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Sample records for head osteonecrosis model

  1. Traumatic and Non-traumatic Osteonecrosis in the Femoral Head of a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yawon; Park, Jinuk; Choi, Seok Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is an idiopathic, debilitating and progressive disease. A number of traumatic or non-traumatic animal models have been reported for research on osteonecrosis. This study was performed to compare the efficacy of femoral head osteonecrosis in rabbits by traumatic and non-traumatic methods. Twenty-seven New Zealand White rabbits were divided into three experimental groups, nine heads each. Two groups were surgically induced into osteonecrosis; a steel cerclage wire was ligated tightly around the neck of the right femoral head (Group W), and the femoral neck was tied with a cerclage wire in the same way as in the W group, and burned by attachment of an electrode tip to the wire and then the wire was removed (Group B). The other group was induced into osteonecrosis with a single intra-muscular injection of 20 mg/kg methyl-prednisolone acetate single injection (Group M). In the control group, the left femoral head of animals in group W and B was used. After two weeks, rabbits were sacrificed and the femoral head and neck were collected. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was evaluated by radiography, histology and immunohistology methods. Osteonecrosis lesions in the femoral head were identified in traumatic models of groups W and B. Cartilage degeneration in the superficial layer and TUNEL positive cells in the femoral head were detected more in Group B than in Group W. These findings revealed that short-term induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head was effectively achieved by cautery around the femoral neck. PMID:21826172

  2. A new osteonecrosis animal model of the femoral head induced by microwave heating and repaired with tissue engineered bone

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rui; Geng, Chengkui; Wang, Yongnian; Wei, Lei

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to induce a new animal model of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) by microwave heating and then repair with tissue engineered bone. The bilateral femoral heads of 84 rabbits were heated by microwave at various temperatures. Tissue engineered bone was used to repair the osteonecrosis of femoral heads induced by microwave heating. The roentgenographic and histological examinations were used to evaluate the results. The femoral heads heated at 55°C for ten minutes showed low density and cystic changes in X-ray photographs, osteonecrosis and repair occurred simultaneously in histology at four and eight weeks, and 69% femoral heads collapsed at 12 weeks. The ability of tissue engineered bone to repair the osteonecrosis was close to that of cancellous bone autograft. The new animal model of ONFH could be induced by microwave heating, and the tissue engineering technique will provide an effective treatment. PMID:18956184

  3. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  4. [Osteonecrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Lafforgue, Pierre

    2002-03-15

    The femoral head is the main location of avascular osteonecrosis. The lesion remains asymptomatic for several months or years before causing non specific hip pain. Risk factors have been identified, mainly femoral neck fractures, corticosteroid therapy and related conditions (lupus erythematosus, organ transplantations), alcohol abuse, dyslipidemia, sickle cell disease, HIV infection, caisson workers, Gaucher's disease, male sex. When typical radiological signs are lacking, MRI is the best investigation. Progression toward hip joint damage highly depends on the necrotic volume assessed at MRI. The combination of plain radiographs which help staging the severity of osteonecrosis, and MRI which indicates the prognosis of the lesion, determines the therapeutic options: symptomatic pain relief therapies or surgical treatment (core decompression, osteotomy or total hip replacement).

  5. Vasculature deprivation--induced osteonecrosis of the rat femoral head as a model for therapeutic trials.

    PubMed

    Bejar, Jacob; Peled, Eli; Boss, Jochanan H

    2005-07-05

    EXPERIMENTAL OSTEONECROSIS: The authors' experience with experimentally produced femoral capital osteonecrosis in rats is reviewed: incising the periosteum at the base of the neck of the femur and cutting the ligamentum teres leads to coagulation necrosis of the epiphysis. The necrotic debris is substituted by fibrous tissue concomitantly with resorption of the dead soft and hard tissues by macrophages and osteoclasts, respectively. Progressively, the formerly necrotic epiphysis is repopulated by hematopoietic-fatty tissue, and replaced by architecturally abnormal and biomechanically weak bone. The femoral heads lose their smooth-surfaced hemispherical shape in the wake of the load transfer through the hip joint such that, together with regressive changes of the joint cartilage and inflammatory-hyperplastic changes of the articular membrane, an osteoarthritis-like disorder ensues. THERAPEUTIC CHOICES: Diverse therapeutic options are studied to satisfy the different opinions concerning the significance of diverse etiological and pathogenic mechanisms: 1. Exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. 2. Exposure to hyperbaric oxygen and non-weight bearing on the operated hip. 3. Medication with enoxaparin. 4. Reduction of intraosseous hypertension, putting to use a procedure aimed at core decompression, namely drilling a channel through the femoral head. 5. Medication with vascular endothelial growth factor with a view to accelerating revascularization. 6. Medication with zoledronic acid to decrease osteoclastic productivity such that the remodeling of the femoral head is slowed. Glucocorticoid-related osteonecrosis appears to be apoptosis-related, thus differing from the vessel-deprivation-induced tissue coagulation found in idiopathic osteonecrosis. The quantities of TNF-alpha, RANK-ligand and osteoprotegerin are raised in glucocorticoid-treated osteoblasts so that the differentiation of osteoclasts is blocked. Moreover, the osteoblasts and osteocytes of the femoral cortex mostly

  6. Vasculature deprivation – induced osteonecrosis of the rat femoral head as a model for therapeutic trials

    PubMed Central

    Bejar, Jacob; Peled, Eli; Boss, Jochanan H

    2005-01-01

    Experimental Osteonecrosis The authors' experience with experimentally produced femoral capital osteonecrosis in rats is reviewed: incising the periosteum at the base of the neck of the femur and cutting the ligamentum teres leads to coagulation necrosis of the epiphysis. The necrotic debris is substituted by fibrous tissue concomitantly with resorption of the dead soft and hard tissues by macrophages and osteoclasts, respectively. Progressively, the formerly necrotic epiphysis is repopulated by hematopoietic-fatty tissue, and replaced by architecturally abnormal and biomechanically weak bone. The femoral heads lose their smooth-surfaced hemispherical shape in the wake of the load transfer through the hip joint such that, together with regressive changes of the joint cartilage and inflammatory-hyperplastic changes of the articular membrane, an osteoarthritis-like disorder ensues. Therapeutic Choices Diverse therapeutic options are studied to satisfy the different opinions concerning the significance of diverse etiological and pathogenic mechanisms: 1. Exposure to hyperbaric oxygen. 2. Exposure to hyperbaric oxygen and non-weight bearing on the operated hip. 3. Medication with enoxaparin. 4. Reduction of intraosseous hypertension, putting to use a procedure aimed at core decompression, namely drilling a channel through the femoral head. 5. Medication with vascular endothelial growth factor with a view to accelerating revascularization. 6. Medication with zoledronic acid to decrease osteoclastic productivity such that the remodeling of the femoral head is slowed. Glucocorticoid-related osteonecrosis appears to be apoptosis-related, thus differing from the vessel-deprivation-induced tissue coagulation found in idiopathic osteonecrosis. The quantities of TNF-α, RANK-ligand and osteoprotegerin are raised in glucocorticoid-treated osteoblasts so that the differentiation of osteoclasts is blocked. Moreover, the osteoblasts and osteocytes of the femoral cortex mostly

  7. A canine model of osteonecrosis of the femoral head induced by MRI guided argon helium cryotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Huawu; Jiang, Honglei; Liu, Ming; Tian, Jing; Hu, Na; Sun, Shui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to identify the reliability of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) modeling established by MRI guided argon helium cryotherapy system in beagles. Methods: A total of 15 beagles were used to establish the ONFH model. The left femoral heads of the beagles received two cycles of argon helium freezing-thawing under MRI guidance and were considered as experimental group while the right femoral heads received only one cycle of argon helium freezing-thawing and were considered as the control group. X-ray, MRI, general shape and histological examinations were performed so as to identify the effect of modeling. Results: At 4 week after modeling, MRI showed obvious bilateral hip joint effusion and marked femoral head bone marrow high signal. At 8 week after surgery, abnormal signal appeared in bilateral femoral heads. T1WI showed irregular patchy low signal, T2WI showed irregular mixed signals and the joint capsule effusion showed long T1 and T2 changes. Twelve weeks after operation, T1WI showed a low signal strip with clear boundary and T2WI showed intermediate signal. The changes of the left femoral heads were significant while compared with those of the right sides. The lacunae rates of femoral heads in the experimental group at 4, 8, and 12 week after surgery (40.75 ± 3.77, 57.46 ± 4.01, 50.27 ± 2.98) were higher than those in control group (30.08 ± 3.61, 49.43 ± 2.82, 40.56 ± 2.73). Conclusion: Canine model of ONFH was successfully established using an argon helium cryotherapy system. PMID:26550205

  8. Experimental animal models of osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Meng; Peng, Jiang; Qin, Ling; Lu, Shibi

    2011-08-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) or avascular necrosis (AVN) is a common bone metabolic disorder, mostly affecting femoral head. Although many biological, biophysical, and surgical methods have been tested to preserve the femoral head with ON, none has been proven fully satisfactory. It lacks consensus on an optimal approach for treatment. This is due, at least in part, to the lack of ability to systematically compare treatment efficacy using an ideal animal model that mimics full-range osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) in humans with high incidence of joint collapse accompanied by reparative reaction adjacent to the necrotic bone in a reproducible and accessible way. A number of preclinical animal ON models have been established for testing potential efficacy of various modalities developed for prevention and treatment of ON before introduction into clinics for potential applications. This paper describes a number of different methods for creating animal experimental ON models. Advantages and disadvantages of such models are also discussed as reference for future research in battle against this important medical condition.

  9. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head: An update in year 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Anjan P; Das, Anusuya; Cui, Quanjun

    2012-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a phenomenon involving disruption to the vascular supply to the femoral head, resulting in articular surface collapse and eventual osteoarthritis. Although alcoholism, steroid use, and hip trauma remain the most common causes, several other etiologies for osteonecrosis have been identified. Basic science research utilizing animal models and stem cell applications continue to further elucidate the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis and promise novel treatment options in the future. Clinical studies evaluating modern joint-sparing procedures have demonstrated significant improvements in outcomes, but hip arthroplasty is still the most common procedure performed in these affected younger adults. Further advances in joint-preserving procedures are required and will be widely studied in the coming decade. PMID:22655222

  10. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  11. Vascular deprivation-induced necrosis of the femoral head of the rat. An experimental model of avascular osteonecrosis in the skeletally immature individual or Legg-Perthes disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, D; Reis, D; Zinman, C; Misselevich, I; Boss, J H

    1998-06-01

    The blood supply of rats' femoral heads was severed by cutting the ligamentum teres and stripping the periostium. Histologically, necrosis of the marrow was apparent on the 2nd postoperative day, necrosis of the bone on the 5th postoperative day and fibrous ingrowth on the 7th postoperative day. During the following 5 weeks, progressive resorption of the intertrabecular necrotic debris and necrotic bony trabeculae and subchondral bone plate and, concurrently, appositional and intramembranous new bone formation resulted in remodeling of the femoral heads. In 2 of 7 femoral heads, replacement of the necrotic bone by viable bone was complete at the 42-day postoperative interval. Also, the articular cartilage of the deformed and flattened femoral heads was undergoing degenerative changes. Reduplicating the pathogenically inferred clinical settings of blood supply deprivation, it is proposed that this model, in a small laboratory animal, satisfies the requirements sought for preclinical studies of treatment modalities of avascular osteonecrosis in man.

  12. A novel animal model of osteonecrosis of the femoral head induced using a magnetic resonance imaging-guided argon-helium cryotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DONG; WANG, GUOWEI; LIU, MING; SUN, LIXIN; ZONG, WEI; JIANG, HONGLEI; ZHANG, HUAWU; LI, HUIBO; GONG, JIANBAO; SUN, SHUI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish a novel animal model of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided argon-helium cryotherapy system. A total of 48 rabbits were used to generate the ONFH models. In group I, the left femoral head of the rabbits received two cycles of argon-helium freezing-thawing under MRI guidance, while in group II, the right femoral head of each rabbit received only one cycle of argon-helium freezing-thawing. X-ray and histological examinations were performed. The percentages of lacunae in the femoral heads of group I at weeks 4, 8 and 12 following surgery (49.75±3.17, 62.06±4.12 and 48.25±2.76%, respectively) were higher than those in group II (39.13±4.48, 50.69±3.84 and 37.50±3.86%, respectively). In addition, the percentage of empty lacunae in group I was 62.06% at week 8 following surgery. Therefore, an animal model of ONFH was successfully established using an argon-helium cryotherapy system. The percentage of empty lacunae in group I was higher than that in group II at weeks 4, 8 and 12 after surgery. PMID:24926337

  13. Knee loading protects against osteonecrosis of the femoral head by enhancing vessel remodeling and bone healing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daquan; Li, Xinle; Li, Jie; Yang, Jing; Yokota, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a serious orthopedic problem. Moderate loads with knee loading promote bone formation, but their effects on osteonecrosis have not been investigated. Using a rat model, we examined a hypothesis that knee loading enhances vessel remodeling and bone healing through the modulation of the fate of bone marrow-derived cells. In this study, osteonecrosis was induced by transecting the ligamentum teres followed by a tight ligature around the femoral neck. For knee loading, 5 N loads were laterally applied to the knee at 15 Hz for 5 min/day for 5 weeks. Changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) of the femur were measured by pDEXA, and ink infusion was performed to evaluate vessel remodeling. Femoral heads were harvested for histomorphometry, and bone marrow-derived cells were isolated to examine osteoclast development and osteoblast differentiation. The results showed that osteonecrosis significantly induced bone loss, and knee loading stimulated both vessel remodeling and bone healing. The osteonecrosis group exhibited the lowest trabecular BV/TV (p b 0.001) in the femoral head, and lowest femoral BMD and BMC (both p b 0.01). However, knee loading increased trabecular BV/TV (p b 0.05) as well as BMD (pb 0.05) and BMC (p b 0.01). Osteonecrosis decreased the vessel volume (pb 0.001), vessel number (pb 0.001) and VEGF expression (p b 0.01), and knee loading increased them (pb 0.001, pb 0.001 and p b 0.01). Osteonecrosis activated osteoclast development, and knee loading reduced its formation, migration, adhesion and the level of “pit” formation (pb 0.001, pb 0.01, pb 0.001 and pb 0.001). Furthermore, knee loading significantly increased osteoblast differentiation and CFU-F (both p b 0.001). A significantly positive correlation was observed between vessel remodeling and bone healing (both p b 0.01). These results indicate that knee loading could be effective in repair osteonecrosis of the femoral head in a rat

  14. Knee loading protects against osteonecrosis of the femoral head by enhancing vessel remodeling and bone healing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daquan; Li, Xinle; Li, Jie; Yang, Jing; Yokota, Hiroki; Zhang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a serious orthopedic problem. Moderate loads with knee loading promote bone formation, but its effects on osteonecrosis have not been investigated. Using a rat model, we examined a hypothesis that knee loading enhances vessel remodeling and bone healing through the modulation of the fate of bone marrow-derived cells. In this study, osteonecrosis was induced by transecting the ligamentum teres followed by a tight ligature around the femoral neck. For knee loading, 5 N loads were laterally applied to the knee at 15 Hz for 5 min/day for 5 weeks. Changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) of the femur were measured by pDEXA, and ink infusion was performed to evaluate vessel remodeling. Femoral heads were harvested for histomorphometry, and bone marrow-derived cells were isolated to examine osteoclast development and osteoblast differentiation. The results showed that osteonecrosis significant induced bone loss, and knee loading stimulated both vessel remodeling and bone healing. The osteonecrosis group exhibited the lowest trabecular BV/TV (p < 0.001) in the femoral head, and lowest femoral BMD and BMC (both p < 0.01). However, knee loading increased trabecular BV/TV (p < 0.05) as well as BMD and BMC (both p < 0.05). Osteonecrosis decreased the vessel volume, vessel number and VEGF expression (all p < 0.01), and knee loading increased them (all p < 0.01). Osteonecrosis activated osteoclast development, and knee loading reduced its formation, migration, adhesion and the level of “pit” formation (all p < 0.001). Furthermore, knee loading significantly increased osteoblast differentiation and CFU-F (both p < 0.001). A significant positive correlation was observed between vessel remodeling and bone healing (both p < 0.01). These results indicate that knee loading could be effective in repair osteonecrosis of the femoral head in a rat model. This effect might be attributed to promoting vessel remodeling

  15. Evaluation of the 3D Finite Element Method Using a Tantalum Rod for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jingsheng; Chen, Jie; Wu, Jianguo; Chen, Feiyan; Huang, Gangyong; Wang, Zhan; Zhao, Guanglei; Wei, Yibing; Wang, Siqun

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to contrast the collapse values of the postoperative weight-bearing areas of different tantalum rod implant positions, fibula implantation, and core decompression model and to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of tantalum rod implantation in different ranges of osteonecrosis in comparison with other methods. Material/Methods The 3D finite element method was used to establish the 3D finite element model of normal upper femur, 3D finite element model after tantalum rod implantation into different positions of the upper femur in different osteonecrosis ranges, and other 3D finite element models for simulating fibula implant and core decompression. Results The collapse values in the weight-bearing area of the femoral head of the tantalum rod implant model inside the osteonecrosis area, implant model in the middle of the osteonecrosis area, fibula implant model, and shortening implant model exhibited no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) when the osteonecrosis range was small (60°). The stress values on the artificial bone surface for the tantalum rod implant model inside the osteonecrosis area and the shortening implant model exhibited statistical significance (p<0.01). Conclusions Tantalum rod implantation into the osteonecrosis area can reduce the collapse values in the weight-bearing area when osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) was in a certain range, thereby obtaining better clinical effects. When ONFH was in a large range (120°), the tantalum rod implantation inside the osteonecrosis area, shortening implant or fibula implant can reduce the collapse values of the femoral head, as assessed by other methods. PMID:25479830

  16. Evaluation of the 3D finite element method using a tantalum rod for osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jingsheng; Chen, Jie; Wu, Jianguo; Chen, Feiyan; Huang, Guangyong; Wang, Zhan; Zhao, Guanglei; Wei, Yibing; Wang, Siqun

    2014-12-06

    The aim of this study was to contrast the collapse values of the postoperative weight-bearing areas of different tantalum rod implant positions, fibula implantation, and core decompression model and to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of tantalum rod implantation in different ranges of osteonecrosis in comparison with other methods. The 3D finite element method was used to establish the 3D finite element model of normal upper femur, 3D finite element model after tantalum rod implantation into different positions of the upper femur in different osteonecrosis ranges, and other 3D finite element models for simulating fibula implant and core decompression. The collapse values in the weight-bearing area of the femoral head of the tantalum rod implant model inside the osteonecrosis area, implant model in the middle of the osteonecrosis area, fibula implant model, and shortening implant model exhibited no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) when the osteonecrosis range was small (60°). The stress values on the artificial bone surface for the tantalum rod implant model inside the osteonecrosis area and the shortening implant model exhibited statistical significance (p<0.01). Tantalum rod implantation into the osteonecrosis area can reduce the collapse values in the weight-bearing area when osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) was in a certain range, thereby obtaining better clinical effects. When ONFH was in a large range (120°), the tantalum rod implantation inside the osteonecrosis area, shortening implant or fibula implant can reduce the collapse values of the femoral head, as assessed by other methods.

  17. Bilateral Osteonecrosis of the Femoral and Humeral Heads after Short Term Corticosteroid Therapy. A Case Study.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Tarek Ahmed; El-Bakoury, Ahmed; Hawkins, Amanda; Ed AlTayeb Mussa, Moham; Er Ahmed Sweed, Tam; Eh Samir Ansara, Sam

    2016-03-23

    Steroid induced osteonecrosis is a devastating injury that usually requires rebuild of the joint, with the femoral and the humeral head being most commonly affected. Steroid therapy is the most common reported cause of atraumatic osteonecrosis. The Collaborative Osteonecrosis Group Study confirmed that steroids are the primary cause of multi-focal osteonecrosis in 91% of the cases. Osteonecrosis is considered multifocal when three or more joints are involved. We report a rare case of bilateral steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the proximal femora and humeri nine months after a short course of intravenous methylprednisolone for treatment of multiple myeloma. The relationship between development of osteonecrosis and corticosteroid treatment has been extensively investigated. Steroid therapy is the most common reported cause of atraumatic osteonecrosis. Multi-focal osteonecrosis should be highly suspected and thoroughly investigated in patients with persistent pain at typical sites after commencement of steroids.

  18. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  19. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-09-18

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated.

  20. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  1. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient's factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems.

  2. Experimentally gained insight - based proposal apropos the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Boss, J H; Misselevich, I; Bejar, J; Norman, D; Zinman, C; Reis, D N

    2004-01-01

    An impeded blood flow through the femoral head is incriminated in the etiopathogenesis of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The disorder is either primary (idiopathic avascular osteonecrosis) or secondary to one condition or another, say, corticosteroid medication, fracture of the neck, coagulation defects, physical or thermal damage, storage disorders, alcoholism, and infectious, autoimmune as also marrow infiltrating diseases. In the wake of the necrosis, several mediators are released in increased amounts, prime among which is the vascular endothelial growth factor. The intermediates recruit endothelial progenitor cells, macrophages, osteoclasts, fibroblasts, and osteoblasts, which, pervading throughout the necrotic areas, initiate the reparative processes. The dead, soft and hard tissular debris is substituted by fibrous - later on by hematopoietic-fatty tissue - and bone. The newly formed, appositional and intramembranous bone is deficient in its mechanical properties. The ordinary load-carrying functions suffice to deform these weakened femoral heads so that osteoarthritic changes develop. Considering contemporary assumptions of the causes of osteonecrosis, oxygenation, revascularization, and core decompression are the realistic therapeutic interventions. Necrosis of rats' femoral heads is studied as a model of osteonecrosis in both adults and children. In view of rodents' lifelong persisting physeal cartilage, vascular deprivation-induced osteonecrosis in rats mimics children's Perthes disease. The experimental model, which is well suited to test treatment modalities, has been used to investigate the effects of exposure to hyperbaric oxygen with and without non-weight bearing, medication of enoxaparin, and creation of an intraosseous conduit on the remodeling of the avascular necrotic femoral head. Intriguingly, the shape of treated rats' femoral heads is disfigured to a greater degree than that of untreated animals. This is most likely due to the reduced

  3. Effects of sodium ferulate on preventing steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lei; Dang, Xiao-qian; Wang, Chun-sheng; Yang, Pei; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Kun-zheng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of sodium ferulate (SF) on anti-apoptosis in steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in rabbits. Japanese white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups (control group, treatment group, and model group), each with 24 rabbits. The model and treatment groups were first injected with an intravenous dose of horse serum, 10 ml/kg, three weeks later with an intravenous dose of 7.5 ml/kg, and two weeks later with an intramuscular dose of methylprednisolone, 45 mg/kg, three times in order to establish rabbit models of osteonecrosis. Concurrently, the treatment group was injected with intravenous doses of SF 20 mg/kg for two weeks, once per day. Three time points, Weeks 2, 4, and 8, were selected after modeling was completed. Osteonecrosis was verified by histopathology with haematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The apoptosis rate of osteonecrosis was observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The apoptosis expressions of caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The rabbit models of osteonecrosis were successfully established and observed by HE staining. SF was effective in intervening in apoptosis and decreasing the apoptosis rate in femoral head necrosis by the immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay (P<0.01). Western blot analysis indicated that there were statistical significances in the protein levels of caspase-3 and Bcl-2 (P<0.01). SF has a protective effect by reducing the incidence of early steroid-induced femoral head necrosis in rabbits, effectively intervening in apoptosis through decreasing caspase-3 expression and up-regulating Bcl-2 expression. PMID:23645179

  4. Modified Transtrochanteric Rotational Osteotomy for Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Azlina Amir; Hur, Chang Ich; Cho, Sang Gwon; Lee, Jin Ho

    2008-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a disabling condition affecting young patients and treatment of the disease in these patients is variable. We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (43 hips) in whom a modified transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy was performed for osteonecrosis. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 36.6 months; range, 24–52 months). The mean patient age was 34.3 years (range, 20–51 years). Based on the ARCO classification, 17 hips were classified as Stage II and 26 as Stage III. We performed rotational osteotomy alone in 15 cases, in combination with simple bone grafting in three, and in combination with muscle-pedicle-bone grafting in 25. Sixteen of 17 ARCO Stage II cases and 24 of 26 ARCO Stage III cases had no progression of collapse or lesion size; three hips progressively collapsed. Of the 40 hips without progression the Harris hip score improved from a mean 70 to 92 points at final followup, as did the range of motion of the hip. Modified transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy is an effective method for delaying the progression of collapse in the treatment of selected cases of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18350346

  5. Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in an Adolescent on Long-Term Inhalational Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Ballock, R. Tracy

    2017-01-01

    A relationship between the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head and systemic corticosteroids has been well established in the literature, particularly in adults. However, the link between osteonecrosis and inhaled corticosteroids is less researched and understood. We report an usual case report of a 10-year-old male who developed ipsilateral femoral head osteonecrosis after long-term inhalational corticosteroid and intermittent short courses of oral steroid usage with a unique presentation and delayed diagnosis. PMID:28337355

  6. [Quantitative study of therapeutic efficacy on early intervention of hyperbaric oxygen to model of steroid-induced avascular osteonecrosis of femoral head by multi-slice perfusion imaging].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-cai; Pan, Zhen-yu; Gu, Hua; Li, Nan; Qian, Xiao-jun; Zhai, Ren-you; Wu, Lian-hua; Gao, Chun-jin

    2008-12-09

    To quantitatively evaluate the hemodynamic status in animal models of steroid-induced avascular osteonecrosis of femoral head (SANFH) by multislice CT (MSCT) perfusion imaging, and estimate the therapeutic efficacy on early intervention of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) to improve the region blood flow (rBF) of ischemic femoral head. Forty-eight New Zealand male rabbits were injected with Escherichia coli endotoxin and methyl-prednisolone to establish SANFH models and then divided into 3 subgroups to undergo MSCT to measure the rBF, regional blood volume (rBV), and mean transit time (MTT) to obtain perfusion maps at the femoral head epiphysis, metaphysic, and neck of femur, and then were killed to undergo histological examination of the bilateral femoral heads 2, 4, and 6 weeks later respectively (Groups M(2), M(4), and M(6)). Twenty-four rabbits underwent HOB treatment after the second injection of E. c. endotoxin for 1-3 courses respectively (Groups H(1), H(2), and H(3)), and then underwent MSCT and pathological examination as described above. Eight rabbits were used as controls (Group N). (1) The rBF values of Groups M(2), M(4), and M(6) were all significantly lower than that of Group N (P < 0.001, < 0.001, and < 0.002). The rBF value of femoral head epiphysis of Group M(2) was remarkably lower than that of Group N, decreased to the lowest in Group M(4), and re-increased in Group M(6). The rBV value demonstrated similar change pattern in femoral head epiphysis. The MTT values of Groups M(2) and M(4) were longer than that of Group N, and then re-decreased in Group M(6). (2) It did differ significantly between the perfusion data of different femoral head anatomic regions in Groups M(2), M(4), M(6) and N (rBF: F = 52.190, P < 0.001; rBV: F = 42.677, P < 0.001; MTT: F = 3.09, P = 0.048). The changes of the perfusion data in femoral head epiphysis were more significant than those in other anatomic regions. (3) There were no statistically significant differences in the r

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen for stage I and II femoral head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Koren, Lior; Ginesin, Eyal; Melamed, Yehuda; Norman, Doron; Levin, Daniel; Peled, Eli

    2015-03-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a suggested joint-preserving treatment for symptomatic early-stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Limited studies of this treatment have been published. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment in a relatively large patient cohort. The authors reviewed the files of 68 patients with 78 symptomatic joints with Steinberg stage I and II osteonecrosis of the femoral head. All patients were treated with hyperbaric oxygen at the authors' medical health center. Pretreatment and immediate posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings were compared. On follow-up, a telephone interview was conducted to determine the survival of the joint. Modified Harris Hip Score and Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) questionnaires of the start of treatment and at follow-up were obtained and evaluated for statistically significant differences. Half of the joints were stage 1 and half were stage II. Seventy-four joints underwent both pre- and posttreatment MRI. Eighty-eight percent of joints showed improvement posttreatment. On follow-up at a mean of 11.1±5.1 years, 54 patients (58 joints) were located and answered the questionnaires. At the time of follow-up, 93% of the joints survived. Mean Harris Hip Score improved from 21 to 81 (P<.0001), the mean physical component of the SF-12 improved from 24 to 46 (P<.0001), and the mean mental component of the SF-12 improved from 54 to 59 (P<.0001). The authors concluded that hyperbaric oxygen treatment is effective in preserving the hip joint in stage I and II osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Association of toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway with steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Zhou, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Kun-Zheng; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Zhi-Bin; Fan, Li-Hong; Sun, Shui

    2014-10-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is frequently observed in patients treated with excessive corticosteroids. However, the pathogenesis of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway in steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intramuscularly with 20 mg/kg methylprednisolone (MP) for 8 weeks, twice per week. The animals were sacrificed at 2, 4 and 8 weeks after the last MP injection, respectively, and then allocated to the 2-, 4- and 8-week model groups (n=24 each). Rats in the control group (n=12) were not given any treatment. Histopathological analysis was performed and the concentration of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) in plasma was determined. The activation of osteoclasts in the femoral head was assessed by TRAP staining. The expression of TLR4, MyD88, TRAF6 and NF-κB p65 that are involved in TLR4 signaling, and MCP-1 production were detected by using real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The results showed that the osteonecrosis in the femoral head was clearly observed and the concentration of TRAP in the plasma was increased in the model rats. The femoral head tissues in MP-treated rats were positive for TRAP and the intensity of TRAP staining was greater in MP-treated rats than in control rats. As compared with the control group, the mRNA expression of TLR4 signaling-related factors was enhanced significantly at 4 and 8 weeks, and the protein levels of these factors increased significantly with time. It was concluded that MP could induce the femoral head osteonecrosis in rats, which was associated with osteoclast activation via the TLR4 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that TLR4 signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of steroid-induced osteonecrosis.

  9. Osteonecrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... collapse of bone, in turn, can lead to degenerative arthritis (also called osteoarthritis ) of nearby joints, most ... osteonecrosis Some people will develop osteoarthritis (also called degenerative arthritis or “wear and tear” of the joints) ...

  10. Multimodality approach to osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, B N; Levine, M; Bauer, T W; Belhobek, G H; Pflanze, W; Feiglin, D H; Roth, A I

    1989-03-01

    Treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head appears to be effective when the disease is identified and treated early. Forty-one patients were evaluated with prospective laboratory assessment, anteroposterior and frog-lateral roentgenograms of both hips, intraosseous pressure measurements (IOP), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and 99mTc methylene diphosphonate planar and single-photon emission computerized tomographic (SPECT) bone imaging. Pathologic specimens were obtained in most patients. Preradiographic disease was identified in 26 hips and 11 of these were asymptomatic. Fifteen clinically symptomatic hips had normal plain roentgenograms, but abnormal protocol studies. Evaluation of sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value (positive and negative), respectively, in diagnosing osteonecrosis of the femoral head revealed the following percentages: 83%, 83%, 96%, and 48% for planar bone scanning; 91%, 78%, 94%, and 70% for SPECT; 87%, 83%, 96%, and 55% for MRI; 80%, 60%, 95%, and 25% for IOP; and 88%, 100%, 100%, and 25% for core biopsy. (There were few true negatives, thus specificity values are approximations.) The identification of preradiographic stages is possible, but difficult. MRI appears appealing at present, particularly in identifying disease in asymptomatic hips. However, there is no definitive method for noninvasive diagnosis. Pathologic confirmation in early stages is difficult.

  11. RANKL inhibition: a novel strategy to decrease femoral head deformity after ischemic osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Harry K W; Morgan-Bagley, Stephanie; Kostenuik, Paul

    2006-12-01

    A novel therapeutic strategy to decrease the development of femoral head deformity after ischemic osteonecrosis was studied in a large animal model of total head infarction. RANKL inhibition through exogenous osteoprotegerin administration significantly decreased pathologic bone resorption and deformity during repair of the infarcted head. Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is a juvenile form of osteonecrosis of the femoral head that can produce permanent femoral head deformity (FHD) and premature osteoarthritis. The development of FHD in LCPD is closely associated with the repair process, characterized by a predominance of bone resorption in its early stage that produces a fragmented appearance and collapse of the femoral head. We present here a novel strategy to preserve the femoral head structure after ischemic osteonecrosis based on inhibition of interaction between RANK and RANKL using exogenous administration of osteoprotegerin (OPG-Fc) in a large animal model of ischemic osteonecrosis. Ischemic osteonecrosis was surgically induced in 18 male piglets by placing a ligature tightly around the right femoral neck to disrupt the blood flow to the right femoral head. Two weeks after the induction of total head infarction, OPG-Fc or saline was administered subcutaneously to nine animals per group for 6 weeks. The contralateral, normal (left) femoral heads from the animals treated with saline served as normal, nondisease controls. All animals were killed at 8 weeks when severe FHD has been previously shown to occur because of the repair process dominated by osteoclastic bone resorption. Radiographic, histomorphometric, and immunohistochemical assessments were performed. Radiographic assessment showed significantly better preservation of the femoral head structure in the OPG-Fc group compared with the saline group. Epiphyseal quotient (the ratio of epiphyseal height to diameter) was significantly higher in the OPG-Fc group (0.41 +/- 0.09) compared with the saline

  12. Glucocorticoid inhibits bone regeneration after osteonecrosis of the femoral head in aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Takano-Murakami, Reiko; Tokunaga, Kunihiko; Kondo, Naoki; Ito, Tomoyuki; Kitahara, Hiroshi; Ito, Masayuki; Endo, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ION) is a painful disease of the hip, the pathogenic mechanism of which is still unclear. The most common extraneous factor is steroid treatment. Steroids have inhibiting effects on bone formation and resorption. When bone regenerative treatments are indicated for ION patients who are exposed to steroids, we cannot ignore the effects of corticosteroid itself on bone healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of glucocorticoid on bone regeneration after osteonecrosis of the femoral head in a rat model. Osteonecrosis was induced surgically on the left femoral heads of aged female rats (about 6 months old) on day 0. Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) or normal saline was administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day from day 7 to 11. Femoral heads were analyzed histologically. There were no pathological findings in the right femoral heads of the MPSS-treated and saline-treated rats, as control for the contralateral injury. The newly formed bone volume and the osteoclast number were significantly smaller in the MPSS-treated group. The normal bone marrow was regenerated in the saline-treated group, whereas most of the bone marrow space still contained fibroblast-like spindle-shaped cells in the MPSS-treated group on day 42. Alkaline phosphatase-positive cells were only seen in the areas around the regenerated bone marrow cavities. Thus, MPSS inhibits bone formation by suppressing osteoblast proliferation and resorption by suppressing the recruitment of osteoclast precursors. These findings may be useful when designing treatments for ION patients exposed to steroids.

  13. [MRI-based surgical simulation of transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy for osteonecrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Sugano, Nobuhiko; Koyama, Tsuyoshi

    2007-06-01

    Transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) is one of the joint-preserving surgical treatments for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). It can prevent collapse of the femoral head as necrotic lesions in the weight-bearing portion can be moved sufficiently to less weight-bearing portion by anterior rotation, posterior rotation or varus angulation. Patient selection and preoperative planning are important to determine indications for TRO. It has been reported that successful TRO requires at least 34% of the weight-bearing area supported by the intact part of the femoral head. However, this ratio is difficult to preoperatively quantify according to the rotation angle using conventional two-dimensional MR images or X-rays. Therefore, we developed a method of simulating TRO using three-dimensional (3-D) models reconstructed from 3-D MR images and applied it to serial patients with types C1 and C2 osteonecrosis at stage 1 or 2. The simulation visualized positional changes of the necrotic lesion in the weight-bearing area and enabled quantitation of the postoperative intact ratio. Our surgical simulation is useful for evaluating the postoperative intact ratio and for determining indications for TRO as well as the optimal angle of femoral head rotation and varus angulation.

  14. MRI-based surgical simulation of transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy for femoral head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Tsuyoshi; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Nishii, Takashi; Miki, Hidenobu; Takao, Masaki; Sato, Yoshinobu; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Tamura, Shinichi

    2009-04-01

    Transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) is one of the joint-preserving surgical treatments for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). It can prevent collapse of the femoral head as necrotic lesions in the weight-bearing portion can be moved sufficiently to a less weight-bearing portion by anterior rotation, posterior rotation, or varus angulation. Patient selection and preoperative planning are important to determine indications for TRO. It has been reported that successful TRO requires at least 34% of the weight-bearing area supported by the intact part of the femoral head. However, this ratio is difficult to preoperatively quantify according to the rotation angle using conventional two-dimensional MR images or X-rays. Therefore, we developed a method of simulating TRO using three-dimensional (3D) models reconstructed from 3D MR images and applied it to serial patients with types C1 and C2 osteonecrosis at stage 1 or 2. The simulation visualized positional changes of the necrotic lesion in the weight-bearing area and enabled quantitation of the postoperative intact ratio. Our surgical simulation is useful for evaluating the postoperative intact ratio and for determining indications for TRO as well as the optimal angle of femoral head rotation and varus angulation.

  15. Vasculature deprivation-induced osteonecrosis of rats' femoral heads associated with the formation of deep surface depressions.

    PubMed

    Bejar, J; Boss, J H

    2006-06-01

    An impeded blood flow through the femoral head is incriminated in the etiopathogenesis of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The disorder is either primary (idiopathic avascular osteonecrosis) or secondary to one condition or another, such as corticosteroid medication, fracture of the neck, coagulation defects, physical or thermal damage, storage disorders, alcoholism, and infectious, autoimmune as also marrow infiltrating diseases. In the wake of the necrosis, several mediators are released in increased amounts, prime among which is the vascular endothelial growth factor. The intermediates recruit endothelial progenitor cells, macrophages, osteoclasts, fibroblasts, and osteoblasts, which, pervading throughout the necrotic areas, initiate the reparative processes. The dead, soft, and hard tissular debris is substituted by fibrous - later on by hematopoietic-fatty tissue - and bone. The newly formed, appositional and intramembranous bone is deficient in its mechanical properties. The ordinary load-carrying functions suffice to deform these weakened femoral heads so that osteoarthritic changes develop. Considering contemporary assumptions of the causes of osteonecrosis, oxygenation, revascularization, and core decompression are the realistic therapeutic interventions. Necrosis of rats' femoral heads is studied as a model of osteonecrosis in both adults and children. In view of rodents' lifelong persisting physeal cartilage, vascular deprivation-induced osteonecrosis in rats mimics children's Perthes disease. The experimental model, which is well suited to test treatment modalities, has been used to investigate the effects of exposure to hyperbaric oxygen with and without non-weight bearing, medication of enoxaparin, and creation of an intraosseous conduit on the remodeling of the avascular necrotic femoral head. Intriguingly, the shape of treated rats' femoral heads is disfigured to a greater degree than that of untreated animals. This is most likely due to the

  16. Can local Erythropoietin administration enhance bone regeneration in osteonecrosis of femoral head?

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Hooman; Rasouli, Mohammad R; Parvizi, Javad

    2012-08-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a challenging disease. Regardless of underlying causes, the ultimate result in all cases is disruption of femoral head blood supply. Once the disease starts, it is progressive in 80% of cases. Since the majority of the affected individuals are young, every effort should be focused on preserving the patients own femoral head. These years, the role of angiogenic growth factors has been investigated with promising results in animal models of ONFH. Erythropoietin (EPO) is a well known hormone that has been used in treatment of chronic anemia for many years with few side effects. Considering the angiogenic properties of EPO, we hypothesize that local delivery of recombinant human EPO during core decompression will enhance bone regeneration in ONFH. In this way we also can avoid systemic side effects of EPO.

  17. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor Prevents Steroid-Associated Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Rabbits by Promoting Angiogenesis and Inhibiting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lihong; Li, Jia; Yu, Zefeng; Dang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Kunzheng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the preventive effect of ethyl 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate(EDHB) on steroid-associated femoral head osteonecrosis(ONFH) in a rabbit model. New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups (prevention group and model group), each containing 24 rabbits. Osteonecrosis was induced by lipopolysaccharide(LPS) combined with methylprednisolone(MPS). The prevention group received an intraperitoneal injection of EDHB at 50 mg/kg body weight every other day starting three days before establishing rabbit models of osteonecrosis, for a total of nine doses. Osteonecrosis was verified by haematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining. The expression of HIF-1α and VEGF was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Angiogenesis, apoptosis and microstructural parameters were also analyzed. The rabbit models of osteonecrosis were successfully established and observed by HE staining. Histopathological observations indicated that EDHB reduced the rate of empty lacunae and the incidence of osteonecrosis. Immunohistochemical staining for HIF-1α and VEGF suggested that EDHB therapy inhibited degradation of HIF-1α and promoted expression of VEGF. Ink artery infusion angiography and microvessel density analysis revealed that there were more microvessels in the prevention group than in the model group. The TUNEL apoptosis assay suggested that EDHB intervention could reduce the number of apoptotic cells in avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Micro-CT scanning indicated that the treatment group had better microstructural parameters than the model group. EDHB prevents steroid-associated osteonecrosis of the femoral head in rabbits by promoting angiogenesis and inhibiting apoptosis of bone cells and hematopoietic tissue. PMID:25244080

  18. Porous tantalum rods for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z H; Guo, W S; Li, Z R; Cheng, L M; Zhang, Q D; Yue, D B; Shi, Z C; Wang, B L; Sun, W; Zhang, N F

    2014-10-20

    This study evaluated the outcomes of using porous tantalum rods for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). We performed core decompression and inserted porous tantalum implants in 149 patients (168 consecutive hips) with ONFH. Hips had large (65), medium (64), or small (39) lesions; 63 lesions were lateral, 68 were central, and 35 were medial. Conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA) was the end point of this survey. A total of 130 cases (138 hips) were followed. The mean follow-up time was 38.46 ± 5.76 months; 43 hips (31%) were converted to or needed THA. Of the 43 hips requiring THA, 33 had large lesions, including 1 medial, 3 central, and 29 lateral lesions; 9 had medium, lateral lesions, and 1 hip had a small, lateral lesion. Bone grafting was used in 59 hips, with 3 hips failing; 40 of 79 hips without bone grafts failed. The sum distances between the tops of the rods and the lateral lesion boundaries (SDTL, mm) were measured in anteroposterior and lateral radiographs. In the failure and spared groups, the average SDTLs were 7.65 ± 2.759 and 0.83 ± 2.286 mm, respectively. The survival of porous tantalum rods used for treating early-stage ONFH was affected by the size and location of the lesion, whether or not a bone graft was used, as well as the distance between top of the rod and the lateral boundary of the lesion.

  19. Salvianolic acid B prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head via PPARγ expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangqing; Wang, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is a water-soluble phenolic compound derived from Salvia Miltiorrhiza. Recent studies show Sal B has a clear function of anti-cerebral ischemia injury, which is closely related to antioxidation, free radical scavenging, neuroprotection and the blood brain barrier. The aim of the present study was to verify whether Sal B prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head and to investigate its underlying pharmacological mechanisms. Steroid-induced osteonecrosis rat models were established to evaluate the effects of Sal B on osteonecrotic changes and repair processes. The use of Sal B improved steroid-induced histopathological scores and inhibited osteoclast differentiation in rats. Notably, Sal B induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into osteogenesis. Moreover, Sal B treatment suppressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ and AP2 protein expression levels and increased runt-related transcription factor 2 and Collagen I protein expression levels in steroid-induced rats. osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase content in steroid-induced rats was enhanced by treatment with Sal B. These results suggest that Sal B prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head via PPARγ expression in rats. The present pilot study provides a brief insight into the effect of Sal B on steroid-induced osteonecrosis. PMID:28352346

  20. Successful transplant of mesenchymal stem cells in induced osteonecrosis of the ovine femoral head: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Matheus Levi Tajra; Fadel, Leandro; Beltrão-Braga, Patrícia Cristina Baleeiro; Wenceslau, Cristiane Valverde; Kerkis, Irina; Kerkis, Alexandre; Birgel Júnior, Eduardo Harry; Martins, João Flávio Panattoni; Martins, Daniele dos Santos; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Ambrósio, Carlos Eduardo

    2010-10-01

    Evaluate the bone tissue recovery following transplantation of ovine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow and human immature dental-pulp stem cells (hIDPSC) in ovine model of induced osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH). Eight sheep were divided in three experimental groups. First group was composed by four animals with ONFH induced by ethanol through central decompression (CD), for control group without any treatment. The second and third group were compose by two animals, six weeks after ONFH induction received transplantation of heterologous ovine MSC (CD + oMSC), and hIDPSC (CD + hIDPSC), respectively. In both experiments the cells were transplanted without application of any type of immunosupression protocol. Our data indicate that both cell types used in experiments were able to proliferate within injured site providing bone tissue recovery. The histological results obtained from CD+hIDPSC suggested that the bone regeneration in such animals was better than that observed in CD animals. Mesenchymal stem cell transplant in induced ovine osteonecrosis of femoral head by central decompression technique is safe, and apparently favors bone regeneration of damaged tissues.

  1. Attrition tendinitis of long head of biceps brachii in relation to humeral head osteonecrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Wiesler, Ethan R; Sarlikiotis, Thomas; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kokkalis, Zinon T

    2013-01-01

    This case report identifies a 41-year-old male patient who developed anterior shoulder pain in the setting of humeral head osteonecrosis. As a consequence of the cartilage degeneration, multiple loose bodies formed and migrated into the bicipital tendon sheath, causing attrition tendinitis, which was a feature of the clinical presentation. The patient was treated by a combination of arthroscopic glenohumeral joint debridement and open tenodesis of the biceps using a suture anchor. Follow-up revealed asymptomatic shoulder function by 18 months. This is the first report in the literature of bicipital tendinitis in the context of avascular necrosis of the shoulder.

  2. Management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Samy, Ahmed M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a debilitating disease in orthopedics, frequently progressing to femoral head collapse and osteoarthritis. It is thought to be a multifactorial disease. ONFH ultimately results in femoral head collapse in 75–85% of untreated patients. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) yields satisfactory results in the treatment of the end stage of the disease. However, disease typically affects males between the ages of 20 and 40 years and joint replacement is not the ideal option for younger patients. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells and platelet rich plasma (PRP) have been used as an adjunct to core decompression to improve clinical success in the treatment of precollapse hips. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 40 hips in 30 patients was done. There were 19 males and 11 females with a mean age 36.7 ± 6.93 years. The indication for the operation was restricted primarily to modified Ficat stages IIb and III. 16 hips (40%) had stage IIb and 24 hips (60%) had stage III ONFH. The period of follow up ranged between 36–50 months with a mean 41.4 ± 3.53 months. All patients were assessed clinically during pre- and post-operative period according to the Harris Hip Score (HHS), Visual Analog Score (VAS) and radiologically by X-rays. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was done preoperatively to confirm the diagnosis and every 6 months postoperatively for assessment of healing. The operative procedure include removal of necrotic area with drilling then the cavity was filled with a composite of bone graft mixed with PRP. Results: The mean HHS improved from 46.0 ± 7.8 preoperatively to 90.28 ± 19 at the end of followup (P < 0.0001). The mean values of VAS were 78 ± 21 and 35 ± 19 at preoperatively period and final followup, respectively, with an average reduction of 43 points. Conclusion: We found that the use of PRP with collagen sheet can increase the reparable capacity after drilling of necrotic segment in stage IIb and

  3. Management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A novel technique.

    PubMed

    Samy, Ahmed M

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a debilitating disease in orthopedics, frequently progressing to femoral head collapse and osteoarthritis. It is thought to be a multifactorial disease. ONFH ultimately results in femoral head collapse in 75-85% of untreated patients. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) yields satisfactory results in the treatment of the end stage of the disease. However, disease typically affects males between the ages of 20 and 40 years and joint replacement is not the ideal option for younger patients. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells and platelet rich plasma (PRP) have been used as an adjunct to core decompression to improve clinical success in the treatment of precollapse hips. A prospective study of 40 hips in 30 patients was done. There were 19 males and 11 females with a mean age 36.7 ± 6.93 years. The indication for the operation was restricted primarily to modified Ficat stages IIb and III. 16 hips (40%) had stage IIb and 24 hips (60%) had stage III ONFH. The period of follow up ranged between 36-50 months with a mean 41.4 ± 3.53 months. All patients were assessed clinically during pre- and post-operative period according to the Harris Hip Score (HHS), Visual Analog Score (VAS) and radiologically by X-rays. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was done preoperatively to confirm the diagnosis and every 6 months postoperatively for assessment of healing. The operative procedure include removal of necrotic area with drilling then the cavity was filled with a composite of bone graft mixed with PRP. The mean HHS improved from 46.0 ± 7.8 preoperatively to 90.28 ± 19 at the end of followup (P < 0.0001). The mean values of VAS were 78 ± 21 and 35 ± 19 at preoperatively period and final followup, respectively, with an average reduction of 43 points. We found that the use of PRP with collagen sheet can increase the reparable capacity after drilling of necrotic segment in stage IIb and III ONFH.

  4. Logistic regression analysis of risk factors for femoral head osteonecrosis after healed intertrochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Zhengliang; Sheng, Jiagen; Zhang, Changqing; Zhu, Zhenhong

    2016-05-16

    To evaluate the potential risk factors of the development of femoral head osteonecrosis after healed intertrochanteric fractures. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who were operated upon with closed reduction and internal fixation for intertrochanteric fractures by our medical group from December 1993 to December 2012. Patients with healed fractures were identified. Age, gender, comorbidities favouring osteonecrosis, causes of injuries, fracture patterns, the location of the primary fracture line, time from injury to surgery, fixation methods, and the development of femur head osteonecrosis of these patients were summarised. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the correlation between potential risk factors and the development of femoral head osteonecrosis. A total of 916 patients with healed intertrochanteric fractures were identified. Femoral head osteonecrosis was found in 8 cases (0.87%). According to the results of univariate logistic regression, a more proximal fracture line, fixation with dynamic hip screws and age were found to be statistically significant factors. The results of multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the statistically significant predictors of femoral head osteonecrosis were younger age (odds ratio [OR] = 17.103; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.988-147.111), a more proximal fracture line (OR = 31.439; 95% CI, 3.700-267.119) and applying dynamic hip screw as the internal fixation (OR = 11.114; 95% CI, 2.064-59.854). Regular follow-up is commended in young patients with a proximal fracture line who underwent closed reduction and internal fixation with dynamic hip screw, even though the bone had healed.

  5. Prevention of osteonecrosis by intravenous administration of human peripheral blood-derived CD34-positive cells in a rat osteonecrosis model.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Yasunaga, Yuji; Yamasaki, Takuma; Hamaki, Takanari; Asahara, Takayuki; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Aseptic idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a painful disorder of the hip that can lead to collapse of the femoral head and the need for total hip replacement following joint destruction. Treatment of this disease still remains a clinical challenge. Adult human circulating CD34(+) cells have been demonstrated to contribute to vasculogenesis and osteogenesis in immunodeficient rat non-union models in vivo. We hypothesized and proved that the transplantation of CD34(+) cells could have a role for improvement of osteonecrosis by promoting vasculogenesis and osteogenesis. Vascular deprivation-induced femoral head necrosis was developed in immunodeficient rats and we then administered human G-CSF mobilized CD34(+) cells intravenously. At 4 weeks after administration, the structure of the femoral head and neck were evaluated histologically and morphometrically with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and micro-CT imaging. Microangiography was carried out for macroscopic evaluation of neovascularization, and the contribution of human cells to vasculogenesis and osteogenesis was evaluated by immunofluorescent staining with human-specific antibodies. Our treatment resulted in an obvious improvement of osteonecrosis after CD34(+) cell administration and demonstrated the differentiation potential of CD34(+) cells into endothelial cells and osteoblasts. In conclusion, this new therapeutic approach using circulating cell fraction could be a promising cell-based therapy for early-stage osteonecrosis of the hip. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Prediction of femoral head collapse in osteonecrosis using 18F-fluoride positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Kubota, So; Inaba, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Naomi; Tateishi, Ukihide; Ike, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Tomio; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the usefulness of (18)F-fluoride PET as a predictor of femoral head collapse in patients with osteonecrosis (ON) before radiographic changes occur. Sixty-six hips of 42 patients diagnosed with ON of the femoral head were included in this study. We evaluated the relationship between the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) in (18)F-fluoride PET and the Ficat classification. We evaluated the relationship between SUV(max) and the presence of femoral head collapse on plain radiography at 12 months after (18)F-fluoride PET in 23 hips of 18 patients with Ficat classification stage 1 or 2. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was carried out to calculate the cut-off SUVmax for the prediction of femoral head collapse. We analyzed the relationship between SUV(max) and femoral head collapse on plain radiography in the 23 hips using a logistic regression model. SUV(max) increased according to the progression of the Ficat classification stage. The mean SUV(max) was 12.3±5.9 in the collapse group and 4.9±1.3 in the noncollapse group (P<0.01). The cut-off SUV(max) of 6.45 (sensitivity: 0.80, specificity: 0.92) was used for the prediction of femoral head collapse. In the univariate analysis, SUV(max), type classification, and ring sign were related significantly to femoral head collapse. We showed that the quantitative assessment of SUV(max) in (18)F-fluoride PET was useful to predict femoral head collapse in ON. (18)F-Fluoride PET might reflect accelerated bone metabolism because of microcollapse of the femoral head, which is undetectable on plain radiography.

  7. Steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis in immune thrombocytopenia treatment with osteochondral autograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulos, Vasileios Ch; Mouzopoulos, George; Floros, Themistoklis; Tzurbakis, Matthaios

    2015-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a devastating complication of steroid administration and has rarely been observed in the treatment of immune thrombocytopenia. The treatment of osteochondral defects in advanced stages of avascular necrosis (AVN), characterized by collapse of the subchondral bone, remains an unsolved burden in orthopedic surgery. In this report, we present a case of a 19-year-old female that was admitted in the Emergency Department with walking disability and painful hip joint movement due to steroid-induced femoral head osteonecrosis. Two years before she was diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia, for which she received pulse steroid therapy with high dose of dexamethasone and underwent a splenectomy. This case report is the first to describe the use of osteochondral autograft transplantation as a treatment of steroid-induced AVN of the femoral head due to immune thrombocytopenia at the age of 19 years with very good clinical and radiological results 3 years postoperatively.

  8. Asparaginase Potentiates Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengcheng; Janke, Laura J; Kawedia, Jitesh D; Ramsey, Laura B; Cai, Xiangjun; Mattano, Leonard A; Boyd, Kelli L; Funk, Amy J; Relling, Mary V

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a common dose-limiting toxicity of glucocorticoids. Data from clinical trials suggest that other medications can increase the risk of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Here we utilized a mouse model to study the effect of asparaginase treatment on dexamethasone-induced osteonecrosis. Mice receiving asparaginase along with dexamethasone had a higher rate of osteonecrosis than those receiving only dexamethasone after 6 weeks of treatment (44% vs. 10%, P = 0.006). Similarly, epiphyseal arteriopathy, which we have shown to be an initiating event for osteonecrosis, was observed in 58% of mice receiving asparaginase and dexamethasone compared to 17% of mice receiving dexamethasone only (P = 0.007). As in the clinic, greater exposure to asparaginase was associated with greater plasma exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.0001). This model also recapitulated other clinical risk factors for osteonecrosis, including age at start of treatment, and association with the systemic exposure to dexamethasone (P = 0.027) and asparaginase (P = 0.036). We conclude that asparaginase can potentiate the osteonecrotic effect of glucocorticoids.

  9. The Protective Effect of Cordycepin On Alcohol-Induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xuan; Zhu, Dao-Yu; Xu, Zheng-Liang; Yin, Jun-Hui; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Mei, Jiong; Gao, You-Shui; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2017-08-21

    Alcohol abuse is known to be a leading risk factor for atraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), in which the suppression of osteogenesis plays a critical role. Cordycepin benefits bone metabolism; however, there has been no study to determine its effect on osteonecrosis. Human bone mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) were identified by multi-lineage differentiation. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, RT-PCR, western blots, immunofluorescent assay and Alizarin red staining of BMSCs were evaluated. A rat model of alcohol-induced ONFH was established to investigate the protective role of cordycepin against ethanol. Hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) staining and micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) were performed to observe ONFH. Apoptosis was assessed by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Immunohistochemical staining was carried out to detect OCN and COL1. Ethanol significantly suppressed ALP activity, decreased gene expression of OCN and BMP2, lowered levels of RUNX2 protein, and reduced immunofluorescence staining of OCN and COL1 and calcium formation of hBMSCs. However, these inhibitory effects were attenuated by cordycepin co-treatment at concentrations of 1 and 10 µg/mL Moreover, it was revealed that the osteo-protective effect of cordycepin was associated with modulation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In vivo, by micro-CT, TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining of OCN and COL1, we found that cordycepin administration prevented alcohol-induced ONFH. Cordycepin treatment to enhance osteogenesis may be considered a potential therapeutic approach to prevent the development of alcohol-induced ONFH. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Application of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Meng, Hao-Ye; Yuan, Xue-Ling; Xu, Xiao-Long; Wang, Ai-Yuan; Guo, Quan-Yi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shi-Bi

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a type of common and refractory disease in the orthopedic clinic that is primarily caused by a partial obstruction of the blood supply to the femoral head, resulting in a series of pathological processes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) comprise a mixture of various stem cells in myeloid tissue with multipotential differentiation capacity. They can differentiate into bone cells under specific conditions and can be used to treat ONFH through cell transplantation. This review summarizes research on MSCs in the field of ONFH in recent years, reveals the inner characteristics of MSCs, describes their potential to treat osteonecrosis disease, and analyzes the existing challenges of using MSCs in clinical applications. PMID:26064202

  11. Vitamin K2 Prevents Glucocorticoid-induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue-Lei; Yin, Jun-Hui; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Gao, You-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid medication is one of the most common causes of atraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), and vitamin K2 (VK2) has been shown to play an important and beneficial role in bone metabolism. In this study, we hypothesized that VK2 could decrease the incidence of glucocorticoid-induced ONFH in a rat model. Using in vitro studies, we investigated how bone marrow-derived stem cells in the presence of methylprednisolone proliferate and differentiate, specifically examining osteogenic-related proteins, including Runx2, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Using in vivo studies, we established glucocorticoid-induced ONFH in rats and investigated the preventive effect of VK2. We employed micro-CT scanning, angiography of the femoral head, and histological and immunohistochemical analyses, which demonstrated that VK2 yielded beneficial effects for subchondral bone trabecula. In conclusion, VK2 is an effective antagonist for glucocorticoid on osteogenic progenitors. The underlying mechanisms include acceleration of BMSC propagation and promotion of bone formation-associated protein expression, which combine and contribute to the prevention of glucocorticoid-induced ONFH in rats.

  12. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in osteonecrosis of femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingyu; Liu, Lihua; Sun, Wei; Gao, Fuqiang; Cheng, Liming; Li, Zirong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Osteonecrosis is an incapacitating disorder with high morbidity. Though extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) provides a noninvasive treatment option, controversial subjects still exist about its effectiveness, indications, and mechanism of action. Methods: An electronic databases search was performed using PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane library to collect clinical trials, case reports, and cases series on this topic and then useful data were extracted and appraised by experienced clinicians. We evaluated the quality of included evidences by using the Oxford Centre for evidence-based medicine (EBM) Levels of Evidence. Results: A total of 17 articles including 2 case reports, 9 open label trials, 2 cohorts, and 6 randomized controlled trials were considered to be eligible for this systematic review. Visual analog scale (VAS), Harris hip scores, and the imaging results were the frequently-used outcome estimates of included studies. Conclusion: By systematically analyzing these evidences, we could conclude that ESWT could act as a safe and effective method to improve the motor function and relieve the pain of patients with osteonecrosis of femoral hip, especially those at early stage. Imaging revealed that bone marrow edema was significantly relieved, but the necrotic bone could not be reversed after ESWT. This technique could slow or even block the progression of ONFH and therefore reduce the demand for surgery. Collaboration with other conservative modalities would not improve the curative benefits of ESWT. Meanwhile, ONFH with various risk factors showed similar reaction to this noninvasive treatment method. However, these conclusions should be interpreted carefully for the low-quality of included publications and further studies are requisite to validate the effect of ESWT in ONFH. PMID:28121934

  13. Gain-of-function mutation in TRPV4 identified in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Wayne; Sonkusare, Swapnil K; Wang, Tracy; Azeddine, Bouziane; Pupavac, Mihaela; Carrot-Zhang, Jian; Hong, Kwangseok; Majewski, Jacek; Harvey, Edward J; Russell, Laura; Chalk, Colin; Rosenblatt, David S; Nelson, Mark T; Séguin, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a debilitating disease that involves impaired blood supply to the femoral head and leads to femoral head collapse. Methods We use whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing to analyse a family with inherited osteonecrosis of the femoral head and fluorescent Ca2+ imaging to functionally characterise the variant protein. Results We report a family with four siblings affected with inherited osteonecrosis of the femoral head and the identification of a c.2480_2483delCCCG frameshift deletion followed by a c.2486T>A substitution in one allele of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene. TRPV4 encodes a Ca2+-permeable cation channel known to play a role in vasoregulation and osteoclast differentiation. While pathogenic TRPV4 mutations affect the skeletal or nervous systems, association with osteonecrosis of the femoral head is novel. Functional measurements of Ca2+ influx through mutant TRPV4 channels in HEK293 cells and patient-derived dermal fibroblasts identified a TRPV4 gain of function. Analysis of channel open times, determined indirectly from measurement of TRPV4 activity within a cluster of TRPV4 channels, revealed that the TRPV4 gain of function was caused by longer channel openings. Conclusions These findings identify a novel TRPV4 mutation implicating TRPV4 and altered calcium homeostasis in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis while reinforcing the importance of TRPV4 in bone diseases and vascular endothelium. PMID:27330106

  14. [Avascular osteonecrosis of femoral head and neck in an AIDS patient].

    PubMed

    Villafañe, Maria F; Corti, Marcelo E; Candela, Miguel; Perez Bianco, Raul; Tezanos Pinto, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    Avascular osteonecrosis (AON) has increased in the last few years in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The most commonly affected bone is the femoral head and neck. Frequently these bilateral and clinical findings include moderate to severe pain and functional impotence of the affected joints. The etiology is multifactorial and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with protease inhibitors (PI) is probably related to its development. In the evolution, a total hip replacement may be needed. We present an hemophilic patient with AIDS, who developed a bilateral AON of the femoral head and neck during HAART.

  15. Vascularized Fibular Grafting for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head With Unusual Indications

    PubMed Central

    Urbaniak, James R.

    2008-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 154 patients of various subgroups treated with the free vascularized fibular graft procedure for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), evaluating pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores, hip range of motion, radiographs, and number of conversions to total hip arthroplasty (THA). Patients were followed a minimum of 1 year (mean, 6.8 years, range, 1 to 19 years). Athletes and patients with pyarthrosis-related osteonecrosis had high Harris hip scores at final review with scores of 94 and 97, respectively. Patients with ONFH after a slipped capital femoral epiphysis or following pregnancy had a low conversion rate to THA at 6% and 8%, respectively. Twenty-five percent of patients with transplant-related osteonecrosis of the femoral head were converted to THA at an average of 2.7 years. However, with select subsets of patients (athletes, pregnancy, organ transplant, femoral neck non-union, slipped capital femoral epiphysis, infection) the FVFG can result in a high rate of success. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18357495

  16. Porous Tantalum Implant in Treating Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: Still a Viable Option?

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinhui; Sun, Wei; Gao, Fuqiang; Guo, Wanshou; Wang, Yunting; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the survivorship and risk factors for radiographic progression and conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA) after porous tantalum implant surgery in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The study comprised 90 ONFH patients (104 consecutive hips) who were treated with a porous tantalum implant combined with bone grafting between June 2008 and December 2013. The patients were 19–61 years of age (mean age, 38 years). The mean follow-up was 42 months. The outcome measures included Harris hip score (HHS), radiographic outcome measures, and survivorship analysis with conversion to THA as the endpoint. The mean postoperative HHS was significantly lower than the mean preoperative HHS (P < 0.001). The Cox proportional hazards model showed that age and Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) stage were independent risk factors for conversion to THA, while age, China-Japan Friendship Hospital (CJFH) type, and ARCO stage were independent risk factors for radiological progression. Ultimately, only 52.9% hips survived. Porous tantalum implant surgery combined with bone grafting is not a viable option for treating ONFH, especially in patients >35 years of age with preoperative ARCO stage III and CJFH type L3. PMID:27324659

  17. Bisphosphonate-modified gold nanoparticles: a useful vehicle to study the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanord, Fedena; Fairbairn, Korie; Kim, Harry; Garces, Amanda; Bhethanabotla, Venkat; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2011-01-01

    Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is a juvenile form of osteonecrosis of the femoral head that presents in children aged 2-14 years. To date, there is no effective medical therapy for treating LCPD largely due to an inability to modulate the repair process, including the predominance of bone resorption. This investigation aims to evaluate the feasibility of using gold nanoparticles (GNPs) that are surface modified with a bisphosphonate compound for the treatment of osteonecrosis at the cellular level. Studies have found osteoclast-mediated resorption to be a process that contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of femoral head deformities arising from Perthes disease. Our in vitro model was designed to elucidate the effect of alendronate-(a bisphosphonate) modified GNPs, on osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function. RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were cultured with recombinant mouse receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), which stimulates osteoclastogenesis, and were then treated with alendronate-modified GNPs for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell proliferation, osteoclast function, and osteoclast morphology were evaluated by trypan blue dye exclusion assay, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Comparative studies were performed with GNPs that were only stabilized with citrate ions and with alendronate alone. Neither osteoclastogenesis nor osteoclast function were adversely affected by the presence of the citrate-GNP. Alendronate-modified GNPs had an enhanced effect on inducing osteoclast apoptosis and impairing osteoclast function when compared to unbound alendronate populations.

  18. Contemporary total hip arthroplasty with and without cement in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Oh, S-H; Kim, J-S; Koo, K-H

    2003-04-01

    The rate of failure of primary total hip arthroplasty in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head is higher than that in patients with osteoarthritis. The purpose of this prospective study was to document the clinical and radiographic results of arthroplasty with so-called third-generation cementing and the results of second-generation cementless total hip arthroplasty in ninety-eight consecutive patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Fifty patients who had had simultaneous bilateral total hip arthroplasty with a cemented stem in one hip and a cementless stem in the other and forty-eight patients who had had a unilateral total hip arthroplasty with a cementless stem were included in the study. A cementless acetabular component was used in all hips. The presumed cause of the osteonecrosis was ethanol abuse in fifty-seven patients, unknown in twenty-seven, fracture of the femoral neck in nine, and steroid use in five. There were eighty men and eighteen women. The mean age at the time of the arthroplasty was 47.3 years (range, twenty-six to fifty-eight years). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed preoperatively; at six weeks; at three, six, and twelve months; and yearly thereafter. The average duration of follow-up was 9.3 years. The average Harris hip scores in the group treated with unilateral arthroplasty (97 points) and the group treated with bilateral arthroplasty (94 points) were similar at the time of final follow-up. They were also similar between the group treated with cement (mean, 96 points) and that treated without cement (95 points). No component had aseptic loosening in either group. In one hip, a cemented femoral stem (2%) and a cementless cup were revised because of infection. Two cementless stems (2%) were revised because of fracture of the proximal part of the femur with loosening of the stem. Annual wear of the polyethylene liner averaged 0.22 mm in the group treated with cement (a zirconia head) and 0.14 mm in the

  19. Correlation Between Residual Displacement and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Following Cannulated Screw Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Xu, Gui-Jun; Han, Zhe; Jiang, Xuan; Zhang, Cheng-Bao; Dong, Qiang; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a new method for measuring the residual displacement of the femoral head after internal fixation and explore the relationship between residual displacement and osteonecrosis with femoral head, and to evaluate the risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with femoral neck fractures treated by closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation.One hundred and fifty patients who sustained intracapsular femoral neck fractures between January 2011 and April 2013 were enrolled in the study. All were treated with closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw internal fixation. The residual displacement of the femoral head after surgery was measured by 3-dimensional reconstruction that evaluated the quality of the reduction. Other data that might affect prognosis were also obtained from outpatient follow-up, telephone calls, or case reviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess the intrinsic relationship between the risk factors and the osteonecrosis of the femoral head.Osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 27 patients (18%). Significant differences were observed regarding the residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification. Moreover, we found more or less residual displacement of femoral head in all patients with high quality of reduction based on x-ray by the new technique. There was a close relationship between residual displacement and ONFH.There exists limitation to evaluate the quality of reduction by x-ray. Three-dimensional reconstruction and digital measurement, as a new method, is a more accurate method to assess the quality of reduction. Residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification were risk factors for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. High-quality reduction was necessary to avoid complications.

  20. Transplantation of hypoxia preconditioned bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells enhances angiogenesis and osteogenesis in rabbit femoral head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lihong; Zhang, Chen; Yu, Zefeng; Shi, Zhibin; Dang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Kunzheng

    2015-12-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head may be a disease resulting from abnormal proliferation or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. The present investigation explored the novel strategy of hypoxia-preconditioned BMMSCs to reverse the impairment of osteonecrosis BMMSCs and enhance the therapeutic potential of hypoxia-treated BMMSC transplantation. BMMSCs from the anterior superior iliac spine region of osteonecrosis rabbit were cultured under 20% O2 or 2% O2 conditions. Normal BMMSCs were cultured under 20% O2 condition as control. Growth factors secreted were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. 20% O2 or 2% O2 BMMSCs were injected into the femoral head of rabbits after core decompression. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed in vitro, and TUNEL staining of the femoral head was analyzed after transplantation. Angiogenesis (capillary-like structure formation, CD31 immunohistochemical staining and ink infusion angiography) and osteogenesis (Alizarin red-S staining, micro-CT scanning and OCN immunohistochemical staining) tests were conducted as well. 2% O2 exposure up-regulated growth factor secretion in BMMSCs. Apoptosis in 2% O2 group was lower when compared with that in 20% O2 osteonecrosis group. Cell viability in 2% O2 was significantly higher when compared with that in 20% O2 osteonecrosis group. Growth factor secretion, cell viability, apoptosis, capillary-like structure formation, Alizarin red-S staining, and ALP staining showed no difference between the 2% O2 BMMSC and normal BMMSC groups. Transplantation of 2% O2 versus 20% O2 mesenchymal stem cells after core decompression resulted in an increase in angiogenesis function and a decrease in local tissue apoptosis. Our study also found that osteogenesis function was improved after hypoxic stem cell transplantation. Hypoxic preconditioning of BMMSCs is an effective means of reversing the impairment of osteonecrosis BMMSCs, promoting their regenerative capability and therapeutic potential for

  1. Summary of the various treatments for osteonecrosis of the femoral head by mechanism: A review

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHENG; PENG, JIANG; LU, SHIBI

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), also known as femoral head avascular necrosis, is a pathological state with a number of possible etiologies including steroid administration, alcohol abuse, traumatic events, vascular injury and idiopathic origins. ONFH causes a reduction in the vascular supply to the subchondral bone of the femoral head, which results in osteocyte death and the collapse of the articular surface. Treatments for ONFH include non-weight-bearing therapy, physical support, the promotion of osteoclast apoptosis, and the reduction of osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis. The aim of the present review was to summarize the treatments for ONFH by mechanism from a new perspective and to describe the condition with an emphasis on treatment options. PMID:25120585

  2. Symptomatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head after adult orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Zhang, Jian; He, Ji-Wen; Wang, Kun; Wang, Gen-Shu; Jiang, Nan; Fu, Bin-Sheng; Wang, Guo-Ying; Yang, Yang; Chen, Gui-Hua

    2012-07-01

    With the increase of survival in liver transplantation recipients, more patients are at a high risk of developing osteonecrosis, especially in the femoral head, due to immunosuppressive treatment. The purpose of this study was to report the incidence, possible risk factors, and outcome of symptomatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in adult patients with current immunosuppressive agents and individual protocol after liver transplantation in China. A retrospective analysis was performed on 226 adult patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) at a single liver transplantation institution between January 2004 and December 2008. The posttransplant survival time (or pre-retransplantation survival time) of all the patients were more than 24 months. The possible pre- and post-transplantation risk factors of symptomatic ONFH were investigated and the curative effects of the treatment were also reported. The incidence of ONFH was 1.33% in patients after OLT. ONFH occurred at a mean of (14 ± 6) months (range, 10 - 21 months) after transplantation. Male patients more often presented with osteonecrosis as a complication than female patients. The patients with lower pre-transplantation total bilirubin and direct bilirubin levels (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the cumulative dose of corticosteroids or tacrolimus between the patients with or without symptomatic ONFH. Patients were treated either pharmacologically or surgically. All patients showed a nice curative effect without major complications during the 18 - 63 months post-treatment follow up. The symptomatic ONFH does not occur commonly after adult OLT in the current individual immunosuppressive protocol in China.

  3. Treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head with vascularized bone grafting.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Patrick D; Karas, Vasili; Wellman, Samuel S

    2015-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a challenging diagnosis for the patient and treating surgeon. Though its cause is poorly understood, several methods of surgical treatment exist and are performed with variable success. Vascularized bone grafting is one such treatment that attempts to restore viable bone, structural support, and blood supply to the avascular portion of the femoral head. This review summarizes the various approaches to this technique that have been proposed and put into practice. The cost effectiveness of these procedures, both in time and resources, has been evaluated and found to be favorable. The use of revascularization procedures, along with the introduction of other potentiating factors, may signal an exciting future for this debilitating disease process.

  4. Gain-of-function mutation in TRPV4 identified in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Mah, Wayne; Sonkusare, Swapnil K; Wang, Tracy; Azeddine, Bouziane; Pupavac, Mihaela; Carrot-Zhang, Jian; Hong, Kwangseok; Majewski, Jacek; Harvey, Edward J; Russell, Laura; Chalk, Colin; Rosenblatt, David S; Nelson, Mark T; Séguin, Chantal

    2016-10-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a debilitating disease that involves impaired blood supply to the femoral head and leads to femoral head collapse. We use whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing to analyse a family with inherited osteonecrosis of the femoral head and fluorescent Ca(2+) imaging to functionally characterise the variant protein. We report a family with four siblings affected with inherited osteonecrosis of the femoral head and the identification of a c.2480_2483delCCCG frameshift deletion followed by a c.2486T>A substitution in one allele of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene. TRPV4 encodes a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel known to play a role in vasoregulation and osteoclast differentiation. While pathogenic TRPV4 mutations affect the skeletal or nervous systems, association with osteonecrosis of the femoral head is novel. Functional measurements of Ca(2+) influx through mutant TRPV4 channels in HEK293 cells and patient-derived dermal fibroblasts identified a TRPV4 gain of function. Analysis of channel open times, determined indirectly from measurement of TRPV4 activity within a cluster of TRPV4 channels, revealed that the TRPV4 gain of function was caused by longer channel openings. These findings identify a novel TRPV4 mutation implicating TRPV4 and altered calcium homeostasis in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis while reinforcing the importance of TRPV4 in bone diseases and vascular endothelium. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Vitamin K2 Ameliorates Damage of Blood Vessels by Glucocorticoid: a Potential Mechanism for Its Protective Effects in Glucocorticoid-induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuelei; Yin, Junhui; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Changqing; Gao, You-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has been reported to decrease blood vessel number and harm the blood supply in the femoral head, which is recognized to be an important mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). To prevent glucocorticoid-induced ONFH, medication that promotes both bone formation and angiogenesis would be ideal. Vitamin K2 has been revealed to play an important role in bone metabolism; however, few studies have focused on the effect of Vitamin K2 on new vascular formation. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether Vitamin K2 promoted new blood vessel formation in the presence of glucocorticoids, both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Vitamin K2 on viability, migration, in vitro tube formation, and VEGF, vWF, CD31, KDR, Flt and PDGFB in EAhy926 incubated with or without dexamethasone were elucidated. VEGF, TGF-β and BMP-2, angiogenesis-related proteins secreted by osteoblasts, were also detected in the osteoblast-like cell line of MG63. In addition, blood vessels of the femoral head in rats administered with or without methylprednisolone and Vitamin K2 were evaluated using angiography and CD31 staining. In vitro studies showed that Vitamin K2 significantly protected endothelial cells from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, promoted endothelial cell migration and in vitro tube formation. Angiogenesis-related proteins both in EAhy926 and MG63 were also upregulated by Vitamin K2 when cotreated with dexamethasone. In vivo studies showed enhanced blood vessel volume and CD31-positive staining cells in rats cotreated with VK2 and methylprednisolone compared to rats treated with methylprednisolone only. Collectively, Vitamin K2 has the ability to promote angiogenesis in vitro and to ameliorate vessels of the femoral head in glucocorticoid-treated rats in vivo, indicating that Vitamin K2 is a promising drug that may be used to prevent steroid-induced ONFH.

  6. Vitamin K2 Ameliorates Damage of Blood Vessels by Glucocorticoid: a Potential Mechanism for Its Protective Effects in Glucocorticoid-induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuelei; Yin, Junhui; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Changqing; Gao, You-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has been reported to decrease blood vessel number and harm the blood supply in the femoral head, which is recognized to be an important mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). To prevent glucocorticoid-induced ONFH, medication that promotes both bone formation and angiogenesis would be ideal. Vitamin K2 has been revealed to play an important role in bone metabolism; however, few studies have focused on the effect of Vitamin K2 on new vascular formation. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether Vitamin K2 promoted new blood vessel formation in the presence of glucocorticoids, both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Vitamin K2 on viability, migration, in vitro tube formation, and VEGF, vWF, CD31, KDR, Flt and PDGFB in EAhy926 incubated with or without dexamethasone were elucidated. VEGF, TGF-β and BMP-2, angiogenesis-related proteins secreted by osteoblasts, were also detected in the osteoblast-like cell line of MG63. In addition, blood vessels of the femoral head in rats administered with or without methylprednisolone and Vitamin K2 were evaluated using angiography and CD31 staining. In vitro studies showed that Vitamin K2 significantly protected endothelial cells from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, promoted endothelial cell migration and in vitro tube formation. Angiogenesis-related proteins both in EAhy926 and MG63 were also upregulated by Vitamin K2 when cotreated with dexamethasone. In vivo studies showed enhanced blood vessel volume and CD31-positive staining cells in rats cotreated with VK2 and methylprednisolone compared to rats treated with methylprednisolone only. Collectively, Vitamin K2 has the ability to promote angiogenesis in vitro and to ameliorate vessels of the femoral head in glucocorticoid-treated rats in vivo, indicating that Vitamin K2 is a promising drug that may be used to prevent steroid-induced ONFH. PMID:27313492

  7. Inefficacy of the cementation of femoral head collapse in glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gangji, Valérie; Rooze, Marcel; De Maertelaer, Viviane

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to assess the efficacy of cementation of the femoral head in stage III glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Ten hips (nine patients) were treated by the injection of low-viscosity cement to reduce the collapse. The follow up included clinical and radiological assessments preoperatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. The visual analogue scale (VAS) score, the Lequesne index and the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score did not show any significant improvement. Eight of the ten hips showed a worsening of the collapse and required total hip arthroplasty during follow up. The mean time before total hip replacement was 8.6 ± 7 months. The other two hips did not show any relapse of collapse nor functional worsening at the maximum follow up of 5 years. Our results suggest that cement injection is not a treatment that should be proposed for glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. PMID:18297285

  8. A current review of non-vascularized bone grafting in osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Todd P; Elmallah, Randa K; Jauregui, Julio J; Poola, Shiva; Mont, Michael A; Delanois, Ronald E

    2015-09-01

    Over the past three decades, non-vascularized bone grafts have been demonstrated to be viable treatments for pre- and early post-collapse osteonecrosis of the femoral head; however, there are limited reviews on this topic. Therefore, the purposes of this review are to (1) provide a summary of the different surgical techniques and their respective clinical outcomes and (2) evaluate new adjunct therapies. Originally, non-vascularized bone grafting was performed using the Phemister technique with varying results. More recently, newer techniques such as the lightbulb and trapdoor are used to place non-vascularized bone grafts with excellent results. The addition of various biological agents has demonstrated positive results; however, further studies are needed to confirm the best appropriate indications and to elucidate long-term results.

  9. Surgical management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F; McGraw, Michael H; Israelite, Craig L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a known risk factor for osteonecrosis of the hip. Necrosis within the femoral head may cause severe pain, functional limitations, and compromise quality of life in this patient population. Early stages of avascular necrosis of the hip may be managed surgically with core decompression with or without autologous bone grafting. Total hip arthroplasty is the mainstay of treatment of advanced stages of the disease in patients who have intractable pain and are medically fit to undergo the procedure. The management of hip pathology in sickle cell disease presents numerous medical and surgical challenges, and the careful perioperative management of patients is mandatory. Although there is an increased risk of medical and surgical complications in patients with sickle cell disease, total hip arthroplasty can provide substantial relief of pain and improvement of function in the appropriately selected patient. PMID:26601059

  10. Outcome after tantalum rod implantation for treatment of femoral head osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Varitimidis, Sokratis E; Dimitroulias, Apostolos P; Karachalios, Theophilos S; Dailiana, Zoe H

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Tantalum rod implantation has recently been proposed for treatment of early stages of femoral head osteonecrosis. The purpose of our study was to report the early results of its use in pre- and post-collapse stages of the disease. Methods We studied prospectively 27 patients who underwent tantalum rod implantation for treatment of nontraumatic femoral head osteonecrosis between December 2000 and September 2005. Patients were evaluated radiologically and clinically using the Steinberg classification and the Harris hip score (HHS). Disease stage varied between stages II and IV. Mean follow-up time was 38 (15–71) months. Results 1 patient (1 hip) died 15 months after surgery for reasons unrelated to it. 13 of 26 hips remained at the same radiographic stage, and 13 deteriorated. Mean HHS improved from 49 to 85. 6 patients required conversion to total hip arthroplasty. When the procedure was used for stages III and IV, both radiological outcome and revision rates were worse than for the stage II hips. There was, however, no difference in postoperative HHS between patients at pre- and post-collapse stages at the time of initial evaluation. Survivorship, with revision to THA as the endpoint, was 70% at 6 years. Interpretation The disease process does not appear to be interrupted, but there was a significant improvement in hip function initially in most hips. Tantalum rod implantation is a safe “buy-time” technique, especially when other joint salvage procedures are not an option. Appropriate patient selection and careful rod insertion are needed for favorable results. PMID:19297785

  11. [Is instillation of bone marrow stem cells at the time of core decompression useful for osteonecrosis of the femoral head?].

    PubMed

    Cabrolier, Jorge; Molina, Marcelo

    2016-03-24

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head leads to degeneration of the head and finally to osteoarthritis of the hip. Decompression is the most widely used treatment, but its effectiveness is limited. It has been proposed instillation of stem cells in addition to decompression, would lead to better results. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified two systematic reviews including two randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded instillation of bone marrow stem cells at the time of core decompression probably slows progression to osteoarthritis of the hip in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head and might reduce the need of subsequent surgeries. It is unclear whether it has any effect on the functionality because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  12. 3D segmentation and quantification of magnetic resonance data: application to the osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klifa, Catherine S.; Lynch, John A.; Zaim, Souhil; Genant, Harry K.

    1999-05-01

    The general objective of our study is the development of a clinically robust three-dimensional segmentation and quantification technique of Magnetic Resonance (MR) data, for the objective and quantitative evaluation of the osteonecrosis (ON) of the femoral head. This method will help evaluate the effects of joint preserving treatments for femoral head osteonecrosis from MR data. The disease is characterized by tissue changes (death of bone and marrow cells) within the weight-bearing portion of the femoral head. Due to the fuzzy appearance of lesion tissues and their different intensity patterns in various MR sequences, we proposed a semi-automatic multispectral segmentation of MR data introducing data constraints (anatomical and geometrical) and using a classical K-means unsupervised clustering algorithm. The method was applied on ON patient data. Results of volumetric measurements and configuration of various tissues obtained with the semi- automatic method were compared with quantitative results delineated by a trained radiologist.

  13. Failed vascularized fibular graft in treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. A histopathological analysis

    PubMed Central

    MELONI, MARIA CHIARA; HOEDEMAEKER, W. RUSSALKA; FORNASIER, VICTOR

    2016-01-01

    Purpose vascularized fibular grafting has been used to treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head in younger patients. Although the results described in the literature are promising, the failure rate is still significant, especially in steroid users. This study was undertaken to learn more, on a histopathological level, about the mechanism of vascularized fibular graft failure. Methods fifteen femoral heads removed at conversion to total hip arthroplasty were analyzed. The case load comprised 10 men and 5 women. They ranged in age from 28 to 39 years and had a median age of 35 years. The interval between the vascularized fibular implant procedure and the conversion to total hip arthroplasty ranged from 22 months to 30 months; the median interval was 26 months. All the patients were steroid users. The heads were sectioned and axial and coronal sections were taken and stained using the WHO method (hematoxylin, phloxine, saffron and Alcian green). A quantitative and qualitative analysis of graft-host interaction at the head (zone 1), neck (zone 2) and epiphysis (zone 3) was performed. Results all the specimens showed recognizable collapse of the articular surface over the area of necrosis. Thirteen femoral heads showed the presence of an osteochondral flap attached only at the margins of the area of avascular necrosis, and 10 of these 13 femoral heads also showed loss of the articulating surface with an ulcer crater corresponding to the exposed area of avascular necrosis. Conclusions vascularized fibular graft failure seems to be related to a negative effect of creeping substitution: the revascularization becomes a negative force as it supports unbalanced bone resorption, which, as is well known, is enhanced by corticosteroids. Clinical relevance creeping substitution is an undermining force in the repair and revascularization of the necrotic area in the femoral head. PMID:27386444

  14. Primary epiphyseal arteriopathy in a mouse model of steroid-induced osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Janke, Laura J; Liu, Chengcheng; Vogel, Peter; Kawedia, Jitesh; Boyd, Kelli L; Funk, Amy J; Relling, Mary V

    2013-07-01

    Patients undergoing glucocorticoid therapy for a variety of disorders, including autoimmune diseases and hematological malignancies, are at risk of developing osteonecrosis. Despite extensive research in both patients and animal models, the underlying pathogenesis remains unclear. Proposed inciting mechanisms include intravascular thrombotic occlusion, marrow fat hypertrophy, osteocyte and/or endothelial cell apoptosis, hypercoagulability, and vasoconstriction of specific arteries and arterioles supplying bone. Our laboratory has developed a model of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in BALBcJ mice which reflects clinically relevant exposures to glucocorticoids in which treated mice develop osteonecrosis of the distal femoral epiphysis when administered 4 to 8 mg/L dexamethasone in drinking water for 6 weeks. We identified lesions in arterioles supplying this area, with the mildest occurring in knees without any evidence of osteonecrosis. However, arteriopathy was more common among mice that did versus did not develop osteonecrosis (P < 0.0001); in mice with osteonecrosis, the associated vessels showed transmural necrosis and thickening of the vessel wall progressing to the point of luminal obstruction. In the most severe cases of osteonecrosis, end-stage lesions consisted of fully occluded vessels with marrow and bone necrosis involving the entire epiphysis. We propose that a primary arteriopathy is the initiating event in the genesis of steroid-induced osteonecrosis and provides a basis for future investigation of this disease process.

  15. Clinical and basic research on steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Toshikazu; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Saito, Masazumi; Ishida, Masashi; Arai, Yuji; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Steroid (glucocorticoid)-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in young adults has been a challenging disorder due to frequent incidence of collapse of the femoral head and resulting dysfunction of the hip joint and impairing quality of life. In Japan, the working group on ONFH in the Specific Disease Investigation Committee under auspices of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare was founded in 1975, clinical and related basic research on ONFH have been continued for more than 40 years. A national epidemiologic survey in 2004 estimated that 2200 new patients per year would be diagnosed with ONFH in Japan. ONFH was associated with steroid intake (51%), heavy alcohol intake (31%), both (3%), and neither (15%). The male-to-female ratio was 5:4, and the peak decades of age at definitive diagnosis were the 40s in male patients and the 30s in females. MRI studies revealed that ONFH would have occurred in early phase after start of steroid administration and no expansion of necrotic lesion within the femoral head in spite of continued steroid use. To standardize ONFH diagnosis and treatment strategy, the Committee established validated diagnostic criteria, a radiological staging system, and type categorization. Most symptomatic patients with collapse of the femoral head require various surgical procedures. Joint preserving surgery, such as transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy and curved varus osteotomy, should be the treatment choice for young patients with healthy areas without severe collapse of the femoral head. Clinical and basic research has been performed to determine the pathogenesis of steroid-induced ONFH. Low hepatic CYP3A activity has been reported to significantly contribute to the risk of steroid-induced ONFH. Several gene polymorphisms related to steroid metabolism were shown to be associated with the occurrence of ONFH. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Preclinical Study of Cell Therapy for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head with Allogenic Peripheral Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Ning-Ning; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Yi; Peng, Jia-Chen; Fang, Ning; Yu, Li-Mei; Liu, Jin-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To explore the value of transplanting peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells from allogenic rabbits (rPBMSCs) to treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Materials and Methods rPBMSCs were separated/cultured from peripheral blood after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilization. Afterwards, mobilized rPBMSCs from a second passage labeled with PKH26 were transplanted into rabbit ONFH models, which were established by liquid nitrogen freezing, to observe the effect of rPBMSCs on ONFH repair. Then, the mRNA expressions of BMP-2 and PPAR-γ in the femoral head were assessed by RT-PCR. Results After mobilization, the cultured rPBMSCs expressed mesenchymal markers of CD90, CD44, CD29, and CD105, but failed to express CD45, CD14, and CD34. The colony forming efficiency of mobilized rPBMSCs ranged from 2.8 to 10.8 per million peripheral mononuclear cells. After local transplantation, survival of the engrafted cells reached at least 8 weeks. Therein, BMP-2 was up-regulated, while PPAR-γ mRNA was down-regulated. Additionally, bone density and bone trabeculae tended to increase gradually. Conclusion We confirmed that local transplantation of rPBMSCs benefits ONFH treatment and that the beneficial effects are related to the up-regulation of BMP-2 expression and the down-regulation of PPAR-γ expression. PMID:27189298

  17. Influence of the volume of osteonecrosis on the outcome of core decompression of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Mazieres, B.; Marin, F.; Chiron, P.; Moulinier, L.; Amigues, J.; Laroche, M.; Cantagrel, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess the outcome of core decompression in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head related to the volume of necrotic bone measured according to a previously reported method.
METHODS—Twenty hips corresponding to strictly Ficat stage II underwent magnetic resonance imaging and the volume of necrotic bone was expressed as a percentage of the volume of the entire head measured on each slice. All hips underwent core decompression and the outcome was evaluated at 24 months. The primary evaluation criterion was radiological appearance: the outcome was considered as good if the hip remained stage II and poor if the disease progressed.
RESULTS—Twenty four months after core decompression, half the cases remained stable and in half the disease had progressed. Outcome seemed to be related to the volume of necrotic bone (average 22% in the good outcome group versus 45% in the poor outcome group (p = 0.0051)) and was independent of risk factors, age, and histological type.
CONCLUSIONS—The volume of necrotic bone should be taken into account in the evaluation of any treatment, bearing in mind that in more than one third of cases this volume will probably decrease, especially at the beginning of the disease process.

 PMID:9496156

  18. Experimental osteonecrosis: development of a model in rodents administered alendronate.

    PubMed

    Conte, Nicolau; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Andrade, Cleverton Roberto de; Esteves, Jônatas Caldeira; Marcantonio, Elcio

    2016-08-22

    The main objective of this study was to cause bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws to develop in a rodent model. Adult male Holtzman rats were assigned to one of two experimental groups to receive alendronate (AL; 1 mg/kg/week; n = 6) or saline solution (CTL; n = 6). After 60 days of drug therapy, all animals were subjected to first lower molar extraction, and 28 days later, animals were euthanized. All rats treated with alendronate developed osteonecrosis, presenting as ulcers and necrotic bone, associated with a significant infection process, especially at the inter-alveolar septum area and crestal regions. The degree of vascularization, the levels of C-telopeptide cross-linked collagen type I and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, as well as the bone volume were significantly reduced in these animals. Furthermore, on radiographic analysis, animals treated with alendronate presented evident sclerosis of the lamina dura of the lower first molar alveolar socket associated with decreased radiographic density in this area. These findings indicate that the protocol developed in the present study opens new perspectives and could be a good starting model for future property design.

  19. Atraumatic osteonecrosis of the humeral head after influenza A-(H1N1) v-2009 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kuether, G; Dietrich, B; Smith, T; Peter, C; Gruessner, S

    2011-09-16

    In the recent pandemic influenza A-(H1N1) v-2009 vaccination campaign, adjuvanted vaccines have been used because of their antigen-sparing effect. According to available reports, the rate of severe vaccination reactions has not increased, as compared with previous seasonal influenza vaccinations. Here we describe an adult female patient who was vaccinated with an AS03 adjuvanted split-virus vaccine injected into the left arm. She experienced a prolonged and painful local reaction for 4 weeks. During this time, persistent incapacitating pain shifted into the left shoulder. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the injection site detected atraumatic humeral head osteonecrosis in conjunction with bursitis of the rotator cuff region. Clinical and laboratory examination revealed no other underlying disease. Using analgetic medication and physical therapy, resting pain completely remitted within the following 14 weeks. Pain on exertion declined within the following 6 months. Atraumatic osteonecrosis, a relatively rare disorder which initially presents non-specific clinical symptoms, has never been associated with parenteral influenza vaccination. Although the available data cannot establish a causal relationship, our patient's clinical course - with a continuous transition from increased local post-vaccination reactions to symptoms of a severe shoulder lesion with osteonecrosis - raises the question of a pathogenetic link. Considering the vascular pathogenesis of osteonecrosis, we hypothesize that our patient's enhanced local immunologic reaction may have led to regional vasculitis as the cause of bone destruction. As mild forms of osteonecrosis may have escaped previous clinical attention, it is the purpose of our report to increase awareness of this exceptional event as a possible side effect of parenteral adjuvanted vaccination.

  20. Potential diagnostic role of diffusion tensor imaging in early-stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hongwei; Xu, Feng; Gu, Rui; Han, Xinzuo; Wang, Anqing; Liu, Kemin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the potential diagnostic role of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) in the early stage of modified corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). A total of 20 beagles were randomly classified (1:1) into either an experimental group (LM), which were intramuscularly injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and methylprednisolone (MPS) on three consecutive days, or control (CON) group, which were injected with saline. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI were performed at pre-induction and 8 and 12 weeks post-induction. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in the range of interest in the femoral head were quantified using DTI. Proximal femora were examined for ONFH at 8 and 12 weeks. The results demonstrated that ONFH developed in four beagles at 8 weeks and in six beagles at 12 weeks, whereas no ONFH was detected in the CON group. No abnormalities were detected by MRI and DTI, and no mortality occurred. In beagles with ONFH in the LM group, the ADC values were 4.7±0.2×10−4 and 4.8±0.3×10−4 mm2/sec at 8 and 12 weeks, respectively, which were significantly increased compared with the CON group (2.5±0.3×10−4 and 2.4±0.3×10−4 mm2, respectively) and the LM group without ONFH (2.6±0.4×10−4 and 2.4±0.3×10−4 mm2, respectively) (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicated that intramuscular injection of LPS and MPS may lead to early-stage ONFH in beagles. As such, the detection of locally elevated ADC values in the femoral head may aid in the early diagnosis of ONFH. PMID:27882161

  1. Corticosteroid administration within 2 weeks after renal transplantation affects the incidence of femoral head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masazumi; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Ishida, Masashi; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Arai, Yuji; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Fukushima, Wakaba; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-06-01

    It has been suggested that avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) of the femoral head occurs early after systemic steroid administration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the risks regarding development of AVN at a very early stage after renal transplantation. The presence or absence of AVN was determined by MRI at 4 weeks, at 6-12 weeks, at 24 weeks, and at 12 months after renal transplantation in 286 patients (183 males) with a mean age of 39 (16-65) years. The relationship between AVN and age, sex, absence or presence of acute rejection (AR), type of transplanted kidney (living or cadaveric), type of immune suppressor, and total dose of orally administered steroids given in the 2-week period after transplantation was investigated. There were no statistically significant correlations between the development of AVN and age, sex, absence or presence of AR, type of transplanted kidney, or type of immune suppressor. A significant dose-response relationship was found between development of AVN and the total dose of steroid administered in the first 2 weeks after surgery. We found a relationship between AVN development and steroid dose in the early postoperative period, and we also showed a dose-response relationship.

  2. Bilateral non-traumatic aseptic osteonecrosis in the femoral head. An experimental study of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Hauzeur, J.P.; Pasteels, J.L.; Orloff, S.

    1987-10-01

    Thirty-five patients who were seen with non-traumatic aseptic osteonecrosis of the femoral head were included in a study of the contralateral hip to evaluate the incidence of bilateral disease. We used not only conventional radiography and scintigraphy but also measurement of intramedullary pressure and core biopsy. Pain was caused by 14.3 per cent of the contralateral hips, a lesion was demonstrated on plain radiographs in 51.4 per cent, and increased isotopic uptake was seen in 31.4 per cent. Histological study of specimens obtained by osteomedullary biopsy (after special procedure) showed bilateral necrosis in 88.5 per cent of the patients. After a mean follow-up of thirty-four months, only one of nine hips that were painless and had negative radiographic and isotopic findings, but had positive findings on biopsy, became painful and radiographically positive. The intramedullary pressure in the intertrochanteric area was recorded in each hip, and no correlation was found with the radiographic stage or with pain.

  3. Use of concentrated bone marrow aspirate and platelet rich plasma during minimally invasive decompression of the femoral head in the treatment of osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, John R.; Houdek, Matthew T.; Sierra, Rafael J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe our surgical procedure for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head using a minimally invasive technique. We have limited the use of this procedure for patients with pre-collapse osteonecrosis of the femoral head (Ficat Stage I or II). To treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head at our institution we currently use a combination of outpatient, minimally invasive iliac crest bone marrow aspirations and blood draw combined with decompressions of the femoral head. Following the decompression of the femoral head, adult mesenchymal stem cells obtained from the iliac crest and platelet rich plasma are injected into the area of osteonecrosis. Patients are then discharged from the hospital using crutches to assist with ambulation. This novel technique was utilized on 77 hips. Sixteen hips (21%) progressed to further stages of osteonecrosis, ultimately requiring total hip replacement. Significant pain relief was reported in 86% of patients (n = 60), while the rest of patients reported little or no pain relief. There were no significant complications in any patient. We found that the use of a minimally invasive decompression augmented with concentrated bone marrow and platelet rich plasma resulted in significant pain relief and halted the progression of disease in a majority of patients. PMID:23771751

  4. The role of hypercoagulability in the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G.; Gelalis, Ioannis D.; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis P.; Vozonelos, Georgios; Korompilias, Anastasios V.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the large number of the outstanding researches, pathogenesis of osteonecrosis remains unknown. During the last decades the hypothesis that increased intravascular coagulation may be the pathogenetic mechanism which leads to osteonecrosis is gaining constantly support. Both primary factors of hyper-coagulability, such as resistance to activated protein C, protein C and protein S deficiency, low levels of tissue plasminogen activator, high levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor, von Willebrand factor, lipoprotein (a), and secondary factors of hypercoagulability with factors potentially activating intravascular coagulation, such as pregnancy, antiphospholipid antibodies, systemic lupus erythematosus, hemoglobinopathies and sickle cell disease, and hemato-oncologic diseases are discussed in this article. Although coagulation abnormalities in patients with hip osteonecrosis might represent increased risk factors for the development of bone necrosis by predisposing the patient to thromboembolic phenomena, further investigation is needed to indicate the definite correlation between factors leading to increased intravascular coagulation and pathogenesis of osteonecrosis. PMID:22802985

  5. The effect of deferoxamine on angiogenesis and bone repair in steroid-induced osteonecrosis of rabbit femoral heads.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Fan, Lihong; Yu, Zefeng; Dang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Kunzheng

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we examined whether local deferoxamine (DFO) administration can promote angiogenesis and bone repair in steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Steroid-induced ONFH was induced in 65 mature male New Zealand white rabbits by methylprednisolone in combination with lipopolysaccharide. Six weeks later, the rabbits received no treatment (model group, N = 15), bilateral core decompression (CD group, N = 20) or CD in combination with local DFO administration (DFO group, N = 20). Six weeks after the surgery, vascularization in the femoral head was evaluated by ink artery infusion angiography and immunohistochemical staining for von Willebrand Factor (vWF). Bone repair was assessed by histologic analysis and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Immunohistochemical staining was performed to analyze the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and osteocalcin (OCN). Ink artery infusion angiography and microvessel analysis by immuohistochemical staining for vWF showed more blood vessels in the DFO group than other groups. The expression of HIF-1α, VEGF, BMP-2, and OCN, indicated by immunohistochemical staining, was higher in the DFO group compared with other groups. Micro-CT scanning results indicated that the DFO group had larger volume of newly formed bone than the CD group. This work indicated that local DFO administration improved angiogenesis and bone repair of early stage ONFH in rabbit model, and it may offer an efficient, economic, and simple therapy for early stage ONFH.

  6. Evaluation of the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) as an Experimental Animal Model for Dysbaric Osteonecrosis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-07

    Osteonecrosis , Squirrel monkeys, Dysbarism, Decompression AM STRACT (Coalftwo Af VOW0 df it 060006 Red AV Ihib 6 In an attempt to develop an animal model for...dysbaric osteonecoosis in man, squirrel monkeys were repetedly exposid to a profile consisting of both hyperbaric and hypobaric pressures. Clinical and...subclinical decomipression sickness was produced. No clinical, radiologic, or post-mortem evidence of osteonecrosis was discovered during either the 6

  7. Revision hip arthroplasty in patients with a previous total hip replacement for osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Soo; Moon, Young-Wan; Lee, Keun-Ho; Lim, Seung-Jae

    2014-12-01

    Patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head are typically relatively young and active and often require high rates of revision after primary total hip arthroplasty. However, outcomes of revision hip arthroplasty in this patient population have rarely been reported in the literature. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 72 patients (75 hips) who underwent revision hip arthroplasty with a primary diagnosis of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Mean age at index revision was 53.3 years (range, 34-76). Components of acetabular revision included a cementless porous-coated cup in 58 hips and an acetabular cage in 3 hips. Components of femoral revision included a fully grit-blasted tapered stem in 30 hips and a proximally porous-coated modular stem in 9 hips. Mean duration of follow-up was 7 years (range, 3-17). Mean Harris Hip Score improved from 49 points preoperatively to 90 points postoperatively. At final follow-up, 11 hips (14.7%) required reoperation because of aseptic loosening (6 hips), infection (2 hips), recurrent dislocation (1 hip), periprosthetic fracture (1 hip), and ceramic fracture (1 hip). Kaplan-Meier survivor-ship with an endpoint of re-revision for any reason was 81% and for mechanical failure was 87.5% for the cup and 100% for the stem at 10 years. Unlike the previous report, the authors' study showed a lower failure rate of the femoral stem after revision hip arthroplasty using modern cementless femoral components in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Aseptic cup loosening or osteolysis is the most common mechanism of failure at medium-term follow-up. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Vascularized bone grafting fixed by biodegradable magnesium screw for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dewei; Huang, Shibo; Lu, Faqiang; Wang, Benjie; Yang, Lei; Qin, Ling; Yang, Ke; Li, Yangde; Li, Weirong; Wang, Wei; Tian, Simiao; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Gao, Wenbin; Wang, Zongpu; Zhang, Yu; Xie, Xinhui; Wang, Jiali; Li, Junlei

    2016-03-01

    Hip-preserving surgery with vascularized bone graft implantation has been widely practiced in treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). However, the current approach presents a drawback, in which the implanted bone graft without screw fixation may slip or exhibit a certain degree of displacement postoperatively. This study was designed to investigate the application potential of biodegradable magnesium (Mg) screws for the fixation of vascularized bone graft in ONFH patients. Forty-eight patients were randomly divided into two groups: the Mg screw group (vascularized bone grafting fixed by Mg screws) and the control group (vascularized bone grafting without fixation). During 12 month follow-up period after surgery, treatment outcomes in patients were assessed by multiple imaging techniques including x-ray and computed tomography (CT) scanning as well as functional recovery Harris hip score (HHS). The temporal changes in serum levels of Mg, Ca, and P as well as in vivo degradation rate of Mg screws were determined. The absence of potential adverse effects induced by degradation products from Mg screws on surrounding bone tissue was validated via CT imaging analysis. HHS was significantly improved in the Mg screw group when compared to the control group. X-ray imaging analysis showed that the screw shape did not show significant alteration due to the diameter of Mg screws measured with approximate 25% reduction within 12 months post-surgically. The postoperative serum levels of Ca, Mg, and P, which are relevant for liver and kidney function, were all within normal physiological range in all patients of both groups. The use of biodegradable Mg screws may provide a promising bone graft-screw fixation route in treating ONFH and present considerable potential for orthopedic applications.

  9. Curative effect and safety of vascularized fibula grafting in renal transplant recipients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y J; Jin, D X; Zhang, C Q; Chen, S B; Sheng, J G; Lee, H S; Zhang, K G; Zeng, B F

    2009-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a common and severe complication after renal transplantation. It is characterized by deterioration of hip joint function, which impairs quality of life. We present 3 renal transplant case reports of patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head who underwent free vascularized fibular grafting at our hospital. Follow-up was from 1(1/2) to 2 years. All 3 patients exhibited good recovery with substantial improvement in joint function. Intraoperative and postoperative findings demonstrated the safety of this surgical procedure.

  10. Effect of bone mesenchymal stem cells transplantation on the micro-environment of early osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Song, Huanjin; Tao, Li; Wang, Fang; Wang, Weizhuo; Wei, Yongchang; Shen, Wenjun; Zhou, Fuling

    2015-01-01

    Autologous implantation of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has achieved promising clinical efficacy for the treatment of early-stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). However, the underlying mechanisms are not completely elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of BMSCs on the early ONFH in vitro and in vivo. In co-cultured system, primary BMSCs enhanced the activity and inhibited the apoptosis of primary OB. The concentrations of VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-cultured medium were significantly higher than those without co-culture. Importantly, BMSCs implantation increased OB, capillaries and VEGF and BMP-2 expressions of the necrotic areas of femoral head in the ONFH rabbits. In conclusion, our results indicated that BMSCs treated the early ONFH possibly through increasing OB and capillaries, as well as VEGF and BMP-2 expression in the femoral head. These results provided possible mechanisms for the treatment of early-stage ONFH with BMSCs transplantation.

  11. Exosomes from Human Synovial-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shang-Chun; Tao, Shi-Cong; Yin, Wen-Jing; Qi, Xin; Sheng, Jia-Gen; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) represents a debilitating complication following glucocorticoid (GC)-based therapy. Synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) can exert protective effect in the animal model of GC-induced ONFH by inducing cell proliferation and preventing cell apoptosis. Recent studies indicate the transplanted cells exert therapeutic effects primarily via a paracrine mechanism and exosomes are an important paracrine factor that can be directly used as therapeutic agents for tissue engineering. Herein, we provided the first demonstration that the early treatment of exosomes secreted by human synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSC-Exos) could prevent GC-induced ONFH in the rat model. Using a series of in vitro functional assays, we found that SMSC-Exos could be internalized into bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and enhance their proliferation and have anti-apoptotic abilities. Finally, SMSC-Exos may be promising for preventing GC-induced ONFH. PMID:27766040

  12. Association of polymorphisms in the Interleukin 23 receptor gene with osteonecrosis of femoral head in Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Hong, Jung Min; Oh, Bermseok; Cho, Yoon Shin; Lee, Jong-Young; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Eun; Ha, Mi-Hyun; Park, Eui Kyun

    2008-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is known as death of the cellular portion of the femoral head due to an interruption in the vascular supply. The underlying pathophysiology regarding bone cell death remains uncertain. Recently, several studies have shown that autoimmune disorders were related to the development of osteonecrosis. This study investigated the genetic effects of Interleukin 23 receptor (IL23R) polymorphisms regarding the risk of ONFH. Ten SNPs were selected and genotyped in 443 ONFH patients and 273 control subjects in order to perform the genetic association analysis. It was found that polymorphisms of the IL23R gene (rs4655686, rs1569922 and rs7539625) were significantly associated with an increased risk of ONFH (P values; 0.0198-0.0447, OR; 1.30-1.49). Particularly, a stratified analysis based on etiology (alcohol, steroid or idiopathic) showed that the associations between these polymorphisms and ONFH were most significant in idiopathic ONFH patients (P values; 0.0001-0.0150, OR; 1.45-2.17). These results suggest that IL23R polymorphisms may play an important role in the development of ONFH. PMID:18779654

  13. Bilateral Idiopathic Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Case Report With an Emphasis on Differential Diagnosis, Imaging, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Patrick J.; Gliedt, Jordan; McDaniel, Courtney; Kettner, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient with bilateral idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), provide a discussion of differential diagnosis for anterior hip pain, imaging, and treatment recommendations for ONFH. Clinical features A 34-year-old man was initially treated by a chiropractic physician for low back pain. At the end of a three week trial of care, the patient’s low back pain resolved. However, he reported a new complaint of mild left anterior hip stiffness. After re-examination, a homecare exercise program was prescribed. The patient returned 1 month later with substantial left anterior hip pain and walked with a noticeable limp. Radiography of the left hip demonstrated advanced ONFH. Magnetic resonance imaging of both hips demonstrated the extent of involvement of the left hip while incidentally revealing ONFH on the right. Intervention and Outcome A total hip arthroplasty was performed on the left hip and the right hip is being monitored without intervention. Conclusion Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a challenging clinical problem with non-specific and wide-ranging signs and symptoms requiring clinicians to engage a cautious and comprehensive differential diagnosis. Prompt recognition ensures that appropriate treatment can be initiated in a timely manner and optimal patient outcomes achieved. PMID:25225469

  14. Dimethyloxaloylglycine increases bone repair capacity of adipose-derived stem cells in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen-Hong; Song, Wen-Qi; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Yin, Ji-Min

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been widely studied to promote local bone regeneration of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Previous studies observed that dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG) enhanced the angiogenic and osteogenic activity of mesenchymal stem cells by activating the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), thereby improving the bone repair capacity of mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, it was investigated whether DMOG could increase the bone repair capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in the treatment of ONFH. Western blot analysis was performed to detect HIF-1α protein expression in ASCs treated with different concentrations of DMOG. The results showed DMOG enhanced HIF-1α expression in ASCs in a dose-dependent manner at least for 7 days. Furthermore, DMOG-treated ASCs were transplanted into the necrotic area of a rabbit model of ONFH to treat the disease. Four weeks later, micro-computed tomography (CT) quantitative analysis showed that 58.8±7.4% of the necrotic area was regenerated in the DMOG-treated ASCs transplantation group, 45.5±3.4% in normal ASCs transplantation group, 25.2±2.8% in only core decompression group and 10.6±2.6% in the untreated group. Histological analysis showed that transplantation of DMOG-treated ASCs clearly improved the bone regeneration of the necrotic area compared with the other three groups. Micro-CT and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the revasculation of the necrotic area were also increased significantly in the DMOG-treated ASC group compared with the control groups. Thus, it is hypothesized that DMOG could increase the bone repair capacity of ASCs through enhancing HIF-1α expression in the treatment of ONFH. PMID:27882083

  15. Avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head in three West African HIV-infected adults with heterozygous sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Eholié, Serge P; Ouiminga, Mariama; Ehui, Eboi; Nzunetu, Gustave; Ouattara, Songda I; Konan, Alexis V; Anglaret, Xavier; Bissagnéné, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Three men (aged 33, 44 and 45 years, CD4(+) T-cell nadir 86 cells/mm(3), 99 cells/mm(3) and 12 cells/mm(3), respectively) were admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases (Treichville Hospital, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire) for hip pain and impaired mobility. Their last available CD4(+) T-cell counts were 243 cells/mm(3), 245 cells/mm(3) and 8 cells/mm(3), respectively. They had all received antiretroviral therapy for >4 years, including lopinavir/ritonavir for >8 months. The other risk factors were hypertriglyceridaemia (n=3), smoking addiction (n=2), alcohol consumption (n=2) and lipodystrophy (n=1). All three patients had heterozygous haemoglobin AS sickle cell disease (percentage of haemoglobin S 41%, 45% and 50%, respectively). The diagnosis of avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head (unilateral n=2 and bilateral n=1) was documented by CT scan. Only one patient underwent surgical arthroplasty. In resource-limited settings, avascular osteonecrosis is uneasy to diagnose and unlikely to be appropriately treated. Physicians should be aware of its symptoms and risk factors, including HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy. Future studies should explore whether these risk factors might include haemoglobin AS sickle cell disease, a common trait in the West African general population.

  16. Treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head by free vascularized fibular grafting: an analysis of surgical outcome and patient health status

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Brian E.; McKee, Michael D.; Richards, Robin R.; Mahoney, James L.; Waddell, James P.; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Yoo, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the limb-specific outcome and general health status of patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head treated with vascularized fibular grafting. Design A retrospective review. Setting A single tertiary care centre. Patients Fifty-five consecutive patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head who underwent fibular grafting (8 bilaterally). Intervention Vascularized fibular grafting. Outcome measures Limb-specific scores (Harris Hip Score, St. Michael’s Hospital Hip Score), general health status (Nottingham Health Profile, SF-36 health status survey) and radiographic outcome measures (Steinberg stage). Results Patients were young (mean age 34 years, range from 18 to 52 years) and 80% had advanced osteonecrosis (Steinberg stages IV and V). Fifty-nine hips were followed up for an average of 50 months (range from 24 to 117 months) after vascularized fibular grafting. Sixteen hips (27%) were converted to total hip arthroplasty (THA). To date, 73% of hips treated with vascularized fibular grafting have required no further surgery. Preoperative and postoperative Harris Hip Scores were 57.3 and 83.6 respectively (p < 0.001). As measured by patient-oriented health status questionnaires (SF-36, Nottingham Health Profile) and compared with population controls, patients had normal mental health scores and only slight decreases in physical component scores. Conclusions Free vascularized fibular grafting for osteonecrosis of the femoral head provides satisfactory pain relief, functional improvement and general health status and halts the progression of symptomatic disease. PMID:10459327

  17. Comparison of Surgical Parameters and Results between Curved Varus Osteotomy and Rotational Osteotomy for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Kyun; Ha, Yong-Chan; Kim, Do-Yeon; Lyu, Sung-Hwa; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2017-01-01

    Background Various osteotomies have been introduced to treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The purpose of this study was to compare surgical parameters, postoperative limb length discrepancy, and minimum 5-year clinical and radiological results between transtrochanteric curved varus osteotomy (TCVO) and transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Methods From 2004 to 2009, 103 consecutive TROs (97 patients) followed by 72 consecutive TCVOs (64 patients) were performed for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Of these, 85 patients (91 hips) in the TRO group and 58 patients (65 hips) in the TCVO group completed minimum 5-year clinical and radiological follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. Results The TCVO group had shorter operation time (p < 0.05) and less estimated blood loss (p = 0.026). Postoperative collapse developed in 26 hips (28.6%) in the TRO group and 7 hips (10.8%) in the TCVO group (p = 0.007). Osteophyte formation was observed in 34 hips (37.4%) in the TRO group and 13 hips (20%) in the TCVO group (p = 0.020). Fifteen hips (16.5%) in the TRO group and 7 hips (10.8%) in the TCVO group underwent conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA). The survival rate at 9 years with radiographic collapse as the endpoint was 68.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 58.1% to 79.3%) in the TRO group, and 84.7% (95% CI, 71.5% to 97.9%) in the TCVO group. With conversion to THA as the endpoint, the survival rate was 82.2% (95% CI, 73.1% to 91.3%) in the TRO group and 89.2% (95% CI, 81.7% to 96.7%) in the TCVO group. Conclusions The comparison indicates that TCVO was better than TRO in terms of surgical parameters including operation time and estimated blood loss while the 9-year survival rates were similar. PMID:28567217

  18. Comparison of Surgical Parameters and Results between Curved Varus Osteotomy and Rotational Osteotomy for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Kyun; Park, Chan Ho; Ha, Yong-Chan; Kim, Do-Yeon; Lyu, Sung-Hwa; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2017-06-01

    Various osteotomies have been introduced to treat osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The purpose of this study was to compare surgical parameters, postoperative limb length discrepancy, and minimum 5-year clinical and radiological results between transtrochanteric curved varus osteotomy (TCVO) and transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. From 2004 to 2009, 103 consecutive TROs (97 patients) followed by 72 consecutive TCVOs (64 patients) were performed for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Of these, 85 patients (91 hips) in the TRO group and 58 patients (65 hips) in the TCVO group completed minimum 5-year clinical and radiological follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to estimate survival. The TCVO group had shorter operation time (p < 0.05) and less estimated blood loss (p = 0.026). Postoperative collapse developed in 26 hips (28.6%) in the TRO group and 7 hips (10.8%) in the TCVO group (p = 0.007). Osteophyte formation was observed in 34 hips (37.4%) in the TRO group and 13 hips (20%) in the TCVO group (p = 0.020). Fifteen hips (16.5%) in the TRO group and 7 hips (10.8%) in the TCVO group underwent conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA). The survival rate at 9 years with radiographic collapse as the endpoint was 68.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 58.1% to 79.3%) in the TRO group, and 84.7% (95% CI, 71.5% to 97.9%) in the TCVO group. With conversion to THA as the endpoint, the survival rate was 82.2% (95% CI, 73.1% to 91.3%) in the TRO group and 89.2% (95% CI, 81.7% to 96.7%) in the TCVO group. The comparison indicates that TCVO was better than TRO in terms of surgical parameters including operation time and estimated blood loss while the 9-year survival rates were similar.

  19. Local Administration of Bisphosphonate-soaked Hydroxyapatite for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jin-Hui; Guo, Wan-Shou; Li, Zi-Rong; Wang, Bai-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic administration of bisphosphonates has shown promising results in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). However, few studies have evaluated the efficacy of local zoledronate (ZOL) administration in the treatment of ONFH. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether local administration of bisphosphonate-soaked hydroxyapatite (HA) could improve bone healing in an experimental rabbit model of ONFH. Methods: This experimental study was conducted between October 2014 and June 2015. Forty-five rabbits underwent simulated ONFH surgery. Immediately following surgery, they were divided into three groups: model (untreated, n = 15), HA (treated with HA alone, n = 15), and HA + ZOL (treated with HA soaked in a low-dose ZOL solution, n = 15). Histological, immunohistochemical, and quantitative analyses were performed to evaluate bone formation and resorption 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery. Results: Gross bone matrix and hematopoietic tissue formation were observed in the HA + ZOL group 4 weeks after surgery. The immunohistochemical staining intensities for 5-bromodeoxyuridine, runt-related transcription factor 2, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and osteoprotegerin were significantly higher in the HA + ZOL group than that in the model (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.018, respectively) and HA groups (P = 0.003, P = 0.049, P < 0.001, P = 0.020, and P = 0.019, respectively), whereas receptor activator of the nuclear factor-κB ligand staining intensity was significantly lower in the HA + ZOL group than that in the model and HA groups (P = 0.029 and P = 0.015, respectively) 4 weeks after surgery. No significant differences in bone formation or bone resorption marker expression were found between the three groups 2 or 8 weeks after surgery (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Local administration of HA soaked in a low-dose ZOL solution increased new bone formation while inhibiting bone resorption in an animal model of ONFH

  20. Therapeutic effect of minimally invasive decompression combined with impaction bone grafting on osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Jun; Liu, You-Wen; Du, Zhi-Qian; Guo, Huili; Fan, Ke-Jie; Liang, Guo-Hui; Liu, Xing-Cai

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the therapeutic effect of minimally invasive decompression combined with impaction bone grafting on osteonecrosis of the femoral head. A total of 67 patients underwent minimally invasive lightbulb decompression combined with impaction bone grafting. The therapeutic effect was evaluated according to Harris scores, and fluoroscopic and magnetic resolution imaging results at different time points. The Harris score was significantly increased after operation. The fineness rate was 85.4%. Postoperative disease progression was found in nine patients with the progression rate of 14.63%. The average necrotic area percentage was noticeably reduced 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after operation. The one-year postoperative percentage showed a significant difference compared with the preoperative one. Minimally invasive lightbulb decompression combined with impaction bone grafting can achieve a satisfactory curative effect on ONFH. This method has the advantages of small trauma, thorough decompression, and good bone implantation.

  1. Study of rotating permanent magnetic field to treat steroid-induced osteonecrosis of femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Huang, YuanShuai; Lin, Bowen

    2008-01-01

    Sixty New Zealand rabbit models with steroid-induced necrosis of femoral head were exposed to a rotating permanent magnetic field (RPMF) (group A1–2 h/d for one month and group A2–2 h/d for two months), and the changes of femoral head, blood viscosity, serum cholesterol, triglyceride, and pressure within the hip joint cavity were measured and statistically analysed compared to that of control group (B1 and B2) and sham group (C1 and C2). After RPMF treatment, the osteogenesis regeneration of the necrotic femoral head was markedly improved, as was shown by micro-CT. Blood viscosity, serum cholesterol, triglyceride, and pressure in the hip joint cavity were found significantly reduced. RPMF could affect various critical aspects in the course of femoral head necrosis, which will be a promising measure in the prevention and treatment of steroid-induced necrosis of femoral head, especially in the early stage. PMID:18204839

  2. HIF-1α transgenic bone marrow cells can promote tissue repair in cases of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Gao, You-Shui; Hu, Chen; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chuan-Gui; Yin, Ji-Min; Sun, Yuan; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Although corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is common, the treatment for it remains limited and largely ineffective. We examined whether implantation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) transgenic bone marrow cells (BMCs) can promote the repair of the necrotic area of corticosteroid-induced ONFH. In this study, we confirmed that HIF-1α gene transfection could enhance mRNA expression of osteogenic genes in BMCs in vitro. Alkaline phosphatase activity assay and alizarin red-S staining indicated HIF-1α transgenic BMCs had enhanced osteogenic differentiation capacity in vitro. Furthermore, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for VEGF revealed HIF-1α transgenic BMCs secreted more VEGF as compared to normal BMCs. An experimental rabbit model of early-stage corticosteroid-induced ONFH was established and used for an evaluation of cytotherapy. Transplantation of HIF-1α transgenic BMCs dramatically improved the bone regeneration of the necrotic area of the femoral head. The number and volume of blood vessel were significantly increased in the necrotic area of the femoral head compared to the control groups. These results support HIF-1α transgenic BMCs have enhanced osteogenic and angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. Transplantation of HIF-1α transgenic BMCs can potentially promote the repair of the necrotic area of corticosteroid-induced ONFH.

  3. Exosomes Secreted from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head by Promoting Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Qing; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Chen, Shengbao; Song, Wenqi; Ding, Jian; Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Local ischemia is the main pathological performance in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). There is currently no effective therapy to promote angiogenesis in the femoral head. Recent studies revealed that exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPS-MSC-Exos) have great therapeutic potential in ischemic tissues, but whether they could promote angiogenesis in ONFH has not been reported, and little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Methods: iPS-MSC-Exos were intravenously injected to a steroid-induced rat osteonecrosis model. Samples of the femoral head were obtained 3 weeks after all the injections. The effects were assessed by measuring local angiogenesis and bone loss through histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, micro-CT and three-dimensional microangiography. The effects of exosomes on endothelial cells were studied through evaluations of proliferation, migration and tube-forming analyses. The expression levels of angiogenic related PI3K/Akt signaling pathway of endothelial cells were evaluated following stimulation of iPS-MSC-Exos. The promoting effects of exosomes were re-evaluated following blockade of PI3K/Akt. Results: The in vivo study revealed that administration of iPS-MSC-Exos significantly prevented bone loss, and increased microvessel density in the femoral head compared with control group. We found that iPS-MSC-Exos significantly enhanced the proliferation, migration and tube-forming capacities of endothelial cells in vitro. iPS-MSC-Exos could activate PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in endothelial cells. Moreover, the promoting effects of iPS-MSC-Exos were abolished after blockade of PI3K/Akt on endothelial cells. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that transplantation of iPS-MSC-Exos exerts a preventative effect on ONFH by promoting local angiogenesis and preventing bone loss. The promoting effect might be attributed to activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway on

  4. Exosomes Secreted from Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head by Promoting Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaolin; Li, Qing; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Chen, Shengbao; Song, Wenqi; Ding, Jian; Zhang, Changqing; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Local ischemia is the main pathological performance in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). There is currently no effective therapy to promote angiogenesis in the femoral head. Recent studies revealed that exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPS-MSC-Exos) have great therapeutic potential in ischemic tissues, but whether they could promote angiogenesis in ONFH has not been reported, and little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Methods: iPS-MSC-Exos were intravenously injected to a steroid-induced rat osteonecrosis model. Samples of the femoral head were obtained 3 weeks after all the injections. The effects were assessed by measuring local angiogenesis and bone loss through histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, micro-CT and three-dimensional microangiography. The effects of exosomes on endothelial cells were studied through evaluations of proliferation, migration and tube-forming analyses. The expression levels of angiogenic related PI3K/Akt signaling pathway of endothelial cells were evaluated following stimulation of iPS-MSC-Exos. The promoting effects of exosomes were re-evaluated following blockade of PI3K/Akt. Results: The in vivo study revealed that administration of iPS-MSC-Exos significantly prevented bone loss, and increased microvessel density in the femoral head compared with control group. We found that iPS-MSC-Exos significantly enhanced the proliferation, migration and tube-forming capacities of endothelial cells in vitro. iPS-MSC-Exos could activate PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in endothelial cells. Moreover, the promoting effects of iPS-MSC-Exos were abolished after blockade of PI3K/Akt on endothelial cells. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that transplantation of iPS-MSC-Exos exerts a preventative effect on ONFH by promoting local angiogenesis and preventing bone loss. The promoting effect might be attributed to activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway on

  5. [Treatment of Steroid-induced Osteonecrosis of Femoral Head by Porous Tantalum Rod and Gugutou Huaisiyu Capsule].

    PubMed

    Tan, Xu-yi; Gao, Fei-fei; Gao, Shu-tu; Liu, You-wen; Chen, Xian-tao; Liu, Li-yun

    2016-01-01

    To observe the curative effect of porous tantalum rod and Gugutou Huaisiyu Capsule (GHC) for steroid-induced osteonecrosis of femoral head (SONFH). A total 60 hips of 50 SONFH patients were randomly assigned to the treatment group and the control group according to grouping time, 25 in each group (30 hips). Patients in the control group were implanted with porous tantalum rod, while those in the treatment group additionally took GHC (5 pills each time, three time per day for 2 successive months; and then twice per day for 4 successive months). Then all patients were followed-up to observe Harris hip score. The curative effect and the femoral head survival time were assessed. A total of 49 patients (59 hips) were followed-up. The Harris hip score of the two groups at the final follow-up was significantly improved after treatment, with statistical difference when compared with before treatment (P < 0.01). Besides, it was higher in the treatment group than in the control group. The curative effect and the survival time were superior in the treatment group, with statistical difference when compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Porous tantalum rod combined GHC got better effect in treating SONFH. It could significantly improve the function of affected hips and prolong the survival time of femoral head.

  6. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    Awareness of the need for prevention of glucocorticoid-induced fractures is growing, but glucocorticoid administration is often overlooked as the most common cause of nontraumatic osteonecrosis. Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis develops in 9-40% of patients receiving long-term therapy although it may also occur with short-term exposure to high doses, after intra-articular injection, and without glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. The name, osteonecrosis, is misleading because the primary histopathological lesion is osteocyte apoptosis. Apoptotic osteocytes persist because they are anatomically unavailable for phagocytosis and, with glucocorticoid excess, decreased bone remodeling retards their replacement. Glucocorticoid-induced osteocyte apoptosis, a cumulative and unrepairable defect, uniquely disrupts the mechanosensory function of the osteocyte-lacunar-canalicular system and thus starts the inexorable sequence of events leading to collapse of the femoral head. Current evidence indicates that bisphosphonates may rapidly reduce pain, increase ambulation, and delay joint collapse in patients with osteonecrosis.

  7. Clinical outcomes of osteonecrosis of the femoral head after autologous bone marrow stem cell implantation: a meta-analysis of seven case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Heng-Feng; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Chang-An; Yan, Zuo-Qin

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of osteonecrosis of the femoral head after autologous bone marrow stem cell implantation. We searched the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases and included all case-control trials that reported on the clinical outcomes of osteonecrosis progression, incidence of total hip arthroplasty and improvement in Harris hip scores. Overall, seven case-control trials were included. Compared with the controls, patients treated with the bone marrow stem cells implantation treatment showed improved clinical outcomes with delayed osteonecrosis progression (odds ratio = 0.17, 95% CI: 0.09 - 0.32; p <0.001), a lower total hip arthroplasty incidence (odds ratio = 0.30, 95% CI: 0.12 - 0.72; p <0.01) and increased Harris hip scores (mean difference = 4.76, 95% CI: 1.24 - 8.28; p<0.01). The heterogeneity, publication bias, and sensitivity analyses showed no statistical difference significant differences between studies. Thus, our study suggests that autologous bone marrow stem cells implantation has a good therapeutic effect on osteonecrosis of the femoral, resulting in beneficial clinical outcomes. However, trials with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Long-term outcomes of transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy for non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Morita, D; Hasegawa, Y; Okura, T; Osawa, Y; Ishiguro, N

    2017-02-01

    Transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) is performed for young patients with non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) to preserve the hip. We aimed to investigate the long-term outcomes and the risk factors for failure 15 years after this procedure. This study included 95 patients (111 hips) with a mean age of 40 years (21 to 64) who underwent TRO for ONFH. The mean follow-up was 18.2 years (3 to 26). Kaplan-Meier survivorship analyses were performed with conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA) and radiological failure due to secondary collapse of the femoral head or osteoarthritic changes as the endpoint. Multivariate analyses were performed to assess risk factors for each outcome. Survival rates at 15 years with conversion to THA and radiological failure as the endpoint were 59% (95% confidence interval (CI) 49 to 67) and 30% (95% CI 22 to 39), respectively. Necrotic type C2 ONFH (lesions extending laterally to the acetabular edge) (hazards ratio (HR) 3.9) and age > 40 years (HR 2.5) were risk factors for conversion to THA. Stage > 3a ONFH (HR 2.0) and age > 40 years (HR 1.9) were risk factors for radiological failure. The 15 year outcomes after TRO for ONFH are unfavorable because osteoarthritic changes occur after five years post-operatively. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:175-83. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. Microstructure and Nanomechanical Properties of Single Trabecular Bone in Different Regions of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yu; Meng, Haoye; Gou, Wenlong; Yuan, Xueling; Xu, Xiaolong; Wang, Aiyuan; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to compare the microstructure and nanomechanical properties of single trabecular bone in different regions of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Osteonecrotic femoral heads were taken from 20 patients undergoing total hip arthroplasties between 2011 and 2014. Following incision, resin was embedded and polished, and divided into four regions according to the type of pathologic change; i.e., subchondral bone, and necrotic, sclerotic, and healthy regions. Indents from a single trabecular bone of each region were randomly selected to undergo nanoindentation. The results are (1) The elastic modulus and degree of hardness were significantly elevated in the sclerotic region, but there were no differences in necrotic and subchondral bone regions compared with healthy regions. (2) The elastic modulus and hardness of the single trabecular bone were significantly greater in central versus edge regions (for all regions). The conclusions are (1) The mechanical properties of single bone trabeculae were not markedly altered in the necrotic region. (2) The elastic modulus and degree of hardness increased significantly between the edge and central regions, regardless of whether the bone was normal or osteonecrotic.

  10. Free Vascularized Fibular Grafting Improves Vascularity Compared With Core Decompression in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu; Guo, Changan; Chen, Jifei; Chen, Zenggan; Yan, Zuoqin

    2017-09-01

    Management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head remains challenging. Core decompression and free vascularized fibular grafting are commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Few studies, however, have compared these two procedures in a randomized controlled study, in terms of improved vascularity of the femoral head, progression of disease, or hip scores. QUESTION/PURPOSES: (1) What is the effect of core decompression and fibular grafting on vascularity of the femoral head as measured by single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT? (2) Does one of these two methods lead to greater progression of Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) stage as determined by serial MRI? (3) What is the relationship between the change in vascularity of the femoral head and hip function as measured by the Harris hip score (HHS) and progression to THA as an endpoint? A randomized controlled trial was performed between June 2010 and October 2012 at Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University. During the study period, 51 patients who presented with ARCO Stages I to IIIB bilateral osteonecrosis were potentially eligible for inclusion, and 33 patients were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria and offered enrollment and randomization. Six patients declined to participate at the time of randomization, leaving a final sample of 27 participants (54 hips). Bilateral hips of each patient were randomly assigned to surgical options: one side was treated with core decompression and the contralateral side was concurrently treated with fibular grafting. SPECT/CT examinations were performed to quantify radionuclide uptake to evaluate vascularity of the femoral head before treatment and at 6 and 36 months after surgery. With the numbers available, we found no differences between the groups regarding vascularity at baseline (64% ± 8% core decompression-treated hips versus 64% ± 7% in the fibular-grafted hips; 95% CI, -5% to 5%; p = 0.90). MR images of the

  11. Relative volume measured with magnetic resonance imaging is an articular collapse predictor in hematological pediatric patients with femoral head osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Davide; Masetto, Alessandro; Talei Franzesi, Cammillo; Bonaffini, Pietro A; Casiraghi, Alessandra; Sironi, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the potential value of femoral head (FH) volume measurements to predict joint collapse, as compared to articular surface involvement, in post-treatment osteonecrosis (ON) in pediatric patients affected by lymphoproliferative diseases. METHODS Considering 114 young patients with lymphoproliferative diseases undergone a lower-limbs magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination between November 2006 and August 2012 for a suspected post-treatment ON, we finally considered a total of 13 cases (7 males, mean age 15.2 ± 4.8 years), which developed a FH ON lesions (n = 23). The MRI protocol included coronal short tau inversion recovery and T1-weighted sequences, from the hips to the ankles. During the follow-up (elapsed time: 9.2 ± 2 mo), 13/23 FH articular surface (FHS) developed articular deformity. The first MRI studies with diagnosis of ON were retrospectively analyzed, measuring FH volume (FHV), FHS, ON volume (ONV) and the articular surface involved by ON (ONS). The relative involvement of FHS, in terms of volume [relative volume (RV): ONV/FHV] and articular surface [relative surface (RS): ONS/FHS], was then calculated. RESULTS By using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis (threshold of 23% of volume involvement), RV predicted articular deformity in 13/13 FHS [sensitivity 100%, specificity 90%, accuracy 95%, positive predictive value (PPV) 93%, negative predictive value (NPV) 100%]. Considering a threshold of 50% of articular involvement, RS predicted articular deformity in 10/13 femoral heads (sensitivity 77%, specificity 100%, accuracy 87%, PPV 100%, NPV 77%). CONCLUSION RV might be a more reliable parameter than RS in predicting FH deformity and could represent a potential complementary diagnostic tool in the follow-up of femoral heads ON lesions. PMID:27648169

  12. Treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head with focal anatomic-resurfacing implantation (HemiCAP): preliminary results of an alternative option.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Onur; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Yel, Mustafa; Karalezli, Nazim; Miniaci, Anthony

    2015-04-28

    The optimal treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head has not been established yet. The aim of this study was to report preliminary clinical results of focal anatomic-resurfacing implantation for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Five patients (four male, one female) with seven surgical procedures, ages between 37 and 52 with an average age of 45.2 (+/- 7.2), diagnosed as femoral head avascular necrosis and who were unresponsive to conservative management or had failed previous surgical treatments were treated with a focal anatomic femoral head resurfacing between the years 2011-2012 and were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with at least two years of follow-up, one left hip, two right hips, and two patients with bilateral hip surgery were included in this review. After safe surgical dislocation of the hip, full exposure of the femoral head was established. A focal-resurfacing implant matching patient anatomy and femoral head curvature was performed accordingly. Neither intraoperative or postoperative complications nor revision ensued. Visual analogue scores and Harris Hip Scores were recorded both preoperatively and at postoperative 2 years for all seven surgeries. The mean follow-up period was 26.6 +/- 3.8 months, with a range between 24-33 months. The mean visual analogue scores were 8.9 +/- 0.9 preoperatively and 2.3 +/- 1.0 postoperatively at year two (p = 0.017). Harris Hip Scores at postoperative follow-up were found to improve significantly from good to excellent scores (86.0 +/- 7.9), compared with preoperative poor scores (26.7 +/- 11.8) (p = 0.018). The clinical improvements in visual analogue scores (VAS) and Harris Hip Scores were also found to correlate with each other (p < 0.05). In the present study, the alternative technique of focal anatomic hip resurfacing with HemiCAP® yielded preliminary successful results for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. To the best of our knowledge, this is

  13. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in MMP9 is associated with decreased risk of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tianbo; Zhao, Zhenqun; Bai, Rui; Xue, Huiqin; Chen, Junyu; Sun, Mingqi; Zhang, Xiyang; Wang, Guoqiang; Wang, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a common hip joint disease, and steroid-induced ONFH accounts for a large number of cases. Here, we examined eight previously-identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MPP2 and MPP9 genes of 285 steroid-induced ONFH patients and 507 healthy controls from northern China to determine whether these SNPs were associated with the risk of developing steroid-induced ONFH. Chi-squared tests and genetic model and haplotype analyses were used to evaluate associations. The rs2274755 SNP in MMP9 was associated with a decreased risk of steroid-induced ONFH in the allele, dominant, and additive models. Additionally, the “CGC” MMP9 haplotype was associated with a 0.69-fold decrease in the risk of steroid-induced ONFH. Although additional, larger population-based studies are needed to confirm these findings, our results reveal for the first time an association between a MMP9 SNP at the rs2274755 locus and a decreased risk of steroid-induced ONFH in a northern Chinese population. PMID:27637086

  14. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Gunalp; Mutluoglu, Mesut; Ersen, Omer; Yildiz, Senol

    2016-01-01

    To review the current literature on the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO₂) therapy in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). We searched PubMed, Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete, CINAHL and MEDLINE through April 2015. We hand-searched relevant textbooks, conference proceedings and the reference lists of review articles and clinical studies Randomized controlled trials (RCT) and observational studies (cohort study, case-control study, case series) that reported the outcome of patients who received HBO₂therapy for ONFH were included. Only English-language articles were included. Study quality was not used as an exclusion criterion. Two authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, extracted data and presented to other authors. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. We identified eight clinical studies; two randomized controlled trials (RCTs); one historically controlled study; and five case series. The majority of the studies were small-scale, heterogeneous and methodologically weak. In four of the studies HBO₂therapy was combined with other treatment modalities, making it impossible to draw firm conclusions on the specific effects of HBO₂therapy. Hip survivorship in studies wherein HBO₂therapy was used alone was 95.5% in Steinberg Stage I lesions, 89% in Steinberg Stage II lesions and 100% in Ficat Stage II lesions. There is a room for HBO₂therapy in the management ONFH. Further RCTs, however, are required to better elucidate the role of HBO₂therapy in the treatment of ONFH.

  15. [Research on the distribution difference of MRI signals in osteonecrosis of the femoral head patients of different TCM syndrome types].

    PubMed

    Yu, Tong; Xie, Li-Min; Wu, Biao; Li, Yu-Bin; Liu, Jia-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2013-12-01

    To observe the distribution difference of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) patients of different TCM syndrome types. Recruited 29 ONFH patients were assigned to the tendon and vessel stagnation group (14 cases) and the Gan-Shen deficiency group (15 cases) according to TCM syndrome typing. The distribution difference of their MRI signals of MRIT1WI, T2WI + fs, T1 and T2 combined signal were compared. There was statistical difference in T1W1 signal distribution between the two TCM syndrome types (P = 0.04). There was no statistical difference in T2WI + fs or T1 and T2 combined signal between the two TCM syndrome types (P = 0.42, P = 0.15). MRI signals in the tendon and vessel stagnation group were mainly manifested as fat-like signals,while they were mainly manifested as mixed signals in the Gan-Shen deficiency group. Distribution difference of MRI signals exists between ONFH patients of different TCM syndrome types.

  16. The Effect of Postoperative Corticosteroid Administration on Free Vascularized Fibular Grafting for Treating Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Chen, Sheng-Bao; Lin, Sen; Gao, You-Shui; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Free vascularized fibular grafting (FVFG) has been reported to be an effective method of treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). This study evaluated whether postoperative maintenance doses of corticosteroids had an adverse effect on FVFG outcomes in patients with corticosteroid-induced ONFH. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 39 patients (67 hips) who had received maintenance doses of corticosteroids following FVFG. This group was matched to a group of patients who had not received corticosteroids treatment after operation. The mean follow-up duration was 5.4 years for the postoperative corticosteroid administration group (PCA group) and 5.0 years for the control group. At the latest follow-up, the average increase in Harris hip score was 11.1 ± 8.7 points for all hips in the PCA group and 12.6 ± 7.4 points for all hips in the control group (P > 0.05). In the PCA group, through radiographic evaluation, 49 hips were improved, 10 hips appeared unchanged, and 8 hips appeared worse. In the control group, 47 hips were improved, 13 hips appeared unchanged, and 7 hips appeared worse. The results suggested that postoperative maintenance doses of corticosteroids do not have an adverse effect on FVFG outcomes in patients with corticosteroid-induced ONFH. PMID:24324377

  17. Teriparatide and the treatment of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Ersan, N; van Ruijven, L J; Bronckers, A L J J; Olgaç, V; İlgüy, D; Everts, V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to establish a bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) rat model and to analyse the effects of teriparatide (TP) on this model. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: I—zoledronic acid (ZA, n = 10); II—ZA and teriparatide (ZA + TP, n = 10); III—control (n = 10). Osteonecrosis was induced by administering zoledronic acid to groups ZA and ZA + TP. A week after the injections, rats underwent extraction of the first left mandibular molar. Following a four week period, TP was administered to the ZA + TP group for 28 days. Upon killing, extraction sockets were examined clinically, radiologically and histopathologically. Results: Clinical examination revealed necrotic bone exposure in none of the animals. MicroCT (µCT) examination showed that bone mineral density of the newly formed bone in the extraction socket was lower in the ZA group than in the ZA + TP group (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that only the ZA and ZA + TP groups developed osteonecrosis, and the osteonecrotic bone area in the ZA group was larger than that in the ZA + TP group (p < 0.05). Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) enzyme histochemistry revealed that the number of detached and large osteoclasts were higher in the ZA group than in other groups, whereas the number of apoptotic osteoclasts in both ZA and ZA + TP groups were higher than in the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our data indicate that bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw model used in the present study is an attractive model to investigate treatment modalities and that TP might be an effective treatment in BRONJ. PMID:24170800

  18. Comprehensive Genome-Wide Transcriptomic Analysis of Immature Articular Cartilage following Ischemic Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Naga Suresh; Kim, Harry K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in piglets results in an ischemic injury to the immature articular cartilage. The molecular changes in the articular cartilage in response to ONFH have not been investigated using a transcriptomic approach. The purpose of this study was to perform a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis to identify genes that are upregulated in the immature articular cartilage following ONFH. Methods ONFH was induced in the right femoral head of 6-week old piglets. The unoperated femoral head was used as the normal control. At 24 hours (acute ischemic-hypoxic injury), 2 weeks (avascular necrosis in the femoral head) and 4 weeks (early repair) after surgery (n = 4 piglets/time point), RNA was isolated from the articular cartilage of the femoral head. A microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix Porcine GeneChip Array. An enrichment analysis and functional clustering of the genes upregulated due to ONFH were performed using DAVID and STRING software, respectively. The increased expression of selected genes was confirmed by a real-time qRTPCR analysis. Results Induction of ONFH resulted in the upregulation of 383 genes at 24 hours, 122 genes at 2 weeks and 124 genes at 4 weeks compared to the normal controls. At 24 hours, the genes involved in oxidoreductive, cell-survival, and angiogenic responses were significantly enriched among the upregulated genes. These genes were involved in HIF-1, PI3K-Akt, and MAPK signaling pathways. At 2 weeks, secretory and signaling proteins involved in angiogenic and inflammatory responses, PI3K-Akt and matrix-remodeling pathways were significantly enriched. At 4 weeks, genes that represent inflammatory cytokines and chemokine signaling pathways were significantly enriched. Several index genes (genes that are upregulated at more than one time point following ONFH and are known to be important in various biological processes) including HIF-1A, VEGFA, IL-6, IL6R, IL-8, CCL2, FGF2, TGFB2

  19. High triglyceride is a risk factor for silent osteonecrosis of the femoral head in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Tanabe, Naohito; Wakamatsu, Ayako; Takai, Chinatsu; Sato, Hiroe; Nakatsue, Takeshi; Wada, Yoko; Nakano, Masaaki; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the factors related to silent osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Seventy-eight patients with SLE were selected on the basis of having been newly diagnosed and requiring high-dose prednisolone, including pulse therapy with methylprednisolone, as the initial treatment. All the patients initially underwent MRI at 3 months after the start of corticosteroid treatment to detect any early changes in the femoral head. These examinations were then performed again 3 months later. Laboratory parameters were evaluated at the start of steroid treatment and at 1 month thereafter. By 3 months after the start of corticosteroid treatment, silent ONFH was diagnosed by MRI in 21 patients (26.9 %), being bilateral in 11 patients and unilateral in 10. The occurrence of silent ONFH was not related to SLE disease activity index, serological activity, or renal function; it was also unrelated to body mass index (BMI), body surface area (BSA), and the initial dose of prednisolone per unit body weight. However, the total cholesterol level at 4 weeks after the start of steroid treatment tended to be higher in patients with silent ONFH. Patients with a higher triglyceride level showed a significantly higher frequency of silent ONFH both before (p = 0.002) and 4 weeks after (p = 0.036) steroid initiation.A high triglyceride level is an important risk factor for silent ONFH in patients with SLE, and large-scale epidemiologic surveys of such early events are needed in this patient population.

  20. Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Debridement and Impacted Bone Graft for the Treatment of Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fuqiang; Shi, Zhencai; Zhang, Qidong; Guo, Wanshou

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of impacted bone graft with or without recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). We examined the effect of bone-grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction, known as the “light bulb” approach, for the treatment of ONFH with a combination of artificial bone (Novobone) mixed with or without rhBMP-2. A total of 42 patients (72 hips) were followed-up from 5 to 7.67 years (average of 6.1 years). The patients with and without BMP were the first group (IBG+rhBMP-2) and the second group (IBG), respectively. The clinical effectiveness was evaluated by Harris hip score (HHS). The radiographic follow-up was evaluated by pre-and postoperative X-ray and CT scan. Excellent, good, and fair functions were obtained in 36, 12, and 7 hips, respectively. The survival rate was 81.8% and 71.8% in the first and second group, respectively. However, the survival rate was 90.3% in ARCO stage IIb, c, and only 34.6% in ARCO stage IIIa(P<0.05). It was concluded that good and excellent mid-term follow-up could be achieved in selected patients with ONFH treated with impacted bone graft operation. The rhBMP-2 might improve the clinical efficacy and quality of bone repair. PMID:24956102

  1. Core decompression or quadratus femoris muscle pedicle bone grafting for nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Deqiang; Li, Ming; Liu, Peilai; Zhang, Yuankai; Ma, Liang; Xu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background: The traditional management for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) includes core decompression (CD) and quadratus femoris muscle pedicle bone graft (QF-MPBG). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of CD and QF-MPBG on the patients with nontraumatic ONFH in an early stage. Materials and Methods: 39 patients (47 hips) with ONFH in an early stage (Ficat Stage I or II) were randomly divided into two groups according to random number table method. One group was treated with CD and cancellous bone grafting. Another group was treated QF-MPBG with cancellous bone grafting. The hip function was evaluated using Harris hip score (HHS). The repair of the femoral head was estimated through X-ray, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The surgical time and intraoperative blood loss was calculated. Results: All patients were followed for an average 2.5 years (range from 1.5 to 4 years). Two hips in CD group progressed into stage 3 and three hips in QF-MPBG group processed into stage 3. No patient accepted the THA at the last followup. The HHSs significantly increased in both groups after surgery (P < 0.05). No statistical differences were found between CD and QF-MPBG groups in postoperative HHSs at last followup (P > 0.05). X-ray and CT showed that the femoral head did not progress to collapse after operation in both groups. In addition, MRI showed that the edema signals decreased. However, the surgical time was longer in QF-MPBG group than that in CD group (P < 0.05). The intraoperative blood loss was more in QF-MPBG than that in CD group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The CD with bone graft could relieve hip pain, improve hip function with much lesser surgical trauma compared to QF-MPBG. Hence, the CD with bone graft should be generally used for the treatment of patients with an early stage (Ficat Stage I or II) ONFH. PMID:27904218

  2. Core decompression for juvenile osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Soto, José A; Price, Charles T

    2011-07-01

    Core decompression may be used as adjunct for treatment in some cases of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD). The primary application is for patients with onset at 12 years of age or older. We recommend classifying these older patients as idiopathic juvenile osteonecrosis and treating them similarly to adults with avascular necrosis. Juvenile osteonecrosis may benefit from core decompression combined with shelf acetabuloplasty during the early stages of necrosis. Younger children with LCPD may benefit from decompression by fenestration of the femoral head. Experience in adult-onset osteonecrosis and our early experience suggest that some patients may benefit from these adjunctive treatments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Total Hip Arthroplasty After Transtrochanteric Rotational Osteotomy for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Mean 10-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Yusuke; Seki, Taisuke; Morita, Daigo; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Okura, Toshiaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-05-18

    The objective of the present study was to investigate clinical, quality of life, and radiographic outcomes of patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty (THA) after transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). We performed a case-control study. The participants were 29 patients (34 hips) who underwent THA after TRO (TRO group). These patients had a mean age at surgery of 51.6 years (range, 30-72 years) and underwent postoperative follow-up for a mean period of 10.5 years (range, 3-19 years). For the control group (primary group), we included 58 patients (68 hips) who underwent primary THA for ONFH, matching for age and gender. The Harris Hip Scores at the last follow-up were significantly poorer in the TRO group than in the primary group. Similarly, preoperative and postoperative hip range of motion was significantly poorer in the TRO group than in the primary group. Quality of life (Short Form-36, Oxford Hip Score, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip Disease Evaluation Questionnaire) and complication rates were not significantly different between the groups. The survival rates at 10 years, with revision for any reason as the endpoint, were 81% in the TRO group and 91% in the primary group, showing no significant difference between the groups. The TRO group had a larger average postoperative leg length discrepancy and a higher rate of stem malalignment than the primary group. The clinical outcomes of THA after TRO for ONFH were poorer than those of primary THA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lesion size changes in osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a long-term prospective study using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng-chao; Zhang, Nian-fei; Wang, Bai-liang; Sun, Wei; Cheng, Li-ming; Liu, Zhao-hui

    2009-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is one of the intractable diseases. It is controversial whether the lesion size assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can change over time without any operative treatment. In this study, we used MRI to observe the lesion size changes of ONFH induced by corticosteroid administration in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. The study included 51 SARS patients (84 hips) with early-stage ONFH who did not receive any operative treatment and were diagnosed by MRI. All of the patients underwent MRI follow-ups. Each patient was evaluated on the basis of the lesion volume on MRI at every follow-up for further comparisons. At the first MRI scan, the mean lesion volume was 10.12 ± 8.05 cm3 (range: 0.39–41.62 cm3). At the mid-term follow-up (2.5 years), the mean lesion volume was 7.82 ± 7.59 cm3 (range: 0.11–39.65 cm3). At the final follow-up (five years), complete regression of the lesion was observed in six hips, and the mean lesion volume was 5.67 ± 6.58 cm3 (range: 0.00–31.47 cm3). Overall, the lesion volume was reduced by >15% in 80 hips, and only four hips with relatively larger lesion volumes showed no apparent reductions. The reduction in lesion size of ONFH observed on MRI is a slow, discontinuous and time-dependent process. PMID:19533123

  5. Combination analysis of NOS3, ABCB1 and IL23R polymorphisms with alcohol-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head risk in Chinese males.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Yang, Xuejun; Shi, Jianping; Zhao, Yan; Pan, Linlin; Zhou, Jinqiu; Wang, Guoqiang; Wang, Jianzhong

    2017-05-16

    Common variants of multiple genes played a crucial role in osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) onset which was proved by many previous reports. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in NOS3, ABCB1 and IL23R were related to individual differences in alcohol sensitivity and the development of alcohol-induced ONFH. In this case-control study, we evaluated 8 SNPs in three genes in the Chinese Han population including 355 male cases and 355 healthy male controls. These SNPs were genotyped by Sequenom MassARRAY RS1000. To identify their relationship with alcohol-induced ONFH susceptibility using χ2 test and genetic model analysis. We found an association with alcohol-induced ONFH susceptibility for 4 SNPs (rs743506, rs3918184, rs13233308 and rs6693831) in three genes after adjusted by age. The genotype "G/A" of rs743506 in NOS3 gene acts as a risk factor in genotype (P = 0.003), dominant (P = 0.048), recessive (P = 0.005) and additive model(P = 0.006); The genotype "T/C" of rs3918184 in NOS3 gene acts as a risk factor in genotype (P = 0.012) and recessive model (P = 0.009); The genotype "T/C" of rs13233308 in ABCB1 gene acts as a risk factor in genotype (P = 0.038) and additive model(P = 0.041); The genotype "T/C" of rs6693831 in IL23R gene acts as a protective factor in genotype model (P = 0.046). This study provides evidence for three alcohol-induced ONFH susceptibility genes (NOS3, ABCB1 and IL23R) in Chinese males and polymorphisms of them may be associated with alcohol-induced ONFH risk.

  6. Involvement of necroptosis, a newly recognized cell death type, in steroid-induced osteonecrosis in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Ichiseki, Toru; Ueda, Shusuke; Ueda, Yoshimichi; Tuchiya, Masanobu; Kaneuji, Ayumi; Kawahara, Norio

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the role of programmed necrosis (necroptosis), a newly recognized form of cell necrosis that has been implicated in the development of steroid-induced osteonecrosis. We used an osteonecrosis model in which 30 Japanese white rabbits each weighing 3.5kg were injected once with methylprednisolone at 20 mg/kg body weight into the right gluteal muscle. Ten animals killed 14 days thereafter were designated as S14d groups, while another 10 animals injected with necroptosis, a specific inhibitor of necrostatin-1 i.v. at 1.65mg/kg on the same day as the steroid were also killed on the 14th day and designated as SN14d group. As a control, 10 animals injected only with physiological saline were studied as N group. After the animals were sacrificed the bilateral femoral bone was examined histopathologically and the presence of osteonecrosis determined. Furthermore, animals subjected to the same treatment and killed on the 3rd day after drug administration were set up as S3d group and SN3d group, and Western blotting of Receptor-interacting protein ( RIP ) 1 and RIP3 in femoral bone performed. The osteonecrosis rate was 70% in S14d group, and 0% in both N and SN groups. In 2 of 10 animals in SN group fatty marrow was found. On Western blotting significantly increased expression of both RIP1 and RIP3 was noted in S3d group, confirming that Nec-1 was suppressed. Necroptosis mediated by RIP1 and RIP3 expression was thought to be implicated in the development of steroid-induced osteonecrosis. Also, by suppressing expression of RIP1 and 3 with the administration of Nec-1 the osteonecrosis rate was significantly decreased. These results suggest that necroptosis may have potential as a novel target for both elucidating the mechanisms underlying steroid-induced osteonecrosis and establishing more effective prophylactic countermeasures. PMID:28260985

  7. Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in a Person With Advanced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue Wen; Jiang, Dong Lei; Zhang, Dai; Wang, Xiao Bei; Yu, Xiao Tong

    2016-09-01

    This case report describes the first patient with avascular necrosis of the femoral head of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage IV, treated with radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. By contrast, previous studies demonstrated the efficacy of a single treatment of focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy in improving pain and Harris Hip Scale in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage I to III. The affected hip was treated with 6000 impulses of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy at 10 Hz and an intensity ranging from 2.5 to 4.0 bar at 7-day intervals for 24 mos. The Harris Hip Scale values were 33, 43, 56, 77, 81, 88, and 92 at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mos, respectively. The radiographs showed that the subluxation of the right hip was slightly aggravated. Joint effusion was reduced, bone marrow edema disappeared, the density became more uniform, and the gluteal muscles were more developed based on magnetic resonance imaging. Increased tracer uptake was evident along the joint margin and superolateral aspect of the head both before and after radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. This case report demonstrates the feasibility of long-term radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy in Association Research Circulation Osseous stage IV patients.

  8. Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy in a Person With Advanced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yue Wen; Jiang, Dong Lei; Zhang, Dai; Wang, Xiao Bei; Yu, Xiao Tong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This case report describes the first patient with avascular necrosis of the femoral head of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage IV, treated with radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. By contrast, previous studies demonstrated the efficacy of a single treatment of focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy in improving pain and Harris Hip Scale in patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head of Association Research Circulation Osseous stage I to III. The affected hip was treated with 6000 impulses of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy at 10 Hz and an intensity ranging from 2.5 to 4.0 bar at 7-day intervals for 24 mos. The Harris Hip Scale values were 33, 43, 56, 77, 81, 88, and 92 at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 mos, respectively. The radiographs showed that the subluxation of the right hip was slightly aggravated. Joint effusion was reduced, bone marrow edema disappeared, the density became more uniform, and the gluteal muscles were more developed based on magnetic resonance imaging. Increased tracer uptake was evident along the joint margin and superolateral aspect of the head both before and after radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. This case report demonstrates the feasibility of long-term radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy in Association Research Circulation Osseous stage IV patients. PMID:27003206

  9. Autologous Concentrated Bone Marrow Grafting for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Humeral Head: A Report of Five Shoulders in Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mishima, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Five shoulders in four patients affected by advanced osteonecrosis of the humeral head were treated with autologous concentrated bone marrow grafting. Bone marrow sample was aspirated from the iliac crests, concentrated by a centrifugation technique, and injected into the necrotic site. The shoulders were evaluated radiologically with X-ray scoring and clinically with measurement of range of motion and pain score (visual analogue scale, VAS). The mean follow-up period was 49.4 (range, 24–73) months. The concentration ratio of nucleated cells was calculated and the number of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) was estimated by a colony-forming assay. All four shoulders with stage 3 disease achieved joint sparing. One shoulder with stage 4 disease required replacement surgery. Clinical evaluation of the spared joints showed improvement in range of motion in two cases and deterioration in two cases. VAS scores were 0 after surgery in three cases. The mean concentration ratio was 2.73, and the mean number of transplanted MSC was 1125. The outcomes of autologous concentrated bone marrow grafting for advanced osteonecrosis of the humeral head were varied. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness and the indications of the present surgery. PMID:28713606

  10. Comparison of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and core decompression in treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Xu, Xian; Wu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The study aims to compare the clinical efficacy of core decompression (CD) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) on the patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). A detailed literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE, Springer, Elsevier Science Direct, Cochrane Library and Google scholar for all relevant papers published was performed. Pooled odds ratio (OR) or weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to evaluate the clinical efficacy of CD and BMMSC with the clinical outcome on the patients with ONFH. A total of 219 hips in 4 studies were indentified in this current meta-analysis. The OR of 2 separate studies consisting of 115 hips (CD group 63 hips; BMMSC group 52 hips) of patients were pooled and suggested BMMSC group had significantly less number of progressed vascularized bone grafting events than CD group (OR = 0.11; 95% CI: 0.03~0.43; P < 0.01). In addition, WMD of other 2 separate studies consisting of 104 hips (CD group 52 hips; BMMSC group 52 hips) in patients were pooled, and significant differences (P < 0.01) in Harris Hip Score (HHS) were observed between these two treatment groups at the end of follow-up study, BMMSC group had significantly better clinical outcome than CD group (WMD = 8.69; 95% CI: 3.76~13.62; P < 0.01). BMMSC may perform a better therapeutic effect than CD on the patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

  11. Cementless total hip arthroplasty with ceramic-on-ceramic bearing in patients younger than 45 years with femoral-head osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoo; Choi, Yoowang; Kim, Jun-Shik

    2010-12-01

    Despite improvements in the quality of alumina ceramics, osteolysis has been reported anecdotally after total hip arthroplasty (THA) with use of a contemporary alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes of THA using alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearing and to determine osteolysis using radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans in young patients. Consecutive primary cementless THA using alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearing were performed in 64 patients (93 hips) who were younger than 45 years of age with femoral-head osteonecrosis. There were 55 men (84 hips) and nine women (nine hips). Average age was 38.2 (range 24-45) years. Average follow-up was 11.1 (range 10-13) years. Preoperative Harris Hip Score was 52.9 (range 22-58) points, which improved to 96 (range 85-100) points at the final follow-up examination. Two of 93 hips (2%) had clicking or squeaking sound. No hip had revision or aseptic loosening. Radiographs and CT scans demonstrated that no acetabular or femoral osteolysis was detected in any hip at the latest follow-up. Contemporary cementless acetabular and femoral components with alumina-on-alumina ceramic bearing couples function well with no osteolysis at a ten year minimum and average of 11.1-year follow-up in this series of young patients with femoral-head osteonecrosis.

  12. Effect of Resveratrol on Preventing Steroid-induced Osteonecrosis in a Rabbit Model.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Ji-Liang; Weng, Xi-Sheng; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Guo, Shi-Gong

    2016-04-05

    Prevention of osteonecrosis (ON) has seldom been addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on preventing steroid-induced ON in rabbits. Seventy-two rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) NEC (ON) group: thirty rabbits were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) once, then with methylprednisolone (MPS) daily for 3 days; (2) PRE (prevention) group: thirty rabbits were given one dose of LPS, then MPS daily for 3 days, and resveratrol on day 0 and daily for 2 weeks; (3) RES (resveratrol) group: six rabbits were given resveratrol for 2 weeks but without LPS/MPS; (4) CON (control) group: six rabbits were given alcohol for 2 weeks but without LPS/MPS. Levels of plasma tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), thrombomodulin (TM), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), maximum enhancement (ME) by magnetic resonance imaging, and ON incidence were evaluated. The PRE group had a lower ON incidence than the NEC group, but with no significant differences at 2 weeks and 12 weeks. The RES and CON groups did not develop ON. TM and VEGF were significantly higher in the NEC group compared with the PRE group at weeks 1, 2, and 4 (TM: 1 week, P = 0.029; 2 weeks, P = 0.005; and 4 weeks, P = 0.047; VEGF: 1 week, P = 0.039; 2 weeks, P = 0.021; 4 weeks, P = 0.014), but the difference disappeared at 12 weeks. The levels of t-PA and PAI-1 were not significantly different between the NEC and PRE groups. The TM, t-PA, PAI-1, and VEGF concentrations in the RES and CON groups did not change over time. Compared to the baseline, ME in the NEC group decreased significantly (P = 0.025) at week 1, increased significantly (P = 0.021) at week 2, and was decreased at week 12. The variance was insignificant in the PRE group. Resveratrol may improve blood supply to bone in a rabbit model of ON of the femoral head via anti-inflammatory effects to protect the vascular endothelium and reduce thrombosis.

  13. Results of Total Hip Arthroplasty after Core Decompression with Tantalum Rod for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun-Woo; Kim, Do-Youn; Lee, Young-Min; Eshnazarov, Kamolhuja Eshnazarovich; Yoon, Taek-Rim

    2016-01-01

    Background Early stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) has many treatment options including core decompression with implantation of a tantalum rod. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes and potential complications during conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) in such patients. Methods Six male patients (8 hips) underwent THA subsequent to removing a tantalum rod (group I) from April 2010 to November 2011. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these patients. We enrolled 12 age- and sex-matched patients (16 hips) during the same period, who had undergone primary THA without a previous operation as the control group (group II). All patients were followed for at least 3 years. We checked the Harris hip score (HHS), operative time, and volume of blood loss. Radiological results, including inclination, anteversion of the acetabular cup, presence of periprosthetic osteolysis, and subsidence of femoral stem were checked at the last follow-up. Results The mean preoperative HHS values were 56.5 (range, 50 to 62) and 59.1 (range, 42 to 70) in groups I and II, respectively. The HHS improved to 96.0 (range, 93 to 100) and 97.6 (range, 93 to 100), respectively, at the 3-year follow-up (p = 0.172). Mean operation time was 98.8 minutes (range, 70 to 120 minutes) in group I and 77.5 minutes (range, 60 to 115 minutes) in group II (p = 0.006). Total blood loss volumes were 1,193.8 mL (range, 960 to 1,360 mL) and 944.1 mL (range, 640 to 1,280 mL) in groups I and II, respectively (p = 0.004). No significant differences in inclination or anteversion of acetabular cup and no evidence of osteolysis or subsidence of the femoral stem were reported in either group in radiological follow-up results. However, one case of squeaking occurred in group I during the follow-up. Conclusions The two groups showed no clinical or radiological differences except extended operative time and increased blood loss. However, the incidence of

  14. Results of Total Hip Arthroplasty after Core Decompression with Tantalum Rod for Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun-Woo; Park, Kyung-Soon; Kim, Do-Youn; Lee, Young-Min; Eshnazarov, Kamolhuja Eshnazarovich; Yoon, Taek-Rim

    2016-03-01

    Early stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) has many treatment options including core decompression with implantation of a tantalum rod. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes and potential complications during conversion total hip arthroplasty (THA) in such patients. Six male patients (8 hips) underwent THA subsequent to removing a tantalum rod (group I) from April 2010 to November 2011. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of these patients. We enrolled 12 age- and sex-matched patients (16 hips) during the same period, who had undergone primary THA without a previous operation as the control group (group II). All patients were followed for at least 3 years. We checked the Harris hip score (HHS), operative time, and volume of blood loss. Radiological results, including inclination, anteversion of the acetabular cup, presence of periprosthetic osteolysis, and subsidence of femoral stem were checked at the last follow-up. The mean preoperative HHS values were 56.5 (range, 50 to 62) and 59.1 (range, 42 to 70) in groups I and II, respectively. The HHS improved to 96.0 (range, 93 to 100) and 97.6 (range, 93 to 100), respectively, at the 3-year follow-up (p = 0.172). Mean operation time was 98.8 minutes (range, 70 to 120 minutes) in group I and 77.5 minutes (range, 60 to 115 minutes) in group II (p = 0.006). Total blood loss volumes were 1,193.8 mL (range, 960 to 1,360 mL) and 944.1 mL (range, 640 to 1,280 mL) in groups I and II, respectively (p = 0.004). No significant differences in inclination or anteversion of acetabular cup and no evidence of osteolysis or subsidence of the femoral stem were reported in either group in radiological follow-up results. However, one case of squeaking occurred in group I during the follow-up. The two groups showed no clinical or radiological differences except extended operative time and increased blood loss. However, the incidence of squeaking (1 of 8 hips) was higher, as

  15. iNOS expression and osteocyte apoptosis in idiopathic, non-traumatic osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Kalhor, Ali; Lu, Shifeier; Crawford, Ross; Ni, Jiang-Dong; Xiao, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Non-traumatic osteonecrosis is a progressive disease with multiple etiologies. It affects younger individuals more and more, often leading to total hip arthroplasty. We investigated whether there is a correlation between inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and osteocyte apoptosis in non-traumatic osteonecrosis. Patients and methods We collected and studied 20 human idiopathic, non-traumatic osteonecrosis femoral heads. Subchondral bone samples in the non-sclerotic region (n = 30), collected from osteoarthritis patients, were used as controls. Spontaneously hypertensive rats were used as a model for osteonecrosis in the study. We used scanning electron microscopy, TUNEL assay, and immunohistochemical staining to study osteocyte changes and apoptosis. Results The morphology of osteocytes in the areas close to the necrotic region changed and the number of apoptotic osteocytes increased in comparison with the same region in control groups. The expression of iNOS and cytochrome C in osteocytes increased while Bax expression was not detectable in osteonecrosis samples. Using spontaneously hypertensive rats, we found a positive correlation between iNOS expression and osteocyte apoptosis in the osteonecrotic region. iNOS inhibitor (aminoguanidine) added to the drinking water for 5 weeks reduced the production of iNOS and osteonecrosis compared to a control group without aminoguanidine. Interpretation Our findings show that increased iNOS expression can lead to osteocyte apopotosis in idiopathic, non-traumatic osteonecrosis and that an iNOS inhibitor may prevent the progression of the disease. PMID:25191931

  16. Cementless total hip arthroplasty using Biolox®delta ceramic-on-ceramic bearing in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Jae; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Dong-Wook; Moon, Young-Wan; Park, Youn-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) using a 32 mm or larger Biolox®delta ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) bearing in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head after a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. We retrospectively analysed 44 patients (53 hips) who underwent cementless THA using Biolox®delta CoC bearing. There were 33 men (40 hips) and 11 women (13 hips) with the mean age of 49 years. A 36 mm head was used in 42 (79%) of 53 hips and a 32 mm head was used in 11 hips with smaller acetabular shells. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.3 years (range 5-6 years). The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 50 points preoperatively to 97 points at final follow-up (p<0.001). All acetabular and femoral components showed radiographic evidence of osseointegration. No osteolysis was observed. No patients sustained ceramic fracture. An audible hip noise was identified in 2 (4%) of the 53 hips (1 squeaking and 1 clicking). Survivorship with revision for any reason at a minimum of 5 years was 100% in the best-case scenario and 95 % in the worst-case scenario. The minimum 5-year results of cementless THA using a 32 mm or larger Biolox®delta CoC bearing in patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head were encouraging with excellent survivorship. However, it was also found that the risk of noise development remains even for the new alumina matrix composite ceramic.

  17. A novel animal model to study non-spontaneous bisphosphonates osteonecrosis of jaw.

    PubMed

    Biasotto, Matteo; Chiandussi, Silvia; Zacchigna, Serena; Moimas, Silvia; Dore, Franca; Pozzato, Gabriele; Cavalli, Fabio; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Contardo, Luca; Giacca, Mauro; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a novel animal model of bisphosphonates-associated osteonecrosis, which realistically recapitulates the same pathological human condition. Five Wistar rats were given intravenous zoledronic acid 0.04 mg once a week for 5 weeks. After 2 weeks, the animals underwent the extraction of an upper molar, producing a 4 mm-diameter bone defect on the same site. After 7 weeks from the extraction, the animals were clinically examined and a bone scintigraphy was carried out. After an additional week, the rats were killed and both Computerized Tomography and histological analysis were performed. Five rats, not treated with zoledronic acid and exposed to the same surgical treatment, were used as controls. At 7 weeks after the extraction, all the rats treated with zoledronic acid showed expansion of the defect and bone exposure. These features were confirmed by bone scintigraphy. The rats of the control group demonstrated epithelialization of the bone defect and a normal uptake of the contrast medium during the scan. The Computerized Tomography scan disclosed irregularity of the cortical margin and bone destruction, which were not evident in the control group. On microscopy, the samples showed necrotic bone, loss of osteocytes and peripheral resorption without inflammatory infiltrate, while the controls showed normal bone healing. The rat treated with zoledronic acid can be considered a novel, reliable and reproducible animal model to understand better the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis of the jaw and to develop a therapeutic approach.

  18. Transphyseal osseous bridges in experimental osteonecrosis of the femoral head of the rat. Histologic study of the bony bridges connecting the epiphyseal with the metaphyseal bony trabeculae through gaps in the physeal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Peskin, B; Shupak, A; Misselevich, I; Zinman, C; Levin, D; Jacob, Z; Reis, D N; Boss, J H

    2001-07-01

    In view of the lifelong persistence of the physis, the femoral head of rats may serve to model Perthes disease and slipped capital femoral epiphysis. To produce osteonecrosis, the blood supply of one femoral head of 133, 6-month-old animals was severed by circumferentially incising the periosteum of the neck and cutting the ligamentum teres. The rats were killed 7 days to 90 days postoperatively. Associated with resorption of the necrotic bone and marrow, remodeling of the epiphysis was characterized by an ingrowth of vascularized fibrous tissue, formation of new bone and some cartilage, architectural deformation and flattening of the head. In 22 of 83 rats killed 30 days or more postoperatively, gaps in the continuity of the physeal cartilage were occupied by osseous bridges, connecting newly formed epiphyseal bony trabeculae with either the preexisting or newly formed metaphyseal osseous trabeculae. This healing mode may follow ischemic death of physeal chondrocytes or be owing to another mechanism, e.g., release of mediatory substances of inflammation. These findings raise the possibility that fixation of the healing epiphysis of a child's previously necrotic femoral head to the metaphysis occurs by transphyseal osseous growth in cases in which the physis is involved in the necrotic process.

  19. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: model and diagnosis with cone beam computerized tomography.

    PubMed

    Barragan-Adjemian, C; Lausten, L; Ang, D B; Johnson, M; Katz, J; Bonewald, L F

    2009-01-01

    Intravenous bisphosphonate (BP) therapy has become the standard of care for the treatment of cancers that metastasize to bone. BPs are associated with osteonecrosis of alveolar bones, a condition known as osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). The incidence or pathogenesis of ONJ is largely unknown. The lesions are characterized by areas of exposed necrotic bone that do not heal after 8 weeks in the absence of radiation to the head and neck. ONJ lesions have been recalcitrant to conventional therapies. Lesions in cancer patients treated with BPs develop in association with periodontal disease, tooth extraction and/or in association with increased mechanical force due to partial/complete dentures. We hypothesized that intravenous BPs in cancer patients impair normal bone remodeling, thereby increasing the incidence of osteonecrotic lesions and that these lesions can be detected using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). From CBCTs taken at the University of Missouri at Kansas City School of Dentistry, 26 subjects had a cancer diagnosis and were on BP therapy. From these 26 subjects, 18 presented visible, exposed necrotic bone. We observed both sclerotic and radiolucent lesions. Lesions could be detected and measured in reconstructed images where most were found to expand to large areas of the bone. We were able to identify necrotic bodies or 'involucrums' within the ONJ lesions, suggesting that this could be the mechanism for the formation of a clinically visible sequestrum. We propose that CBCT can potentially identify and follow the progression of both pre- and postclinical lesions in ONJ patients, allowing better diagnosis and assessment of disease status. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis model.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Akira; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Saito, Masazumi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Hayashi, Shigeki; Ishida, Masashi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis rabbit model by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Steroid-induced osteonecrosis was produced by single intramuscular injection of methylprednisolone in 15 rabbits. Eight rabbits underwent PEMF stimulation (PEMF group) and seven did not (control group). DCE-MRI was performed before PEMF stimulation, immediately before steroid administration, and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after steroid administration. Regions of interest were set in the bilateral proximal femora. Enhancement ratio (ER), initial slope (IS), and area under the curve (AUC) were analyzed. ER, IS, and AUC in the control group significantly decreased after steroid administration compared with before administration (P<0.05). In PEMF group, IS significantly decreased; however, ER and AUC showed no significant differences after steroid administration compared with before. ER and IS in PEMF group were higher than in control group until 10th day, and AUC was higher until 5th day after steroid administration (P<0.05). PEMF stimulation restrains the decrease in blood flow after steroid administration.

  1. Efficacy of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy for osteonecrosis of the femoral head: A three-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Qu, Zhiguo; Yin, Xiaoguang; Shang, Chunyu; Ao, Qiang; Gu, Yongquan; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This is a retrospective analysis of the clinical effects of transplant of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (hUC-MSCs) for the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The biological characteristics of hUC-MSCs were assessed using flow cytometry. Nine eligible patients were enrolled in the study as they adhered to the Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification of stage II–IIIa, and hUC-MSCs were grafted by intra-arterial infusion. Organize effective perfusion was assessed using the oxygen delivery index (ODI). The results showed that the ODI was increased at three days post-operation. The MRI results revealed that at 12 and 24 months after treatment, the necrotic volume of the femoral heads was significantly reduced. No obvious abnormalities were observed. Taken together, these data indicate that intra-arterially infused hUC-MSCs migrate into the necrotic field of femoral heads and differentiate into osteoblasts, thus improving the necrosis of femoral heads. This finding suggested that intra-arterial infusion of hUC-MSCs MSCs is a feasible and relatively safe method for the treatment of femoral head necrosis. PMID:27634376

  2. Higher Levels of Serum Triglycerides were Associated with Postoperative Deep Vein Thrombosis After Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Nontraumatic Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Dai, Xiaoyu; Yao, Yao; Shi, Dongquan; Chen, Dongyang; Dai, Jin; Teng, Huajian; Jiang, Qing

    2016-03-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the association of serum lipids and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) risk following total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). A total of 224 nontraumatic ONFH patients were enrolled. Serum levels of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were detected preoperatively. All the patients underwent unilateral lower extremity venography on postoperative days 3 to 5 for DVT screening. In females, patients who were venogram positive for DVT had a higher serum TG level than those who were venogram negative for DVT (P = .029) and a higher TG level was associated with an increased DVT risk (P = .042). Serum TG levels considerably affect DVT risk after THA in female nontraumatic ONFH patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Effects of non-weight bearing and hyperbaric oxygen therapy in vascular deprivation-induced osteonecrosis of the rat femoral head.

    PubMed

    Peskin, B; Shupak, A; Levin, D; Norman, D; Jacob, Z; Boss, J F; Misselevich, I; Reis, D N; Zinman, C

    2001-01-01

    We examined the role of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO2) combined with non-weight bearing (NWB) in the treatment of vascular deprivation-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head in the rat. Group 1 included 16 rats treated by a combination of NWB and HBO2. Twenty animals treated by NWB alone (group 2), and 18 rats which received no treatment (group 3), served as the control groups. Maximal benefit of HBO2 was observed on Day 30 of the study. The femoral heads were less deformed in group 1 animals (P = 0.07). Preservation of the femoral heads was observed in a larger proportion of the HBO2-treated animals (P = 0.06). A smaller proportion of high-grade new bone formation was observed, and more animals demonstrated well-regenerated hematopoietic tissue (P = 0.08). The tendency for less deformation of the femoral head in the HBO2-treated group might be a predictor of better function of the hipjoint.

  4. What Is Osteonecrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteonecrosis PDF Version Size: 59 KB Audio Version Time: 10:07 Size: 9.5 MB November 2014 What Is Osteonecrosis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Osteonecrosis is a ...

  5. Prevalence of Nontraumatic Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head and its Associated Risk Factors in the Chinese Population: Results from a Nationally Representative Survey.

    PubMed

    Zhao, De-Wei; Yu, Mang; Hu, Kai; Wang, Wei; Yang, Lei; Wang, Ben-Jie; Gao, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Yong-Ming; Xu, Yong-Qing; Wei, Yu-Shan; Tian, Si-Miao; Yang, Fan; Wang, Nan; Huang, Shi-Bo; Xie, Hui; Wei, Xiao-Wei; Jiang, Hai-Shen; Zang, Yu-Qiang; Ai, Jun; Chen, Yuan-Liang; Lei, Guang-Hua; Li, Yu-Jin; Tian, Geng; Li, Zong-Sheng; Cao, Yong; Ma, Li

    2015-11-05

    Nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (NONFH) is a debilitating disease that represents a significant financial burden for both individuals and healthcare systems. Despite its significance, however, its prevalence in the Chinese general population remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of NONFH and its associated risk factors in the Chinese population. A nationally representative survey of 30,030 respondents was undertaken from June 2012 to August 2013. All participants underwent a questionnaire investigation, physical examination of hip, and bilateral hip joint X-ray and/or magnetic resonance imaging examination. Blood samples were taken after overnight fasting to test serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels. We then used multivariate logistic regression analysis to investigate the associations between various metabolic, demographic, and lifestyle-related variables and NONFH. NONFH was diagnosed in 218 subjects (0.725%) and the estimated NONFH cases were 8.12 million among Chinese people aged 15 years and over. The prevalence of NONFH was significantly higher in males than in females (1.02% vs. 0.51%, χ2 = 24.997, P < 0.001). Among NONFH patients, North residents were subjected to higher prevalence of NONFH than that of South residents (0.85% vs. 0.61%, χ 2 = 5.847, P = 0.016). Our multivariate regression analysis showed that high blood levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and non-HDL-cholesterol, male, urban residence, family history of osteonecrosis of the femoral head, heavy smoking, alcohol abuse and glucocorticoid intake, overweight, and obesity were all significantly associated with an increased risk of NONFH. Our findings highlight that NONFH is a significant public health challenge in China and underscore the need for policy measures on the national level. Furthermore, NONFH shares a number of risk factors with

  6. Fate of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells following autologous transplantation in a rabbit model of osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Mishima, Hajime; Gao, Ran; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu; Aoto, Katsuya; Li, Meihua; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ogawa, Takeshi; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    Internalizing quantum dots (i-QDs) are a useful tool for tracking cells in vivo in models of tissue regeneration. We previously synthesized i-QDs by conjugating QDs with a unique internalizing antibody against a heat shock protein 70 family stress chaperone. In the present study, i-QDs were used to label rabbit mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) that were then transplanted into rabbits to assess differentiation potential in an osteonecrosis model. The i-QDs were taken up by bone marrow-derived MSCs collected from the iliac of 12-week-old Japanese white rabbits that were positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)81 and negative for CD34 and human leukocyte antigen DR. The average rate of i-QD internalization was 93.3%. At 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after transplantation, tissue repair was evaluated histologically and by epifluorescence and electron microscopy. The i-QDs were detected at the margins of the drill holes and in the necrotized bone trabecular. There was significant colocalization of the i-QD signal in transplanted cells and markers of osteoblast and mineralization at 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-transplantation, while i-QDs were detected in areas of mineralization at 12 and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Moreover, i-QDs were observed in osteoblasts in regenerated tissue by electron microscopy, demonstrating that the tissue was derived from transplanted cells. These results indicate that transplanted MSCs can differentiate into osteoblasts and induce tissue repair in an osteonecrosis model and can be tracked over the long term by i-QD labeling. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Exploratory Clinical Trial for Idiopathic Osteonecrosis of Femoral Head by Cultured Autologous Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Augmented with Vascularized Bone Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Goto, Koji; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Ueda, Michiko; Kasai, Yasunari; Maekawa, Taira; Tada, Harue; Teramukai, Satoshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic osteonecrosis of femoral head (ION) is a painful disorder that progresses to collapse of the femoral head and destruction of the hip joint. Although its precise pathology remains unknown, the loss of blood supply causing the loss of living bone-forming cells is a hallmark of the pathophysiology of osteonecrosis. Transplantation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is a promising tool for regenerating the musculoskeletal system. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of transplantation of cultured autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs mixed with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) in combination with vascularized bone grafts for the treatment of advanced stage ION in a clinical trial. Ten patients with stage 3 ION were enrolled in this study. Autologous bone marrow-derived MSCs were cultured with autologous serum, and cells (0.5–1.0×108) were transplanted after mixing with β-TCP granules in combination with vascularized iliac bone grafts. Patients were assessed 24 months after treatment. The primary and secondary endpoints were progression of the radiological stage and changes in bone volume at the femoral head, and clinical score, respectively. Nine of ten patients completed the protocol, seven of whom remained at stage 3, and the remaining two cases progressed to stage 4. The average bone volume increased from 56.5±8.5 cm3 to 57.7±10.6 cm3. The average clinical score according to the Japan Orthopaedic Association improved from 65.6±25.5 points to 87.9±19.0 points. One severe adverse event was observed, which was not related to the clinical trial. Although the efficacy of cell transplantation was still to be determined, all procedures were successfully performed and some young patients with extensive necrotic lesions with pain demonstrated good bone regeneration with amelioration of symptoms. Further improvements in our method using MSCs and the proper selection of patients will open a new approach for the

  8. Treatment with acetylsalicylic acid prevents short to mid-term radiographic progression of nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Albers, Anthony; Carli, Alberto; Routy, Bertrand; Harvey, Edward J.; Séguin, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Background Nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a progressive disease in young adults producing substantial morbidity and frequently resulting in total hip arthroplasty. Although hip-preserving surgical procedures represent the current mainstay of treatment for early disease, medical therapies targeting specific pathways in the ONFH pathogenesis could help prevent disease progression while producing less morbidity. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is a promising alternative to other therapies for ONFH owing to its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic mechanisms of action and its relatively benign side effect profile. Methods We followed a prospective cohort of 10 patients (12 hips) with precollapse ONFH who were given ASA to prevent disease progression. Their outcomes were compared with those of a historic control group taken from the literature. Results Progression occurred in 1 of 12 (8%) patients taking ASA compared with 30 of 45 (66.6%) controls (p = 0.002) at a mean follow-up of 3.7 years. Patients taking ASA also tended to exhibit decreased femoral head involvement at the end of therapy. Conclusion This hypothesis-generating study leads us to believe that ASA may be a simple and effective treatment option for delaying disease progression in patients with early-stage ONFH. PMID:26011853

  9. Transplantation of iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    CUI, GUOFENG; WEI, RONG; HOU, CHUNYING; BI, ZHENGGANG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and clinical application of iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels for the treatment of Association for Research on Osseous Circulation (ARCO) stage II–III osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in young adults. In total, 35 patients with ONFH at ARCO stage II–III were treated with iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels. Patients were classified according to etiological factors and ARCO stages. Postoperative clinical assessment was accomplished with Harris hip scores (HHSs), and ARCO stage change was evaluated with imaging. All 35 patients completed the follow-up. The HHS results indicated that hip function was improved significantly from the preoperative status of 56.53±7.66 points to the postoperative status of 87.49±5.89 points (P<0.0001). Postoperative imaging displayed apparent osteogenesis and satisfactory structural remodeling in 32 patients, presenting no staging progress. Three patients exhibited mild collapse (<2 mm) compared with preoperative collapse. No patients developed osteoarthritis or required total hip arthroplasty. The clinical success rate was 91.43%. Iliac bone flaps pedicled with sartorius muscular fascia around superficial circumflex iliac vessels is a feasible means for treating ARCO stage II–III ONFH in young adults, who have abundant blood circulation, good osteogenesis and function of the hip. It is also an effective means for retaining the femoral head. PMID:27284301

  10. Outcome of transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy for posttraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head with a mean follow-up of 12.3 years.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the outcomes of applying transtrochanteric rotational osteotomy (TRO) for posttraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ON). We retrospectively reviewed 28 hips in 28 patients (male, n = 17; female n = 11) with a mean age of 34.8 years (12-61 years) at the time of TRO. Transtrochanteric anterior rotational osteotomy (ARO) was used when the lesion was localized on the anterior aspect of the femoral head, and transtrochanteric posterior rotational osteotomy (PRO) was indicated in patients with lesions limited to the posterior aspect of the femoral head. The mean follow-up period was 12.3 years (5.0-21.3 years). We investigated the patients' clinical and radiological factors, including age, sex, body mass index, preoperative Harris Hip Score (HHS), type of antecedent trauma, preoperative stage, and postoperative intact ratio (the ratio of the intact articular surface of the femoral head to the weight-bearing surface of the acetabulum). We divided the patients into a hip-survival group and a conversion-to-total hip arthroplasty (THA) group and then compared these factors between the two groups. At the final follow-up, 22 hips had survived with a mean HHS of 85.8. The remaining six hips underwent THA at a mean of 10.2 years after TRO. The preoperative stage was correlated with hip survival. Furthermore, the postoperative intact ratio was significantly lower in the conversion-to-THA group. Based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, a ratio of less than 33.6 % was found to be associated with the need to convert to THA. TRO to correct posttraumatic ON resulted in favorable midterm results. The possible risk factors for conversion to THA were an advanced preoperative stage and a postoperative intact ratio of less than 33.6 %.

  11. Population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling for assessing risk of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw

    PubMed Central

    Sedghizadeh, Parish P.; Jones, Allan C.; LaVallee, Chris; Jelliffe, Roger W.; Le, Anh D.; Lee, Peter; Kiss, Andrew; Neely, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that patients with bisphosphonate (BP)-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) accumulate higher levels of BP in bone than those without BRONJ. Study Design Using the Pmetrics® package and published data, we designed a population pharmacokinetic model of pamidronate concentration in plasma and bone and derived a toxic bone BP threshold of 0.2 mM. With the model, and using patient individual BP duration and bone mineral content estimated from lean body weight, we calculated bone BP levels in 153 subjects. Results Mean bone BP in 69 BRONJ cases was higher than in 84 controls (0.20 vs. 0.10 mM, P<0.001) consistent with the toxic bone threshold of 0.2 mM. BRONJ was also associated with longer duration BP therapy (5.3 vs. 2.7 years, P<0.001), older age (76 vs. 70 years, P<0.001), and Asian race (49% vs. 14%, P<0.001). Conclusions Our model accurately discriminated BRONJ cases from controls, among patients on BP therapy. PMID:23246224

  12. Prevention of osteonecrosis of the jaw by mucoperiosteal coverage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, J; Agholme, F; Aspenberg, P

    2013-05-01

    There is evidence for a link between the use of systemic bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). This condition has the appearance of chronic osteomyelitis, and antibiotics prevent the development of ONJ in animal models. Clinically, ONJ can sometimes be treated successfully by mucoperiosteal coverage. If ONJ is indeed primarily caused by bacterial infection, immediate coverage of the extraction alveolus might reduce the risk of ONJ developing in risk patients. Therefore, we studied whether immediate mucoperiosteal coverage after tooth extraction could prevent the development of ONJ in a rat model. Thirty rats were randomly allocated to three groups (10 in each): (1) group I (controls): extraction, no drug treatment; (2) group II (non-coverage): extraction, dexamethasone plus alendronate; (3) group III (coverage): extraction, dexamethasone plus alendronate, plus coverage with a mucoperiosteal flap. Rats were examined for macroscopic ONJ-like wounds after 2 weeks. All animals in the non-coverage group developed large ONJ-like changes. The coverage and control groups showed an intact overlying mucosa in all rats. Findings were confirmed with histology. Bisphosphonates and dexamethasone caused ONJ-like lesions after tooth extraction in a rat model. This was prevented by immediate mucoperiosteal coverage. The risk of ONJ in patients using bisphosphonates might be reduced by mucoperiosteal coverage after tooth extraction.

  13. Collar Osteophytes Mimicking Osteonecrosis in Planar Bone Scintigraphy and Usefulness of SPECT/CT Images.

    PubMed

    Juang, Jr-Jian; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Tsai, Shih-Chuan; Lin, Wan-Yu

    2017-03-01

    The use of prednisolone is one major risk factor for osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Bone scintigraphy can be a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis. We present a case who had collar osteophytes at the bilateral femoral heads, which mimicked osteonecrosis in the planar bone scintigram. An SPECT/CT scan avoided this pitfall and increased the diagnostic accuracy for osteonecrosis.

  14. A Model for Osteonecrosis of the Jaw with Zoledronate Treatment following Repeated Major Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Howie, R. Nicole; Borke, James L.; Kurago, Zoya; Daoudi, Asma; Cray, James; Zakhary, Ibrahim E.; Brown, Tara L.; Raley, J. Nathan; Tran, Loan T.; Messer, Regina; Medani, Fardous; Elsalanty, Mohammed E.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop a reproducible rat model for post-traumatic bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). In our previous studies using dental extraction as an inducing factor, only 30% - 60% of zoledronate-treated animals fulfilled the definition of clinical BRONJ. We modified the zoledronate regimen and introduced repeated surgical extraction to illicit quantifiable BRONJ in all animals. Eighty retired-breeder female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided between the treatment (IV zoledronate; 80 μg/kg/week for 13 weeks) and control (saline) groups. On week 13, the left mandibular first molar was surgically extracted, followed by the second molar a week later. Animals were euthanized at 1-week, 2-weeks, and 8-weeks following extraction. The occurrence and severity of BRONJ were scored in each animal based on gross and MicroCT analysis. Parameters of bone formation and osteoclast functions at the extraction site were compared between groups. All zoledronate-treated animals developed a severe case of BRONJ that fulfilled the clinical definition of the condition in humans. Osteoclast attachment continued to be defective eight weeks after stopping the treatment. There were no signs of kidney or liver toxicity. Our data confirmed that repeated surgical extraction (major trauma) by itself consistently precipitated massive bone necrosis in ZA-treated animals, eliminating the need to induce pre-existing infection or comorbidity. These results will be the basis for further studies examining the in-vivo pathogenesis and prevention of BRONJ. PMID:26186665

  15. Rehabilitation program after mesenchymal stromal cell transplantation augmented by vascularized bone grafts for idiopathic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tomoki; Fujita, Yasuko; Madoba, Katsuyuki; Nankaku, Manabu; Yamada, Minoru; Tomita, Motoko; Goto, Koji; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Shuichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2015-03-01

    To determine the feasibility and safety of implementing a 12-week rehabilitation program after mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation augmented by vascularized bone grafting for idiopathic osteonecrosis (ION) of the femoral head. A prospective case series. University clinical research laboratory. Participants (N=10) with ION who received MSC transplantation augmented by vascularized bone grafting. A 12-week exercise program, which included range-of-motion (ROM) exercises, muscle-strengthening exercises, and aerobic training. Measures of ROM, muscle strength, Timed Up and Go test, and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) were collected before surgery and again at 6 and 12 months after surgery. All participants completed the 12-week program. External rotation ROM as well as extensor and abductor muscle strength significantly improved 6 months after treatment compared with that before treatment (P<.05). Significant improvements were also seen in physical function, role physical, and bodily pain subgroup scores of the SF-36 (P<.05). No serious adverse events occurred. This study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of a multiplex rehabilitation program after MSC transplantation and provides support for further study on the benefits of rehabilitation programs in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head using porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites to suppress reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guoying; Niu, Kerun; Zhou, Feng; Li, Buxiao; Kang, Yingjie; Liu, Xijian; Hu, Junqing; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiugen; Yi, Chengqing; Wang, Qian

    2017-03-01

    Reducing oxidative stress (ROS) have been demonstrated effective for steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (steroid-induced ONFH). Selenium (Se) plays an important role in suppressing oxidative stress and has huge potential in ONFH treatments. However the Se has a narrow margin between beneficial and toxic effects which make it hard for therapy use in vivo. In order to make the deficiency up, a control release of Se (Se@SiO2) were realized by nanotechnology modification. Porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites have favorable biocompatibility and can reduced the ROS damage effectively. In vitro, the cck-8 analysis, terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) stain and flow cytometry analysis showed rare negative influence by porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites but significantly protective effect against H2O2 by reducing ROS level (detected by DCFH-DA). In vivo, the biosafety of porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites were confirmed by the serum biochemistry, the ROS level in serum were significantly reduced and the curative effect were confirmed by Micro CT scan, serum Elisa assay (inflammatory factors), Western blotting (quantitative measurement of ONFH) and HE staining. It is expected that the porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites may prevent steroid-induced ONFH by reducing oxidative stress.

  17. Treatment of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head using porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites to suppress reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guoying; Niu, Kerun; Zhou, Feng; Li, Buxiao; Kang, Yingjie; Liu, Xijian; Hu, Junqing; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiugen; Yi, Chengqing; Wang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Reducing oxidative stress (ROS) have been demonstrated effective for steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (steroid-induced ONFH). Selenium (Se) plays an important role in suppressing oxidative stress and has huge potential in ONFH treatments. However the Se has a narrow margin between beneficial and toxic effects which make it hard for therapy use in vivo. In order to make the deficiency up, a control release of Se (Se@SiO2) were realized by nanotechnology modification. Porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites have favorable biocompatibility and can reduced the ROS damage effectively. In vitro, the cck-8 analysis, terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) stain and flow cytometry analysis showed rare negative influence by porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites but significantly protective effect against H2O2 by reducing ROS level (detected by DCFH-DA). In vivo, the biosafety of porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites were confirmed by the serum biochemistry, the ROS level in serum were significantly reduced and the curative effect were confirmed by Micro CT scan, serum Elisa assay (inflammatory factors), Western blotting (quantitative measurement of ONFH) and HE staining. It is expected that the porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites may prevent steroid-induced ONFH by reducing oxidative stress. PMID:28256626

  18. Study on correlation between bone marrow edema, stage of necrosis and area ratio of necrosis with the hip pain grading in nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Jianchuan, Wang; Lei, Yang; Benjie, Wang; Dewei, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the correlation between bone marrow edema, stage of necrosis, and area ratio of necrosis with the hip pain grading in non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Bone marrow edema grading at all levels and the hip pain grade differences were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Bone marrow edema grading increased by levels of 0, 1, and 2, whereas average pain rating increased as well to 40.73, 104.66 and 143.49. I ~ III period stage of necrosis and the hip pain grade difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001), with the average grade progress pain stage by the death of a rank gradually increased, I period, II period, III period was 57.00, 88.58 and 120.62, respectively. Area ratio of necrosis between 0 ~ 3 were positively correlated with pain, compared the two was statistically significant (P < 0.001), and with the degree of pathological changes is aggravating, increase the average rank of levels of pain. 0, 1, 2 and 3 are 36.88, 98.03, 123.87 and 151.93 respectively. We can choose the treatment method and evaluate treatment effect by considering a patients’ degree of bone marrow edema, stage of necrosis and area ratio of necrosis.

  19. Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Associated with Tantalum Rod Implantation and Vascularized Iliac Grafting for the Treatment of End-Stage Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Baoyi; Wang, Benjie; Yang, Lei; Xie, Hui; Huang, Shibo; Zhang, Yao; Wei, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Tantalum rod implantation with vascularized iliac grafting has been reported to be an effective method for the treatment of young patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) to avert the need for total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there have been unsatisfactory success rates for end-stage ONFH. The authors describe a modified technique using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) associated with porous tantalum rod implantation combined with vascularized iliac grafting for the treatment of end-stage ONFH. A total of 24 patients (31 hips) with end-stage ONFH were treated with surgery; ARCO IIIc stage was observed in 19 hips and ARCO IV stage was observed in 12 hips. All patients were followed for a mean time of 64.35 ± 13.03 months (range 26–78). Operations on only five hips were converted to THA. The joint-preserving success rate of the entire group was 89.47% for ARCO stage IIIc and 75% for ARCO stage IV. The mean Harris hip score of the 31 hips improved significantly from 38.74 ± 5.88 points (range 22–50) to 77.23 ± 14.75 points (range 33–95). This intervention was safe and effective in delaying or avoiding total hip replacement for end-stage ONFH. PMID:25802840

  20. A 10-Year Follow-Up of Two-Incision and Modified Watson-Jones Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Jie; Lin, Po-Chun; Kuo, Feng-Chih; Peng, Kuo-Ti; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2017-01-01

    Long-term data and information indicating whether minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches are safe and effective with total hip arthroplasty (THA) are lacking. Between 2004 and 2006, 75 patients with alcohol-related osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) who underwent 75 THAs with the two-incision approach were studied. The medical records, radiographic parameters, and functional outcomes were collected prospectively. All data were compared with those for matched patients who underwent a modified Watson-Jones (WJ) approach. THA using the two-incision approach was associated with longer operation time, more blood loss, more lateral femoral cutaneous nerve injury, and more periprosthetic femoral fractures (p < 0.05 for all four) than the modified WJ approach. The Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) increased significantly from the period preoperatively to 6 weeks postoperatively and thereafter up to the last follow-up in both groups. However, there were no significant differences in terms of radiographic parameters and functional outcomes between the two groups throughout the study period. Both the two-incision and the modified WJ approach provided satisfactory results and survival rates at a mean follow-up of 10.8 years. A prospective, randomized, large-scale cohort study is still warranted for evidence-based recommendations. PMID:28386565

  1. Autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells associated with tantalum rod implantation and vascularized iliac grafting for the treatment of end-stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Baoyi; Wang, Benjie; Yang, Lei; Xie, Hui; Huang, Shibo; Zhang, Yao; Wei, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Tantalum rod implantation with vascularized iliac grafting has been reported to be an effective method for the treatment of young patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) to avert the need for total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, there have been unsatisfactory success rates for end-stage ONFH. The authors describe a modified technique using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) associated with porous tantalum rod implantation combined with vascularized iliac grafting for the treatment of end-stage ONFH. A total of 24 patients (31 hips) with end-stage ONFH were treated with surgery; ARCO IIIc stage was observed in 19 hips and ARCO IV stage was observed in 12 hips. All patients were followed for a mean time of 64.35 ± 13.03 months (range 26-78). Operations on only five hips were converted to THA. The joint-preserving success rate of the entire group was 89.47% for ARCO stage IIIc and 75% for ARCO stage IV. The mean Harris hip score of the 31 hips improved significantly from 38.74 ± 5.88 points (range 22-50) to 77.23 ± 14.75 points (range 33-95). This intervention was safe and effective in delaying or avoiding total hip replacement for end-stage ONFH.

  2. Treatment of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head using porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites to suppress reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guoying; Niu, Kerun; Zhou, Feng; Li, Buxiao; Kang, Yingjie; Liu, Xijian; Hu, Junqing; Li, Bo; Wang, Qiugen; Yi, Chengqing; Wang, Qian

    2017-03-03

    Reducing oxidative stress (ROS) have been demonstrated effective for steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (steroid-induced ONFH). Selenium (Se) plays an important role in suppressing oxidative stress and has huge potential in ONFH treatments. However the Se has a narrow margin between beneficial and toxic effects which make it hard for therapy use in vivo. In order to make the deficiency up, a control release of Se (Se@SiO2) were realized by nanotechnology modification. Porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites have favorable biocompatibility and can reduced the ROS damage effectively. In vitro, the cck-8 analysis, terminal dexynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) stain and flow cytometry analysis showed rare negative influence by porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites but significantly protective effect against H2O2 by reducing ROS level (detected by DCFH-DA). In vivo, the biosafety of porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites were confirmed by the serum biochemistry, the ROS level in serum were significantly reduced and the curative effect were confirmed by Micro CT scan, serum Elisa assay (inflammatory factors), Western blotting (quantitative measurement of ONFH) and HE staining. It is expected that the porous Se@SiO2 nanocomposites may prevent steroid-induced ONFH by reducing oxidative stress.

  3. Effects of Modified Qing'e Pill () on expression of adiponectin, bone morphogenetic protein 2 and coagulation-related factors in patients with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Gang; Shen, Lin; Yang, Yan-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Juan; Shuai, Bo; Ma, Chen

    2017-03-01

    To observe the regulation of Chinese herbal medicine, Modifified Qing'e Pill (, MQEP), on the expression of adiponectin, bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and other potentially relevant risk factors in patients with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). A total of 96 patients with nontraumatic ONFH were unequal randomly divided into treatment group (60 cases) and control group (36 cases). The treatment group were treated with MQEP while the control group were treated with simulated pills. Both groups were given caltrate D. Six months were taken as a treatment course. Patients were followed up every 2 months. The levels of plasma adiponectin, BMP2, OPG, von Willebrand factor (vWF), von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (vWF-cp), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), C-reactive protein (CRP), blood rheology, bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral head and Harris Hip Score were measured before and after treatment. After 6 months of treatment, compared with the control group, patients in the treatment group had signifificantly higher adiponectin and BMP2 levels (P<0.01 and P=0.013, respectively), lower vWF, PAI-1 and CRP levels (P=0.019, P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively), and lower blood rheology parameters. BMD of the femoral neck, triangle area and Harris Hip Score in the treatment group were signifificantly higher than those in the control group. Moreover, plasma adiponectin showed a positive association with BMP2 (r=0.231, P=0.003) and a negative association with PAI-1 (r=-0.159, P<0.05). MQEP may play a protective role against nontraumatic ONFH by increasing the expression of adiponectin, regulating bone metabolism and improving the hypercoagulation state, which may provide an experimental base for its clinical effects.

  4. Bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis: potential treatment or serious complication?

    PubMed

    Goytia, Robin N; Salama, Andrew; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2009-04-01

    They are commonly used to treat osteoporosis and other diseases that involve osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, including Paget's disease and multiple myeloma. Their use in treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head has been studied and theoretically holds promise. There are complications associated with these medications, however, including the development of osteonecrosis in the jaw.

  5. [Potential uses of cytokines and growth factors in treatment of osteonecrosis].

    PubMed

    Hungerford, M W; Mont, M A

    2000-05-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head remains a devastating disease for young patients. As the normal process of bone formation, bone destruction, and fracture healing becomes more clearly understood, molecular agents--including cytokines, bone morphogenetic proteins, and angiogenic factors--will be identified as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of osteonecrosis. As the pathology of osteonecrosis and repair of osteonecrotic lesions becomes clear, the potential combination of these molecular factors to influence the outcome of the disease in its repair process should become evident. With the myriad of agents and combinations of agents which may be beneficial in the treatment of osteonecrosis, a reproducible animal model is urgently needed to determine which of these combinations is most effective. Despite the lack of an animal model, progress in the use of cytokines for osteonecrosis treatment in conjunction with traditional treatment methods is possible in human subjects. This is due to the extremely low incidence of adverse reactions when these cytokines are used locally in nanogram to microgram quantities.

  6. The effects of enoxaparin on the reparative processes in experimental osteonecrosis of the femoral head of the rat.

    PubMed

    Norman, Doron; Miller, Yoav; Sabo, Edmund; Misselevich, Ines; Peskin, Bezalel; Zinman, Chaim; Levin, Daniel; Reis, Daniel N; Boss, Jochanan H

    2002-03-01

    The blood supply of one femoral head of 6-month-old rats was severed by incising the periosteum of the neck and cutting the ligamentum teres. The rats were killed on the 30th postoperative day and the femoral bones were obtained for semiquantification of the reparative processes in the necrotic heads. Fourteen rats were treated with enoxaparin and 14 untreated animals served as controls. Statistically, the amounts of necrotic bone in the epiphysis were less, the extent of remodeling of the femoral heads was milder, and the articular cartilage degeneration was slighter in the enoxaparin-treated than untreated rats. There was no significant difference in the quantities of newly formed bone in femoral heads of treated and untreated rats. These findings are in agreement with the known effects of unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparins which enhance osteoclastic bone resorption and angiogenesis and decrease osteoblastic bone formation. The former activities, operative in minimizing the structural distortion of the femoral head, oppose the crucial event in the pathogenesis of post-osteonecrotic osteoarthritis.

  7. Functional investigation of bone implant viability using radiotracers in a new model of osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schiper, Luis; Faintuch, Bluma Linkowski; da Silva Badaró, Roberto José; de Oliveira, Erica Aparecida; Chavez, Victor E. Arana; Chinen, Elisangela; Faintuch, Joel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Conventional imaging methods are excellent for the morphological characterization of the consequences of osteonecrosis; however, only specialized techniques have been considered useful for obtaining functional information. To explore the affinity of radiotracers for severely devascularized bone, a new mouse model of isolated femur implanted in a subcutaneous abdominal pocket was devised. To maintain animal mobility and longevity, the femur was harvested from syngeneic donors. Two technetium-99m-labeled tracers targeting angiogenesis and bone matrix were selected. METHODS: Medronic acid and a homodimer peptide conjugated with RGDfK were radiolabeled with technetium-99m, and biodistribution was evaluated in Swiss mice. The grafted and control femurs were evaluated after 15, 30 and 60 days, including computed tomography (CT) and histological analysis. RESULTS: Radiolabeling achieved high (>95%) radiochemical purity. The biodistribution confirmed good blood clearance 1 hour after administration. For 99mTc-hydrazinonicotinic acid (HYNIC)-E-[c(RGDfK)2, remarkable renal excretion was observed compared to 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP), but the latter, as expected, revealed higher bone uptake. The results obtained in the control femur were equal at all time points. In the implanted femur, 99mTc-HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)2 uptake was highest after 15 days, consistent with early angiogenesis. Regarding 99mTc-MDP in the implant, similar uptake was documented at all time points, consistent with sustained bone viability; however, the uptake was lower than that detected in the control femur, as confirmed by histology. CONCLUSIONS: 1) Graft viability was successfully diagnosed using radiotracers in severely ischemic bone at all time points. 2) Analogously, indirect information about angiogenesis could be gathered using 999mTc-HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)2. 3) These techniques appear promising and warrant further studies to determine their potential clinical applications. PMID

  8. Analysis of Cell Therapies Used in Clinical Trials for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Piuzzi, Nicolas S; Chahla, Jorge; Jiandong, Hao; Chughtai, Morad; LaPrade, Robert F; Mont, Michael A; Muschler, George F; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2017-08-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is associated with regional loss of cells within bone, often resulting in pain and mechanical collapse. Our purpose was to analyze the cell-therapies used in clinical trials for the treatment of ONFH with regard to (1) cell-sources, (2) collection techniques, (3) cell-processing, (4) qualitative and quantitative characterizations, and (5) delivery methods. A systematic review of the current literature on the use of cell therapies for the treatment of ONFH was performed. Studies with a level-of-evidence III or higher were evaluated. A total of 1483 articles were screened. Eleven studies met the criteria to be included in this review. Ten studies used bone-marrow, and 1 study used blood as the cell-source. Nine studies used freshly isolated tissue-derived nucleated cells from bone-marrow, mixed bone marrow-derived nucleated cells, 1 study used mixed blood-derived nucleated cells, and 1 study used culture-expanded cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. Cell dose varied from 2-million to 3-billion cells. Qualitative cell characterization of injected cells using surface markers was done by 5 studies using CD34. Two studies assayed the cell-population using a colony-forming-unit assay. There is a lack of standardization with respect to the quantitative and qualitative characterization of methods for cell-harvest, cell-processing, and cell-transplantation/delivery. Cell-therapy holds promise as a means of restoring local cell populations that are made deficient because of injury or disease. However, the orthopedic community and patients will benefit greatly by a greater investment in blinded, randomized, controlled trials and clinical effectiveness trials that embrace rigorous standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR inhibits miR-17-5p to regulate osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoxiang; Guo, Xiaxia; Liu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim The biological functions of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been widely identified in many human diseases. In the present study, the relationship between long non-coding RNA HOTAIR and microRNA-17-5p (miR-17-5p) and their roles in osteogenic differentiation and proliferation in non-traumatic osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) were investigated. Methods The expression levels of HOTAIR and miR-17-5p in the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from patients with non-traumatic ONFH and osteoarthritis (OA) were examined by real-time PCR. BMP-2 induced human MSCs from bone marrow (hMSC-BM) were used for osteogenic differentiation. Results It was observed that the expression level of miR-17-5p was lower and the level of HOTAIR was higher in samples of non-traumatic ONFH compared with OA. HOTAIR downregulation induced by si-HOTAIR led to the increase of miR-17-5p expression and the decrease of miR-17-5p target gene SMAD7 expression. The values of osteogenic differentiation markers, including RUNX2 and COL1A1 mRNA expression and ALP activity, were also elevated by si-HOTAIR. However, the increase of these values was canceled by miR-17-5p inhibitor or SMAD7 upregulation. Conclusion HOTAIR played a role in regulating osteogenic differentiation and proliferation through modulating miR-17-5p and its target gene SMAD7 in non-traumatic ONFH. PMID:28207735

  10. Significant Associations of SOX9 Gene Polymorphism and Gene Expression with the Risk of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in a Han Population in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ren, Ming; Yang, Qiwei; Sui, Yujie; Wang, Qingyu; Wang, Ao; Zhao, Haiyue

    2016-01-01

    Sex determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) is a key transcription factor involved in cartilage formation during the embryonic development stage and cartilage growth and repair after birth. To explore the roles of polymorphism and expression of the SOX9 gene in the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), we analyzed the polymorphism of rs12601701 [A/G] and rs1042667 [A/C] and the serum protein expression of the SOX9 gene in 182 patients with ONFH and 179 healthy control subjects. Results revealed that the A-A haplotype of SOX9 gene as well as the GG and AA genotypes of rs12601701 was significantly associated with increased ONFH risk (P = 0.038) and the risk of bilateral hip lesions of ONFH (P = 0.009), respectively. The C-A, A-A, and A-G haplotypes were also statistically associated with the decreased and increased risk of bilateral hip lesions of ONFH (P = 0.03, P = 0.048, and P = 0.013), respectively, while the A-A haplotype closely related to the clinical stages of ONFH (P = 0.041). More importantly, the serum SOX9 protein expression of the ONFH group was greatly decreased compared to control group (P = 0.0001). Our results first showed that the gene polymorphism and gene expression of SOX9 were significantly associated with the risk and clinical phenotypes of ONFH and also indicate that the SOX9 gene may play a key role in the development of ONFH. PMID:28090537

  11. P-glycoprotein overexpression in bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells decreases the risk of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Han, Ning; Li, Zengchun; Cai, Zhengdong; Yan, Zuoqin; Hua, Yingqi; Xu, Chong

    2016-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a role in steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We hypothesized that P-gp overexpression can prevent ONFH by regulating bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cell (BMSC) adipogenesis and osteogenesis. BMSCs from Sprague-Dawley rats were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or the multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) encoding GFP and P-gp. Dexamethasone was used to induce BMSC differentiation. Adipogenesis was determined by measuring peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ) expression and the triglyceride level. Osteogenesis was determined by measuring runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression and alkaline phosphatase activity. For in vivo experiments, rats were injected with saline, BMSCs expressing GFP (GFP-BMSCs) or BMSCs expressing GFP-P-gp (MDR1-GFP-BMSCs). After dexamethasone induction, adipogenesis was determined by measuring PPAR-γ expression and fatty marrow, whereas osteogenesis was detected by measuring Runx2 expression, trabecular parameters and the mineral apposition rate, followed by evaluation of the incidence of ONFH. Overexpression of P-gp in BMSCs resulted in markedly decreased expression of adipogenic markers and increased expression of osteogenic markers. Compared with rats injected with saline, rats injected with GFP-BMSCs showed reduced ONFH, and the injected GFP-positive BMSCs attached to trabecular surfaces and exhibited an osteoblast-like morphology. Compared with the rats injected with BMSCs expressing GFP alone, rats injected with BMSCs overexpressing GFP and P-gp showed lower adipocytic variables, higher osteogenic variables and lower incidence of ONFH. Overexpression of P-gp inhibited BMSC adipogenesis and promoted osteogenesis, which reduced the incidence of steroid-induced ONFH. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular

  12. Identification of aberrantly expressed of serum microRNAs in patients with hormone-induced non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Wei, Biaofang; Wei, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The non-translation RNA-microRNA (miRNA) has been demonstrated to correlate to various disease occurrence in body. Serum miRNA was gradually considered as molecular markers for disease diagnosis. This study was designed to analyze differential serum miRNAs level in hormone-induced non-traumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (hormone-NOFH) patients. We selected 30 patients with hormone-NOFH as case group, and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited as control group. miRCURYTM LNA miRNA chip and quantitative RT-PCR were used to examine differential miRNAs expression. Correlation assay was performed between miRNAs and NOFH trait. We found that 9 miRNAs were upregulated while 3 miRNAs were downregulated in hormone-TOFH patient serum by result of miRNA chip. QRT-PCR assay revealed that the level of miR-423-5p was significantly increased and miR-10a-5p was significantly decreased. Using Spearman correlation analysis, we observed that miR-423-5p serum level is positive association to FHC levels whereas miR-10a-5p has no association with FHC levels. Furthermore, miR-423-5p is negatively correlated to its downstream molecule-adiponectin. We report a miRNA profile of hormone-NOFH and provide a new perspective to understand this intricate disease. This novel information suggests the potential roles of miR-423-5p in the diagnosis, prognosis biomarkers, or therapy targets of hormone-NOFH. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Tibial osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Lonner, J H; Lotke, P A

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the tibial plateau involves a continuum of change observed in the subchondral zone that is commonly associated with early and mid stages of osteoarthritis. The typical patient is an elderly woman who experiences a sudden onset of pain in the medial aspect of the knee. The diagnosis of this under-appreciated clinical entity may be difficult, but careful examination and judicious use of imaging studies, as well as a high index of suspicion, may facilitate the accurate diagnosis. Although the radiographs may initially be normal (with the exception of mild arthrosis), radionuclide scans and MRI can be of great value. The MRI studies usually show a decreased signal intensity on a T1-weighted image, but may be normal in the early course of the disease. The T2-weighted images and fat suppression views are helpful in establishing a diagnosis and determining the extent of involvement. Recognition of this problem may help to avoid unnecessary intra-articular surgery. Many of these patients have complete or partial resolution of symptoms by 1 year, after a period of protected weight bearing. Nonetheless, surgery may be necessary for more advanced lesions and in those patients with progressive arthrosis.

  14. Exosomes derived from human platelet-rich plasma prevent apoptosis induced by glucocorticoid-associated endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat osteonecrosis of the femoral head via the Akt/Bad/Bcl-2 signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shi-Cong; Yuan, Ting; Rui, Bi-Yu; Zhu, Zhen-Zhong; Guo, Shang-Chun; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2017-01-01

    An excess of glucocorticoids (GCs) is reported to be one of the most common causes of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). In addition, GCs can induce bone cell apoptosis through modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Among the three main signal pathways in ER stress, the PERK (protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase)/CHOP (CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein) pathway has been considered to be closely associated with apoptosis. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been referred to as a concentration of growth factors and the exosomes derived from PRP (PRP-Exos) have a similar effect to their parent material. The enriched growth factors can be encapsulated into PRP-Exos and activate Akt and Erk pathways to promote angiogenesis. Activation of the Akt pathway may promote the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins like Bcl-2, while CHOP can inhibit B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression to increase the level of cleaved caspase-3 and lead to cell death. Consequently, we hypothesized that PRP-Exos prevent apoptosis induced by glucocorticoid-associated ER stress in rat ONFH via the Akt/Bad/Bcl-2 signal pathway. To verify this hypothesis, a dexamethasone (DEX)-treated in vitro cell model and methylprednisolone (MPS)-treated in vivo rat model were adopted. Characterization of PRP-Exos, and effects of PRP-Exos on proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and osteogenesis of cells treated with GCs in vitro and in vivo were examined. Furthermore, the mechanism by which PRP-Exos rescue the GC-induced apoptosis through the Akt/Bad/Bcl-2 pathway was also investigated. The results indicate that PRP-Exos have the capability to prevent GC-induced apoptosis in a rat model of ONFH by promoting Bcl-2 expression via the Akt/Bad/Bcl-2 signal pathway under ER stress. PMID:28255363

  15. High-Energy Extracorporeal Shock Wave for Early Stage Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Single-Center Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fuqiang; Sun, Wei; Li, Zirong; Guo, Wanshou; Wang, Weiguo; Cheng, Liming; Wang, Bailiang

    2015-01-01

    Our retrospective study assessed the effects of treatment of early stage ONFH with extracorporeal shock wave therapy. 335 patients (528 hips) were treated with shockwave therapy in our institution. Each patient underwent two sessions. The hips were divided into two groups according to whether the lateral pillar of the femoral head (LPFH) was preserved: LPFH and non-LPFH groups. Patients were followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months after the treatment. Most of the patients (83.9% hips) demonstrated pain reduction and improved mobility of the treated joint (visual analogue scale score, P = 0.00006; Harris hip score, P = 0.00091). During the follow-up period, 16 hips failed following femoral head collapse and required hip arthroplasty (2 hips in LPFH group and 14 hips in non-LPFH group). The lesion size decreased after ESWT. However, the differences were statistically not significant (LPFH group, P = 0.091; non-LPFH group, P = 0.087). A significant reduction in bone marrow edema was observed after treatment (LPFH group, P = 0.007; non-LPFH group, P = 0.016). High-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy resulted in considerable improvement in early stage ONFH, which can effectively relieve pain and improve the function of the hip. PMID:26609311

  16. [A comparative study on short-term effectiveness between cemented and uncemented total hip arthroplasty for osteonecrosis of femoral head after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Yu, Liankui; Qi, Chao; Yu, Tengbo; Meng, Qingyang; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Kai; Cai, Yan

    2013-12-01

    To compare the short-term effectiveness between primary cemented and uncemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) for osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) after renal transplantation. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed from 18 patients (21 hips) with ONFH after renal transplantation undergoing cemented THA in 11 cases (13 hips) (cemented group) and uncemented THA in 7 cases (8 hips) (uncemented group) between February 2005 and February 2012. There was no significant difference in gender, age, disease duration, ONFH stage, preoperative Harris score, and bone density between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Postoperative complications were observed in 2 groups; the hip function was assessed based on Harris scores; X-ray film was used to observe the prosthetic situation. All the wounds healed by first intention. The patients were followed up 6-77 months (mean, 46 months) in the cemented group, and 4-71 months (mean, 42 months) in the uncemented group. Femoral prosthesis infection occurred in 1 case (1 hip) respectively in each group; hip dislocation, femoral prosthesis loosening, and acetabular prosthesis loosening occurred in 1 case (1 hip) of the cemented group, respectively. At last follow-up, the incidences of postoperative complications and revision rate of the cemented group were 30.7% (4/13) and 23.1% (3/13) respectively, which were significantly higher than those of the uncemented group [12.5% (1/8) and 0 (0/8)] (P=0.047, P=0.040). Harris score was significantly increased to 94.1 +/- 3.7 in the uncemented group and 90.0 +/- 4.2 in the cemented group, showing significant differences compared with the preoperative scores in 2 groups (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between 2 groups (t = -1.815, P = 0.062). Postoperative X-ray films showed that the initial position of the prosthesis was satisfactory. At last follow-up, the bone fixation, fibrous stability, and loosening of the femoral prosthesis and loosening of acetabular prosthesis occurred

  17. Model of beam head erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1980-08-08

    An analytical model of beam head dynamics is presented, leading to an estimate of the erosion rate due to the combined effects of Ohmic dissipation and scattering. Agreement with the results of a computer simulation and detailed one-dimensional computations is good in all respects except for the scaling of the erosion rate with net current.

  18. Neuroelectromagnetic forward head modeling toolbox.

    PubMed

    Acar, Zeynep Akalin; Makeig, Scott

    2010-07-15

    This paper introduces a Neuroelectromagnetic Forward Head Modeling Toolbox (NFT) running under MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.) for generating realistic head models from available data (MRI and/or electrode locations) and for computing numerical solutions for the forward problem of electromagnetic source imaging. The NFT includes tools for segmenting scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues from T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is used for the numerical solution of the forward problem. After extracting segmented tissue volumes, surface BEM meshes can be generated. When a subject MR image is not available, a template head model can be warped to measured electrode locations to obtain an individualized head model. Toolbox functions may be called either from a graphic user interface compatible with EEGLAB (http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab), or from the MATLAB command line. Function help messages and a user tutorial are included. The toolbox is freely available under the GNU Public License for noncommercial use and open source development. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuroelectromagnetic Forward Head Modeling Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Zeynep Akalin; Makeig, Scott

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a Neuroelectromagnetic Forward Head Modeling Toolbox (NFT) running under MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.) for generating realistic head models from available data (MRI and/or electrode locations) and for computing numerical solutions for the forward problem of electromagnetic source imaging. The NFT includes tools for segmenting scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues from T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is used for the numerical solution of the forward problem. After extracting segmented tissue volumes, surface BEM meshes can be generated. When a subject MR image is not available, a template head model can be warped to measured electrode locations to obtain an individualized head model. Toolbox functions may be called either from a graphic user interface compatible with EEGLAB (http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab), or from the MATLAB command line. Function help messages and a user tutorial are included. The toolbox is freely available under the GNU Public License for noncommercial use and open source development. PMID:20457183

  20. Head Transplantation in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Ping; Ye, Yi-Jie; Li, Peng-Wei; Shen, Zi-Long; Han, Ke-Cheng; Song, Yang

    2015-08-01

    The mouse model of allo-head and body reconstruction (AHBR) has recently been established to further the clinical development of this strategy for patients who are suffering from mortal bodily trauma or disease, yet whose mind remains healthy. Animal model studies are indispensable for developing such novel surgical practices. The goal of this work was to establish head transplant mouse model, then the next step through the feasible biological model to investigate immune rejection and brain function in next step, thereby promoting the goal of translation of AHBR to the clinic in the future. Our approach involves retaining adequate blood perfusion in the transplanted head throughout the surgical procedure by establishing donor-to-recipient cross-circulation by cannulating and anastomosing the carotid artery on one side of the body and the jugular vein on the other side. Neurological function was preserved by this strategy as indicated by electroencephalogram and intact cranial nerve reflexes. The results of this study support the feasibility of this method for avoiding brain ischemia during transplantation, thereby allowing for the possibility of long-term studies of head transplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Relation between the development of osteoporosis and osteonecrosis following glucocorticoid in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tao; Liu, Junbin; Yang, Shuhua; Liu, Xianzhe; Feng, Xiaobo; Fu, Dehao

    2016-01-01

    Background: There has been a recent increase in the number of patients suffering from bone and joint diseases, as a consequence of corticosteroids administration. There are more patients treated with low dose of GCs under long-term conditions in clinical, such as effect of GCs on Rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease and Asthma patients. Hence, it was difficult for doctor to determine which problem occur first – OP or ON; however, there was no clinical report previously in the literature, and there was no effective animal model of OP and ON about low dose GCs. This study was conducted to develop rabbit models of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced femoral head ON and OP and to investigate the temporal relationship between the occurrence of the two events following administration of glucocorticoids. Materials and Methods: Fifty six, 6 months old female rabbits were randomly divided into the GC group and control group (C). Rabbits received gluteal injections of methylprednisolone sodium succinate once a day for 4 weeks, while normal saline solution in the control group. Rabbits were sacrificed at 0, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Hip magnetic resonance imaging was performed before the rabbits were sacrificed. Serum calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels were also measured. The bone mineral density (BMD) of femoral head and the femoral shaft were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The trabecular parameters of the femur and the 4th lumbar vertebrae (L4) were measured with a micro-computed tomography (μ-CT). Also, the femoral head was stained with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results: At 4 weeks in the GC group, the BMD of the femur reduced 33% and 22% in the femoral head and shaft; there was irregular intermediate to high T2-weighted images signals; μ-CT showed microfractures and cystic changes in the femoral head and L4 at 4 weeks. At 8 weeks in the GC group, the classical “line-like sign” indicating ON of the femoral head was observed

  2. Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Jaws in the Maxilla of Mice on Antiresorptive Treatment: A Novel ONJ Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Cheong, Simon; Bezouglaia, Olga; Dry, Sarah M; Pirih, Flavia; Cirelli, Joni Augusto; Aghaloo, Tara L; Tetradis, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Although osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ), a serious complication of antiresorptive medications, was reported a decade ago, the exact mechanisms of disease pathophysiology remain elusive. ONJ-like lesions can be induced in animals after antiresorptive treatment and experimental interventions such as tooth extraction or periapical or periodontal disease. However, experimental induction and manipulation of disease progression does not always reflect clinical reality. Interestingly, naturally occurring maxillofacial abscesses, inducing aggressive inflammation of the peri-radicular mucosa with significant osteolysis and alveolar bone expansion, have been reported in mice. Here, we aimed to explore whether osteonecrotic lesions would develop in areas of maxillary peri-radicular infections, in mice on antiresorptive medications with distinct pharmacologic action, thus establishing a novel ONJ animal model. Mice were treated with RANK-Fc or OPG-Fc that bind to RANKL or with the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZA). Maxillae were assessed radiographically and histologically. μCT imaging of vehicle mice revealed several maxillae with altered alveolar bone morphology, significant ridge expansion and large lytic areas. However, in RANK-Fc, OPG-Fc and ZA treated animals the extent of bone loss was significantly less, but exuberant bone deposition was noted at the ridge periphery. BV and BV/TV were increased in the diseased site of antiresorptive vs. veh animals. Histologically, extensive inflammation, bone resorption and marginal gingival epithelium migration were seen in the diseased site of vehicle animals. Rank-Fc, OPG-Fc and ZA reduced alveolar bone loss, increased periosteal bone formation, and induced areas of osteonecrosis, and bone exposure that in many animals covered significant part of the alveolar bone. Collectively, our data demonstrate ONJ-like lesions at sites of maxillary peri-radicular infection, indistinguishable in mice treated with RAKL inhibitors vs

  3. Hip preserving surgery with concentrated autologous bone marrow aspirate transplantation for the treatment of asymptomatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head: retrospective review of clinical and radiological outcomes at 6 years postoperatively.

    PubMed

    Tomaru, Yohei; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Sugaya, Hisashi; Aoto, Katsuya; Wada, Hiroshi; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mishima, Hajime

    2017-07-06

    We had previously established concentrated autologous bone marrow aspirate transplantation (CABMAT), a one-step, low-invasive, joint-preserving surgical technique for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of CABMAT as a hip preserving surgical approach, preventing femoral head collapse in asymptomatic ONFH. In total, 222 patients (341 hips) with ONFH were treated with CABMAT between April 2003 and March 2013. Based on magnetic resonance imaging, we determined that 119 of these patients had bilateral asymptomatic ONFH (238 hips), and 38 further patients had unilateral asymptomatic ONFH (38 hips). In this series, we retrospectively examined 31 hips in 31 patients with unilateral asymptomatic ONFH treated surgically between 2003 and 2012 and followed up for more than 2 years. Clinical and radiological evaluation were performed immediately before the procedure and at the final follow-up. The two-year follow-up rate among patients with unilateral ONFH was 82% (31/38). Therefore, the present study included 31 patients (19 males and 12 females), with a mean age and follow-up period of 40 and 5.8 years, respectively. Of the 31 asymptomatic hips, 5, 6, 10, and 10 had osteonecrosis of types A, B, C1, and C2, respectively. The diagnosis, classification, and staging of ONFH were based on the 2001 Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) classification. Secondary collapse of the femoral head was observed in 6/10 hips and 5/10 hips with osteonecrosis of types C1 and C2, respectively. Total hip arthroplasty was performed in 9.6% of patients (3/31 hips), at an average of 33 months after surgery. Clinical symptoms improved after surgery, and the secondary collapse rate at a mean of 5.8 years after CABMAT was lower than that reported in several previous studies on the natural course of asymptomatic ONFH. Early diagnosis of ONFH (i.e., before femoral head collapse) and early intervention with CABMAT could improve the

  4. Aggravated bone density decline following symptomatic osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    den Hoed, Marissa A H; Pluijm, Saskia M F; te Winkel, Mariël L; de Groot-Kruseman, Hester A; Fiocco, Martha; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; Leeuw, Jan A; Bruin, Marrie C A; van der Sluis, Inge M; Bresters, Dorien; Lequin, Maarten H; Roos, Jan C; Veerman, Anjo J P; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2015-12-01

    Osteonecrosis and decline of bone density are serious side effects during and after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It is unknown whether osteonecrosis and low bone density occur together in the same patients, or whether these two osteogenic side-effects can mutually influence each other's development. Bone density and the incidence of symptomatic osteonecrosis were prospectively assessed in a national cohort of 466 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (4-18 years of age) who were treated according to the dexamethasone-based Dutch Child Oncology Group-ALL9 protocol. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMDLS) (n=466) and of the total body (BMDTB) (n=106) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Bone density was expressed as age- and gender-matched standard deviation scores. Thirty patients (6.4%) suffered from symptomatic osteonecrosis. At baseline, BMDLS and BMDTB did not differ between patients who did or did not develop osteonecrosis. At cessation of treatment, patients with osteonecrosis had lower mean BMDLS and BMDTB than patients without osteonecrosis (respectively, with osteonecrosis: -2.16 versus without osteonecrosis: -1.21, P<0.01 and with osteonecrosis: -1.73 versus without osteonecrosis: -0.57, P<0.01). Multivariate linear models showed that patients with osteonecrosis had steeper BMDLS and BMDTB declines during follow-up than patients without osteonecrosis (interaction group time, P<0.01 and P<0.01). We conclude that bone density status at the diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia does not seem to influence the occurrence of symptomatic osteonecrosis. Bone density declines from the time that osteonecrosis is diagnosed; this suggests that the already existing decrease in bone density during acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy is further aggravated by factors such as restriction of weight-bearing activities and destruction of bone architecture due to osteonecrosis. Osteonecrosis can, therefore, be considered a risk

  5. Investigating Clinical Failure of Bone Grafting through a Window at the Femoral Head Neck Junction Surgery for the Treatment of Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Zhao, Dingyan; Gao, Fuqiang; Su, Yangming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to analyze the clinical factors related to the failure of bone grafting through a window at the femoral head-neck junction. Methods In total, 119 patients (158 hips) underwent bone grafting for treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The patients were classified by their ARCO staging and CJFH classification. All patients were clinically and radiographically followed up every three months during the first year and every six months in the following year. The clinical follow-up comprised determination of pre- and postoperative Harris hip scores, while serial AP, frog lateral radiographs, and CT scan were used for the radiographic follow-up. Results The clinical failure of bone grafting was observed in 40 patients. The clinical failure rates in patients belonging to ARCO stage II period, IIIa, and III (b + c) were 25.9%, 16.2%, and 61.5%, respectively, while those in patients belonging to (C + M + L1) type and L2, L3 type disease groups were 1.7%, 38.9%, and 39%, respectively. The clinical failure rates in patients aged below 40 and those aged 40 and over were 20.5% and 39.0%, respectively (all P < 0.05). Conclusion Disease type, disease stage, and patient age are risk factors for failure of bone graft surgery. Patients belonging to ARCO stage II and IIIa showed a good overall response rate, while patients belonging to ARCO stage IIIb and IIIc and those with necrotic lesions involving the lateral pillar (L2 and L3 type) showed high surgical failure rates. PMID:27285821

  6. ACTH protects against glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis of bone.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Mone; Sun, Li; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Liu, Li; Wang, Yujuan; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Liu, Xuan; Li, Jianhua; Peng, Yuanzhen; Yang, Guozhe; Shi, Xingming; Levine, Alice; Iqbal, Jameel; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B; Isales, Carlos; Blair, Harry C

    2010-05-11

    We report that adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) protects against osteonecrosis of the femoral head induced by depot methylprednisolone acetate (depomedrol). This therapeutic response likely arises from enhanced osteoblastic support and the stimulation of VEGF by ACTH; the latter is largely responsible for maintaining the fine vascular network that surrounds highly remodeling bone. We suggest examining the efficacy of ACTH in preventing human osteonecrosis, a devastating complication of glucocorticoid therapy.

  7. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the jaws in the maxilla of mice on antiresorptive treatment: a novel ONJ mouse model.

    PubMed

    de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Cheong, Simon; Bezouglaia, Olga; Dry, Sarah M; Pirih, Flavia; Cirelli, Joni Augusto; Aghaloo, Tara L; Tetradis, Sotirios

    2014-11-01

    Although osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ), a serious complication of antiresorptive medications, was reported a decade ago, the exact mechanisms of disease pathophysiology remain elusive. ONJ-like lesions can be induced in animals after antiresorptive treatment and experimental interventions such as tooth extraction or periapical or periodontal disease. However, experimental induction and manipulation of disease progression does not always reflect clinical reality. Interestingly, naturally occurring maxillofacial abscesses, inducing aggressive inflammation of the peri-radicular mucosa with significant osteolysis and alveolar bone expansion, have been reported in mice. Here, we aimed to explore whether osteonecrotic lesions would develop in areas of maxillary peri-radicular infections, in mice on antiresorptive medications with distinct pharmacologic action, thus establishing a novel ONJ animal model. Mice were treated with RANK-Fc or OPG-Fc that bind to RANKL or with the potent bisphosphonate zoledronic acid (ZA). Maxillae were assessed radiographically and histologically. μCT imaging of vehicle mice revealed several maxillae with altered alveolar bone morphology, significant ridge expansion and large lytic areas. However, in RANK-Fc, OPG-Fc and ZA treated animals the extent of bone loss was significantly less, but exuberant bone deposition was noted at the ridge periphery. BV and BV/TV were increased in the diseased site of antiresorptive vs. veh animals. Histologically, extensive inflammation, bone resorption and marginal gingival epithelium migration were seen in the diseased site of vehicle animals. Rank-Fc, OPG-Fc and ZA reduced alveolar bone loss, increased periosteal bone formation, and induced areas of osteonecrosis, and bone exposure that in many animals covered significant part of the alveolar bone. Collectively, our data demonstrate ONJ-like lesions at sites of maxillary peri-radicular infection, indistinguishable in mice treated with RAKL inhibitors vs

  8. National Osteonecrosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation is made up of a group of patients, physicians and others who want to see the end ... NONF Brochure | Legg Perthes Disease Borchure | Membership Form | Patient Questionnaire | Physician Members Copyright © 2014, National Osteonecrosis Foundaton. All Rights ...

  9. Osteonecrosis (Avascular Necrosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... than osteonecrosis found in other parts of the skeleton. For more information on ONJ, contact the National ... as well as during normal growth, keeps the skeleton strong and helps it to maintain a balance ...

  10. Establishment of an Animal Model of Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaws in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Rats

    PubMed Central

    Takaoka, Kazuki; Yamamura, Michiyo; Nishioka, Toshihiro; Abe, Tetsuya; Tamaoka, Joji; Segawa, Emi; Shinohara, Masami; Ueda, Haruyasu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Urade, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the side effects of bisphosphonate (BP) on tooth extraction socket healing in spontaneously diabetic Torii (SDT) rats, an established model of non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus, to develop an animal model of BP-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ). Materials and Methods Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and SDT rats were randomly assigned to the zoledronic acid (ZOL)-treated groups (SD/ZOL or SDT/ZOL) or to the control groups (SD/control or SDT/control). Rats in the SD/ZOL or SDT/ZOL groups received an intravenous bolus injection of ZOL (35 μg/kg) every 2 weeks. Each group consisted of 6 rats each. Twenty-one weeks after ZOL treatment began, the left maxillary molars were extracted. The rats were euthanized at 2, 4, or 8 weeks after tooth extraction, and the total maxillae were harvested for histological and histochemical studies. Results In the oral cavity, bone exposure persisted at the tooth extraction site in all rats of the SDT/ZOL group until 8 weeks after tooth extraction. In contrast, there was no bone exposure in SD/control or SDT/control groups, and only 1 of 6 rats in the SD/ZOL group showed bone exposure. Histologically, necrotic bone areas with empty lacunae, microbial colonies, and less invasion by inflammatory cells were observed. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts was lower in the SDT/ZOL group than in the SD/control group. The mineral apposition rate was significantly lower in the SDT/ZOL group compared with the SD/control group. Conclusions This study demonstrated the development of BRONJ-like lesions in rats and suggested that low bone turnover with less inflammatory cell infiltration plays an important role in the development of BRONJ. PMID:26659123

  11. Osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Philip N; Ebeling, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Bisphosphonates are effective therapy for osteoporosis, Paget's disease, and metastatic bone disease. Generally, the side effects of bisphosphonates are minimal. Recently, an uncommon adverse reaction affecting the maxilla or mandible, called osteonecrosis of the jaw, has been reported, especially in those patients receiving high doses of bisphosphonates in the oncology setting. Regarding doses used to treat osteoporosis, clinicians must keep the very small potential absolute risk of jaw osteonecrosis in perspective and consider it in relation to the demonstrated benefit of bisphosphonates. Still, in a very small number of patients taking bisphosphonates, intractable, painful, nonhealing exposed bone may occur following dental extractions or denture irritation.

  12. Combination treatment of biomechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiang; Wang, Weidong; Xu, Taotao; Zhang, Shanxing; Xiao, Luwei; Chen, Di; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the benefits of combination treatment with mechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) via the medial circumflex femoral artery on the progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Fifty-five patients (89 hips) with early and intermediate stage ONFH were recruited and randomly assigned to combination treatment or mechanical support treatment (control group). All hips received mechanical support treatment (porous tantalum rod implantation). Then, hips in the combination treatment group were performed targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs. At each follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) and Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification were used to evaluate the symptoms and progression of osteonecrosis. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was assessed as an endpoint at each follow-up. At 36 months, 9 of the 41 hips (21.95%) in the control group progressed to clinical failure and underwent THA whereas only 3 of the 48 hips (6.25%) in the combination treatment group required THA (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in the survival time between the two groups (log-rank test; p = 0.025). Compared to the control group, combination treatment significantly improved the HHS at 36 months (p = 0.003). At the final follow-up examination, radiological progression was noted in 13 of 41 hips (31.71%) for the control group, but in only 4 of 48 hips (8.33%) for the combination treatment group (p = 0.005). The overall collapse rates were 15.15% (5/33 hips) and 8.11% (3/37 hips) in the control and combination treatment groups, respectively. Targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs is capable of enhancing the efficacy of biomechanical support in the treatment of ONFH. This clinical trial confirmed that the combination treatment might be a safe and feasible

  13. PTH[1-34] improves the effects of core decompression in early-stage steroid-associated osteonecrosis model by enhancing bone repair and revascularization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen-He; Meng, Jia-Hong; Zhao, Chen-Chen; Ye, Chen-Yi; Zhu, Han-Xiao; Hu, Bin; Heng, Boon Chin; Shen, Yue; Lin, Tiao; Yang, Xiao-Bo; Shi, Zhong-Li; Shen, Wei-Liang; Yan, Shi-Gui

    2017-01-01

    Steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON) might induce bone collapse and subsequently lead to joint arthroplasty. Core decompression (CD) is regarded as an effective therapy for early-stage SAON, but the prognosis is unsatisfactory due to incomplete bone repair. Parathyroid hormone[1-34] (PTH[1-34]) has demonstrated positive efficacy in promoting bone formation. We therefore evaluated the effects of PTH on improving the effects of CD in Early-Stage SAON. Distal femoral CD was performed two weeks after osteonecrosis induction or vehicle injection, with ten of the ON-induced rabbits being subjected to six-week PTH[1-34] treatment and the others, including ON-induced and non-induced rabbits, being treated with vehicle. MRI confirmed that intermittent PTH administration improved SAON after CD therapy. Micro-CT showed increased bone formation within the tunnel. Bone repair was enhanced with decreased empty osteocyte lacunae and necrosis foci area, resulting in enhanced peak load and stiffness of the tunnel. Additionally, PTH enlarged the mean diameter of vessels in the marrow and increased the number of vessels within the tunnels, as well as elevated the expression of BMP-2, RUNX2, IGF-1, bFGF and VEGF, together with serum OCN and VEGF levels. Therefore, PTH[1-34] enhances the efficacy of CD on osteogenesis and neovascularization, thus promoting bone and blood vessels repair in the SAON model.

  14. PTH[1-34] improves the effects of core decompression in early-stage steroid-associated osteonecrosis model by enhancing bone repair and revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chen-yi; Zhu, Han-xiao; Hu, Bin; Heng, Boon Chin; Shen, Yue; Lin, Tiao; Yang, Xiao-bo; Shi, Zhong-li; Shen, Wei-liang

    2017-01-01

    Steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON) might induce bone collapse and subsequently lead to joint arthroplasty. Core decompression (CD) is regarded as an effective therapy for early-stage SAON, but the prognosis is unsatisfactory due to incomplete bone repair. Parathyroid hormone[1–34] (PTH[1–34]) has demonstrated positive efficacy in promoting bone formation. We therefore evaluated the effects of PTH on improving the effects of CD in Early-Stage SAON. Distal femoral CD was performed two weeks after osteonecrosis induction or vehicle injection, with ten of the ON-induced rabbits being subjected to six-week PTH[1–34] treatment and the others, including ON-induced and non-induced rabbits, being treated with vehicle. MRI confirmed that intermittent PTH administration improved SAON after CD therapy. Micro-CT showed increased bone formation within the tunnel. Bone repair was enhanced with decreased empty osteocyte lacunae and necrosis foci area, resulting in enhanced peak load and stiffness of the tunnel. Additionally, PTH enlarged the mean diameter of vessels in the marrow and increased the number of vessels within the tunnels, as well as elevated the expression of BMP-2, RUNX2, IGF-1, bFGF and VEGF, together with serum OCN and VEGF levels. Therefore, PTH[1–34] enhances the efficacy of CD on osteogenesis and neovascularization, thus promoting bone and blood vessels repair in the SAON model. PMID:28562696

  15. Head Start Curriculum Models: A Reference List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Early Childhood Education, Champaign, IL.

    This bibliography lists references to books, articles, curriculum aids, progress reports and other writings related to the 11 different Head Start curriculum models now being tested experimentally in many communities. The models, developed by experienced educators, are: Academically Oriented Preschool; Behavior Analysis Model; Responsive…

  16. Vitamin E prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kuribayashi, Masaaki; Takahashi, Kenji A; Arai, Yuji; Ishida, Masashi; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Prevention of osteonecrosis after corticosteroid administration would be important. We examined the potential of vitamin E (α-tocopherol) to reduce the incidence of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis in an animal model. Methods Japanese white rabbits were divided into 2 groups; the control group was fed a normal diet and the experimental group was fed α-tocopherol-supplemented diet in which α-tocopherol (600 mg/kg diet) was added to the normal diet. To induce osteonecrosis, high-dose methylprednisolone acetate (MPSL) (20 mg/kg body weight) was injected once into the right gluteus medius muscle of all rabbits. 4 weeks after the injection of MPSL, the presence or absence of osteonecrosis of bilateral femurs was examined histopathologically. The tocopherol/cholesterol ratios were calculated. The plasma levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) were measured. Results Alpha-tocopherol-supplemented diet reduced the incidence of osteonecrosis, which developed in 14 of 20 rabbits in the control group and 5 of 21 rabbits in the experimental group (p = 0.004). The tocopherol/cholesterol ratio was higher in the experimental group than in the control group after the α-tocopherol administration. The plasma TBARS level was lower in the experimental group than in the control group at 4 weeks after the MPSL administration. Interpretation Our findings may offer a new approach for the prevention of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis. PMID:20146637

  17. Vitamin E prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, Masaaki; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Takahashi, Kenji A; Arai, Yuji; Ishida, Masashi; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2010-02-01

    Prevention of osteonecrosis after corticosteroid administration would be important. We examined the potential of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) to reduce the incidence of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis in an animal model. Japanese white rabbits were divided into 2 groups; the control group was fed a normal diet and the experimental group was fed alpha-tocopherol-supplemented diet in which alpha-tocopherol (600 mg/kg diet) was added to the normal diet. To induce osteonecrosis, high-dose methylprednisolone acetate (MPSL) (20 mg/kg body weight) was injected once into the right gluteus medius muscle of all rabbits. 4 weeks after the injection of MPSL, the presence or absence of osteonecrosis of bilateral femurs was examined histopathologically. The tocopherol/cholesterol ratios were calculated. The plasma levels of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) were measured. Alpha-tocopherol-supplemented diet reduced the incidence of osteonecrosis, which developed in 14 of 20 rabbits in the control group and 5 of 21 rabbits in the experimental group (p = 0.004). The tocopherol/cholesterol ratio was higher in the experimental group than in the control group after the alpha-tocopherol administration. The plasma TBARS level was lower in the experimental group than in the control group at 4 weeks after the MPSL administration. Our findings may offer a new approach for the prevention of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis.

  18. A sensor-weighted overlapping-sphere head model and exhaustive head model comparison for MEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. X.; Mosher, J. C.; Leahy, R. M.

    1999-02-01

    The spherical head model has been used in magnetoencephalography (MEG) as a simple forward model for calculating the external magnetic fields resulting from neural activity. For more realistic head shapes, the boundary element method (BEM) or similar numerical methods are used, but at greatly increased computational cost. We introduce a sensor-weighted overlapping-sphere (OS) head model for rapid calculation of more realistic head shapes. The volume currents associated with primary neural activity are used to fit spherical head models for each individual MEG sensor such that the head is more realistically modelled as a set of overlapping spheres, rather than a single sphere. To assist in the evaluation of this OS model with BEM and other head models, we also introduce a novel comparison technique that is based on a generalized eigenvalue decomposition and accounts for the presence of noise in the MEG data. With this technique we can examine the worst possible errors for thousands of dipole locations in a realistic brain volume. We test the traditional single-sphere model, three-shell and single-shell BEM, and the new OS model. The results show that the OS model has accuracy similar to the BEM but is orders of magnitude faster to compute.

  19. Hydrogen-rich saline attenuates steroid-associated femoral head necrosis through inhibition of oxidative stress in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, SHENG-LI; JIAO, JIAN; YAN, HONG-WEI

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that hydrogen is a novel, selective antioxidant that exerts a protective effect against organ damage. The present study investigated the effect of hydrogen-rich saline on corticosteroid-induced necrosis of the femoral head in an animal model established using prednisolone. A total of 30 healthy, male, adult New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: Hydrogen-rich saline (treated with hydrogen-rich saline via intraperitoneal injection) and placebo (treated with normal saline). At the set time-points, the structure of the femoral head was examined using a microscope; the concentrations of glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxide (LPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thrombomodulin (TM) in the plasma were measured and the microvessel density was quantified. The results showed that hydrogen-rich saline significantly decreased the levels of VEGF, TM and LPO and increased the GSH level in steroid-associated necrosis of the femoral head in the rabbit model. A significant increase in the microvessel density was observed in the hydrogen-rich saline group. Histopathological staining confirmed the results of the biochemical analysis. The present study demonstrates that hydrogen treatment may alleviate steroid-associated osteonecrosis by inhibiting oxidative stress. Hydrogen-rich saline may provide an alternative treatment for steroid-associated necrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26889236

  20. Factors associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw among bisphosponate users

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Lisa M; Jeter, Joanne M; Benham-Hutchins, Marge; Alberts, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are medications that impact bone reformation by inhibiting osteoclast function. Osteonecrosis of the jaw has been reported among patients receiving these medications. It is unclear if the risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw among cancer patients taking bisphosphonates are also possible risk factors among patients receiving these medications for other indications. Methods A systematic review search strategy was used to identify cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw among patients taking bisphosphonates for an indication other than cancer to identify potential contributing factors. Data were analyzed according to previous models to develop a more expanded model that may explain possible mechanisms for the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw among patients without cancer. Results Ninety-nine cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw were identified among patients who were prescribed a bisphosphonate for an indication other than cancer. These cases included 85 osteoporosis patients, 10 patients with Paget’s disease, two patients with rheumatoid arthritis, one patient with diabetes and one patient with maxillary fibrous dysplasia. The mean age was 69.4 years, 87.3% were female, and 87.6% were receiving oral, but not intravenous, bisphosphonates. Of the 63 patients reporting dental care information, 88.9% had a dental procedure prior to the onset of osteonecrosis of the jaw. Of all cases providing medical information, 71% were taking at least one medication that affects bone turnover in addition to the bisphosphonate, and 81.6% reported additional underlying health conditions. Conclusions The case details suggest a multiplicity of factors associated with this condition and provide the foundation for a model outlining the potential mechanism for the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw among patients taking bisphosphonates for an indication other than cancer. PMID:18501224

  1. A stochastic model for head lice infections.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patricia; Wilkinson-Herbots, Hilde; Isham, Valerie

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of head lice infections in schools, by considering a model for endemic infection based on a stochastic SIS (susceptible-infected-susceptible) epidemic model, with the addition of an external source of infection. We deduce a range of properties of our model, including the length of a single outbreak of infection. We use the stationary distribution of the number of infected individuals, in conjunction with data from a recent study carried out in Welsh schools on the prevalence of head lice infections, and employ maximum likelihood methods to obtain estimates of the model parameters. A complication is that, for each school, only a sample of the pupils was checked for infection. Our likelihood function takes account of the missing data by incorporating a hypergeometric sampling element. We arrive at estimates of the ratios of the "within school" and "external source" transmission rates to the recovery rate and use these to obtain estimates for various quantities of interest.

  2. From the radiologic pathology archives imaging of osteonecrosis: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Foreman, Kristopher L; Klassen-Fischer, Mary K; Fox, Michael G; Chung, Ellen M; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is common and represents loss of blood supply to a region of bone. Common sites affected include the femoral head, humeral head, knee, femoral/tibial metadiaphysis, scaphoid, lunate, and talus. Symptomatic femoral head osteonecrosis accounts for 10,000-20,000 new cases annually in the United States. In contradistinction, metadiaphyseal osteonecrosis is often occult and asymptomatic. There are numerous causes of osteonecrosis most commonly related to trauma, corticosteroids, and idiopathic. Imaging of osteonecrosis is frequently diagnostic with a serpentine rim of sclerosis on radiographs, photopenia in early disease at bone scintigraphy, and maintained yellow marrow at MR imaging with a serpentine rim of high signal intensity (double-line sign) on images obtained with long repetition time sequences. These radiologic features correspond to the underlying pathology of osseous response to wall off the osteonecrotic process and attempts at repair with vascularized granulation tissue at the reactive interface. The long-term clinical importance of epiphyseal osteonecrosis is almost exclusively based on the likelihood of overlying articular collapse. MR imaging is generally considered the most sensitive and specific imaging modality both for early diagnosis and identifying features that increase the possibility of this complication. Treatment subsequent to articular collapse and development of secondary osteoarthritis typically requires reconstructive surgery. Malignant transformation of osteonecrosis is rare and almost exclusively associated with metadiaphyseal lesions. Imaging features of this dire sequela include aggressive bone destruction about the lesion margin, cortical involvement, and an associated soft-tissue mass. Recognizing the appearance of osteonecrosis, which reflects the underlying pathology, improves radiologic assessment and is important to guide optimal patient management. ©RSNA, 2014.

  3. Steroid-induced osteonecrosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Cruess, R L

    1981-11-01

    Between 1963 and 1980 cortisone-induced osteonecrosis has been seen in 122 patients at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal. Of these, 68 had had renal homotransplants; the others suffered from a variety of conditions. The femoral head was most commonly affected; the humeral head, distal femur, proximal tibia, talus and capitellum were also involved. There were two patterns of involvement, similar in all locations. The more common is subchondral osteolysis, which may heal without operation. The other is similar to osteochondritis dissecans and requires operation. Alteration in fat metabolism is the most likely cause of the condition. Vascular occlusion and bone death may result from an increase in fat cell size or from fat embolization. Treatment should be conservative as often as possible, but gratifying results have been obtained in those patients requiring surgical procedures.

  4. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that…

  5. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-01-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that…

  6. Osteonecrosis of Femoral Head Treated with Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy: Analysis of Short-term Clinical Outcomes of Treatment with Radiologic Staging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Young; Kwon, Jae-Woo; Park, Jung-Seob; Han, Kyeol; Shin, Woo-jin; Lee, Jeong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate clinical results of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) with radiographic staging on patients with avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH). Materials and Methods We evaluated 24 patients diagnosed with AVNFH (32 hip joints) who were treated with ESWT from 1993 to 2012. Average follow-up period was 27 months, and the average age of patients was 47.8 years. The Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) system was used to grade radiographic stage prior to treatment. For this study patients were divided into two groups based on their ARCO stage, group 1 (ARCO stages I and II) and group 2 (ARCO stage III). Comparative analyses were done between the two groups using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score and the Harris hip score (HHS) at pre-treatment and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. Failure was defined when radiographic stage progressed or arthroplasty surgery was needed due to clinical exacerbation. Results Both groups showed clinical improvements with VAS scoring at final follow-up (group 1: median 7 to 1.5, P<0.001; group 2: mean 7 to 4, P=0.056). Using HHS, group 1 showed a significant improvement (from 65.5 to 95 [P<0.001]), while no significance was observed for group 2 (P=0.280). At final follow-up, 3 hips from group 1 and one hip from group 2 showed radiographic improvement; however, two patients underwent total hip arthroplasty due to persistent pain and dysfunction. Conclusion ESWT can be considered as an interventional option before surgical treatment in patients with not only early stage AVNFH but also with mid stage. PMID:27536633

  7. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the proximal humerus.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shelain; Colaco, Henry B; Elvey, Michael E; Lee, Marcus H

    2015-10-01

    Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the proximal humerus represents a challenging problem to the surgeon. It is commonly seen following multi-fragmentary fractures of the proximal humerus which may affect the long-term functional recovery after such injuries. This review summarises the current evidence on risk factors, reasons why estimating its epidemiology is difficult, the vascular supply of the humeral head, classification, and management options.

  8. [Femoral osteonecrosis - Ahlbaeck's disease].

    PubMed

    Pape, D; Hoffmann, A; Kohn, D

    2012-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee can present as a spontaneous, primary (SPON) or a secondary clinical entity (SON). The natural history of SPON follows a course of several sequential stages which seem to be irreversible in later stages of both entities. Early diagnosis of ON is crucial and the earlier the stage of the lesion at the time of diagnosis, the better the prognosis. Clinically, early diagnosis and treatment of ON might prevent unnecessary surgery in cases with a concomitant degenerative meniscal tear. From a medicolegal viewpoint early-stage ON should be ruled out prior to surgery as arthroscopy has recently been associated with ON. Recent biopsy studies showed that SPONK is most likely caused by insufficiency fractures which seem to appear as osteonecrotic lesions in later stages of the disease due to failed bone healing.

  9. Walking Ahead: The Headed Social Force Model.

    PubMed

    Farina, Francesco; Fontanelli, Daniele; Garulli, Andrea; Giannitrapani, Antonio; Prattichizzo, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Human motion models are finding an increasing number of novel applications in many different fields, such as building design, computer graphics and robot motion planning. The Social Force Model is one of the most popular alternatives to describe the motion of pedestrians. By resorting to a physical analogy, individuals are assimilated to point-wise particles subject to social forces which drive their dynamics. Such a model implicitly assumes that humans move isotropically. On the contrary, empirical evidence shows that people do have a preferred direction of motion, walking forward most of the time. Lateral motions are observed only in specific circumstances, such as when navigating in overcrowded environments or avoiding unexpected obstacles. In this paper, the Headed Social Force Model is introduced in order to improve the realism of the trajectories generated by the classical Social Force Model. The key feature of the proposed approach is the inclusion of the pedestrians' heading into the dynamic model used to describe the motion of each individual. The force and torque representing the model inputs are computed as suitable functions of the force terms resulting from the traditional Social Force Model. Moreover, a new force contribution is introduced in order to model the behavior of people walking together as a single group. The proposed model features high versatility, being able to reproduce both the unicycle-like trajectories typical of people moving in open spaces and the point-wise motion patterns occurring in high density scenarios. Extensive numerical simulations show an increased regularity of the resulting trajectories and confirm a general improvement of the model realism.

  10. Walking Ahead: The Headed Social Force Model

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Human motion models are finding an increasing number of novel applications in many different fields, such as building design, computer graphics and robot motion planning. The Social Force Model is one of the most popular alternatives to describe the motion of pedestrians. By resorting to a physical analogy, individuals are assimilated to point-wise particles subject to social forces which drive their dynamics. Such a model implicitly assumes that humans move isotropically. On the contrary, empirical evidence shows that people do have a preferred direction of motion, walking forward most of the time. Lateral motions are observed only in specific circumstances, such as when navigating in overcrowded environments or avoiding unexpected obstacles. In this paper, the Headed Social Force Model is introduced in order to improve the realism of the trajectories generated by the classical Social Force Model. The key feature of the proposed approach is the inclusion of the pedestrians’ heading into the dynamic model used to describe the motion of each individual. The force and torque representing the model inputs are computed as suitable functions of the force terms resulting from the traditional Social Force Model. Moreover, a new force contribution is introduced in order to model the behavior of people walking together as a single group. The proposed model features high versatility, being able to reproduce both the unicycle-like trajectories typical of people moving in open spaces and the point-wise motion patterns occurring in high density scenarios. Extensive numerical simulations show an increased regularity of the resulting trajectories and confirm a general improvement of the model realism. PMID:28076435

  11. Focal cryogen insults for inducing segmental osteonecrosis: computational and experimental assessments of thermal fields.

    PubMed

    Reed, Karen L; Brown, Thomas D; Conzemius, Michael G

    2003-09-01

    Orthopaedic management of femoral head osteonecrosis is a common clinical problem for which there presently is no good solution. Current animal models are inappropriate to study potential new solutions, since it has been difficult to replicate the natural history of structural collapse seen in the human disorder. Recently, progression to collapse was obtained for cryogenically induced osteonecrosis in emus, although the lesions involved were imprecisely controlled in terms of size or location. A new cryo-insult probe is here reported for the purpose of delivering well-prescribed local thermal insults in this new animal model, while minimizing damage to non-targeted regions. Finite element analysis was used to elucidate the influence of operator-controlled parameters upon the temporal/spatial variation of the thermal field. The numerical formulation includes convective heat transfer attributable to tissue bed perfusion. The computational results agreed closely with the results of thermocouple recordings in a companion bench-top experiment. The cryo-insult probe successfully produced segmental lesions in the emu model of sizes comparable to the computed freeze front diameters.

  12. The pathogenesis of multifocal osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Shi, Zhencai; Gao, Fuqiang; Wang, Bailiang; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to study the incidence, etiology, and diagnosis of multifocal osteonecrosis (MFON) and its treatment options to facilitate an earlier diagnosis and to optimize treatment. A radiological investigation was performed in osteonecrosis patients with a high risk of MFON for a more accurate diagnosis between January 2010 and June 2015. For patients with osteonecrosis of both the hip and knee joints or for patients with a history of corticosteroid use or alcohol abuse who had osteonecrosis of one or more joints in the shoulder, ankle, wrist or elbow, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also performed on other joints, regardless of whether these joints were symptomatic. Furthermore, we performed a radiological screening of 102 patients who had a negative diagnosis of MFON but were at a high risk; among them, another 31 MFON cases were successfully identified (30.4%). Thus, the incidence of MFON during the study period increased from 3.1% to 5.2%. Patients diagnosed with osteonecrosis and who are at a high risk of MFON should have their other joints radiologically examined when necessary. This will reduce missed diagnosis of MFON and facilitate an earlier diagnosis and treatment to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:27404962

  13. Osteonecrosis of the knee: review

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Ammar R.; Cherian, Jeffrey J.; Jauregui, Julio J.; Pierce, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a devastating disease that can lead to end-stage arthritis of various joint including the knee. There are three categories of osteonecrosis that affect the knee: spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK), secondary, and post-arthroscopic. Regardless of osteonecrosis categories, the treatment of this disease aims to halt further progression or delay the onset of end-stage arthritis of the knee. However, once substantial joint surface collapse has occurred or there are sign of degenerative arthritis, joint arthroplasty is the most appropriate treatment option. Currently, the non-operative treatment options consist of observation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), protected weight bearing, and analgesia as needed. Operative interventions include joint preserving surgery, unilateral knee arthroplasty (UKA), or total knee arthroplasty (TKA) depending on the extent and type of disease. Joint preserving procedures (i.e., arthroscopy, core decompression, osteochondral autograft, and bone grafting) are usually attempted in pre-collapse and some post-collapse lesions, when the articular cartilage is generally intact with only the underlying subchondral bone being affected. Conversely, after severe subchondral collapse has occurred, procedures that attempt to salvage the joint are rarely successful and joint arthroplasty are necessary to relieve pain. The purpose of this article is to highlight the recent evidence concerning the treatment options across the spectrum of management of osteonecrosis of the knee including lesion observation, medications, joint preserving techniques, and total joint arthroplasties. PMID:25705638

  14. Histologic analysis of postmeniscectomy osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Yasukazu; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Hatayama, Kazuhisa; Kimura, Masashi

    2013-05-01

    Bone marrow signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after meniscectomy have been reported as evidence of postmeniscectomy osteonecrosis, but this pathology is unclear. We conducted a study to follow-up cases with bone marrow signal changes on MRI after meniscectomy and investigate the pathology of underlying lesions. Of 136 patients with no presurgical evidence of osteonecrosis, 29 had juxta-articular bone marrow signal changes on MRI after arthroscopic meniscectomy and subsequently underwent conservative therapy. In 6 of these 29 patients, clinical symptoms and radiographic changes began deteriorating. Based on the Koshino classification, 4 of the 6 patients had Stage-2 knee osteonecrosis and 2 had Stage-3. Arthroscopic and pathologic examinations were performed. Arthroscopic findings were fibrillation (all 6 cases), fissuring (4), ulceration (2), and eburnation (2). Histologic analysis confirmed subchondral bone fractures in all 6 cases, but osteonecrotic lesions were detected only in 2 cases with obvious radiologic deterioration. Postmeniscectomy osteonecrosis might result from subchondral bone fractures. Fracture healing is worse in patients with comorbidities than in those without it; comorbidities might be a risk factor for osteonecrosis.

  15. Use of Cone-Beam Computerized Tomography for Evaluation of Bisphosphonate-Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaws in an Experimental Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Isler, Sabri Cemil; Demircan, Sabit; Soluk, Merva; Kasapoglu, Cetin; Oral, Cuneyt Korhan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw (BONJ) is a frequently reported complication. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and histopathological presentation of BONJ with the Hounsfield score and to evaluate the reliability of the score for determining necrosis in an animal model. Material/Methods: Eighty rats were prospectively and randomly divided into two groups of 40 each: a control group and an experimental group. Half of the animals from each group underwent extraction of the left mandibular molars, and the other half underwent extraction of the left maxillary molars under pentobarbital-induced general anesthesia. All animals were euthanized 28 days after tooth extraction. Maxillae and mandibles were extracted, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed, and Hounsfield scores were evaluated. Results: The Hounsfield scores of the experimental group were found to be compatible with chronic osteomyelitis and periosteal reactions. The Hounsfield scores of the control group were compatible with a healthy healing period. Conclusion: In light of these results, both cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the Hounsfield Units (HU) evaluations together are thought to be efficient in the diagnosis of BONJ. PMID:22135613

  16. Allogeneic head and body reconstruction: mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiao-Ping; Song, Yang; Ye, Yi-Jie; Li, Peng-Wei; Han, Ke-Cheng; Shen, Zi-Long; Shan, Ji-Gang; Luther, Kristin; Yang, Bao-Feng

    2014-12-01

    There is still no effective way to save a surviving healthy mind when there is critical organ failure in the body. The next frontier in CTA is allo-head and body reconstruction (AHBR), and just as animal models were key in the development of CTA, they will be crucial in establishing the procedures of AHBR for clinical translation. Our approach, pioneered in mice, involves retaining the donor brain stem and transplanting the recipient head. Our preliminary data in mice support that this allows for retention of breathing and circulatory function. Critical aspects of the current protocol include avoiding cerebral ischemia through cross-circulation (donor to recipient) and retaining the donor brain stem. Successful clinical translation of AHBR will become a milestone of medical history and potentially could save millions of people. This experimental study has confirmed a method to avoid cerebral ischemia during the surgery and solved an important part of the problem of how to accomplish long-term survival after transplantation and preservation of the donor brain stem. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Medical management of osteonecrosis of the hip: a review.

    PubMed

    Rajpura, Asim; Wright, Andrew C; Board, Timothy N

    2011-01-01

    Osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis (AVN) of the hip is a progressive disease mainly affecting adults in their third, fourth or fifth decade of life. Studies into the natural history of the disease suggest that femoral head collapse occurs within 2-3 yrs with associated degenerative changes and at that stage arthroplasty is the most reliable treatment option. Therefore prevention of femoral head collapse is highly desirable in this young patient group. In early stage disease, before femoral head collapse (Ficat and Arlet stage 1-3) core decompression of the femoral head is currently the most widely used procedure to try to relieve intraosseous pressure in the femoral head and restore blood supply.Greater understanding of the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis has led to research into non-surgical management of early stages of the disease, including pharmacological and biophysical treatments.There may be a reduction in symptoms and evidence of prevention of disease progression following some non-surgical treatments. Further studies are needed, including trials comparing medical management with surgical intervention.

  18. Modeling heading in adult soccer players.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Ernesto; Ponce, Daniel; Andresen, Max

    2014-01-01

    Heading soccer balls can generate mild brain injuries and in the long run can lead to difficulty in solving problems, memory deficits, and language difficulties. Researchers evaluated the effects on the head for both correct and incorrect heading techniques. They based the head's geometry on medical images. They determined the injury's magnitude by comparing the neurological tissue's resistance with predictions of the generated stresses. The evaluation examined fast playing conditions in adult soccer, taking into account the ball's speed and the type of impact. Mathematical simulations using the finite element method indicated that correctly heading balls arriving at moderate speed presents a low risk of brain injury. However, damage can happen around the third cervical vertebra. These results coincide with medical studies. Incorrect heading greatly increases the brain injury risk and can alter the parietal area.

  19. The Texas Head Start Metro Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Mary Tom, Ed.; Flores, Alfredo R., Ed.

    The Texas Metro Network (TMN) is an informal group of Head Start Directors and Executive Directors organized for the purposes of improving the delivery of training and technical assistance and for assisting communication between large scale Head Start programs in the metropolitan areas of Texas. In pursuit of these aims, each member unit of the…

  20. Bacterial promotion of bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Tsurushima, H; Kokuryo, S; Sakaguchi, O; Tanaka, J; Tominaga, K

    2013-11-01

    Clinically, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis (BRON) only occurs in the jaw (BRONJ). We aimed to determine differences between the jaw and other bones, as well as the relationship between periodontal pathogens and BRON. Twelve male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: group Z (n=6) were subcutaneously injected with zoledronic acid weekly for 4 weeks; group C (n=6) were injected with saline. One week after the final injection, rats in both groups were divided into three subgroups: Aa subgroup was injected with freeze-dried Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans into bone marrow of the mandibles and femurs, while CFA and saline subgroups were injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or saline using the same protocol. Four weeks after those injections, the rats were euthanized. Areas of osteonecrosis were measured histologically. Statistically, rats in group Z showed significantly wider osteonecrosis areas in both mandibles and femurs with each type of local injection than rats in group C. In group Z, mandibles and femurs stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans or CFA had significantly wider osteonecrosis areas than those stimulated with saline. We have developed a rat model with BRONJ-like lesions. Our results showed BRON to develop not only in the jaw but also in other types of bone following an inflammatory stimulus. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lipoic acid prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bang-Bao; Li, Kang-Hua

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate in vivo effects of lipoic acid (LA) in preventing steroid-induced osteonecrosis and the possible pathway in a rabbit model. Sixty rabbits were divided into 2 groups: rabbits were intraperitoneally injected with LA aqueous solution at 36 mg/kg of body weight per day for 4 weeks in Group A and rabbits were injected with physiologic saline (PS) as a control in Group B. At 2 weeks after starting treatment, they were intramuscularly injected once with 20 mg/kg of methylprednisolone acetate (MPSL). The femora were histopathologically examined for the presence of osteonecrosis. The plasma levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), glutathione (GSH), endothelin (ET) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were assayed at 2 weeks after the injection of MPSL. The incidence of osteonecrosis was significantly higher in Group B (73.1%) than in Group A (20.8%). The GSH level was higher in Group A than in Group B after the LA injection. The plasma MDA and ET levels were lower in Group A than in Group B at 2 weeks after the MPSL administration. Lipoic acid can prevent the development of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rabbits. Inhibited oxidative stress and amendment of vascular endothelial dysfunction is a possible mechanism for this effect.

  2. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis and Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Glucocorticoid administration is the most common cause of secondary osteoporosis and the leading cause of nontraumatic osteonecrosis. In patients receiving long-term therapy, glucocorticoids induce fractures in 30 to 50% and osteonecrosis in 9 to 40%. This article reviews glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and osteonecrosis addressing the risk factors, pathogenesis, evaluation, treatment, and uncertainties in the clinical management of these disorders. PMID:22877431

  3. A Personal Computer-Based Head-Spine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    injury criterion for the cervical spine . Simulations with the head and cervical spine model in the fore-aft and... Spine Model Primate Models - Chimpanzee, Baboon, and Rhesus CSHM - Cervical Spine and Head Model PAM - Pilot Alignment Models (six separate models...Biomech. 17(2):81- 95,1984. 9 Farfan, H, Gracovetsky, S., and Helleur. Cervical Spine Analysis for Ejection Injury Prediction. AFOSR-TR-33, Air

  4. Involvement of the maxillary sinus in bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: Radiologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Wasserzug, Oshri; Kaffe, Israel; Lazarovici, Towy Sorel; Weissman, Tal; Yahalom, Ran; Fliss, Dan M; Yarom, Noam

    2017-01-01

    The use of bisphosphonates is very common among patients with osteoporosis and multiple myeloma as well as those with bone metastases from various malignancies. The benefits of bisphosphonates are well recognized, but it became evident during the past decade that these medications portend the major adverse effect of osteonecrosis of the jaw, known as bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. Our aim was to evaluate the specific manifestations of bisphosphonate use on the maxillary sinus in patients with documented bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. A retrospective review of all the patients diagnosed between October 2003 to August 2014 as having bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw in a large university-affiliated tertiary care medical center. The records of 173 patients diagnosed as having bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw during the study period were retrieved. The available head and neck computed tomographic images were analyzed for cases of involvement of the maxilla. Manifestations of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw as observed on physical examination and on imaging studies. Seventy-one patients (41%) had involvement of the maxilla, 86 patients (49%) had involvement of the mandible, and 16 patients (9%) had involvement of both the maxilla and the mandible. Computerized tomography studies were available for 50 patients with involvement of the maxilla: 36 (72%) had evidence of maxillary sinus opacification (in comparison, the incidence of maxillary sinus opacification as an incidental finding in the general population is reported to be 19%, p < 0.0001). Sixteen patients (32%) had evidence of oroantral fistula, and five patients (10%) had oronasal fistula. In addition to its well-established effects on the mandible and maxilla, bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw significantly affected the maxillary sinus. Its radiologic manifestations should be recognized by clinicians and especially by

  5. An internal model of head kinematics predicts the influence of head orientation on reflexive eye movements.

    PubMed

    Zupan, L H; Merfeld, D M

    2005-09-01

    Our sense of self-motion and self-orientation results from combining information from different sources. We hypothesize that the central nervous system (CNS) uses internal models of the laws of physics to merge cues provided by different sensory systems. Different models that include internal models have been proposed; we focus herein on that referred to as the sensory weighting model. For simplicity, we isolate the portion of the sensory weighting model that estimates head angular velocity: it includes an inverse internal model of head kinematics and an 'idiotropic' vector aligned with the main body axis. Following a post-rotatory tilt in the dark, which is a rapid tilt following a constant-velocity rotation about an earth-vertical axis, the inverse internal model is applied to conflicting vestibular signals. Consequently, the CNS computes an inaccurate estimate of head angular velocity that shifts toward alignment with an estimate of gravity. Since reflexive eye movements known as vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) compensate for this estimate of head angular velocity, the model predicts that the VOR rotation axis shifts toward alignment with this estimate of gravity and that the VOR time constant depends on final head orientation. These predictions are consistent with experimental data.

  6. An internal model of head kinematics predicts the influence of head orientation on reflexive eye movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, L. H.; Merfeld, D. M.

    2005-09-01

    Our sense of self-motion and self-orientation results from combining information from different sources. We hypothesize that the central nervous system (CNS) uses internal models of the laws of physics to merge cues provided by different sensory systems. Different models that include internal models have been proposed; we focus herein on that referred to as the sensory weighting model (Zupan et al 2002 Biol. Cybern. 86 209-30). For simplicity, we isolate the portion of the sensory weighting model that estimates head angular velocity: it includes an inverse internal model of head kinematics and an 'idiotropic' vector aligned with the main body axis. Following a post-rotatory tilt in the dark, which is a rapid tilt following a constant-velocity rotation about an earth-vertical axis, the inverse internal model is applied to conflicting vestibular signals. Consequently, the CNS computes an inaccurate estimate of head angular velocity that shifts toward alignment with an estimate of gravity. Since reflexive eye movements known as vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) compensate for this estimate of head angular velocity, the model predicts that the VOR rotation axis shifts toward alignment with this estimate of gravity and that the VOR time constant depends on final head orientation. These predictions are consistent with experimental data.

  7. A case of early detection of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Mori, Miyu; Koide, Tetsuro; Matsui, Yuriyo; Matsuda, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaws is an adverse reaction associated with the use of bisphosphonates. Although the diagnosis of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is based on symptomatology, it is often detected late because the patients become symptomatic only after osteonecrosis is well established. We describe a case of early oral BRONJ detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) accidentally. Head MRI revealed low signal of T1-weight images in left mandibula. Patient had been treated with minodronate for osteoporosis during 18 months. Based on the MRI findings and medication history, early stage BRONJ could be considered. Therefore minodronate was switched to teriparatide. Thereafter mandible pares-thesias, odontalgia and exposed bone were not observed. This case suggests that MRI is useful for the early detection of BRONJ.

  8. [Bionic model for coordinated head-eye motion control].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaobo; Chen, Tiejun

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between eye movements and head movements of the primate during gaze shifts are analyzed in detail in the present paper. Applying the mechanisms of neurophysiology to engineering domain, we have improved the robot eye-head coordination. A bionic control strategy of coordinated head-eye motion was proposed. The processes of gaze shifts are composed of an initial fast phase followed by a slow phase. In the fast phase saccade eye movements and slow head movements were combined, which cooperate to bring gaze from an initial resting position toward the new target rapidly, while in the slow phase the gaze stability and target fixation were ensured by the action of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) where the eyes and head rotate by equal amplitudes in opposite directions. A bionic gaze control model was given. The simulation results confirmed the effectiveness of the model by comparing with the results of neurophysiology experiments.

  9. Osmotic Model to Explain Anomalous Hydraulic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marine, I. Wendell; Fritz, Steven J.

    1981-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that compacted clays act as osmotic membranes when they separate aqueous solutions of unequal ionic concentration. Theoretically, osmotically induced differential hydraulic pressure in groundwater systems can be relatively high. The magnitude depends primarily upon concentration differences across the membrane, type of ions, type of clay, and pore size. In experiments, thin, compacted clay membranes commonly exhibit varying degrees of osmotic efficiency due to ion leak-age through the clay. In natural systems the membrane and the solution containers are not as distinct and well defined as they are in the laboratory. Moreover, the membrane is commonly thick, inhomogeneous, and composite. In a buried Triassic basin at the Savannah River plant near Aiken, South Carolina, it is suspected that osmosis causes the saline water in the basin center to be slightly geopressurized in relation to freshwater in the overlying coastal plain aquifer. Two wells have heads of 7.88 and 12.98 bars (114.3 and 188.3 psi) above the head in the coastal plain aquifer. The head in each of these wells approximates the osmotic equilibrium head calculated from solution concentration of water produced by each well (12,000 and 18,500 mg/l, respectively). Other wells penetrating the top and edge of the Triassic basin probably penetrate a zone where ion leakage gives rise to less saline water. Thus these wells are not geopressurized.

  10. Head Motion Modeling for Human Behavior Analysis in Dyadic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Georgiou, Panayiotis; Baucom, Brian; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of head motion in human interaction, notably of its role in conveying interlocutors’ behavioral characteristics. Head motion is physically complex and carries rich information; current modeling approaches based on visual signals, however, are still limited in their ability to adequately capture these important properties. Guided by the methodology of kinesics, we propose a data driven approach to identify typical head motion patterns. The approach follows the steps of first segmenting motion events, then parametrically representing the motion by linear predictive features, and finally generalizing the motion types using Gaussian mixture models. The proposed approach is experimentally validated using video recordings of communication sessions from real couples involved in a couples therapy study. In particular we use the head motion model to classify binarized expert judgments of the interactants’ specific behavioral characteristics where entrainment in head motion is hypothesized to play a role: Acceptance, Blame, Positive, and Negative behavior. We achieve accuracies in the range of 60% to 70% for the various experimental settings and conditions. In addition, we describe a measure of motion similarity between the interaction partners based on the proposed model. We show that the relative change of head motion similarity during the interaction significantly correlates with the expert judgments of the interactants’ behavioral characteristics. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed head motion model, and underscore the promise of analyzing human behavioral characteristics through signal processing methods. PMID:26557047

  11. Evaluation of a laboratory model of human head impact biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Fidel; Shull, Peter B; Camarillo, David B

    2015-09-18

    This work describes methodology for evaluating laboratory models of head impact biomechanics. Using this methodology, we investigated: how closely does twin-wire drop testing model head rotation in American football impacts? Head rotation is believed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) but helmet safety standards only model head translations believed to cause severe TBI. It is unknown whether laboratory head impact models in safety standards, like twin-wire drop testing, reproduce six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head impact biomechanics that may cause mTBI. We compared 6DOF measurements of 421 American football head impacts to twin-wire drop tests at impact sites and velocities weighted to represent typical field exposure. The highest rotational velocities produced by drop testing were the 74th percentile of non-injury field impacts. For a given translational acceleration level, drop testing underestimated field rotational acceleration by 46% and rotational velocity by 72%. Primary rotational acceleration frequencies were much larger in drop tests (~100 Hz) than field impacts (~10 Hz). Drop testing was physically unable to produce acceleration directions common in field impacts. Initial conditions of a single field impact were highly resolved in stereo high-speed video and reconstructed in a drop test. Reconstruction results reflected aggregate trends of lower amplitude rotational velocity and higher frequency rotational acceleration in drop testing, apparently due to twin-wire constraints and the absence of a neck. These results suggest twin-wire drop testing is limited in modeling head rotation during impact, and motivate continued evaluation of head impact models to ensure helmets are tested under conditions that may cause mTBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of a laboratory model of human head impact biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Fidel; Shull, Peter B.; Camarillo, David B.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes methodology for evaluating laboratory models of head impact biomechanics. Using this methodology, we investigated: how closely does twin-wire drop testing model head rotation in American football impacts? Head rotation is believed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) but helmet safety standards only model head translations believed to cause severe TBI. It is unknown whether laboratory head impact models in safety standards, like twin-wire drop testing, reproduce six degree-of-freedom (6DOF) head impact biomechanics that may cause mTBI. We compared 6DOF measurements of 421 American football head impacts to twin-wire drop tests at impact sites and velocities weighted to represent typical field exposure. The highest rotational velocities produced by drop testing were the 74th percentile of non-injury field impacts. For a given translational acceleration level, drop testing underestimated field rotational acceleration by 46% and rotational velocity by 72%. Primary rotational acceleration frequencies were much larger in drop tests (~100Hz) than field impacts (~10Hz). Drop testing was physically unable to produce acceleration directions common in field impacts. Initial conditions of a single field impact were highly resolved in stereo high-speed video and reconstructed in a drop test. Reconstruction results reflected aggregate trends of lower amplitude rotational velocity and higher frequency rotational acceleration in drop testing, apparently due to twin-wire constraints and the absence of a neck. These results suggest twin-wire drop testing is limited in modeling head rotation during impact, and motivate continued evaluation of head impact models to ensure helmets are tested under conditions that may cause mTBI. PMID:26117075

  13. Bilateral rapidly destructive arthrosis of the hip joint resulting from subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuaki; Schneider, Robert; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Bullough, Peter G

    2010-02-01

    A 57-year-old woman suffered rapid destruction of both hip joints over a 10 months period. At the first visit, her radiographs demonstrated slight joint space narrowing and acetabular cyst formation in both hips. Five months later, joint space narrowing had further progressed, and intra-articular injection of steroid was given in both hips. However, the hip pain gradually became worse. Five months later, both joint spaces had totally disappeared and both femoral heads had undergone massive collapse. At gross examination, both resected femoral heads showed extensive opaque yellow areas consistent with osteonecrosis. Microscopic examination of these areas revealed evidence of both extensive fracture and callus formation, as well as necrosis throughout, indicating that the osteonecrosis observed in this case was a secondary phenomenon superimposed on pre-existing osteoarthritis and subchondral fracture. There were many pseudogranulomatous lesions in the marrow space and necrotic area, where tiny fragments of bone and articular cartilage, surrounded by histiocytes and giant cells, were embedded, such as are typically seen in rapidly destructive arthrosis. No radiologic or morphologic evidence of primary osteonecrosis was noted. This case indicates that at least some cases of rapidly destructive arthritis are the result of subchondral fracture with superimposed secondary osteonecrosis.

  14. Apoptosis of osteocytes in glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, R S; Nicholas, R W; Manolagas, S C

    2000-08-01

    An increase in osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis has been demonstrated in mice and humans receiving glucocorticoids and may be involved in the pathogenesis of the associated osteonecrosis. To examine the spatial relationship between osteocyte apoptosis and glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis, we determined the prevalence of osteocyte apoptosis in whole femoral heads obtained from patients who underwent prosthetic hip replacement because of osteonecrosis due to chronic glucocorticoid treatment (n = 5), alcoholism (n = 3), and trauma (n = 1) as well as in femoral neck cores from patients with sickle cell disease (n = 5). Abundant apoptotic osteocytes and cells lining cancellous bone were found juxtaposed to the subchondral fracture crescent in femurs from the patients with glucocorticoid excess. In contrast, apoptotic bone cells were absent from the specimens taken from patients with trauma or sickle cell disease and were rare with alcohol abuse. These results indicate that glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis is a misnomer. The bone is not necrotic; instead, it shows prominent apoptosis of cancellous lining cells and osteocytes. Glucocorticoid-induced osteocyte apoptosis, a cumulative and irreparable defect, could uniquely disrupt the mechanosensory function of the osteocyte network and thus start the inexorable sequence of events leading to collapse of the femoral head.

  15. What is the pain source? A case report of a patient with low back pain and bilateral hip osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Minkalis, Amy L.; Vining, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain is a common symptom arising from many possible sources and includes the possibility of the contribution of remote pathology. This report describes a patient with bilateral osteonecrosis of the femoral heads presenting with a primary symptom of low back pain. Case presentation: A 37-year-old male presented for evaluation of dominant pain that existed for approximately 6–12 months and was located in the right low back. Milder pain was also reported in the right hip. Low back and hip pain were both aggravated by weight-bearing activities. An evidence-based diagnostic evaluation revealed little indication for a primary pain source originating from low back structures. Radiographs revealed bilateral osteonecrosis with evidence of left femoral head collapse. Conclusion: Hip osteonecrosis may have contributed to an atypical presentation of low back pain due to aberrant localization of pain and/or combined with altered biomechanical loading of musculoskeletal structures. PMID:26500365

  16. Evaluation of Femoral Head Necrosis Using a Volumetric Method Based on MRI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    hip hemi - arthroplasty . The specimens were trimmed and rounded-up with wax, to take the shape of a sphere. In order to simulate the affected...106 hips with osteonecrosis before treatment with vascularized fibular grafting. The hips were evaluated using the volumetric method. The follow up...Osteonecrosis, MRI, Volumetric Feature Extraction, Automated Diagnosis I.INTRODUCTION Femoral head osteonecrosis is responsible for a large number of hip

  17. Modeling transient streaming potentials in falling-head permeameter tests.

    PubMed

    Malama, Bwalya; Revil, André

    2014-01-01

    We present transient streaming potential data collected during falling-head permeameter tests performed on samples of two sands with different physical and chemical properties. The objective of the work is to estimate hydraulic conductivity (K) and the electrokinetic coupling coefficient (Cl ) of the sand samples. A semi-empirical model based on the falling-head permeameter flow model and electrokinetic coupling is used to analyze the streaming potential data and to estimate K and Cl . The values of K estimated from head data are used to validate the streaming potential method. Estimates of K from streaming potential data closely match those obtained from the associated head data, with less than 10% deviation. The electrokinetic coupling coefficient was estimated from streaming potential vs. (1) time and (2) head data for both sands. The results indicate that, within limits of experimental error, the values of Cl estimated by the two methods are essentially the same. The results of this work demonstrate that a temporal record of the streaming potential response in falling-head permeameter tests can be used to estimate both K and Cl . They further indicate the potential for using transient streaming potential data as a proxy for hydraulic head in hydrogeology applications.

  18. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for anisotropic inhomogeneous head tissue conductivity in human head modelling.

    PubMed

    Bashar, M R; Li, Y; Wen, P

    2010-06-01

    The accuracy of an electroencephalography (EEG) forward problem partially depends on the head tissue conductivities. These conductivities are anisotropic and inhomogeneous in nature. This paper investigates the effects of conductivity uncertainty and analyses its sensitivity on an EEG forward problem for a spherical and a realistic head models. We estimate the uncertain conductivities using an efficient constraint based on an optimization method and perturb it by means of the volume and directional constraints. Assigning the uncertain conductivities, we construct spherical and realistic head models by means of a stochastic finite element method for fixed dipolar sources. We also compute EEG based on the constructed head models. We use a probabilistic sensitivity analysis method to determine the sensitivity indexes. These indexes characterize the conductivities with the most or the least effects on the computed outputs. These results demonstrate that conductivity uncertainty has significant effects on EEG. These results also show that the uncertain conductivities of the scalp, the radial direction of the skull and transversal direction in the white matter are more sensible.

  19. Osteonecrosis in Children After Therapy for Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kaste, Sue C.; Karimova, Evguenia J.; Neel, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Osteonecrosis in the growing population of childhood cancer survivors results from disease and treatment. Imagers must be knowledgeable about patient groups at risk for its development, patterns of involvement and potential implications. This review will focus on implications of this potentially life-altering toxicity. CONCLUSION Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for developing osteonecrosis. Because osteonecrosis is often asymptomatic until late in the process, imaging is critical for its detection and characterization when interventions may be most effective to ameliorate its progression. PMID:21512065

  20. Numerical modeling of temperature distributions within the neonatal head.

    PubMed

    Van Leeuwen, G M; Hand, J W; Lagendijk, J J; Azzopardi, D V; Edwards, A D

    2000-09-01

    Introduction of hypothermia therapy as a neuroprotection therapy after hypoxia-ischemia in newborn infants requires appraisal of cooling methods. In this numerical study thermal simulations were performed to test the hypothesis that cooling of the surface of the cranium by the application of a cooling bonnet significantly reduces deep brain temperature and produces a temperature differential between the deep brain and the body core. A realistic three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of infant head anatomy was used, derived from magnetic resonance data from a newborn infant. Temperature distributions were calculated using the Pennes heatsink model. The cooling bonnet was at a constant temperature of 10 degrees C. When modeling head cooling only, a constant body core temperature of 37 degrees C was imposed. The computed result showed no significant cooling of the deep brain regions, only the very superficial regions of the brain are cooled to temperatures of 33-34 degrees C. Poor efficacy of head cooling was still found after a considerable increase in the modeled thermal conductivities of the skin and skull, or after a decrease in perfusion. The results for the heatsink thermal model of the infant head were confirmed by comparison of results computed for a scaled down adult head, using both the heatsink description and a discrete vessel thermal model with both anatomy and vasculature obtained from MR data. The results indicate that significant reduction in brain temperature will only be achieved if the infant's core temperature is lowered.

  1. Approximate average head models for EEG source imaging.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Hernández, Pedro A; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Ojeda-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Kochen, Silvia; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Muravchik, Carlos; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro A

    2009-12-15

    We examine the performance of approximate models (AM) of the head in solving the EEG inverse problem. The AM are needed when the individual's MRI is not available. We simulate the electric potential distribution generated by cortical sources for a large sample of 305 subjects, and solve the inverse problem with AM. Statistical comparisons are carried out with the distribution of the localization errors. We propose several new AM. These are the average of many individual realistic MRI-based models, such as surface-based models or lead fields. We demonstrate that the lead fields of the AM should be calculated considering source moments not constrained to be normal to the cortex. We also show that the imperfect anatomical correspondence between all cortices is the most important cause of localization errors. Our average models perform better than a random individual model or the usual average model in the MNI space. We also show that a classification based on race and gender or head size before averaging does not significantly improve the results. Our average models are slightly better than an existing AM with shape guided by measured individual electrode positions, and have the advantage of not requiring such measurements. Among the studied models, the Average Lead Field seems the most convenient tool in large and systematical clinical and research studies demanding EEG source localization, when MRI are unavailable. This AM does not need a strict alignment between head models, and can therefore be easily achieved for any type of head modeling approach.

  2. Steroid therapy and the risk of osteonecrosis in SARS patients: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, R; Wang, H; Wang, X; Feng, F

    2017-03-01

    This meta-analysis synthesized current evidence from 10 trials to evaluate the association between steroid therapy and osteonecrosis incidence in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Our results suggest that higher cumulative doses and longer treatment durations of steroids are more likely to lead to the development of osteonecrosis in SARS patients. The link between steroid treatment and the risk of osteonecrosis in SARS patients remains unknown. The present meta-analysis aimed to examine the dose-response association between steroid therapy and osteonecrosis incidence in SARS patients. The sex differences in the development of steroid-induced osteonecrosis were also examined. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, CNKI, and WANFANG for studies that involved steroid therapy and reported osteonecrosis data in SARS patients. Two authors independently extracted the data from the individual studies, and the rate ratio (RR) of osteonecrosis was calculated using random-effect models. Ten studies with 1137 recovered SARS patients met the inclusion criteria. Close relationships between osteonecrosis incidence and both the cumulative dose and treatment duration of steroids were observed. The summary RR of osteonecrosis was 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-1.89, p < 0.001) per 5.0 g increase in the cumulative dose of steroids and was 1.29 (95% CI 1.09-1.53, p = 0.003) for each 10-day increment of increase in treatment duration. The relationship was non-linear (p non-linear < 0.001 and p non-linear = 0.022). There were no significant differences in the risk of developing osteonecrosis between the male and female patients (RR 0.01, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.06, p = 0.582). SARS patients who received higher cumulative doses and longer treatment durations of steroids were more likely to develop osteonecrosis, and there were no sex differences in this dose-dependent side effect. Our findings suggest that it is important to reduce osteonecrosis risk by

  3. Osteonecrosis of the jaw due to bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    2008-10-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used to treat osteoporosis, bone complications of cancer, malignant hypercalcaemia and Paget's disease. Osteonecrosis of the jaw is a major adverse effect of these drugs. It can affect eating, interpersonal relations, and physical appearance. Ulceration of the tongue and nerve involvement can also occur. Osteonecrosis of the jaw due to bisphosphonates is mainly seen in cancer patients, and more rarely in patients treated for osteoporosis. Between 5% and 11% of cancer patients treated with bisphosphonates develop osteonecrosis of the jaw. The frequency of jaw osteonecrosis increases with the duration of bisphosphonate treatment and is higher in case of recent dental work. The main bisphosphonate withdrawal and surgery are rarely effective. In practice, when bisphosphonate therapy is needed, the patient must be informed of the risks, should seek dental care (if possible) before starting treatment, see a dentist regularly, and consult a doctor in case of delayed healing after dental extraction, jaw pain, or numbness.

  4. Inverse Modelling to Obtain Head Movement Controller Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Lee, S. H.; Hannaford, B.; Stark, L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentally obtained dynamics of time-optimal, horizontal head rotations have previously been simulated by a sixth order, nonlinear model driven by rectangular control signals. Electromyography (EMG) recordings have spects which differ in detail from the theoretical rectangular pulsed control signal. Control signals for time-optimal as well as sub-optimal horizontal head rotations were obtained by means of an inverse modelling procedures. With experimentally measured dynamical data serving as the input, this procedure inverts the model to produce the neurological control signals driving muscles and plant. The relationships between these controller signals, and EMG records should contribute to the understanding of the neurological control of movements.

  5. Osteonecrosis of the knee: current clinical concepts.

    PubMed

    Patel, D V; Breazeale, N M; Behr, C T; Warren, R F; Wickiewicz, T L; O'Brien, S J

    1998-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee should be differentiated into two main categories: (1) primary, spontaneous, or idiopathic osteonecrosis and (2) secondary osteonecrosis (e.g., secondary to factors such as steroid therapy, systemic lupus erythematosus, alcoholism, Caisson decompression sickness, Gaucher's disease, hemoglobinopathies, etc.). Spontaneous or primary osteonecrosis of the knee presents with an acute knee pain in elderly patients. It is three times more common in women than in men. Traumatic and vascular theories have been proposed as a causative factor of osteonecrosis of the knee, but the precise etiology still remains speculative. High index of clinical awareness and a good history and physical examination are essential to make an early, accurate diagnosis. Plain radiographs are often normal during the early course of the disease and, in such instances, radioisotope bone scan and magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful. In the early stage of the disease, nonoperative treatment is indicated and many patients, if diagnosed early, have a benign course with a satisfactory pain relief and a good knee function. In patients with advanced stage of the disease, treatment options include arthroscopic debridement, curettage or drilling of the lesion, bone grafting, high tibial osteotomy, use of osteochondral allograft, and unicompartmental or total knee arthroplasty. The choice of treatment should be based on factors such as age of the patient, severity of symptoms, activity level and functional demands on the knee, site and stage of the lesion, and extent of deformity and secondary osteoarthritis. The clinical features and treatment of steroid-induced osteonecrosis of the knee are briefly discussed. In recent years, "postmeniscectomy" osteonecrosis has been reported, but at present its prevalence and pathophysiology remain unknown. It is possible that this may be a preexisting condition that was not recognized at the time of initial consultation or osteonecrosis may

  6. [Osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Edgardo G; Figueroa, Raúl H; Scapellato, Pablo G; Vidal, Gabriela I; Rodriguez Brieschke, Maria T; Da Representaçao, Silvia; Seoane, Maria B; Laurido, Marcelo F; Caiafa, Diego; Lopardo, Gustavo; Herrera, Fabian; Cassetti, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Osteonecrosis, also known as avascular necrosis, is chiefly characterized by death of bone caused by vascular compromise. The true incidence of osteonecrosis in HIV-infected patients is not well known and the pathogenesis remains undefined. Hypothetical risk factors peculiar to HIV-infected individuals that might play a role in the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis include the introduction of protease inhibitors and resulting hyperlipidemia, the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies in serum leading to a hypercoagulable state, immune recovery and vasculitis. Hereby we present a series of 13 HIV-infected patients with osteonecrosis. The most common symptom upon presentation was arthralgia. The majority of the patients had received steroids, 9 had developed hyperlipidemia after the introduction of HAART, 8 were smokers and 4 patients were alcoholics. In 2 patients, seric anticardiolipin antibodies were detected. Twelve patients had AIDS and were on HAART (11 were on protease inhibitors). We believe that osteonecrosis should be included as differential diagnosis of every HIV-infected patient who complains of pain of weight bearing joints. Likewise, it seems prudent to rule out HIV infection in subjects with osteonecrosis.

  7. Elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels following anti-resorptive drug treatment is required for osteonecrosis development in infectious osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Mayu; Iwasaki, Ryotaro; Sato, Yuiko; Kobayashi, Tami; Watanabe, Ryuichi; Oike, Takatsugu; Nakamura, Satoshi; Keneko, Yosuke; Miyamoto, Kana; Ishihara, Kazuyuki; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ishii, Ken; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Kawana, Hiromasa; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Various conditions, including bacterial infection, can promote osteonecrosis. For example, following invasive dental therapy with anti-bone resorptive agents, some patients develop osteonecrosis in the jaw; however, pathological mechanisms underlying these outcomes remain unknown. Here, we show that administration of anti-resorptive agents such as the bisphosphonate alendronate accelerates osteonecrosis promoted by infectious osteomyelitis. Potent suppression of bone turnover by these types of agents is considered critical for osteonecrosis development; however, using mouse models we found that acceleration of bone turnover by teriparatide injection did not prevent osteonecrosis but rather converted osteoclast progenitors to macrophages expressing inflammatory cytokines, which were required for osteonecrosis development. In fact, we demonstrate that TNFα-, IL-1α/β- or IL-6-deficient mice as well as wild-type mice administered a TNFα-inhibitor were significantly resistant to development of osteonecrosis accompanying infectious myelitis, even under bisphosphonate treatment. Our data provide new insight into mechanisms underlying osteonecrosis and suggest new ways to prevent it. PMID:28387378

  8. In vivo and in vitro characteristic of HIF-1α and relative genes in ischemic femoral head necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wanglin; Yuan, Zhe; Pei, Xinhong; Ma, Ruixue

    2015-01-01

    Background: Legg-Calvé-Perthes Disease (Perthes’ disease) is a childhood hip disorder initiated by ischemic necrosis of the growing femoral head. So far, the etiology and pathogenesis of Perthes’ disease is poorly understood. Materials and methods: Avascular osteonecrosis rat model was established to mimic the pathophysiological changes of femoral head necrosis. The chondrocytes of newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were isolated and cultured in hypoxic and normoxic condition. The expression characteristic of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro models. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and apoptotic genes in chondrocytes treated with normoxia and hypoxia were also studied. Results: HIF-1α expression increased greatly after ischemic operation and kept at relative high level in the arthromeningitis stage and declined in the stages of osteonecrosis and reconstruction. The HIF-1α mRNA levels of chondrocytes incubated at hypoxia were significantly higher than the cells treated with normoxia at 24 and 72 hours. Hypoxia inhibited VEGF expression; chondrocytes could oppose this inhibition manifested by the increasing of VEGF mRNA level after 72 hours hypoxia. The expression of apoptotic genes, Casp3, Casp8 and Casp9, elevated in chondrocytes after hypoxia with time differences. Conclusion: Hypoxia might be an etiological factor for femoral head necrosis, HIF-1α, VEGF as well as apoptotic genes participated the pathophysiological process of ischemic osteonecrosis. PMID:26261616

  9. Emerging ideas: treatment of precollapse osteonecrosis using stem cells and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Quanjun; Botchwey, Edward A

    2011-09-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) of the femoral head is a devastating disease affecting young patients at their most productive age, causing major socioeconomic burdens. ON is associated with various etiologic factors, and the pathogenesis of the disease is unknown. Most investigators believe the disease is the result of secondary microvascular compromise with subsequent bone and marrow cell death and defective bone repair. We hypothesize that local delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6), which induces angiogenesis and osteogenesis respectively, will reverse the disease process and provide a treatment for precollapse ON. We will use genetically engineered bone marrow stem cells, carrying VEGF and BMP-6 genes, to enhance angiogenesis and osteogenesis in necrotic bone of an animal model, by local delivery of growth factor in addition to the bone-forming property of the stem cells. The participation, localization, and fate of the stem cells in the repair process will be evaluated by tracing marker-gene product. Osteogenesis and angiogenesis will be assessed using high-resolution xray CT and immunohistomorphometry quantitatively. Mechanical properties of the repair tissue will be determined using an indentation test of the femoral head. We envision that a deliverable or injectable bone graft substitute containing engineered stem cells and therapeutic growth factors will be developed through this proposed study and will provide a much needed treatment for ON.

  10. Sestamibi and FDG-PET scans to support diagnosis of jaw osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Lucio; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Petruzziello, Fara; Fonti, Rosa; Salvatore, Barbara; Martorelli, Carmen; Califano, Catello; Caparrotti, Giuseppe; Segreto, Sabrina; Pace, Leonardo; Rotoli, Bruno

    2007-06-01

    Osteonecrosis of the maxillary or mandibular bone is an infrequent but often severe event occurring in patients who undergo prolonged treatment with bisphosphonates. Histology is in some cases mandatory to differentiate it from neoplastic osteolysis, but a biopsy can further contribute to bone damage. Functional imaging obtained by a tracer that shows oncotropic properties, such as Tc99m-sestamibi, in comparison to a non-tumor-specific substance such as FDG-PET, can support the differential diagnosis, thus avoiding invasive procedures. Four patients affected by multiple myeloma and jaw osteonecrosis were prospectively evaluated by sestamibi and FDG-PET scans. Local diagnosis was performed by clinical, radiological and, in some cases, histological evaluations. Each patient was studied by Tc99m-sestamibi, performed by planar anterior and posterior whole-body scans and SPECT of the head and neck, and by PET/CT. Two nuclear medicine physicians, unaware of the final diagnosis, reviewed the images. No sestamibi uptake was evident in the four patients with jaw osteonecrosis, while FDG-PET/CT showed focal uptake in all of them. Our study suggests that the combined use of sestamibi scintigraphy and FDG-PET/CT could support the clinical diagnosis of oral osteonecrosis avoiding the risks of a surgical biopsy. Studies on higher number of patients are necessary to validate these preliminary observations.

  11. A correction on coastal heads for groundwater flow models.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunhui; Werner, Adrian D; Simmons, Craig T; Luo, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a simple correction to coastal heads for constant-density groundwater flow models that contain a coastal boundary, based on previous analytical solutions for interface flow. The results demonstrate that accurate discharge to the sea in confined aquifers can be obtained by direct application of Darcy's law (for constant-density flow) if the coastal heads are corrected to ((α + 1)/α)hs  - B/2α, in which hs is the mean sea level above the aquifer base, B is the aquifer thickness, and α is the density factor. For unconfined aquifers, the coastal head should be assigned the value hs1+α/α. The accuracy of using these corrections is demonstrated by consistency between constant-density Darcy's solution and variable-density flow numerical simulations. The errors introduced by adopting two previous approaches (i.e., no correction and using the equivalent fresh water head at the middle position of the aquifer to represent the hydraulic head at the coastal boundary) are evaluated. Sensitivity analysis shows that errors in discharge to the sea could be larger than 100% for typical coastal aquifer parameter ranges. The location of observation wells relative to the toe is a key factor controlling the estimation error, as it determines the relative aquifer length of constant-density flow relative to variable-density flow. The coastal head correction method introduced in this study facilitates the rapid and accurate estimation of the fresh water flux from a given hydraulic head measurement and allows for an improved representation of the coastal boundary condition in regional constant-density groundwater flow models.

  12. Experimental osteonecrosis of the lunate. Revascularization may cause collapse.

    PubMed

    Aspenberg, P; Wang, J S; Jonsson, K; Hagert, C G

    1994-10-01

    Is lunate collapse in Kienböck's disease a consequence of spontaneous revascularization, leading to focal osteolysis? A literature review of osteonecrosis in other locations such as the femoral head and bone allografts showed clearly that the loss of mechanical integrity is due to cellular processes which follow the spontaneous restoration of blood supply. We found no evidence in the literature that the lunate has been shown to be avascular at the time of collapse. On the contrary, increased osteoclastic activity has been reported. We excised and reimplanted the lunate in two monkeys, and found spontaneous revascularization, leading to increased osteoblastic activity. Other parts of the bone were destroyed by osteoclasts, leading to collapse. This histological example suggests that it may be possible to make an analogy with osteonecrosis in other locations. Thus, changes on plain radiography may indicate that the bone is revascularized spontaneously. Before performing operative revascularization of the lunate, one should consider that revascularization is a probable cause for collapse.

  13. [Osteonecrosis: natural course and conservative therapy].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, S; Mazières, B

    2000-05-01

    The natural course of Osteonecrosis (ON) of the femoral head has yet not been evaluated sufficiently. Especially in the early forms of the disease (ARCO 0 to II) without collapse of the femoral head, useful information on the natural course could only be collected since the routine use of MR-imaging. The unspecific findings in ARCO stage I with negative radiographs are potential reversible. The "point of no return" already lies in the irreversible ARCO stage II in almost all cases. Prognosis for further progression for both early stages depends primarily on the extension and location of the lesion. Only the rare, small to medium sized lesions in the medial or central location may have a good prognostic course over a period of more than five years. The much more common large sized and lateral located lesions will have a probability of about 80% to progress to femoral head collapse within two years. Conservative therapy with single protected weight bearing has shown bad results not significantly different from the natural course of the disease. Pulsed electromagnetic fields are still discussed controversially. Until now there is no MRI controlled study available in early ON, showing superior results compared to the easy and cost-effective core decompression therapy. The extra corporal shock wave therapy has shown spontaneous pain relief in early ON. Midterm results of this new therapeutical concept are not available yet. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has shown to stimulate the repair process in an animal experiment. The preliminary clinical results of this time and cost consuming therapy are not convincing. Vasoactive drugs in combination with limited weight bearing may play a role in the conservative management of early ON (ARCO I and part of ARCO II) in the future. For the conservative therapy in ON several other substance are currently in clinical testing. The benefit of conservative therapeutical concepts in ON in the future can only be evaluated with prospective MRI

  14. Femoral Resurfacing in Young Patients with Hematologic Cancer and Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Karimova, Evguenia J.; Rai, Shesh N.; Wu, Jianrong; Britton, Lunetha; Kaste, Sue C.

    2008-01-01

    Resurfacing hemiarthroplasties were performed to treat advanced osteonecrosis of 20 femoral heads in 14 patients (median age, 19.8 years; range, 15.1–27.4 years), treated for hematologic cancer in childhood or adolescence. Seven hips in five patients were revised to total hip arthroplasties (THA) because of pain; three of these showed radiographic loosening of the femoral head resurfacing component. The median time from resurfacing to revision was 2.4 years (range, 0.9–4.8 years). Marginal Cox-regression analysis, adjusting for correlations owing to bilateral involvement, showed positive association of revision-free survival of the prosthesis with patient’s age; time from resurfacing to the end of anticancer therapy, end of glucocorticosteroid therapy; percentage of joint space at the last radiograph; and size of the lesion has a negative association with revision-free survival. Because of this study’s exploratory nature, p values were not adjusted for the number of statistical comparisons. Among 14 patients, the probability of not requiring resurfacing prosthesis revision was 66% (SE, ±15%; 95% CI, 44%–100%) at 3 years. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head in young patients treated for hematologic cancer in childhood or adolescence poses a serious challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. The data of this preliminary study suggest that in selected patients resurfacing hemiarthroplasty may delay the need for THA for 3–7 years. Level of Evidence: Level II, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18679763

  15. Computer model of catalytic combustion/Stirling engine heater head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, E. K.; Chang, R. L.; Tong, H.

    1981-01-01

    The basic Acurex HET code was modified to analyze specific problems for Stirling engine heater head applications. Specifically, the code can model: an adiabatic catalytic monolith reactor, an externally cooled catalytic cylindrical reactor/flat plate reactor, a coannular tube radiatively cooled reactor, and a monolithic reactor radiating to upstream and downstream heat exchangers.

  16. Ranking Medical Subject Headings using a factor graph model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    Automatically assigning MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) to articles is an active research topic. Recent work demonstrated the feasibility of improving the existing automated Medical Text Indexer (MTI) system, developed at the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Encouraged by this work, we propose a novel data-driven approach that uses semantic distances in the MeSH ontology for automated MeSH assignment. Specifically, we developed a graphical model to propagate belief through a citation network to provide robust MeSH main heading (MH) recommendation. Our preliminary results indicate that this approach can reach high Mean Average Precision (MAP) in some scenarios.

  17. Kinematics of a Head-Neck Model Simulating Whiplash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Zollman, Dean; Wiesner, Hartmut; Sen, Ahmet Ilhan

    2008-02-01

    A whiplash event is a relative motion between the head and torso that occurs in rear-end automobile collisions. In particular, the large inertia of the head results in a horizontal translation relative to the thorax. This paper describes a simulation of the motion of the head and neck during a rear-end (whiplash) collision. A head-neck model that qualitatively undergoes the same forces acting in whiplash and shows the same behavior is used to analyze the kinematics of both the head and the cervical spine and the resulting neck loads. The rapid acceleration during a whiplash event causes the extension and flexion of the cervical spine, which in turn can cause dislocated vertebrae, torn ligaments, intervertebral disc herniation, and other trauma that appear to be the likely causes of subsequent painful headache or neck pain symptoms. Thus, whiplash provides a connection between the dynamics of the human body and physics. Its treatment can enliven the usual teaching in kinematics, and both theoretical and experimental approaches provide an interesting biological context to teach introductory principles of mechanics.

  18. Symptomatic osteonecrosis in childhood leukemia survivors: prevalence, risk factors and impact on quality of life in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Girard, Pauline; Auquier, Pascal; Barlogis, Vincent; Contet, Audrey; Poiree, Maryline; Demeocq, François; Berbis, Julie; Herrmann, Iris; Villes, Virginie; Sirvent, Nicolas; Kanold, Justyna; Chastagner, Pascal; Chambost, Hervé; Plantaz, Dominique; Michel, Gérard

    2013-07-01

    Corticosteroid can induce osteonecrosis in children with leukemia. Few studies have been designed to assess the influence of a wide range of cumulative steroid dose on this side effect. Prevalence, risk factors of symptomatic osteonecrosis and its impact on adults' Quality of Life were assessed in 943 patients enrolled in the French "Leucémies de l'Enfant et de l'Adolescent" (LEA) cohort of childhood leukemia survivors. During each medical visit, data on previous osteonecrosis diagnosis were retrospectively collected. Patients without a history but with suggestive symptoms were investigated with magnetic resonance imaging. The total steroid dose in equivalent of prednisone was calculated for each patient and its effect on osteonecrosis occurrence was studied in multivariate models. Cumulative incidence was 1.4% after chemotherapy alone versus 6.8% after transplantation (P<0.001). A higher cumulative steroid dose, age over ten years at diagnosis, and treatment with transplantation significantly increased the risk of osteonecrosis. A higher post-transplant steroid dose and age over ten years at time of transplantation were significant factors in the transplanted group. With patients grouped according to steroid dose quartile, cumulative incidence of osteonecrosis reached 3.8% in the chemotherapy group for a dose beyond 5835 mg/m(2) and 23.8% after transplantation for a post-transplant dose higher than 2055 mg/m(2). Mean physical composite score of Quality of Life was 44.3 in patients with osteonecrosis versus 54.8% in patients without (P<0.001). We conclude that total and post-transplant cumulative steroid dose may predict the risk of osteonecrosis, a rare late effect with a strong negative impact on physical domains of Quality of Life.

  19. Osteonecrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walk Test (SMWT) Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) Fracture Risk ... Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in ...

  20. Osteonecrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... collapses Pain that occurs even at rest Limited range of motion Groin pain, if the hip joint is affected ... ankle is affected. You may need to do range-of-motion exercises. Nonsurgical treatment can often slow the progression ...

  1. Updates on osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Junro; McCauley, Laurie K; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2010-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is an uncommon condition noted to occur in patients with cancer who are receiving intravenous bisphosphonates. The cause of ONJ remains unknown. The leading hypotheses addressing the mechanism of ONJ are reviewed here. The present clinical data suggest that ONJ may occur in approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bone disease. The ability to predict an individual's risk of developing ONJ remains elusive. It is likely that an altered bone microenvironment and/or host defense mechanisms effected by medications used to treat patients with metastatic bone disease contributes to the development of ONJ. Medications that significantly reduce osteoclastic activity are associated with ONJ. Preclinical models of ONJ are being developed but to establish such an intricate systemic condition in animals is challenging. The ONJ field has progressed via knowledge gained by case reports, population-based studies, and emerging animal models. Still, there are myths that need to be resolved and important clues that need to be investigated. Understanding the pathophysiology of this condition will be critical to improve patient care. Communications between oncologists, dentists, basic scientists, and patients are central to effective treatment and research for this condition.

  2. Updates on Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Junro; McCauley, Laurie; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ) in an uncommon condition noted to occur in patients with cancer receiving intravenous bisphosphonates. The etiology of ONJ remains unknown. The leading hypotheses addressing the mechanism of ONJ are reviewed here. Recent findings The present clinical data suggests that ONJ may occur in approximately 5% of patients with metastatic bone disease. The ability to predict an individual’s risk of developing ONJ remains elusive. It is likely that an altered bone microenvironment and/or host defense mechanisms effected by medications used to treat patients with metastatic bone disease contributes to the development of ONJ. Medications that significantly reduce osteoclastic activity are associated with ONJ. Preclinical models of ONJ are being developed, but to establish such an intricate systemic condition in animals is challenging. Summary The ONJ field has progressed via knowledge gained by case reports, population-based studies and emerging animal models. Still, there are myths that need to be resolved and important clues that need to be investigated. Understanding the pathophysiology of this condition will be critical to improve patient care. Communications between oncologists, dentists, basic scientists and patients are central to effective treatment and research for this condition. PMID:20657284

  3. Bisphosphonates are not associated with vertebral osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Kallmes, David F; Rad, Arash Ehteshami; Gray, Leigh A; McDonald, Robert J; Clarke, Bart L

    2009-01-01

    Intravertebral clefts are considered markers for osteonecrosis. We tested the hypothesis that bisphosphonate therapy was associated with vertebral osteonecrosis. A retrospective review of a vertebroplasty database was performed. Exposure to, duration of, and type of bisphosphonate therapy was documented. Radiographs were reviewed to identify intravertebral gas-filled or fluid-filled clefts, which are considered a marker for vertebral osteonecrosis. Proportion of patients with and without clefts was compared between the group exposed to bisphosphonates and the unexposed group using Chi-squared test. Duration of bisphosphonate exposure was compared between patients with and without clefts using Student's t-test. After exclusion of 16 patients with malignancy and 21 with chronic steroid therapy 237 patients were identified. Sixty-seven (28%) of the total cohort of patients were prescribed bisphosphonate therapy. Overall, clefts were present in 68 (29%) of the 237 patients. Among the 67 patients exposed to bisphosphonate therapy, 15 patients (22%) had clefts. Among the 170 patients not exposed to bisphosphonate therapy, 53 patients (31%) had clefts (P = 0.17 compared to bisphosphonate therapy group). Mean duration of bisphosphonate therapy among patients with clefts was 52 +/- 63 weeks and among patients without clefts was 57 +/- 79 weeks (P = 0.80). Intravertebral clefts are not associated with bisphosphonate therapy. If these clefts indicate osteonecrosis, then bisphosphonate therapy does not appear to be associated with vertebral osteonecrosis.

  4. Osteonecrosis of the mandible or maxilla associated with the use of new generation bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Matthew C; Summerlin, Don-John; Krowiak, Edward; Huntley, Tod; Freeman, Stephen; Borrowdale, Richard; Tomich, Charles

    2006-01-01

    The use of bisphosphonates is well established for the treatment of patients with metastatic bone disease, osteoporosis, and Paget's disease. Osteonecrosis of the mandible or maxilla associated with the use of bisphosphonates is a newly described entity never before discussed in the otolaryngology literature. In this paper, we review a series of patients diagnosed with osteonecrosis, all treated with new generation bisphosphonates. Our objective is to inform and educate others, particularly otolaryngologists/head and neck surgeons, about this drug induced entity, a condition that should be recognized early to avoid potential devastating consequences. Retrospective chart review of a series of patients from a tertiary referral center. Pathology reports of specimens submitted from either the mandible or maxilla were reviewed from the previous 12 months. Any patient diagnosed with osteonecrosis without evidence of metastatic disease at that site was included; those with a previous history of radiation therapy were excluded. Each patient's medical history and profile were reviewed. Twenty-three patients were identified with osteonecrosis of the mandible or maxilla. All of these were associated with the use of new generation bisphosphonates: zolendronate (Zometa, Novartis), pamidronate (Aredia, Novartis), and alendronate (Fosamax, Merck). Eighteen patients with known bone metastases had been treated with the intravenous form, whereas five patients with either osteoporosis or Paget's disease were using oral therapy. Patients typically presented with a nonhealing lesion, often times the result of previous dental intervention. Although the majority of these patients were treated with conservative surgical debridement, we present a case requiring a near total maxillectomy. Drug induced osteonecrosis of the mandible or maxilla has been recently recognized as a sequelae of treatment with the new generation of bisphosphonates. Most patients can be treated with conservative

  5. A female head-neck model for rear impact simulations.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Mendoza-Vazquez, Manuel; Sato, Fusako; Svensson, Mats Y; Linder, Astrid; Brolin, Karin

    2017-01-25

    Several mathematical cervical models of the 50th percentile male have been developed and used for impact biomechanics research. However, for the 50th percentile female no similar modelling efforts have been made, despite females being subject to a higher risk of soft tissue neck injuries. This is a limitation for the development of automotive protective systems addressing Whiplash Associated Disorders (WADs), most commonly caused in rear impacts, as the risk for females sustaining WAD symptoms is double that of males. In this study, a finite element head and neck model of a 50th percentile female was validated in rear impacts. A previously validated ligamentous cervical spine model was complemented with a rigid body head, soft tissues and muscles. In both physiological flexion-extension motions and simulated rear impacts, the kinematic response at segment level was comparable to that of human subjects. Evaluation of ligament stress levels in simulations with varied initial cervical curvature revealed that if an individual assumes a more lordotic posture than the neutral, a higher risk of WAD might occur in rear impact. The female head and neck model, together with a kinematical whole body model which is under development, addresses a need for tools for assessment of automotive protection systems for the group which is at the highest risk to sustain WAD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Etiologic diagnosis of jaw osteonecrosis, other than bisphosphonate and radiotherapy related osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Magremanne, M; Picheca, S; Reychler, H

    2014-02-01

    Our purpose was to highlight the various etiologies of maxillo-mandibular osteonecrosis, other than radiotherapy and biphosphonate related osteitis that have been abundantly reported. We performed a PubMed search from August 1, 1972 to August 1, 2012 using the following MeSH terms: "osteonecrosis", "bone", "necrosis", "jaw", "maxilla", "mandible", "palate", "oral", "avascular necrosis", NOT "bisphosphonate" NOT "osteoradionecrosis". Most cases of osteonecrosis were iatrogenic. Viral, mycotic, or bacterial infections were less frequent causes. Cocaine abuse, Wegener's granulomatosis, and N/K lymphoma were other etiologies. It is important to identify the various etiologies rapidly to manage this sometimes very mutilating condition adequately.

  7. Pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulation prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) stimulation has been used successfully to treat nonunion fractures and femoral head osteonecrosis, but relatively little is known about its effects on preventing steroid-induced osteonecrosis. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of PEMF stimulation on the prevention of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rats and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods Seventy-two male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups and treated as follows. (1) PEMF stimulation group (PEMF group, n = 24): intravenously injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10 μg/kg) on day 0 and intramuscularly injected with methylprednisolone acetate (MPSL, 20 mg/kg) on days 1, 2 and 3, then subjected to PEMF stimulation 4 h per day for 1 to 8 weeks. (2) Methylprednisolone-treated group (MPSL group, n = 24): injected the same dose of LPS and MPSL as the PEMF group but without exposure to PEMF. (3) Control group (PS group, n = 24): injected 0.9% saline in the same mode at the same time points. The incidence of osteonecrosis, serum lipid levels and the mRNA and protein expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in the proximal femur were measured 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after the last MPSL (or saline) injection. Results The incidence of osteonecrosis in the PEMF group (29%) was significantly lower than that observed in the MPSL group (75%), while no osteonecrosis was observed in the PS group. The serum lipid levels were significantly lower in the PEMF and PS groups than in the MPSL group. Compared with the MPSL and PS groups, the mRNA expression of TGF-β1 increased, reaching a peak 1 week after PEMF treatment, and remained high for 4 weeks, then declined at 8 weeks, whereas the protein expression of TGF-β1 increased, reaching a peak at 2 weeks after PEMF treatment, and remained high for 8 weeks. Conclusions PEMF stimulation can prevent steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rats, and the underlying mechanisms involve decreased

  8. Nonvascularized Bone Grafting Defers Joint Arthroplasty in Hip Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seyler, Thorsten M.; Marker, David R.; Ulrich, Slif D.; Fatscher, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    A variety of nonvascularized bone grafting techniques have been proposed with varying degrees of success as treatment alternatives for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. The success of these procedures may be enhanced using ancillary growth and differentiation factors. We retrospectively reviewed 33 patients (39 hips) with osteonecrosis of the hip who had nonvascularized bone grafting procedures with supplemental OP-1. We compared the outcomes in this cohort to similar patients treated nonoperatively or with other nonvascularized bone grafting procedures. We used a trapdoor to make a window at the head-neck junction to remove necrotic bone and packed the excavated area with autogenous cancellous bone graft, marrow, and OP-1. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 36 months; range, 24–50 months). We performed no further surgery in 25 of 30 small- and medium-sized lesions (80%) but did in two of nine large lesions. Hips with Ficat Stage II disease were not reoperated in 18 of 22 cases during the followup periods. Our short-term results compare similarly to nonoperative treatment and other reports of nonvascularized bone grafting. With the addition of ancillary growth factors, these procedures effectively reduce donor site morbidity and may defer joint arthroplasty in selected patients. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0211-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18351424

  9. Drug induced osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Hamadeh, Issam S; Ngwa, Bridget A; Gong, Yan

    2015-05-01

    Despite the widespread use of bisphosphonates and their unequivocal efficacy for the treatment of various disease states, osteonecrosis of the jaw remains one of the most feared complications associated with their use. Current evidence, however, suggests that there is also a relationship between occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw and use of other classes of pharmacotherapies namely RANKL inhibitors as well as angiogenesis inhibitors. Although these drugs have different mechanisms of action than bisphosphonates, they all seem to interfere with the bone remodeling process i.e. alter the balance between bone resorption and bone formation which may be the most plausible explanation for pathogenesis of osteonecrosis of the jaw. The main objective of this review is to introduce the readership to a number of relatively new medications that may cause osteonecrosis of the jaw. Accordingly, we will summarize latest findings from clinical studies, meta analyses and case reports published in medical literature on this topic. For some of these medications, the evidence may not appear as robust as that for bisphosphonates; yet, the possibility of this adverse event occurring with these non bisphosphonate drugs should never be precluded unless proven otherwise. Thus, it is imperative that health care providers implement preventive measures so as to circumvent the incidence of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In this day of age where medical care is becoming personalized, we will highlight some of significant findings from studies seeking to identify genetic markers that may potentially play a role in development of osteonecrosis of the jaw. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Osteonecrosis in patients with malignant lymphoma: a review of twenty-five cases

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, I.A.; Straus, D.J.; Lacher, M.; Lane, J.; Smith, J.

    1981-09-01

    A retrospective study of 25 patients with malignant lymphoma who had osteonecrosis of either the femoral or humeral head(s) was undertaken. The common factor present among all patients was the administration of intermittent steroid-containing combination chemotherapy. Seventeen Hodgkin's disease patients received chemotherapy predominantly consisting of an alkylating agent, vincristine, procarbazine, and moderate amounts of prednisone. The non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients were on various moderate dosage steroid-containing protocols, except three who received prolonged high-dose steroid-containing chemotherapy regimens. Sixteen of the 17 Hodgkin's disease patients and five of the eight non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients received radiotherapy to the bones that subsequently developed osteonecrosis. Two of the three non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were not irradiated were treated with high-dose steroid-containing chemotherapy regimens. Symptoms developed in patients 12 months to 32 months after completion of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, respectively. Osteonecrosis was a long-term complication of treatment between 1970 and 1979 and occurred in 1.6% of the Hodgkin's disease and 0.12% of the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients treated. The authors conclude that the patients at highest risk for this complication are those who receive both radiotherapy to the affected bone(s) and intermittent steroid-containing multiple drug chemotherapy.

  11. The validation and application of a finite element human head model for frontal skull fracture analysis.

    PubMed

    Asgharpour, Z; Baumgartner, D; Willinger, R; Graw, M; Peldschus, S

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic head injuries can result from vehicular accidents, sports, falls or assaults. The current advances in computational methods and the detailed finite element models of the human head provide a significant opportunity for biomechanical study of human head injuries. The biomechanical characteristics of the human head through head impact scenarios can be studied in detail by using the finite element models. Skull fracture is one of the most frequent occurring types of head injuries. The purpose of this study is to analyse the experimental head impacts on cadavers by means of the Strasbourg University Finite Element Head Model (SUFEHM). The results of the numerical model and experimental data are compared for validation purpose. The finite element model has also been applied to predict the skull bone fracture in frontal impacts. The head model includes the scalp, the facial bone, the skull, the cerebral spinal fluid, the meninges, the cerebrum and the cerebellum. The model is used to simulate the experimental frontal head impact tests using a cylindrical padded impactor. Results of the computational simulation shows that the model correlated well with a number of experimental data and a global fracture pattern has been predicted well by the model. Therefore the presented numerical model could be used for reconstruction of head impacts in different impact conditions also the forensic application of the head model would provide a tool for investigation of the causes and mechanism of head injuries.

  12. Genetic risk factors for glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Li-Li; Fang, Lian-Hua; Wang, He-Yao; Peng, Jian-Hao; Si, Kun; Zhu, Jin; Han, Fei-Fei; Wang, Yue-Hua; Du, Guan-Hua; Pei, Li-Xia; Liu, Li-Hong

    2013-04-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis is a common and severe adverse event. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate whether polymorphisms in target genes were associated with the risk of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis. Published literature from PubMed and EMBASE were searched for eligible publications. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a fixed- or random-effects model. There were 23 articles with 35 genes described the relationship between polymorphisms and glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis. Meta-analyses were carried out for those SNPs with three or more eligible studies, which included four SNPs located in three genes (PAI-1, MTHFR, ABCB1). The meta-analysis revealed that the PAI-1 4G allele was associated with an increased risk of osteonecrosis compared with the 5G allele (combined studies: OR=1.932, 95% CI=1.145-3.261). The OR for the 4G/4G vs. 5G/5G genotype of PAI-1 was 3.217 (95% CI 1.667-6.209 with combined studies), The relative risk of osteonecrosis was increased in the 4G allele vs. 5G/5G and 4G/4G genotype vs. 5G allele, with odds ratios of 2.304 (95% CI=1.235-4.299) and 2.307 (95% CI=1.527-3.485) in combined studies, respectively. The ABCB1 C3435T genotype distributions available confirmed that the C allele increased osteonecrosis risk compared with the T allele (OR 1.668, 95% CI=1.214-2.293) and TT genotype (OR 2.946, 95% CI=1.422-6.101). There was no evidence for significant association between MTHFR C677T and ABCB1 G2677T/A polymorphisms and risk of osteonecrosis. Results of this meta-analysis indicate that the PAI-1 4G/5G and ABCB1 C3435T polymorphisms may be risk factors for osteonecrosis.

  13. Short-Term Bisphosphonate Therapy Could Ameliorate Osteonecrosis: A Complication in Childhood Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Greggio, N. A.; Pillon, M.; Varotto, E.; Zanin, A.; Talenti, E.; Palozzo, A. C.; Calore, E.; Messina, C.

    2010-01-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) is a critical complication in the treatment of childhood leukemia and lymphoma. It particularly affects survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma reflecting the cumulative exposure to glucocorticosteroid therapy. ON is often multiarticular and bilateral, specially affecting weight-bearing joints. A conventional approach suggests a surgical intervention even if pharmacological options have also recently been investigated. We reported two cases of long time steroid-treated patients who underwent Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) for hematological disease. Both patients developed femoral head osteonecrosis (ON) that was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the ON was also accompanied with pain and a limp. Despite of the conventional strategies of therapy, we successfully started a short-term treatment with bisphosphonates in order to decrease the pain and the risk of fracture. PMID:20589085

  14. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the tarsal navicular in an adult: Mueller-Weiss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Bilgehan; Al, Firat; Tosun, Alptekin

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the navicular in the adult is known as Mueller-Weiss syndrome, which is a rare disease characterized by a collapse of the lateral portion of the tarsal navicular combined with a medial protrusion of the talar head and peri-navicular osteoarthritis. In this article, we describe a case of spontaneous osteonecrosis of tarsal navicular in a 43-year-old male. Chronic midfoot pain over the dorsomedial aspect of the right foot was resolved after complete removal of the necrotic bone from the tarsal navicular, followed by an autologous bone grafting of the resultant defect. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a Finite Element Head Model for the Study of Impact Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Tse, Kwong-Ming; Chen, Ning; Tan, Long-Bin; Zheng, Qing-Qian; Yang, Hui-Min; Hu, Min; Pan, Gang; Lee, Heow-Pueh

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed at developing a high quality, validated finite element (FE) human head model for traumatic brain injuries (TBI) prediction and prevention during vehicle collisions. The geometry of the FE model was based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of a volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile male. The material and structural properties were selected based on a synthesis of current knowledge of the constitutive models for each tissue. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was simulated explicitly as a hydrostatic fluid by using a surface-based fluid modeling method. The model was validated in the loading condition observed in frontal impact vehicle collision. These validations include the intracranial pressure (ICP), brain motion, impact force and intracranial acceleration response, maximum von Mises stress in the brain, and maximum principal stress in the skull. Overall results obtained in the validation indicated improved biofidelity relative to previous FE models, and the change in the maximum von Mises in the brain is mainly caused by the improvement of the CSF simulation. The model may be used for improving the current injury criteria of the brain and anthropometric test devices. PMID:25405201

  16. A cross-circulated bicephalic model of head transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Wei; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Yun-Long; Wang, Bing-Jian; Song, Yang; Shen, Zi-Long; Jiang, Hong-Jun; Jin, Hai; Canavero, Sergio; Ren, Xiao-Ping

    2017-06-01

    A successful cephalosomatic anastomosis ("head transplant") requires, among others, the ability to control long-term immune rejection and avoidance of ischemic events during the head transference phase. We developed a bicephalic model of head transplantation to study these aspects. The thoracic aorta and superior vena cava of a donor rat were anastomosed with the carotid artery and extracorporeal veins of a recipient rat by vascular grafts. Before thoracotomy in the donor rat, the axillary artery and vein of the donor were connected to the carotid and the extracranial vein of the third rat through a silicone tube. The silicone tube was passed through a peristaltic pump to ensure donor brain tissue blood supply. There is no ischemia reperfusion injury in donor brain tissue analyzed by electroencephalogram. Postoperative donor has pain reflex and corneal reflex. Peristaltic pump application can guarantee the blood supply of donor brain tissue per unit time, while the application of temperature change device to the silicone tube can protect the brain tissue hypothermia, postoperative experimental data show that there is no brain tissue ischemia during the whole operation. The application of vascular grafting can also provide the possibility of long-term survival of the model. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Cortisone-induced humerus head necrosis in acute myeloid leukemia: cartilage-preserving arthroscopic spongioplasty].

    PubMed

    Heid, A; Dickschas, J; Schoeffl, V

    2013-02-01

    Osteonecrosis is a long known side effect in patients receiving cortisone or chemotherapy. A young patient was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2005. After receiving combined cortisone and chemotherapy the patient was in complete remission. In 2007 a total hip replacement was necessary due to femoral head necrosis. Years after the joint replacement the patient reported acute shoulder pain without trauma. In this article an alternative procedure to an endoprothesis in a young patient with a humeral head osteonecrosis is presented.

  18. Development of skull fracture criterion based on real-world head trauma simulations using finite element head model.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance an existing finite element (FE) head model with composite modeling and a new constitutive law for the skull. The response of the state-of-the-art FE head model was validated in the time domain using data from 15 temporo-parietal impact experiments, conducted with postmortem human surrogates. The new model predicted skull fractures observed in these tests. Further, 70 well-documented head trauma cases were reconstructed. The 15 experiments and 70 real-world head trauma cases were combined to derive skull fracture injury risk curves. The skull internal energy was found to be the best candidate to predict skull failure based on an in depth statistical analysis of different mechanical parameters (force, skull internal energy), head kinematic-based parameter, the head injury criterion (HIC), and skull fracture correlate (SFC). The proposed tolerance limit for 50% risk of skull fracture was associated with 453mJ of internal energy. Statistical analyses were extended for individual impact locations (frontal, occipital and temporo-parietal) and separate injury risk curves were obtained. The 50% risk of skull fracture for each location: frontal: 481mJ, occipital: 457mJ, temporo-parietal: 456mJ of skull internal energy.

  19. Characterizing discourse deficits following penetrating head injury: a preliminary model.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carl; Lê, Karen; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Hamilton, Mark; Tyler, Elizabeth; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2013-05-01

    Discourse analyses have demonstrated utility for delineating subtle communication deficits following closed head injuries (CHIs). The present investigation examined the discourse performance of a large group of individuals with penetrating head injury (PHI). Performance was also compared across 6 subgroups of PHI based on lesion locale. A preliminary model of discourse production following PHI was proposed and tested. Story narratives were elicited from 2 groups of participants, 167 with PHI and 46 non brain-injured (NBI). Micro- and macrostructural components of each story were analyzed. Measures of memory, executive functions, and intelligence were also administered. All measures were compared across groups and PHI subgroups. The proposed model of discourse production was tested with a structural equation modeling procedure. No differences for the discourse measures were noted across the six PHI subgroups. Three measures distinguished the PHI and NBI groups: narrative length, story grammar, and completeness. The proposed model of discourse production had an adequate-to-good fit with the cognitive and discourse data. In spite of differing mechanisms of injury, the PHI group's discourse performance was consistent with what has been reported for individuals with CHI. The model tested represents a preliminary step toward understanding discourse production following traumatic brain injury.

  20. [Osteonecrosis of the jaws by long term therapy with bisphosphonates].

    PubMed

    Piesold, Jörn-Uwe; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Grötz, Knut A

    2006-09-01

    examinations are recommended.Patients with dental implants inserted before a bisphophonate therapy should be subject to intensive recall examinations. For patients undergoing or following a bisphosphonate therapy the indication for dental implants should be as strict as for patients following head and neck radiation therapy. In the present for patients with osteonecrosis, even after healing, dental implants are regarded as contra-indication. Therapy of the necrosis often requires general anaesthesia, hospitalisation, naso-gastral feeding tube and intravenous, systemic antiinfective treatment. The necrosis is removed completely and a tension free wound closure with vascularised tissue is intended. A literature review shows the metabolic effect of biphosphonates, the known pathogenesis of the bisphosphonate-induced jaw necrosis. It is essential to develop interdisciplinary communication, aiming at a joint care for this group of concerned patients and involving not only those medical disciplines, which order and use bisphosphonates, but especially dentists and maxillofacial surgeons.

  1. Ellipsoidal head model for fetal magnetoencephalography: forward and inverse solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, David; Nehorai, Arye; Preissl, Hubert

    2005-05-01

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is a non-invasive technique where measurements of the magnetic field outside the maternal abdomen are used to infer the source location and signals of the fetus' neural activity. There are a number of aspects related to fMEG modelling that must be addressed, such as the conductor volume, fetal position and orientation, gestation period, etc. We propose a solution to the forward problem of fMEG based on an ellipsoidal head geometry. This model has the advantage of highlighting special characteristics of the field that are inherent to the anisotropy of the human head, such as the spread and orientation of the field in relationship with the localization and position of the fetal head. Our forward solution is presented in the form of a kernel matrix that facilitates the solution of the inverse problem through decoupling of the dipole localization parameters from the source signals. Then, we use this model and the maximum likelihood technique to solve the inverse problem assuming the availability of measurements from multiple trials. The applicability and performance of our methods are illustrated through numerical examples based on a real 151-channel SQUID fMEG measurement system (SARA). SARA is an MEG system especially designed for fetal assessment and is currently used for heart and brain studies. Finally, since our model requires knowledge of the best-fitting ellipsoid's centre location and semiaxes lengths, we propose a method for estimating these parameters through a least-squares fit on anatomical information obtained from three-dimensional ultrasound images.

  2. Ellipsoidal head model for fetal magnetoencephalography: forward and inverse solutions.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, David; Nehorai, Arye; Preissl, Hubert

    2005-05-07

    Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) is a non-invasive technique where measurements of the magnetic field outside the maternal abdomen are used to infer the source location and signals of the fetus' neural activity. There are a number of aspects related to fMEG modelling that must be addressed, such as the conductor volume, fetal position and orientation, gestation period, etc. We propose a solution to the forward problem of fMEG based on an ellipsoidal head geometry. This model has the advantage of highlighting special characteristics of the field that are inherent to the anisotropy of the human head, such as the spread and orientation of the field in relationship with the localization and position of the fetal head. Our forward solution is presented in the form of a kernel matrix that facilitates the solution of the inverse problem through decoupling of the dipole localization parameters from the source signals. Then, we use this model and the maximum likelihood technique to solve the inverse problem assuming the availability of measurements from multiple trials. The applicability and performance of our methods are illustrated through numerical examples based on a real 151-channel SQUID fMEG measurement system (SARA). SARA is an MEG system especially designed for fetal assessment and is currently used for heart and brain studies. Finally, since our model requires knowledge of the best-fitting ellipsoid's centre location and semiaxes lengths, we propose a method for estimating these parameters through a least-squares fit on anatomical information obtained from three-dimensional ultrasound images.

  3. Oral bisphosphonates-associated osteonecrosis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Junquera, L; Gallego, L; Pelaz, A; Olay, S

    2009-06-01

    Adverse effects associated with the use of bisphosphonates are infrequent and consist of pyrexia, renal function impairment, and hypocalcemia. Bisphosphonates-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws is an uncommon but potentially serious complication of intravenous bisphosphonate therapy in cancer patients. The degree of risk for osteonecrosis in patients taking oral bisphosphonates, such as alendronate, is uncertain and warrants careful monitoring. Oral bisphosphonates-associated osteonecrosis can occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of mandibular osteonecrosis in a patient who received alendronate for 3.8 years. The pathology improved after bisphosphonate therapy discontinuation and sequestrectomy. To our knowledge there are only three cases published in the literature relating bisphosphonates-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. All the cases published, including our case, have reported association between methotrexate, prednisone and alendronate sodium (Fosamax) therapy. Corticosteroid therapy and dental surgery could increase the risk of developing bisphosphonates-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws in these patients.

  4. 3D head model classification using optimized EGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xin; Wong, Hau-san; Ma, Bo

    2006-02-01

    With the general availability of 3D digitizers and scanners, 3D graphical models have been used widely in a variety of applications. This has led to the development of search engines for 3D models. Especially, 3D head model classification and retrieval have received more and more attention in view of their many potential applications in criminal identifications, computer animation, movie industry and medical industry. This paper addresses the 3D head model classification problem using 2D subspace analysis methods such as 2D principal component analysis (2D PCA[3]) and 2D fisher discriminant analysis (2DLDA[5]). It takes advantage of the fact that the histogram is a 2D image, and we can extract the most useful information from these 2D images to get a good result accordingingly. As a result, there are two main advantages: First, we can perform less calculation to obtain the same rate of classification; second, we can reduce the dimensionality more than PCA to obtain a higher efficiency.

  5. The thermal effects of lavage on 57 ox femoral heads prepared for hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Previously, we have documented surface temperatures recorded by thermography great enough to cause osteonecrosis of the femoral head during hip resurfacing. We now performed an in vitro investigation with 3 questions: (1) whether water irrigation reduced bone surface temperature, (2) whether external bone temperatures were similar to core temperatures, and (3) whether blunting of the reamer affected temperature generation. Methods Using an ox-bone model, 57 femoral heads were peripherally reamed. The surface temperatures of bone were measured using a thermal camera and internal bone temperatures were measured using 2 theromocouples. We measured the effects of cooling with water at room temperature and with ice-cooled water. Progressive blunting of reamers was assessed over the 57 experiments. Results Mean and maximum temperatures generated during peripheral reaming were greater when no irrigation was used. Ice-cold saline protected femoral heads from thermal damage. External bone temperatures were much greater than internal temperatures, which were not sufficiently elevated to cause osteonecrosis regardless of lavage. Blunting of the reamer was not found to have a statistically significant effect in this study. Interpretation Cooling with ice-cooled water is recommended. Internal bone temperatures are not elevated despite the high surface temperatures reached during femoral head resurfacing. PMID:24079554

  6. Animal models of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Supsavhad, Wachiraphan; Dirksen, Wessel P; Martin, Chelsea K; Rosol, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the most common oral cancer worldwide. Local bone invasion into the maxilla or mandible and metastasis to regional lymph nodes often result in a poor prognosis, decreased quality of life and shortened survival time for HNSCC patients. Poor response to treatment and clinical outcomes are the major concerns in this aggressive cancer. Multiple animal models have been developed to replicate spontaneous HNSCC and investigate genetic alterations and novel therapeutic targets. This review provides an overview of HNSCC as well as the traditional animal models used in HNSCC preclinical research. The value and challenges of each in vivo model are discussed. Similarity between HNSCC in humans and cats and the possibility of using spontaneous feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) as a model for HNSCC in translational research are highlighted.

  7. Stage-related results in treatment of hip osteonecrosis with core-decompression and autologous mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Persiani, Pietro; De Cristo, Claudia; Graci, Jole; Noia, Giovanni; Gurzì, Michele; Villani, Ciro

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to analyse the clinical outcome of a series of patients affected by avascular necrosis of the femoral head and treated with core-decompression technique and autologous stromal cells of the bone marrow.We enrolled in our study 29 patients with 31 hips in total affected by avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The clinical and radiological outcome has been assessed through self-administered questionnaires (HHS, VAS and SF12) X-ray and Magnetic Resonance.Of all the examined hips, 25 showed a relief of the symptoms and a resolution of the osteonecrosis, 11 of these were at Stage I and 14 at Stage II. The progression of the disease occurred in 6 hips (2 Stage II, 2 Stage III and 2 Stage IV). Our results show a significant decrease in joint pain level and a success in avoiding or delaying the need of hip replacement in early stages of osteonecrosis.

  8. Osteonecrosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gontero, Romina Patricia; Bedoya, María Eugenia; Benavente, Emilio; Roverano, Susana Graciela; Paira, Sergio Oscar

    2015-01-01

    To define the proportion of osteonecrosis (ON) in our patient population with lupus and to identify factors associated with the development of ON in systemic lupus erythematosus, as well as to carry out a descriptive analysis of ON cases. Observational retrospective study of 158 patients with SLE (ACR 1982 criteria). Demographic and laboratory data, clinical manifestations, SLICC, SLEDAI, cytotoxic and steroid treatments were compared. In patients with ON, we analyzed time of disease progression and age at ON diagnosis, form of presentation, joints involved, diagnostic methods, Ficat-Arlet classification, and treatment. To compare the means, t-test or Mann-Whitney's test were employed and the cHi-2 test or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate, were used to measure the equality of proportions. ON was present in 15 out 158 patients (9.5%), 13 women and 2 men, with a mean age of 30 (r: 16-66) at diagnosis and 35 months of evolution until diagnosis (r: 1-195). Among the 15 patients, 34 joints presented ON, 23 were symptomatic and 22 were diagnosed by magnetic resonance images. Twenty-six occurred in hips (24 bilateral), 4 in knees and 4 in shoulders. In 13 patients, ON involved 2 or more joints. At onset, 28 joints were in stage i-ii, one in stage iii and 5 had no data and; in the end, 14 were in stage iii-iv, 5 in stage i-ii and 15 had no data. Twenty-nine underwent conservative treatment with rest and 8 hips required joint replacement. ON progression was associated with Cushing's syndrome (P=0.014) OR 4.16 (95% CI 1.4-12.6) and 2nd year SLICC (P=0.042). No relation with clinical manifestations, lab results, cytotoxic treatment, steroid treatment (total accumulated dose, mean daily dose and duration) metilprednisolone pulses, nor activity was found. All patients with ON received antimalarials, in contrast to 77% of those without ON. The proportion of ON was 9.5%, mainly in women, 76% in hips (26) and 92% bilaterally. They were associated significantly with Cushing

  9. Porous tantalum seeded with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells attenuates steroid-associated osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Fu, W-M; Yang, L; Wang, B-J; Xu, J-K; Wang, J-L; Qin, L; Zhao, D-W

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) have been widely applied in osteonecrosis. However, lack of biomechanical support limited application of BMMSCs. And porous tantalum (PTA) has been identified as a cell-friendly scaffold for bone regeneration. Herein, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of PTA seeded with BMMSCs in the treatment of osteonecrosis. After the production of PTA seeded with BMMSCs, MTT and GFP were performed to identify the proliferation and adhesion of BMMSCs respectively, which was further examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). And real-time PCR was also used to determine mRNA level of osteogenic markers, including Alp, OCN, OPN, Col I and Runx-2 in BMMSCs. Nineteen adult rabbits were applied for building steroid-associated osteonecrosis (SAON) models. Bone formation rate (BFR) and mineral apposition rate (MAR) were determined. And Goldner Trichrome Staining was used in these SAON models, which further confirmed the efficacy of PTA seeded with BMMSCs in SAON. PTA seeded with BMMSCs showed excellent biocompatibility. Additionally, SEM assay showed that BMMSCs adhered tightly and spread fully in the pores of PTA. Next, the expression of ALP and OPN mRNA in BMMSCs were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the PTA-treated group compared to those in the PTA-untreated group. Furthermore, compared to those treated by only PTA, the dynamic bone formation in rabbits treated by PTA seeded with BMMSCs was significantly increased (p < 0.001) at both week 3rd and week 6th. The product, PTA seeded with BMMSCs, was successfully produced, and was determined as high efficacy for treatment of steroid-associated osteonecrosis. PTA seeded with BMMSCs may afford a promising option for treating osteonecrosis.

  10. Rapidly recomputable EEG forward models for realistic head shapes.

    PubMed

    Ermer, J J; Mosher, J C; Baillet, S; Leah, R M

    2001-04-01

    With the increasing availability of surface extraction techniques for magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography images, realistic head models can be readily generated as forward models in the analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. Inverse analysis of this data, however, requires that the forward model be computationally efficient. We propose two methods for approximating the EEG forward model using realistic head shapes. The 'sensor-fitted sphere' approach fits a multilayer sphere individually to each sensor, and the 'three-dimensional interpolation' scheme interpolates using a grid on which a numerical boundary element method (BEM) solution has been precomputed. We have characterized the performance of each method in terms of magnitude and subspace error metrics, as well as computational and memory requirements. We have also made direct performance comparisons with traditional spherical models. The approximation provided by the interpolative scheme had an accuracy nearly identical to full BEM, even within 3 mm of the inner skull surface. Forward model computation during inverse procedures was approximately 30 times faster than for a traditional three-shell spherical model. Cast in this framework, high-fidelity numerical solutions currently viewed as computationally prohibitive for solving the inverse problem (e.g. linear Galerkin BEM) can be rapidly recomputed in a highly efficient manner. The sensor-fitting method has a similar one-time cost to the BEM method, and while it produces some improvement over a standard three-shell sphere, its performance does not approach that of the interpolation method. In both methods, there is a one-time cost associated with precomputing the forward solution over a set of grid points.

  11. Improved transcranial magnetic stimulation coil design with realistic head modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We are investigating Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a noninvasive technique based on electromagnetic induction which causes stimulation of the neurons in the brain. TMS can be used as a pain-free alternative to conventional electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) which is still widely implemented for treatment of major depression. Development of improved TMS coils capable of stimulating subcortical regions could also allow TMS to replace invasive deep brain stimulation (DBS) which requires surgical implantation of electrodes in the brain. Our new designs allow new applications of the technique to be established for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications of psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Calculation of the fields generated inside the head is vital for the use of this method for treatment. In prior work we have implemented a realistic head model, incorporating inhomogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, allowing the site of neuronal activation to be accurately calculated. We will show how we utilize this model in the development of novel TMS coil designs to improve the depth of penetration and localization of stimulation produced by stimulator coils.

  12. A conceptual model of emergency physician decision making for head computed tomography in mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Probst, Marc A; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Schriger, David L

    2014-06-01

    The use of computed tomographic scanning in blunt head trauma has increased dramatically in recent years without an accompanying rise in the prevalence of injury or hospital admission for serious conditions. Because computed tomography is neither harmless nor inexpensive, researchers have attempted to optimize utilization, largely through research that describes which clinical variables predict intracranial injury, and use this information to develop clinical decision instruments. Although such techniques may be useful when the benefits and harms of each strategy (neuroimaging vs observation) are quantifiable and amenable to comparison, the exact magnitude of these benefits and harms remains unknown in this clinical scenario. We believe that most clinical decision instrument development efforts are misguided insofar as they ignore critical, nonclinical factors influencing the decision to image. In this article, we propose a conceptual model to illustrate how clinical and nonclinical factors influence emergency physicians making this decision. We posit that elements unrelated to standard clinical factors, such as personality of the physician, fear of litigation and of missed diagnoses, patient expectations, and compensation method, may have equal or greater impact on actual decision making than traditional clinical factors. We believe that 3 particular factors deserve special consideration for further research: fear of error/malpractice, financial incentives, and patient engagement. Acknowledgement and study of these factors will be essential if we are to understand how emergency physicians truly make these decisions and how test-ordering behavior can be modified.

  13. Osteonecrosis of jaw associated with bisphosphonate use

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Ashu; Rattan, Vidya; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) that is defined as an area of exposed, nonvital bone in the maxilla or mandible persisting over 6–8 weeks. We describe a case of 55-year-old female who developed ONJ after tooth extraction and had been receiving oral ibandronate for osteoporosis. Diagnosis of ONJ was confirmed on CT scan. The patient was managed conservatively as she denied teriparatide therapy because of cost constraints. PMID:22629519

  14. Clinical and motion studies of the Bateman bipolar prosthesis in osteonecrosis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Mess, D; Barmada, R

    1990-02-01

    Forty-seven hips in 38 patients with femoral head osteonecrosis were reviewed for a mean follow-up period of 2.6 years. The average preoperative Harris hip score was 24.7; postoperatively, the average score was 84.5. Cineroentgenographic motion studies were carried out on 14 hips and revealed motion at both the inner and outer bearing up to seven years postoperatively. In the unloaded mode, inner- and outer-bearing motion were equal. In the weight-bearing position, inner-bearing motion increased significantly while outer-bearing motion decreased. Only one case of acetabular wear or protrusio was noted.

  15. Bisphophonates related osteonecrosis of the jaw

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Gupta, Hemant; Mandhyan, Devendra; Srivastava, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Objective: With sporadic reporting of BPs related osteonecrosis of jaw and in absence of definitive guidelines regarding the management of such patients, the dentists and the oral and maxillofacial surgeons need to be updated about this issue. The objective of this article was to produce an updated bibliographic review of BPs related ONJ. This paper reviews the literature regarding the same for better understanding of the problem and its management. Background: Bisphosphonates (BPs) are potent inhibitors of bone resorption and are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other diseases that cause bone mass loss, such as Paget's disease, bone metastases, and multiple myeloma, to prevent pathological fractures. With increasing use, evidence is emerging that patients taking BP drugs are at risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJs), sometimes occurring spontaneously, but more commonly following dental extractions or oral bone surgery. Materials and Methods: A bibliographic search was carried out using PubMed, Medline, and search engines ending in April, 2013. The search terms used were: Oral BPs, dental implants, and osteonecrosis. Conclusion: On the basis of available literature, the management of patients on bisphosphonates requiring dental treatment is classified according to the duration of BPs treatment, method of administration of BPs etc. Dental treatments when planned carefully in such patients have a fair to good prognosis. PMID:24665168

  16. [Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Atanes-Bonome, P; Atanes-Bonome, A; Ríos-Lage, P; Atanes-Sandoval, A D

    2014-04-01

    The bisphosphonates are stable inorganic pyrophosphate analogs that have demonstrated their efficacy in treatment of osteolytic lesions associated with bony metastases, and multiple myeloma, malignant hypercalcemia, Paget's disease, and osteoporosis. Several publications within the last few years have suggested that osteonecrosis of the jaw is associated with bisphosphonate therapy. The diagnosis and management strategies of the patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw is very difficult. It is important for patients to be informed of the risk of this complication, so that they have the opportunity to assess the need for dental treatment before starting therapy. Preventive measures must be taken before, during, and after treatment with bisphosphonates. If osteonecrosis of the jaw is present, management should be conservative: oral chlorhexidine and antibiotics. Surgical treatment should be reserved for those patients who are symptomatic. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Head modeling for realistic electrical brain activity mapping identification of a multimodal neuroimaging protocol.

    PubMed

    Vatta, F; Bruno, P; Di Salle, F; Esposito, F; Meneghini, F; Mininel, S; Rodaro, M

    2008-01-01

    Realistic electrical brain activity mapping implies reconstructing and visualizing sources of electrical brain activity within the specific patient's head. This requires the assumption of a precise and realistic volume conductor model of the specific subject's head, i.e., a 3-D representation of the head's electrical properties in terms of shape and electrical conductivities. Source reconstruction accuracy is influenced by errors committed in head modeling. Clinical images, MRI and CT, are used to identify the head structures to be included in the volume conductor head model. Modeling accuracy mainly relies on the correct image-based identification of head structures, characterized by different electrical conductivities, to be included as separate compartments in the model. This paper analyzes the imaging protocols used in clinical practice to define the most suitable procedures for identification of the various head structures necessary to build an accurate head model also in the presence of morphologic brain pathologies. Furthermore, tissues anisotropy is discussed and identified as well. With this work we have identified a protocol for the acquisition of multimodal patient's imaging data for realistic electrical brain activity mapping purposes, able to account for pathological conditions and for head tissues anisotropy.

  18. Low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography in a realistic geometry head model: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Lai, Yuan; He, Bin

    2005-01-01

    It is of importance to localize neural sources from scalp recorded EEG. Low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) has received considerable attention for localizing brain electrical sources. However, most such efforts have used spherical head models in representing the head volume conductor. Investigation of the performance of LORETA in a realistic geometry head model, as compared with the spherical model, will provide useful information guiding interpretation of data obtained by using the spherical head model. The performance of LORETA was evaluated by means of computer simulations. The boundary element method was used to solve the forward problem. A three-shell realistic geometry (RG) head model was constructed from MRI scans of a human subject. Dipole source configurations of a single dipole located at different regions of the brain with varying depth were used to assess the performance of LORETA in different regions of the brain. A three-sphere head model was also used to approximate the RG head model, and similar simulations performed, and results compared with the RG-LORETA with reference to the locations of the simulated sources. Multi-source localizations were discussed and examples given in the RG head model. Localization errors employing the spherical LORETA, with reference to the source locations within the realistic geometry head, were about 20-30 mm, for four brain regions evaluated: frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions. Localization errors employing the RG head model were about 10 mm over the same four brain regions. The present simulation results suggest that the use of the RG head model reduces the localization error of LORETA, and that the RG head model based LORETA is desirable if high localization accuracy is needed.

  19. Adalimumab: Another Medication Related to Osteonecrosis of the Jaws?

    PubMed Central

    Cassoni, Andrea; Romeo, Umberto; Terenzi, Valentina; Della Monaca, Marco; Rajabtork Zadeh, Oriana; Raponi, Ingrid; Fadda, Maria Teresa; Polimeni, Antonella; Valentini, Valentino

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The acronym MRONJ has been created in order to identify “Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw,” observed after the use of Bisphosphonates, RANK ligand inhibitor, and antiangiogenic medications. Only a case of osteonecrosis of the jaw in a Chron's disease patient following a course of Bisphosphonate and Adalimumab therapy has been recently described, so that it has been supposed that also this medication could promote manifestation of osteonecrosis. Clinical Case. On August, 2014, a 63-year-old female with a history of idiopathic arthritis treated with medical treatment with Adalimumab from 2010 to 2013 presented referring pain in the right mandible. Results. This patient presented with nonexposed osteonecrosis of the jaw after placement, on September, 2010, of four titanium fixtures in the mandible. Conclusions. The authors suggest that the biologic therapy with an anti-TNF-α antibody might promote the manifestation of osteonecrosis and compromise oral healing capacity of the bone. PMID:27088019

  20. Adalimumab: Another Medication Related to Osteonecrosis of the Jaws?

    PubMed

    Cassoni, Andrea; Romeo, Umberto; Terenzi, Valentina; Della Monaca, Marco; Rajabtork Zadeh, Oriana; Raponi, Ingrid; Fadda, Maria Teresa; Polimeni, Antonella; Valentini, Valentino

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The acronym MRONJ has been created in order to identify "Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw," observed after the use of Bisphosphonates, RANK ligand inhibitor, and antiangiogenic medications. Only a case of osteonecrosis of the jaw in a Chron's disease patient following a course of Bisphosphonate and Adalimumab therapy has been recently described, so that it has been supposed that also this medication could promote manifestation of osteonecrosis. Clinical Case. On August, 2014, a 63-year-old female with a history of idiopathic arthritis treated with medical treatment with Adalimumab from 2010 to 2013 presented referring pain in the right mandible. Results. This patient presented with nonexposed osteonecrosis of the jaw after placement, on September, 2010, of four titanium fixtures in the mandible. Conclusions. The authors suggest that the biologic therapy with an anti-TNF-α antibody might promote the manifestation of osteonecrosis and compromise oral healing capacity of the bone.

  1. Osteonecrosis of the mandible associated with bevacizumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Belizário Rosa, Giuliano Augusto; Castro Júnior, Gilberto de; Dias, Reinaldo Brito; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Brandão, Thaís Bianca

    2013-06-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized antibody that blocks vascular endothelial growth factor and is of great value for the treatment of advanced cancer. Several adverse effects following its administration have been reported. To date, only 8 cases of osteonecrosis of the jaws associated with bevacizumab (without any association with bisphosphonates) have been reported. The aim of this article was to describe an original case of bevacizumab-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. A 61-year-old man diagnosed with advanced renal cell carcinoma was undergoing treatment with intravenous bevacizumab and temsirolimus when he spontaneously developed mandible osteonecrosis, which resolved after 3 months of conservative management. The present case reinforces recent speculation that the anti-angiogenic properties of bevacizumab may represent a potential new source of osteonecrosis of the jaws in patients undergoing cancer treatment. Multidisciplinary teams in cancer care should be aware of the possible association between osteonecrosis of the jaw and bevacizumab therapy.

  2. Research study on neck injury lessening with active head restraint using human body FE model.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Junji

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the active head restraint system in reducing neck injury risk of car occupants in low-speed rear impacts. A human body FE model "THUMS" was used to simulate head and neck kinematics of the occupant and to evaluate loading to the neck. Joint capsule strain was calculated to predict neck injury risk as well as NIC. The validity of the model was confirmed comparing its mechanical responses to those in human subjects in the literatures. Seat FE models were also prepared representing one with a fixed head restraint and the other one with an active head restraint system. The active head restraint system was designed to move the head restraint forward and upward when the lower unit was lower unit was loaded by the pelvis. Rear impact simulations were performed assuming a triangular acceleration pulse at a delta-V of 25 km/h. The model reproduced similar head and neck motions to those measured in the human volunteer test, except for active muscular responses. The calculated joint capsule strain also showed a good match with those of PMHS tests in the literature. A rear-impact simulation was conducted using the model with the fixed head restraint. The result revealed that NIC was strongly correlated with the relative acceleration between the head and the torso and that its maximum peak appeared when the head contacted the head restraint. It was also found that joint capsule strain grew in later timing synchronizing with the relative displacement. Another simulation with the active head restraint system showed that both NIC and joint capsule strain were lowered owing to the forward and upward motion of the head restraint. A close investigation of the vertebral motion indicated that the active head restraint reduced the magnitude of shear deformation in the facet joint, which contributed to the strain growth in the fixed head restraint case. Rear-impact simulations were conducted using a human body FE model, THUMS

  3. Effects of local tissue conductivity on spherical and realistic head models.

    PubMed

    Bashar, M R; Li, Y; Wen, P

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we consider different conductivity values based on tissue location in a human head model. We implement local conductivity (LC) to compute head surface potentials in three-, four-layered spherical and realistic head models using finite element method (FEM). Implementing LC for all head models, we obtain significant scalp potential variations in the term of relative difference measurement (RDM) and magnification (MAG) values with a maximum of 2.03±1.81 and 8.27±6.36, respectively. We also investigate the effects of conductivity variations (CVs) of head tissue layer on scalp potentials and find a maximum of 2.15±1.93 RDM and 8.57±6.61 MAG values. Our study concludes that it is important to assign LC to each tissue and it is also important to assign appropriate conductivity value in the construction of a head model for achieving accurate scalp potentials.

  4. Comparison of realistic head modeling methods in EEG source imaging - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Vatta, F; Meneghini, F; Esposito, F; Mininel, S; Disalle, F

    2010-01-01

    EEG inverse source imaging aims at reconstructing the underlying current distribution in the human brain using potential differences measured non-invasively from the head surface. A critical component of source reconstruction is the head volume conductor model used to reach an accurate solution of the associated forward problem, i.e., the simulation of the EEG for a known current source in the brain. The volume conductor model contains both the geometry and the electrical conduction properties of the head tissues and the accuracy of both parameters has direct impact on the accuracy of the source analysis. This was examined in detail with two different human head models. Two realistic head models derived from an averaged T1-weighted MRI dataset of the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) were used for this study. These models were: (1) BEM Model: a four-shell surface-based Boundary Elements (BEM) head model; (2) FDM Model: a volume-based Finite Difference (FDM) model, which allows better modeling accuracy than BEM as it better represents the cortical structures, such as, sulci and gyri in the brain in a three-dimensional head model. How model accuracy description influences the EEG source localizations was studied with the above realistic models of the head. We present here a detailed computer simulation study in which the performances of the two realistic four-shell head models are compared, the realistic MNI-based BEM Model and the FDM Model. As figures of merit for the comparative analysis, the point spread function (PSF) maps and the lead field (LF) correlation coefficients are used. The obtained results demonstrate that a better description of realistic geometry can provide a factor of improvement particularly important when considering sources placed in the temporal or in the occipital cortex. In these situations, using a more refined realistic head model will allow a better spatial discrimination of neural sources.

  5. Prevalence of bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis of the jaw within the field of osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Walter, Christian; Grötz, Knut A; Kunkel, Martin; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2007-02-01

    Prevalence of bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws within the catchment area of a university hospital maxillofacial unit and to review the outcome of treatment. In a retrospective study, all patients with osteonecrosis, osteomyelitis and osteoradionecrosis treated in the period from January 2000 to March 2005 in the department for Maxillo Facial Surgery at the University of Mainz, Germany were analysed. Forty percent of the patients are grouped to odontogenic or surgically induced osteomyelitis. The second largest group (28%) were patients with osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Ten percent of all patients developed an osteonecrosis after treatment with bisphosphonates (BOJ). Eight percent showed osteomyelitis or sequester due to a trauma while 14% of all patients had osteomyelitis of unknown origin. All BOJ patients took bisphosphonates because of metastatic diseases of the bone (plasmocytoma, mamma carcinoma and prostate cancer) for up to 5 years. All had been administered a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate (either pamidronat or zoledronat). Thirteen out of the 17 patients with BOJ and 14 of the 45 with ORN reported a possible trigger like previous tooth extraction, pressure denture sore or periodontal diseases. These findings support the association of bisphosphonate therapy and osteonecrosis of the jaw. The importance of this new disease is characterised by the growing number of patients. The role of dental trigger factors and the poor surgical outcome both seem to justify a prophylactic dental care concept in high-risk patients.

  6. A Cardiovascular Mathematical Model of Graded Head-Up Tilt

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Einly; Chan, Gregory S. H.; Dokos, Socrates; Ng, Siew C.; Latif, Lydia A.; Vandenberghe, Stijn; Karunanithi, Mohan; Lovell, Nigel H.

    2013-01-01

    A lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system has been developed and optimized using experimental data obtained from 13 healthy subjects during graded head-up tilt (HUT) from the supine position to . The model includes descriptions of the left and right heart, direct ventricular interaction through the septum and pericardium, the systemic and pulmonary circulations, nonlinear pressure volume relationship of the lower body compartment, arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors, as well as autoregulatory mechanisms. A number of important features, including the separate effects of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes, and autoregulation in the lower body, as well as diastolic ventricular interaction through the pericardium have been included and tested for their significance. Furthermore, the individual effect of parameter associated with heart failure, including LV and RV contractility, baseline systemic vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance, total blood volume, LV diastolic stiffness and reflex gain on HUT response have also been investigated. Our fitted model compares favorably with our experimental measurements and published literature at a range of tilt angles, in terms of both global and regional hemodynamic variables. Compared to the normal condition, a simulated congestive heart failure condition produced a blunted response to HUT with regards to the percentage changes in cardiac output, stroke volume, end diastolic volume and effector response (i.e., heart contractility, venous unstressed volume, systemic vascular resistance and heart rate) with progressive tilting. PMID:24204817

  7. The potential and limitations of utilising head impact injury models to assess the likelihood of significant head injury in infants after a fall.

    PubMed

    Cory, C Z; Jones, M D; James, D S; Leadbeatter, S; Nokes, L D

    2001-12-01

    The use of engineering principles in assessing head injury scenarios is of increasing significance in investigations into suspected child abuse. A fall scenario is often given as the history for a head injury to an infant. This paper addresses the basic engineering principles and factors to be considered when calculating the severity of a head impact after free-fall. The application of head injury models (HIMs) to ascertain the forces involved in childhood head injuries from impact is also discussed. Previous studies including Duhaime et al. [J. Neurosurg. 66 (1987) 409] and Nokes et al. [Forensic Sci. Int. 79 (1995) 85] have utilised HIMs for this purpose: this paper reviews those models most widely documented.The HIM currently considered the 'state-of-the-art' is the head injury criterion (HIC) and it is suggested that this model should be utilised for assessing head impact injury in child abuse cases where appropriate.

  8. Ultrahigh head pump/turbine development program: Volume 5, Model tests: Basic performance: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.

    1987-01-01

    Pump/turbine model tests for the Ultra-High Head Pump/Turbine Development Program were conducted for evaluating and refining the pump/turbine design, rated speed 720 rpm, net head 1450, output 655 MW on the scale model at Hitachi Hydraulic Research Laboratory. The basic testing resulted in verification of the design, analysis, and performance of the high head pump/turbine.

  9. Periapical disease and bisphosphonates induce osteonecrosis of the jaws in mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ben; Cheong, Simon; Chaichanasakul, Thawinee; Bezouglaia, Olga; Atti, Elisa; Dry, Sarah M; Pirih, Flavia Q; Aghaloo, Tara L; Tetradis, Sotirios

    2013-07-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a well-recognized complication of antiresorptive medications, such as bisphosphonates (BPs). Although ONJ is most common after tooth extractions in patients receiving high-dose BPs, many patients do not experience oral trauma. Animal models using tooth extractions and high BP doses recapitulate several clinical, radiographic, and histologic findings of ONJ. We and others have reported on rat models of ONJ using experimental dental disease in the absence of tooth extraction. These models emphasize the importance of dental infection/inflammation for ONJ development. Here, we extend our original report in the rat, and present a mouse model of ONJ in the presence of dental disease. Mice were injected with high dose zoledronic acid and pulpal exposure of mandibular molars was performed to induce periapical disease. After 8 weeks, quantitative and qualitative radiographic and histologic analyses of mouse mandibles were done. Periapical lesions were larger in vehicle-treated versus BP-treated mice. Importantly, radiographic features resembling clinical ONJ, including thickening of the lamina dura, periosteal bone deposition, and increased trabecular density, were seen in the drilled site of BP-treated animals. Histologically, osteonecrosis, periosteal thickening, periosteal bone apposition, epithelial migration, and bone exposure were present in the BP-treated animals in the presence of periapical disease. No difference in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)+ cell numbers was observed, but round, detached, and removed from the bone surface cells were present in BP-treated animals. Although 88% of the BP-treated animals showed areas of osteonecrosis in the dental disease site, only 33% developed bone exposure, suggesting that osteonecrosis precedes bone exposure. Our data further emphasize the importance of dental disease in ONJ development, provide qualitative and quantitative measures of ONJ, and present a novel mouse ONJ model in

  10. Periapical Disease and Bisphosphonates Induce Osteonecrosis of the Jaws in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ben; Cheong, Simon; Chaichanasakul, Thawinee; Bezouglaia, Olga; Atti, Elisa; Dry, Sarah M; Pirih, Flavia Q; Aghaloo, Tara L.; Tetradis, Sotirios

    2013-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a well-recognized complication of antiresorptive medications, such as bisphosphonates (BPs). Although ONJ is most common after tooth extractions in patients receiving high dose BPs, many patients do not experience oral trauma. Animal models utilizing tooth extractions and high BP doses recapitulate several clinical, radiographic and histologic findings of ONJ. We and others have reported on rat models of ONJ utilizing experimental dental disease in the absence of tooth extraction. These models emphasize the importance of dental infection/inflammation for ONJ development. Here, we extend our original report in the rat, and present a mouse model of ONJ in the presence of dental disease. Mice were injected with high dose zoledronic acid and pulpal exposure of mandibular molars was performed to induce periapical disease. After 8 weeks, quantitative and qualitative radiographic and histologic analyses of mouse mandibles were executed. Periapical lesions were larger in vehicle- vs. BP treated mice. Importantly, radiographic features resembling clinical ONJ, including thickening of the lamina dura, periosteal bone deposition and increased trabecular density, were seen in the drilled site of BP treated animals. Histologically, osteonecrosis, periosteal thickening, periosteal bone apposition, epithelial migration and bone exposure were present in the BP treated animals in the presence of periapical disease. No difference in TRAP+ cell numbers was observed, but round, detached, and removed from the bone surface cells were present in BP animals. Although 88% of the BP animals showed areas of osteonecrosis in the dental disease site, only 33% developed bone exposure, suggesting that osteonecrosis precedes bone exposure. Our data further emphasize the importance of dental disease in ONJ development, provide qualitative and quantitative measures of ONJ, and present a novel mouse ONJ model in the absence of tooth extraction that should be useful

  11. Characterizing Discourse Deficits Following Penetrating Head Injury: A Preliminary Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Carl; Le, Karen; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Hamilton, Mark; Tyler, Elizabeth; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Discourse analyses have demonstrated utility for delineating subtle communication deficits following closed head injuries (CHIs). The present investigation examined the discourse performance of a large group of individuals with penetrating head injury (PHI). Performance was also compared across 6 subgroups of PHI based on lesion locale. A…

  12. Characterizing Discourse Deficits Following Penetrating Head Injury: A Preliminary Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coelho, Carl; Le, Karen; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Hamilton, Mark; Tyler, Elizabeth; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Discourse analyses have demonstrated utility for delineating subtle communication deficits following closed head injuries (CHIs). The present investigation examined the discourse performance of a large group of individuals with penetrating head injury (PHI). Performance was also compared across 6 subgroups of PHI based on lesion locale. A…

  13. Head-Spine Structure Modeling: Enhancements to Secondary Loading Path Model and Validation of Head-Cervical Spine Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    Injuries , Head- Spine Structure, Cervical 06 07 Spine , Muscles. t9 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necesary and...Recent interest in the use of helmet-mounted devices makes the cervical spine an area of potential injury and it is significant to note that limited... Cervical Spine Injuries Cervical spsine injuries are classified according to the suspected mechanisms of injury which have already been described.

  14. Analysis of finite element models for head injury investigation: reconstruction of four real-world impacts.

    PubMed

    Franklyn, Melanie; Fildes, Brian; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King; Sparke, Laurie

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that both excessive linear and rotational accelerations are the cause of head injuries. Although the head injury criterion has been beneficial as an indicator of head injury risk, it only considers linear acceleration, so there is a need to consider both types of motion in future safety standards. Advanced models of the head/brain complex have recently been developed to gain a better understanding of head injury biomechanics. While these models have been verified against laboratory experimental data, there is a lack of suitable real-world data available for validation. Hence, using two computer models of the head/brain, the objective of the current study was to reconstruct four real-world crashes with known head injury outcomes in a full-vehicle crash laboratory, simulate head/brain responses using kinematics obtained during these reconstructions, and to compare the results predicted by the models against the actual injuries sustained by the occupant. Cases where the occupant sustained no head injuries (AIS 0) and head injuries of severity AIS 4, AIS 5, and multiple head injuries were selected. Data collected from a 9-accelerometer skull were input into the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM) and the NHTSA Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon). The results demonstrated that both models were able to predict varying injury severities consistent with the difference in AIS injury levels in the real-world cases. The WSUHIM predicted a slightly higher injury threshold than the SIMon, probably due to the finer mesh and different software used for the simulations, and could also determine regions of the brain which had been injured. With further validation, finite element models can be used to establish an injury criterion for each type of brain injury in the future.

  15. Development and validation of a realistic head model for EEG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangera, Nitin Bhalchandra

    The utility of extracranial electrical or magnetic field recordings (EEG or MEG) is greatly enhanced if the generators of the bioelectromagnetic fields can be determined accurately from the measured fields. This procedure, known as the 'inverse method,' depends critically on calculations of the projection from generators in the brain to the EEG and MEG sensors. Improving and validating this calculation, known as the 'forward solution,' is the focus of this dissertation. The improvements involve more accurate modeling of the structures of the brain and thus understanding how current flows within the brain as a result of addition of structures in the forward model. Validation compares calculations using different forward models to the experimental results obtained by stimulating with implanted dipole electrodes. The human brain tissue displays inhomogeneity in electrical conductivity and also displays anisotropy, notably in the skull and brain white matter. In this dissertation, a realistic head model has been implemented using the finite element method to calculate the effects of inhomogeneity and anisotropy in the human brain. Accurate segmentation of the brain tissue type is implemented using a semi-automatic method to segment multimodal imaging data from multi-spectral MRI scans (different flip angles) in conjunction with the regular T1-weighted scans and computed x-ray tomography images. The electrical conductivity in the anisotropic white matter tissue is quantified from diffusion tensor MRI. The finite element model is constructed using AMIRA, a commercial segmentation and visualization tool and solved using ABAQUS, a commercial finite element solver. The model is validated using experimental data collected from intracranial stimulation in medically intractable epileptic patients. Depth electrodes are implanted in medically intractable epileptic patients in order to direct surgical therapy when the foci cannot be localized with the scalp EEG. These patients

  16. A Drosophila model of closed head traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Loewen, Carin A; Wassarman, Douglas R; Petersen, Andrew J; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A

    2013-10-29

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a substantial health issue worldwide, yet the mechanisms responsible for its complex spectrum of pathologies remains largely unknown. To investigate the mechanisms underlying TBI pathologies, we developed a model of TBI in Drosophila melanogaster. The model allows us to take advantage of the wealth of experimental tools available in flies. Closed head TBI was inflicted with a mechanical device that subjects flies to rapid acceleration and deceleration. Similar to humans with TBI, flies with TBI exhibited temporary incapacitation, ataxia, activation of the innate immune response, neurodegeneration, and death. Our data indicate that TBI results in death shortly after a primary injury only if the injury exceeds a certain threshold and that age and genetic background, but not sex, substantially affect this threshold. Furthermore, this threshold also appears to be dependent on the same cellular and molecular mechanisms that control normal longevity. This study demonstrates the potential of flies for providing key insights into human TBI that may ultimately provide unique opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Identification of femoral head center of bipolar hemiarthroplasy in radiostereometric analysis with elementary geometrical shape models.

    PubMed

    Tsukanaka, Masako; Röhrl, Stephan M; von Schewelov, Thord; Nordsletten, Lars

    2016-02-08

    Elementary geometrical shape (EGS) models are useful in radiostereometric analysis (RSA) on hip stems because tantalum markers attached to the stems can be omitted. In order to create an EGS model of a femoral stem, the center of the femoral head has to be identified. The contour of the femoral head is recommended to be used. However, the contour of the femoral head cannot be detected exclusively by computer if it is combined with a bipolar head or a metal cup. We therefore hypothesized that the contour of the outer head of bipolar hemiarthroplasty can be included in the EGS model as well as the femoral head contour. We calculated the time required for the detection of the contour, the precision of analysis and the stem micromotion at 2 years using the two different methods in the same picture set and compared the results. The detection of the bipolar head contour was 10 times faster than that of the femoral head contour. The precision for subsidence was 0.16 mm in EGS RSA with the femoral head contour, and 0.15 mm with the bipolar head contour (p=0.68). The precisions were comparable and clinically acceptable. There was no significant difference between the results of the 2-year micromotion with the two different methods. We conclude that this new method is applicable to measure stem micromotion of hemi-arthroplasty with EGS RSA and the method facilitates the Radiostereometric analysis.

  18. Hip Osteonecrosis Is Associated with Increased Plasma IL-33 Level

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinhui; Guo, Wanshou; Li, Zirong; Li, Shirui; Wang, Peng

    2017-01-01

    The recently discovered IL-33 as an IL-1 cytokine family member has been proved to be specifically released from osteonecrotic bones. We aimed to investigate the potential role of IL-33 in the development of osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH). Forty patients diagnosed with ONFH and forty age-, sex-, and body mass index- (BMI-) matched healthy subjects were included in this prospective study between March 2016 and September 2016. A commercially available ELISA kit was used to test the level of plasma IL-33. The IL-33 levels were compared among different ARCO stages, CJFH types, and etiology groups. Plasma IL-33 levels were significantly higher in the ONFH patients than that in the control subjects. The levels of IL-33 did not differ significantly among the ONFH patients with different ARCO stages. The IL-33 levels of patients with CJFH type L3 were significantly higher than that of patients with types L1 and L2. No significant differences were observed in IL-33 levels between steroid-induced, alcohol-induced, and idiopathic patients. Our findings seem to indicate that IL-33 effects may be detrimental during ONFH, which appeared to be associated with the prognosis of ONFH. The IL-33 deserves particular attention in the pathogenesis of ONFH. PMID:28167850

  19. Closed-Head TBI Model of Multiple Morbidity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Floyd J; Hou, Jiamei; Bose, Prodip K

    2016-01-01

    Successful therapy for TBI disabilities awaits refinement in the understanding of TBI neurobiology, quantitative measurement of treatment-induced incremental changes in recovery trajectories, and effective translation to human TBI using quantitative methods and protocols that were effective to monitor recovery in preclinical models. Details of the specific neurobiology that underlies these injuries and effective quantitation of treatment-induced changes are beginning to emerge utilizing a variety of preclinical and clinical models (for reviews see (Morales et al., Neuroscience 136:971-989, 2005; Fujimoto et al., Neurosci Biobehav Rev 28:365-378, 2004; Cernak, NeuroRx 2:410-422, 2005; Smith et al., J Neurotrauma 22:1485-1502, 2005; Bose et al., J Neurotrauma 30:1177-1191, 2013; Xiong et al., Nat Rev Neurosci 14:128-142, 2013; Xiong et al., Expert Opin Emerg Drugs 14:67-84, 2009; Johnson et al., Handb Clin Neurol 127:115-128, 2015; Bose et al., Brain neurotrauma: molecular, neuropsychological, and rehabilitation aspects, CRC Press/Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, 2015)). Preclinical models of TBI, essential for the efficient study of TBI neurobiology, benefit from the setting of controlled injury and optimal opportunities for biometric quantitation of injury and treatment-induced changes in the trajectories of disability. Several preclinical models are currently used, and each offer opportunities for study of different aspects of TBI primary and secondary injuries (for review see (Morales et al., Neuroscience 136:971-989, 2005; Xiong et al., Nat Rev Neurosci 14:128-142, 2013; Xiong et al., Expert Opin Emerg Drugs 14:67-84, 2009; Johnson et al., Handb Clin Neurol 127:115-128, 2015; Dixon et al., J Neurotrauma 5:91-104, 1988)). The closed-head, impact-acceleration model of TBI designed by Marmarou et al., 1994 (J Neurosurg 80:291-300, 1994), when used to produce mild to moderate TBI, produces diffuse axonal injuries without significant additional focal injuries of the

  20. [Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Koy, S; Schubert, M; Koy, J; Ney, M; Lauer, G; Sabatowski, R

    2015-04-01

    Bisphosphonates (BP) are used in the treatment of severe osteoporosis and metastasis of malignant diseases. A possible relationship between the occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw and BP therapy was first described in 2003. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is difficult to treat. In some cases the condition of the patients is so compromised that only minimally invasive surgery is possible. Histopathologically, osteonecrosis shows the features of chronic sequestered osteomyelitis, which can be found in different areas of the upper and lower jaw. Sometimes extensive resections of the jaw are necessary. Thus, BRONJ can cause mutilation, impairment of function and esthetics in the orofacial system and, thereby, compromise the life quality of the patients. Triggering factors are often tooth extraction without surgical plastic wound closure of the alveoli, but can also be associated with bruises from denture or other minor wounds. The purpose of this article is to present results from our own patient collective, including therapy regime, success rate, and therapy recommendations. The patient populations at three German hospitals were analyzed using a standard questionnaire. The patients in the study group, entered into a follow-up system for early detection of possible BRONJ, were evaluated for treatement outcome. The success rate for prophylactic surgery in asymptomatic patients was very high at 96 %. In the group with symptomatic BRONJ, the outcome was significantly lower (76.4 %). Because of the complex symptoms, close cooperation between oncologists, dentists, and maxillofacial surgeons is required in the treatment of BRONJ. Before starting therapy with bisphosphonates and during the therapy, dental treatment and monitoring of the patient' oral health is necessary.

  1. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw Developed in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sil; Kanayama, Keiichi; Kaur, Kawaljit; Tseng, Han-Ching Helen; Banankhah, Sina; Quje, Davood Talebi; Sayre, James W.; Jewett, Anahid; Nishimura, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), an uncommon co-morbidity in patients treated with bisphosphonates (BP), occurs in the segment of jawbone interfacing oral mucosa. This study aimed to investigate a role of oral mucosal barrier γδ T cells in the pathogenesis of ONJ. Female C57Bl/6J (B6) mice received a bolus zoledronate intravenous injection (ZOL, 540 μg/kg), and their maxillary left first molars were extracted 1 week later. ZOL-treated mice (WT ZOL) delayed oral wound healing with patent open wounds 4 weeks after tooth extraction with characteristic oral epithelial hyperplasia. γδ T cells appeared within the tooth extraction site and hyperplastic epithelium in WT ZOL mice. In ZOL-treated γδ T cell null (Tcrd−/− ZOL) mice, the tooth extraction open wound progressively closed; however, histological ONJ-like lesions were identified in 75 and 60% of WT ZOL and Tcrd−/− ZOL mice, respectively. Although the bone exposure phenotype of ONJ was predominantly observed in WT ZOL mice, Tcrd−/− ZOL mice developed the pustule/fistula disease phenotype. We further addressed the role of γδ T cells from human peripheral blood (h-γδ T cells). When co-cultured with ZOL-pretreated human osteoclasts in vitro, h-γδ T cells exhibited rapid expansion and robust IFN-γ secretion. When h-γδ T cells were injected into ZOL-treated immunodeficient (Rag2−/− ZOL) mice, the oral epithelial hyperplasia developed. However, Rag2−/− ZOL mice did not develop osteonecrosis. The results indicate that γδ T cells are unlikely to influence the core osteonecrosis mechanism; however, they may serve as a critical modifier contributing to the different oral mucosal disease variations of ONJ. PMID:26013832

  2. A kinematic model for 3-D head-free gaze-shifts

    PubMed Central

    Daemi, Mehdi; Crawford, J. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Rotations of the line of sight are mainly implemented by coordinated motion of the eyes and head. Here, we propose a model for the kinematics of three-dimensional (3-D) head-unrestrained gaze-shifts. The model was designed to account for major principles in the known behavior, such as gaze accuracy, spatiotemporal coordination of saccades with vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), relative eye and head contributions, the non-commutativity of rotations, and Listing's and Fick constraints for the eyes and head, respectively. The internal design of the model was inspired by known and hypothesized elements of gaze control physiology. Inputs included retinocentric location of the visual target and internal representations of initial 3-D eye and head orientation, whereas outputs were 3-D displacements of eye relative to the head and head relative to shoulder. Internal transformations decomposed the 2-D gaze command into 3-D eye and head commands with the use of three coordinated circuits: (1) a saccade generator, (2) a head rotation generator, (3) a VOR predictor. Simulations illustrate that the model can implement: (1) the correct 3-D reference frame transformations to generate accurate gaze shifts (despite variability in other parameters), (2) the experimentally verified constraints on static eye and head orientations during fixation, and (3) the experimentally observed 3-D trajectories of eye and head motion during gaze-shifts. We then use this model to simulate how 2-D eye-head coordination strategies interact with 3-D constraints to influence 3-D orientations of the eye-in-space, and the implications of this for spatial vision. PMID:26113816

  3. Bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Philip; Olver, Ian; Goss, Alastair

    2006-10-01

    Recently an association between bisphosphonate use and a rare dental condition termed 'osteonecrosis of the jaw' (ONJ) has been reported. Patients with osteoporosis and Paget disease who take bisphosphonates have a significantly reduced risk of fracture and other skeletal complications. This represents significant health benefits, against which the small risk of ONJ needs to be considered. In patients with bone malignancy, the risk of ONJ needs to be balanced against the benefit of therapy on the underlying malignancy. There are still many uncertainties about this condition. This position paper seeks to summarise what is currently known about ONJ to provide information to medical practitioners and dental practitioners.

  4. Osteonecrosis caused by Bisphosphonates: a clinical case

    PubMed Central

    SPINELLI, D.; DE VICO, G.; BONINO, M.; BARLATTANI, A.; BOLLERO, P.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The osteonecrosis of the maxillares caused by bisphosphonates (OMB) either wrongly known or not reconised in earlier times became nowadays very important among the dentists and maxillo-facials surgeons because of the potential serious consequences that might bring in the oral cave of the patients, who are suffering already for their base condition. The goal of our work was to verify if a deep treatment and an attentive observation with a close follow-up can bring to the resolution of serious cases of ostenecrosis of the maxillares by bisphosphonantes. Although without a statistic value our case report put the basis for a chance to execute wider casistic studies. PMID:23285372

  5. Multifocal osteonecrosis secondary to occupational exposure to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Filippi, Renée Zon; Ferreira, Arnaldo Amado

    2017-01-01

    Multifocal osteonecrosis is a rare disease; chronic use of corticosteroids is considered the main risk factor. Patients with chronic renal failure can develop aluminum toxicity, which can lead to osteomalacia and encephalopathy. An association between osteonecrosis and aluminum toxicity has been reported among patients with dialytic renal insufficiency. Occupational exposure to aluminum rarely causes lung disease and no cases of bone lesions resulting from exposure to this metal have been reported. In this manuscript, we describe a novel case of a patient with multifocal osteonecrosis associated with chronic occupational exposure to aluminum. Level of Evidence IV, Case Report.

  6. Head and cervical spine posture in behaving rats: implications for modeling human conditions involving the head and cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Choong, W Y; Teh, W; Buxton, A J; Bolton, P S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the temporal and spatial (postural) characteristics of the head and cervical vertebral column (spine) of behaving rats in order to better understand their suitability as a model to study human conditions involving the head and neck. Time spent in each of four behavioral postures was determined from video tape recordings of rats (n = 10) in the absence and presence of an intruder rat. Plain film radiographic examination of a subset of these rats (n = 5) in each of these postures allowed measurement of head and cervical vertebral column positions adopted by the rats. When single they were quadruped or crouched most (∼80%) of the time and bipedal either supported or free standing for only ∼10% of the time. The introduction of an intruder significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced the proportion of time rats spent quadruped (median, from 71% to 47%) and bipedal free standing (median, from 2.9% to 0.4%). The cervical spine was orientated (median, 25-75 percentile) near vertical (18.8°, 4.2°-30.9°) when quadruped, crouched (15.4°, 7.6°-69.3°) and bipedal supported (10.5°, 4.8°-22.6°) but tended to be less vertical oriented when bipedal free standing (25.9°, 7.7°-39.3°). The range of head positions relative to the cervical spine was largest when crouched (73.4°) and smallest when erect free standing (17.7°). This study indicates that, like humans, rats have near vertical orientated cervical vertebral columns but, in contrast to humans, they displace their head in space by movements at both the cervico-thoracic junction and the cranio-cervical regions.

  7. Thrust and torque characteristics based on a new cutter-head load model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianqin; Ren, Jiabao; Guo, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Full face rock tunnel boring machine(TBM) has been widely used in hard rock tunnels, however, there are few published theory about cutter-head design, and the design criteria of cutter-head under complex geological is not clear yet. To deal with the complex relationship among geological parameters, cutter parameters, and operating parameters during tunneling processes, a cutter-head load model is established by using CSM(Colorado school of mines) prediction model. Force distribution on cutter-head under a certain geology is calculated with the new established load model, and result shows that inner cutters bear more force than outer cutters, combining with disc cutters abrasion; a general principle of disc cutters' layout design is proposed. Within the model, the relationship among rock uniaxial compressive strength(UCS), penetration and thrust on cutter-head are analyzed, and the results shows that with increasing penetration, cutter thrust increases, but the growth rate slows and higher penetration makes lower special energy(SE). Finally, a fitting mathematical model of ZT(ratio of cutter-head torque and thrust) and penetration is established, and verified by TB880E, which can be used to direct how to set thrust and torque on cutter-head. When penetration is small, the cutter-head thrust is the main limiting factor in tunneling; when the penetration is large, cutter-head torque is the major limiting factor in tunneling. Based on the new cutter-head load model, thrust and torque characteristics of TBM further are researched and a new way for cutter-head layout design and TBM tunneling operations is proposed.

  8. Dysbaric osteonecrosis screening in Turkish Navy divers.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Gunalp; Toklu, Akin Savas; Yildiz, Senol; Sonmez, Guner; Aktaş, Samil; Sezer, Hakan; Mutlu, Hakan; Cimşit, Maide

    2008-01-01

    Dysbaric osteonecrosis (DON) is regarded as an occupational disease for caisson workers, commercial, and military divers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was suggested for the surveillance of military divers for DON. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of DON in Turkish Navy divers. The shoulder, hip, and knee joints of 106 male divers were screened for DON with MRI. A questionnaire was used to obtain information about subjects' medical history and diving experience. The mean age of divers was 34.3 +/- 5.8 yr. The divers had spent an average of 12.1 +/- 6.1 yr at their occupation. The average of total hours of diving was 834 +/- 458 h. The maximum diving depth was 53.0 +/- 18.4 m (175 +/- 61 ft) and the average diving depth was 13.3 +/- 8.4 m (44 +/- 28 ft). MRI examinations of divers did not reveal bone lesions consistent with osteonecrosis. We concluded that the risk of DON is very low for military divers who strictly obey the decompression rules and who undergo periodic medical examination. The use of MRI for routine screening of military divers is not justified.

  9. Environmental Anchoring of Head Direction in a Computational Model of Retrosplenial Cortex

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allocentric (world-centered) spatial codes driven by path integration accumulate error unless reset by environmental sensory inputs that are necessarily egocentric (body-centered). Previous models of the head direction system avoided the necessary transformation between egocentric and allocentric reference frames by placing visual cues at infinity. Here we present a model of head direction coding that copes with exclusively proximal cues by making use of a conjunctive representation of head direction and location in retrosplenial cortex. Egocentric landmark bearing of proximal cues, which changes with location, is mapped onto this retrosplenial representation. The model avoids distortions due to parallax, which occur in simple models when a single proximal cue card is used, and can also accommodate multiple cues, suggesting how it can generalize to arbitrary sensory environments. It provides a functional account of the anatomical distribution of head direction cells along Papez' circuit, of place-by-direction coding in retrosplenial cortex, the anatomical connection from the anterior thalamic nuclei to retrosplenial cortex, and the involvement of retrosplenial cortex in navigation. In addition to parallax correction, the same mechanism allows for continuity of head direction coding between connected environments, and shows how a head direction representation can be stabilized by a single within arena cue. We also make predictions for drift during exploration of a new environment, the effects of hippocampal lesions on retrosplenial cells, and on head direction coding in differently shaped environments. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The activity of head direction cells signals the direction of an animal's head relative to landmarks in the world. Although driven by internal estimates of head movements, head direction cells must be kept aligned to the external world by sensory inputs, which arrive in the reference frame of the sensory receptors. We present a computational

  10. Combined with Bone Marrow-Derived Cells and rhBMP-2 for Osteonecrosis after Femoral Neck Fractures in Children and Adolescents: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fuqiang; Sun, Wei; Guo, Wanshou; Wang, Bailiang; Cheng, Liming; Li, Zirong

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) following femoral neck fractures is a rare, yet severe, disorder in children and adolescents. This study evaluated the effectiveness of core decompression (CD) combined with implantation of bone marrow–derived cells (BMDC) and rhBMP-2 for osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) after femoral neck fractures in children and adolescents. This study included 51 patients, aged 11.4–18.1 years, with ARCO stages I–III ONFH after femoral neck fractures between 2004 and 2010. The hips were divided into two groups based on whether the lateral pillar of the femoral head (LPFH) was preserved: LPFH and non-LPFH groups. All patients were followed up clinically and radiographically for a minimum of 5 years. 44 patients (86.3%) had improved clinical outcome. Radiologically, 9 of the 51 hips (17.6%) exhibited collapse onset or progression of the femoral head or narrowing of the hip joint space, and one patient in the non-LPFH group required hip arthroplasty due to the worsened syndrome. The technique provided an effective therapeutic option for children and adolescents with ONFH following femoral neck fractures. It relieves hip pain and prevents the progression of osteonecrosis in young patients lasting more than 5 years after surgery. PMID:27477836

  11. A Success Story: The Evaluation of Four Head Start Bilingual Multicultural Curriculum Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arenas, Soledad; Trujillo, Lorenzo A.

    An evaluation was made of four Head Start bilingual/ multicultural curriculum models to assess their effectiveness and impact on children, staff, and parents. Intended as a pre-post design (with 90 children at each of eight Head Start replication sites and with treatment and control groups stratified on the basis of Spanish or English language…

  12. Effects of head models and dipole source parameters on EEG fields.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Peng, Mingming; Xu, Anhuai

    2015-01-01

    Head model and an efficient method for computing the forward EEG (electroencephalography)problem are essential to dipole source localization(DSL). In this paper, we use less expensive ovoid geometry to approximate human head, aiming at investigating the effects of head shape and dipole source parameters on EEG fields. The application of point least squares (PLS) based on meshless method was introduced for solving EEG forward problem and numerical simulation is implemented in three kinds of ovoid head models. We present the performances of the surface potential in the face of varying dipole source parameters in detail. The results show that the potential patterns are similar for different dipole position in different head shapes, but the peak value of potential is significantly influenced by the head shape. Dipole position induces a great effect on the peak value of potential and shift of peak potential. The degree of variation between sphere head model and non-sphere head models is seen at the same time. We also show that PLS method with the trigonometric basis is superior to the constant basis, linear basis, and quadratic basis functions in accuracy and efficiency.

  13. Effects of Head Models and Dipole Source Parameters on EEG Fields

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li; Peng, Mingming; Xu, Anhuai

    2015-01-01

    Head model and an efficient method for computing the forward EEG (electroencephalography)problem are essential to dipole source localization(DSL). In this paper, we use less expensive ovoid geometry to approximate human head, aiming at investigating the effects of head shape and dipole source parameters on EEG fields. The application of point least squares (PLS) based on meshless method was introduced for solving EEG forward problem and numerical simulation is implemented in three kinds of ovoid head models. We present the performances of the surface potential in the face of varying dipole source parameters in detail. The results show that the potential patterns are similar for different dipole position in different head shapes, but the peak value of potential is significantly influenced by the head shape. Dipole position induces a great effect on the peak value of potential and shift of peak potential. The degree of variation between sphere head model and non-sphere head models is seen at the same time. We also show that PLS method with the trigonometric basis is superior to the constant basis, linear basis, and quadratic basis functions in accuracy and efficiency. PMID:25893011

  14. Bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaws: science and rationale.

    PubMed

    Gutta, Rajesh; Louis, Patrick J

    2007-08-01

    Bisphosphonates as a group of drugs were introduced for the management of various conditions such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease, multiple myeloma, hypercalcemia of malignancy, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and other tumors. This group of drugs has improved the quality of life in many patients with proven efficacy in limiting pain and skeletal-related events. The controversy of osteonecrosis of the jaws and bisphosphonates is a recent and growing problem. Osteonecrosis of the jaws is recognized as a serious complication of bisphosphonate therapy, more commonly with the intravenous form of the drugs. However, there is limited scientific understanding about the association between osteonecrosis of the jaws and bisphosphonates. In the present article we discuss various mechanisms of action of bisphosphonates, the rationale for occurrence of osteonecrosis in the jaws, and treatment guidelines for the condition.

  15. BISPHOSPHONATE-INDUCED MAXILLOFACIAL OSTEONECROSIS IN OSTEOPOROTIC INDIVIDUALS

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Santos, Paulo Sérgio; Oliveira, Márcio Augusto; Felix, Valtuir Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the maxillae may be an important complication of long-term osteoporosis treatment. The possibility of osteonecrosis of the maxillae in patients exposed to nitrogenated bisphosphonates was first described in 2003. Since then, case reports and retrospective studies have demonstrated higher percentages of occurrence of osteonecrosis in patients who have used or are using bisphosphonates. Although this complication may be spontaneous, invasive oral procedures have a role as risk factors associated with dental procedures such as tooth extractions and other bone operations. In addition, tooth infections and periodontal disease have been reported to be the main risk factors for development of bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the maxillae. For this reason, dentists, general clinicians, orthopedists, geriatricians and oral-maxillofacial surgeons need to be aware of this problem and work in a multidisciplinary environment, thereby stimulating early diagnosis and prevention of further potential cases. PMID:27027044

  16. Osteonecrosis of the knee: a review of three disorders.

    PubMed

    Zywiel, Michael G; McGrath, Mike S; Seyler, Thorsten M; Marker, David R; Bonutti, Peter M; Mont, Michael A

    2009-04-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee is a debilitating disease that is poorly understood. Originally described as a single disorder, it encompasses three distinct conditions: spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK), secondary osteonecrosis of the knee, and post-arthroscopic osteonecrosis of the knee. This article reviews the current knowledge of these distinct conditions by describing their etiology, pathology, and pathogenesis, as well as their clinical and radiographic presentations. The various treatment options available for each condition are reviewed, with a discussion of their rationale and indications, and a summary of results with various techniques. A thorough understanding of these conditions and their distinguishing features is critical to selecting the best treatment option for an individual patient.

  17. A case of mandible osteonecrosis after a severe periimplant infection

    PubMed Central

    Grecchi, Francesco; Zollino, Ilaria; Candotto, Valentina; Gallo, Francesco; Rubino, Giuseppe; Giglio, Sara; Bianco, Raffaella; Carinci, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    The term osteonecrosis has been applied to describe the presence of a persistent inflammation of the mouth, osteomyelitis, delayed healing of extraction sockets, development of sequestra or presence of fistulae from the mouth to the lower skin. Here, we document a case of mandible osteonecrosis that developed in a patient after a severe periimplant infection. Osteonecrosis, severe inflammatory osteolysis, and heavy bacterial colonization were found. Surgical toilette and hyperbaric oxygen therapy permitted complete healing of the case. No complication was recorded in the post-operative period and no further surgery was performed. The clinical follow up and the imaging after one year showed a complete ‘restitution ad integrum’ of the mandible. Although the risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw for oral implants is low, the devastating complications still require caution. PMID:23814591

  18. Constructing three-dimensional detachable and composable computer models of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Fan, Min; Dai, Peishan; Zheng, Buhong; Li, Xinchun

    2015-06-01

    The head and neck region has a complex spatial and topological structure, three-dimensional (3D) computer model of the region can be used in anatomical education, radiotherapy planning and surgical training. However, most of the current models only consist of a few parts of the head and neck, and the 3D models are not detachable and composable. In this study, a high-resolution 3D detachable and composable model of the head and neck was constructed based on computed tomography (CT) serial images. First, fine CT serial images of the head and neck were obtained. Then, a color lookup table was created for 58 structures, which was used to create anatomical atlases of the head and neck. Then, surface and volume rendering methods were used to reconstruct 3D models of the head and neck. Smoothing and polygon reduction steps were added to improve 3D rendering effects. 3D computer models of the head and neck, including the sinus, pharynx, vasculature, nervous system, endocrine system and glands, muscles, bones and skin, were reconstructed. The models consisted of 58 anatomical detachable and composable structures and each structure can be displayed individually or together with other structures.

  19. Total hip arthroplasty in steroid-induced osteonecrosis: early functional and radiological outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Wael A.; Garbuz, Donald S.; Masri, Bassam A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The proportion of total hip arthroplasties (THAs) associated with corticosteroid use is uncertain, and the mechanisms of corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis remain unknown. We sought to evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcomes, complications and satisfaction with THA among patients with corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis. Methods We retrospectively assessed functional outcome at a minimum 1-year follow-up using the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC); Oxford Hip Score; Short Form (SF)-12; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Activity; and patient satisfaction scores. Results We included 31 patients (35 hips). The average follow-up was 20 (range 12–55) months, and the average age at surgery was 47 (range 19–78) years. At follow-up, patients showed significant improvement in all 4 components of the WOMAC (means: function 84, stiffness 75, pain 86, global 84), Oxford-12 (mean 83) and SF-12 (means: mental 40 and physical 48) scores. However, there was no significant improvement in the UCLA Activity scores. Mean patient satisfaction scores were good for pain relief (86), function (80), recreation (77.5) and overall results of surgery (86). Radiographic review at follow-up showed that all components were well fixed with no evidence of loosening. The complication rate was high (17%), with 6 complications in 5 patients (6 of 35 hips). Four patients (4 of 35 hips; 11%) required reoperations. Conclusion Total hip arthroplasty in patients with corticosteroid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head is successful in reducing pain and improving function; however, the rate of complications and reoperation is high. PMID:22992403

  20. Testosterone Therapy Can Interact With Thrombophilia, Leading to Osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Riaz, Rashid; Prince, Marloe; Freiberg, Richard A; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Although this effect is not widely recognized, testosterone therapy can interact with thrombophilia, causing osteonecrosis. In 12 men and 4 women who had idiopathic osteonecrosis a median of 6 months after the onset of testosterone therapy, the authors examined the interaction between testosterone therapy and previously undiagnosed thrombophilia. The authors hypothesized that patients who had osteonecrosis after starting testosterone therapy were more likely than 110 normal control subjects or 48 patients who had osteonecrosis and were not receiving testosterone therapy to have thrombophilia. Measures of thrombophilia included Factor V Leiden, prothrombin, PAI-1 gene mutations, Factor VIII, Factor XI, anticardiolipin antibody immunoglobulin G or immunoglobulin M, and homocysteine values. In 10 cases, osteonecrosis occurred 6 months or less after the onset of testosterone therapy, and in all 16 cases, it occurred after a median of 6 months of testosterone therapy. Of the 16 cases, 5 (31%) were Factor V Leiden heterozygotes vs 2 of 109 (2%) healthy control subjects (P=.0003) and 4 of 48 patients who had osteonecrosis and were not receiving testosterone therapy (P=.04). Of the 16 cases, 4 (25%) had high (>150%) Factor VIII levels vs 7 of 103 (7%) healthy control subjects (P=.04), and 3 (19%) had high (>150%) Factor XI levels vs 3 of 101 (3%) healthy control subjects (P=.03). Of the 16 patients with osteonecrosis, 14 (88%) had at least 1 abnormal procoagulant value (of the 8 measured) vs 47 of 110 (43%) healthy control subjects (P=.0009). Of the 5 men whose serum estradiol level was measured while they were receiving testosterone therapy, this level was high (≥42.6 pg/mL) in 4. When testosterone therapy is given to patients with thrombophilia, they are at increased risk for osteonecrosis.

  1. [RESEARCH PROGRESS OF EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS OF AVASCULAR NECROSIS OF FEMORAL HEAD].

    PubMed

    Yu, Kaifu; Tan, Hongbo; Xu, Yongqing

    2015-12-01

    To summarize the current researches and progress on experimental animal models of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Domestic and internation literature concerning experimental animal models of avascular necrosis of the femoral head was reviewed and analyzed. The methods to prepare the experimental animal models of avascular necrosis of the femoral head can be mainly concluded as traumatic methods (including surgical, physical, and chemical insult), and non-traumatic methods (including steroid, lipopolysaccharide, steroid combined with lipopolysaccharide, steroid combined with horse serum, etc). Each method has both merits and demerits, yet no ideal methods have been developed. There are many methods to prepare the experimental animal models of avascular necrosis of the femoral head, but proper model should be selected based on the aim of research. The establishment of ideal experimental animal models needs further research in future.

  2. Modeling length-tension properties of RCPm muscles during voluntary retraction of the head.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    Head retraction exercises are one of several commonly used clinical tools that are used to assess and treat patients with head and neck pain and to aid in restoration of a normal neutral head posture. Retraction of the head results in flexion of the occipitoatlantal (OA) joint and stretching of rectus capitis posterior minor (RCPm) muscles. The role that retraction of the head might have in treating head and neck pain patients is currently unknown. RCPm muscles arise from the posterior tubercle of the posterior arch of C1 and insert into the occipital bone inferior to the inferior nuchal line and lateral to the midline. RCPm muscles are the only muscles that attach to the posterior arch of C1. The functional role of RCPm muscles has not been clearly defined. The goal of this project was to develop a three-dimensional, computer-based biomechanical model of the posterior aspect of the OA joint. This model should help clarify why voluntary head retraction exercises seem to contribute to the resolution of head and neck pain and restoration of a normal head posture in some patients. The model documents that length-tension properties of RCPm muscles are significantly affected by variations in the physical properties of the musculotendonous unit. The model suggests that variations in the cross sectional area of RCPm muscles due to pathologies that weaken the muscle, such as muscle atrophy, may reduce the ability of these muscles to generate levels of force that are necessary for the performance of normal, daily activities. The model suggests that the main benefit of the initial phase of head retraction exercises may be to strengthen RCPm muscles through eccentric contractions, and that the main benefit of the final phase of retraction may be to stretch the muscles as the final position is held.

  3. Head out of water immersion: A simulation model of microgravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verheyden, B.; Beckers, F.; Aubert, Ae.

    Introduction. It is well known that during weightlessness a redistribution of body fluids occurs towards the upper parts of the body causing altered cardiovascular reflex activities. During head out of water immersion (HOI), the hydrostatic pressure on the soft tissues of the lower limbs causes thoracic blood volume to increase, comparably with the observed haemodynamics during weightlessness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate HOI as a simulation model of microgravity concerning the cardiovascular autonomic control system. Methods. Heartbeat and continuous blood pressure (fingerplethysmography) were measured in 18 (age=22.2± 10.3yr) healthy subjects in different conditions: Supine, sitting and standing in air (25C); upright submersion in thermo neutral water (34C) up to the shoulders (HOI). After 5 minutes of accommodation to the position and condition, recordings were made for 10 minutes. Time domain parameters (MeanRR, SD, rMSSD and pNN50) as well as frequency domain parameters (Total Power, high frequency (HF), low frequency (LF)) of HRV and BPV were calculated. An index of baroreflex sensitivity was determined by the sequence method. Results from the HOI experiment were compared to results obtained from microgravity phases in parabolic flights in 5 subjects. Results. Cardiac autonomic control during HOI was characterized by a gain in vagal predominance as shown by a decrease of the LF/HF-ratio from 950 ± 130 ms2 during standing control towards 389 ± 119 ms2 during HOI and a increase of BRS by approximately 20%. As a result, heart rate decreased by approximately 28% during HOI. The same evolution was shown during the transition from a standing control position towards 0G obtained during parabolic flights. LF power of BPV, as a marker of peripheral vasomotor sympathetic activity, decreased significantly both in absolute values and normalized units during HOI compared to standing and seated control (p < 0.05). In contrast, an increase in LF power of BPV

  4. Osteonecrosis of the Knee After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lansdown, Drew A.; Shaw, Jeremy; Allen, Christina R.; Ma, C. Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is performed commonly, with a low risk of complication. Osteonecrosis of the knee is a potentially devastating condition and has been observed both spontaneously and after meniscectomy, although osteonecrosis has not been described as a complication after ACL reconstruction. Purpose: To describe the development of osteonecrosis of the knee in 5 patients after arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study involved 5 patients (mean age, 33.2 years) who developed osteonecrosis of the knee after ACL reconstruction. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify clinical characteristics and surgical factors present in each of the 5 cases. Results: In 4 cases, the pathologic changes were present in both the medial and lateral femoral condyles, with isolated lateral condyle changes in the other case. The mean time to diagnosis was 11.6 months. These patients underwent an average of 1.8 additional surgical procedures after the diagnosis of osteonecrosis. Conclusion: Osteonecrosis of the knee is a rare outcome after ACL reconstruction. We are unable to identify clear risk factors for the development of this complication, although we hope the presentation of these cases will help promote the identification of other cases in future studies. PMID:26665035

  5. Modeling and Vibration Analysis of Spinning Hard Disk and Head Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kao-An; Huang, Shyh-Chin

    A read/write head assembly attached to a spinning disk was modeled and investigated through a different approach, in which the head assembly was represented by a suspension arm with an attached mass and an air spring (film) at its free end. The receptance method was applied to connect the spinning disk and the head assembly. The natural frequencies and mode shapes of the combined spinning disk-fixed head assembly as a whole were then interpreted. Numerical results showed that the head assembly induced extra modes from a single disk. Even for just weak coupling between disk and head, the bifurcations of mode shapes were very obvious, but the changes of natural frequencies were slight. The effects on frequency changes due to head's flexibility, air spring constant, head's location, and spinning speed were examined as well. Disk's spinning speed was found to pull the disk-head frequency loci to pass through the crossings of single disk's frequency loci and induce curve veering phenomenon.

  6. Osteoarthritis-like disorder in rats with vascular deprivation-induced necrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Levin, D; Norman, D; Zinman, C; Misselevich, I; Reis, D N; Boss, J H

    1999-01-01

    The reparative processes following vascular deprivation-induced necrosis of the femoral head were studied histologically in rats sacrificed 2, 7, 14, 21, 42 and 92 days postoperatively. The blood supply was severed by incision of the periosteum at the neck of the femoral head and transection of the ligamentum teres. Granulation tissue and a well-vascularized fibrous tissue originating from the joint capsule invaded the necrotic marrow spaces. With progressive resorption of the necrotic tissues and osteoneogenesis, both appositional and intramembranous, within the fibrotic intertrabecular spaces, the remodeling process led to a shift of the normal spongy architecture of the femoral head to a compacta-like one. In a few cases, osseous bridges bisected a necrotic physeal cartilage at the latest time intervals. The remodeling was associated with flattening of the femoral heads as well as with degenerative, regenerative and reparative alterations of the articular cartilage. In one of the two femoral heads obtained three months postoperatively, cystic spaces developed in the fibrous subchondral zone. Our findings are consistent with the view that ineffective attempts at restoring the prenecrotic state of the femoral head by replacing the necrotic with viable tissue triggers the collapse of the femoral head. Thickening and condensation of the subchondral bone, leading to increased stiffness of the subchondral zone, result in the osteoarthritis-like disorder. Mimicking the well-known phases of human osteonecrosis, the model readily allows for preclinical studies of therapeutic regimens.

  7. Development, Validation and Parametric study of a 3-Year-Old Child Head Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shihai; Chen, Yue; Li, Haiyan; Ruan, ShiJie

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury caused by drop and traffic accidents is an important reason for children's death and disability. Recently, the computer finite element (FE) head model has been developed to investigate brain injury mechanism and biomechanical responses. Based on CT data of a healthy 3-year-old child head, the FE head model with detailed anatomical structure was developed. The deep brain structures such as white matter, gray matter, cerebral ventricle, hippocampus, were firstly created in this FE model. The FE model was validated by comparing the simulation results with that of cadaver experiments based on reconstructing the child and adult cadaver experiments. In addition, the effects of skull stiffness on the child head dynamic responses were further investigated. All the simulation results confirmed the good biofidelity of the FE model.

  8. Development/global validation of a 6-month-old pediatric head finite element model and application in investigation of drop-induced infant head injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2013-12-01

    Drop is a frequent cause for infant head injury. To date, finite element (FE) modeling was gradually used to investigate child head dynamic response under drop impact conditions, however, two shortages still exist on this topic: (1) due to ethical reasons, none of developed 6-month-old (6MO) head FE model was found to be quantitatively validated against child cadaver tests at similar age group; (2) drop height and impact surface stiffness effects on infant head responses were not comprehensively investigated. In this study, motivated by the recently published material properties of soft tissues (skull and suture, etc.) and reported pediatric head global cadaver tests, a 6MO child head FE model was developed and simulated results compared with the child cadaver experimental data under compression and drop conditions. Comparison of results indicated that the FE model showed a fairly good biofidelic behavior in most dynamic responses. The validated FE model was further used to investigate effects of different drop heights and impact surface stiffness on the head dynamic responses. Numerical results show that the pediatric head mechanical parameters (peak acceleration, HIC, maximal vonMises stress and maximal first principal strain of skull) keep increasing with the increase in drop height, and exhibit "logarithmic function" shapes at "fast-slow" trends with increase in impact surface stiffness. Based on above analysis, the regressions were conducted to describe the relationship between drop height and impact surface stiffness and head global injury predictors (head peak acceleration, HIC, etc.). This paper provides a fundamental study of child head injury mechanism and protection under drop conditions.

  9. Dysbaric osteonecrosis: a consequence of intravascular bubble formation, endothelial damage, and platelet thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Slichter, S J; Stegall, P; Smith, K; Huang, T W; Harker, L A

    1981-10-01

    Survival and turnover of platelets, fibrinogen, and plasminogen were measured in association with hyperbaric exposure in man. In addition, kinetic and vascular studies were carried out in a hyperbaric swine model to assess the role of vascular injury and thrombosis in the pathogenesis of dysbaric osteonecrosis. In man, significant increases in platelet and fibrinogen consumption were directly associated with dive depth and with repetitive exposure at lesser depths. The increased destruction of platelets and fibrinogen was not accompanied by reduced blood levels because of compensatory shifts in production rats and distribution between circulating and storage compartments. Platelet consumption was substantially greater than fibrinogen destruction with respect to both severity and duration. Platelet function inhibitors decreased platelet consumption. Increased fibrinogen consumption was sometimes associated with reduced plasminogen survival, but levels of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products were never measurably altered from normal values. The relationships among platelet and fibrinogen consumption, vascular changes, and dysbaric osteonecrosis were studied in hyperbaric swine. Consumption of hemostatic factors was most severe with rapid, uncontrolled decompression, low oxygen concentrations, and deeper or repetitive dives. Platelet consumption induced by hyperbaric exposure resolved spontaneously with time, suggesting a repair process after the simulated diving conditions were discontinued. Interruption of increased platelet and fibrinogen consumption in the swine model required either moderation of the dive profile or a combination of drugs that inhibit platelet function (dipyridamole or sudoxicam) together with an anticoagulant (warfarin or heparin). Repeated hyperbaric exposure under conditions that uniformly produced femoral osteonecrosis and consumption of platelets and fibrinogen was associated with detectable endothelial injury and arterial intimal lesion

  10. Influence of head mass on temporo-parietal skull impact using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2015-09-01

    The effect of head mass on its biomechanical response during lateral impact to the head is investigated in this computational study. The mass of the head of a state-of-the-art validated finite element head model is altered by ± 10 % from the base value of 4.7 kg. Numerical simulations of lateral head impacts for 30 cases (representing 15 human cadaver experiments × 2 mass configurations) are performed using the LS-DYNA solver at different velocities ranging from 2.4 to 6.5 m/s and three impacting conditions representing different stiffness and shapes of the contact/impact surfaces. Results are compared with the original model using the baseline head mass, thus resulting in a total of 45 simulations. Present findings show that the head mass has greater influence for peak interaction forces and the force has a greater dependency on stiffness of contact surface than the shape. Mass variations have also influence on skull strain energy. Regardless of increase/decrease in skull strain energy influenced by head mass variations used in the computational study, the 50 % fracture tolerance limit was unaltered, which was 544 mJ. The present study gives a better understanding of the mechanism of temporo-parietal skull impact.

  11. Dental extraction following zoledronate, induces osteonecrosis in rat's jaw.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Gutiérrez, X; Gómez-Clavel, J-F; Gaitán-Cepeda, L-A

    2017-03-01

    Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BRONJ) is clinically characterized by the presence of exposed bone in the oral cavity that persists for more than eight weeks. Previous attempts to establish an animal model have not sufficiently considered disease features. Our aim was to establish an inexpensive and replicable animal model that develops BRONJ in a short time. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control and experimental. In the experimental group, we administered 0.06mg/kg intraperitoneal dose of zoledronic acid (ZA) 7 and 14 days prior to maxillary second molar extraction. At two, four and six weeks after tooth extraction, the animals were euthanized, and we dissected the maxilla following histological procedures. We stained serial slides with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome. The samples were harvested for macroscopic, radiologic and histological evaluation of bone changes. At two weeks postextraction, we observed exposed necrotic bone in dental socket areas in experimental groups. Radiological analysis revealed osteolytic lesions accompanied by extensive destruction and sequestrum formation in the same group. Histological examination confirmed the absence of necrotic bone in control groups in contrast with the experimental groups. The percentage of empty lacunae and the number of osteoclasts and the necrotic bone area were significantly increased (p<0.05) in the experimental groups. The animal model using ZA administration to prior dental extraction successfully mimicked human BRONJ lesions. Also, the model was easily replicated, inexpensive and showed different features than other previous BRONJ models.

  12. Efficacy of visor and helmet for blast protection assessed using a computational head model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Cronin, D. S.

    2017-06-01

    Head injury resulting from blast exposure has been identified as a challenge that may be addressed, in part, through improved protective systems. Existing detailed head models validated for blast loading were applied to investigate the influence of helmet visor configuration, liner properties, and shell material stiffness. Response metrics including head acceleration and intracranial pressures (ICPs) generated in brain tissue during primary blast exposure were used to assess and compare helmet configurations. The addition of a visor was found to reduce peak head acceleration and positive ICPs. However, negative ICPs associated with a potential for injury were increased when a visor and a foam liner were present. In general, the foam liner material was found to be more significant in affecting the negative ICP response than positive ICP or acceleration. Shell stiffness was found to have relatively small effects on either metric. A strap suspension system, modeled as an air gap between the head and helmet, was more effective in reducing response metrics compared to a foam liner. In cases with a foam liner, lower-density foam offered a greater reduction of negative ICPs. The models demonstrated the "underwash" effect in cases where no foam liner was present; however, the reflected pressures generated between the helmet and head did not translate to significant ICPs in adjacent tissue, when compared to peak ICPs from initial blast wave interaction. This study demonstrated that the efficacy of head protection can be expressed in terms of load transmission pathways when assessed with a detailed computational model.

  13. [Bisphosphonate and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Akira

    Marx first reported avascular osteonecrosis of the jaw(ONJ)in oncology patients who had used high dose intravenous bisphosphonate(BP)at 2003. Ruggiero et al. also reported BP-related ONJ in osteoporosis patients who had used low dose oral BP at 2004. Since tooth extraction was considered one of risk factors for ONJ, discontinuation of BP before and after tooth extraction was recommended as one of preventive strategy for ONJ, especially in osteoporosis patients. However, recent studies showed that discontinuation of BP did not prevent ONJ, but increased the occurrence of adverse events such as fracture. Best strategies for preventing ONJ include elimination of oral disease such as periodontal and/or periapical diseases prior to initiation of BP, as well as maintenance of good oral hygiene. Development of a strategy for sharing information about ONJ among physicians, dentists, and patients is required to reduce the incidence of ONJ.

  14. Realistic avatar eye and head animation using a neurobiological model of visual attention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itti, Laurent; Dhavale, Nitin; Pighin, Frederic

    2004-01-01

    We describe a neurobiological model of visual attention and eye/head movements in primates, and its application to the automatic animation of a realistic virtual human head watching an unconstrained variety of visual inputs. The bottom-up (image-based) attention model is based on the known neurophysiology of visual processing along the occipito-parietal pathway of the primate brain, while the eye/head movement model is derived from recordings in freely behaving Rhesus monkeys. The system is successful at autonomously saccading towards and tracking salient targets in a variety of video clips, including synthetic stimuli, real outdoors scenes and gaming console outputs. The resulting virtual human eye/head animation yields realistic rendering of the simulation results, both suggesting applicability of this approach to avatar animation and reinforcing the plausibility of the neural model.

  15. Feasibility and Efficacy of Autologous Bone Marrow Aspirate Transplantation Combined with Human Parathyroid Hormone 1-34 Administration to Treat Osteonecrosis in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Hisashi; Aoto, Katsuya; Uemura, Kenta; Tanaka, Kenta; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Masashi; Mishima, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    No studies have examined the transplantation of a bone marrow aspirate (BMA) containing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with human parathyroid hormone 1-34 (hPTH1-34) administration. Therefore, we evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of autologous BMA transplantation combined with hPHT1-34 administration in a bone necrosis model. The metatarsal bones of rabbits were necrotized using liquid nitrogen, and the rabbits received a BMA transplantation or saline injection followed by hPTH1-34 (30 μg/kg) or saline administration three times per week (n = 3-4 per group). The rabbits were euthanized at 12 weeks after the initiation of treatment. No systemic adverse effects or local neoplastic lesions were observed. Importantly, the rabbits in the BMA transplantation plus hPTH1-34 group showed the highest bone volumes and histological scores of new bone. These data confirmed the feasibility of BMA transplantation combined with hPTH1-34, at least during the experimental period. The observed efficacy may be explained by a synergistic effect from the stimulation of MSC differentiation to osteoblasts with hPTH1-34-mediated suppression of apoptosis in osteoblasts. These results indicate the promising potential for BMA transplantation combined with hPTH1-34 administration in bone necrosis treatment. Longer term experiments are needed to confirm the safety of this therapeutic strategy. PMID:28386485

  16. Bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Jodi; Shannon, John; Modelevsky, Steven; Grippo, Anne A

    2011-12-01

    Bisphosphonates are used worldwide as a successful treatment for people with osteoporosis, which is the major underlying cause of fractures in postmenopausal women and older adults. These agents are successful at increasing bone mass and bone trabecular thickness, decreasing the risk of fracture, and decreasing bone pain, enabling individuals to have better quality of life. Bisphosphonates are also used to treat multiple myeloma, bone metastasis, and Paget's disease; however, bisphosphonate treatment may result in negative side effects, including osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). ONJ involves necrotic, exposed bone in the jaw, pain, possible secondary infection, swelling, painful lesions, and various dysesthesias, although less-severe cases may be asymptomatic. First-generation bisphosphonates, which do not contain nitrogen, are metabolized into a nonfunctional, cytotoxic analogue of adenosine triphosphate and cause osteoclast death by starvation. Second-generation bisphosphonates are nitrogen-containing agents; these inhibit osteoclast vesicular trafficking, membrane ruffling, morphology, and cytoskeletal arrangement by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase in the mevalonate pathway. Physicians treating older adults with osteoporosis and cancer should work together with dental practitioners, pharmacists, and other clinicians to inform individuals receiving bisphosphonates of their possible side effects and to suggest precautionary steps that may minimize the risk of osteonecrosis, particularly of the jaw. These include practicing good oral hygiene; scheduling regular dental examinations and cleanings; and cautioning people who are scheduling treatment for periodontal disease, oral and maxillofacial therapy, endodontics, implant placement, restorative dentistry, and prosthodontics. Recommendations for management of people with ONJ include an oral rinse, such as chlorhexidine, and antibiotics. © 2011, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American

  17. Osteonecrosis in patients with malignant lymphoma. A review of 31 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Rossleigh, M.A.; Smith, J.; Straus, D.J.; Engel, I.A.

    1986-09-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral and humeral heads is a serious complication of therapy for Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Twenty-five patients were reassessed 5 years after being initially reported, in order to study the further progress and natural history of this complication. In addition, six recent patients who have also developed this condition are presented. With 5-year additional follow-up, no patient had developed symptoms of osteonecrosis in any bone other than those initially involved. Five patients developed severe complications thought to arise from their therapy suggesting that this group of patients were more sensitive to radiation injury than other patients treated with this modality. During the relatively short follow-up 5-year period, a surprising finding was the fact that 31% of the patients with Hodgkin's disease and 50% with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma had died. It is recommended that patients treated for lymphoma with steroid containing chemotherapy and radiotherapy be observed carefully for the occurrence of joint pain. Early diagnosis should lead to attempts to prevent total joint destruction.

  18. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws: how to manage cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Madrid, C; Bouferrache, K; Abarca, M; Jaques, B; Broome, M

    2010-06-01

    Bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is defined as exposed necrotic bone appearing in the jaws of patients treated by systemic IV or oral BPs never irradiated in the head and neck area and that has persisted for more than 8 weeks. More than 90% of cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw have been in patients with cancer who received IV-BPs. The estimate of cumulative incidence of BRONJ in cancer patients with IV-BPs ranges from 0.8% to 18.6%. The pathogenesis of BRONJ appeared related to the potent osteoblast-inhibiting properties of BPs which act by blocking osteoclast recruitment, decreasing osteoclast activity and promoting osteoclast apoptosis. Dental extractions are the most potent local risk factor. Cancer patients wearing a denture could also be at increased risk of BRONJ. Non-healing mucosal breaches caused by dentures could be a portal for the oral flora to access bone, while the oral mucosa of patients on IV-BPs could also be defective. Whether periodontal disease is a risk factor for BRONJ remains controversial. Preventive measures are fundamental. Nevertheless, some teams have questioned its cost-effectiveness. The perceived limitations of surgical therapy of BRONJ led to the restriction of aggressive surgery to symptomatic patients with stage 3 BRONJ. The evidence-based literature on BRONJ is growing but there are still many controversial aspects. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Osteonecrosis as a complication in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Ilaria; Pota, Elvira; Marcarelli, Marco; Affinita, Maria Carmen; Di Pinto, Daniela; Indolfi, Cristiana; Del Regno, Nicola; Esposito, Marco

    2016-11-28

    Osteonecrosis is a significant adverse effect of treatment administered to children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that may have a negative effect on the quality of life. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the rate of secondary vascular osteonecrosis (ON) in a population of pediatric patients with ALL treated with corticosteroids and cytostatic agents. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of the medical records of 328 patients with ALL identified 4 cases with ON, corresponding to 1.2% of all cases observed. Of the 4 patients identified in our study 3 were girls and 1 was a boy, aged from 10 to 16 years old (average age at diagnosis, 12 years). Median time between the diagnosis of ALL and ON was 12.5 months (range, 12 to 36 months). Regarding the lesion size of ON, in all cases the femoral head (monolateral in 1 case and bilateral in 3 cases) was involved and was associated with the scapula-humeral joint in one case. ON of the weight-bearing joints has been identified as a severe complication in children with leukemia that may be associated with the development of articular surface collapse, subsequent debilitating arthritis, sometimes needing arthroplasty. For this reason it is very important to implement prevention strategies, especially in adolescent girls treated with steroids and chemotherapy. An early diagnosis of ON and careful orthopedic follow-up are necessary in order to avoid bone deformations related to the late start or the wrong therapy.

  20. A finite-element reciprocity solution for EEG forward modeling with realistic individual head models.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Erik; Chellappa, Sarah L; Gaggioni, Giulia; Ly, Julien Q M; Vandewalle, Gilles; André, Elodie; Geuzaine, Christophe; Phillips, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    We present a finite element modeling (FEM) implementation for solving the forward problem in electroencephalography (EEG). The solution is based on Helmholtz's principle of reciprocity which allows for dramatically reduced computational time when constructing the leadfield matrix. The approach was validated using a 4-shell spherical model and shown to perform comparably with two current state-of-the-art alternatives (OpenMEEG for boundary element modeling and SimBio for finite element modeling). We applied the method to real human brain MRI data and created a model with five tissue types: white matter, gray matter, cerebrospinal fluid, skull, and scalp. By calculating conductivity tensors from diffusion-weighted MR images, we also demonstrate one of the main benefits of FEM: the ability to include anisotropic conductivities within the head model. Root-mean square deviation between the standard leadfield and the leadfield including white-matter anisotropy showed that ignoring the directional conductivity of white matter fiber tracts leads to orientation-specific errors in the forward model. Realistic head models are necessary for precise source localization in individuals. Our approach is fast, accurate, open-source and freely available online. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A Head in Virtual Reality: Development of A Dynamic Head and Neck Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Ngan; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in computer and interface technologies have made it possible to create three-dimensional (3D) computerized models of anatomical structures for visualization, manipulation, and interaction in a virtual 3D environment. In the past few decades, a multitude of digital models have been developed to facilitate complex spatial learning of the…

  2. A Head in Virtual Reality: Development of A Dynamic Head and Neck Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Ngan; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in computer and interface technologies have made it possible to create three-dimensional (3D) computerized models of anatomical structures for visualization, manipulation, and interaction in a virtual 3D environment. In the past few decades, a multitude of digital models have been developed to facilitate complex spatial learning of the…

  3. Central Pain Mechanisms and Novel Therapeutic Strategies in a Model of Closed Head Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0594 TITLE: Central Pain Mechanisms and Novel Therapeutic Strategies in a Model of Closed Head Injury PRINCIPAL...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Central Pain Mechanisms and Novel Therapeutic Strategies in a Model of Closed Head Injury 5b. GRANT...1 week and chronic 4 week endpoints. Quantitative EEG headache behavioral testing, as well as immunohistochemical and molecular studies uncover

  4. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice. PMID:26904144

  5. Double-ring network model of the head-direction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaohui; Hahnloser, Richard H.; Seung, H. Sebastian

    2002-10-01

    In the head-direction system, the orientation of an animal's head in space is encoded internally by persistent activities of a pool of cells whose firing rates are tuned to the animal's directional heading. To maintain an accurate representation of the heading information when the animal moves, the system integrates horizontal angular head-velocity signals from the vestibular nuclei and updates the representation of directional heading. The integration is a difficult process, given that head velocities can vary over a large range and the neural system is highly nonlinear. Previous models of integration have relied on biologically unrealistic mechanisms, such as instantaneous changes in synaptic strength, or very fast synaptic dynamics. In this paper, we propose a different integration model with two populations of neurons, which performs integration based on the differential input of the vestibular nuclei to these two populations. We mathematically analyze the dynamics of the model and demonstrate that with carefully tuned synaptic connections it can accurately integrate a large range of the vestibular input, with potentially slow synapses.

  6. Principle Study of Head Meridian Acupoint Massage to Stress Release via Grey Data Model Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ya-Ting

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the scientific study of the effectiveness and action principle of head meridian acupoint massage by applying the grey data model analysis approach. First, the head massage procedure for massaging the important head meridian acupuncture points including Taiyang, Fengfu, Tianzhu, Fengqi, and Jianjing is formulated in a standard manner. Second, the status of the autonomic nervous system of each subject is evaluated by using the heart rate variability analyzer before and after the head massage following four weeks. Afterward, the physiological factors of autonomic nerves are quantitatively analyzed by using the grey data modeling theory. The grey data analysis can point out that the status of autonomic nervous system is greatly improved after the massage. The order change of the grey relationship weighting of physiological factors shows the action principle of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves when performing head massage. In other words, the grey data model is able to distinguish the detailed interaction of the autonomic nervous system and the head meridian acupoint massage. Thus, the stress relaxing effect of massaging head meridian acupoints is proved, which is lacked in literature. The results can be a reference principle for massage health care in practice.

  7. Augmented saliency model using automatic 3D head pose detection and learned gaze following in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Parks, Daniel; Borji, Ali; Itti, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that gaze direction of actors in a scene influences eye movements of passive observers during free-viewing (Castelhano, Wieth, & Henderson, 2007; Borji, Parks, & Itti, 2014). However, no computational model has been proposed to combine bottom-up saliency with actor's head pose and gaze direction for predicting where observers look. Here, we first learn probability maps that predict fixations leaving head regions (gaze following fixations), as well as fixations on head regions (head fixations), both dependent on the actor's head size and pose angle. We then learn a combination of gaze following, head region, and bottom-up saliency maps with a Markov chain composed of head region and non-head region states. This simple structure allows us to inspect the model and make comments about the nature of eye movements originating from heads as opposed to other regions. Here, we assume perfect knowledge of actor head pose direction (from an oracle). The combined model, which we call the Dynamic Weighting of Cues model (DWOC), explains observers' fixations significantly better than each of the constituent components. Finally, in a fully automatic combined model, we replace the oracle head pose direction data with detections from a computer vision model of head pose. Using these (imperfect) automated detections, we again find that the combined model significantly outperforms its individual components. Our work extends the engineering and scientific applications of saliency models and helps better understand mechanisms of visual attention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Crowd modeling framework using fast head detection and shape-aware matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Jie; Loza, Artur; Bhaskar, Harish; Al-Mualla, Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    A framework for crowd modeling using a combination of multiple kernel learning (MKL)-based fast head detection and shape-aware matching is proposed. First, the MKL technique is used to train a classifier for head detection using a combination of the histogram of oriented gradient and local binary patterns feature sets. Further, the head detection process is accelerated by implementing the classification procedure only at those spatial locations in the image where the gradient points overlap with moving objects. Such moving objects are determined using an adaptive background subtraction technique. Finally, the crowd is modeled as a deformable shape through connected boundary points (head detection) and matched with the subsequent detection from the next frame in a shape-aware manner. Experimental results obtained from crowded videos show that the proposed framework, while being characterized by a low computation load, performs better than other state-of-art techniques and results in reliable crowd modeling.

  9. Boundary element method calculation of individual head-related transfer function. I. Rigid model calculation.

    PubMed

    Katz, B F

    2001-11-01

    Human spatial perception of sound is a complex phenomenon. The Head-Related Transfer Function (HRTF) is a vital component to spatial sound perception. In order improve the understanding of the correlation between the HRTF and specific geometry of the head and pinna, a Boundary Element Method (BEM) has been used to calculate a portion of the HRTF of an individual based on precise geometrical data. Advantages of this approach include the ability to alter the geometry of the individual through the model in ways which are not possible with real subjects. Several models are used in the study, including a head with no pinna and several sized spheres. Calculations are performed for various source locations around the head. Results are presented for rigid model cases. Effects of variations on impedance and comparisons to measured data will be presented in the subsequent paper.

  10. Surgical treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in "Krokodil" drug addicted patients.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Yuri M; Hakobyan, Koryun A; Poghosyan, Anna Yu; Avetisyan, Eduard K

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study of jaw osteonecrosis treatment in patients using the "Krokodil" drug from 2009 to 2013. On the territory of the former USSR countries there is widespread use of a self-produced drug called "Krokodil". Codeine containing analgesics ("Sedalgin", "Pentalgin" etc), red phosphorus (from match boxes) and other easily acquired chemical components are used for synthesis of this drug, which used intravenously. Jaw osteonecrosis develops as a complication in patients who use "Krokodil". The main feature of this disease is jawbone exposure in the oral cavity. Surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". 40 "Krokodil" drug addict patients with jaw osteonecrosis were treated. Involvement of maxilla was found in 11 patients (27.5%), mandible in 21 (52.5%), both jaws in 8 (20%) patients. 35 Lesions were found in 29 mandibles and 21 lesions in 19 maxillas. Main factors of treatment success are: cessation of "Krokodil" use in the pre- (minimum 1 month) and postoperative period and osteonecrosis area resection of a minimum of 0.5 cm beyond the visible borders of osteonecrosis towards the healthy tissues. Surgery was not delayed until sequestrum formation. In the mandible marginal or segmental resection (with or without TMJ exarticulation) was performed. After surgery recurrence of disease was seen in 8 (23%) cases in the mandible, with no cases of recurrence in the maxilla. According to our experience in this case series, surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". Cessation of drug use and jaw resection minimize the rate of recurrences in such patients.

  11. A head-to-head comparison between CT- and IVUS-derived coronary blood flow models.

    PubMed

    Bulant, C A; Blanco, P J; Maso Talou, G D; Bezerra, C Guedes; Lemos, P A; Feijóo, R A

    2017-01-25

    The goal of this work is to compare coronary hemodynamics as predicted by computational blood flow models derived from two imaging modalities: coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and intravascular ultrasound integrated with angiography (IVUS). Criteria to define boundary conditions are proposed to overcome the dissimilar anatomical definition delivered by both modalities. The strategy to define boundary conditions is novel in the present context, and naturally accounts for the flow redistribution induced by the resistance of coronary vessels. Hyperemic conditions are assumed to assess model predictions under stressed hemodynamic environments similar to those encountered in Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) calculations. As results, it was found that CCTA models predict larger pressure drops, higher average blood velocity and smaller FFR. Concerning the flow rate at distal locations in the major vessels of interest, it was found that CCTA predicted smaller flow than IVUS, which is a consequence of a larger sensitivity of CCTA models to coronary steal phenomena. Comparisons to in-vivo measurements of FFR are shown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical studies in an ovine model of non-accidental head injury.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R W G; Sandoz, B; Dutschke, J K; Finnie, J W; Turner, R J; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J; Vink, R

    2014-08-22

    This paper presents the head kinematics of a novel ovine model of non-accidental head injury (NAHI) that consists only of a naturalistic oscillating insult. Nine, 7-to-10-day-old anesthetized and ventilated lambs were subjected to manual shaking. Two six-axis motion sensors tracked the position of the head and torso, and a triaxial accelerometer measured head acceleration. Animals experienced 10 episodes of shaking over 30 min, and then remained under anesthesia for 6h until killed by perfusion fixation of the brain. Each shaking episode lasted for 20s resulting in about 40 cycles per episode. Each cycle typically consisted of three impulsive events that corresponded to specific phases of the head's motion; the most substantial of these were interactions typically with the lamb's own torso, and these generated accelerations of 30-70 g. Impulsive loading was not considered severe. Other kinematic parameters recorded included estimates of head power transfer, head-torso flexion, and rate of flexion. Several styles of shaking were also identified across episodes and subjects. Axonal injury, neuronal reaction and albumin extravasation were widely distributed in the hemispheric white matter, brainstem and at the craniocervical junction and to a much greater magnitude in lower body weight lambs that died. This is the first biomechanical description of a large animal model of NAHI in which repetitive naturalistic insults were applied, and that reproduced a spectrum of injury associated with NAHI.

  13. 3D dynamic computer model of the head-neck complex.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Daniel A; Enderle, John D

    2006-01-01

    A 3D dynamic computer model for the movement of the head is presented that incorporates anatomically correct information about the diverse elements forming the system. The skeleton is considered as a set of interconnected rigid 3D bodies following the Newton-Euler laws of movement. The muscles are modeled using Enderle's linear model. Finally, the soft tissues, namely the ligaments, intervertebral disks, and zigapophysial joints, are modeled using the finite elements approach. The model is intended to study the neural network that controls movement and maintains the balance of the head-neck complex during eye movements.

  14. Development of head injury assessment reference values based on NASA injury modeling.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jeffrey T; Granderson, Bradley; Melvin, John W; Tabiei, Ala; Lawrence, Charles; Feiveson, Alan; Gernhardt, Michael; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Patalak, John

    2011-11-01

    NASA is developing a new crewed vehicle and desires a lower risk of injury compared to automotive or commercial aviation. Through an agreement with the National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing, Inc. (NASCAR®), an analysis of NASCAR impacts was performed to develop new injury assessment reference values (IARV) that may be more relevant to NASA's context of vehicle landing operations. Head IARVs associated with race car impacts were investigated by analyzing all NASCAR recorded impact data for the 2002-2008 race seasons. From the 4015 impact files, 274 impacts were selected for numerical simulation using a custom NASCAR restraint system and Hybrid III 50th percentile male Finite Element Model (FEM) in LS-DYNA. Head injury occurred in 27 of the 274 selected impacts, and all of the head injuries were mild concussions with or without brief loss of consciousness. The 247 noninjury impacts selected were representative of the range of crash dynamics present in the total set of impacts. The probability of head injury was estimated for each metric using an ordered probit regression analysis. Four metrics had good correlation with the head injury data: head resultant acceleration, head change in velocity, HIC 15, and HIC 36. For a 5% risk of AIS≥1/AIS≥2 head injuries, the following IARVs were found: 121.3/133.2 G (head resultant acceleration), 20.3/22.0 m/s (head change in velocity), 1,156/1,347 (HIC 15), and 1,152/1,342 (HIC 36) respectively. Based on the results of this study, further analysis of additional datasets is recommended before applying these results to future NASA vehicles.

  15. A Unified Model of Heading and Path Perception in Primate MSTd

    PubMed Central

    Layton, Oliver W.; Browning, N. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Self-motion, steering, and obstacle avoidance during navigation in the real world require humans to travel along curved paths. Many perceptual models have been proposed that focus on heading, which specifies the direction of travel along straight paths, but not on path curvature, which humans accurately perceive and is critical to everyday locomotion. In primates, including humans, dorsal medial superior temporal area (MSTd) has been implicated in heading perception. However, the majority of MSTd neurons respond optimally to spiral patterns, rather than to the radial expansion patterns associated with heading. No existing theory of curved path perception explains the neural mechanisms by which humans accurately assess path and no functional role for spiral-tuned cells has yet been proposed. Here we present a computational model that demonstrates how the continuum of observed cells (radial to circular) in MSTd can simultaneously code curvature and heading across the neural population. Curvature is encoded through the spirality of the most active cell, and heading is encoded through the visuotopic location of the center of the most active cell's receptive field. Model curvature and heading errors fit those made by humans. Our model challenges the view that the function of MSTd is heading estimation, based on our analysis we claim that it is primarily concerned with trajectory estimation and the simultaneous representation of both curvature and heading. In our model, temporal dynamics afford time-history in the neural representation of optic flow, which may modulate its structure. This has far-reaching implications for the interpretation of studies that assume that optic flow is, and should be, represented as an instantaneous vector field. Our results suggest that spiral motion patterns that emerge in spatio-temporal optic flow are essential for guiding self-motion along complex trajectories, and that cells in MSTd are specifically tuned to extract complex trajectory

  16. Modeling eye-head gaze shifts in multiple contexts without motor planning.

    PubMed

    Haji-Abolhassani, Iman; Guitton, Daniel; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2016-10-01

    During gaze shifts, the eyes and head collaborate to rapidly capture a target (saccade) and fixate it. Accordingly, models of gaze shift control should embed both saccadic and fixation modes and a mechanism for switching between them. We demonstrate a model in which the eye and head platforms are driven by a shared gaze error signal. To limit the number of free parameters, we implement a model reduction approach in which steady-state cerebellar effects at each of their projection sites are lumped with the parameter of that site. The model topology is consistent with anatomy and neurophysiology, and can replicate eye-head responses observed in multiple experimental contexts: 1) observed gaze characteristics across species and subjects can emerge from this structure with minor parametric changes; 2) gaze can move to a goal while in the fixation mode; 3) ocular compensation for head perturbations during saccades could rely on vestibular-only cells in the vestibular nuclei with postulated projections to burst neurons; 4) two nonlinearities suffice, i.e., the experimentally-determined mapping of tectoreticular cells onto brain stem targets and the increased recruitment of the head for larger target eccentricities; 5) the effects of initial conditions on eye/head trajectories are due to neural circuit dynamics, not planning; and 6) "compensatory" ocular slow phases exist even after semicircular canal plugging, because of interconnections linking eye-head circuits. Our model structure also simulates classical vestibulo-ocular reflex and pursuit nystagmus, and provides novel neural circuit and behavioral predictions, notably that both eye-head coordination and segmental limb coordination are possible without trajectory planning. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of nose-to-ceiling head positioning for sphenoid sinus irrigation.

    PubMed

    Craig, John R; Palmer, James N; Zhao, Kai

    2017-05-01

    After sinus surgery, patients are commonly instructed to irrigate with saline irrigations with their heads over a sink and noses directed inferiorly (nose-to-floor). Although irrigations can penetrate the sinuses in this head position, no study has assessed whether sphenoid sinus penetration can be improved by irrigating with the nose directed superiorly (nose-to-ceiling). The purpose of this study was to use a validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of sinus irrigations to assess the difference in sphenoid sinus delivery of irrigations after irrigating in a nose-to-floor vs nose-to-ceiling head position. Bilateral maxillary antrostomies, total ethmoidectomies, wide sphenoidotomies, and a Draf III frontal sinusotomy were performed on a single fresh cadaver head. CFD models were created from postoperative computed tomography maxillofacial scans. CFD modeling software was used to simulate a 120-mL irrigation to the left nasal cavity with the following parameters: flow rate 30 mL/second, angle of irrigation 20 degrees to the nasal floor, and either nose-to-floor or nose-to-ceiling head positioning. In the postoperative CFD models, the sphenoid sinuses were completely penetrated by the irrigation while in a nose-to-ceiling head position. However, no sphenoid sinus penetration occurred in the nose-to-floor position. Other sinuses were similarly penetrated in both head positions, although the ipsilateral maxillary sinus was less penetrated in the nose-to-ceiling position. CFD modeling demonstrated that the nose-to-ceiling head position was superior to the nose-to-floor position in delivering a 120-mL irrigation to the sphenoid sinuses. © 2017 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  18. Modeling eye-head gaze shifts in multiple contexts without motor planning

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Abolhassani, Iman; Guitton, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    During gaze shifts, the eyes and head collaborate to rapidly capture a target (saccade) and fixate it. Accordingly, models of gaze shift control should embed both saccadic and fixation modes and a mechanism for switching between them. We demonstrate a model in which the eye and head platforms are driven by a shared gaze error signal. To limit the number of free parameters, we implement a model reduction approach in which steady-state cerebellar effects at each of their projection sites are lumped with the parameter of that site. The model topology is consistent with anatomy and neurophysiology, and can replicate eye-head responses observed in multiple experimental contexts: 1) observed gaze characteristics across species and subjects can emerge from this structure with minor parametric changes; 2) gaze can move to a goal while in the fixation mode; 3) ocular compensation for head perturbations during saccades could rely on vestibular-only cells in the vestibular nuclei with postulated projections to burst neurons; 4) two nonlinearities suffice, i.e., the experimentally-determined mapping of tectoreticular cells onto brain stem targets and the increased recruitment of the head for larger target eccentricities; 5) the effects of initial conditions on eye/head trajectories are due to neural circuit dynamics, not planning; and 6) “compensatory” ocular slow phases exist even after semicircular canal plugging, because of interconnections linking eye-head circuits. Our model structure also simulates classical vestibulo-ocular reflex and pursuit nystagmus, and provides novel neural circuit and behavioral predictions, notably that both eye-head coordination and segmental limb coordination are possible without trajectory planning. PMID:27440248

  19. Modeling heading and path perception from optic flow in the case of independently moving objects

    PubMed Central

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Humans are usually accurate when estimating heading or path from optic flow, even in the presence of independently moving objects (IMOs) in an otherwise rigid scene. To invoke significant biases in perceived heading, IMOs have to be large and obscure the focus of expansion (FOE) in the image plane, which is the point of approach. For the estimation of path during curvilinear self-motion no significant biases were found in the presence of IMOs. What makes humans robust in their estimation of heading or path using optic flow? We derive analytical models of optic flow for linear and curvilinear self-motion using geometric scene models. Heading biases of a linear least squares method, which builds upon these analytical models, are large, larger than those reported for humans. This motivated us to study segmentation cues that are available from optic flow. We derive models of accretion/deletion, expansion/contraction, acceleration/deceleration, local spatial curvature, and local temporal curvature, to be used as cues to segment an IMO from the background. Integrating these segmentation cues into our method of estimating heading or path now explains human psychophysical data and extends, as well as unifies, previous investigations. Our analysis suggests that various cues available from optic flow help to segment IMOs and, thus, make humans' heading and path perception robust in the presence of such IMOs. PMID:23554589

  20. Modeling heading and path perception from optic flow in the case of independently moving objects.

    PubMed

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Humans are usually accurate when estimating heading or path from optic flow, even in the presence of independently moving objects (IMOs) in an otherwise rigid scene. To invoke significant biases in perceived heading, IMOs have to be large and obscure the focus of expansion (FOE) in the image plane, which is the point of approach. For the estimation of path during curvilinear self-motion no significant biases were found in the presence of IMOs. What makes humans robust in their estimation of heading or path using optic flow? We derive analytical models of optic flow for linear and curvilinear self-motion using geometric scene models. Heading biases of a linear least squares method, which builds upon these analytical models, are large, larger than those reported for humans. This motivated us to study segmentation cues that are available from optic flow. We derive models of accretion/deletion, expansion/contraction, acceleration/deceleration, local spatial curvature, and local temporal curvature, to be used as cues to segment an IMO from the background. Integrating these segmentation cues into our method of estimating heading or path now explains human psychophysical data and extends, as well as unifies, previous investigations. Our analysis suggests that various cues available from optic flow help to segment IMOs and, thus, make humans' heading and path perception robust in the presence of such IMOs.

  1. Double-stranded DNA organization in bacteriophage heads: An alternative toroid-based model

    SciTech Connect

    Hud, N.V.

    1995-10-01

    Studies of the organization of double-stranded DNA within bacteriophage heads during the past four decades have produced a wealth of data. However, despite the presentation of numerous models, the true organization of DNA within phage heads remains unresolved. The observations of toroidal DNA structures in electron micrographs of phage lysates have long been cited as support for the organization of DNA in a spool-like fashion. This particular model, like all other models, has not been found to be consistent with all available data. Recently, the authors proposed that DNA within toroidal condensates produced in vitro is organized in a manner significantly different from that suggested by the spool model. This new toroid model has allowed the development of an alternative model for DNA organization within bacteriophage heads that is consistent with a wide range of biophysical data. Here the authors propose that bacteriophage DNA is packaged in a toroid that is folded into a highly compact structure.

  2. Simplified realistic human head model for simulating Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields).

    PubMed

    Wenger, Cornelia; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Salvador, Ricardo; Basser, Peter J; Miranda, Pedro C

    2016-08-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are alternating electric fields in the intermediate frequency range (100-300 kHz) of low-intensity (1-3 V/cm). TTFields are an anti-mitotic treatment against solid tumors, which are approved for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) patients. These electric fields are induced non-invasively by transducer arrays placed directly on the patient's scalp. Cell culture experiments showed that treatment efficacy is dependent on the induced field intensity. In clinical practice, a software called NovoTalTM uses head measurements to estimate the optimal array placement to maximize the electric field delivery to the tumor. Computational studies predict an increase in the tumor's electric field strength when adapting transducer arrays to its location. Ideally, a personalized head model could be created for each patient, to calculate the electric field distribution for the specific situation. Thus, the optimal transducer layout could be inferred from field calculation rather than distance measurements. Nonetheless, creating realistic head models of patients is time-consuming and often needs user interaction, because automated image segmentation is prone to failure. This study presents a first approach to creating simplified head models consisting of convex hulls of the tissue layers. The model is able to account for anisotropic conductivity in the cortical tissues by using a tensor representation estimated from Diffusion Tensor Imaging. The induced electric field distribution is compared in the simplified and realistic head models. The average field intensities in the brain and tumor are generally slightly higher in the realistic head model, with a maximal ratio of 114% for a simplified model with reasonable layer thicknesses. Thus, the present pipeline is a fast and efficient means towards personalized head models with less complexity involved in characterizing tissue interfaces, while enabling accurate predictions of electric field distribution.

  3. Finite-element models of the human head and their applications in forensic practice.

    PubMed

    Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy; Ludes, Bertrand

    2008-09-01

    Since the 1960s, predictive human head impact indices have been developed to help the investigation of causation of human head injury. Finite-element models (FEM) can provide interesting tools for the forensic scientists when various human head injury mechanisms need to be evaluated. Human head FEMs are mainly used for car crash evaluations and are not in common use in forensic science. Recent technological progress has resulted in creating more simple tools, which will certainly help to consider the use of FEM in routine forensic practice in the coming years. This paper reviews the main FEMs developed and focuses on the models which can be used as predictive tools. Their possible applications in forensic medicine are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of Head Response to Blast Using Sagittal and Transverse Finite Element Head Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    nod translation. F in order to ca mponent in th d by Lockhart by a series of [28]. The sin ull, vertebrae , was not antic ontinuum and proximation...Tissue Material Model Density (kg/m3) Poisson’s Ratio Young’s Mod. (Pa) Bulk Mod. (Pa) G0 (Pa) G∞ (Pa) B (s-1) Skull/ Vertebrae [14...to the study of cervical spine mechanics, Proc. 37th Stapp Car Crash Conf., San Antonio, TX, 1993. [31] DuBois P.A., A simplified approach to the

  5. Experimental Test of Spatial Updating Models for Monkey Eye-Head Gaze Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Van Grootel, Tom J.; Van der Willigen, Robert F.; Van Opstal, A. John

    2012-01-01

    How the brain maintains an accurate and stable representation of visual target locations despite the occurrence of saccadic gaze shifts is a classical problem in oculomotor research. Here we test and dissociate the predictions of different conceptual models for head-unrestrained gaze-localization behavior of macaque monkeys. We adopted the double-step paradigm with rapid eye-head gaze shifts to measure localization accuracy in response to flashed visual stimuli in darkness. We presented the second target flash either before (static), or during (dynamic) the first gaze displacement. In the dynamic case the brief visual flash induced a small retinal streak of up to about 20 deg at an unpredictable moment and retinal location during the eye-head gaze shift, which provides serious challenges for the gaze-control system. However, for both stimulus conditions, monkeys localized the flashed targets with accurate gaze shifts, which rules out several models of visuomotor control. First, these findings exclude the possibility that gaze-shift programming relies on retinal inputs only. Instead, they support the notion that accurate eye-head motor feedback updates the gaze-saccade coordinates. Second, in dynamic trials the visuomotor system cannot rely on the coordinates of the planned first eye-head saccade either, which rules out remapping on the basis of a predictive corollary gaze-displacement signal. Finally, because gaze-related head movements were also goal-directed, requiring continuous access to eye-in-head position, we propose that our results best support a dynamic feedback scheme for spatial updating in which visuomotor control incorporates accurate signals about instantaneous eye- and head positions rather than relative eye- and head displacements. PMID:23118883

  6. Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw: a medical enigma?

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Allauddin; Payne, Alan G T; Zafar, Sobia

    2009-09-01

    Bisphosphonates are used for the standard of care of patients with skeletal metastases and hypocalcemia of malignancy. Bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis (BION) is a serious complication. Clinically, BION presents as an area of exposed alveolar bone that occurs spontaneously or becomes evident following an invasive surgical procedure such as extraction of a tooth, periodontal surgery, apicoectomy, or oral implant placement. The mechanism by which bisphosphonates cause osteonecrosis is uncertain. There are no controlled trials to show a direct cause-effect relationship between bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Oral bisphosphonate-induced necrosis is a rare clinical entity, less frequent, less aggressive, more predictable, and more responsive to treatment than IV forms of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. However, there have been reports of this complication with the less potent oral forms of bisphosphonates (0.007% to 0.01%). The morbidity of osteonecrosis of the jaw induced by IV bisphosphonates is significant, so prevention should receive prime importance. Patients should receive prophylactic dental examinations, and any necessary dental treatment before starting bisphosphonate therapy. Good communication among dentists, oral surgeons, physicians, and oncologists is of vital importance in providing care of these patients.

  7. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B.; Cook, Mark J.; Wolters, Carsten H.; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery. PMID:27092044

  8. Changing head model extent affects finite element predictions of transcranial direct current stimulation distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indahlastari, Aprinda; Chauhan, Munish; Schwartz, Benjamin; Sadleir, Rosalind J.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. In this study, we determined efficient head model sizes relative to predicted current densities in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Approach. Efficiency measures were defined based on a finite element (FE) simulations performed using nine human head models derived from a single MRI data set, having extents varying from 60%-100% of the original axial range. Eleven tissue types, including anisotropic white matter, and three electrode montages (T7-T8, F3-right supraorbital, Cz-Oz) were used in the models. Main results. Reducing head volume extent from 100% to 60%, that is, varying the model’s axial range from between the apex and C3 vertebra to one encompassing only apex to the superior cerebellum, was found to decrease the total modeling time by up to half. Differences between current density predictions in each model were quantified by using a relative difference measure (RDM). Our simulation results showed that {RDM} was the least affected (a maximum of 10% error) for head volumes modeled from the apex to the base of the skull (60%-75% volume). Significance. This finding suggested that the bone could act as a bioelectricity boundary and thus performing FE simulations of tDCS on the human head with models extending beyond the inferior skull may not be necessary in most cases to obtain reasonable precision in current density results.

  9. Skull Defects in Finite Element Head Models for Source Reconstruction from Magnetoencephalography Signals.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stephan; Güllmar, Daniel; Flemming, Lars; Grayden, David B; Cook, Mark J; Wolters, Carsten H; Haueisen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are influenced by skull defects. However, there is a lack of evidence of this influence during source reconstruction. Our objectives are to characterize errors in source reconstruction from MEG signals due to ignoring skull defects and to assess the ability of an exact finite element head model to eliminate such errors. A detailed finite element model of the head of a rabbit used in a physical experiment was constructed from magnetic resonance and co-registered computer tomography imaging that differentiated nine tissue types. Sources of the MEG measurements above intact skull and above skull defects respectively were reconstructed using a finite element model with the intact skull and one incorporating the skull defects. The forward simulation of the MEG signals reproduced the experimentally observed characteristic magnitude and topography changes due to skull defects. Sources reconstructed from measured MEG signals above intact skull matched the known physical locations and orientations. Ignoring skull defects in the head model during reconstruction displaced sources under a skull defect away from that defect. Sources next to a defect were reoriented. When skull defects, with their physical conductivity, were incorporated in the head model, the location and orientation errors were mostly eliminated. The conductivity of the skull defect material non-uniformly modulated the influence on MEG signals. We propose concrete guidelines for taking into account conducting skull defects during MEG coil placement and modeling. Exact finite element head models can improve localization of brain function, specifically after surgery.

  10. Mental Models: Knowledge in the Head and Knowledge in the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.; Henning, Philip

    1999-01-01

    Explores the utility of mental models as learning outcomes in using complex and situated learning environments. Describes two studies: one aimed at eliciting mental models in the heads of novice refrigeration technicians, and the other an ethnographic study eliciting knowledge and models within the community of experienced refrigeration…

  11. Immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhen-ge; Ren, Xiao-hua; Wang, Sha-sha; Liang, Xin-hua; Tang, Ya-ling

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models can closely mimic human oral squamous epithelial carcinogenesis, greatly expand the in vivo research possibilities, and play a critical role in the development of diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. With the development of the recent research on the contribution of immunity/inflammation to cancer initiation and progression, mouse models have been divided into two categories, namely, immunocompromised and immunocompetent mouse models. And thus, this paper will review these two kinds of models applied in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to provide a platform to understand the complicated histological, molecular, and genetic changes of oral squamous epithelial tumorigenesis. PMID:26869799

  12. Parametric Comparisons of Intracranial Mechanical Responses from Three Validated Finite Element Models of the Human Head

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Ghadyani, Hamidreza; Bolander, Richard P.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Ford, James C.; Mcallister, Thomas W.; Flashman, Laura A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Ernstrom, Karin; Jain, Sonia; Raman, Rema; Zhang, Liying; Greenwald, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of human head finite element (FE) models have been developed from different research groups over the years to study the mechanisms of traumatic brain injury. These models can vary substantially in model features and parameters, making it important to evaluate whether simulation results from one model are readily comparable with another, and whether response-based injury thresholds established from a specific model can be generalized when a different model is employed. The purpose of this study is to parametrically compare regional brain mechanical responses from three validated head FE models to test the hypothesis that regional brain responses are dependent on the specific head model employed as well as the region of interest (ROI). The Dartmouth Scaled and Normalized Model (DSNM), the Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon), and the Wayne State University Head Injury Model (WSUHIM) were selected for comparisons. For model input, 144 unique kinematic conditions were created to represent the range of head impacts sustained by male collegiate hockey players during play. These impacts encompass the 50th, 95th, and 99th percentile peak linear and rotational accelerations at 16 impact locations around the head. Five mechanical variables (strain, strain rate, strain × strain rate, stress, and pressure) in seven ROIs reported from the FE models were compared using Generalized Estimating Equation statistical models. Highly significant differences existed among FE models for nearly all output variables and ROIs. The WSUHIM produced substantially higher peak values for almost all output variables regardless of the ROI compared to the DSNM and SIMon models (p < 0.05). DSNM also produced significantly different stress and pressure compared with SIMon for all ROIs (p < 0.05), but such differences were not consistent across ROIs for other variables. Regardless of FE model, most output variables were highly correlated with linear and rotational peak accelerations. The

  13. S-values calculated from a tomographic head/brain model for brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Tsi-chian; Xu, X. George

    2004-11-01

    A tomographic head/brain model was developed from the Visible Human images and used to calculate S-values for brain imaging procedures. This model contains 15 segmented sub-regions including caudate nucleus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, cerebral white matter, corpus callosum, eyes, lateral ventricles, lenses, lentiform nucleus, optic chiasma, optic nerve, pons and middle cerebellar peduncle, skull CSF, thalamus and thyroid. S-values for C-11, O-15, F-18, Tc-99m and I-123 have been calculated using this model and a Monte Carlo code, EGS4. Comparison of the calculated S-values with those calculated from the MIRD (1999) stylized head/brain model shows significant differences. In many cases, the stylized head/brain model resulted in smaller S-values (as much as 88%), suggesting that the doses to a specific patient similar to the Visible Man could have been underestimated using the existing clinical dosimetry.

  14. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency.

    PubMed

    Khalin, Igor; Jamari, Nor Laili Azua; Razak, Nadiawati Bt Abdul; Hasain, Zubaidah Bt; Nor, Mohd Asri Bin Mohd; Zainudin, Mohd Hakimi Bin Ahmad; Omar, Ainsah Bt; Alyautdin, Renad

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI.

  15. Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head after pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Kawtar; Rachidi, Wafae; Janani, Saadia; Mkinsi, Ouafa

    2016-01-01

    A documented case of beginning aseptic necrosis of the femoral head associated with pregnancy together with a review of the literature about this rare complication of pregnancy is presented. The known risk factors of osteonecrosis are; steroid use, alcoholism, organ transplantation, especially after kidney transplant or bone marrow transplantation bone, systemic lupus erythematosus, dyslipidemia especially hypertriglyceridemia, dysbaric decompression sickness, drepanocytosis and Gaucher's disease. Among the less established factors, we mention procoagulations abnormalities, HIV infection, chemotherapy. We report a case of osteonecrosis of femoral head after pregnancy. PMID:27795792

  16. Modified Delphi survey for decision analysis for prophylaxis of post-radiation osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Carl K; Epstein, Joel B; Sheps, Samuel B; Schechter, Martin T; Busser, James R

    2002-09-01

    to augment epidemiological data from the literature, assist Bayesian perspectives and a decision analytic framework for the minimization of post-radiation osteonecrosis (PRON; osteoradionecrosis) and its impacts in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. a modified Delphi process survey of 15 international clinical experts was used to identify and assess outcome data and factors related to PRON risk, extraction, and factor suitability for formal decision analysis. Clinimetric pain and function outcome scales were created and assessed for relevance to quality of life. expert opinion qualitative assessments were generally adequate and consistent between open- and close-ended items, but many quantitative (e.g. PRON risk rate) estimates were not. A research agenda advocated to validate the epidemiological database for minimization of PRON and decision analysis includes: adoption of a uniform definition of PRON, and ICD code for non-experimental databases; more detailed, consistent data reporting in articles; and quality of life studies.

  17. [Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws in lung cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Neves, Inês; Morais, António; Magalhães, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) can occur as a complication of bisphosphonate therapy. This condition has been described in cancer patients and its development has been associated with prolonged exposure to high doses of bisphosphonates. Bad dental hygiene, a history of prosthesis or dental extraction, chemotherapy, corticosteroids, and radiation therapy of the head and neck are risk factors reported. In the initial stages it may be asymptomatic, but the patient subsequently develops severe pain and progressive exposed bone. The authors describe three cases of ONJ in lung cancer patients after prolonged exposure to bisphosphonates and there were known risk factors. ONJ can seriously affect the quality of life of cancer patients. An early diagnosis may reduce or avoid the consequences of progressive bone lesion. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of geometric head model perturbations on the EEG forward and inverse problems.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Nehorai, Arye

    2006-03-01

    We study the effect of geometric head model perturbations on the electroencephalography (EEG) forward and inverse problems. Small magnitude perturbations of the shape of the head could represent uncertainties in the head model due to errors on images or techniques used to construct the model. They could also represent small scale details of the shape of the surfaces not described in a deterministic model, such as the sulci and fissures of the cortical layer. We perform a first-order perturbation analysis, using a meshless method for computing the sensitivity of the solution of the forward problem to the geometry of the head model. The effect on the forward problem solution is treated as noise in the EEG measurements and the Cramér-Rao bound is computed to quantify the effect on the inverse problem performance. Our results show that, for a dipolar source, the effect of the perturbations on the inverse problem performance is under the level of the uncertainties due to the spontaneous brain activity. Thus, the results suggest that an extremely detailed model of the head may be unnecessary when solving the EEG inverse problem.

  19. Combined radio-colour contrast in the examination of ballistic head models.

    PubMed

    Schyma, C; Greschus, S; Urbach, H; Madea, B

    2012-07-01

    The conventional analysis of ballistic gelatine is performed by transillumination and scanning of 1-cm-thick slices. Previous research demonstrated the advantages of colour and radio contrast in gelatine for computed tomography (CT). The aim of this study was to determine whether this method could be applied to head models in order to facilitate their examination. Four head models of about 14 cm in diameter were prepared from two acryl hollow spheres and two polypropylene hollow spheres. Acryl paint was mixed with barium meal and sealed in a thin foil bag which was attached to the gelatine-filled sphere which was covered with about 3-mm-thick silicone. The head models were shot at using 9 mm × 19 expanding bullets from 4 m distance. The models were examined via multislice CT. The gelatine core was removed; the bullet track was photographed and cut into consecutive slices which were scanned optically. CT images were processed with Corel Photo-Paint. Optical and radiological images were analysed using the AxioVision software. The disruption of the gelatine within the head model was visualised by extensive distribution of paint up to the end of the finest cracks and fissures and along the whole bullet track. CT imaging with excellent radio contrast in the gelatine cracks caused by the temporary cavity allowed for multiplanar reconstruction. We conclude that the combination of colour contrast in gelatine with contrast material-enhanced CT facilitates accurate measurements in ballistic head models.

  20. Emulating the Visual Receptive Field Properties of MST Neurons with a Template Model of Heading Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, John A.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously proposed a computational neural-network model by which the complex patterns of retinal image motion generated during locomotion (optic flow) can be processed by specialized detectors acting as templates for specific instances of self-motion. The detectors in this template model respond to global optic flow by sampling image motion over a large portion of the visual field through networks of local motion sensors with properties similar to neurons found in the middle temporal (MT) area of primate extrastriate visual cortex. The model detectors were designed to extract self-translation (heading), self-rotation, as well as the scene layout (relative distances) ahead of a moving observer, and are arranged in cortical-like heading maps to perform this function. Heading estimation from optic flow has been postulated by some to be implemented within the medial superior temporal (MST) area. Others have questioned whether MST neurons can fulfill this role because some of their receptive-field properties appear inconsistent with a role in heading estimation. To resolve this issue, we systematically compared MST single-unit responses with the outputs of model detectors under matched stimulus conditions. We found that the basic physiological properties of MST neurons can be explained by the template model. We conclude that MST neurons are well suited to support heading estimation and that the template model provides an explicit set of testable hypotheses which can guide future exploration of MST and adjacent areas within the primate superior temporal sulcus.

  1. Head model and electrical source imaging: A study of 38 epileptic patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Birot, Gwénael; Spinelli, Laurent; Vulliémoz, Serge; Mégevand, Pierre; Brunet, Denis; Seeck, Margitta; Michel, Christoph M.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical source imaging (ESI) aims at reconstructing the electrical brain activity from scalp EEG. When applied to interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), this technique is of great use for identifying the irritative zone in focal epilepsies. Inaccuracies in the modeling of electro-magnetic field propagation in the head (forward model) may strongly influence ESI and lead to mislocalization of IED generators. However, a systematic study on the influence of the selected head model on the localization precision of IED in a large number of patients with known focus localization has not yet been performed. We here present such a performance evaluation of different head models in a dataset of 38 epileptic patients who have undergone high-density scalp EEG, intracranial EEG and, for the majority, subsequent surgery. We compared ESI accuracy resulting from three head models: a Locally Spherical Model with Anatomical Constraints (LSMAC), a Boundary Element Model (BEM) and a Finite Element Model (FEM). All of them were computed from the individual MRI of the patient and ESI was performed on averaged IED. We found that all head models provided very similar source locations. In patients having a positive post-operative outcome, at least 74% of the source maxima were within the resection. The median distance from the source maximum to the nearest intracranial electrode showing IED was 13.2, 15.6 and 15.6 mm for LSMAC, BEM and FEM, respectively. The study demonstrates that in clinical applications, the use of highly sophisticated and difficult to implement head models is not a crucial factor for an accurate ESI. PMID:25003030

  2. Osteonecrosis of the jaws and bisphosphonates. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Zuazaga, Daniel; Garatea-Crelgo, Joaquín; Martino-Gorbea, Raúl; Etayo-Pérez, Amaya; Sebastián-López, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are recently acquiring increasing relevance in the treatment of several diseases. In line with the increased use of these compounds, cases of mandibular osteonecrosis, and to a lesser extent, maxillary osteonecrosis, are being reported. This necrosis is difficult to treat in patients who usually have a previously limited quality of life. A surgical performance carried out by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, stomatologists and odontologists might lead to bone exposure. A treatment based on conservation and as harmless as possible seems to be the most advisable way of acting with these patients in order to minimize the incidence and treat the complications, once the lesions have been ascertained. We report three cases treated in our service of osteonecrosis of the jaws after exodontics. This side effect should be remembered before starting any surgical treatment in these patients.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND PATHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SPONTANEOUS OSTEONECROSIS OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Mears, Simon C.; McCarthy, Edward F.; Jones, Lynne C.; Hungerford, David S.; Mont, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee affects patients typically over the age of fifty-five years. Evidence exists that this process may not be true necrosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize the demographic, radiographic, and pathologic features of this condition. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients (twenty-two knees) consecutively treated for spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee were studied. Results: Only one of twenty-two specimens demonstrated evidence of bone necrosis. No specimens showed fat necrosis, marrow necrosis, fibrous change or appositional bone repair. Fourteen of twenty-two specimens (64%) showed significant osteopenia and fifteen of twenty-two specimens (68%) showed evidence of osteoarthritis. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee is not an osteonecrotic condition and has been misnamed. Osteopenia and osteoarthritis may play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:19742083

  4. Jaw osteonecrosis in patients treated with bisphosphonates: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, I; Cristofaro, M G; Amantea, M; Russo, E; De Fazio, S; Zuccalà, V; Conforti, F; Amorosi, A; Donato, G; Tripepi, S; Giudice, M

    2010-08-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw is a severe bone disorder traditionally associated with periodontal disease, local malignancy, chemotherapy, glucocorticoid therapy, or trauma. Recently a growing number of publications reported the occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients undergoing treatment with bisphosphonates. The mechanism by which bisphosphonates might contribute to the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw is far from being fully elucidated. Suppression of bone turnover, infection, tissue hypoxia and cellular toxicity were proposed as possible mechanisms by which bisphosphonates may exert adverse effects on bone metabolism. Here, we studied 25 consecutive patients treated with bisphosphonates for osteoporosis or tumoral pathologies. We provide good evidence of hyperactive osteoclastic bone resorption and suggest a direct cytotoxic effect of bisphosphonates on bone tissue through induction of osteocyte cell death. We also demonstrate that bisphosphonates only have limited adverse effects on bone vascular network.

  5. [Relationship between osteonecrosis of the jaw and bisphosphonate treatment].

    PubMed

    Badel, Tomislav; Keros, Jadranka; Krapac, Ladislav; Pavicin, Ivana Savić

    2010-09-01

    Bisphosphonate treatment and its aetiopathogenic association with aseptic osteonecrosis of the jaw is one of the more prominent public health issues today. The aim of this review is to see into the mechanisms of bisphosphonate effects on bones described in literature (anti-osteoclastic activity, cytotoxicity, antiangiogenesis, genetic factors, and imbalance between osteoclasts and osteoblasts). Bisphosphonate treatment is the dominant cause of jaw necrosis. Epidemiological data show an exclusive incidence of osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients who took one or a combination of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates. Risk factors vary by the bisphosphonate potency (particularly risky are the highly potent pamidronate and zoledronate, which are given intravenously), dosage, duration of treatment, and the illness. Jaw necrosis is most common in oncology patients, and only 5 % in patients with osteoporosis. From a dental-medical point of view, a good oral health is important because osteonecrosis often appears after a periodontal or oral surgical procedure.

  6. Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis. A clinician's reference to patient management.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Varinder S; Fayans, Edgar P

    2008-01-01

    Bisphosphonates, as inhibitors of osteoclasts, are widely used in the management of metastatic bone disease and in the prevention of osteomalacia and osteoporosis. Recent cases of bone necrosis of the jaws have been associated with the use of bisphosphonate therapy. A case is presented of a patient with osteonecrosis of the maxilla with a history of long-term bisphosphonate therapy for metastatic breast cancer. The authors treated the patient and suggest appropriate patient management guidelines with reference to current knowledge. Although a definitive treatment for bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis has not yet been established, clinicians must be aware of the pharmacologic properties of several bisphosphonates currently available and their indications, susceptible risk factors in the development of osteonecrosis of the jaws, the clinical signs and symptoms, and recommendations for patient management, including prevention and early recognition.

  7. [Sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    PubMed

    Soós, Balázs; Vajta, László; Szalma, József

    2015-11-15

    The tendency for bisphosphonate and non-bisphosphonate (eg.: antiresorptive or anti-angiogenesis drugs) induced osteonecrosis is increasing. Treatment of these patients is a challenge both for dentists and for oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Cooperation with the drug prescribing general medicine colleagues to prevent osteonecrosis is extremely important. Furthermore, prevention should include dental focus elimination, oral hygienic instructions and education, dental follow-up and, in case of manifest necrosis, referral to maxillofacial departments. Authors outline the difficulties of conservative and surgical treatment of a patient with sunitinib and zoledronic acid induced osteonecrosis. The patient became symptomless and the operated area healed entirely six and twelve months postoperatively. A long term success further follow-up is necessary to verify long-term success.

  8. Aseptic osteonecrosis of the hip in the adult: current evidence on conservative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Raymond; Trevisan, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Treatment of Avascular Osteonecrosis (AVN) of the femoral head to prevent progression to an arthritic hip is a challenging subject. Many conservative treatment options have been proposed in the literature. Weight bearing restriction as a stand-alone therapy is insufficient in preventing disease progression but it may be useful when combined with pharmacological agents or surgery. Bisphosphonate treatment in AVN might be efficient in early stages of disease, however there are no clear recommendations on length of treatment and therapeutic dosage and, considered the limited evidence and potential side effects of treatment, it could be considered in a pre-collapse stage in selected cases. Current literature suggests that low molecular weight heparin could lower disease progression in idiopathic AVN with quality of evidence being very low. Also the evidence to support the use of statins or vasodilators in the treatment of osteonecrosis is very low and their use cannot be recommended. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy may improve pain and function in early stages of disease with a low evidence, but there doesn’t seem to be a significant change in time to the occurrence of femoral head collapse. Only one study has been conducted with pulsed electromagnetic fields therefore no recommendation can be given on clinical use of PEF in AVN. Evidence on hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of AVN is very limited and the high cost of treatment and the limited availability of structures that can provide the service poses other concerns about its feasibility. Based on current evidence, conservative treatment may be considered in early stages of asymptomatic AVN instead of observation only. PMID:27134631

  9. Aseptic osteonecrosis of the hip in the adult: current evidence on conservative treatment.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Raymond; Trevisan, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of Avascular Osteonecrosis (AVN) of the femoral head to prevent progression to an arthritic hip is a challenging subject. Many conservative treatment options have been proposed in the literature. Weight bearing restriction as a stand-alone therapy is insufficient in preventing disease progression but it may be useful when combined with pharmacological agents or surgery. Bisphosphonate treatment in AVN might be efficient in early stages of disease, however there are no clear recommendations on length of treatment and therapeutic dosage and, considered the limited evidence and potential side effects of treatment, it could be considered in a pre-collapse stage in selected cases. Current literature suggests that low molecular weight heparin could lower disease progression in idiopathic AVN with quality of evidence being very low. Also the evidence to support the use of statins or vasodilators in the treatment of osteonecrosis is very low and their use cannot be recommended. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy may improve pain and function in early stages of disease with a low evidence, but there doesn't seem to be a significant change in time to the occurrence of femoral head collapse. Only one study has been conducted with pulsed electromagnetic fields therefore no recommendation can be given on clinical use of PEF in AVN. Evidence on hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of AVN is very limited and the high cost of treatment and the limited availability of structures that can provide the service poses other concerns about its feasibility. Based on current evidence, conservative treatment may be considered in early stages of asymptomatic AVN instead of observation only.

  10. A dynamical model for reflex activated head movements in the horizontal plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, G. C.; Hain, T. C.; Peterson, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a controls systems model of horizontal-plane head movements during perturbations of the trunk, which for the first time interfaces a model of the human head with neural feedback controllers representing the vestibulocollic (VCR) and the cervicocollic (CCR) reflexes. This model is homeomorphic such that model structure and parameters are drawn directly from anthropomorphic, biomechanical and physiological studies. Using control theory we analyzed the system model in the time and frequency domains, simulating neck movement responses to input perturbations of the trunk. Without reflex control, the head and neck system produced a second-order underdamped response with a 5.2 dB resonant peak at 2.1 Hz. Adding the CCR component to the system dampened the response by approximately 7%. Adding the VCR component dampened head oscillations by 75%. The VCR also improved low-frequency compensation by increasing the gain and phase lag, creating a phase minimum at 0.1 Hz and a phase peak at 1.1 Hz. Combining all three components (mechanics, VCR and CCR) linearly in the head and neck system reduced the amplitude of the resonant peak to 1.1 dB and increased the resonant frequency to 2.9 Hz. The closed loop results closely fit human data, and explain quantitatively the characteristic phase peak often observed.

  11. A dynamical model for reflex activated head movements in the horizontal plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, G. C.; Hain, T. C.; Peterson, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a controls systems model of horizontal-plane head movements during perturbations of the trunk, which for the first time interfaces a model of the human head with neural feedback controllers representing the vestibulocollic (VCR) and the cervicocollic (CCR) reflexes. This model is homeomorphic such that model structure and parameters are drawn directly from anthropomorphic, biomechanical and physiological studies. Using control theory we analyzed the system model in the time and frequency domains, simulating neck movement responses to input perturbations of the trunk. Without reflex control, the head and neck system produced a second-order underdamped response with a 5.2 dB resonant peak at 2.1 Hz. Adding the CCR component to the system dampened the response by approximately 7%. Adding the VCR component dampened head oscillations by 75%. The VCR also improved low-frequency compensation by increasing the gain and phase lag, creating a phase minimum at 0.1 Hz and a phase peak at 1.1 Hz. Combining all three components (mechanics, VCR and CCR) linearly in the head and neck system reduced the amplitude of the resonant peak to 1.1 dB and increased the resonant frequency to 2.9 Hz. The closed loop results closely fit human data, and explain quantitatively the characteristic phase peak often observed.

  12. A Model of Self-Organizing Head-Centered Visual Responses in Primate Parietal Areas

    PubMed Central

    Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Stringer, Simon M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a hypothesis for how head-centered visual representations in primate parietal areas could self-organize through visually-guided learning, and test this hypothesis using a neural network model. The model consists of a competitive output layer of neurons that receives afferent synaptic connections from a population of input neurons with eye position gain modulated retinal receptive fields. The synaptic connections in the model are trained with an associative trace learning rule which has the effect of encouraging output neurons to learn to respond to subsets of input patterns that tend to occur close together in time. This network architecture and synaptic learning rule is hypothesized to promote the development of head-centered output neurons during periods of time when the head remains fixed while the eyes move. This hypothesis is demonstrated to be feasible, and each of the core model components described is tested and found to be individually necessary for successful self-organization. PMID:24349064

  13. Dual-Route Model of the Effect of Head Orientation on Perceived Gaze Direction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on gaze perception have identified 2 opposing effects of head orientation on perceived gaze direction—1 repulsive and the other attractive. However, the relationship between these 2 effects has remained unclear. By using a gaze categorization task, the current study examined the effect of head orientation on the perceived direction of gaze in a whole-head condition and an eye-region condition. We found that the perceived direction of gaze was generally biased in the opposite direction to head orientation (a repulsive effect). Importantly, the magnitude of the repulsive effect was more pronounced in the eye-region condition than in the whole-head condition. Based on these findings, we developed a dual-route model, which proposes that the 2 opposing effects of head orientation occur through 2 distinct routes. In the framework of this dual-route model, we explain and reconcile the findings from previous studies, and provide a functional account of attractive and repulsive effects and their interaction. PMID:24730742

  14. Development of Head Injury Assessment Reference Values Based on NASA Injury Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, Jeffrey T.; Melvin, John W.; Tabiei, Ala; Lawrence, Charles; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Granderson, Bradley; Feiveson, Alan; Gernhardt, Michael; Patalak, John

    2011-01-01

    NASA is developing a new capsule-based, crewed vehicle that will land in the ocean, and the space agency desires to reduce the risk of injury from impact during these landings. Because landing impact occurs for each flight and the crew might need to perform egress tasks, current injury assessment reference values (IARV) were deemed insufficient. Because NASCAR occupant restraint systems are more effective than the systems used to determine the current IARVs and are similar to NASA s proposed restraint system, an analysis of NASCAR impacts was performed to develop new IARVs that may be more relevant to NASA s context of vehicle landing operations. Head IARVs associated with race car impacts were investigated by completing a detailed analysis of all of the 2002-2008 NASCAR impact data. Specific inclusion and exclusion criteria were used to select 4071 impacts from the 4015 recorder files provided (each file could contain multiple impact events). Of the 4071 accepted impacts, 274 were selected for numerical simulation using a custom NASCAR restraint system and Humanetics Hybrid-III 50th percentile numerical dummy model in LS-DYNA. Injury had occurred in 32 of the 274 selected impacts, and 27 of those injuries involved the head. A majority of the head injuries were mild concussions with or without brief loss of consciousness. The 242 non-injury impacts were randomly selected and representative of the range of crash dynamics present in the total set of 4071 impacts. Head dynamics data (head translational acceleration, translational change in velocity, rotational acceleration, rotational velocity, HIC-15, HIC-36, and the Head 3ms clip) were filtered according to SAE J211 specifications and then transformed to a log scale. The probability of head injury was estimated using a separate logistic regression analysis for each log-transformed predictor candidate. Using the log transformation constrains the estimated probability of injury to become negligible as IARVs approach

  15. The role of blood vessels in high-resolution volume conductor head modeling of EEG.

    PubMed

    Fiederer, L D J; Vorwerk, J; Lucka, F; Dannhauer, M; Yang, S; Dümpelmann, M; Schulze-Bonhage, A; Aertsen, A; Speck, O; Wolters, C H; Ball, T

    2016-03-01

    Reconstruction of the electrical sources of human EEG activity at high spatio-temporal accuracy is an important aim in neuroscience and neurological diagnostics. Over the last decades, numerous studies have demonstrated that realistic modeling of head anatomy improves the accuracy of source reconstruction of EEG signals. For example, including a cerebro-spinal fluid compartment and the anisotropy of white matter electrical conductivity were both shown to significantly reduce modeling errors. Here, we for the first time quantify the role of detailed reconstructions of the cerebral blood vessels in volume conductor head modeling for EEG. To study the role of the highly arborized cerebral blood vessels, we created a submillimeter head model based on ultra-high-field-strength (7T) structural MRI datasets. Blood vessels (arteries and emissary/intraosseous veins) were segmented using Frangi multi-scale vesselness filtering. The final head model consisted of a geometry-adapted cubic mesh with over 17×10(6) nodes. We solved the forward model using a finite-element-method (FEM) transfer matrix approach, which allowed reducing computation times substantially and quantified the importance of the blood vessel compartment by computing forward and inverse errors resulting from ignoring the blood vessels. Our results show that ignoring emissary veins piercing the skull leads to focal localization errors of approx. 5 to 15mm. Large errors (>2cm) were observed due to the carotid arteries and the dense arterial vasculature in areas such as in the insula or in the medial temporal lobe. Thus, in such predisposed areas, errors caused by neglecting blood vessels can reach similar magnitudes as those previously reported for neglecting white matter anisotropy, the CSF or the dura - structures which are generally considered important components of realistic EEG head models. Our findings thus imply that including a realistic blood vessel compartment in EEG head models will be helpful to

  16. The role of blood vessels in high-resolution volume conductor head modeling of EEG

    PubMed Central

    Fiederer, L.D.J.; Vorwerk, J.; Lucka, F.; Dannhauer, M.; Yang, S.; Dümpelmann, M.; Schulze-Bonhage, A.; Aertsen, A.; Speck, O.; Wolters, C.H.; Ball, T.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of the electrical sources of human EEG activity at high spatiotemporal accuracy is an important aim in neuroscience and neurological diagnostics. Over the last decades, numerous studies have demonstrated that realistic modeling of head anatomy improves the accuracy of source reconstruction of EEG signals. For example, including a cerebrospinal fluid compartment and the anisotropy of white matter electrical conductivity were both shown to significantly reduce modeling errors. Here, we for the first time quantify the role of detailed reconstructions of the cerebral blood vessels in volume conductor head modeling for EEG. To study the role of the highly arborized cerebral blood vessels, we created a submillimeter head model based on ultra-high-field-strength (7 T) structural MRI datasets. Blood vessels (arteries and emissary/intraosseous veins) were segmented using Frangi multi-scale vesselness filtering. The final head model consisted of a geometry-adapted cubic mesh with over 17 × 106 nodes. We solved the forward model using a finite-element-method (FEM) transfer matrix approach, which allowed reducing computation times substantially and quantified the importance of the blood vessel compartment by computing forward and inverse errors resulting from ignoring the blood vessels. Our results show that ignoring emissary veins piercing the skull leads to focal localization errors of approx. 5 to 15 mm. Large errors (>2 cm) were observed due to the carotid arteries and the dense arterial vasculature in areas such as in the insula or in the medial temporal lobe. Thus, in such predisposed areas, errors caused by neglecting blood vessels can reach similar magnitudes as those previously reported for neglecting white matter anisotropy, the CSF or the dura — structures which are generally considered important components of realistic EEG head models. Our findings thus imply that including a realistic blood vessel compartment in EEG head models will be helpful to

  17. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty for spontaneous osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tong; Tu, Yihui; Xue, Huaming; Wen, Tao; Mei, Jiong

    2017-01-01

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is an effective treatment option for medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Whether spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) can be successfully treated with UKA remains controversial. This study evaluated the clinical and radiological results of patients with SPONK who were treated by UKA using Oxford phase III prostheses. We compared a prospective series of 23 UKA cases operated for SPONK with 235 UKA cases operated for OA. All patients underwent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to confirm the diagnosis and exclude any major lesion in the lateral compartment. The stage, condylar ratio, and volume of the necrotic lesion were evaluated. The pre and postoperative Oxford knee scores (OKSs) were compared. The mean follow-up was 60 months. No statistical differences in complication rates between the groups were found. The mean OKS improved from 39.48 ± 5.69 to 18.83 ± 3.82 ( p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the pre and postoperative OKS between the different groups. SPONK can be successfully treated with UKA, with a favorable short- to mid-term follow-up.

  18. [Bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis of the jaws].

    PubMed

    Urade, Masahiro

    2007-02-01

    The osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ) has been reported occasionally in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, bisphosphonate (BP)-associated ONJ in patients with cancer such as multiple myeloma, breast cancer and prostate cancer mainly administered with intravenous BPs has been first reported in 2003. Since then, many cases over 2,500 are accumulating worldwide. Since BPs are often used for osteoporosis, cancer-associated hypercalcemia and osteolytic bone metastasis, it is speculated that ONJ cases will increase in Japan where a small number of them were reported until now. Most of ONJ in cancer patients receiving BP administration occur after dental treatments such as tooth extraction, periodontal surgery and dental implants, and do not respond to conventional treatment modalities such as debridement, antibiotic therapy and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. No effective therapy for ONJ is established yet and empirical conservative therapy is recommended in the guidelines for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of ONJ. Therefore, dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons need to recognize ONJ as a serious side effect of BPs and to make informed consent to the patients and a close consultation with medical oncologists for administration of BPs.

  19. Bisphosphonates and osteonecrosis: an open matter

    PubMed Central

    Vescovi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ) in patients on long-term Bisphosphonate Therapy (BPT) is being reported in the last ten years in the literature with increasing frequency. The therapy for this condition is a real dilemma. Temporary suspension of BPT offers no short term benefits, hyperbaric oxygen has no proven efficiency and therefore is not recommended, intermittent or continuous antibiotic with surgical debridement can be beneficial to palliate the symptoms. Er:YAG laser can be used to eliminate necrotic portions of the bone by partial or total resection of the jaws as an alternative to conventional rotary tools. The high degree of affinity of this wavelength for water and hydroxyapatite means the soft tissue and bone can both be treated. The technique can also be used for conservative interventions by gradually evaporating the part of necrotic bone, getting close to the healthy area. One certain advantage of the Er:YAG laser is its bactericidal and biostimulatory action, inducing the healing of the soft tissues and the bone, quicker than in conventional treatments. In conclusion, from our experience, it is possible to observe that an early conservative surgical approach with Er:YAG laser associated to biostimulation, LLLT (Low Level Laser Therapy), for BRONJ could be considered as more efficacious in comparison to medical therapy or other techniques. PMID:23289026

  20. A Three-Dimensional Computational Human Head Model That Captures Live Human Brain Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ganpule, Shailesh; Daphalapurkar, Nitin P; Ramesh, Kaliat T; Knutsen, Andrew K; Pham, Dzung L; Bayly, Philip V; Prince, Jerry L

    2017-04-10

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a debilitating consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) attributed to abnormal stretching of axons caused by blunt head trauma or acceleration of the head. We developed an anatomically accurate, subject-specific, three-dimensional (3D) computational model of the human brain, and used it to study the dynamic deformations in the substructures of the brain when the head is subjected to rotational accelerations. The computational head models use anatomy and morphology of the white matter fibers obtained using MRI. Subject-specific full-field shearing motions in live human brains obtained through a recently developed tagged MRI imaging technique are then used to validate the models by comparing the measured and predicted heterogeneous dynamic mechanical response of the brain. These results are used to elucidate the dynamics of local shearing deformations in the brain substructures caused by rotational acceleration of the head. Our work demonstrates that the rotational dynamics of the brain has a timescale of ∼100 ms as determined by the shearing wave speeds, and thus the injuries associated with rotational accelerations likely occur over these time scales. After subject-specific validation using the live human subject data, a representative subject-specific head model is used to simulate a real life scenario that resulted in a concussive injury. Results suggest that regions of the brain, in the form of a toroid, encompassing the white matter, the cortical gray matter, and outer parts of the limbic system have a higher susceptibility to injury under axial rotations of the head.

  1. Management of osteonecrosis of proximal tibia using trabecular osteonecrotic rods.

    PubMed

    Rao, Biyyam; Kamal, Tamer

    2012-06-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee is a well-described cause of acute knee pain. It can lead to significant functional impairment, rapid arthritic joint changes and subsequent collapse. Several hypotheses exist different treatment options are used ranging from conservative management to joint arthroplasty. The majority of cases involve the distal femoral condyle and to a much lesser extent the medial tibial plateau. We are presenting a rare case of osteonecrosis of the proximal tibia affecting the lateral tibial condyle in 44 years old Caucasian male which was treated successfully using osteonecrotic tantalum rods with 26 month follow-up.

  2. Management of osteonecrosis of proximal tibia using trabecular osteonecrotic rods

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Biyyam; Kamal, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the knee is a well-described cause of acute knee pain. It can lead to significant functional impairment, rapid arthritic joint changes and subsequent collapse. Several hypotheses exist different treatment options are used ranging from conservative management to joint arthroplasty. The majority of cases involve the distal femoral condyle and to a much lesser extent the medial tibial plateau. We are presenting a rare case of osteonecrosis of the proximal tibia affecting the lateral tibial condyle in 44 years old Caucasian male which was treated successfully using osteonecrotic tantalum rods with 26 month follow-up. PMID:25983460

  3. Nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the distal pole of the scaphoid

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Bhavuk; Gupta, Himanshu; Kotwal, Prakash P

    2011-01-01

    Post traumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of scaphoid is very rare. We present a case of 34 years old male, drill operator by occupation with nontraumatic osteonecrosis of distal pole of the scaphoid. The patient was managed conservatively and was kept under regular follow-up every three months. The patient was also asked to change his profession. Two years later, the patient had no pain and had mild restriction of wrist movements (less than 15 degrees in either direction). The radiographs revealed normal density of the scaphoid suggesting revascularization. PMID:21430877

  4. Modeling Time Resolved Light Propagation Inside a Realistic Human Head Model

    PubMed Central

    Bazrafkan, Sh; Kazemi, K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Near infrared spectroscopy imaging is one of the new techniques used for investigating structural and functionality of different body tissues. This is done by injecting light into the medium and measuring the photon intensity at the surface of the tissue. Methods: In this paper the different medical applications, various imaging and simulation techniques of NIRS imaging is described. Each method is introduced and discussed. Then, the optimized model is prepared for numerical simulations. In this paper, the finite element method is used for solving the diffusion equation numerically. Results: Diffusion equation was solved for realistic human head model using finite element approach for a point light source and time resolved case. The photon intensity distribution in different head layers has been shown and the intensity orientation via the CSF layer has been illustrated. Conclusion: Simulating the photon transformation inside the tissue is essential for investigating the NIRS imaging technique. The finite element approach is a fast and accurate method for simulating this fact. The time resolved approach of this technique could illustrate the photon migration and intensity orientation in the tissue for time dependent light sources in tissues. PMID:25505770

  5. Does Head Start differentially benefit children with risks targeted by the program’s service model?☆

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth B.; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J.

    2015-01-01

    Data from the Head Start Impact Study (N = 3540) were used to test for differential benefits of Head Start after one program year and after kindergarten on pre-academic and behavior outcomes for children at risk in the domains targeted by the program’s comprehensive services. Although random assignment to Head Start produced positive treatment main effects on children’s pre-academic skills and behavior problems, residualized growth models showed that random assignment to Head Start did not differentially benefit the pre-academic skills of children with risk factors targeted by the Head Start service model. The models showed detrimental impacts of Head Start for maternal-reported behavior problems of high-risk children, but slightly more positive impacts for teacher-reported behavior. Policy implications for Head Start are discussed. PMID:26379369

  6. Mathematical modeling of the head-disk interface (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crone, Robert M.; Jhon, Myung S.

    1993-05-01

    State-of-the-art theoretical and numerical techniques required to simulate the head-disk interface (HDI) of future magnetic storage devices is presented. The severity of operating conditions (i.e., attempts to achieve flying heights as low as 40 nm) pose several challenges. Large transient pressure gradients can be established within air bearing leading to numerical oscillations as well as to increased program execution times. Enhanced gaseous rarefaction effects must also be incorporated into the analysis. In the present study, accurate nonoscillatory air bearing pressure distributions were obtained using a high resolution finite element algorithm to solve the generalized Reynolds equation. Higher order gaseous rarefaction effects are incorporated into generalized Reynolds equations using the total mass flow rate coefficient predicted from the linearized Boltzmann equation. The form of the generalized Reynolds equation that is presented in this paper is an improved version of the continued fraction approximation previously proposed by Crone et al.1 A simple scaling analysis, which is based upon the results of the linearized Boltzmann equation, will also be presented to study the effect of slider miniaturization, as well as to obtain a novel interpretation of accelerated wear and accelerated flyability test results.

  7. Five-layer realistic head model based on inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution of different tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dandan; Zhang, Jianwei; Wu, Weijuan; Ying, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xiangping

    2009-10-01

    This paper is focused on the sophisticated realistic head modeling based on inhomogeneous and anisotropic conductivity distribution of the head tissues. The finite element method (FEM) was used to model the five-layer head volume conductor models with hexahedral elements from segmentation and mapping of DT-MRI data. Then the inhomogeneous conductivities of the scalp, CSF and gray matter tissue were distributed according a normal distribution based on the mean value of respective tissues. The electric conductivity of the brain tissues dictates different inhomogeneous and anisotropic at some different microscopic levels. Including the inhomogeneous and anisotropy of the tissue would improve the accuracy of the MREIT, EEG and MEG problems in the simulation research.

  8. Solving the forward problem in EEG source analysis by spherical and fdm head modeling: a comparative analysis - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Vatta, Federica; Meneghini, Fabio; Esposito, Fabrino; Mininel, Stefano; Di Salle, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    Neural source localization techniques based on electroencephalography (EEG) use scalp potential data to infer the location of underlying neural activity. This procedure entails modeling the sources of EEG activity and modeling the head volume conduction process to link the modeled sources to the EEG, solving the so called EEG forward problem, and reconstructing the brain electrical activity from recorded EEG data, solving the EEG inverse problem. Many factors affect the accuracy of the forward and hence of the inverse problem solution, one of them is the shape of the head model. Realistic head models can lead to more accurate forward problem solutions, but imply heavier computational burdens in comparison to spherical models. Conversely, inverse solutions require the forward model to be computationally efficient. The aim of this study is to investigate the different general potentialities, in terms of EEG source reconstruction, which can be achieved adopting realistic or spherical geometries in head modeling. Previous studies in the literature analyzed the effect of head model geometry presenting results for particular cases of head models. In this paper, we re-address the effect of realistic geometry in head modeling, seeking for more general results by adopting the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) phantom model to represent a whole family of realistic head models. This paper presents results of a computer simulation study in which the potentialities of two different four-shell head models are compared, the realistic MNI-based FDM and the corresponding sensor-fitted spherical-shaped model, by means of the Point Spread Function (PSF) correlation maps, with a quantitative analysis of the accuracy in EEG source reconstruction given by head modeling refinement from the spherical to the more complex realistic FDM head modeling.

  9. A mathematical model for predicting the outcome in moderate head injury.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, U S

    2006-03-01

    Virtually all the literature on head injury has focused on the outcome prediction of severe and mild head injuries and very few studies have been dedicated to patients sustaining moderate head injuries. To identify the patient following moderate head injury who may die, develop severe disability or significant cognitive and behavioral problems on the first day of injury itself. Tertiary teaching hospital. Prospective study divided into two groups. The study included 85 patients whose Glasgow coma scale score were 9-12 and who had isolated moderate head injury. Among the above patients a preliminary prospective study was conducted in first group of 64 patients using 7 clinical factors, 18 neuro-behavioral sequel and CT brain data in prediction of outcome with moderate head injury. From the results obtained in the above study three statistically significant factors were identified and a mathematical model was developed and used prospectively in the next 21 patients and its accuracy was evaluated. STATISTICAL METHODS USED: Multiple regression analysis and Kendall's tau non- parametric test using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS 11-5-version) were used to find out the predictive factors. Results of these patients showed combination of CT scan brain data, verbal response and neurological signs could provide a reliable prediction in moderate head injury. Based upon the above results a mathematical model was developed giving a value for the above-mentioned factors. The mathematical model was "CT brain data x (Verbal response + Neurological Signs)". Its overall accuracy when used on the day of admission was around 80%.

  10. Modeling smooth muscle myosin's two heads: long-lived enzymatic roles and phosphorylation-dependent equilibria.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam; Warshaw, David M

    2010-08-09

    Smooth muscle myosin has two heads, each capable of interacting with actin to generate force and/or motion as it hydrolyzes ATP. These heads are inhibited when their associated regulatory light chain is unphosphorylated (0P), becoming active and hydrolyzing ATP maximally when phosphorylated (2P). Interestingly, with only one of the two regulatory light chains phosphorylated (1P), smooth muscle myosin is active but its ATPase rate is <2P. To explain published 1P single ATP turnover and steady-state ATPase activities, we propose a kinetic model in which 1P myosin exists in an equilibrium between being fully active (2P) and inhibited (0P). Based on the single ATP turnover data, we also propose that each 2P head adopts a hydrolytic role distinct from its partner at any point in time, i.e., one head strongly binds actin and hydrolyzes ATP at its actin-activated rate while the other weakly binds actin. Surprisingly, the heads switch roles slowly (<0.1 s(-1)), suggesting that their activities are not independent. The phosphorylation-dependent equilibrium between active and inhibited states and the hydrolytic role that each head adopts during its interaction with actin may have implications for understanding regulation and mechanical performance of other members of the myosin family of molecular motors.

  11. Effects of uncertainty in head tissue conductivity and complexity on EEG forward modeling in neonates.

    PubMed

    Azizollahi, Hamed; Aarabi, Ardalan; Wallois, Fabrice

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of uncertainty in head tissue conductivities and inherent geometrical complexities including fontanels in neonates. Based on MR and CT coregistered images, we created a realistic neonatal head model consisting of scalp, skull, fontanels, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM). Using computer simulations, we investigated the effects of exclusion of CSF and fontanels, discrimination between GM and WM, and uncertainty in conductivity of neonatal head tissues on EEG forward modeling. We found that exclusion of CSF from the head model induced the strongest widespread effect on the EEG forward solution. Discrimination between GM and white matter also induced a strong widespread effect, but which was less intense than that of CSF exclusion. The results also showed that exclusion of the fontanels from the neonatal head model locally affected areas beneath the fontanels, but this effect was much less pronounced than those of exclusion of CSF and GM/WM discrimination. Changes in GM/WM conductivities by 25% with respect to reference values induced considerable effects in EEG forward solution, but this effect was more pronounced for GM conductivity. Similarly, changes in skull conductivity induced effects in the EEG forward modeling in areas covered by the cranial bones. The least intense effect on EEG was caused by changes in conductivity of the fontanels. Our findings clearly emphasize the impact of uncertainty in conductivity and deficiencies in head tissue compartments on modeling research and localization of brain electrical activity in neonates. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3604-3622, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A guideline for head volume conductor modeling in EEG and MEG.

    PubMed

    Vorwerk, Johannes; Cho, Jae-Hyun; Rampp, Stefan; Hamer, Hajo; Knösche, Thomas R; Wolters, Carsten H

    2014-10-15

    For accurate EEG/MEG source analysis it is necessary to model the head volume conductor as realistic as possible. This includes the distinction of the different conductive compartments in the human head. In this study, we investigated the influence of modeling/not modeling the conductive compartments skull spongiosa, skull compacta, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter, and white matter and of the inclusion of white matter anisotropy on the EEG/MEG forward solution. Therefore, we created a highly realistic 6-compartment head model with white matter anisotropy and used a state-of-the-art finite element approach. Starting from a 3-compartment scenario (skin, skull, and brain), we subsequently refined our head model by distinguishing one further of the above-mentioned compartments. For each of the generated five head models, we measured the effect on the signal topography and signal magnitude both in relation to a highly resolved reference model and to the model generated in the previous refinement step. We evaluated the results of these simulations using a variety of visualization methods, allowing us to gain a general overview of effect strength, of the most important source parameters triggering these effects, and of the most affected brain regions. Thereby, starting from the 3-compartment approach, we identified the most important additional refinement steps in head volume conductor modeling. We were able to show that the inclusion of the highly conductive CSF compartment, whose conductivity value is well known, has the strongest influence on both signal topography and magnitude in both modalities. We found the effect of gray/white matter distinction to be nearly as big as that of the CSF inclusion, and for both of these steps we identified a clear pattern in the spatial distribution of effects. In comparison to these two steps, the introduction of white matter anisotropy led to a clearly weaker, but still strong, effect. Finally, the distinction between skull

  13. Of lice and math: using models to understand and control populations of head lice.

    PubMed

    Laguna, María Fabiana; Laguna, Mara Fabiana; Risau-Gusman, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we use detailed data about the biology of the head louse (pediculus humanus capitis) to build a model of the evolution of head lice colonies. Using theory and computer simulations, we show that the model can be used to assess the impact of the various strategies usually applied to eradicate head lice, both conscious (treatments) and unconscious (grooming). In the case of treatments, we study the difference in performance that arises when they are applied in systematic and non-systematic ways. Using some reasonable simplifying assumptions (as random mixing of human groups and the same mobility for all life stages of head lice other than eggs) we model the contagion of pediculosis using only one additional parameter. It is shown that this parameter can be tuned to obtain collective infestations whose characteristics are compatible with what is given in the literature on real infestations. We analyze two scenarios: One where group members begin treatment when a similar number of lice are present in each head, and another where there is one individual who starts treatment with a much larger threshold ("superspreader"). For both cases we assess the impact of several collective strategies of treatment.

  14. Of Lice and Math: Using Models to Understand and Control Populations of Head Lice

    PubMed Central

    Laguna, Mara Fabiana; Risau-Gusman, Sebastián

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we use detailed data about the biology of the head louse (pediculus humanus capitis) to build a model of the evolution of head lice colonies. Using theory and computer simulations, we show that the model can be used to assess the impact of the various strategies usually applied to eradicate head lice, both conscious (treatments) and unconscious (grooming). In the case of treatments, we study the difference in performance that arises when they are applied in systematic and non-systematic ways. Using some reasonable simplifying assumptions (as random mixing of human groups and the same mobility for all life stages of head lice other than eggs) we model the contagion of pediculosis using only one additional parameter. It is shown that this parameter can be tuned to obtain collective infestations whose characteristics are compatible with what is given in the literature on real infestations. We analyze two scenarios: One where group members begin treatment when a similar number of lice are present in each head, and another where there is one individual who starts treatment with a much larger threshold (“superspreader”). For both cases we assess the impact of several collective strategies of treatment. PMID:21799752

  15. Segmentation of magnetic resonance images to construct human head model for diffuse optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yosuke; Obata, Takayuki; Okada, Eiji

    2011-07-01

    The brain activation image obtained by diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is obtained by solving inverse problem using the spatial sensitivity profile (SSP). The SSP can be obtained from the analysis of the light propagation using threedimensional head models. The head model is based upon segmented magnetic resonance (MR) image and there are several types of software based on binarization for segmentation of MR head images. We segmented superficial tissues which effect the light propagation in human head from MR images acquired with FATSAT and FIESTA pulse sequences by using region growing algorithm and morphological operation to facilitate the construction of the individual head models for DOT. The pixel intensity distribution of these images has appropriate characteristics to extract the superficial tissues by using algorithm based on binarization. The result of extraction was compared with the extraction from T2-weighted image which is commonly used to extract superficial tissues. The result of extraction from FATSAT or FIESTA image agree well with ground truth determined by manual segmentation.

  16. Cross-validated models of the relationships between neck muscle electromyography and three-dimensional head kinematics during gaze behavior.

    PubMed

    Farshadmanesh, Farshad; Byrne, Patrick; Keith, Gerald P; Wang, Hongying; Corneil, Brian D; Crawford, J Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The object of this study was to model the relationship between neck electromyography (EMG) and three-dimensional (3-D) head kinematics during gaze behavior. In two monkeys, we recorded 3-D gaze, head orientation, and bilateral EMG activity in the sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, complexus, biventer cervicis, rectus capitis posterior major, and occipital capitis inferior muscles. Head-unrestrained animals fixated and made gaze saccades between targets within a 60° × 60° grid. We performed a stepwise regression in which polynomial model terms were retained/rejected based on their tendency to increase/decrease a cross-validation-based measure of model generalizability. This revealed several results that could not have been predicted from knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy. During head holding, EMG activity in most muscles was related to horizontal head orientation, whereas fewer muscles correlated to vertical head orientation and none to small random variations in head torsion. A fourth-order polynomial model, with horizontal head orientation as the only independent variable, generalized nearly as well as higher order models. For head movements, we added time-varying linear and nonlinear perturbations in velocity and acceleration to the previously derived static (head holding) models. The static models still explained most of the EMG variance, but the additional motion terms, which included horizontal, vertical, and torsional contributions, significantly improved the results. Several coordinate systems were used for both static and dynamic analyses, with Fick coordinates showing a marginal (nonsignificant) advantage. Thus, during gaze fixations, recruitment within the neck muscles from which we recorded contributed primarily to position-dependent horizontal orientation terms in our data set, with more complex multidimensional contributions emerging during the head movements that accompany gaze shifts. These are crucial components of the late neuromuscular

  17. Development of New, Low-Head Hydropower Turbine - Modeling & Laboratory Test DE-EE0005426

    SciTech Connect

    Krouse, Wayne

    2014-12-05

    Hydro Green Energy, LLC (HGE) will complete the design, fabrication and laboratory testing of a scaled, vertically stackable, low-head hydropower turbine called the Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT). HGE will also complete a summary report that includes the laboratory testing results and analysis of the tests. Project Goals: Design, model and test modular bulb turbine for installation in numerous HGE low-head hydropower projects at non-powered USACE dams. Project Results: The sub-scale prototype was tested successfully at a leading US hydraulic laboratory. Laboratory data results agreed well with predicted results from numerical modeling.

  18. High-Dose Corticosteroid Use and Risk of Hip Osteonecrosis: Meta-Analysis and Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Mont, Michael A; Pivec, Robert; Banerjee, Samik; Issa, Kimona; Elmallah, Randa K; Jones, Lynne C

    2015-09-01

    The effect of varying corticosteroid regimens on hip osteonecrosis incidence remains unclear. We performed a meta-analysis and systematic literature review to determine osteonecrosis occurrences in patients taking corticosteroids at varying mean and cumulative doses and treatment durations, and whether medical diagnoses affected osteonecrosis incidence. Fifty-seven studies (23,561 patients) were reviewed. Regression analysis determined significance between corticosteroid usage and osteonecrosis incidence. Osteonecrosis incidence was 6.7% with corticosteroid treatment of >2 g (prednisone-equivalent). Systemic lupus erythematosus patients had positive correlations between dose and osteonecrosis incidence. Each 10 mg/d increase was associated with a 3.6% increase in osteonecrosis rate, and >20 mg/d resulted in a higher osteonecrosis incidence. Clinicians must be wary of osteonecrosis in patients on high corticosteroid regimens, particularly in systematic lupus erythematosus.

  19. Analysis of two colliding fractionally damped spherical shells in modelling blunt human head impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossikhin, Yury; Shitikova, Marina

    2013-06-01

    The collision of two elastic or viscoelastic spherical shells is investigated as a model for the dynamic response of a human head impacted by another head or by some spherical object. Determination of the impact force that is actually being transmitted to bone will require the model for the shock interaction of the impactor and human head. This model is indended to be used in simulating crash scenarios in frontal impacts, and provide an effective tool to estimate the severity of effect on the human head and to estimate brain injury risks. The model developed here suggests that after the moment of impact quasi-longitudinal and quasi-transverse shock waves are generated, which then propagate along the spherical shells. The solution behind the wave fronts is constructed with the help of the theory of discontinuities. It is assumed that the viscoelastic features of the shells are exhibited only in the contact domain, while the remaining parts retain their elastic properties. In this case, the contact spot is assumed to be a plane disk with constant radius, and the viscoelastic features of the shells are described by the fractional derivative standard linear solid model. In the case under consideration, the governing differential equations are solved analytically by the Laplace transform technique. It is shown that the fractional parameter of the fractional derivative model plays very important role, since its variation allows one to take into account the age-related changes in the mechanical properties of bone.

  20. Effect of D-003, a Mixture of High Molecular Weight Aliphatic Acids, on Glucocorticoid- and Lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-Induced Osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Noa, Miriam; Más, Rosa; Valle, Maikel; Mendoza, Sarahí; Mendoza, Nilda

    2012-01-01

    Osteonecrosis (ON) is characterized through the impairment of osseous blood flow that leads to the collapse of femur head. Corticoid-induced ON in rats and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced in rabbits are useful models to assess the efficacy of potential treatments on this disease. D-003 inhibits the mevalonate pathway, lipid peroxidation and prevents osteoporosis in rats through increasing the osteoclast apoptosis. This study investigated the effects of D-003 on corticoid- and LPS-induced ON in rats and rabbits. Corticoid-induced ON: Rats were randomized into five groups. A negative control and four groups treated with prednisolone 6 mg/Kg: a positive control and three treated with D-003 (5, 25 and 200 mg/Kg) for 80 days. All positive controls presented ON areas. D-003 significantly reduced the numbers and proportions of ON lesions, as compared to the positive control group. LPS-induced ON in rabbits: Rabbits were randomized into five groups: a negative control and four injected with a single intra-venous injection of LPS (10 μg/Kg) including a positive control and three with D-003 (5, 25 and 200 mg/Kg) for 30 days. ON was seen in all positive controls. The incidence of ON and the number of ON lesions in the groups treated with D-003 (25 and 200 mg/Kg) was significantly lower compared to the positive controls. LPS injection significantly increased the size of bone marrow fat cells in positive controls and such increase was significantly decreased by D-003. In conclusion, D-003 reduced ON lesions in corticoid-and LPS-induced ON and also the size of bone marrow fat cells in rabbits with LPS.

  1. A Porcine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury via Head Rotational Acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Harris, James P.; Browne, Kevin D.; Wolf, John A; Duda, John E.; Meaney, David F.; Margulies, Susan S.; Smith, Douglas H.

    2017-01-01

    Unique from other brain disorders, traumatic brain injury (TBI) generally results from a discrete biomechanical event that induces rapid head movement. The large size and high organization of the human brain makes it particularly vulnerable to traumatic injury from rotational accelerations that can cause dynamic deformation of the brain tissue. Therefore, replicating the injury biomechanics of human TBI in animal models presents a substantial challenge, particularly with regard to addressing brain size and injury parameters. Here we present the historical development and use of a porcine model of head rotational acceleration. By scaling up the rotational forces to account for difference in brain mass between swine and humans, this model has been shown to produce the same tissue deformations and identical neuropathologies found in human TBI. The parameters of scaled rapid angular accelerations applied for the model reproduce inertial forces generated when the human head suddenly accelerates or decelerates in falls, collisions, or blunt impacts. The model uses custom-built linkage assemblies and a powerful linear actuator designed to produce purely impulsive nonimpact head rotation in different angular planes at controlled rotational acceleration levels. Through a range of head rotational kinematics, this model can produce functional and neuropathological changes across the spectrum from concussion to severe TBI. Notably, however, the model is very difficult to employ, requiring a highly skilled team for medical management, biomechanics, neurological recovery, and specialized outcome measures including neuromonitoring, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and neuropathology. Nonetheless, while challenging, this clinically relevant model has proven valuable for identifying mechanisms of acute and progressive neuropathologies as well as for the evaluation of noninvasive diagnostic techniques and potential neuroprotective treatments following TBI. PMID:27604725

  2. Computational representation of a realistic head and brain volume conductor model: electroencephalography simulation and visualization study.

    PubMed

    Kybartaite, Asta

    2012-11-01

    Computational head and brain volume conductor modeling is a practical and non-invasive method to investigate neuroelectrical activity in the brain. Anatomical structures included in a model affect the flow of volume currents and the resulting scalp surface potentials. The influence of different tissues within the head on scalp surface potentials was investigated by constructing five highly detailed, realistic head models from segmented and processed Visible Human Man digital images. The models were: (1) model with 20 different tissues, that is, skin, dense connective tissue (fat), aponeurosis (muscle), outer, middle and inner tables of the scalp, dura matter, arachnoid layer (including cerebrospinal fluid), pia matter, six cortical layers, eye tissue, muscle around the eye, optic nerve, temporal muscle, white matter and internal air, (2) model with three main inhomogeneities, that is, scalp, skull, brain, (3) model with homogeneous scalp and remaining inhomogeneities, (4) model with homogeneous skull and remaining inhomogeneities, and (5) model with homogeneous brain matter and remaining inhomogeneities. Scalp potentials because of three different dipolar sources in the parietal-occipital lobe were computed for all five models. Results of a forward solution revealed that tissues included in the model and the dipole source location directly affect the simulated scalp surface potentials. The major finding indicates that significant change in the scalp surface potentials is observed when the brain's distinctions are removed. The other modifications, for example, layers of the scalp and skull are important too, but they have less effect on the overall results.

  3. A dynamic factor modeling framework for analyzing multiple groundwater head series simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendrecht, W. L.; van Geer, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present an approach in which we combine a dynamic factor model (DFM) and predefined response functions to analyze a set of groundwater head series simultaneously. Each groundwater head series is decomposed into: (a) one or more deterministic components as a response to known driving forces, (b) one or more common dynamic factors, representing spatial patterns not related to any of the input series and (c) one specific dynamic factor for each groundwater head series, describing unique variation for that series. The approach reduces the degrees of freedom for each response function, enables the application to irregular observed data, and exploits the correlation between residual series of a set of groundwater head series. The common dynamic factors may be interpreted as spatial patterns due to e.g. limitations in the model specification or concept, spatially correlated errors in input variables, or driving forces which have not been included in the model. In the latter case the model can be applied in the context of an alarming system, e.g. to monitor regional trends. The specific dynamic factor depicts the variation of a particular groundwater head series that cannot be related to any other time series of the set nor to any input series. Therefore the specific dynamic factor is suitable for analyzing local variations and detecting incidental measurement errors, for example in a quality control procedure. The DFM framework is illustrated with a set of 8 groundwater head series and applied for filling gaps in time series, reconstructing high-frequency data, and detecting outliers.

  4. Development of a finite element human head model partially validated with thirty five experimental cases.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haojie; Zhang, Liying; Jiang, Binhui; Genthikatti, Vinay V; Jin, Xin; Zhu, Feng; Makwana, Rahul; Gill, Amandeep; Jandir, Gurdeep; Singh, Amrinder; Yang, King H

    2013-11-01

    This study is aimed to develop a high quality, extensively validated finite element (FE) human head model for enhanced head injury prediction and prevention. The geometry of the model was based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans of an adult male who has the average height and weight of an American. A feature-based multiblock technique was adopted to develop hexahedral brain meshes including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, corpus callosum, ventricles, and thalamus. Conventional meshing methods were used to create the bridging veins, cerebrospinal fluid, skull, facial bones, flesh, skin, and membranes-including falx, tentorium, pia, arachnoid, and dura. The head model has 270,552 elements in total. Thirty five loading cases were selected from a range of experimental head impacts to check the robustness of the model predictions based on responses including the brain pressure, relative skull-brain motion, skull response, and facial response. The brain pressure was validated against intracranial pressure data reported by Nahum et al. (1977, "Intracranial Pressure Dynamics During Head Impact," Proc. 21st Stapp Car Crash Conference, SAE Technical Paper No. 770922) and Trosseille et al. (1992, "Development of a F.E.M. of the Human Head According to a Specific Test Protocol," Proc. 36th Stapp Car Crash Conference, SAE Technical Paper No. 922527). The brain motion was validated against brain displacements under sagittal, coronal, and horizontal blunt impacts performed by Hardy et al. (2001, "Investigation of Head Injury Mechanisms Using Neutral Density Technology and High-Speed Biplanar X-Ray," Stapp Car Crash Journal, 45, pp. 337-368; and 2007, "A Study of the Response of the Human Cadaver Head to Impact," Stapp Car Crash Journal, 51, pp. 17-80). The facial bone responses were validated under nasal impact (Nyquist et al. 1986, "Facial Impact Tolerance and Response," Proc. 30th Stapp Car Crash Conference, SAE Technical Paper No. 861896

  5. Risk Factors for Osteonecrosis of the Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Barasch, A.; Cunha-Cruz, J.; Curro, F.A.; Hujoel, P.; Sung, A.H.; Vena, D.; Voinea-Griffin, A.E.; Beadnell, Steven; Craig, Ronald G.; DeRouen, Timothy; Desaranayake, Ananda; Gilbert, Ann; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Goldberg, Ken; Hauley, Richard; Hashimoto, Mariko; Holmes, Jon; Latzke, Brooke; Leroux, Brian; Lindblad, Anne; Richman, Joshua; Safford, Monika; Ship [deceased], Jonathan; Thompson, Van P.; Williams, O. Dale; Yin, Wanrong

    2011-01-01

    Case reports and cohort studies have linked bisphosphonate therapy and osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ), but neither causality nor specific risks for lesion development have been clearly established. We conducted a 1:3 case-control study with three dental Practice-based Research Networks, using dentist questionnaires and patient interviews for collection of data on bisphosphonate therapy, demographics, co-morbidities, and dental and medical treatments. Multivariable logistic regression analyses tested associations between bisphosphonate use and other risk factors with ONJ. We enrolled 191 ONJ cases and 573 controls in 119 dental practices. Bisphosphonate use was strongly associated with ONJ (odds ratios [OR] 299.5 {95%CI 70.0-1282.7} for intravenous [IV] use and OR = 12.2 {4.3-35.0} for oral use). Risk markers included local suppuration (OR = 7.8 {1.8-34.1}), dental extraction (OR = 7.6 {2.4-24.7}), and radiation therapy (OR = 24.1 {4.9-118.4}). When cancer patients (n = 143) were excluded, bisphosphonate use (OR = 7.2 {2.1-24.7}), suppuration (OR = 11.9 {2.0-69.5}), and extractions (OR = 6.6 {1.6-26.6}) remained associated with ONJ. Higher risk of ONJ began within 2 years of bisphosphonate initiation and increased four-fold after 2 years. Both IV and oral bisphosphonate use were strongly associated with ONJ. Duration of treatment > 2 years; suppuration and dental extractions were independent risk factors for ONJ. PMID:21317246

  6. Osteonecrosis of the jaws in patients treated with bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Ata-Ali, Fadi; Flichy-Fernández, Antonio J.; Bagan, José V.

    2012-01-01

    The literature describes an increasing presence of bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ), characterized by the exposure for over 8 weeks of necrotic bone in the maxillofacial region, after bisphosphonate therapy, in the absence of prior maxillary radiotherapy. The present literature review examines the etiopathogenesis, risk factors, clinical forms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of bisphosphonate-induced ONJ. In addition, a review is made of all the series involving over 15 patients diagnosed with this disorder between 1 January 2011 and 15 May 2011. A PubMed-Medline search was carried out with the following key words: “bisphosphonates” and “osteonecrosis”. The appearance of osteonecrosis is a serious complication, with an increasing incidence, that affects patient quality of life and causes important morbidity. All patients treated with bisphosphonates are at risk of developing osteonecrosis as a result of such medication. This potential complication therefore should be explained to the patient by both the prescribing physician and the dental surgeon in charge of oral treatment, with the obtainment of informed consent in all cases. Key words:Osteonecrosis of the jaws, bisphosphonates, etiopathogenesis, prevention, treatment. PMID:24558527

  7. Bone end sclerosis in renal osteodystrophy simulating osteonecrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lewis, L.; Keats, T.E.

    1982-08-01

    Osteosclerosis of the bone ends is an unusual manifestation of renal osteodystrophy. In evaluating this finding one should be careful to exclude clinical and radiographic evidence for osteonecrosis. In the two known cases of this entity, bone end sclerosis has been found to develop over one to two years with symmetrical involvement of multiple bones.

  8. Earnings Profiles of Department Heads: Comparing Cross-Sectional and Panel Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragan, James F., Jr.; Rehman, Qazi Najeeb

    1996-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 842 faculty who served as department heads between 1965-92 was compared with 170 in a panel study for whom earnings were estimated using a personal effects model. The average chair received a 12% wage premium for administrative service. Skill depreciation was most severe and wage growth most adversely affected in the…

  9. Female-Headed Families: An Ecological