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Sample records for head scatter factors

  1. Measurement and comparison of head scatter factor for 7 MV unflattened (FFF) and 6 MV flattened photon beam using indigenously designed columnar mini phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambiraj, Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda; Bhushan, Manindra; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Aim To measure and compare the head scatter factor for 7 MV unflattened and 6 MV flattened photon beam using a home-made designed mini phantom. Background The head scatter factor (Sc) is one of the important parameters for MU calculation. There are multiple factors that influence the Sc values, like accelerator head, flattening filter, primary and secondary collimators. Materials and methods A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with high and low atomic number material for measurement of head scatter factors at 10 cm and dmax dose water equivalent thickness. Results The Sc values measured with high-Z are higher than the low-Z mini phantoms observed for both 6MV-FB and 7MV-UFB photon energies. Sc values of 7MV-UFB photon beams were smaller than those of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.6–2.2% (Primus), 0.2–1.4% (Artiste) and 0.6–3.7% (Clinac iX (2300CD))) for field sizes ranging from 10 cm × 10 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams. The presence of wedge filters influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effects showed that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FF and FFF. Conclusions There were significant differences in Sc values measured for 6MV-FB and unflattened 7MV-UFB photon beams over the range of field sizes from 10 cm × 10 cm to 40 cm × 04 cm. Different results were obtained for measurements performed with low-Z and high-Z mini phantoms. PMID:25949220

  2. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques. PMID:25190997

  3. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-07-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of the Head Scatter and Jaw Transmission Correction Factor for Commissioning of Enhanced Dynamic Wedge Fields Using a MapCHECK 2 Diode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Edward C.

    Quality assurance in radiation oncology treatment planning requires independent verification of dose to be delivered to a patient through "second check" calculations for simple plans as well as planar dose fluence measurements for more complex treatments, such as intensity modulated radiation treatments (IMRT). Discrepancies between treatment planning system (TPS) and second check calculations created a need for treatment plan verification using a two dimensional diode array for Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) fields. While these measurements met clinical standards for treatment, they revealed room for improvement in the EDW model. The purpose of this study is to analyze the head scatter and jaw transmission effects of the moving jaw in EDW fields by measuring dose profiles with a two dimensional diode array in order to minimize differences between the manufacturer provided fluence table (Golden Segmented Treatment Table) and actual machine output. The jaw transmission effect reduces the dose gradient in the wedge direction due to transmission photons adding dose to the heel region of the field. The head scatter effect also reduces the gradient in the dose profile due to decreased accelerator output at increasingly smaller field sizes caused by the moving jaw. The field size continuously decreases with jaw motion, and thus the toe region of the wedge receives less dose than anticipated due to less head scatter contribution for small field sizes. The Golden Segmented Treatment Table (GSTT) does not take these factors into account since they are specific to each individual machine. Thus, these factors need to be accounted for in the TPS to accurately model the gradient of the wedge. The TPS used in this clinic uses one correction factor (transmission factor) to account for both effects since both factors reduce the dose gradient of the wedge. Dose profile measurements were made for 5x5 cm2, 10x10 cm2, and 20x20 cm2 field sizes with open fields and 10°, 15°, 20°, 25

  5. Inelastic Scattering Form Factors

    1992-01-01

    ATHENA-IV computes form factors for inelastic scattering calculations, using single-particle wave functions that are eigenstates of motion in either a Woods-Saxon potential well or a harmonic oscillator well. Two-body forces of Gauss, Coulomb, Yukawa, and a sum of cut-off Yukawa radial dependences are available.

  6. An FDTD model of scattering from meteor head plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.; Close, S.

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) model of scattering of radar waves from meteor head plasma. The model treats the meteor head plasma as a cold, collisional, and magnetized plasma, and solves Maxwell's equations and the Langevin equation simultaneously and self-consistently in and around the plasma. We use this model to investigate scattering of radar waves from a meteor head (the "head echo") under a range of plasma densities, meteor scale sizes, and wave frequencies. In this way we relate the radar cross section (RCS) to these variable parameters. We find that computed RCS disagrees with previous analytical theory at certain meteor sizes and densities, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. We find that the calculated meteor head RCS is monotonically related to the "overdense area" of the meteor, defined as the cross-section area of the part of the meteor where the plasma frequency exceeds the wave frequency. These results provides a physical measure of the meteor size and density that can be inferred from measured RCS values from ground-based radars. Meteoroid mass can then be inferred from the meteor plasma distribution using established methods.

  7. Analysing collimator structure effects in head-scatter calculations for IMRT class fields using scatter raytracing.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, S A; Sarfaraz, M; Holmes, T; Yu, C X; Li, X A

    2001-07-01

    The frequent blocking of the irradiated volume in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) makes the head-scatter fraction of the incident photon fluence more significant than that in conventional therapy with open fields. On the other hand. certain collimator configurations block scatter photons directed to a given observation point while allowing primary photons to be transmitted. The 'anomalous blocking' makes the primary field a poor indicator of the scatter fluence. Since large MU-to-cGy ratios in IMRT can magnify head-scatter uncertainties, it becomes necessary to accurately model both the effective scatter source and the collimator structure that limits the scatter reaching the irradiated volume. First we obtain a dual-source model, using a Taylor series expansion to derive the effective scatter source distribution from the data measured for the Elekta SL20 linac equipped with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Then, using a raytracing algorithm, we calculate the transmission of scatter rays from the effective scatter source plane to points in the patient plane. The method can account for the anomalous blocking of scatter by the MLC leaves and the backup diaphragms. For a variety of collimator settings tested, the calculations agree with measurements to an accuracy of 0.002psi10 x 10, where psi10 x 10 is the total (primary + scatter) photon fluence of an open 10 x 10 cm2 field for the same MU delivered. Although the significance of collimator structure in IMRT depends strongly on fields shapes employed for the delivery, potential cumulative errors on the order of a few per cent can be avoided in fluence calculations if the proposed method is used. PMID:11474941

  8. Factorization and non-factorization in diffractive hard scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berera, Arjun

    1997-04-20

    Factorization, in the sense defined for inclusive hard scattering, is discussed for diffractive hard scattering. A factorization theorem similar to its inclusive counterpart is presented for diffractive DIS. For hadron-hadron diffractive hard scattering, in contrast to its inclusive counterpart, the expected breakdown of factorization is discussed. Cross section estimates are given from a simple field theory model for non-factorizing double-pomeron-exchange (DPE) dijet production with and without account for Sudakov suppression.

  9. Scatter factor and reliability of aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueller, G. I.; Freudenthal, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    The concept of time to first failure is utilized to perform a parameter study of scatter factors of aircraft structures. The Weibull distribution is used for estimation of characteristic and certifiable lives. Scatter factors for various Weibull-shaped parameters, fleet sizes and level of reliabilities are calculated. It is concluded that the currently used range of scatter factors (2 through 4) is too narrow for the estimation of a safe life and that a safe and economical design for structural materials with shape parameters less than 2 does not seem feasible except for very small fleet sizes and low levels of reliability.

  10. Relativistic Thomson Scatter from Factor Calculation

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this program is calculate the fully relativistic Thomson scatter from factor in unmagnetized plasmas. Such calculations are compared to experimental diagnoses of plasmas at such facilities as the Jupiter laser facility here a LLNL.

  11. GENERAL Holomorphic Factorization of Superstring Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Davis

    2011-01-01

    The holomorphic factorization of the superstring partition function is verified at arbitrary genus. The evaluation of scattering amplitudes and the implications of genus-dependent estimates on the string coupling are given.

  12. Scatter factor induces blood vessel formation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D S; Kleinman, H K; Goldberg, I D; Bhargava, M M; Nickoloff, B J; Kinsella, J L; Polverini, P; Rosen, E M

    1993-01-01

    Scatter factor (also known as hepatocyte growth factor) is a glycoprotein secreted by stromal cells that stimulates cell motility and proliferation. In vitro, scatter factor stimulates vascular endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and organization into capillary-like tubes. Using two different in vivo assays, we showed that physiologic quantities of purified native mouse scatter factor and recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor induce angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). The angiogenic activity was blocked by specific anti-scatter factor antibodies. Scatter factor induced cultured microvascular endothelial cells to accumulate and secrete significantly increased quantities of urokinase, an enzyme associated with development of an invasive endothelial phenotype during angiogenesis. We further showed that immunoreactive scatter factor is present surrounding sites of blood vessel formation in psoriatic skin. These findings suggest that scatter factor may act as a paracrine mediator in pathologic angiogenesis associated with human inflammatory disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7680481

  13. Scattering characteristics of high-resolution meteor head echoes detected at multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, S.; Oppenheim, M.; Hunt, S.; Dyrud, L.

    2002-10-01

    Meteor data collected at the Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR) during the peak of the 1998 Leonid storm comprise the only simultaneous observations of meteor head echoes and trails using seven frequencies (very high frequency (VHF), ultrahigh frequency (UHF), L-, S-, C-, Ka-, and W-band spanning 160 MHz to 95 GHz). The primary sensor was the ARPA Long-Range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar (ALTAIR) radar operating at 160 MHz with 30 m range resolution and 422 MHz with 7.5 m range resolution, including both interferometric and polarization capabilities. This paper presents an analysis of this high-resolution data set with the following results: First, these observations support the theory that head echo scattering arises from an ionized region with a density sufficiently high that its plasma frequency exceeds the radar frequency (overdense reflection). Second, radar cross section (RCS) decreases rapidly with decreasing wavelength because higher frequencies must penetrate further into the increasing density of the plasma surrounding the meteoroid to reach its reflection point. Third, head echo angle measurements indicate that most of the observed meteors are sporadics not originating from the Leonid radiant. Fourth, polarization ratios showed that head echo reflections result from plasmas with a circular cross section. Fifth, the highest RCS values are detected near 105 km altitude, where the meteoroid gives up the most kinetic energy during its decent. This paper presents the first analyses of a three-frequency head echo as well as the polarization ratios and RCS characteristics from numerous two-frequency head echoes, which will allow us to develop a better understanding of meteor physics.

  14. Trust my face: cognitive factors of head fakes in sports.

    PubMed

    Kunde, Wilfried; Skirde, Stefanie; Weigelt, Matthias

    2011-06-01

    In many competitive sports, players try to deceive their opponents about their behavioral intentions by using specific body movements or postures called fakes. For example, fakes are performed in basketball when a player gazes in one direction but passes or shoots the ball in another direction to avert efficient defense actions. The present study aimed to identify the cognitive processes that underlie the effects of fakes. The paradigmatic situation studied was the head fake in basketball. Observers (basketball novices) had to decide as quickly as possible whether a basketball player would pass a ball to the left or to the right. The player's head and gaze were oriented in the direction of an intended pass or in the opposite direction (i.e., a head fake). Responding was delayed for incongruent compared to congruent directions of the player's gaze and the pass. This head fake effect was independent of response speed, the presence of a fake in the immediately preceding trial, and practice with the task. Five further experiments using additive-factors logic and locus-of-slack logic revealed a perceptual rather than motor-related origin of this effect: Turning the head in a direction opposite the pass direction appears to hamper the perceptual encoding of pass direction, although it does not induce a tendency to move in the direction of the head's orientation. The implications of these results for research on deception in sports and their relevance for sports practice are discussed.

  15. Scattering form factors for self-assembled network junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, T.; Safran, S. A.; Sottmann, T.; Strey, R.

    2007-11-01

    The equilibrium microstructures in microemulsions and other self-assembled systems show complex, connected shapes such as symmetric bicontinuous spongelike structures and asymmetric bicontinuous networks formed by cylinders interconnected at junctions. In microemulsions, these cylinder network microstructures may mediate the structural transition from a spherical or globular phase to the bicontinuous microstructure. To understand the structural and statistical properties of such cylinder network microstructures as measured by scattering experiments, models are needed to extract the real-space structure from the scattering data. In this paper, we calculate the scattering functions appropriate for cylinder network microstructures. We focus on such networks that contain a high density of network junctions that connect the cylindrical elements. In this limit, the network microstructure can be regarded as an assembly of randomly oriented, closed packed network junctions (i.e., the cylinder scattering contributions are neglected). Accordingly, the scattering spectrum of the network microstructure can be calculated as the product of the junction number density, the junction form factor, which describes the scattering from the surface of a single junction, and a structure factor, which describes the local correlations of different junctions due to junction interactions (including their excluded volume). This approach is applied to analyze the scattering data from a bicontinuous microemulsion with equal volumes of water and oil. In a second approach, we included the cylinder scattering contribution in the junction form factor by calculating the scattering intensity of Y junctions to which three rods with spherical cross section are attached. The respective theoretical predictions are compared with results of neutron scattering measurements on a water-in-oil microemulsion with a connected microstructure.

  16. Examining Protective Factors and Risk Factors in Urban and Rural Head Start Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Stacy L.; Fedor, Megan C.; Carlson, John S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined a comprehensive screening model within children attending Head Start programs from urban (n = 232) and rural (n = 231) communities. The Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (DECA; LeBuffe & Naglieri, 1999) was used to measure social-emotional protective factors (i.e., Total Protective Factors [TPF]) and risk factors (i.e.,…

  17. Scatter estimation and removal of anti-scatter grid-line artifacts from anthropomorphic head phantom images taken with a high resolution image detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, R.; Jain, A.; Shankar, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    In radiography, one of the best methods to eliminate image-degrading scatter radiation is the use of anti-scatter grids. However, with high-resolution dynamic imaging detectors, stationary anti-scatter grids can leave grid-line shadows and moiré patterns on the image, depending upon the line density of the grid and the sampling frequency of the x-ray detector. Such artifacts degrade the image quality and may mask small but important details such as small vessels and interventional device features. Appearance of these artifacts becomes increasingly severe as the detector spatial resolution is improved. We have previously demonstrated that, to remove these artifacts by dividing out a reference grid image, one must first subtract the residual scatter that penetrates the grid; however, for objects with anatomic structure, scatter varies throughout the FOV and a spatially differing amount of scatter must be subtracted. In this study, a standard stationary Smit-Rontgen X-ray grid (line density - 70 lines/cm, grid ratio - 13:1) was used with a high-resolution CMOS detector, the Dexela 1207 (pixel size - 75 micron) to image anthropomorphic head phantoms. For a 15 x 15cm FOV, scatter profiles of the anthropomorphic head phantoms were estimated then iteratively modified to minimize the structured noise due to the varying grid-line artifacts across the FOV. Images of the anthropomorphic head phantoms taken with the grid, before and after the corrections, were compared demonstrating almost total elimination of the artifact over the full FOV. Hence, with proper computational tools, antiscatter grid artifacts can be corrected, even during dynamic sequences.

  18. X-Ray Form Factor, Attenuation and Scattering Tables

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 66 X-Ray Form Factor, Attenuation and Scattering Tables (Web, free access)   This database collects tables and graphs of the form factors, the photoabsorption cross section, and the total attenuation coefficient for any element (Z <= 92).

  19. An EPID response calculation algorithm using spatial beam characteristics of primary, head scattered and MLC transmitted radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosca, Florin; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2008-06-15

    We have developed an independent algorithm for the prediction of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) response. The algorithm uses a set of images [open beam, closed multileaf collimator (MLC), various fence and modified sweeping gap patterns] to separately characterize the primary and head-scatter contributions to EPID response. It also characterizes the relevant dosimetric properties of the MLC: Transmission, dosimetric gap, MLC scatter [P. Zygmansky et al., J. Appl. Clin. Med. Phys. 8(4) (2007)], inter-leaf leakage, and tongue and groove [F. Lorenz et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 52, 5985-5999 (2007)]. The primary radiation is modeled with a single Gaussian distribution defined at the target position, while the head-scatter radiation is modeled with a triple Gaussian distribution defined downstream of the target. The distances between the target and the head-scatter source, jaws, and MLC are model parameters. The scatter associated with the EPID is implicit in the model. Open beam images are predicted to within 1% of the maximum value across the image. Other MLC test patterns and intensity-modulated radiation therapy fluences are predicted to within 1.5% of the maximum value. The presented method was applied to the Varian aS500 EPID but is designed to work with any planar detector with sufficient spatial resolution.

  20. On the factorization and fitting of molecular scattering information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldflam, R.; Kouri, D. J.; Green, S.

    1977-01-01

    The reported analysis is based on the factored IOS T-matrix. It is shown that line shape measurements may be used over a range of temperatures to evaluate inelastic scattering cross sections. Basic factorization or parameterization relations are derived by considering the wavefunction equations. The parameterization of cross sections is considered, taking into account the differential scattering amplitude and cross section, integral cross sections, phenomenological cross sections for general relaxation processes, and viscosity and diffusion cross sections. Thermal averages and rates are discussed, giving attention to integral cross sections and rates, and general phenomenological cross sections. The results of computational studies are also presented.

  1. Driver linac design for a femtosecond head-on inverse Compton scatteringX-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, N. Y.; Lau, W. K.; Liang, C. C.; Lee, A. P.; Cheng, W. C.; Yang, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    The feasibility of generating an ultra-short relativistic electron beam with a thermionic cathode rf gun driver linac for a femtosecond head-on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) X-ray source has been examined by space charge tracking throughout the entire beamline, from the cathode to the interaction point. It has been determined that GHz-repetition-rate electron pulses as short as 49 fs can be produced by compressing the energy-chirped beam from a 2998-MHz, 1.5-cell rf gun with an alpha magnet and an rf linac operating at the injection phase near the zero crossing. These electron pulses, with a 42-pC bunch charge, are accelerated to 27 MeV with an S-band traveling-wave constant-gradient linac structure for the ICS in an interaction chamber located downstream. The driver linac design that allows the operation of an ultra-short ICS X-ray source at a 0.7-Å wavelength, with a peak photon flux of 9.08×1017 photons/s, is presented in this paper.

  2. Analytical evaluation of atomic form factors: Application to Rayleigh scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, L.; Santos, J. P.; Amaro, P.; Jänkälä, K.; Fratini, F.

    2015-05-15

    Atomic form factors are widely used for the characterization of targets and specimens, from crystallography to biology. By using recent mathematical results, here we derive an analytical expression for the atomic form factor within the independent particle model constructed from nonrelativistic screened hydrogenic wave functions. The range of validity of this analytical expression is checked by comparing the analytically obtained form factors with the ones obtained within the Hartee-Fock method. As an example, we apply our analytical expression for the atomic form factor to evaluate the differential cross section for Rayleigh scattering off neutral atoms.

  3. An effective field theory for forward scattering and factorization violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothstein, Ira Z.; Stewart, Iain W.

    2016-08-01

    Starting with QCD, we derive an effective field theory description for forward scattering and factorization violation as part of the soft-collinear effective field theory (SCET) for high energy scattering. These phenomena are mediated by long distance Glauber gluon exchanges, which are static in time, localized in the longitudinal distance, and act as a kernel for forward scattering where | t| ≪ s. In hard scattering, Glauber gluons can induce corrections which invalidate factorization. With SCET, Glauber exchange graphs can be calculated explicitly, and are distinct from graphs involving soft, collinear, or ultrasoft gluons. We derive a complete basis of operators which describe the leading power effects of Glauber exchange. Key ingredients include regulating light-cone rapidity singularities and subtractions which prevent double counting. Our results include a novel all orders gauge invariant pure glue soft operator which appears between two collinear rapidity sectors. The 1-gluon Feynman rule for the soft operator coincides with the Lipatov vertex, but it also contributes to emissions with ≥ 2 soft gluons. Our Glauber operator basis is derived using tree level and one-loop matching calculations from full QCD to both SCETII and SCETI. The one-loop amplitude's rapidity renormalization involves mixing of color octet operators and yields gluon Reggeization at the amplitude level. The rapidity renormalization group equation for the leading soft and collinear functions in the forward scattering cross section are each given by the BFKL equation. Various properties of Glauber gluon exchange in the context of both forward scattering and hard scattering factorization are described. For example, we derive an explicit rule for when eikonalization is valid, and provide a direct connection to the picture of multiple Wilson lines crossing a shockwave. In hard scattering operators Glauber subtractions for soft and collinear loop diagrams ensure that we are not sensitive to

  4. Wide Angle Compton Scattering within the SCET factorization Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivel, Nikolay

    2016-03-01

    Existing data for the electromagnetic proton form factors and for the cross section of the wide angle Compton scattering (WACS) show that the hard two-gluon exchange mechanism (collinear factorization) is still not applicable in the kinematical region where Mandelstam variables s ~ -t ~ -u are about few GeV2. On the other hand these observables can be described in phenomenological models where spectator quarks are soft which assumes a large contribution due to the soft-overlap mechanism. It turns out that the simple QCD factorization picture is not complete and must also include the soft-overlap contribution which can be described as a certain matrix element in the soft collinear effective theory (SCET). Then the leading power contribution to WACS amplitude is described as a sum of the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. The existing experimental data allows one to check certain conclusions based on the assumption about dominant role of the soft-spectator mechanism.

  5. SU-E-T-08: A Convolution Model for Head Scatter Fluence in the Intensity Modulated Field

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M; Mo, X; Chen, Y; Parnell, D; Key, S; Olivera, G; Galmarini, W; Lu, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To efficiently calculate the head scatter fluence for an arbitrary intensity-modulated field with any source distribution using the source occlusion model. Method: The source occlusion model with focal and extra focal radiation (Jaffray et al, 1993) can be used to account for LINAC head scatter. In the model, the fluence map of any field shape at any point can be calculated via integration of the source distribution within the visible range, as confined by each segment, using the detector eye's view. A 2D integration would be required for each segment and each fluence plane point, which is time-consuming, as an intensity-modulated field contains typically tens to hundreds of segments. In this work, we prove that the superposition of the segmental integrations is equivalent to a simple convolution regardless of what the source distribution is. In fact, for each point, the detector eye's view of the field shape can be represented as a function with the origin defined at the point's pinhole reflection through the center of the collimator plane. We were thus able to reduce hundreds of source plane integration to one convolution. We calculated the fluence map for various 3D and IMRT beams and various extra-focal source distributions using both the segmental integration approach and the convolution approach and compared the computation time and fluence map results of both approaches. Results: The fluence maps calculated using the convolution approach were the same as those calculated using the segmental approach, except for rounding errors (<0.1%). While it took considerably longer time to calculate all segmental integrations, the fluence map calculation using the convolution approach took only ∼1/3 of the time for typical IMRT fields with ∼100 segments. Conclusions: The convolution approach for head scatter fluence calculation is fast and accurate and can be used to enhance the online process.

  6. SU-E-I-55: The Contribution to Skin Dose Due to Scatter From the Patient Table and the Head Holder During Fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, N; Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine contributions to skin dose due to scatter from the table and head holder used during fluoroscopy, and also to explore alternative design material to reduce the scatter dose. Methods: Measurements were made of the primary and scatter components of the xray beam exiting the patient table and a cylindrical head holder used on a Toshiba Infinix c-arm unit as a function of kVp for the various beam filters on the machine and for various field sizes. The primary component of the beam was measured in air with the object placed close to the x-ray tube with an air gap between it and a 6 cc parallel-plate ionization chamber and with the beam collimated to a size just larger than the chamber. The primary plus scatter radiation components were measured with the object moved to a position in the beam next to the chamber for larger field sizes. Both sets of measurements were preformed while keeping the source-to-chamber distance fixed. The scatter fraction was estimated by taking the ratio of the difference between the two measurements and the reading that included both primary and scatter. Similar measurements were also made for a 2.3 cm thick Styrofoam block which could substitute for the patient support. Results: The measured scatter fractions indicate that the patient table as well as the head holder contributes an additional 10–16% to the patient entrance dose depending on field size. Forward scatter was reduced with the Styrofoam block so that the scatter fraction was about 4–5%. Conclusion: The results of this investigation demonstrated that scatter from the table and head holder used in clinical fluoroscopy contribute substantially to the skin dose. The lower contribution of scatter from Styrofoam suggests that there is an opportunity to redesign patient support accessories to reduce the skin dose. Partial support from NIH grant R01EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation Equipment Grant.

  7. Characterisation of hydraulic head changes and aquifer properties in the London Basin using Persistent Scatterer Interferometry ground motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonì, R.; Cigna, F.; Bricker, S.; Meisina, C.; McCormack, H.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, Persistent Scatterer Interferometry was applied to ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT satellite data covering 1992-2000 and 2002-2010 respectively, to analyse the relationship between ground motion and hydraulic head changes in the London Basin, United Kingdom. The integration of observed groundwater levels provided by the Environment Agency and satellite-derived displacement time series allowed the estimation of the spatio-temporal variations of the Chalk aquifer storage coefficient and compressibility over an area of ∼1360 km2. The average storage coefficient of the aquifer reaches values of 1 × 10-3 and the estimated average aquifer compressibility is 7.7 × 10-10 Pa-1 and 1.2 × 10-9 Pa-1 for the periods 1992-2000 and 2002-2010, respectively. Derived storage coefficient values appear to be correlated with the hydrogeological setting, where confined by the London Clay the storage coefficient is typically an order of magnitude lower than where the chalk is overlain by the Lambeth Group. PSI-derived storage coefficient estimates agree with the values obtained from pumping tests in the same area. A simplified one-dimensional model is applied to simulate the ground motion response to hydraulic heads changes at nine piezometers. The comparison between simulated and satellite-observed ground motion changes reveals good agreement, with errors ranging between 1.4 and 6.9 mm, and being 3.2 mm on average.

  8. Altered sensory-motor control of the head as an etiological factor in space-motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical unloading during head movements in weightlessness may be an etiological factor in space-motion sickness. We simulated altered head loading on Earth without affecting vestibular stimulation by having subjects wear a weighted helmet. Eight subjects were exposed to constant velocity rotation about a vertical axis with direction reversals every 60 sec. for eight reversals with the head loaded and eight with the head unloaded. The severity of motion sickness elicited was significantly higher when the head was loaded. This suggests that altered sensory-motor control of the head is also an etiological factor in space-motion sickness.

  9. Noninvasive determination of absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads by time-resolved reflectance measurements for functional near infra-red spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tanifuji, T; Wang, L

    2014-01-01

    Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients (μ(a) and μ'(s)) of adult heads have been noninvasively determined by time-resolved reflectance measurements. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis was used to calculate time-resolved reflectance from realistic adult head models with brain grooves containing a non-scattering layer. In vivo time-resolved reflectances of human heads were measured by a system composed of a time-correlated single photon counter and a diode laser. By minimizing the objective functions that compare theoretical and experimental time resolved reflectances, μ(a) and μ'(s) of brain were determined. It became clear that time-resolved measurements have enough sensitivity to determine both μ(a) and μ'(s) for superficial tissues, gray matter and white matter, except μ(s) for white matter.

  10. Analysis of risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Jun-Ying; Zha, Guo-Chun; Jiang, Tao; You, Zhen-Jun; Yuan, De-Jing

    2014-12-01

    Femoral head necrosis is a rare but devastating complication following femoral neck fracture. The reported incidence of avascular necrosis after femoral neck fracture fixation varies widely, and there is no consensus regarding its risk factors. The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors for femoral head necrosis after internal fixation in femoral neck fracture. This retrospective study included 166 patients with femoral neck fractures treated with surgical reduction and internal fixation at the authors' institution from January 2004 to December 2008. Eight patients died for reasons unrelated to the surgery, and 12 patients were lost to follow-up. The remaining 146 patients (146 fractures) were followed until union or until conversion to total hip arthroplasty. The patients included 61 males and 85 females with an average age of 47.5 years (range, 18-68 years). The authors analyzed the following factors: age, sex, Garden classification, reduction quality, surgical methods, injury-to-surgery interval, preoperative traction, weight-bearing time, and implant removal. All patients were followed for a mean of 52 months (range, 6-90 months). The incidence of femoral head necrosis was 14.4% (21/146). Garden classification (P=.012), reduction quality (P=.008), implant removal (P=.020), and preoperative traction (P=.003) were significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. Patient age (P=.990), sex (P=.287), injury-to-surgery interval (P=.360), weight-bearing time (P=.868), and surgical methods (P=.987) were not significantly associated with femoral head necrosis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, implant removal was not a significant risk factor for femoral head necrosis development (P=.498). Garden classification, reduction quality, and preoperative traction had a significant effect on femoral head necrosis development. PMID:25437087

  11. A dynamic factor modeling framework for analyzing multiple groundwater head series simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendrecht, W. L.; van Geer, F. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present an approach in which we combine a dynamic factor model (DFM) and predefined response functions to analyze a set of groundwater head series simultaneously. Each groundwater head series is decomposed into: (a) one or more deterministic components as a response to known driving forces, (b) one or more common dynamic factors, representing spatial patterns not related to any of the input series and (c) one specific dynamic factor for each groundwater head series, describing unique variation for that series. The approach reduces the degrees of freedom for each response function, enables the application to irregular observed data, and exploits the correlation between residual series of a set of groundwater head series. The common dynamic factors may be interpreted as spatial patterns due to e.g. limitations in the model specification or concept, spatially correlated errors in input variables, or driving forces which have not been included in the model. In the latter case the model can be applied in the context of an alarming system, e.g. to monitor regional trends. The specific dynamic factor depicts the variation of a particular groundwater head series that cannot be related to any other time series of the set nor to any input series. Therefore the specific dynamic factor is suitable for analyzing local variations and detecting incidental measurement errors, for example in a quality control procedure. The DFM framework is illustrated with a set of 8 groundwater head series and applied for filling gaps in time series, reconstructing high-frequency data, and detecting outliers.

  12. Robustness of the fractal regime for the multiple-scattering structure factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, Nisha; Botet, Robert; Puri, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    In the single-scattering theory of electromagnetic radiation, the fractal regime is a definite range in the photon momentum-transfer q, which is characterized by the scaling-law behavior of the structure factor: S(q) ∝ 1 /q df. This allows a straightforward estimation of the fractal dimension df of aggregates in Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments. However, this behavior is not commonly studied in optical scattering experiments because of the lack of information on its domain of validity. In the present work, we propose a definition of the multiple-scattering structure factor, which naturally generalizes the single-scattering function S(q). We show that the mean-field theory of electromagnetic scattering provides an explicit condition to interpret the significance of multiple scattering. In this paper, we investigate and discuss electromagnetic scattering by three classes of fractal aggregates. The results obtained from the TMatrix method show that the fractal scaling range is divided into two domains: (1) a genuine fractal regime, which is robust; (2) a possible anomalous scaling regime, S(q) ∝ 1 /qδ, with exponent δ independent of df, and related to the way the scattering mechanism uses the local morphology of the scatterer. The recognition, and an analysis, of the latter domain is of importance because it may result in significant reduction of the fractal regime, and brings into question the proper mechanism in the build-up of multiple-scattering.

  13. Comparing the quality of passively-scattered proton and photon tomotherapy plans for brain and head and neck disease sites.

    PubMed

    Kainz, Kristofer; Firat, Selim; Wilson, J Frank; Schultz, Christopher; Siker, Malika; Wang, Andrew; Olson, Dan; Li, X Allen

    2015-03-21

    We compare the quality of photon IMRT (helical tomotherapy) with classic proton plans for brain, head and neck tumors, in terms of target dose uniformity and conformity along with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. Plans were created for twelve target volumes among eight cases. All patients were originally planned and treated using helical tomotherapy. Proton plans were generated using a passively-scattered beam model with a maximum range of 32 g cm(-2) (225 MeV), range modulation in 0.5 g cm(-2) increments and range compensators with 4.8 mm milling tool diameters. All proton plans were limited to two to four beams. Plan quality was compared using uniformity index (UI), conformation number (CN) and a EUD-based plan quality index (fEUD). For 11 of the 12 targets, UI was improved for the proton plan; on average, UI was 1.05 for protons versus 1.08 for tomotherapy. For 7 of the 12 targets, the tomotherapy plan exhibited more favorable CN. For proximal OARs, the improved dose conformity to the target volume from tomotherapy led to a lower maximum dose. For distal OARs, the maximum dose was much lower for proton plans. For 6 of the 8 cases, near-total avoidance for distal OARs provided by protons leads to improved fEUD. However, if distal OARs are excluded in the fEUD calculation, the proton plans exhibit better fEUD in only 3 of the 8 cases. The distal OAR sparing and target dose uniformity are generally better with passive-scatter proton planning than with photon tomotherapy; proton therapy may be preferred if the clinician deems those attributes critical. However, tomotherapy may serve equally as well as protons for cases where superior target dose conformity from tomotherapy leads to plan quality nearly identical to or better than protons and for cases where distal OAR sparing is not concerning.

  14. Purification of scatter factor, a fibroblast-derived basic protein that modulates epithelial interactions and movement.

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, E; Gray, J; Stoker, M; Perryman, M; Furlong, R

    1989-01-01

    Scatter factor is a fibroblast-derived protein that causes separation of contiguous epithelial cells and increased local mobility of unanchored cells. Highly purified scatter factor has been obtained by a combination of ion-exchange and reverse-phase chromatography from serum-free medium conditioned by a ras-transformed clone (D4) of mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Under nonreducing conditions scatter factor has a pI of approximately 9.5 and migrates in SDS/polyacrylamide gels as a single band at approximately 62 kDa from which epithelial scatter activity can be recovered. Treatment with reducing agents destroys biological activity and is associated with the appearance of two major bands at approximately 57 and approximately 30 kDa. Whether both the 57-kDa and 30-kDa polypeptides are required for biological activity remains to be established. All the activities observed in crude medium conditioned by cells producing scatter factor are retained by highly purified preparations of scatter factor. These include (i) increased local movement, modulation of morphology, and inhibition of junction formation by single epithelial cells and (ii) disruption of epithelial interactions and cell scattering from preformed epithelial sheets. These changes occur with picomolar concentrations of purified scatter factor and without an effect on cell growth. Images PMID:2527367

  15. Human papilloma virus: a new risk factor in a subset of head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Manisha; Bist, Sampan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. Tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption are two well known behavioral risk factors associated with head and neck cancer. Recently, evidence is mounting that infection with human papilloma virus, most commonly human papilloma virus-16 is responsible for a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma especially tumors of tonsillar origin. The molecular pathway used by human papilloma virus to trigger malignant transformation of tissue is different from that of other well known risk factors, i.e. smoking and alcohol, associated with squamous cell carcinoma. Apparently, these subsets of patients with human papilloma virus positive tumor are more likely to have a better prognosis than human papilloma virus negative tumor. Considering this fact, the human papilloma virus infection should be determined in all oropharyngeal cancers since it can have a major impact on the decision making process of the treatment.

  16. Factors affecting the aluminium content of human femoral head and neck.

    PubMed

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Rogala, Piotr; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    Tissues for the study were obtained intraoperatively during hip replacement procedures from 96 patients. In all the cases, the indication for this treatment was primary or secondary degenerative changes in the hip joint. The subject of the study was the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Aluminium concentrations measured in femoral head and neck samples from patients aged between 25 and 91 were varied. Statistical methods were applied to determine the variations in relation to the parameters from the background survey. Significant differences in the aluminium content of femoral head samples were observed between patients under and over 60 years of age. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the aluminium accumulates in bones over a lifetime. The study showed that the content of aluminium in the head and neck of the femur depends on the factors such as: type of medicines taken, contact with chemicals at work, differences in body anatomy and sex. The study on the levels of aluminium in bones and the factors affecting its concentration is a valuable source of information for further research on the role of aluminium in bone diseases. Based on the investigations, it was found that the GF-AAS technique is the best analytical tool for routine analysis of aluminium in complex matrix samples. The use of femoral heads in the investigations was approved by the Bioethics Committee of the University of Medical Sciences in Poznań (Poland).

  17. Factor structure of the California Verbal Learning Test in moderate and severe closed-head injury.

    PubMed

    Millis, S R

    1995-02-01

    A factor analysis with principal components extraction and varimax rotation was performed on 19 California Verbal Learning Test age-uncorrected scores from a sample of 75 moderate and severe closed-head-injured patients. A 6-factor solution was obtained that accounted for 80% of the total variance and was similar to those reported previously. The factors were labeled General Verbal Learning, Response Discrimination, Learning Strategy, Proactive Effect, Self-monitoring, and Serial Position. Factor scores were derived and correlated with other neuropsychological measures. The General Verbal Learning factor scores were significantly correlated with those on measures of memory, complex attention, and strategy induction.

  18. Family Risks and Protective Factors: Pathways to Early Head Start Toddlers' Social-Emotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick Whittaker, Jessica E.; Harden, Brenda Jones; See, Heather M.; Meisch, Allison D.; Westbrook, T'Pring R.

    2011-01-01

    Early Head Start children may be more likely to exhibit difficulties with social-emotional functioning due to the high-risk environments in which they live. However, positive parenting may serve as a protective factor against the influence of risk on children's outcomes. The current study examines the effects of contextual and proximal risks on…

  19. A STUDY OF SOME ECOLOGICAL, ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL FACTORS INFLUENCING PARENTAL PARTICIPATION IN PROJECT HEAD START.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, HENRY S.; PALOMARES, UVALDO H.

    THE MAJOR PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO DETERMINE IF THERE WERE SIGNIFICANTLY DIFFERENT RESPONSES TO CERTAIN ECOLOGICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY FACTORS BETWEEN PARENTS WHOSE CHILDREN PARTICIPATED IN THE HEAD START PROJECT AND THOSE WHOSE CHILDREN WERE ELIGIBLE BUT DID NOT PARTICIPATE. ALL PARENTS OF PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN, 2 1/2 TO…

  20. Assessment of Factors Resulting in Abuse Evaluations in Young Children with Minor Head Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderst, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The primary objective was to determine which of the examined factors prompted physicians to initiate a further abuse evaluation in young children with minor head injury. The recording of important historical elements in the charts of these patients was also evaluated. Methods: Charts of 349 children less than 3 years of age with minor…

  1. Surgical site infection in clean-contaminated head and neck cancer surgery: risk factors and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Hanai, Nobuhiro; Ozawa, Taijiro; Hyodo, Ikuo; Suzuki, Mikio

    2013-03-01

    Since new treatment strategies, such as chemoradiotherapy, have been introduced for head and neck cancer, a higher number of unknown factors may be involved in surgical site infection in clean-contaminated head and neck cancer surgery. The aim of the present study was to clarify the risk factors of surgical site infection in clean-contaminated surgery for head and neck cancer and the prognosis of patients with surgical site infection. Participants were 277 consecutive patients with head and neck cancer who underwent clean-contaminated surgery for primary lesions at the Aichi Cancer Center over a 60-month period. A total of 22 putative risk factors were recorded in each patient and statistically analyzed to elucidate surgical site infection related factors. Surgical site infection was observed in 92 (32.1 %) of 277 cases. Univariate analysis indicated that alcohol consumption, T classification, neck dissection, reconstructive procedure, and chemoradiotherapy were significantly associated with surgical site infection. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two independent risk factors for surgical site infection: reconstructive surgery (p = 0.04; odds ratio (OR) 1.77) and chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.01; OR 1.93). In spite of surgical site infection, the five-year overall survival rate of patients with surgical site infection was not significantly different from those without surgical site infection. Although surgical site infection did not impact the overall survival of patients with surgical procedures, head and neck surgeons should pay attention to patients with previous chemoradiotherapy as well as to those with a high risk of surgical site infection requiring reconstructive surgery. PMID:22865106

  2. Experimental Determination of Dual-Wavelength Mie Lidar Geometric form Factor Combining Side-Scatter and Back-Scatter Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenzhu; Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2016-06-01

    In theory, lidar overlap factor can be derived from the difference between the particle backscatter coefficient retrieved from lidar elastic signal without overlap correction and the actual particle backscatter coefficient, which can be obtained by other measured techniques. The side-scatter signal using a CCD camera is testified to be a powerful tool to detect the particle backscatter coefficient in near ground layer during night time. In experiment, by combining side-scatter and backscatter signals the geometric form factor for vertically-pointing Mie lidar in 532 nm channel is determined successfully, which is corrected by an iteration algorithm combining the retrieved particle backscatter coefficient using CCD sidescatter method and Fernald method. In this study, the method will be expanded to 1064 nm channel in dual-wavelength Mie lidar during routine campaigns. The experimental results in different atmosphere conditions demonstrated that the method present in this study is available in practice.

  3. Scattering from phase-separated vesicles. I. An analytical form factor for multiple static domains

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Anghel, Vinicius N. P.; Katsaras, John

    2015-08-18

    This is the first in a series of studies considering elastic scattering from laterally heterogeneous lipid vesicles containing multiple domains. Unique among biophysical tools, small-angle neutron scattering can in principle give detailed information about the size, shape and spatial arrangement of domains. A general theory for scattering from laterally heterogeneous vesicles is presented, and the analytical form factor for static domains with arbitrary spatial configuration is derived, including a simplification for uniformly sized round domains. The validity of the model, including series truncation effects, is assessed by comparison with simulated data obtained from a Monte Carlo method. Several aspects of the analytical solution for scattering intensity are discussed in the context of small-angle neutron scattering data, including the effect of varying domain size and number, as well as solvent contrast. Finally, the analysis indicates that effects of domain formation are most pronounced when the vesicle's average scattering length density matches that of the surrounding solvent.

  4. Scattering coefficients and gray-body factor for 1D BEC acoustic black holes: Exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbri, Alessandro; Balbinot, Roberto; Anderson, Paul R.

    2016-03-01

    A complete set of exact analytic solutions to the mode equation is found in the region exterior to the acoustic horizon for a class of 1D Bose-Einstein condensate acoustic black holes. From these, analytic expressions for the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor are obtained. The results are used to verify previous predictions regarding the behaviors of the scattering coefficients and gray-body factor in the low-frequency limit.

  5. Involvement of an SHP-2-Rho small G protein pathway in hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor-induced cell scattering.

    PubMed

    Kodama, A; Matozaki, T; Fukuhara, A; Kikyo, M; Ichihashi, M; Takai, Y

    2000-08-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) induces cell scattering through the tyrosine kinase-type HGF/SF receptor c-Met. We have previously shown that Rho small G protein (Rho) is involved in the HGF/SF-induced scattering of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells by regulating at least the assembly and disassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions, but it remains unknown how c-Met regulates Rho activity. We have found here a novel signaling pathway of c-Met consisting of SHP-2-Rho that regulates the assembly and disassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions in MDCK cells. SHP-2 is a protein-tyrosine phosphatase that contains src homology-2 domains. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of SHP-2 (SHP-2-C/S) markedly increased the formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions in MDCK cells and inhibited their scattering. C3, a Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase, and Y-27632, a specific inhibitor for ROCK, reversed the stimulatory effect of SHP-2-C/S on stress fiber formation and the inhibitory effect on cell scattering. Vav2 is a GDP/GTP exchange protein for Rho. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of Vav2 blocked the stimulatory effect of SHP-2-C/S on stress fiber formation. Conversely, expression of mutants of Vav2 that increased stress fiber formation inhibited HGF/SF-induced cell scattering. These results indicate that SHP-2 physiologically modulates the activity of Rho to form stress fibers and focal adhesions and thereby regulates HGF/SF-induced cell scattering. In addition, Vav2 may be involved in the SHP-2-Rho pathway.

  6. Influence of length and conformation of saccharide head groups on the mechanics of glycolipid membranes: Unraveled by off-specular neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akihisa; Abuillan, Wasim; Burk, Alexandra S; Körner, Alexander; Ries, Annika; Werz, Daniel B; Demé, Bruno; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-04-21

    The mechanical properties of multilayer stacks of Gb3 glycolipid that play key roles in metabolic disorders (Fabry disease) were determined quantitatively by using specular and off-specular neutron scattering. Because of the geometry of membrane stacks deposited on planar substrates, the scattered intensity profile was analyzed in a 2D reciprocal space map as a function of in-plane and out-of-plane scattering vector components. The two principal mechanical parameters of the membranes, namely, bending rigidity and compression modulus, can be quantified by full calculation of scattering functions with the aid of an effective cut-off radius that takes the finite sample size into consideration. The bulkier "bent" Gb3 trisaccharide group makes the membrane mechanics distinctly different from cylindrical disaccharide (lactose) head groups and shorter "bent" disaccharide (gentiobiose) head groups. The mechanical characterization of membranes enriched with complex glycolipids has high importance in understanding the mechanisms of diseases such as sphingolipidoses caused by the accumulation of non-degenerated glycosphingolipids in lysosomes or inhibition of protein synthesis triggered by the specific binding of Shiga toxin to Gb3. PMID:25903910

  7. Influence of length and conformation of saccharide head groups on the mechanics of glycolipid membranes: Unraveled by off-specular neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akihisa; Abuillan, Wasim; Burk, Alexandra S.; Körner, Alexander; Ries, Annika; Werz, Daniel B.; Demé, Bruno; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical properties of multilayer stacks of Gb3 glycolipid that play key roles in metabolic disorders (Fabry disease) were determined quantitatively by using specular and off-specular neutron scattering. Because of the geometry of membrane stacks deposited on planar substrates, the scattered intensity profile was analyzed in a 2D reciprocal space map as a function of in-plane and out-of-plane scattering vector components. The two principal mechanical parameters of the membranes, namely, bending rigidity and compression modulus, can be quantified by full calculation of scattering functions with the aid of an effective cut-off radius that takes the finite sample size into consideration. The bulkier "bent" Gb3 trisaccharide group makes the membrane mechanics distinctly different from cylindrical disaccharide (lactose) head groups and shorter "bent" disaccharide (gentiobiose) head groups. The mechanical characterization of membranes enriched with complex glycolipids has high importance in understanding the mechanisms of diseases such as sphingolipidoses caused by the accumulation of non-degenerated glycosphingolipids in lysosomes or inhibition of protein synthesis triggered by the specific binding of Shiga toxin to Gb3.

  8. Influence of length and conformation of saccharide head groups on the mechanics of glycolipid membranes: Unraveled by off-specular neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Akihisa E-mail: tanaka@uni-heidelberg.de; Tanaka, Motomu E-mail: tanaka@uni-heidelberg.de; Abuillan, Wasim; Körner, Alexander; Burk, Alexandra S.; Ries, Annika; Werz, Daniel B.; Demé, Bruno

    2015-04-21

    The mechanical properties of multilayer stacks of Gb3 glycolipid that play key roles in metabolic disorders (Fabry disease) were determined quantitatively by using specular and off-specular neutron scattering. Because of the geometry of membrane stacks deposited on planar substrates, the scattered intensity profile was analyzed in a 2D reciprocal space map as a function of in-plane and out-of-plane scattering vector components. The two principal mechanical parameters of the membranes, namely, bending rigidity and compression modulus, can be quantified by full calculation of scattering functions with the aid of an effective cut-off radius that takes the finite sample size into consideration. The bulkier “bent” Gb3 trisaccharide group makes the membrane mechanics distinctly different from cylindrical disaccharide (lactose) head groups and shorter “bent” disaccharide (gentiobiose) head groups. The mechanical characterization of membranes enriched with complex glycolipids has high importance in understanding the mechanisms of diseases such as sphingolipidoses caused by the accumulation of non-degenerated glycosphingolipids in lysosomes or inhibition of protein synthesis triggered by the specific binding of Shiga toxin to Gb3.

  9. Macrophage response in patients diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the femoral head presenting different risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Diana; Trăistaru, Rodica; Kamal, Constantin Kamal; Alexandru, Dragoş Ovidiu; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Grecu, Dan Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic necrosis of the femoral head is a condition caused by partial or total interruption of blood supply to the femoral head. The diminished blood supply causes necrosis of the cellular elements and of the bone marrow, followed by the collapse of the bone structure, events that ultimately lead to the destruction of the bone tissue, the appearance of local pain and loss of function in the affected coxofemoral joint. The importance of this condition is that it mainly affects young adults aged 30-50 years, active from a socio-professional standpoint, and increased life expectancy. The material studied to achieve CD68 immunostaining was represented by bone fragments from the area of necrosis and from the adjacent areas of the femoral heads, harvested from 39 patients when performing hip arthroplasty surgery. The patients were diagnosed with aseptic necrosis of the femoral head and hospitalized in the Clinic of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency County Hospital of Craiova, Romania, from June 2014 to January 2015. The 39 patients included in the study were divided into four categories according to presented risk factors (alcohol, alcohol and smoking, trauma, corticosteroids). All the 39 cases had positive immunostaining for CD68, macrophage being highlighted both in the area of necrosis and in the adjacent areas. We noted significant differences in the number and arrangement of macrophages in patients presenting different risk factors. The highest number of macrophages was present in patients presenting a risk factor corticosteroids, and the lowest number of macrophages was found in patients who had trauma as the main risk factor.

  10. Hepatocyte Growth Factor/Scatter Factor and MET Are Involved in Arterial Repair and Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Heather; Gherardi, Ermanno; Reidy, Michael; Bowyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Several studies have shown that in the arterial wall hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) is expressed by smooth muscle cells (SMCs) but acts on endothelial cells, not SMCs. Other studies, however, have indicated that SMCs can respond to HGF/SF. We have reinvestigated expression and activity of HGF/SF and its receptor MET in arterial SMC and endothelial cell cultures and in whole arteries after superficial or deep injury or atherogenesis. High-density cultures of SMCs produced HGF/SF but did not express MET, whereas SMCs, at the leading edge of injured cultures, expressed both ligand and receptor and showed a dramatic motility and growth response to HGF/SF. In line with these results, HGF/SF and MET expression was undetectable in the media of uninjured carotid arteries but was induced after deep arterial injury in areas of SMC migration in the neointima. Strong MET expression was also observed in the SMCs of the atherosclerotic lesions of homozygous apoE−/− mice, whereas HGF/SF was expressed by macrophage-derived foam cells. These results demonstrate that MET is induced in migrating and proliferating SMCs and that HGF/SF and MET are key mediators of the SMC response in atherogenesis. PMID:16400035

  11. The Proton Coulomb Form Factor from Polarized Inclusive e-p Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Harris

    2001-08-01

    The proton form factors provide information on the fundamental properties of the proton and provide a test for models based on QCD. In 1998 at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) in Newport News, VA, experiment E93026 measured the inclusive e-p scattering cross section from a polarized ammonia (15NH3) target at a four momentum transfer squared of Q2 = 0.5 (GeV/c)2. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from the polarized target and the scattered electron was detected. Data has been analyzed to obtain the asymmetry from elastically scattered electrons from hydrogen in 15NH3. The asymmetry, Ap, has been used to determine the proton elastic form factor GEp. The result is consistent with the dipole model and data from previous experiments. However, due to the choice of kinematics, the uncertainty in the measurement is large.

  12. Finding electromagnetic and chemical enhancement factors of surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Dvoynenko, Mykhaylo M; Wang, Juen-Kai

    2007-12-15

    The authors report two methods to determine electromagnetic and chemical enhancement factors in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which are based on saturation property and decay dynamics of photoluminescence and concurrent measurements of photoluminescence and resonance Raman scattering intensities. Considerations for experimental implementation are discussed. This study is expected to facilitate the understanding of SERS mechanisms and the advancement of the usage of SERS in chemical and biological sensor applications.

  13. Measurement of the neutron electric form factor GEn in quasielastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Donal Day

    2003-07-15

    We have measured the electric form factor of the neutron, GEn, at two momentum transfers (Q2= 0.5 and Q2= 1.0 GeV/c2) through quasielastic scattering in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Longitudinally polarized electrons scattered from polarized deuterated ammonia and GEn was extracted from the beam-target asymmetry AVed which, in quasielastic kinematics, is particularly sensitive to GEn and insensitive to MEC and FSI.

  14. The Role of Prothrombotic Factors in the Ocular Manifestations of Abusive and Non-Abusive Head Trauma: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Anna; Stephens, Derek; Feldman, Brian M.; Parkin, Patricia C.; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Brandao, Leonardo R.; Shouldice, Michelle; Levin, Alex V.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Retinal hemorrhage is a cardinal manifestation of abusive head injury. Thrombophilia is relatively common in the general population and in adults can be associated with retinal hemorrhage. The specificity of retinal hemorrhage for abusive head trauma in the presence of prothrombotic factors, in particular following non-abusive head…

  15. Comparison of risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Manoogian, Sarah J

    2012-03-01

    Previous epidemiological studies of rollover crashes have focused primarily on serious and fatal injuries in general, while rollover crash testing has focused almost exclusively on cervical spine injury. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in real world rollover crashes. Rollover crashes from 1995-2008 in the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) were investigated. A large data set of 6015 raw cases (2.5 million weighted) was generated. Nonparametric univariate analyses, univariate logistic regression, and multivariate logistic regression were conducted. Complete or partial ejection, a lack of seatbelt use, a greater number of roof inversions, and older occupant age significantly increased the risk of all types of injuries studied (p<0.05). Far side seating position increased the risk of fatal, head, and cervical spine injury (p<0.05), but not serious injury in general. Higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of fatal, serious, and cervical spine injury (p<0.05), but not head injury. Greater roof crush was associated with a higher rate of fatal and cervical spine injury (p<0.05). Vehicle type, occupant height, and occupant gender had inconsistent and generally non-significant effects on injury. This study demonstrates both common and unique risk factors for different types of injuries in rollover crashes. PMID:22269486

  16. Factors Associated With External and Internal Lymphedema in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jie; Ridner, Sheila H.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Wells, Nancy; Wallston, Kenneth A.; Sinard, Robert J.; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Murphy, Barbara A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the presence of secondary external and internal lymphedema in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: The sample included 81 patients {>=}3 months after HNC treatment. Physical and endoscopic examinations were conducted to determine if participants had external, internal, and/or combined head-and-neck lymphedema. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with the presence of lymphedema. Results: The following factors were statistically significantly associated with presence of lymphedema: (1) location of tumor associated with presence of external (P=.009) and combined lymphedema (P=.032); (2) time since end of HNC treatment associated with presence of external (P=.004) and combined lymphedema (P=.005); (3) total dosage of radiation therapy (P=.010) and days of radiation (P=.017) associated with the presence of combined lymphedema; (4) radiation status of surgical bed was associated with the presence of internal lymphedema, including surgery with postoperative radiation (P=.030) and (salvage) surgery in the irradiated field (P=.008); and (5) number of treatment modalities associated with external (P=.002), internal (P=.039), and combined lymphedema (P=.004). No demographic, health behavior-related, or comorbidity factors were associated with the presence of lymphedema in the sample. Conclusions: Select tumor and treatment parameters are associated with increased occurrence of lymphedema in patients with HNC. Larger and longitudinal studies are needed to identify adjusted effects and causative risk factors contributing to the development of lymphedema in patients with HNC.

  17. In-vivo Optical Tomography of Small Scattering Specimens: time-lapse 3D imaging of the head eversion process in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Dong, Di; Zhu, Shouping; Savakis, Charalambos; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Even though in vivo imaging approaches have witnessed several new and important developments, specimens that exhibit high light scattering properties such as Drosophila melanogaster pupae are still not easily accessible with current optical imaging techniques, obtaining images only from subsurface features. This means that in order to obtain 3D volumetric information these specimens need to be studied either after fixation and a chemical clearing process, through an imaging window - thus perturbing physiological development -, or during early stages of development when the scattering contribution is negligible. In this paper we showcase how Optical Projection Tomography may be used to obtain volumetric images of the head eversion process in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster pupae, both in control and headless mutant specimens. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of Helical Optical Projection Tomography (hOPT) as a tool for high throughput 4D-imaging of several specimens simultaneously. PMID:25471694

  18. In-vivo optical tomography of small scattering specimens: time-lapse 3D imaging of the head eversion process in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Alicia; Dong, Di; Zhu, Shouping; Savakis, Charalambos; Tian, Jie; Ripoll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Even though in vivo imaging approaches have witnessed several new and important developments, specimens that exhibit high light scattering properties such as Drosophila melanogaster pupae are still not easily accessible with current optical imaging techniques, obtaining images only from subsurface features. This means that in order to obtain 3D volumetric information these specimens need to be studied either after fixation and a chemical clearing process, through an imaging window--thus perturbing physiological development -, or during early stages of development when the scattering contribution is negligible. In this paper we showcase how Optical Projection Tomography may be used to obtain volumetric images of the head eversion process in vivo in Drosophila melanogaster pupae, both in control and headless mutant specimens. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of Helical Optical Projection Tomography (hOPT) as a tool for high throughput 4D-imaging of several specimens simultaneously. PMID:25471694

  19. Vehicle Related Factors that Influence Injury Outcome in Head-On Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jeremy J.; Scullion, Paul; Morgan, Richard M.; Digges, Kennerly; Kan, Cing-Dao; Park, Shinhee; Bae, Hanil

    2008-01-01

    This study specifically investigated a range of vehicle-related factors that are associated with a lower risk of serious or fatal injury to a belted driver in a head-on collision. This analysis investigated a range of structural characteristics, quantities that describes the physical features of a passenger vehicle, e.g., stiffness or frontal geometry. The study used a data-mining approach (classification tree algorithm) to find the most significant relationships between injury outcome and the structural variables. The algorithm was applied to 120,000 real-world, head-on collisions, from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s (NHTSA’s) State Crash data files, that were linked to structural attributes derived from frontal crash tests performed as part of the USA New Car Assessment Program. As with previous literature, the analysis found that the heavier vehicles were correlated with lower injury risk to their drivers. This analysis also found a new and significant correlation between the vehicle’s stiffness and injury risk. When an airbag deployed, the vehicle’s stiffness has the most statistically significant correlation with injury risk. These results suggest that in severe collisions, lower intrusion in the occupant cabin associated with higher stiffness is at least as important to occupant protection as vehicle weight for self-protection of the occupant. Consequently, the safety community might better improve self-protection by a renewed focus on increasing vehicle stiffness in order to improve crashworthiness in head-on collisions. PMID:19026230

  20. Head and Neck Cancer Pain: Systematic Review of Prevalence and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Tanja; Ranasinghe, Sriyani; Ah-See, Kim W.; Renny, Nick; Hurman, David

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives Pain is a major symptom in patients with cancer; however information on head and neck cancer related pain is limited. The aim of this review was to investigate the prevalence of pain and associated factors among patients with HNC. Material and Methods The systematic review used search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases to December 2011. Cancers of the oral mucosa, oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx were included in this review with pain as main outcome. The review was restricted to full research reports of observational studies published in English. A checklist was used to assess the quality of selected studies. Results There were 82 studies included in the review and most of them (84%) were conducted in the past ten years. Studies were relatively small, with a median of 80 patients (IQR 44, 154). The quality of reporting was variable. Most studies (77%) used self-administered quality of life questionnaires, where pain was a component of the overall scale. Only 33 studies reported pain prevalence in HNC patients (combined estimate from meta-analysis before (57%, 95% CI 43% - 70%) and after (42%, 95% CI 33% - 50%) treatment. Only 49 studies (60%) considered associated factors, mostly tumour- or treatment-related. Conclusions The study has shown high levels of pain prevalence and some factors associated with higher levels of pain. There is a need for higher quality studies in a priority area for the care of patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:24422003

  1. Targeting epidermal growth factor receptor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: still lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher H.; Saba, Nabil F.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is preferentially expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and is a promising therapeutic target. Yet other than cetuximab, no agent targeting EGFR has been approved for this disease, and none has shown benefit over the standard of care. Several randomized trials of antibody and small molecule agents have found no new indication for these agents, despite their initial promise. In this review, we examine the major clinical evidence and discuss potential future developments of translational science in this area, including use of these agents in risk-stratified subgroups, inhibition of downstream/parallel targets, and combination with immunotherapy. PMID:27004227

  2. Scattering from phase-separated vesicles. I. An analytical form factor for multiple static domains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Anghel, Vinicius N. P.; Katsaras, John

    2015-08-18

    This is the first in a series of studies considering elastic scattering from laterally heterogeneous lipid vesicles containing multiple domains. Unique among biophysical tools, small-angle neutron scattering can in principle give detailed information about the size, shape and spatial arrangement of domains. A general theory for scattering from laterally heterogeneous vesicles is presented, and the analytical form factor for static domains with arbitrary spatial configuration is derived, including a simplification for uniformly sized round domains. The validity of the model, including series truncation effects, is assessed by comparison with simulated data obtained from a Monte Carlo method. Several aspects ofmore » the analytical solution for scattering intensity are discussed in the context of small-angle neutron scattering data, including the effect of varying domain size and number, as well as solvent contrast. Finally, the analysis indicates that effects of domain formation are most pronounced when the vesicle's average scattering length density matches that of the surrounding solvent.« less

  3. Identification of appropriate outcome indices in head and neck cancer and factors influencing them.

    PubMed

    Tighe, D; Kwok, A; Putcha, V; McGurk, M

    2014-09-01

    Audit of early postoperative outcomes adjusted for patient case mix is still in its infancy in head and neck surgery. Nevertheless the role for audit of early postoperative outcomes is obvious. The primary outcome measure of this study was to identify factors that are associated with early mortality or morbidity after surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The secondary outcome measure was to develop a pilot score that allows for risk-adjustment of outcome data to facilitate departmental audit. In this series the mortality rate was low (2.8%), in keeping with other published series. Complications, including those causing death, occurred after 38.1% of operations. Independent risk factors for mortality on logistic regression were shown to be previous HNSCC (P=0.03), estimated blood loss (l) (P=0.03), and extracapsular spread (P=0.05). Age (P=0.01), tracheostomy (P<0.01), estimated blood loss (l) (P=0.05), and duration of anaesthesia (P<0.01) were independent predictors of complications. Models predicting for risk demonstrated good discrimination (area under the curve statistics) for mortality (0.86) and morbidity (0.81). These pilot scores need external validation and may herald a means of facilitating risk-adjustment in the audit of early outcomes, allowing meaningful comparison of surgeons and their units over time.

  4. Bidirectional scattering distribution function measurements from volume diffusers: correction factors and associated uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Germer, Thomas A

    2016-09-01

    We consider the effect of volume diffusion on measurements of the bidirectional scattering distribution function when a finite distance is used for the solid angle defining aperture. We derive expressions for correction factors that can be used when the reduced scattering coefficients and the index of refraction are known. When these quantities are not known, the expressions can be used to guide the assessment of measurement uncertainty. We find that some measurement geometries reduce the effect of volume diffusion compared to their reciprocal geometries. PMID:27607273

  5. Factors affecting ultimate imaging depth of two-photon fluorescence microscopy in scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Katichev, Aleksey R.

    2009-10-01

    Different aspects of multiple small-angle scattering effect on two-phonon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) imaging ability are discussed in this paper. We focus on theoretical evaluation of the maximum accessible imaging depth. There are three main factors which potentially restrict imaging depth: i) decay of tightly focused excitation beam caused by scattering and accompanied by loss of diffraction-limited resolution; ii) out-of focus fluorescence originated from excessive illumination of the sample surface which is required to compensate for the lack of peak intensity inside scattering medium; iii) decrease of signal-to noise ratio of fluorescence signal due to Beer-Bouguer-Lambert law decrease of excitation intensity. Based on small-angle diffusive approximation of radiation transfer theory we compared the influence of these factors and found out that the first two factors define fundamental limitation of 2PEM potentialities in scattering medium while the last one provides principal instrumental limitation which prevails in state-of the-art commercial laser scanning microscopy systems.

  6. Factors affecting ultimate imaging depth of two-photon fluorescence microscopy in scattering medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Katichev, Aleksey R.

    2010-02-01

    Different aspects of multiple small-angle scattering effect on two-phonon fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) imaging ability are discussed in this paper. We focus on theoretical evaluation of the maximum accessible imaging depth. There are three main factors which potentially restrict imaging depth: i) decay of tightly focused excitation beam caused by scattering and accompanied by loss of diffraction-limited resolution; ii) out-of focus fluorescence originated from excessive illumination of the sample surface which is required to compensate for the lack of peak intensity inside scattering medium; iii) decrease of signal-to noise ratio of fluorescence signal due to Beer-Bouguer-Lambert law decrease of excitation intensity. Based on small-angle diffusive approximation of radiation transfer theory we compared the influence of these factors and found out that the first two factors define fundamental limitation of 2PEM potentialities in scattering medium while the last one provides principal instrumental limitation which prevails in state-of the-art commercial laser scanning microscopy systems.

  7. The Ah receptor regulates growth factor expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    John, Kaarthik; Lahoti, Tejas S; Wagner, Kelly; Hughes, Jarod M; Perdew, Gary H

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines have revealed that the Ah receptor (AHR) plays a significant role in mediating the "aggressive" phenotype of these cells, which includes enhanced inflammatory signaling (e.g., IL6) and migratory potential. Here we sought to identify putative novel targets of the AHR associated with enhanced tumor invasiveness. Global gene expression analysis identified a number of genes that are repressed upon treatment of OSC-19 or HN30 cells with an AHR antagonist. Three growth factors were targets of AHR activity; amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFA) were repressed by an AHR antagonist and further examined. Quantitative PCR analysis, ELISA, and siRNA-mediated knock down of AHR revealed an attenuation of basal and/or induced levels of expression of these growth factors in two HNSCC lines, following AHR antagonism. In silico analysis revealed that these growth factors possess dioxin-like response elements. Two other AHR ligands, 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole and benzo(a)pyrene (BP) also elicited similar responses. In conclusion, this study identified AREG, EREG, and PDGFA as growth factor targets of AHR activity associated with metastatic phenotype of HNSCC cells, suggesting that attenuation of AHR activity may be a therapeutic strategy.

  8. Group-fitted ab initiosingle- and multiple-scattering EXAFS Debye-Waller factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Bunker, Grant

    2002-05-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is one of the few direct probes of the structure of metalloprotein binding that is equally applicable to proteins in crystals, solutions, and membranes. Despite considerable progress in the calculation of the photoelectron scattering aspects of XAFS, calculation of the vibrational aspects has lagged because of the difficulty of the calculations. We report here initial results that express single- and multiple-scattering Debye-Waller factors as polynomial functions of first shell radial distance for metal-peptide complexes, enabling quantitatively accurate full multiple-scattering XAFS data analysis of active sites of unknown structure at arbitrary temperatures without the use of ad hoc assumptions.

  9. Factors influencing repeated seed movements by scatter-hoarding rodents in an alpine forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin; Corlett, Richard T

    2014-04-24

    Scatter-hoarding rodents are effective dispersal agents for many plant species. Several studies have shown that rodents repeatedly re-cache seeds. The re-caching process often has a significant impact on final seedling establishment, but the factors determining its occurrence are poorly understood. In this study, we followed the fate of 3564 artificial seeds that varied in size, nutrient content and tannin content. Seeds cached closer to their original releasing plots were more likely to be re-cached, and to a further distance. Larger seeds were more likely to be re-cached than smaller ones, while nutrient and tannin content had little effect. Most plant species that depend on scatter-hoarding rodents for seed dispersal bear relatively large seeds, and large seeds are usually more likely to be dispersed and to establish seedlings, suggesting that the caching preferences of scatter-hoarding rodents may have played an important role in the evolution of large seeds.

  10. New experimental method for lidar overlap factor using a CCD side-scatter technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenzhu; Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Wu, Decheng; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2015-04-15

    In theory, lidar overlap factor can be derived from the difference between the particle backscatter coefficient retrieved from lidar elastic signal without overlap correction and the actual particle backscatter coefficient, which can be obtained by other measured techniques. The side-scatter technique using a CCD camera is testified to be a powerful tool to detect the particle backscatter coefficient in near ground layer during night time. A new experiment approach to determine the overlap factor for vertically pointing lidar is presented in this study, which can be applied to Mie lidars. The effect of overlap factor on Mie lidar is corrected by an iteration algorithm combining the retrieved particle backscatter coefficient using CCD side-scatter method and Fernald method. This method has been successfully applied to Mie lidar measurements during a routine campaign, and the comparison of experimental results in different atmosphere conditions demonstrated that this method is available in practice.

  11. The Risk Factors for Hydrocephalus and Subdural Hygroma after Decompressive Craniectomy in Head Injured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Hee Jong; Lee, Hong-Jae; Yi, Jin-Seok; Yang, Ji-Ho; Lee, Il-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study aims to investigate 1) the risk factors for hydrocephalus and subdural hygroma (SDG) occurring after decompressive craniectomy (DC), and 2) the association between the type of SDG and hydrocephalus. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological features of 92 patients who underwent DC procedures after severe head injuries. The risk factors for developing post-traumatic hydrocephalus (PTH) and SDG were analyzed. Types of SDGs were classified according to location and their relationship with hydrocephalus was investigated. Results Ultimately, 26.09% (24/92) of these patients developed PTH. In the univariate analyses, hydrocephalus was statically associated with large bone flap diameter, large craniectomy area, bilateral craniectomy, intraventricular hemorrhage, contralateral or interhemisheric SDGs, and delayed cranioplasty. However, in the multivariate analysis, only large craniectomy area (adjusted OR=4.66; p=0.0239) and contralateral SDG (adjusted OR=6.62; p=0.0105) were significant independent risk factors for developing hydrocephalus after DC. The incidence of overall SDGs after DC was 55.43% (51/92). Subgroup analysis results were separated by SDG types. Statistically significant associations between hydrocephalus were found in multivariate analysis in the contralateral (adjusted OR=5.58; p=0.0074) and interhemispheric (adjusted OR=17.63; p=0.0113) types. Conclusion For patients who are subjected to DC following severe head trauma, hydrocephalus is associated with a large craniectomy area and contralateral SDG. For SDGs after DC that occur on the interhemispherical or controlateral side of the craniectomy, careful follow-up monitoring for the potential progression into hydrocephalus is needed. PMID:26539270

  12. Quality of life in head and neck cancers patients: predictive factors, functional and psychosocial outcome.

    PubMed

    Babin, E; Sigston, E; Hitier, M; Dehesdin, D; Marie, J P; Choussy, O

    2008-03-01

    The principal endpoints in head and neck cancer are survival with improvement of quality of life (QoL) in cancer patients. Patients treated for head and neck cancer suffer from a number of symptom domains: physical symptoms linked to diet and feeding, communication disorders, pain and their general state of health; psychological symptoms including depression, irritability, loss of self-esteem (occasionally feelings of shame), and social symptoms including relationship difficulties with partner (sexual disorders) or with other family members, loss of work, reduction in salary, and sense of uselessness, resulting in a negative impact on their daily life. At present, most tools only partially evaluate patient QoL, concentrating on the global impact of disease and its treatment on patients' physical and psychological condition. The "sociability" of individual patients is rarely evaluated, and the development of qualitative studies in this domain will enable improved understanding of the social factors involved in each patient's adaptability to disease, its treatment and after-effects.

  13. Using the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment to Identify Behavioral Risk and Protective Factors within a Head Start Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Tara M.; Wigent, Catherine A.; Tomac, Rachelle A.; Pham, Andy V.; Carlson, John S.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of behavioral risk and protective factors among at-risk preschoolers. Parent-reported data ( N = 2,550) from the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (DECA) indicated that Head Start preschoolers had significantly more behavior concerns and fewer protective factors than would be expected based…

  14. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering and the Electric and Magnetic Strange Form Factors of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David S.; McKeown, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Measurement of the neutral weak vector form factors of the nucleon provides unique access to the strange quark content of the nucleon. These form factors can be studied using parity-violating electron scattering. A comprehensive program of experiments has been performed at three accelerator laboratories to determine the role of strange quarks in the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon. This article reviews the remarkable technical progress associated with this program, describes the various methods used in the different experiments, and summarizes the physics results along with recent theoretical calculations.

  15. [The rate and factors of return-to-work in head-injured patients following hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Chen, C L; Howng, S L

    1994-06-01

    Return-to-work is often used as a measure of overall recovery from injury or illness. This study focuses on the labor force population who inhabit in Kaohsiung City, and were hospitalized into Chung Ho Memorial Hospital Kaohsiung Medical College in 1992. The patients were contacted for an interview at least six months post-discharge. In addition to the rate of return-to-work by severity, factors were examined for their influence on return-to-work. Of those 85 eligible individuals, the rate of return-to-work was 81.2%. According to the Glasgow Coma Scale, the head injury severity was classified as mild, moderate and severe. The rate of return-to-work by severity were 86.4%, 78.6%, and 58.3%, respectively. Factors influencing return-to-work were divided into pre-injury, hospitalization, and post-discharge period. According to the study, the three influencing factors that correlated with post-injury employment status were number of productive members in family, length of stay, and physical handicap.

  16. Lipoteichoic acid and interleukin 1 stimulate synergistically production of hepatocyte growth factor (scatter factor) in human gingival fibroblasts in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, A; Arakaki, R; Ohnishi, T; Arakaki, N; Daikuhara, Y; Takada, H

    1996-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTA) from various gram-positive bacteria, including oral streptococci such as Streptococcus sanguis, enhanced the production of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) (scatter factor) by human gingival fibroblasts in culture, whereas lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from various gram-negative bacteria did not. In contrast, LPS induced interleukin 1 activity in human gingival epithelial cells in culture, while LTA had little effect. LTA and recombinant human interleukin 1 alpha enhanced synergistically the production of HGF/SF in human gingival fibroblast cultures. Recombinant human HGF, in turn, enhanced the proliferation of human gingival epithelial cells in culture. PMID:8606111

  17. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Polifka, Richard

    2015-04-10

    The QCD factorization theorem in diffraction is tested by comparing diffractive jet production data to QCD predictions based on fits to inclusive diffractive cross section data. H1 measured dijet production with a leading proton detected in the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer (VFPS), both in deep-inelastic scattering and in photoproduction. The DIS measurements are complemented by measurements of dijet production with an associated rapidity gap and in a data sample selected with a leading proton in the Forward Proton Spectrometer (FPS)

  18. Predictive factors for surgical site infection in head and neck cancer surgery: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Henry, J S; Buffet-Bataillon, S; Deberge, S; Jegoux, F

    2014-01-01

    Surgical Site Infection (SSI) after head and neck cancer surgery may be life threatening and induces increasing in healthcare cost. The objective of this present study was to identify predictive factors associated to surgical site infection in head and neck cancer surgery. Numerous predictive factors were analyzed with univariate case-control method, then with multivariate method. This retrospective study included 71 patients who have been hospitalized in our department during 2010 for a head and neck cancer surgery. The incidence of surgical site infection was 15.5%. The T3-T4 stages were identified as an independent predictive factor (p = 0.04). Our study does not find other predictive factor for a SSI. The NNIS index (National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance), used by the Center for disease control and prevention as predictive factor, was not valid in our study. A specific predictive index should include the tumor stage for Head and Neck Cancer surgery and should be taken into account for the management of a preventive antibiotic treatment.

  19. Stepwise Progress in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Radiation Studies for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, Paul M.

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of four new epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors for cancer therapy (cetuximab, panitumumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib) over the last 3 years is a remarkable milestone in oncology. Indeed, molecular inhibition of EGFR signaling represents one of the most promising current arenas for the development of molecular-targeted cancer therapies. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors from both the monoclonal antibody and tyrosine kinase inhibitor class have demonstrated clinical activity in the treatment of a broad spectrum of common human malignancies. For the discipline of radiation oncology, the 2006 report of a phase III trial demonstrating a survival advantage for advanced head and neck cancer patients with the addition of weekly cetuximab during a 7-week course of radiation is particularly gratifying. Indeed, this is the first phase III trial to confirm a survival advantage with the addition of a molecular-targeted agent to radiation. Furthermore, this result seems to have been achieved with only a modest increment in overall treatment toxicity and with very high compliance to the prescribed treatment regimen. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned regarding the rational integration of EGFR inhibitors into cancer treatment regimens, as well as methods to optimize the selection of patients most likely to benefit from EGFR inhibitor strategies.

  20. Risk factors associated with retinal hemorrhage in suspected abusive head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Zachary N.; Thurber, Clinton J.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Kumar, Kartik S.; Davis, Garvin H.; Kellaway, Judianne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors associated with retinal hemorrhage (RH) in pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT) suspects. Methods Records of children aged 0–3 years hospitalized for suspected AHT from January 2007 to November 2011 were retrospectively reviewed in this case–control study. Children were classified into case and control groups based on RH presence. Medical history, presenting symptoms, reasons, and characteristics of injury were recorded. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors. Results A total of 168 children (104 males) were included. Of these, 103 were classified as cases and 65 as controls. The mean age (with standard deviation) was 9.3 ± 8.3 months (range, 1 day-36 months). Of the 103 cases, 22 (21%) had subretinal hemorrhage, 9 (9%) had retinoschisis, and 1 (1%) had vitreous hemorrhage. Children presenting with lethargy or altered mental status (P < 0.0001), subdural hemorrhage (P < 0.0001), and other radiologic findings (eg, cerebral ischemia, diffuse axonal injury, hydrocephalus, or solid organ injury; P = 0.01546) were likely to have RH. All 23 children with skull or nonskull fracture without intracranial hemorrhage did not have RH (P < 0.0001 both categories). Conclusions Retinal hemorrhages were almost never found in the absence of intracranial hemorrhage and not found in the setting of fracture without intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:25828822

  1. Proton form factors and two-photon exchange in elastic electron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolenko, D. M.; Arrington, J.; Barkov, L. M.; Vries, H. de; Gauzshtein, V. V.; Golovin, R. A.; Gramolin, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. F.; Zhilich, V. N.; Zevakov, S. A.; Kaminsky, V. V.; Lazarenko, B. A.; Mishnev, S. I.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Neufeld, V. V.; Rachek, I. A.; Sadykov, R. Sh.; Stibunov, V. N.; Toporkov, D. K.; Holt, R. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Proton electromagnetic form factors are among the most important sources of information about the internal structure of the proton. Two different methods for measuring these form factors, the method proposed by Rosenbluth and the polarization-transfer method, yield contradictory results. It is assumed that this contradiction can be removed upon taking into account the hard part of the contribution of two-photon exchange to the cross section for elastic electron-proton scattering. This contribution can measured experimentally via a precision comparison of the cross sections for the elastic scattering of positrons and electrons on protons. Such a measurement, performed at the VEPP-3 storage ring in Novosibirsk at the beam energies of 1.6 and 1.0 GeV for positron (electron) scattering angles in the ranges of θ{sub e} = 15°–25° and 55°–75° in the first case and in the range of θ{sub e} = 65°–105° in the second case is described in the present article. Preliminary results of this experiment and their comparison with theoretical predictions are described.

  2. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; et al

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentummore » transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ε at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.« less

  3. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; Amaryan, M.; Anderson, M.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W.; Burkert, V.; Carman, D.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Gilfoyle, G.; Giovanetti, K.; Girod, F.; Goetz, J.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.; Griffioen, K.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D.; Ishkhanov, B.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Kalantarians, N.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M.; Meyer, C.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, E.; Smith, G.; Sober, D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Wood, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Zonta, I.

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentum transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ε at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.

  4. Towards a resolution of the proton form factor problem: new electron and positron scattering data.

    PubMed

    Adikaram, D; Rimal, D; Weinstein, L B; Raue, B; Khetarpal, P; Bennett, R P; Arrington, J; Brooks, W K; Adhikari, K P; Afanasev, A V; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Avakian, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Briscoe, W J; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Careccia, S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Dupre, R; Egiyan, H; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Fradi, A; Garillon, B; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Jenkins, D; Jiang, H; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Joosten, S; Kalantarians, N; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mattione, P; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R A; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Camacho, C Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peña, C; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Sharabian, Y G; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, I; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, Z W; Zonta, I

    2015-02-13

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, G(E)(p), extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of G(E)(p) from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (ϵ) and momentum transfer (Q(2)) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ϵ at Q(2)=1.45  GeV(2). This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q(2)≈1.75  GeV(2) and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Δ intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3  GeV(2).

  5. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R. P.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Afanasev, A. V.; Dupre, R.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Hafidi, K.; Moody, C. I.

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, G(E)(p), extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of G(E)(p). from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentum transfer (Q(2)) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing epsilon at Q(2) = 1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q(2) approximate to 1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.

  6. Architectural constraints are a major factor reducing path integration accuracy in the rat head direction cell system.

    PubMed

    Page, Hector J I; Walters, Daniel; Stringer, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Head direction cells fire to signal the direction in which an animal's head is pointing. They are able to track head direction using only internally-derived information (path integration)In this simulation study we investigate the factors that affect path integration accuracy. Specifically, two major limiting factors are identified: rise time, the time after stimulation it takes for a neuron to start firing, and the presence of symmetric non-offset within-layer recurrent collateral connectivity. On the basis of the latter, the important prediction is made that head direction cell regions directly involved in path integration will not contain this type of connectivity; giving a theoretical explanation for architectural observations. Increased neuronal rise time is found to slow path integration, and the slowing effect for a given rise time is found to be more severe in the context of short conduction delays. Further work is suggested on the basis of our findings, which represent a valuable contribution to understanding of the head direction cell system.

  7. Head injury as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease: the evidence 10 years on; a partial replication

    PubMed Central

    Fleminger, S; Oliver, D; Lovestone, S; Rabe-Hesketh, S; Giora, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine, using a systematic review of case-control studies, whether head injury is a significant risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. We sought to replicate the findings of the meta-analysis of Mortimer et al (1991). Methods: A predefined inclusion criterion specified case-control studies eligible for inclusion. A comprehensive and systematic search of various electronic databases, up to August 2001, was undertaken. Two independent reviewers screened studies for eligibility. Fifteen case-control studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria, of which seven postdated the study of Mortimer et al. Results: We partially replicated the results of Mortimer et al. The meta-analysis of the seven studies conducted since 1991 did not reach significance. However, analysis of all 15 case-control studies was significant (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.21 to 2.06), indicating an excess history of head injury in those with Alzheimer's disease. The finding of Mortimer et al that head injury is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease only in males was replicated. The excess risk of head injury in those with Alzheimer's disease is only found in males (males: OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.06; females: OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.47). Conclusions: This study provides support for an association between a history of previous head injury and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. PMID:12810767

  8. Examining Risk and Protective Factors in Head Start Populations Located in High- and Low-Violence Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedor, Megan C.; Bender, Stacy L.; Carlson, John S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined parental reports of children attending Head Start programs in high- (N = 200) and low- (N = 188) violence communities to determine whether differences existed in the level of risk and protective factors as measured by the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (P. A. LeBuffe & J. A. Naglieri, 1999). Previous research has indicated…

  9. Family Factors Associated with High Academic Competence among Former Head Start Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Nancy M.; Weinberg, Richard A.; Redden, David; Ramey, Sharon L.; Ramey, Craig T.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 154 Head Start children with high academic achievement found that their families reported higher educational and income levels, had fewer children, were more likely to be Caucasian, reported less prolonged depression, and had more responsive, flexible, and less restrictive parenting practices than other Head Start children. (Author/CR)

  10. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized [sup 3]He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L. ); Jones, C.E. ); DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P. ); Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C. ); Lorenzon, W. )

    1994-08-01

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized [sup 3]He target. The neutron magnetic form factor [ital G][sup [ital n

  11. [Human papilloma viruses: other risk factor of head and neck carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Woto-Gaye, G; M'Farrej, M K; Doh, K; Thiam, I; Touré, S; Diop, R; Dial, C

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck carcinoma (HNC) occupy the sixth place as the most frequent type of cancer worldwide. Next to alcohol and tobacco intoxication, other risk factors (RF) are suspected, including the human papilloma viruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to highlight the prevalence of HPVs and histo-epidemiological characteristics of HNC HPV+ in Senegal. This is a prospective, multicenter preliminary study of 18 months (January 1, 2012-June 30, 2014). The cases of HNC histologically confirmed in Senegal were then sent to the bio-pathology department of the Curie Institute in Paris to search HPVs. In the 90 included cases, the PCR technique was successful in 54 cases (60%). HPVs were found in seven cases, that is, a prevalence of 13%. HPVs were associated with 5 cases of hypopharyngeal carcinoma and 2 cases of carcinoma of the oral cavity. Patients with HNC HPV+ had a median age of 42 years against 49 years for HPV-patients. Three patients (42.8%) with HPV+ carcinomas were smokers. Of the 47 HPV-patients, 40 patients (87.1%) had alcohol intoxication and/or smoking. The concept of oral sex was refuted by all our patients. Squamous cell carcinoma was the only histological type found. HPV+ cell carcinoma showed no specific histological appearance. HPVs are another certain RF of HNC in Senegal. The major therapeutic and prognostic impact of HPVinduced cancers requires the systematic search of the viruses by the PCR technique.

  12. Potentiated endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated dilations in cerebral arteries following mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Golding, E M; You, J; Robertson, C S; Bryan, R M

    2001-07-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests that endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) may act in a compensatory manner such that during conditions of compromised nitric oxide (NO), EDHF serves as a back-up mechanism. Given that constitutive NO synthase is chronically downregulated after head trauma, we tested the hypothesis that EDHF is potentiated following injury. Male adult rats were subjected to either sham injury (n = 27) or mild controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury (n = 26). Branches of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) directly within the contusion site were harvested either 1 or 24 h later, pressurized to 60 mm Hg in a vessel chamber and allowed to develop spontaneous tone. Relaxation to luminal application of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was similar in all groups. Relaxation to ATP in the presence of L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) and indomethacin was similar in all groups except for vessels isolated at 24 h following mild CCI injury. In this case, L-NAME and indomethacin had no effect on the ATP-mediated dilation. The ATP-mediated dilation in L-NAME and indomethacin-treated MCA branches was inhibited by charybdotoxin, an inhibitor of large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels. These findings suggest that there is a significant potentiation of the EDHF-mediated dilation to ATP in cerebral arteries isolated at 24 h following mild CCI injury.

  13. Prognostic value of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Mineta, H; Miura, K; Ogino, T; Takebayashi, S; Misawa, K; Ueda, Y; Suzuki, I; Dictor, M; Borg, Å; Wennerberg, J

    2000-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been identified as the substance that increases the permeability and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells. We examined the clinical significance of VEGF expression in 60 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using the methods of Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), comparatively, and analysed the relationship between VEGF status in Western blot and tumour size, lymph-node status, histologic grade and disease-free survival (DFS) rate. Western blot analysis revealed high VEGF expressors (tumour/normal tissue density ≥ 3-fold) in 26 patients (43%) and low VEGF expressors (< 3-fold) in 34 patients (57%). The results of the Western blot analysis correlated significantly with those of the RT-PCR (P= 0.00007) or immunohistochemistry (P= 0.00006). High VEGF expressors are associated with the progression of lymph-node spread (P= 0.0009), which are correlated with poor DFS. The 2-year DFS rate of high VEGF expressors (30%) was significantly lower than that of low VEGF expressors (78%) (P= 0.0008). Multivariate analysis showed VEGF expression and stage were independent predictors for the DFS (P= 0.045 and 0.041, respectively). VEGF expression may play an important role in progression of HNSCC. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952783

  14. Is MDM2 SNP309 Variation a Risk Factor for Head and Neck Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xianlu; Ye, Huiping; Li, Qi; Xiang, Zhaolan; Zhang, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Murine double minute-2 (MDM2) is a negative regulator of P53, and its T309G polymorphism has been suggested as a risk factor for a variety of cancers. Increasing evidence has shown the association of MDM2 T309G polymorphism with head and neck carcinoma (HNC) risk. However, the results are inconsistent. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association. The meta-analysis retrieved studies published up to August 2015, and essential information was extracted for analysis. Separate analyses on ethnicity, source of controls, sample size, detection method, and cancer types were also conducted. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the association. Pooled data from 16 case–control studies including 4625 cases and 6927 controls failed to indicate a significant association. However, in the subgroup analysis of sample sizes, an increased risk was observed in the largest sample size group (>1000) under a recessive model (OR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.08–2.13). Increased risks were also found in the nasopharyngeal cancer in the subgroup analysis of cancer types (GG vs TT: OR = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.38–3.12; dominant model: OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.13–1.93; recessive model: OR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.17–2.65). The results suggest that homozygote GG alleles of MDM2 SNP309 may be a low-penetrant risk factor for HNC, and G allele may confer nasopharyngeal cancer susceptibility. PMID:26945408

  15. Factors Associated with Hemispheric Hypodensity after Subdural Hematoma following Abusive Head Trauma in Children

    PubMed Central

    Recker, Matthew J.; Lee, Philip S.; Bell, Michael J.; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a unique form of pediatric TBI with increased mortality and neurologic sequelae. Hemispheric hypodensity (HH) in association with subdural blood after AHT has been described. Though risk factors for HH are not understood, we hypothesized that risk factors could be identified. We retrospectively enrolled children under 5 years with TBI secondary to AHT (child advocacy diagnosis) who had undergone initial and interval brain imaging. Records were interrogated for prearrival and in-hospital physiologic and radiographic findings. HH was determined by a blinded observer. Twenty-four children were enrolled and 13 developed HH. HH was not significantly associated with age, initial Glascow Coma Scale, or mortality. Pediatric Intensity Level of Therapy (PILOT) scores (p=0.01) and daily maximal intracranial pressure (ICPmax; p=0.037) were higher in HH. Hypoxia, hypotension, cardiopulmonary arrest, need for blood transfusion, and daily blood glucoses tended to be greater in HH. Whereas all children with HH had acute subdural hematoma (SBH), many children without HH also had subdural blood; the presence of skull fracture was more likely in the children who did not develop HH (p=0.04), but no other intracranial radiographic pattern of injury was associated with HH. Surgical intervention did not appear to protect against development of HH. A variety of insults associated with ischemia, including intracranial hypertension, ICP-directed therapies, hypoxia, hypotension, and cardiac arrest, occurred in the children who developed HH. Given the morbidity and mortality of this condition, larger studies to identify mechanisms leading to the development of HH and mitigating clinical approaches are warranted. PMID:24693985

  16. Parity-Violating Electron Deuteron Scattering and the Proton's Neutral Weak Axial Vector Form Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Takeyasu; Averett, Todd; Barkhuff, David; Batigne, Guillaume; Beck, Douglas; Beise, Elizabeth; Blake, A.; Breuer, Herbert; Carr, Robert; Clasie, Benjamin; Covrig, Silviu; Danagoulian, Areg; Dodson, George; Dow, Karen; Dutta, Dipangkar; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Filippone, Bradley; FRANKLIN, W.; Furget, Christophe; Gao, Haiyan; Gao, Juncai; Gustafsson, Kenneth; Hannelius, Lars; Hasty, R.; Allen, Alice; Herda, M.C.; Jones, CE; King, Paul; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kowalski, Stanley; Kox, Serge; Kramer, Kevin; Lee, P.; Liu, Jinghua; Martin, Jeffery; McKeown, Robert; Mueller, B.; Pitt, Mark; Plaster, Bradley; Quemener, Gilles; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Ritter, J.; Roche, Julie; Savu, V.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Seely, Charles; Spayde, Damon; Suleiman, Riad; Taylor, S.; Tieulent, Raphael; Tipton, Bryan; Tsentalovich, E.; Wells, Steven; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Jing; Yun, Junho; Zwart, Townsend

    2004-03-01

    We report on a new measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in quasielastic electron scattering from the deuteron at backward angles at Q2 = 0.038 (GeV/c)2. This quantity provides a determination of the neutral weak axial vector form factor of the nucleon, which can potentially receive large electroweak corrections. The measured asymmetry A = z3.51±0.57 (stat)±0.58 (syst) ppm is consistent with theoretical predictions. We also report on updated results of the previous experiment at Q2 = 0.091 (GeV/c)2, which are also consistent with theoretical predictions.

  17. X-ray Intermolecular Structure Factor (XISF): separation of intra- and intermolecular interactions from total X-ray scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Q.; Benmore, C. J.; Yarger, J. L.

    2015-06-01

    XISF is a MATLAB program developed to separate intermolecular structure factors from total X-ray scattering structure factors for molecular liquids and amorphous solids. The program is built on a trust-region-reflective optimization routine with the r.m.s. deviations of atoms physically constrained. XISF has been optimized for performance and can separate intermolecular structure factors of complex molecules.

  18. The risk factors of head and neck cancer and their general patterns in Australia: a descriptive review and update.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagtar; Ramamoorthi, Ramya; Baxi, Siddhartha; Jayaraj, Rama; Thomas, Mahiban

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a descriptive review of risk factors of head and neck cancer (HNC), with particular interest in their general patterns in Australia. All these risk factors are deeply perplexing, with socioeconomic, cultural, and geographic variables. We reviewed articles from PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar by using keywords such as risk factors, alcohol, tobacco, human papilloma virus (HPV), environmental risk factors, and other risk factors. We selected relevant articles after they completely fit into the inclusion criteria for this review. Previous reports highlight that smoking tobacco, consuming alcohol, and HPV infection are the major risk factors for HNC. Geographical variations in incidence rates are indicative of differences in the prevalence of risk factors among countries. HNC could be prevented by reducing the prevalence of established risk factors.

  19. Head injuries in the female football player: incidence, mechanisms, risk factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Jiri; McCrory, Paul; Kirkendall, Donald T

    2007-01-01

    Although all injuries in sports are a concern for participants, head injuries are particularly troublesome because of the potential for long‐term cognitive deficits. To prevent any specific injury, it is important to understand the basic frequency and incidence of injury and then the mechanism of injury. Once these are established, prevention programmes can be tested to see if the rate of injury changes. A primary problem with head injuries is recognising that the injury has occurred. Many athletes are not aware of the seriousness of concussive injury, thus this type of injury is probably under‐reported. Once the diagnosis of a concussion is made, the next difficult decision is when to return a player to the game. These two management issues dominate the continuing development of understanding of concussive head injury. This paper explores the known gender differences between head injuries and highlights the areas that need to be considered in future research. PMID:17496069

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibition and Head and Neck Cancer Recurrence and Death in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christopher; Zeringue, Angelique L.; McDonald, Jay R.; Eisen, Seth A.; Ranganathan, Prabha

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to determine the effect of tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) therapy on the risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) recurrence or HNC-attributable death in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA patients with HNC were assembled from the US national Veterans’ Affairs (VA) administrative databases, and diagnoses confirmed and data collected by electronic medical record review. The cohort was divided into those treated with non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs) versus TNF inhibitors (TNFi) after a diagnosis of HNC. Likelihood of a composite endpoint of recurrence or HNC-attributable death was determined by Cox proportional hazards regression. Of 180 patients with RA and HNC, 31 were treated with TNFi and 149 with nbDMARDs after the diagnosis of HNC. Recurrence or HNC-attributable death occurred in 5/31 (16.1%) patients in the TNFi group and 44/149 (29.5%) patients in the nbDMARD group (p = 0.17); it occurred in 2/16 (13%) patients who received TNFi in the year prior to HNC diagnosis but not after. Overall stage at diagnosis (p = 0.03) and stage 4 HNC (HR 2.49 [CI 1.06–5.89]; p = 0.04) were risk factors for recurrence or HNC-attributable death; treatment with radiation or surgery was associated with a lower risk (HR 0.35 [CI 0.17–0.74]; p = 0.01 and HR 0.39 [CI 0.20–0.76]; p = 0.01 respectively). Treatment with TNFi was not a risk factor for recurrence or HNC-attributable death (HR 0.75; CI 0.31–1.85; p = 0.54). We conclude that treatment with TNFi may be safe in patients with RA and HNC, especially as the time interval between HNC treatment and non-recurrence increases. In this study, TNF inhibition was not associated with an increase in recurrence or HNC-attributable death. PMID:26599370

  1. Keratinocyte growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor are heparin-binding growth factors for alveolar type II cells in fibroblast-conditioned medium.

    PubMed Central

    Panos, R J; Rubin, J S; Csaky, K G; Aaronson, S A; Mason, R J

    1993-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mediate aspects of normal lung growth and development and are important in the restoration of normal alveolar architecture after lung injury. To determine if fibroblasts are a source of soluble growth factors for alveolar type II cells, we investigated the effect of fibroblast-conditioned medium (CM) on alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. Serum-free CM from confluent adult human lung fibroblasts was concentrated fivefold by lyophilization. Type II cells were isolated from adult rats by elastase dissociation and incubated with [3H]thymidine and varying dilutions of concentrated CM and serum from day 1 to 3 of culture. Stimulation of type II cell DNA synthesis by fibroblast-CM was maximal after 48 h of conditioning and required the presence of serum. The activity of the CM was eliminated by boiling and by treatment with trypsin, pepsin, or dithiothreitol and was additive with saturating concentrations of acidic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and insulin. The growth factor activity bound to heparin-Sepharose and was eluted with 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl. Neutralizing antibody studies demonstrated that the primary mitogens isolated in the 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl fractions were keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor 7) and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), respectively. HGF/SF was demonstrated in the crude CM and KGF was detected in the 0.6 M NaCl eluent by immunoblotting. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the lung fibroblasts expressed both KGF and HGF/SF transcripts. Human recombinant KGF and HGF/SF induced a concentration- and serum-dependent increase in rat alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. We conclude that adult human lung fibroblasts produce at least two soluble heparin-binding growth factors, KGF and HGF/SF, which promote DNA synthesis and proliferation of rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. KGF and HGF/SF may be important stimuli for alveolar type II cell

  2. Risk factors for revision surgery following Humeral Head Replacement: 1,431 shoulders over 3 decades

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sperling, John; Cofield, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Objective Assess long-term risk of revision surgery and its predictors after undergoing humeral head replacement (HHR). Methods We used prospectively collected data from the Mayo Clinic Total Joint registry and other institutional electronic databases. Revision-free survival for HHR at 5-, 10- and 20-years was calculated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. We used univariate and multivariable-adjusted Cox regression analyses to examine the association of age, gender, body mass index (BMI), comorbidity assessed by Deyo-Charlson index, American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) class, implant fixation (cemented versus not) and underlying diagnosis with the risk of revision surgery. Hazard ratio with 95% confidence interval (CI) and p-values are presented. Results 1,359 patients underwent 1,431 shoulder HHRs during the study period, 1976–2008. The average age was 63 years, 63% were female, mean BMI was 28 kg/m2 and 60% implants were cemented. 114 HHRs were revised during the follow-up. At 5-, 10- and 20-years, the shoulder implant survival was 93.6% (95% CI, 92.1%–95%), 90% (95% CI, 88%–92%) and 85% (95% CI, 81.8%–88.4%) respectively. In multivariable-adjusted analyses, older age was associated with lower hazard of revision, hazard ratio, 0.97 (95% CI, 0.96–0.99; p-value<0.001) and higher BMI with higher hazard ratio of 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01–1.08; p-value=0.02). Conclusions Long-term survival of HHR at 20-years was excellent. Obesity and younger age are risk factors for higher revision rate after HHR. Further studies should investigate the biologic rationale for these important associations. Surgeons can discuss these differences in revision risk with patients, especially in young obese patients. PMID:21982347

  3. Context-specific function of the LIM homeobox 1 transcription factor in head formation of the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Fossat, Nicolas; Ip, Chi Kin; Jones, Vanessa J; Studdert, Joshua B; Khoo, Poh-Lynn; Lewis, Samara L; Power, Melinda; Tourle, Karin; Loebel, David A F; Kwan, Kin Ming; Behringer, Richard R; Tam, Patrick P L

    2015-06-01

    Lhx1 encodes a LIM homeobox transcription factor that is expressed in the primitive streak, mesoderm and anterior mesendoderm of the mouse embryo. Using a conditional Lhx1 flox mutation and three different Cre deleters, we demonstrated that LHX1 is required in the anterior mesendoderm, but not in the mesoderm, for formation of the head. LHX1 enables the morphogenetic movement of cells that accompanies the formation of the anterior mesendoderm, in part through regulation of Pcdh7 expression. LHX1 also regulates, in the anterior mesendoderm, the transcription of genes encoding negative regulators of WNT signalling, such as Dkk1, Hesx1, Cer1 and Gsc. Embryos carrying mutations in Pcdh7, generated using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, and embryos without Lhx1 function specifically in the anterior mesendoderm displayed head defects that partially phenocopied the truncation defects of Lhx1-null mutants. Therefore, disruption of Lhx1-dependent movement of the anterior mesendoderm cells and failure to modulate WNT signalling both resulted in the truncation of head structures. Compound mutants of Lhx1, Dkk1 and Ctnnb1 show an enhanced head truncation phenotype, pointing to a functional link between LHX1 transcriptional activity and the regulation of WNT signalling. Collectively, these results provide comprehensive insight into the context-specific function of LHX1 in head formation: LHX1 enables the formation of the anterior mesendoderm that is instrumental for mediating the inductive interaction with the anterior neuroectoderm and LHX1 also regulates the expression of factors in the signalling cascade that modulate the level of WNT activity.

  4. Effect of the pair-structure factor of a particulate medium on scalar wave scattering in the first Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serkan; Korotkova, Olga

    2009-06-15

    Using scattering matrices and the angular spectrum representation of waves, we develop the analytical theory of scattering of random scalar waves from random collections of particles, valid under the first Born approximation. We demonstrate that in the calculation of far-field statistics, such as the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence, the knowledge of the pair-structure factor of the collection is crucial. We illustrate our analytical approach by considering a numerical example involving scattering of two partially correlated plane waves from a random distribution of spheres. PMID:19529695

  5. Effect of the pair-structure factor of a particulate medium on scalar wave scattering in the first Born approximation.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Serkan; Korotkova, Olga

    2009-06-15

    Using scattering matrices and the angular spectrum representation of waves, we develop the analytical theory of scattering of random scalar waves from random collections of particles, valid under the first Born approximation. We demonstrate that in the calculation of far-field statistics, such as the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence, the knowledge of the pair-structure factor of the collection is crucial. We illustrate our analytical approach by considering a numerical example involving scattering of two partially correlated plane waves from a random distribution of spheres.

  6. Impact of targeting insulin-like growth factor signaling in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Limesand, Kirsten H; Chibly, Alejandro Martinez; Fribley, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The IGF system has been shown to have either negative or negligible impact on clinical outcomes of tumor development depending on specific tumor sites or stages. This review focuses on the clinical impact of IGF signaling in head and neck cancer, the effects of IGF targeted therapies, and the multi-dimensional role of IRS 1/2 signaling as a potential mechanism in resistance to targeted therapies. Similar to other tumor sites, both negative and positive correlations between levels of IGF-1/IGF-1-R and clinical outcomes in head and neck cancer have been reported. In addition, utilization of IGF targeted therapies has not demonstrated significant clinical benefit; therefore the prognostic impact of the IGF system on head and neck cancer remains uncertain.

  7. Two factors critical in the pressure response of the impacted head.

    PubMed

    Nusholtz, G S; Kaiker, P S; Gould, W S

    1987-12-01

    The response of the head to blunt impact in the posterior-to-anterior direction (+Gx) was investigated using anesthetized Macques (Macaca mulatta). Three-dimensional motion and epidural pressures were measured. The data were analyzed in the time domain using time histories and auto- cross-correlation functions; in the frequency domain, transfer functions were used. The results of the tests demonstrate that: 1) the thermodynamic response (fluid vaporization) of the cerebrospinal system is an important consideration when the impact produces significant tension, and 2) the interaction of the neck and the skull affects both the stresses produced in the brain and the injury response. These results are important for both the mathematical modeling of head trauma and establishing the injury tolerance of the head.

  8. Sensor and Display Human Factors Based Design Constraints for Head Mounted and Tele-Operation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Andre; Mullins, Linda; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    For mobile imaging systems in head mounted displays and tele-operation systems it is important to maximize the amount of visual information transmitted to the human visual system without exceeding its input capacity. This paper aims to describe the design constraints on the imager and display systems of head mounted devices and tele-operated systems based upon the capabilities of the human visual system. We also present the experimental results of methods to improve the amount of visual information conveyed to a user when trying to display a high dynamic range image on a low dynamic range display. PMID:22319370

  9. The role of multiple scattering in twilight zenith sky observations of atmospheric absorbers: Diurnal photochemistry and airmass factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perliski, Lori Mac

    The ability to properly interpret UV-visible twilight absorption measurements of atmospheric chemical constituents is dependent on how well the optical path, or airmass factor, of light collected by the spectrometer is understood. In the case of direct light measurement, the airmass factor may be calculated from simple geometrical considerations for a spherical atmosphere. In the case of scattered light, a spherical radiative transfer model must be used. A simple single scattering model and a Monte Carlo radiative transfer scheme were developed to study the effects of multiple scattering, aerosol scattering, albedo and refraction on scattered light airmass factors. Stratospheric airmass factors are found to be relatively insensitive to multiple scattering, albedo, refraction and aerosol scattering by background aerosols at fairly short visible wavelengths (about 450 nm). Tropospheric airmass factors, on the other hand, are very sensitive to these processes. Ground albedo, refraction, multiple scattering and aerosol scattering are also important in determining photolysis rates of atmospheric species. It is found that one-dimensional photochemical model calculations of vertical column abundances of several stratospheric chemical constituents are relatively insensitive to changes in photolysis rates due to albedo, refraction and background aerosol scattering, although they are sensitive to multiple scattering. Following the June 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, OClO and BrO were observed at Fritz Peak Observatory for the first time every. The radiative and photochemical effects of the presence of Pinatubo volcanic aerosols are examined using a one-dimensional photochemical model coupled to a spherical matrix inversion radiative transfer model. Although the heterogeneous removal of NO(x) is not explicitly considered in the photochemical model, the photochemical effects of NO(x) removal may be studied by prescribing the amount of NO(x) removed by heterogeneous chemistry

  10. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  11. Post-operative pain management in head and neck cancer patients: predictive factors and efficacy of therapy.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, C; Malagò, M; Crema, L; Aimoni, C; Matarazzo, T; Bortolazzi, S; Ciorba, A; Pelucchi, S; Pastore, A

    2016-04-01

    There is increasing interest about all aspects of pain sensation for patients undergoing head and neck surgery, and efforts have been made to better assess, monitor and reduce the occurrence of pain. The aetiology of pain is considered to be "multifactorial", as it is defined by several features such as personal experience, quality perception, location, intensity and emotional impact. The aim of this paper is: (i) to evaluate the efficacy of analgesic treatment in patients with head and neck cancer treated by surgery, and (ii) to study the variables and predictive factors that can influence the occurrence of pain. A total of 164 patients, affected by head and neck cancer and surgically treated, between December 2009 and December 2013, were included in this study. Data collected include age, gender, assessment of anaesthetic risk, tumour localisation, pathological cancer stage, TNM stage, type of surgery performed, complexity and duration of surgery, post-operative complications, postoperative days of hospital stay and pain evaluation on days 0, 1, 3 and 5 post-surgery. We studied the appropriateness of analgesic therapy in terms of incidence and prevalence of post-operative pain; we also related pain to patient characteristics, disease and surgical treatment to determine possible predictive factors. The population studied received adequate pain control through analgesic therapy immediately post-surgery and in the following days. No associations between gender, age and post-operative pain were found, whereas pathological cancer stage, complexity of surgery and tumour site were significantly associated with the risk of post-operative pain. Adequate pain control is essential in oncological patients, and particularly in head and neck cancer patients as the prevalence of pain in this localisation is reported to be higher than in other anatomical sites. Improved comprehension of the biological and psychological factors that characterise pain perception will help to

  12. Early Head Start: Factors Associated with Caregiver Knowledge of Child Development, Parenting Behavior, and Parenting Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, Harolyn M. E.; Watkins, Katara; Johnson, Elizabeth; Ialongo, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of socioeconomic status, parental mental health, and knowledge of child development on parenting styles and perceived parenting stress in caregivers of children, ages 3 months to 3 years, enrolled in Early Head Start (EHS). Caregivers of EHS students were interviewed using the Knowledge of Infant Development…

  13. Family Factors Associated with High Academic Competence in Former Head Start Children at Third Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Nancy M.; Lanzi, Robin Gaines; Weinberg, Richard A.; Ramey, Sharon Landesman; Ramey, Craig T.

    2002-01-01

    A group of 162 out of 5,400 former Head Start children were identified at the end of third grade as highest achieving and thriving both socially and academically. Families of these children had somewhat more resources on which to call and somewhat fewer stresses. Caretakers of high achievers ascribed to more positive parenting attitudes and were…

  14. Evaluation of time-resolved multi-distance methods to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads in vivo: Optical parameters dependences on geometrical structures of the models used to calculate reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, T.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved multi-distance measurements are studied to retrieve absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of adult heads, which have enough depth sensitivity to determine the optical parameters in superficial tissues and brain separately. Measurements were performed by putting the injection and collection fibers on the left semi-sphere of the forehead, with the injection fiber placed toward the temporal region, and by moving the collection fiber between 10 and 60 mm from the central sulcus. It became clear that optical parameters of the forehead at all collection fibers were reasonably determined by selecting the appropriate visibility length of the geometrical head models, which is related to head surface curvature at each position.

  15. In vivo time-resolved multidistance near infra-red spectroscopy of adult heads: time shift tolerance of measured reflectance to suppress the coupling between absorption and reduced scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanifuji, T.; Sakai, D.

    2015-03-01

    The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients ( μa and μ's) of adult heads were determined by multidistance timeresolved reflectance measurements. The finite difference time domain analysis was used to calculate the time-resolved reflectance from adult head models. In vivo time-resolved reflectances of human heads was measured at wavelengths of 680 and 780 nm. By minimizing the objective functions that compare the theoretical and experimental time-resolved reflectances, μa and μ's of the brains were determined. The results show that the time shift tolerance of measured reflectance for reducing to less than 10% the deviations in μa and μ's due to their coupling from the values obtained by optimum time shifts is more than 20 ps at both wavelengths.

  16. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L.; Jones, C.E.; DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P.; Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C.; Lorenzon, W.

    1995-07-10

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target. The neutron magnetic form factor {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} has been extracted from the measured asymmetry based on recent PWIA calculations using spin-dependent spectral functions. This experiment represents the first measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor using spin-dependent electron scattering. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. Factors for inconsistent aerosol single scattering albedo between SKYNET and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, P.; Takamura, T.; Nakajima, T.; Estellés, V.; Irie, H.; Kuze, H.; Campanelli, M.; Sinyuk, A.; Lee, S.-M.; Sohn, B. J.; Pandithurai, G.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S. C.; Martinez-Lozano, J. A.; Hashimoto, M.; Devara, P. C. S.; Manago, N.

    2016-02-01

    SKYNET and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrieved aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) values of four sites, Chiba (Japan), Pune (India), Valencia (Spain), and Seoul (Korea), were compared to understand the factors behind often noted large SSA differences between them. SKYNET and AERONET algorithms are found to produce nearly same SSAs for similarity in input data, suggesting that SSA differences between them are primarily due to quality of input data due to different calibration and/or observation protocols as well as difference in quality assurance criteria. The most plausible reason for high SSAs in SKYNET is found to be underestimated calibration constant for sky radiance (ΔΩ). The disk scan method (scan area: 1° × 1° area of solar disk) of SKYNET is noted to produce stable wavelength-dependent ΔΩ values in comparison to those determined from the integrating sphere used by AERONET to calibrate sky radiance. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) difference between them can be the next important factor for their SSA difference, if AOTs between them are not consistent. Inconsistent values of surface albedo while analyzing data of SKYNET and AERONET can also bring SSA difference between them, but the effect of surface albedo is secondary. The aerosol nonsphericity effect is found to be less important for SSA difference between these two networks.

  18. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Head Remodelling and Sperm Tail Development

    PubMed Central

    Vernet, Nadege; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K.; Decarpentrie, Fanny; Longepied, Guy; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Burgoyne, Paul S.; Mitchell, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A previous study indicated that genetic information encoded on the mouse Y chromosome short arm (Yp) is required for efficient completion of the second meiotic division (that generates haploid round spermatids), restructuring of the sperm head, and development of the sperm tail. Using mouse models lacking a Y chromosome but with varying Yp gene complements provided by Yp chromosomal derivatives or transgenes, we recently identified the Y-encoded zinc finger transcription factors Zfy1 and Zfy2 as the Yp genes promoting the second meiotic division. Using the same mouse models we here show that Zfy2 (but not Zfy1) contributes to the restructuring of the sperm head and is required for the development of the sperm tail. The preferential involvement of Zfy2 is consistent with the presence of an additional strong spermatid-specific promotor that has been acquired by this gene. This is further supported by the fact that promotion of sperm morphogenesis is also seen in one of the two markedly Yp gene deficient models in which a Yp deletion has created a Zfy2/1 fusion gene that is driven by the strong Zfy2 spermatid-specific promotor, but encodes a protein almost identical to that encoded by Zfy1. Our results point to there being further genetic information on Yp that also has a role in restructuring the sperm head. PMID:26765744

  19. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Head Remodelling and Sperm Tail Development.

    PubMed

    Vernet, Nadege; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Decarpentrie, Fanny; Longepied, Guy; de Rooij, Dirk G; Burgoyne, Paul S; Mitchell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    A previous study indicated that genetic information encoded on the mouse Y chromosome short arm (Yp) is required for efficient completion of the second meiotic division (that generates haploid round spermatids), restructuring of the sperm head, and development of the sperm tail. Using mouse models lacking a Y chromosome but with varying Yp gene complements provided by Yp chromosomal derivatives or transgenes, we recently identified the Y-encoded zinc finger transcription factors Zfy1 and Zfy2 as the Yp genes promoting the second meiotic division. Using the same mouse models we here show that Zfy2 (but not Zfy1) contributes to the restructuring of the sperm head and is required for the development of the sperm tail. The preferential involvement of Zfy2 is consistent with the presence of an additional strong spermatid-specific promotor that has been acquired by this gene. This is further supported by the fact that promotion of sperm morphogenesis is also seen in one of the two markedly Yp gene deficient models in which a Yp deletion has created a Zfy2/1 fusion gene that is driven by the strong Zfy2 spermatid-specific promotor, but encodes a protein almost identical to that encoded by Zfy1. Our results point to there being further genetic information on Yp that also has a role in restructuring the sperm head. PMID:26765744

  20. Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Amarantov, S. V.; Naletova, I. N.; Kurochkina, L. P.

    2011-08-15

    The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

  1. Modeling particle scattering structure factor for branched bio-inspired polymers in solution: A small angle X-ray scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, Lucio; Calandra, Pietro; Proverbio, Edoardo; Lombardo, Domenico

    2012-12-01

    We present a study which illustrates the modeling of the Particle Scattering Structure Factor of an hyperbranched biopolymer in water solution using the Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data. The studied sample was a sodium carboxilate terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (generation 2.5) dispersed in water medium. The experimental inter-dendrimer structure factor S(q) has been analyzed in the framework of liquid integral equation theory for charged systems in solution. From that, we derive an effective interparticle interaction composed of a screened Coulombic plus hard-sphere repulsion potential, which allows the estimation of the dendrimer effective charge Zeff. The present analysis strongly supports the finding that structures and interaction of dendrimer are strongly influenced by charge effects. As a result, this quantity can be considered as a crucial parameter for the modulation of the degree of structural organization in solution, suitable for a number of potential applications. We conclude our form factor analysis with the investigation of the long-range assembly conditions during the growth of the intermediate nanoaggregates generated by the inclusion of aluminosilicate components of zeolite 13X on the surface of dendrimers.

  2. Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Locher, Julie L.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia.

  3. Roles of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor and the met receptor in the early development of the metanephros.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A S; Kolatsi-Joannou, M; Hardman, P; Andermarcher, E; Moorby, C; Fine, L G; Jat, P S; Noble, M D; Gherardi, E

    1995-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), a soluble protein secreted by embryo fibroblasts and several fibroblast lines, may elicit morphogenesis in adjacent epithelial cells. We investigated the role of HGF/SF and its membrane receptor, the product of the c-met protooncogene, in the early development of the metanephric kidney. At the inception of the mouse metanephros at embryonic day 11, HGF/SF was expressed in the mesenchyme, while met was expressed in both the ureteric bud and the mesenchyme, as assessed by reverse transcription PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. To further investigate the expression of met in renal mesenchyme, we isolated 13 conditionally immortal clonal cell lines from transgenic mice expressing a temperature-sensitive mutant of the SV-40 large T antigen. Five had the HGF/SF+/met+ phenotype and eight had the HGF/SF-/met+ phenotype. None had the HGF/SF+/met- nor the HGF/SF-/met- phenotypes. Thus the renal mesenchyme contains cells that express HGF/SF and met or met alone. When metanephric rudiments were grown in serum-free organ culture, anti-HGF/SF antibodies (a) inhibited the differentiation of metanephric mesenchymal cells into the epithelial precursors of the nephron; (b) increased cell death within the renal mesenchyme; and (c) perturbed branching morphogenesis of the ureteric bud. These data provide the first demonstration for coexpression of the HGF/SF and met genes in mesenchymal cells during embryonic development and also imply an autocrine and/or paracrine role for HGF/SF and met in the survival of the renal mesenchyme and in the mesenchymal-epithelial transition that occurs during nephrogenesis. They also confirm the postulated paracrine role of HGF/SF in the branching of the ureteric bud.

  4. IMC-C225, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody for treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Hong, Waun Ki

    2002-10-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck remains a clinical challenge because of the high rate of locoregional disease recurrence. The importance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the development and progression of many solid tumors, including squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, is well understood; increased expression is associated with enhanced tumor invasiveness, resistance to chemotherapy, and a lower patient survival rate. Several approaches have been developed to achieve EGFR blockade as an anticancer treatment strategy, including the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody IMC-C225, which competitively binds to the extracellular receptor site and prevents binding by the natural EGFR ligands EGF and transforming growth factor-alpha. Preclinical studies to evaluate IMC-225 in human cancer cell lines in vitro and human tumor xenografts in vivo have shown its potent antitumor activity. Clinical efficacy of IMC-C225 appears to involve multiple mechanisms, including inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, inhibition of metastasis, and enhancement of the response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Phase I studies of IMC-C225 combined with chemotherapy or radiation showed promising response rates in patients with recurrent or refractory squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Phase II and III trials to examine the efficacy and safety of these combinations are currently underway. To date, IMC-C225 has been well tolerated, with skin rashes and allergic reactions being the most clinically important adverse events reported. IMC-C225 displays dose-dependent elimination characteristics and a half-life of approximately 7 days. Current recommendations for dosing include a 400 mg/m(2) loading dose, followed by weekly infusions at 250 mg/m(2).

  5. Enhancement factor statistics of surface enhanced Raman scattering in multiscale heterostructures of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Suitable metal nanostructures may induce surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors (EFs) large-enough to reach single-molecule sensitivity. However, the gap hot-spot EF probability density function (PDF) has the character of a long-tail distribution, which dramatically mines the reproducibility of SERS experiments. Herein, we carry out electrodynamic calculations based on a 3D finite element method of two plasmonic nanostructures, combined with Monte Carlo simulations of the EF statistics under different external conditions. We compare the PDF produced by a homodimer of nanoparticles with that provided by a self-similar trimer. We show that the PDF is sensitive to the spatial distribution of near-field enhancement specifically supported by the nanostructure geometry. Breaking the symmetry of the plasmonic system is responsible for inducing particular modulations of the PDF tail resembling a multiple Poisson distribution. We also study the influence that molecular diffusion towards the hottest hot-spot, or selective hot-spot targeting, might have on the EF PDF. Our results quantitatively assess the possibility of designing the response of a SERS substrate so as to contain the intrinsic EF PDF variance and significantly improving, in principle, the reproducibility of SERS experiments. PMID:27497573

  6. Covariant Spectator Theory of np scattering: Deuteron magnetic moment and form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz L.

    2014-06-01

    The deuteron magnetic moment is calculated using two model wave functions obtained from 2007 high precision fits to $np$ scattering data. Included in the calculation are a new class of isoscalar $np$ interaction currents which are automatically generated by the nuclear force model used in these fits. After normalizing the wave functions, nearly identical predictions are obtained: model WJC-1, with larger relativistic P-state components, gives 0.863(2), while model WJC-2 with very small $P$-state components gives 0.864(2) These are about 1\\% larger than the measured value of the moment, 0.857 n.m., giving a new prediction for the size of the $\\rho\\pi\\gamma$ exchange, and other purely transverse interaction currents that are largely unconstrained by the nuclear dynamics. The physical significance of these results is discussed, and general formulae for the deuteron form factors, expressed in terms of deuteron wave functions and a new class of interaction current wave functions, are given.

  7. Enhancement factor statistics of surface enhanced Raman scattering in multiscale heterostructures of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Rusciano, Giulia; Sasso, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Suitable metal nanostructures may induce surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement factors (EFs) large-enough to reach single-molecule sensitivity. However, the gap hot-spot EF probability density function (PDF) has the character of a long-tail distribution, which dramatically mines the reproducibility of SERS experiments. Herein, we carry out electrodynamic calculations based on a 3D finite element method of two plasmonic nanostructures, combined with Monte Carlo simulations of the EF statistics under different external conditions. We compare the PDF produced by a homodimer of nanoparticles with that provided by a self-similar trimer. We show that the PDF is sensitive to the spatial distribution of near-field enhancement specifically supported by the nanostructure geometry. Breaking the symmetry of the plasmonic system is responsible for inducing particular modulations of the PDF tail resembling a multiple Poisson distribution. We also study the influence that molecular diffusion towards the hottest hot-spot, or selective hot-spot targeting, might have on the EF PDF. Our results quantitatively assess the possibility of designing the response of a SERS substrate so as to contain the intrinsic EF PDF variance and significantly improving, in principle, the reproducibility of SERS experiments.

  8. Measurement of the neutron magnetic form factor from inclusive quasielastic scattering of polarized electrons from polarized {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Bray, B.; Carr, R.W.; Filippone, B.W.; Lung, A.; McKeown, R.D.; Mueller, B.; Pitt, M.L.; Jones, C.E.; DeSchepper, D.; Dodson, G.; Dow, K.; Ent, R.; Farkhondeh, M.; Hansen, J.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, L.H.; Lee, K.; Makins, N.; Milner, R.G.; Tieger, D.R.; Welch, T.P.; Candell, E.; Napolitano, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.B.; Tripp, C.; Lorenzon, W.

    1995-05-10

    We report a measurement of the asymmetry in spin-dependent quasielastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target. The neutron magnetic form factor {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} has been extracted from the measured asymmetry based on recent PWIA calculations using spin-dependent spectral functions. This work represents the first measurement of {ital G}{sup {ital n}}{sub {ital M}} using spin-dependent electron scattering. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; Rakhman, A.; Souder, P. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Liyanage, N.; Paschke, K. D.; Saenboonruang, K.; Silwal, R.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.« less

  10. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  11. Risk and Protective Factors for Adult and Child Hunger Among Low-Income Housed and Homeless Female-Headed Families

    PubMed Central

    Wehler, Cheryl; Weinreb, Linda F.; Huntington, Nicholas; Scott, Richard; Hosmer, David; Fletcher, Kenneth; Goldberg, Robert; Gundersen, Craig

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify factors associated with adult or child hunger. Methods. Low-income housed and homeless mothers were interviewed about socioeconomic, psychosocial, health, and food sufficiency information. Multinomial logistic regression produced models predicting adult or child hunger. Results. Predictors of adult hunger included mothers’ childhood sexual molestation and current parenting difficulties, or “hassles.” Risk factors for child hunger included mothers’ childhood sexual molestation, housing subsidies, brief local residence, having more or older children, and substandard housing. Conclusions. This study found that the odds of hunger, although affected by resource constraints in low-income female-headed families, were also worsened by mothers’ poor physical and mental health. Eliminating hunger thus may require broader interventions than food programs. PMID:14713707

  12. Factors affecting breeding season survival of Red-Headed Woodpeckers in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, John, C.; Vukovich, Mark

    2011-11-18

    Red-headed woodpecker (Melanerpes erythrocephalus) populations have declined in the United States and Canada over the past 40 years. However, few demographic studies have been published on the species and none have addressed adult survival. During 2006-2007, we estimated survival probabilities of 80 radio-tagged red-headed woodpeckers during the breeding season in mature loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) forests in South Carolina. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to estimate survival within and between years and to evaluate the effects of foliar cover (number of available cover patches), snag density treatment (high density vs. low density), and sex and age of woodpeckers. Weekly survival probabilities followed a quadratic time trend, being lowest during mid-summer, which coincided with the late nestling and fledgling period. Avian predation, particularly by Cooper's (Accipiter cooperii) and sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus), accounted for 85% of all mortalities. Our best-supported model estimated an 18-week breeding season survival probability of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.54-0.85) and indicated that the number of cover patches interacted with sex of woodpeckers to affect survival; females with few available cover patches had a lower probability of survival than either males or females with more cover patches. At the median number of cover patches available (n = 6), breeding season survival of females was 0.82 (95% CI = 0.54-0.94) and of males was 0.60 (95% CI = 0.42-0.76). The number of cover patches available to woodpeckers appeared in all 3 of our top models predicting weekly survival, providing further evidence that woodpecker survival was positively associated with availability of cover. Woodpecker survival was not associated with snag density. Our results suggest that protection of {ge}0.7 cover patches per ha during vegetation control activities in mature pine forests will benefit survival of this Partners In Flight Watch List species.

  13. Role of decompressive surgery in the management of severe head injuries: prognostic factors and patient selection.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Tanju; Akyuz, Mahmut; Kazan, Saim; Tuncer, Recai

    2005-11-01

    Decompressive surgery or craniectomy (DC) is a treatment option, which should be considered when the intracranial pressure (ICP) cannot be treated by conservative methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of decompressive craniectomy in patients with intractable posttraumatic intracranial hypertension and to evaluate the patient selection criteria for this management protocol. In this study, 100 patients with severe head injuries were involved. All patients were treated according to the European Brain Injury Consortium (EBIC) guidelines for severe head injuries and were assessed based on individual initial Glasgow Coma Scores (GCS), age, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), presence of systemic injury, changes in ICP, presence of mass lesion and the right timing for DC. All patients presented with a GCS of 8 or below. Based on their initial GCS, the patients were divided in two groups of 60 (group I with GCS 4-5) and 40 (group II with GCS 6-8) in each, respectively. Prognosis was evaluated according to the (GOS). After treatment with DC, 84 of the patients (84%) showed unfavorable and 16 (16%) showed favorable outcomes. In group I, 58 patients (96.6%) showed unfavorable and two (3.4%) showed favorable outcomes. In group II, 26 (65%) patients showed unfavorable and 14 (25%) showed favorable outcomes. The importance of initial GCS and age in patient outcomes were statistically significant. The presence of systemic injuries or mass lesions in outcomes were not statistically significant. Based on our findings, we conclude that patients with Glasgow Coma Scores of 6-8 are the best candidates for DC treatment.

  14. The generalized star product and the factorization of scattering matrices on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrykin, V.; Schrader, R.

    2001-04-01

    In this article we continue our analysis of Schrödinger operators on arbitrary graphs given as certain Laplace operators. In the present article we give the proof of the composition rule for the scattering matrices. This composition rule gives the scattering matrix of a graph as a generalized star product of the scattering matrices corresponding to its subgraphs. We perform a detailed analysis of the generalized star product for arbitrary unitary matrices. The relation to the theory of transfer matrices is also discussed.

  15. Dosimetric Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Desmond, Renee A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Intensification of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer may lead to increased rates of dysphagia. Dosimetric predictors of objective findings of long-term dysphagia were sought. Methods and Materials: From an institutional database, 83 patients were identified who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, after exclusion of those who were treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary lesion, had locoregional recurrence at any time, had less than 12 months of follow-up, or had postoperative radiotherapy. Dosimetric parameters were analyzed relative to three objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube dependence at 12 months, aspiration on modified barium swallow, or pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Results: Mean dose greater than 41 Gy and volume receiving 60 Gy (V{sub 60}) greater than 24% to the larynx were significantly associated with PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 60} greater than 12% to the inferior pharyngeal constrictor was also significantly associated with increased PEG tube dependence and aspiration. V{sub 65} greater than 33% to the superior pharyngeal constrictor or greater than 75% to the middle pharyngeal constrictor was associated with pharyngoesophageal stricture requiring dilation. Conclusions: Doses to the larynx and pharyngeal constrictors predicted long-term swallowing complications, even when controlled for other clinical factors. The addition of these structures to intensity-modulated radiotherapy optimization may reduce the incidence of dysphagia, although cautious clinical validation is necessary.

  16. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  17. Factors that increase external pressure to the fibular head region, but not medial region, during use of a knee-crutch/leg-holder system in the lithotomy position

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Ju; Takahashi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Background Paralysis of the common peroneal nerve is one of the relatively common nerve injuries related to the lithotomy position with the use of a knee-crutch/leg-holder system. Several risk factors have been implicated in lithotomy position-related common peroneal nerve paralysis during operation. Materials and methods In the present study, 21 young healthy volunteers participated in the investigation of the causes of the paralysis of the common peroneal nerve in the lithotomy position using a knee-crutch/leg-holder; Knee Crutch. We assessed the external pressure applied to the fibular head and medial regions using the Big-Mat pressure-distribution measurement system. Relationships between the peak contact pressure and physical characteristics, such as sex, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and fibular head circumference, were analyzed. Results The peak contact pressure to the fibular head region was greater for males than for females. For all subjects, significant positive correlations were observed between the peak contact pressure to the fibular head region and weight, BMI, or fibular head circumference. However, there was no significant difference between the peak contact pressure to the fibular head region and height for any subjects. Moreover, there was no sex-related difference in the peak contact pressure to the fibular medial region, and no significant differences between the peak contact pressure to the fibular medial region and height, weight, BMI, or fibular head circumference. Conclusion External pressure to the fibular head region is greater for males than for females using a knee-crutch/leg-holder system in the lithotomy position. In addition, the external pressure to the fibular head region, but not the fibular medial region, increases with increasing weight, BMI, and fibular head circumference. Therefore, these patient-related characteristics may contribute to the risk of developing lower-extremity neuropathy, leading to injury or ischemia

  18. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and ligand targeting in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, Mark G; Black, Leigh Ann; Kibbey, Megan M; Tingler, Melissa A; Day, Terry A; Rosenzweig, Steven A

    2007-04-18

    IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling is associated with increased tumorigenesis of epithelial cancers. In light of recent epidemiological studies correlating high circulating levels of IGF-1 with increased risk of second primary tumors (SPTs) of the head and neck, we examined IGF system and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) matched pairs and a cross-section of HNSCC cell lines. Employing the latter, we demonstrated that IGF-1 stimulated S-phase transition in a PI 3-K/Akt and Erk-dependent manner in 5 of 8 cell lines, with Erk activation being dependent upon EGFR kinase activity. IGF-1 stimulated thymidine incorporation was inhibited by treatment with IGFBP-3, the IGF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541, or the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478. Combining IGFBP-3 with NVP-AEW541 or AG1478 abrogated IGF-1 responses at 10-fold lower doses than either compound alone. These results demonstrate the potential for co-targeting the IGF system and EGFR in HNSCC.

  19. Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Pretreatment Evaluation, Predictive Factors, and Assessment during Radio-Chemotherapy, Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Merlano, Marco C.; Russi, Elvio G.

    2013-01-01

    Progress in head and neck cancer (HNC) therapies has improved tumor response, loco-regional control, and survival. However, treatment intensification also increases early and late toxicities. Dysphagia is an underestimated symptom in HNC patients. Impairment of swallowing process could cause malnutrition, dehydration, aspiration, and pneumonia. A comprehensive literature review finalized in May 2012 included searches of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and CAB abstracts) and scientific societies meetings materials (American Society of Clinical Oncology, Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica, Associazione Italiana di Oncologia Cervico-Cefalica, American Head and Neck Society, and European Society for Medical Oncology). Hand-searches of HNC journals and reference lists were carried out. Approximately one-third of dysphagia patients developed pneumonia requiring treatment. Aspiration pneumonia associated mortality ranged from 20% to 65%. Unidentified dysphagia caused significant morbidity, increased mortality, and decreased the quality of life. In this review we underline definition, causes, predictive factors of dysphagia and report on pretreatment and on-treatment evaluation, suggesting some key points to avoid underestimation. A multi-parameter assessment of swallowing problems may allow an earlier diagnosis. An appropriate evaluation might lead to a better treatment of both symptoms and cancer. PMID:24069513

  20. Conduct problems and level of social competence in Head Start children: prevalence, pervasiveness, and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Webster-Stratton, C; Hammond, M

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the current project was to determine the prevalence of conduct problems, low social competence, and associated risk factors in a sample of 4-year-old low-income children (N = 426) from 64 Head Start classrooms in the Seattle area. Conduct problems and social competence were assessed based on a combination of teacher reports, parent reports, and independent observations of children interacting with peers in the classroom and with parents at home. We examined the relative contribution of a variety of risk factors, including maternal history and socioeconomic background, current levels of stress and social support, mothers' emotional state, and parenting competence in relation to "pervasive" (i.e., at home and school) and "nonpervasive" conduct problems and low social competence. Findings indicated similar risk factors for conduct problems and for low social competence, with an ordered increase in the number of risk factors from normal to "nonpervasive" to "pervasive" groups. Harshness of parenting style (i.e., slapping, hitting, yelling) significantly distinguished between the three groups for low social competence and conduct problems. Positive affect, praise, and physical warmth from mothers were positively related to social competence but unrelated to conduct problems. PMID:11324301

  1. Conduct problems and level of social competence in Head Start children: prevalence, pervasiveness, and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Webster-Stratton, C; Hammond, M

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the current project was to determine the prevalence of conduct problems, low social competence, and associated risk factors in a sample of 4-year-old low-income children (N = 426) from 64 Head Start classrooms in the Seattle area. Conduct problems and social competence were assessed based on a combination of teacher reports, parent reports, and independent observations of children interacting with peers in the classroom and with parents at home. We examined the relative contribution of a variety of risk factors, including maternal history and socioeconomic background, current levels of stress and social support, mothers' emotional state, and parenting competence in relation to "pervasive" (i.e., at home and school) and "nonpervasive" conduct problems and low social competence. Findings indicated similar risk factors for conduct problems and for low social competence, with an ordered increase in the number of risk factors from normal to "nonpervasive" to "pervasive" groups. Harshness of parenting style (i.e., slapping, hitting, yelling) significantly distinguished between the three groups for low social competence and conduct problems. Positive affect, praise, and physical warmth from mothers were positively related to social competence but unrelated to conduct problems.

  2. Quality of life associated factors in head and neck cancer patients in a developing country using the FACT-H&N.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Sobia; Doss, Jennifer Geraldine; Cella, David; Rogers, Simon N

    2015-03-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) associated factors are vital considerations prior to treatment decision-making for head and neck cancer patients. The study aimed to identify potential socio-demographic and clinical prognostic value of HRQoL in head and neck cancer patients in a developing country. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H&N)-V4 in Urdu language was administered among 361 head and neck cancer patients. Data were statistically tested through multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and regression modeling to identify the potentially associated factors. Treatment status, tumor stage and tumor site had the strongest negative impact on patients HRQoL, with a statistically significant decrement in FACT summary scales (effect size >0.15). Moderate associated factors of HRQoL included treatment type, marital status, employment status and age (effect size range 0.06-0.15). Weak associated factors of HRQoL with a small effect size (>0.01-0.06) included tumor size and type, gender, education level and ethnicity. This study reports 12 socio-demographic and clinical variables that have a significant impact on HRQoL of head, and neck cancer patients, and that should be considered during treatment decision-making by multidisciplinary teams and also in future HRQoL studies conducted in other developing countries.

  3. Lifestyle Factors in Cancer Survivorship: Where We Are and Where We Are Headed

    PubMed Central

    Vijayvergia, Namrata; Denlinger, Crystal S.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in early detection and curative therapies have led to an increased number of cancer survivors over the last twenty years. With this population comes the need to evaluate the late and long term effects of cancer treatment and develop recommendations about how to optimally care for these survivors. Lifestyle factors (diet, body weight, physical activity, and smoking) have been linked to a higher risk of many medical comorbidities (cardiovascular, metabolic, etc.). There is increasing evidence linking these factors to the risk of developing cancer and likely cancer-related outcomes. This link has been studied extensively in common cancers like breast, colon, prostate, and lung cancers through observational studies and is now being prospectively evaluated in interventional studies. Realizing that survivors are highly motivated to improve their overall health after a diagnosis of cancer, healthy lifestyle recommendations from oncology providers can serve as a strong tool to motivate survivors to adopt health behavior changes. Our article aims to review the evidence that links lifestyle factors to cancer outcomes and provides clinical recommendations for cancer survivors. PMID:26147495

  4. The pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β2 in glaucomatous damage to the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2011-08-01

    In patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), the optic nerve head (ONH) shows characteristic cupping correlated with visual field defects. The progressive optic neuropathy is characterized by irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC). The critical risk factor for axonal damage at the ONH is an elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). The increase in IOP correlates with axonal loss in the ONH, which might be due to an impaired axoplasmatic flow leading to the loss of RGCs. Damage to the optic nerve is thought to occur in the lamina cribrosa (LC) region of the ONH, which is composed of characteristic sieve-like connective tissue cribriform plates through which RGC axons exit the eye. The cupping of the optic disc, and the compression and excavation of LC are characteristic signs of glaucomatous ONH remodelling. In ONH of POAG patients a disorganized distribution and deposition of elastic fibers and a typical pronounced thickening of the connective tissue septae surrounding the optic nerve fibers is found. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 could be one of the pathogenic factors responsible for the structural alterations in POAG patients as the TGF-β2 levels in the ONH of glaucomatous eyes are elevated as well as in the aqueous homour. TGF-β2 leads to an increased synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules mediated by connective tissue growth factor and to an impaired ECM degradation in cultured ONH astrocytes. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 effectively antagonizes the effects of TGF-β2 on matrix deposition. The BMP antagonist gremlin blocks this inhibition, allowing TGF-β2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Overall, the ECM in the ONH is kept in balance in the OHN by factors that augment or block the activity of TGF-β2.

  5. Ethnicity, location, age, and fluoridation factors in baby bottle tooth decay and caries prevalence of Head Start children.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G P; Parker, W A; Lyon, T C; Drum, M A; Coleman, G C

    1992-01-01

    Baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD) is a term applied to a specific form of rampant decay associated with inappropriate bottle or breast feeding of infants and young children. Although the prevalence of BBTD has been studied in individual ethnic groups, comparison studies are rare. Head Start children have frequently served as study subjects for assessing the prevalence of BBTD. The purpose of this study was to compare BBTD and caries prevalence among Head Start children who are members of four ethnic groups in five southwestern States. Age, residence, and fluoridation status were also compared for the total sample and ethnic categories. The sampling process was a stratified random site selection; it was used to obtain data on 1,230 children. This number constituted 3 percent of the children enrolled in Head Start in Public Health Service Region VI (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) where the study was conducted. The criterion for determining the presence of BBTD was based on the number of carious deciduous maxillary incisors observed. The severity of the condition was reported as two of four and three of four of the target teeth affected. Thus, two levels of severity are reported. BBTD was prevalent in approximately 24 percent and 15 percent of the total sample, depending on the severity criterion used. Native American children had a significantly higher (P less than 0.05) prevalence than Hispanic, white, and black subjects. Rural children had significantly higher (P less than 0.05) prevalence of BBTD than nonrural children for all ethnic groups except whites. The prevalence of decayed and filled (df) surfaces of primary dentition was significantly greater for all rural than for non rural groups (P< 0.05).Children attending centers showed no significant differences based on fluoride status for the total sample or other variables. BBTD and caries prevalence increased with age. Studies are needed to identify predisposing factors among the ethnic

  6. Factors associated with general self-efficacy and resilience among youth heads of households in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Michael L; Lloyd, Linda E; Selwyn, Beatrice J; Morgan, Robert O; Mwongera, Moses; Gitari, Stanley; Keiser, Philip H

    2016-10-01

    This study assesses resilience and general self-efficacy among Kenyan orphans and vulnerable children (n = 1060) active in a community-based program combining economic household strengthening with psychosocial support. Quantile regression analyses modeled associations between the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of resilience and general self-efficacy and multiple covariates. Program participation positively predicted increased general self-efficacy at all levels. Program participation predicted increased resilience at the 25th percentile but decreased resilience at the 75th percentile. Other significant predictors included economic, educational, sexual behavior and other demographic factors. This study suggests support for an integrated approach to economic and psychosocial empowerment.

  7. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering from {sup 4}He and the Strange Electric Form Factor of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Aniol, Konrad; Armstrong, David; Averett, Todd; Benaoum, Hachemi; Bertin, Pierre; Burtin, Etienne; Cahoon, Jason; Cates, Gordon; Chang, C; Chao, Yu-Chiu; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Craver, Brandon; Cusanno, Francesco; Decowski, Piotr; Deepa, Deepa; Ferdi, Catherine; Feuerbach, Robert; Finn, John; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuoti, Kirsten; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Gorbenko, V; Grames, Joseph; Hansknecht, John; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmes, Richard; Holmstrom, Timothy; Humensky, Thomas; Ibrahim, Hassan; Jager, Cornelis De; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kowalski, Stanley; Kumar, Krishna; Lambert, Daniel; Laviolette, Peter; LeRose, John; Lhuillier, David; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Mazouz, Malek; McCormick, Kathy; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Monaghan, Peter; Camacho, Carlos Munoz; Nanda, Sirish; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Neyret, Damien; Paschke, Kent; Poelker, Benard; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Qiang, Yi; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Julie; Saha, Arunava; Singh, Jaideep; Snyder, Ryan; Souder, Paul; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vacheret, Antonin; Voutier, Eric; Wang, Kebin; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2005-06-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from {sup 4}He at an average scattering angle {theta}{sub lab} = 5.7 degrees and a four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 0.091 GeV{sup 2}. From these data, for the first time, the strange electric form factor of the nucleon G{sub E}{sup s} can be isolated. The measured asymmetry of A{sub PV} = 6.72 {+-} 0.84 (stat) {+-} 0.21 (syst) parts per million yields a value of G{sub E}{sup s} = -0.038 {+-} 0.042 (stat) {+-} 0.010 (syst), consistent with zero.

  8. Search for optimal conditions for exploring double-parton scattering in four-jet production: kT -factorization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutak, Krzysztof; Maciuła, Rafał; Serino, Mirko; Szczurek, Antoni; van Hameren, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we discuss how to maximize the double-parton scattering (DPS) contribution in four-jet production by selecting kinematical cuts. Here both single-parton and double-parton scattering effects are calculated in the kT -factorization approach, following our recent developments of relevant methods and tools. Several differential distributions are shown and discussed in the context of future searches for DPS effects, such as rapidity of jets, rapidity distance, and azimuthal correlations between jets. The dependence of the relative DPS amount is studied as a function of those observables. The regions with an enhanced DPS contribution are identified. Future experimental explorations could extract more precise values of σeff and its potential dependence on kinematical variables.

  9. An investigation of the factors influencing the detection sensitivity of cavity enhanced Raman scattering for probing aqueous binary aerosol droplets.

    PubMed

    Symes, Rachel; Gilham, Richard J J; Sayer, Robert M; Reid, Jonathan P

    2005-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from single aerosol droplets can be observed at extremely low laser threshold intensities at wavelengths commensurate with whispering gallery modes. Although droplet size can routinely be determined from the ensuing cavity enhanced Raman scattering (CERS) fingerprint, determining droplet composition is a considerably more challenging measurement. We present here an examination of the factors that influence and limit the detection sensitivity of CERS in quantifying the concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in water droplets, 20-50 microm in radius. In particular, we consider the variation in nitrate and sulfate SRS signal with variation in species concentration, probe laser intensity and droplet size. We illustrate that the band contour of the OH stretching band can be used as a relative measure of the internal light intensity circulating within the droplet and experimentally investigate how the threshold condition for SRS is achieved.

  10. Impact of boron-interstitial clusters on Hall scattering factor in high-dose boron-implanted ultrashallow junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Severac, Fabrice; Cristiano, Fuccio; Bedel-Pereira, Elena; Fazzini, Pier Francesco; Lerch, Wilfried; Paul, Silke; Hebras, Xavier; Giannazzo, Filippo

    2009-02-15

    The Hall scattering factor r{sub H} has been determined for holes in high-dose boron-implanted ultrashallow junctions containing high concentrations of boron-interstitial clusters (BICs), combining scanning capacitance microscopy, nanospreading resistance, Hall effect, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements. A value of r{sub H}=0.74{+-}0.1 has been found in reference defect-free fully activated junctions, in good agreement with the existing literature. In the case of junctions containing high concentrations of immobile and electrically inactive BICs, and independently of the implant or the annealing process, the r{sub H} value has been found to be equal to 0.95{+-}0.1. The increase in the r{sub H} value is explained in terms of the additional scattering centers associated to the presence of high concentrations of BICs.

  11. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering from {sup 4}He and the Strange Electric Form Factor of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Armstrong, D.S.; Averett, T.; Finn, J.M.; Holmstrom, T.; Kelleher, A.; Moffit, B.; Sulkosky, V.; Benaoum, H.; Holmes, R.; Souder, P.A.; Bertin, P.Y.; Ferdi, C.

    2006-01-20

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from {sup 4}He at an average scattering angle <{theta}{sub lab}>=5.7 deg. and a four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2}=0.091 GeV{sup 2}. From these data, for the first time, the strange electric form factor of the nucleon G{sub E}{sup s} can be isolated. The measured asymmetry of A{sub PV}=(6.72{+-}0.84{sub (stat)}{+-}0.21{sub (syst)})x10{sup -6} yields a value of G{sub E}{sup s}=-0.038{+-}0.042{sub (stat)}{+-}0.010{sub (syst)}, consistent with zero.

  12. The Effect of Socioeconomic Factors on Quality of Life After Treatment in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demiral, Ayse Nur Sen, Mehmet; Demiral, Yuecel; Kinay, Muenir

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of socioeconomic factors on quality of life (QoL) after treatment in patients with head and neck carcinoma (HNC). Patients and Methods: The study population included 50 HNC patients seen in their control examinations after radiotherapy during a 2-month interval and who were willing to complete the Short-Form 36 QoL questionnaire. Socioeconomic, demographic, and tumor- and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their effect on physical component summary score (PCS) and mental component summary score (MCS) using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: All patients received radiotherapy, and 33 patients (66%) underwent surgery for the primary tumor and/or neck disease. Chemotherapy was given in 9 patients (18%). Mean PCS and MCS were 47.9 (range, 24.8-59.3) and 46.7 (range, 22-63.3) for the whole patient population. There was no significant factor affecting PCS. Education level of 'middle school or higher,' perceived economic status of 'medium or higher,' social security status of not being 'absent or minimally covered,' and unilateral type of neck surgery were found to increase MCS significantly. According to separate linear regression analyses performed for three socioeconomic variables, the most significant factor for MCS was social security status compared with education level and perceived economic status. It was the only parameter that retained its significance when all five parameters were combined in a linear regression model. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that educational status, perceived economic status, and social security status showed a significant effect on the QoL of HNC patients after radiotherapy. When all variables were taken into account, only 'social security status' remained significant.

  13. Meta-analysis of Factor V Leiden G1691A polymorphism and osteonecrosis of femoral head susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    SHANG, XIFU; LUO, ZHENGLIANG; LI, XU; HU, FEI; ZHAO, QICHUN; ZHANG, WENZHI

    2013-01-01

    Testing for genetic risk associations between Factor V Leiden (FVL) and the osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is common, however, inconsistent results have been previously obtained. To summarize results on the association of FVL mutation polymorphism with ONFH in various populations and to calculate the overall genetic risk factors, we performed a search of electronic databases including PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and the Chinese Biomedical Database to identify published studies correlating the FVL mutation with ONFH. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan) version 5.0 and Stata statistical software (version 10). We identified 57 titles and included 7 studies comprising 481 cases and 867 controls in this meta-analysis. The groups were pooled, and a significant association between FVL mutation and increased ONFH was found (OR=4.55, 95% CI, 2.75–7.52, P<0.00001). This meta-analysis demonstrated that FVL plays an important role in non-Asian populations. Large sample studies including different ethnic groups and age- and gender-matched groups, as well as multiple gene polymorphism detection should be considered to clarify the association of FVL mutation polymorphism and ONFH susceptibility in the future. PMID:24648992

  14. Identification of chemoresistant factors by protein expression analysis with iTRAQ for head and neck carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, K; Tsuchiya, Y; Okamoto, H; Ijichi, K; Gosho, M; Fukayama, M; Yoshikawa, K; Ueda, H; Bradford, C R; Carey, T E; Ogawa, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin and other anticancer drugs are important in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma; however, some tumours develop drug resistance. If chemoresistance could be determined before treatment, unnecessary drug administration would be avoided. Here, we investigated chemoresistance factors by comprehensive analyses at the protein level. Methods: Four human carcinoma cell lines were used: cisplatin-sensitive UM-SCC-23, UM-SCC-23-CDDPR with acquired cisplatin resistance, naturally cisplatin-resistant UM-SCC-81B, and UM-SCC-23/WR with acquired 5-fluorouracil resistance. Extracted proteins were labelled with iTRAQ and analysed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify resistance. Protein expression was confirmed by western blotting and functional analysis was carried out using siRNA. Results: Thirteen multiple-drug resistance proteins were identified, as well as seven proteins with specific resistance to cisplatin, including α-enolase. Differential expression of these proteins in cisplatin-resistant and -sensitive cell lines was confirmed by western blotting. Functional analysis for α-enolase by siRNA showed that cisplatin sensitivity significantly was increased in UM-SCC-81B and slightly in UM-SCC-23-CDDPR but not in UM-SCC-23/WR cells. Conclusions: We identified proteins thought to mediate anticancer drug resistance using recent proteome technology and identified α-enolase as a true cisplatin chemoresistance factor. Such proteins could be used as biomarkers for anticancer agent resistance and as targets of cancer therapy. PMID:25032734

  15. Meta-analysis of Factor V Leiden G1691A polymorphism and osteonecrosis of femoral head susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xifu; Luo, Zhengliang; Li, Xu; Hu, Fei; Zhao, Qichun; Zhang, Wenzhi

    2013-07-01

    Testing for genetic risk associations between Factor V Leiden (FVL) and the osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is common, however, inconsistent results have been previously obtained. To summarize results on the association of FVL mutation polymorphism with ONFH in various populations and to calculate the overall genetic risk factors, we performed a search of electronic databases including PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure and the Chinese Biomedical Database to identify published studies correlating the FVL mutation with ONFH. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan) version 5.0 and Stata statistical software (version 10). We identified 57 titles and included 7 studies comprising 481 cases and 867 controls in this meta-analysis. The groups were pooled, and a significant association between FVL mutation and increased ONFH was found (OR=4.55, 95% CI, 2.75-7.52, P<0.00001). This meta-analysis demonstrated that FVL plays an important role in non-Asian populations. Large sample studies including different ethnic groups and age- and gender-matched groups, as well as multiple gene polymorphism detection should be considered to clarify the association of FVL mutation polymorphism and ONFH susceptibility in the future.

  16. Polynesian head form: an interpretation of a factor analysis of Cartesian co-ordinate data.

    PubMed Central

    Buranarugsa, M; Houghton, P

    1981-01-01

    The three dimensional co-ordinates of a large number of landmarks on a series of Polynesian skulls have been obtained by means of a diagraph, and from standard lateral cephalograms. The method is accurate, and a very large amount of data is stored in the concise form of the standardized co-ordinates. A factor analysis of some of these data defines a number of distinct craniofacial segments showing independent variation in positioning, and therefore presumably growth, along defined axes. The segments thus defined relate well to the conclusions of other studies of skull growth and form, and support the view that the basis of cranial variation is the same for all Homo sapiens. It is suggested that the strict independence of the isolated craniofacial segments may be a consequence of the particular method, and may not truly reflect the situation in the growing skull. PMID:7328041

  17. New relativistic S-matrix results for scattering -- beyond the usual anomalous factors/beyond impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.H.; Bergstrom, P.M. Jr.; Kissel, L. |

    1993-08-01

    The relativistic second-order S-matrix elements for photon-atom scattering have been successfully calculated with numerical methods within the independent particle approximation (IPA). This permits an assessment of the validity of simpler approximate predictions which are commonly used and it offers the possibility of improved tabulations of theoretical predictions. A variety of unresolved issues remain, some associated with the relativistic theory, some with IPA. The systematic use of the second-order S-matrix in calculations of Rayleigh scattering from isolated atoms has led to significant progress in understanding this process and to a wide range of agreement with experiment. The energy and angular dependence of anomalous factors and the importance of relativistic, higher-multipole and bound-bound contributions in their calculation is better understood. However correlation effects must also be included to obtain predictions for the near-edge region, such extensions of the present S-matrix calculation have been discussed but few results are sofar available. Existing empirical approaches can be assessed in regard to their success in dealing with known IPA features. We have recently calculated the relativistic second-order S-matrix element for Compton scattering and have begun to try to understand this process in different regions. We can discuss when the more complete calculation confirms the standard Compton peak. In the softer part of the spectrum impulse approximation fails. There can be resonant Raman peaks, and in the soft-photon region the spectrum is infrared divergent, proportional to the photoeffect angular distribution. This means the traditional incoherent scattering factor is undefined in the absence of a low-energy detector efficiency cutoff.

  18. Head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child's head circumference Normal ranges for a child's sex and age (weeks, months), based on values that experts have obtained for normal growth rates of infants' and children's heads Measurement of the head circumference is an ...

  19. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  20. Inelastic x-ray scattering studies on dynamic structure factor of polymeric liquid Se under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Masanori; Kajihara, Yukio; Kimura, Koji; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Ohara, Koji; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke

    2015-08-17

    Inelastic X-ray scattering measurements at 25 MPa using synchrotron radiation were carried out for semiconducting liquid Se at high temperatures up to 1673 K. The excitation energy of the acoustic mode disperses approximately 10-50 % faster than the ultrasonic sound velocity in the observed temperature range while the ultrasonic sound rapidly slows down with increasing temperature. We carried out X-ray scattering measurements and found that the average coordination number at 1673 K is 1.3, indicating that the high temperature liquid consists of short chain molecules. These results suggest that weakening of the interatomic interaction is correlated with breaking of polymeric chain molecules.

  1. The prevalence of food insecurity and associated factors among households with children in Head Start programs in Houston, Texas and Birmingham, Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study measured food security and hunger of households enrolled in Head Start in Houston, Texas, and Birmingham, Alabama and assessed factors that could affect food security. Interviewers collected data from primary caregivers on demographic characteristics, dietary intake, and the six-item US f...

  2. [Nutritional risk factors in patients with head and neck cancer in oncology care center Michoacan state].

    PubMed

    García Rojas Vázquez, L E; Trujano-Ramos, L A; Pérez-Rivera, E

    2013-01-01

    En Michoacán, México, el cáncer de cabeza y cuello (CCC), es el tercer tipo de cáncer más frecuente y representa el 12% de las defunciones. El incremento de la desnutrición en un paciente con CCC se ha relacionado con el aumento en la mortalidad. Material y métodos: Se estudiaron de forma prospectiva 30 pacientes de ambos sexos, mayores de 18 años de edad con cáncer de cabeza y cuello del Centro de Atención Oncológica del Estado de Michoacán. En el periodo de evaluación comprendido de agosto de 2010 a agosto de 2011. Se utilizaron los formatos de VGS-Oncológico (Valoración Global Subjetiva), NRS 2002 (Nutritional risk screen) y GUSS (Gugging Swallowing Screen), por medio de los cuales se determinó el riesgo nutricional, y se estableció la capacidad deglutoria de la población estudiada. Resultados: El 53,3% de la población presento desnutrición moderada según la VGS Oncológica, El 33% registro pérdida de peso. La NRS 2002 muestro que el 43,3% se encuentra en riesgo de desnutrición. El grado de disfagia se muestra con mayor frecuencia en aquellos pacientes de mayor edad, el tipo cáncer que comprometía la vía oral y el estadio de la enfermedad. Conclusiones: Las escalas de riesgo nutricional se relacionan de manera directamente proporcional con la localización del tumor y el estadio, además, existen otros factores distintos a los oncológicos que participan en el deterioro nutricional del paciente. Por lo cual es de vital importancia contar con un nutriólogo como parte del equipo multidisciplinario, para detectar el riesgo nutricional y poder manejarlo de manera oportuna.

  3. Neutron Scattering Facility for the Measurement of Light Quenching Factors of Dark Matter Detectors at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, R.; Ciemniak, C.; Deuter, G.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Gütlein, A.; Hagn, H.; Jochum, J.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Lepelmeier, J.; Pfister, S.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Rottler, K.; Sailer, C.; Scholl, S.; von Sivers, M.; Thalhammer, U.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Usherov, I.

    2012-06-01

    The light yield of scintillating crystals which is quantified by light Quenching Factors (QFs) strongly depends on the kind of interaction in the crystal. For Dark Matter experiments like CRESST the precise knowledge of QFs is crucial for the discrimination of background events from possible WIMP signals. At the tandem accelerator of the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratorium (MLL) in Garching a low-temperature scattering facility was set up, which in its current phase aims at the determination of the QFs of O, Ca, and W in CaWO4 crystals as used in the CRESST experiment. A CRESST detector module consists of a 300 g CaWO4 target crystal operated as a phonon detector and a separate silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) light detector to detect the corresponding scintillation light simultaneously. In order to disentangle the light yield corresponding to O, Ca and W recoils, monoenergetic neutrons (11 MeV) produced by the accelerator are scattered off an especially developed CRESST-like detector module, which is operated at mK temperatures in a dilution refrigerator. Arrays of liquid-scintillator detectors placed at fixed scattering angles allow one to identify the recoiling nuclei by a neutron time-of-flight measurement. The unique facility is suited for the characterization of different detector materials and will be a powerful tool also for the future multi-material experiment EURECA. We report on the experimental approach, the low-temperature setup and present first results.

  4. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  5. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  6. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection.

    PubMed

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-18

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single 'complex peak' in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  7. Honokiol inhibits the growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tripti; Gupta, Nirzari A; Xu, Su; Prasad, Ram; Velu, Sadanandan E; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2015-08-28

    Here, we report the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol, a phytochemical from Magnolia plant, on human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Treatment of HNSCC cell lines from different sub-sites, SCC-1 (oral cavity), SCC-5 (larynx), OSC-19 (tongue) and FaDu (pharynx) with honokiol inhibited their cell viability, which was associated with the: (i) induction of apoptosis, (ii) correction of dysregulatory cell cycle proteins of G0/G1 phase. Honokiol decreased the expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mTOR and their downstream signaling molecules. Treatment of FaDu and SCC-1 cell lines with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR pathway, also reduced cell viability of HNSCC cells. Administration of honokiol by oral gavage (100 mg/kg body weight) significantly (P < 0.01-0.001) inhibited the growth of SCC-1 and FaDu xenografts in athymic nude mice, which was associated with: (i) inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, (ii) induction of apoptosis, (iii) reduced expressions of cyclins and Cdks, and (iv) inhibition of EGFR signaling pathway. Molecular docking analysis of honokiol in EGFR binding site indicated that the chemotherapeutic effect of honokiol against HNSCC is mediated through its firm binding with EGFR, which is better than that of gefitinib, a commonly used drug for HNSCC treatment.

  8. Differential diagnostic value of computed tomography perfusion combined with vascular endothelial growth factor expression in head and neck lesions

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIE; TANG, ZUOHUA; WANG, SHUYI; ZENG, WENJIAO; QIAN, WEN; WU, LINGJIE; WANG, WENZHONG; LUO, JIANFENG

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous types of head and neck lesions (HNLs), and conventional computed tomography (CT) has low specificity and sensitivity in the definitive and differential diagnosis of HNLs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of perfusion CT (CTP) combined with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in the differentiation between malignant and benign HNLs. In total, 41 HNLs, which were pathologically confirmed, underwent CTP and VEGF expression analysis. All lesions were divided into three groups: Group A, benign hypovascular lesions; Group B, benign hypervascular lesions; and Group C, malignant lesions. Time density curve (TDC) and CTP parameters [maximum intensity projection (MIP), blood volume (BV), blood flow (BF), mean transit time and capillary permeability] were analyzed. The association between perfusion measurements and VEGF was assessed using Pearson's correlation. TDCs were classified into three types, and type I was more frequently identified in benign tumors (Groups A and B) compared with malignant tumors (Group C) (P=0.003). Malignant tumors primarily had a TDC of type II and III. MIP, BF and BV were all significantly higher in Groups B and C compared to Group A (P<0.01). VEGF expression of malignant tumors was significantly higher than benign tumors (P=0.007). No correlation was identified between VEGF and any CTP parameter. The present findings suggest that CTP combined with VEGF may differentiate between malignant and benign HNLs, and between benign hypovascular and hypervascular lesions. PMID:27123114

  9. Targeting Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity Through Modulation of Epidermal Growth Factor and Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Signaling in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Hui Sun; Chong, Fui Teen; Sew, Pui Hoon; Lau, Dawn P.; Wong, Bernice H.; Teh, Bin-Tean

    2014-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that cancer stem cells (CSCs) exist in equilibrium with differentiated cells and that stochastic transitions between these states can account for tumor heterogeneity and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro system that recapitulates stem cell plasticity in head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCCs) and identify the factors that play a role in the maintenance and repopulation of CSCs. Tumor spheres were established using patient-derived cell lines via anchorage-independent cell culture techniques. These tumor spheres were found to have higher aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD) cell fractions and increased expression of Kruppel-like factor 4, SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2, and Nanog and were resistant to γ-radiation, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and etoposide treatment compared with monolayer culture cells. Monolayer cultures were subject to single cell cloning to generate clones with high and low ALD fractions. ALDHigh clones showed higher expression of stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers compared with ALDLow clones. ALD fractions, representing stem cell fractions, fluctuated with serial passaging, equilibrating at a level specific to each cell line, and could be augmented by the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and/or insulin. ALDHigh clones showed increased EGF receptor (EGFR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) phosphorylation, with increased activation of downstream pathways compared with ALDLow clones. Importantly, blocking these pathways using specific inhibitors against EGFR and IGF-1R reduced stem cell fractions drastically. Taken together, these results show that HNSCC CSCs exhibit plasticity, with the maintenance of the stem cell fraction dependent on the EGFR and IGF-1R pathways and potentially amenable to targeted therapeutics. PMID:25024430

  10. Meteoric Head Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajduk, A.; Galád, A.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 3261 radar meteor head echoes observed during the Orionid and Lyrid periods by the high-power radar of the Springhill Meteor Observatory are given. Dependence of the occurence of head echoes on the geometrical factors and physical properties of the meteoroids has been studied. Increas of the head echo rates with the elevation of the shower radiant and with the velocity of meteoroids has been observed.

  11. Influence of electron-neutral collisions on the Compton scattering cross section and the Salpeter structure factor in warm collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-03-15

    The electron-neutral collision effects on the Compton scattering process are investigated in warm collisional plasmas. The Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas is obtained by the Salpeter structure factor with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the plasma dielectric function as a function of the electron-neutral collision frequency, Debye length, and wave number. It is shown that the influence of electron-neutral collision strongly suppresses the Compton scattering cross section in warm collisional plasmas. It is also found that the electron-neutral collision effect on the differential Compton scattering cross section is more significant in forward scattering directions. We show that the differential Compton scattering cross section has a maximum at the scattering angle φ=π/2. In addition, we find that the electron-neutral collision effect on the total Compton scattering cross section increases with increasing Debye length and wave number. The variation of the Compton scattering cross section due to the change of collision frequency and plasma parameters is also discussed.

  12. Experience of head and neck theatre staff and attitudes to human factors using an aviation-based analysis and classification system--a pilot survey.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Katarzyna M; Seager, Leonie; Scott, Jim; Colbert, Serryth; Dale, Trevor; Brennan, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    The role that human factors have in contributing to air crashes is well known and is included as an essential part of training. Awareness of human factors in surgery is increasingly being recognised but surprisingly few papers have come from head and neck specialties. We circulated a questionnaire on human factors based on an aviation model to 140 head and neck medical and ancillary staff who work in operating theatres in 3 large UK hospitals. Most positive responses were found in the consultant group followed by trainee doctors and support staff. A significant difference was found in the subcategories of Unsafe Supervision (p=0.002) and Preconditions to Unsafe Acts (p=0.001). This work will help to identify multi-system deficiencies that can be corrected, and highlights aspects that may yield the greatest reduction in surgical errors.

  13. Magneto-transport in MoS2: phase coherence, spin-orbit scattering, and the hall factor.

    PubMed

    Neal, Adam T; Liu, Han; Gu, Jiangjiang; Ye, Peide D

    2013-08-27

    We have characterized phase coherence length, spin-orbit scattering length, and the Hall factor in n-type MoS2 2D crystals via weak localization measurements and Hall-effect measurements. Weak localization measurements reveal a phase coherence length of ~50 nm at T = 400 mK for a few-layer MoS2 film, decreasing as T(-1/2) with increased temperatures. Weak localization measurements also allow us, for the first time without optical techniques, to estimate the spin-orbit scattering length to be 430 nm, pointing to the potential of MoS2 for spintronics applications. Via Hall-effect measurements, we observe a low-temperature Hall mobility of 311 cm(2)/(V s) at T = 1 K, which decreases as a power law with a characteristic exponent γ = 1.5 from 10 to 60 K. At room temperature, we observe Hall mobility of 24 cm(2)/(V s). By determining the Hall factor for MoS2 to be 1.35 at T = 1 K and 2.4 at room temperature, we observe drift mobility of 420 and 56 cm(2)/(V s) at T = 1 K and room temperature, respectively.

  14. Optical constants and scattering factors from reflectivity measurements: 50 eV to 5 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.L.; Davis, J.C.; Graessle, D.E.; Burbine, T.H.; Gullikson, E.M.

    1992-12-01

    An improved reflection technique has been introduced to permit more accurate measurements of material optical constants {delta} and {beta}, the density {rho}, and from these the atomic scattering factors f {prime} and f {double_prime}. Regions of normal and anomolous dispersion can be measured with resolving power 1000 or larger using a portable reflectometer that is moved to any of three beamlines at NSLS or two at CHESS. Herein the reflectometer and measurement techniques are described together with sample characteristics and preliminary results for the Ni LIII edge and the M edges of Au, Pt, and Ir. The primary accuracy limiting factors are density determination, accumulation of surface oxides or carbonaceous deposits, and synchrotron orbit stability. Each sample must be prepared for the specific energy range to be measured so that model fitting routines have the minimum possible number of free variables.

  15. New Measurement of Parity Violation in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering and Implications for Strange Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad Aniol; David Armstrong; Todd Averett; Maud Baylac; Etienne Burtin; John Calarco; Gordon Cates; Christian Cavata; Zhengwei Chai; C. Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Marius Coman; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Martin Epstein; Stephanie Escoffier; Lars Ewell; Nicolas Falletto; John Finn; A. Fleck; Bernard Frois; Salvatore Frullani; Juncai Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Ashot Gasparian; G. M. Gerstner; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Jens-ole Hansen; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Maurik Holtrop; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Mauro Iodice; Cornelis De Jager; Johann Jardillier; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; J. Jorda; Christophe Jutier; W. Kahl; James Kelly; Donghee Kim; M. -J. Kim; Minsuk Kim; Ioannis Kominis; Edgar Kooijman; Kevin Kramer; Krishna Kumar; Michael Kuss; John LeRose; Raffaele De Leo; M. Leuschner; David Lhuillier; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; R. Lourie; Richard Madey; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Frederic Marie; Pete Markowitz; Jacques Martino; Peter Mastromarino; Kathy McCormick; Justin McIntyre; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Brian Milbrath; Gerald Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Ludyvine Morand; Damien Neyret; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; John Price; David Prout; Thierry Pussieux; Gilles Quemener; Ronald Ransome; David Relyea; Yves Roblin; Julie Roche; Gary Rutledge; Paul Rutt; Marat Rvachev; Franck Sabatie; Arunava Saha; Paul Souder; Marcus Spradlin; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Jeffrey Templon; T. Teresawa; James Thompson; Raphael Tieulent; Luminita Todor; Baris Tonguc; Paul Ulmer; Guido Urciuoli; Branislav Vlahovic; Krishni Wijesooriya; R. Wilson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Rhett Woo; Wang Xu; Imran Younus; C. Zhang

    2001-06-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from the proton. The result is A = -15.05 +- 0.98(stat) {+-} 0.56(syst) ppm at the kinematic point theta{sub lab} = 12.3 degrees and Q{sup 2} = 0.477 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The measurement implies that the value for the strange form factor (G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392 G{sub M}{sup s})/(G{sub M}{sup p} {mu}{sub p}) = 0.069 +- 0.056 +- 0.039, where the first error is experimental and the second arises from the uncertainties in electromagnetic form factors. This measurement is the first fixed-target parity violation experiment that used either a ''strained'' GaAs photocathode to produce highly polarized electrons or a Compton polarimeter to continuously monitor the electron beam polarization.

  16. Optical constants and scattering factors from reflectivity measurements: 50 eV to 5 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R.L.; Davis, J.C. ); Graessle, D.E.; Burbine, T.H. ); Gullikson, E.M. )

    1992-01-01

    An improved reflection technique has been introduced to permit more accurate measurements of material optical constants [delta] and [beta], the density [rho], and from these the atomic scattering factors f [prime] and f [double prime]. Regions of normal and anomolous dispersion can be measured with resolving power 1000 or larger using a portable reflectometer that is moved to any of three beamlines at NSLS or two at CHESS. Herein the reflectometer and measurement techniques are described together with sample characteristics and preliminary results for the Ni LIII edge and the M edges of Au, Pt, and Ir. The primary accuracy limiting factors are density determination, accumulation of surface oxides or carbonaceous deposits, and synchrotron orbit stability. Each sample must be prepared for the specific energy range to be measured so that model fitting routines have the minimum possible number of free variables.

  17. J. J. Sakurai Prize for Theoretical Particle Physics Talk: Hard scattering factorization in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John

    2009-05-01

    Many important cross sections in high-energy collisions are analyzed using factorization properties. I review the nature of factorization, how it arose from the parton model, and current issues in its development. This talk will be coordinated with the one by Soper.

  18. Axl mediates acquired resistance of head and neck cancer cells to the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Giles, Keith M; Kalinowski, Felicity C; Candy, Patrick A; Epis, Michael R; Zhang, Priscilla M; Redfern, Andrew D; Stuart, Lisa M; Goodall, Gregory J; Leedman, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Elevated expression and activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with development and progression of head and neck cancer (HNC) and a poor prognosis. Clinical trials with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., erlotinib) have been disappointing in HNC. To investigate the mechanisms mediating resistance to these agents, we developed an HNC cell line (HN5-ER) with acquired erlotinib resistance. In contrast to parental HN5 HNC cells, HN5-ER cells exhibited an epithelial-mesenchymal (EMT) phenotype with increased migratory potential, reduced E-cadherin and epithelial-associated microRNAs (miRNA), and elevated vimentin expression. Phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinase profiling identified Axl activation in HN5-ER cells. Growth and migration of HN5-ER cells were blocked with a specific Axl inhibitor, R428, and R428 resensitized HN5-ER cells to erlotinib. Microarray analysis of HN5-ER cells confirmed the EMT phenotype associated with acquired erlotinib resistance, and identified activation of gene expression associated with cell migration and inflammation pathways. Moreover, increased expression and secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in HN5-ER cells suggested a role for inflammatory cytokine signaling in EMT and erlotinib resistance. Expression of the tumor suppressor miR-34a was reduced in HN5-ER cells and increasing its expression abrogated Axl expression and reversed erlotinib resistance. Finally, analysis of 302 HNC patients revealed that high tumor Axl mRNA expression was associated with poorer survival (HR = 1.66, P = 0.007). In summary, our results identify Axl as a key mediator of acquired erlotinib resistance in HNC and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of Axl by small molecule drugs or specific miRNAs might overcome anti-EGFR therapy resistance. PMID:24026012

  19. IMC-C225, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody, for treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Herbst, R S; Kim, E S; Harari, P M

    2001-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck (H&N) remains a clinical challenge due to its high rate of locoregional disease recurrence. The importance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in the development and progression of many solid tumours (including SCC of the H&N) is well understood; increased expression is associated with enhanced tumour invasion, resistance to chemotherapy and decreased patient survival. Several approaches have been developed to achieve EGFR blockade as an anticancer treatment strategy, including an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb), IMC-C225, which competitively binds to the extracellular receptor site to prevent binding by natural EGFR ligands (EGF and TGF-alpha). Preclinical studies evaluating this chimeric mAb in human cancer cell lines in vitro and human tumour xenografts in vivo have demonstrated its potent antitumour activity. The clinical efficacy of IMC-C225 appears to involve multiple anticancer mechanisms, including inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, anti-angiogenesis, inhibition of metastasis and its ability to enhance the response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Phase I studies of IMC-C225 combined with chemotherapy or radiation for SCC of the H&N demonstrate excellent response rates in patients with recurrent or refractory disease. Phase II and III trials examining the efficacy and safety of these combinations are currently underway. To date, IMC-C225 has been well-tolerated, with skin rashes and allergic reactions being the most clinically important adverse events reported. IMC-C225 displays dose-dependent elimination characteristics and a half-life of approximately 7 days. Current recommendations for dosing include a 400 mg/m2 loading dose, followed by weekly infusions of 250 mg/m2.

  20. Identification of independent risk factors for flap failure: A retrospective analysis of 1530 free flaps for breast, head and neck and extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Las, David E; de Jong, Tim; Zuidam, J Michiel; Verweij, Norbert M; Hovius, Steven E R; Mureau, Marc A M

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructive microsurgery is a powerful method of treating various complex defects. However, flap loss remains a possibility, leading to additional surgery, hospitalisation and costs. Consequently, it is important to know which factors lead to an increased risk of flap failure, so that measures can be undertaken to reduce this risk. Therefore, we analysed our results over a 20-year period to identify risk factors for flap failure after breast, head and neck and extremity reconstruction. The medical files of all patients treated between 1992 and 2012 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, surgical data and post-operative complications were scored, and independent risk factors for flap loss were identified. Reconstruction with a total of 1530 free flaps was performed in 1247 patients. Partial and total flap loss occurred in 5.5% and 4.4% of all free flaps, respectively. In all flaps, signs of compromised flap circulation were a risk factor for flap failure. More specifically, the risk factors for flap failure in breast reconstruction were previous radiotherapy, venous anastomosis revision, gluteal artery perforator (GAP) flap choice and post-operative bleeding. In head and neck reconstruction, pulmonary co-morbidity and anastomosis to the lingual vein or superficial temporal artery were risk factors, whereas a radial forearm flap reduced the risk. In extremity reconstruction, diabetes, prolonged anaesthesia time and post-operative wound infection were risk factors. Independent pre-, intra- and post-operative risk factors for flap failure after microvascular breast, head and neck and extremity reconstruction were identified. These results may be used to improve patient counselling and to adjust treatment algorithms to further reduce the chance of flap failure.

  1. Determination of the scattering coefficient of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of the anisotropy factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    The anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, has a strong influence on the calculation of the scattering coefficient μ s in inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulations. It has been reported that g has the wavelength and absorption dependence; however, few attempts have been made to calculate μ s using g values by taking the wavelength and absorption dependence into account. In this study, the angular distributions of scattered light for biological tissue phantoms containing hemoglobin as a light absorber were measured by a goniometric optical setup at strongly (405 nm) and weakly (664 nm) absorbing wavelengths to obtain g. Subsequently, the optical properties were calculated with the measured values of g by integrating sphere measurements and an iMC simulation, and compared with the results obtained with a conventional g value of 0.9. The μ s values with measured g were overestimated at the strongly absorbing wavelength, but underestimated at the weakly absorbing wavelength if 0.9 was used in the iMC simulation.

  2. Review of scattering and extinction cross-sections, damping factors, and resonance frequencies of a spherical gas bubble.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2011-11-01

    Perhaps the most familiar concepts when discussing acoustic scattering by bubbles are the resonance frequency for bubble pulsation, the bubbles' damping, and their scattering and extinction cross-sections, all of which are used routinely in oceanography, sonochemistry, and biomedicine. The apparent simplicity of these concepts is illusory: there exist multiple, sometimes contradictory definitions for their components. This paper reviews expressions and definitions in the literature for acoustical cross-sections, resonance frequencies, and damping factors of a spherically pulsating gas bubble in an infinite liquid medium, deriving two expressions for "resonance frequency" that are compared and reconciled with two others from the reviewed literature. In order to prevent errors, care is needed by researchers when combining results from different publications that might have used internally correct but mutually inconsistent definitions. Expressions are presented for acoustical cross-sections associated with forced pulsations damped by liquid shear and (oft-neglected) bulk or dilatational viscosities, gas thermal diffusivity, and acoustic re-radiation. The concept of a dimensionless "damping coefficient" is unsuitable for radiation damping because different cross-sections would require different functional forms for this parameter. Instead, terms based on the ratio of bubble radius to acoustic wavelength are included explicitly in the cross-sections where needed.

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  4. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prescription products. Over-the-counter shampoos and lotions containing pyrethrin (one brand name: Rid) or permethrin ( ... commonly used to treat head lice. Shampoos and lotions that kill head lice contain pesticides and other ...

  5. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor/bone morphogenetic protein-2 bone marrow combined modification of the mesenchymal stem cells to repair the avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Wei; Cui, Da-Ping; Zhao, De-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) was used to repair avascular necrosis of the femoral head, which can maintain the osteogenic phenotype of seed cells, and effectively secrete VEGF and BMP-2, and effectively promote blood vessel regeneration and contribute to formation and revascularization of tissue engineered bone tissues. To observe the therapeutic effect on the treatment of avascular necrosis of the femoral head by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified by VEGF-165 and BMP-2 in vitro. The models were avascular necrosis of femoral head of rabbits on right leg. There groups were single core decompression group, core decompression + BMSCs group, core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group. Necrotic bone was cleared out under arthroscope. Arthroscopic observation demonstrated that necrotic bone was cleared out in each group, and fresh blood flowed out. Histomorphology determination showed that blood vessel number and new bone area in the repair region were significantly greater at various time points following transplantation in the core decompression + VEGF-165/BMP-2 transfect BMSCs group compared with single core decompression group and core decompression + BMSCs group (P < 0.05). These suggested that VEGF-165/BMP-2 gene transfection strengthened osteogenic effects of BMSCs, elevated number and quality of new bones and accelerated the repair of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:26629044

  8. A functional domain in the heavy chain of scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor binds the c-Met receptor and induces cell dissociation but not mitogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, G; Naldini, L; Weidner, K M; Sachs, M; Vigna, E; Comoglio, P M; Birchmeier, W

    1992-01-01

    We recently found that scatter factor (SF), a cell motility factor with a multimodular structure, is identical to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a potent mitogen of various cell types. SF/HGF is the ligand of the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase. Here we used transient expression of naturally occurring and in vitro mutagenized cDNAs of SF/HGF to delineate the protein domains necessary for biological activity and binding to the c-Met receptor. (i) A single-chain SF/HGF resulting from the destruction of the protease cleavage site between heavy and light chain (Arg-494--> Gln) was largely inactive, indicating that proteolytic cleavage is essential for acquisition of the biologically active conformation. (ii) A SF/HGF splice variant encoding a protein with a 5-amino acid deletion in the first kringle domain was as highly active as the wild-type molecule. (iii) The separately expressed light chain (with serine protease homology) was inactive in all assays tested. (iv) The separate heavy chain as well as a naturally occurring splice variant consisting of the N terminus and the first two kringle domains bound the c-Met receptor, stimulated tyrosine auto-phosphorylation, and induced scattering of epithelial cells but not mitogenesis. These data indicate that a functional domain in the N terminus/first two kringle regions of SF/HGF is sufficient for binding to the Met receptor and that this leads to the activation of the downstream signal cascade involved in the motility response. However, the complete SF/HGF protein seems to be required for mitogenic activity. Images PMID:1280830

  9. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  10. Nanoparticle properties and synthesis effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering enhancement factor: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Israelsen, Nathan D; Hanson, Cynthia; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has enabled researchers to map the specific chemical makeup of surfaces, solutions, and even cells. However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated. When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified. This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The extent of SERS enhancement is due to a variety of factors such as nanoparticle size, shape, material, and configuration. The choice of Raman reporters and protective coatings will also influence SERS enhancement. This review provides an introduction to how these factors influence signal enhancement and how to optimize them during synthesis of SERS nanoparticles. PMID:25884017

  11. Nanoparticle Properties and Synthesis Effects on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Enhancement Factor: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has enabled researchers to map the specific chemical makeup of surfaces, solutions, and even cells. However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated. When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified. This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The extent of SERS enhancement is due to a variety of factors such as nanoparticle size, shape, material, and configuration. The choice of Raman reporters and protective coatings will also influence SERS enhancement. This review provides an introduction to how these factors influence signal enhancement and how to optimize them during synthesis of SERS nanoparticles. PMID:25884017

  12. Virtual light-by-light scattering and the g factor of a bound electron

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.N.; Milstein, A.I.; Terekhov, I.S.; Karshenboim, S.G.

    2005-05-15

    The contribution of the light-by-light diagram to the g factor of an electron and muon bound in a Coulomb field is obtained. For an electron in a ground state, our results are in good agreement with the results of other authors obtained numerically for large Z. For relatively small Z our results have essentially higher accuracy as compared to the previous ones. For muonic atoms, the contribution is obtained with a high accuracy in the whole region of Z.

  13. Psychological Factors Associated with Head and Neck Cancer Treatment and Survivorship : Evidence and Opportunities for Behavioral Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howren, M. Bryant; Christensen, Alan J.; Karnell, Lucy Hynds; Funk, Gerry F.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer (HNC) not only face a potentially life-threatening diagnosis but must endure treatment that often results in significant, highly visible disfigurement and disruptions of essential functioning, such as deficits or complications in eating, swallowing, breathing, and speech. Each year, approximately…

  14. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor on the invasion of colorectal cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Wu; Shan, Ji-Xian

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a multifunctional growth factor which has pleiotrophic biological effects on epithelial cells, such as proliferation, motogenesis, invas-iveness and morphogenesis. There are few reports about the role of HGF played in the colorectal cancer invasion. In the present study, we tried to investigate the possible mechanism of HGF involved in the invasion of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. METHODS: Matrigel migration assay was used to analyze the migrational ability of Caco-2 and Colo320 in vitro. We detected the mRNA expressive levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and their natural inhibitors TIMP-1, TIMP-2 in Caco-2 cells by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. RESULTS: After 48 h incubation, there were notable differences when we compared the migrational numbers of Caco-2 cells in the group of HGF and PD98059 (the inhibitor of p42/p44MAPK) with the control (104.40 ± 4.77 vs 126.80 ± 5.40, t = 7.17, P = 0.002 < 0.01; 104.40 ± 4.77 vs 82.80 ± 4.15, t = 7.96, P = 0.001 < 0.01). The deviation between the HGF and PD98059 was significant (P < 0.01). Compared with controls, MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expres-sions were up-regulated by HGF (0.997 ± 0.011 vs 1.207 ± 0.003, t = 35.002,P = 0.001 < 0.01; 0.387 ± 0.128 vs 0.971 ± 0.147, t = 106.036, P = 0.0000 < 0.01, respectively); compared with controls, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 mRNA expressions were increased by PD98059 (1.344 ± 0.007 vs 1.905 ± 0.049, t = 17.541, P = 0.003 < 0.01; 1.286 ± 0.020 vs 1.887 ± 0.022, t = 24.623, P = 0.002 < 0.01, respectively). CONCLUSION: HGF promoted Caco-2 migration mainly by p42/p44MAPK pathway; HGF/SF stimulated the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9 in Caco-2 and enabled tumoral cells to damage the ECM and reach the distant organ and develop metastasis; HGF played the function of promoted-invasion and promoted-metastasis, in which cellular selection was possible. PMID:15991286

  15. Evaluation of beam hardening and photon scatter by brass compensator for IMRT.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shimpei; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Yukio; Miyashita, Hisayuki; Chang, Weishan; Kawachi, Toru; Katayose, Tetsurou; Kobayashi, Nao; Kunieda, Etsuo; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2012-11-01

    When a brass compensator is set in a treatment beam, beam hardening may take place. This variation of the energy spectrum may affect the accuracy of dose calculation by a treatment planning system and the results of dose measurement of brass compensator intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). In addition, when X-rays pass the compensator, scattered photons are generated within the compensator. Scattered photons may affect the monitor unit (MU) calculation. In this study, to evaluate the variation of dose distribution by the compensator, dose distribution was measured and energy spectrum was simulated using the Monte Carlo method. To investigate the influence of beam hardening for dose measurement using an ionization chamber, the beam quality correction factor was determined. Moreover, to clarify the effect of scattered photons generated within the compensator for the MU calculation, the head scatter factor was measured and energy spectrum analyses were performed. As a result, when X-rays passed the brass compensator, beam hardening occurred and dose distribution was varied. The variation of dose distribution and energy spectrum was larger with decreasing field size. This means that energy spectrum should be reproduced correctly to obtain high accuracy of dose calculation for the compensator IMRT. On the other hand, the influence of beam hardening on k(Q) was insignificant. Furthermore, scattered photons were generated within the compensator, and scattered photons affect the head scatter factor. These results show that scattered photons must be taken into account for MU calculation for brass compensator IMRT.

  16. Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 1. The luminance factor of reflected light

    SciTech Connect

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2013-08-31

    Based on the analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, we have studied the angular structure of the luminance factor of light reflected by the rough skin surface with large-scale relief elements, illuminated by a directed radiation beam incident at an arbitrary angle inside or outside the medium. The parameters of the surface inhomogeneities are typical of human skin. The calculated angular dependences are interpreted from the point of view of the angular distribution function of micro areas. The results obtained can be used for solving direct and inverse problems in biomedical optics, in particular for determining the depth of light penetration into a biological tissue, for studying the light action spectra on tissue chromophores under the in vivo conditions, for developing diagnostic methods of structural and biophysical parameters of a medium, and for optimising the mechanisms of interaction of light with biological tissues under their noninvasive irradiation through skin. (biomedical optics)

  17. Constraints on hard spectator scattering and annihilation corrections in Bu,d → PV decays within QCD factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfeng; Chang, Qin; Hu, Xiaohui; Yang, Yueling

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the contributions of hard spectator scattering and annihilation in B → PV decays within the QCD factorization framework. With available experimental data on B → πK* , ρK , πρ and Kϕ decays, comprehensive χ2 analyses of the parameters XA,Hi,f (ρA,Hi,f, ϕA,Hi,f) are performed, where XAf (XAi) and XH are used to parameterize the endpoint divergences of the (non)factorizable annihilation and hard spectator scattering amplitudes, respectively. Based on χ2 analyses, it is observed that (1) The topology-dependent parameterization scheme is feasible for B → PV decays; (2) At the current accuracy of experimental measurements and theoretical evaluations, XH = XAi is allowed by B → PV decays, but XH ≠ XAf at 68% C.L.; (3) With the simplification XH = XAi, parameters XAf and XAi should be treated individually. The above-described findings are very similar to those obtained from B → PP decays. Numerically, for B → PV decays, we obtain (ρA,Hi ,ϕA,Hi [ ° ]) = (2.87-1.95+0.66 , -145-21+14) and (ρAf, ϕAf [ ° ]) = (0.91-0.13+0.12 , -37-9+10) at 68% C.L. With the best-fit values, most of the theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data within errors. However, significant corrections to the color-suppressed tree amplitude α2 related to a large ρH result in the wrong sign for ACPdir (B- →π0K*-) compared with the most recent BABAR data, which presents a new obstacle in solving "ππ" and "πK" puzzles through α2. A crosscheck with measurements at Belle (or Belle II) and LHCb, which offer higher precision, is urgently expected to confirm or refute such possible mismatch.

  18. Critical assessment of enhancement factor measurements in surface-enhanced Raman scattering on different substrates.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daniel C; de Souza, Michele L; Souza, Klester S; dos Santos, Diego P; Andrade, Gustavo F S; Temperini, Marcia L A

    2015-09-01

    The SERS enhancement factor (SERS-EF) is one of the most important parameters that characterizes the ability of a given substrate to enhance the Raman signal for SERS applications. The comparison of SERS intensities and SERS-EF values across different substrates is a common practice to unravel the performance of a given substrate. In this study, it is shown that such a comparison may lack significance if we compare substrates of very distinct nature and optical properties. It is specifically shown that the SERS-EF values for static substrates (e.g. immobilized metallic nanostructures) cannot be compared to those of dynamic ones (e.g. colloidal metal nanoparticle solutions), and that the optical properties for the latter show strong dependence on the metal-molecule interaction dynamics. The most representative experimental results concerning the dynamic substrates have been supported by generalized Mie theory simulations, which are tools used to describe the substrate complexity and the microscopic information not usually taken into account.

  19. Rapid growth of invasive metastatic melanoma in carcinogen-treated hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor-transgenic mice carrying an oncogenic CDK4 mutation.

    PubMed

    Tormo, Damia; Ferrer, Aleix; Gaffal, Evelyn; Wenzel, Jörg; Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Steitz, Julia; Heukamp, Lukas C; Gütgemann, Ines; Buettner, Reinhard; Malumbres, Marcos; Barbacid, Mariano; Merlino, Glenn; Tüting, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Currently, novel mouse models of melanoma are being generated that recapitulate the histopathology and molecular pathogenesis observed in human disease. Impaired cell-cycle control, which is a hallmark of both familial and sporadic melanoma, promotes slowly growing carcinogen-induced melanomas in the skin of mice carrying a mutated cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4(R24C)). Deregulated receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, which is another important feature of human melanoma, leads to spontaneous development of metastatic melanoma after a long latency period in mice overexpressing hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF mice). Here we report that treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate induced metastatic melanomas in all HGF/SF mice on the C57BL/6 background, which histologically resemble human melanoma. Importantly, mutant CDK4 dramatically increased the number and the growth kinetics of carcinogen-induced primary melanomas in the skin and promoted the growth of spontaneous metastases in lymph nodes and lungs in all HGF/SF mice within the first 3 months of life. Apart from very few skin papillomas, we did not observe tumors of other histology in carcinogen-treated HGF/SF x CDK4(R24C) mice. This new experimental mouse model can now be exploited to study further the biology of melanoma and evaluate new treatment modalities.

  20. Anthropogenic Factors Are the Major Cause of Hospital Admission of a Threatened Species, the Grey-Headed Flying Fox (Pteropus poliocephalus), in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Scheelings, Titus Franciscus; Frith, Sarah Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    To determine the reasons for presentation and outcomes of hospitalised grey-headed flying foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) in Victoria, Australia, a retrospective analysis was performed on 532 records from two wildlife hospitals. Cases were categorised based on presenting signs and outcomes determined. Anthropogenic factors (63.7%) were a major cause of flying fox admissions with entanglement in fruit netting the most significant risk for bats (36.8%). Overall the mortality rate for flying fox admissions was 59.3%. This study highlights the effects of urbanisation on wild animal populations and a need for continued public education in order to reduce morbidity and mortality of wildlife, especially threatened species. PMID:26207984

  1. Epidermal growth factor receptors as a target for cancer treatment: the emerging role of IMC-C225 in the treatment of lung and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S; Langer, Corey J

    2002-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor is one of four receptors critical to cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival, and is widely expressed in malignant tissue, particularly in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Expression has been associated with malignant progression, inhibition of apoptosis, neoplastic angiogenesis, enhanced metastatic potential, and both chemoresistance and radioresistance. IMC-C225 is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets extracellular epidermal growth factor receptor; it has shown both in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in tumor cells lines expressing epidermal growth factor receptor, including heightened radiation response in vitro in cultured human squamous cell carcinoma and enhancement of taxane- and platinum-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. In A431 head and neck squamous cell xenografts, IMC-C225 administered both before and after radiation therapy yields a radiation enhancement factor of 3.62, attributable to both tumor necrosis and antiangiogenesis. In phase I pharmacokinetic studies, IMC-C225 has a long half-life, lending itself to convenient weekly administration. It has shown a favorable toxicity profile, limited primarily to allergic and dermatologic reactions, the latter characterized by a self-limited, sterile, acneiform rash. Anaphylaxis is rare. Standard treatment entails a loading dose of 400 mg/m(2) at week 1, followed by a maintenance dose of 250 mg/m(2) weekly. An ongoing phase III international multicenter, randomized study in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is evaluating therapeutic radiation therapy, either alone or in conjunction with IMC-C225. In a pilot trial, six of nine patients with platinum-exposed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck exhibited objective response. In an ongoing phase II trial in patients with stable or progressive disease on platinum-based therapy, the preliminary response rate is approximately 20

  2. Field calibration of multi-scattering correction factor for aethalometer aerosol absorption coefficient during CAPMEX Campaign, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Yoon, S. C.; Park, R.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filter-based instrument, such as aethalometer, is being widely used to measure equivalent black carbon(EBC) mass concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient(AAC). However, many other previous studies have poited that AAC and its aerosol absorption angstrom exponent(AAE) are strongly affected by the multi-scattering correction factor(C) when we retrieve AAC from aethalometer EBC mass concentration measurement(Weingartner et al., 2003; Arnott et al., 2005; Schmid et al., 2006; Coen et al., 2010). We determined the C value using the method given in Weingartner et al. (2003) by comparing 7-wavelngth aethalometer (AE-31, Magee sci.) to 3-wavelength Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3, DMT) at Gosan climate observatory, Korea(GCO) during Cheju ABC plume-asian monsoon experiment(CAPMEX) campaign(August and September, 2008). In this study, C was estimated to be 4.04 ± 1.68 at 532 nm and AAC retrieved with this value was decreased as approximately 100% as than that retrieved with soot case value from Weingartner et al (2003). We compared the AAC determined from aethalomter measurements to that from collocated Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measurements from January 2012 to December 2013 at GCO and found good agreement in both AAC and AAE. This result suggests the determination of site-specific C is crucially needed when we calculate AAC from aethalometer measurements.

  3. Ethnicity, location, age, and fluoridation factors in baby bottle tooth decay and caries prevalence of Head Start children.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, G P; Parker, W A; Lyon, T C; Drum, M A; Coleman, G C

    1992-01-01

    Baby bottle tooth decay (BBTD) is a term applied to a specific form of rampant decay associated with inappropriate bottle or breast feeding of infants and young children. Although the prevalence of BBTD has been studied in individual ethnic groups, comparison studies are rare. Head Start children have frequently served as study subjects for assessing the prevalence of BBTD. The purpose of this study was to compare BBTD and caries prevalence among Head Start children who are members of four ethnic groups in five southwestern States. Age, residence, and fluoridation status were also compared for the total sample and ethnic categories. The sampling process was a stratified random site selection; it was used to obtain data on 1,230 children. This number constituted 3 percent of the children enrolled in Head Start in Public Health Service Region VI (Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas) where the study was conducted. The criterion for determining the presence of BBTD was based on the number of carious deciduous maxillary incisors observed. The severity of the condition was reported as two of four and three of four of the target teeth affected. Thus, two levels of severity are reported. BBTD was prevalent in approximately 24 percent and 15 percent of the total sample, depending on the severity criterion used. Native American children had a significantly higher (P less than 0.05) prevalence than Hispanic, white, and black subjects. Rural children had significantly higher (P less than 0.05) prevalence of BBTD than nonrural children for all ethnic groups except whites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. PMID:1561298

  4. Refining Measurement of Social Cognitive Theory Factors Associated with Exercise Adherence in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura Q; Fogleman, Amanda; Verhulst, Steven; Bhugra, Mudita; Rao, Krishna; Malone, James; Robbs, Randall; Robbins, K Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) measures related to exercise adherence in head and neck cancer (HNCa) patients were developed. Enrolling 101 HNCa patients, psychometric properties and associations with exercise behavior were examined for barriers self-efficacy, perceived barriers interference, outcome expectations, enjoyment, and goal setting. Cronbach's alpha ranged from.84 to.95; only enjoyment demonstrated limited test-retest reliability. Subscales for barriers self-efficacy (motivational, physical health) and barriers interference (motivational, physical health, time, environment) were identified. Multiple SCT constructs were cross-sectional correlates and prospective predictors of exercise behavior. These measures can improve the application of the SCT to exercise adherence in HNCa patients.

  5. Refining Measurement of Social Cognitive Theory Factors Associated with Exercise Adherence in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura Q; Fogleman, Amanda; Verhulst, Steven; Bhugra, Mudita; Rao, Krishna; Malone, James; Robbs, Randall; Robbins, K Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) measures related to exercise adherence in head and neck cancer (HNCa) patients were developed. Enrolling 101 HNCa patients, psychometric properties and associations with exercise behavior were examined for barriers self-efficacy, perceived barriers interference, outcome expectations, enjoyment, and goal setting. Cronbach's alpha ranged from.84 to.95; only enjoyment demonstrated limited test-retest reliability. Subscales for barriers self-efficacy (motivational, physical health) and barriers interference (motivational, physical health, time, environment) were identified. Multiple SCT constructs were cross-sectional correlates and prospective predictors of exercise behavior. These measures can improve the application of the SCT to exercise adherence in HNCa patients. PMID:26177345

  6. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; Rakhman, A.; Souder, P. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Liyanage, N.; Paschke, K. D.; Saenboonruang, K.; Silwal, R.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Quinn, B.; Kumar, K. S.; McNulty, D.; Mercado, L.; Riordan, S.; Wexler, J.; Michaels, R. W.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW($\\bar{q}$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $\\bar{q}$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($\\bar{q}$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($\\bar{q}$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.

  7. Use of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry to Assess Land Deformation in the Nile Delta and its Controlling Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, E.; Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Emil, M.; Ahmed, M.; Chouinard, K.

    2015-12-01

    We applied Persistent scatterer interferometry (PSInSAR) to assess land deformation (subsidence and uplift) across the entire Nile delta and its surroundings and to identify possible causes of the observed deformation. For the purpose of the present study, 100 Envisat Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR; level 0) scenes that were acquired along four tracks and covering a time span of seven years (2004 to 2010) were used. The scenes extend from the Mediterranean coast in the north to Cairo city in the south. These scenes were focused using Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage (ROI_PAC) software and the subsequent PSI processing was done using the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) method. A low coherence threshold (0.2) was used to decrease the impact of vegetation-related poor coherence and decorrelation of the scenes over the investigated time span. Subsidence was observed over: (1) the Demietta Nile River branch (3 to 14 mm/yr) where it intersects the Mediterranean coastline, (2) thick (~ 40 m) Holocene sediments in lake Manzala (up to 9 mm/yr), (3) reclaimed desert areas (west of Nile Delta; up to 12 mm/yr) of high groundwater extraction, (4) along parts of a previously proposed flexure line (up to 10 mm/yr), and (5) along the eastern sections of the Mediterranean coastline (up to 15.7 mm/yr). The city of Alexandria (underlain by carbonate platform) and the terminus of the Rosetta branch of the Nile River seem to experience almost no ground movement (mean subsidence of 0.28 mm/yr and 0.74 mm/yr respectively) while the cities of Ras Elbar and Port Said (underlain by thick Holocene sediment) exhibit the highest subsidence values (up to 14 mm/yr and 8.5 mm/yr respectively). The city of Cairo has also experienced subsidence in limited areas of up to 7.8 mm/yr. High spatial correlation was also observed between the subsiding areas and the Abu Madi incised valley; the largest gas field in the Nile Delta. Most of the area undergoing subsidence in the

  8. Lifetime Prevalence and Factors Associated with Head Injury among Older People in Low and Middle Income Countries: A 10/66 Study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A.; Prince, M.; Brayne, C.; Prina, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing public health problem around the world, yet there is little information on the prevalence of head injury in low and middle income countries (LMICs). We utilised data collected by the 10/66 research group to investigate the lifetime prevalence of head injury in defined sites in low and middle income countries, its risk factors and its relationship with disability. Methods We analysed data from one-phase cross-sectional surveys of all residents aged 65 years and older (n = 16430) distributed across twelve sites in eight low and middle income countries (China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, India, Venezuela, Mexico, Peru, and Puerto Rico). Self-reported cases of head injury with loss of consciousness were identified during the interview. A sensitivity analysis including data provided by informants of people with dementia was also used to estimate the impact of this information on the estimates. Prevalence ratios (PR) from Poisson regressions were used to identify associated risk factors. Results The standardised lifetime prevalence of TBI ranged from 0.3% in China to 14.6% in rural Mexico and Venezuela. Being male (PR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.29–1.82), younger (PR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.92–0.99), with lower education (PR 0.91, 95% CI: 0.86–0.96), and having fewer assets (PR 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88–0.96), was associated with a higher prevalence of TBI when pooling estimates across sites. Discussion Our analysis revealed that the prevalence of TBI in LMICs is similar to that of developed nations. Considering the growing impact of TBI on health resources in these countries, there is an urgent need for further research. PMID:26146992

  9. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  10. Model of beam head erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.

    1980-08-08

    An analytical model of beam head dynamics is presented, leading to an estimate of the erosion rate due to the combined effects of Ohmic dissipation and scattering. Agreement with the results of a computer simulation and detailed one-dimensional computations is good in all respects except for the scaling of the erosion rate with net current.

  11. The Use of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Monoclonal Antibodies in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Jeffery S.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of the EGF receptor (EGFR) has become a standard of care in several tumor types. In squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, monoclonal antibodies directed against EGFR have become a regular component of therapy for curative as well as palliative treatment strategies. These agents have anti-tumor efficacy as a single modality and have demonstrated synergistic tumor killing when combined with radiation and/or chemotherapy. While cetuximab has been the primary anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody used in the US, variant anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies have been used in several clinical studies and shown benefit with improved toxicity profiles. Next generation anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies may demonstrate multi-target epitope recognition, enhanced immune cell stimulation, or conjugation with radioisotopes in order to improve clinical outcomes. Identification of the specific patient subset that would optimally benefit from anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies remains an elusive goal. PMID:23150825

  12. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Other than Factor V Leiden Are Associated with Coagulopathy and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kou-Ti; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Huang, Tsan-Wen; Lee, Yun-Shien; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu; Hsu, Robert W. W.; Ueng, Steve W. N.; Lee, Mel S.

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of factor V Leiden have been associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) in Caucasians but remains controversial in Asians. We used an SNP microarray to screen 55 loci of factor V gene in patients with ONFH of Chinese. Significantly different candidate SNPs at 14 loci were analyzed in 146 patients and 116 healthy controls using MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight) mass spectrometry and gene sequencing. The factor V Leiden (rs6025) was not found in all participants. Six SNP loci (rs9332595, rs6020, rs9332647, rs3766110, rs10919186, and rs12040141) were confirmed with significant differences in patients but not in controls. The rs6020 G-to-A polymorphism was found in 88.9% of the patients. In addition, a high percentage (87.6%) of the patients had an abnormal coagulation profile that included hyperfibrinogen, elevated fibrinogen degradation products, elevated D-dimer, abnormal protein S, abnormal protein C, or a decrease in anti-thrombin III. Patients with the rs6020 G-to-A polymorphism (mutation) had a higher risk (odds ratio: 4.62; 95% confidence interval: 1.44–14.8) of having coagulation abnormalities than did those without the mutation (wild-type) (χ2 p  =  0.006). Our findings suggested that the rs6020 polymorphism might be the genetic trait that accounts for the higher prevalence of ONFH in the Chinese population than in Westerners. Exposure to risk factors such as alcohol and steroids in patients with the rs6020 polymorphism causes coagulation abnormalities and, subsequently, thromboembolisms in the femoral head. PMID:25119470

  13. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  14. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  15. Small angle X-ray scattering data and structure factor fitting for the study of the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Steven; Filippova, Ekaterina V; Kiryukhina, Olga; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Here we describe the treatment of the small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) data used during SpeG quaternary structure study as part of the research article "Substrate induced allosteric change in the quaternary structure of the spermidine N-acetyltransferase SpeG" published in Journal of Molecular Biology [1]. These data were collected on two separate area detectors as separate dilution series of the SpeG and the SpeG with spermine samples along with data from their companion buffers. The data were radially integrated, corrected for incident beam variation, and scaled to absolute units. After subtraction of volume-fraction scaled buffer scattering and division by the SpeG concentration, multiple scattering curves free of an inter-molecular structure factor were derived from the dilution series. Rather than extrapolating to infinite dilution, the structure factor contribution was estimated by fitting to the full set of data provided by dividing the scattering curves of a dilution series by the curve from the most dilute sample in that series.

  16. The structure factor of poly(1-butene) and poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) from wide angle X-ray scattering, molecular dynamics and PRISM.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habenschuss, Anton; Kim, Man-Ho; Curro, John G.; Heine, David R.

    2003-03-01

    The melt structures of the isotactic vinyl polymers poly(1-butene) and poly(4-methyl-1-pentene), with corresponding ethyl and isobutyl side chains, were recently studied with wide-angle X-ray diffraction. For these polymers, a "pre-peak" appears below the main diffraction peak in the carbon-carbon structure factor. The pre-peak becomes stronger and shifts to lower scattering vectors with increasing bulkiness of the side chain. These features are predicted on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations and Polymer Reference Interaction Site Model (PRISM) calculations. Good agreement is found for the structure factor determined with simulation and theory and the X-ray scattering experiments. The origin of the pre-peak for vinyl polymers based on experiment and theory will be discussed.

  17. Nephrotoxicity as a Dose-Limiting Factor in a High-Dose Cisplatin-Based Chemoradiotherapy Regimen for Head and Neck Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Jantien; Bloemendal, Karen M.; van der Velden, Lilly-Ann A.; van Diessen, Judi N.A.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Klop, Willem M.C.; Tesselaar, Margot E.T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Loco-regional control and organ preservation are significantly improved with concomitant cisplatin/radiotherapy and are compromised with less than 5% grade 3 nephrotoxicity (creatinine clearance 15–29 mL/min). However, although clinically important, in none of the randomized trials is grade 2 nephrotoxicity (defined as creatinine clearance 59–30 mL/min) mentioned. In this study, we assessed nephrotoxicity in daily practice among patients treated with high-dose cisplatin (100 mg/m2 on days 1, 22, and 43), concurrently with chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and the impact on treatment modifications. Methods: 208 patients with advanced-stage malignancies of the head and neck region were evaluated. All patients were treated with high-dose cisplatin CCRT. The main outcome parameters were nephrotoxicity (defined as creatinine clearance grade 2 or more) and cumulative doses of cisplatin and radiation. Results: 133 patients (64%) completed all pre-planned courses of cisplatin. Nephrotoxicity was the main reason to discontinue the chemotherapy. Grade 3 nephrotoxicity was seen in 16 patients (8%) while grade 2 nephrotoxicity was seen in 53 patients (25%). Thirty six patients (17%) could not complete the pre-planned chemotherapy due to nephrotoxicity. Conclusions: In head and neck cancer patients, nephrotoxicity grade 2 is under-reported but is the major factor for discontinuing cisplatin during CCRT. PMID:26891330

  18. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid and serum in severe head injury: relationship to tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Is, Merih; Coskun, Abdurrahman; Sanus, Galip Zihni; Tanriverdi, Taner; Kafadar, Ali Metin; Hanimoglu, Hakan; Tanriover, Necmettin; Gezen, Ferruh; Uzan, Mustafa

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in inflammatory diseases; however, it is unclear whether this molecule has a role after severe head injury (SHI). Our aim was to evaluate the levels of hsCRP in both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum from patients after SHI. The study focused on 11 patients with SHI, and evaluated CSF and serum levels of hsCRP, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a 10-day period following the head trauma. The values were compared with those from nine control patients, who had normal pressure hydrocephalus. In the CSF and serum of the patients after SHI, HsCRP was found to be significantly higher, at all times, than in the controls; TNF-alpha and IL-6 levels were also higher in these patients. However, hsCRP levels did not correlate with either TNF-alpha or IL-6. TNF-alpha and IL-6 increased during the period immediately following the SHI, and intrathecal levels were always higher than those of the serum. This study demonstrates for the first time that hsCRP reaches high levels in both CSF and serum in patients with SHI, and it may therefore be used as an inflammatory index. This finding suggests a need for further studies in this area, which are larger in scope than the present study.

  19. A Natural Hepatocyte Growth Factor/Scatter Factor Autocrine Loop in Myoblast Cells and the Effect of the Constitutive Met Kinase Activation on Myogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Anastasi, Sergio; Giordano, Silvia; Sthandier, Olga; Gambarotta, Giovanna; Maione, Rossella; Comoglio, Paolo; Amati, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    As a rule, hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) is produced by mesenchymal cells, while its receptor, the tyrosine kinase encoded by the met proto-oncogene, is expressed by the neighboring epithelial cells in a canonical paracrine fashion. In the present work we show that both HGF/SF and met are coexpressed by undifferentiated C2 mouse myoblasts. In growing cells, the autocrine loop is active as the receptor exhibits a constitutive phosphorylation on tyrosine that can be abrogated by exogenously added anti-HGF/SF neutralizing antibodies. The transcription of HGF/SF and met genes is downregulated when myoblasts stop proliferating and differentiate. The coexpression of HGF/SF and met genes is not exclusive to C2 cells since it has been assessed also in other myogenic cell lines and in mouse primary satellite cells, suggesting that HGF/SF could play a role in muscle development through an autocrine way. To analyze the biological effects of HGF/SF receptor activation, we stably expressed the constitutively activated receptor catalytic domain (p65tpr-met) in C2 cells. This active kinase determined profound changes in cell shape and inhibited myogenesis at both morphological and biochemical levels. Notably, a complete absence of muscle regulatory markers such as MyoD and myogenin was observed in p65tpr-met highly expressing C2 clones. We also studied the effects of the ectopic expression of human isoforms of met receptor (h-met) and of HGF/SF (h-HGF/SF) in stable transfected C2 cells. Single constitutive expression of h-met or h-HGF/SF does not alter substantially the growth and differentiation properties of the myoblast cells, probably because of a species-specific ligand–receptor interaction. A C2 clone expressing simultaneously both h-met and h-HGF/SF is able to grow in soft agar and shows a decrease in myogenic potential comparable to that promoted by p65tpr-met kinase. These data indicate that a met kinase signal released from differentiation

  20. Comparison of techniques that use the single scattering model to compute the quality factor Q from coda waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1991-01-01

    Using simulated coda waves, the resolution of the single-scattering model to extract coda Q (Qc) and its power law frequency dependence was tested. The back-scattering model of Aki and Chouet (1975) and the single isotropic-scattering model of Sato (1977) were examined. The results indicate that: (1) The input Qc models are reasonably well approximated by the two methods; (2) almost equal Qc values are recovered when the techniques sample the same coda windows; (3) low Qc models are well estimated in the frequency domain from the early and late part of the coda; and (4) models with high Qc values are more accurately extracted from late code measurements. ?? 1991 Birkha??user Verlag.

  1. An Analysis of Heavy-Ion Elastic Scattering Processes Using Numerical Model Based on the Partial Wave Parameterised S-Matrix with Regge Pole Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badran, R. I.; Al-Lehyani, I. H.

    2016-06-01

    Analyses of the angular distributions in the elastic scattering processes of 9, 10, 11Be by the target nucleus 64Zn at the laboratory energies of 27.95 MeV, and 4, 6, 8He by the target nucleus 208Pb at the laboratory energy of 22 MeV are performed. These analyses rely on a numerical model based on a parameterised scattering matrix (S-matrix) derived from Frahn and Venter. They confirm the absence of the Coulomb rainbow peak in angular distributions of elastic scattering in collisions of halo nuclei at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The correlation between the total reaction cross section and the halo structure for each scattering that involves a halo nucleus is discussed, and values of the total reaction cross section are found comparable with those of others. The diffractive features of the systems 16, 18O + 19F at specific laboratory energies are examined, and the effect of exchanging the projectile and target nuclei at such energies on these features are inspected. The incorporation of the Regge pole factor into the parameterised S-matrix calculations, which is found important in some cases, is employed in order to account for the oscillatory structure (if available) at backward angles. The theoretical results are found reasonable, reproducing the general pattern of the data. The trend of the extracted parameters meets the requirements proposed by the adopted models.

  2. Risk Factors for Hearing Loss in Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zuur, Charlotte L.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Balm, Alfons J.; Rasch, Coen R.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment of head-and-neck carcinoma. The objective of this study was to perform a prospective multivariate assessment of the dose-effect relationship between intensity-modulated RT and hearing loss. Methods and Materials: Pure tone audiometry at 0.250-16 kHz was obtained before and after treatment in 101 patients (202 ears). All patients received full-course intensity-modulated RT (range, 56-70 Gy), with a median cochlear dose of 11.4 Gy (range, 0.2-69.7). Results: Audiometry was performed 1 week before and a median of 9 weeks (range, 1-112) after treatment. The mean hearing deterioration at pure tone average air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz was small (from 28.6 dB HL to 30.1 dB HL). However, individual patients showed clinically significant hearing loss, with 10-dB threshold shift incidences of 13% and 18% at pure tone averages air-conduction 1-2-4 kHz and 8-10-12.5 kHz, respectively. Post-treatment hearing capability was unfavorable in the case of greater inner ear radiation doses (p <0.0001), unfavorable baseline hearing capability (p <0.0001), green-eyed patients (p <0.0001), and older age (p <0.0001). Using multivariate analysis, a prediction of individual hearing capabiltity after treatment was made. Conclusion: RT-induced hearing loss in the mean population is modest. However, clinically significant hearing loss was observed in older patients with green eyes and unfavorable pretreatment hearing. In these patients, the intended radiation dose may be adjusted according to the proposed predictive model, aiming to decrease the risk of ototoxicity.

  3. Active head rotations and eye-head coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zangemeister, W. H.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that head movements play an important role in gaze. The interaction between eye and head movements involves both their shared role in directing gaze and the compensatory vestibular ocular reflex. The dynamics of head trajectories are discussed, taking into account the use of parameterization to obtain the peak velocity, peak accelerations, the times of these extrema, and the duration of the movement. Attention is given to the main sequence, neck muscle EMG and details of the head-movement trajectory, types of head model accelerations, the latency of eye and head movement in coordinated gaze, gaze latency as a function of various factors, and coordinated gaze types. Clinical examples of gaze-plane analysis are considered along with the instantaneous change of compensatory eye movement (CEM) gain, and aspects of variability.

  4. A Measurement of the Neutron Electric Form Factor in Dvec (evec,e'n)p Quasielastic Scattering at Q2=0.5(GeV/c)2

    SciTech Connect

    Hongguo Zhu

    2000-08-01

    The form factors of the neutron give information on fundamental properties of the nucleons and provide a critical testing ground for models based on QCD. In late 1998, Jefferson Lab (JLAB) experiment E93-026 measured the spin-dependent part of the exclusive (e, e'n) scattering cross section from a polarized deuterated ammonia ({sup 15}ND{sub 3}) target at a four momentum transfer squared of Q{sup 2} = 0.5 (GeV/c){sub 2}. A longitudinally polarized electron beam was scattered from the polarized target and the quasi-elastically scattered electron was detected in coincidence with the knocked-out neutron. The data have been analyzed in terms of the spin-correlation parameter, or the electron-deuteron vector asymmetry (A{sub ed}{sup V}), of (e, e'n) to determine the neutron electric form factor G{sub E}{sup n}. The result is consistent with data from existing experiments and shows a good agreement with the Galster parameterization of G{sub E}{sup n} within experimental uncertainty.

  5. Treatment factors influencing the use of recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (Regranex) for head and lateral line erosion syndrome in ocean surgeonfish (Acanthurus bahianus).

    PubMed

    Fleming, Gregory J; Corwin, Allison; McCoy, A Jeanene; Stamper, M Andrew

    2008-06-01

    The clinical efficacy of becaplermin (Regranex, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc., Raritan, New Jersey 08869) on head and lateral line erosion syndrome (HLLES) in ocean surgeonfish (Acanthurus bahianus) was examined in a two-part study to determine suitable application frequencies of the drug and the effects of the environment on outcome of treatments. In the first part of the study, 12 ocean surgeonfish with prior HLLES were equally divided into three treatment groups, varying in application frequency of becaplermin: 1) one application, 2) three applications every 3 wk, and 3) no applications. After 9 wk, it was determined through photograph and computer analysis that fish treated with becaplermin did heal significantly more than the fish that were not treated. No significant difference was found when comparing the two treatment regimes; therefore, a one-time treatment of becaplermin was just as effective as the three-time application, reducing cost of the treatment, staff labor, and stress to the animals. In the second part of the study, the effect of the water environment on HLLES development was documented before and after a one-time treatment of becaplermin. When fish were treated and placed into a system known to cause HLLES, the becaplermin treatment had no effect on reducing the HLLES progression, whereas treated fish that were placed into a system that did not cause HLLES showed a significant decrease in erosion after the treatment. Therefore, treating fish being placed into a HLLES-causing system serves no beneficial purpose to healing HLLES.

  6. Near-field-assisted localization: effect of size and filling factor of randomly distributed zinc oxide nanoneedles on multiple scattering and localization of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silies, Martin; Mascheck, Manfred; Leipold, David; Kollmann, Heiko; Schmidt, Slawa; Sartor, Janos; Yatsui, Takashi; Kitamura, Kokoro; Ohtsu, Motoicho; Kalt, Heinz; Runge, Erich; Lienau, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the influence of the diameter and the filling factor of randomly arranged ZnO nanoneedles on the multiple scattering and localization of light in disordered dielectrics. Coherent, ultra-broadband second-harmonic (SH) microscopy is used to probe the spatial localization of light in representative nm-sized ZnO arrays of needles. We observe strong fluctuations of the SH intensity inside different ZnO needle geometries. Comparison of the SH intensity distributions with predictions based on a one-parameter scaling model indicate that SH fluctuations can be taken as a quantitative measure for the degree of localization. Interestingly, the strongest localization signatures are found for densely packed arrays of thin needles with diameters in the range of only 30 nm range, despite the small scattering cross section of these needles. FDTD simulations indicate that in this case coupling of electric near-fields between neighbouring needles governs the localization.

  7. Determination of {sup 16}O and {sup 18}O sensitivity factors and charge-exchange processes in low-energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tellez, H.; Chater, R. J.; Fearn, S.; Symianakis, E.; Kilner, J. A.; Brongersma, H. H.

    2012-10-08

    Quantitative analysis in low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) requires an understanding of the charge-exchange processes to estimate the elemental sensitivity factors. In this work, the neutralization of He{sup +} scattered by {sup 18}O-exchanged silica at energies between 0.6 and 7 keV was studied. The process is dominated by Auger neutralization for E{sub i} < 0.8 keV. An additional mechanism starts above the reionization threshold. This collision-induced neutralization becomes the dominant mechanism for E{sub i} > 2 keV. The ion fractions P{sup +} were determined for Si and O using the characteristic velocity method to quantify the surface density. The {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O sensitivity ratio indicates an 18% higher sensitivity for the heavier O isotope.

  8. [Analysis of Scattered Radiation in an Irradiated Body by Means of the Monte Carlo Simulation: Back-scatter Factors of Diagnostic X-rays in the Incident Surface Which is Not Flat].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki; Minami, Kazuyuki; Asada, Yasuki; Suzuki, Shoichi

    2016-05-01

    To obtain patient entrance surface dose in X-ray photography, a calculation method based on measured exposure or air kerma radiated from X-ray tube is generally used. Two factors are necessary for this calculation: (1) exposure/air kerma to absorb dose conversion factor and (2) back-scatter factor (BSF) based on X-ray quality and on field size. These BSFs are commonly obtained by interpolation from existent data which were given for a water phantom whose entrance surface is flat. Since patient's surface in X-ray photograph is not flat, some error may occur when existent BSF is used in this calculation. In this article, BSF for water phantom with cylindrical surface and elliptic cylinder surface were calculated by means of the Monte Carlo simulation. And these BSFs were compared with BSF for flat surface phantom. As a result (1) radius of curvature of cylindrical phantom or horizontal axis of elliptic cylinder phantom is smaller, (2) half value layer of X-ray is larger, (3) field size is larger, difference of these BSF with that for flat surface phantom tends to be larger. Maximum difference by calculation condition assumed in this article was more than 10%. The cause of this difference is because scattering volume in irradiated body of cylindrical or elliptic cylinder phantom is smaller than flat surface phantom. To obtain patient entrance surface dose more precisely, it is necessary to use BSF respectively calculated for phantom resembling patient's body such as cylindrical or elliptic cylinder phantom by means of the Monte Carlo simulation.

  9. Spectator scattering and annihilation contributions as a solution to the πK and ππ puzzles within QCD factorization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Qin; Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling; Li, Xiaonan

    2014-09-01

    The large branching ratios for pure annihilation B ¯s0→π+π- and B ¯d0→K+K- decays reported by CDF and LHCb collaborations recently and the so-called πK and ππ puzzles indicate that spectator scattering and annihilation contributions are important to the penguin-dominated, color-suppressed tree dominated, and pure annihilation nonleptonic B decays. Combining the available experimental data for Bu ,d→ππ, πK and KK ¯ decays, we do a global fit on the spectator scattering and annihilation parameters XH(ρH,ϕH), XAi(ρAi,ϕAi) and XAf(ρAf,ϕAf), which are used to parametrize the end point singularity in amplitudes of spectator scattering, nonfactorizable and factorizable annihilation topologies within the QCD factorization framework, in three scenarios for different purpose. Numerically, in Scenario II, we get (ρAi,ϕAi[∘])=(2.88-1.30+1.52,-103-40+33) and (ρAf,ϕAf[∘])=(1.21-0.25+0.22,-40-8+12) at the 68% confidence level, which are mainly demanded by resolving the πK puzzle and confirm the presupposition that XAi≠XAf. In addition, correspondingly, the B-meson wave function parameter λB is also fitted to be 0.18-0.08+0.11 MeV, which plays an important role for resolving both πK and ππ puzzles. With the fitted parameters, the QCD factorization results for observables of Bu ,d→ππ, πK and KK ¯ decays are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Many more experimental and theoretical efforts are expected to understand the underlying QCD dynamics of spectator scattering and annihilation contributions.

  10. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Aidan

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q2 and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized 3 He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. Gn E was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q2 = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV2 , respectively.

  11. SU-E-T-59: Calculations of Collimator Scatter Factors (Sc) with and Without Custom-Made Build-Up Caps for CyberKnife

    SciTech Connect

    Wokoma, S; Yoon, J; Jung, J; Lee, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of custom-made build-up caps for a diode detector in robotic radiosurgery radiation fields with variable collimator (IRIS) for collimator scatter factor (Sc) calculation. Methods: An acrylic cap was custom-made to fit our SFD (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) diode detector. The cap has thickness of 5 cm, corresponding to a depth beyond electron contamination. IAEA phase space data was used for beam modeling and DOSRZnrc code was used to model the detector. The detector was positioned at 80 cm source-to-detector distance. Calculations were performed with the SFD, with and without the build-up cap, for clinical IRIS settings ranging from 7.5 to 60 mm. Results: The collimator scatter factors were calculated with and without 5 cm build-up cap. They were agreed within 3% difference except 15 mm cone. The Sc factor for 15 mm cone without buildup was 13.2% lower than that with buildup. Conclusion: Sc data is a critical component in advanced algorithms for treatment planning in order to calculate the dose accurately. After incorporating build-up cap, we discovered differences of up to 13.2 % in Sc factors in the SFD detector, when compared against in-air measurements without build-up caps.

  12. RISK-FACTORS, PATHOGENESIS, AND PHARMACEUTICAL APPROACHES FOR TREATMENT OF STEROID-INDUCED BONE INFARCTION OF FEMORAL HEAD.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Yang; Hu, Ningning; Miao, Xuman

    2016-01-01

    During first year of steroid usage, osteocyte necrosis and blood vessel blockage may occur, which subsequently may produce steroid-induced bone infarction (SIBI) resulting in painful movement of patient. For treatment of SIBI, pharmaceutical strategy is the basic approach. It involves the use of various pharmacologically active compounds including bisphosphonates, hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), coenzyme Q10, erythropoietin, antihyperlipidemics, anticoagulants, antioxidants, and tissue repair protein. Out of these, there is no pharmaceutical agent that may completely treat this disease because many factors are found to be responsible for SIBI development; therefore, there are multiple biomarkers of this disease. This situation argues for need of new therapeutic agents for SIEB1.

  13. Risk factors for developing a second upper aerodigestive cancer after radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in patients with head-and-neck cancers: An exploratory outcomes analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel . E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca; Rufibach, Kaspar M.Sc.; Huguenin, Pia; Allal, Abdelkarim S.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: The objective was to assess the influence of treatment-related and patient-related factors on the risk of developing a second primary tumor (SPT) of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) in patients with locoregionally advanced nonmetastatic carcinomas of the head-and-neck region. Methods and Materials: The data of 521 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year were pooled: 224 patients from the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research (SAKK) 10/94 trial, treated with 1.2 Gy b.i.d. to 74.4 Gy, and randomized to receive or not to receive simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin (excluding nasopharyngeal and maxillary sinus carcinomas); and 297 patients from Geneva, all treated with accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost to 69.9 Gy and predominantly cisplatin-based concomitant chemotherapy in 33% of patients (including 21 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinomas). An exploratory analysis using competing risk methodology was performed. Results: A total of 65 SPT of the UADT were observed after a median observation time of 4.7 years. The overall risk of experiencing an SPT of the UADT at 10 years in the presence of all other possible events was estimated to be 33%. There were no SPTs after treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, there was no difference in occurrence of SPT at 3 years with respect to the administration of chemotherapy (p = 0.31), age (p 0.62), performance status (p = 0.61), gender (p = 0.27), presence of nodal disease (p = 0.51), or T stage (p = 0.72). However, patients treated with concomitant boost had fewer SPTs (p = 0.0093). Conclusions: Our data do not suggest that addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy influences the incidence of second cancers in patients with head-and-neck cancer. The difference in the incidence of SPT between the two radiotherapy schedule groups merits further exploration.

  14. Treatment factors influencing the use of recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (Regranex) for head and lateral line erosion syndrome in ocean surgeonfish (Acanthurus bahianus).

    PubMed

    Fleming, Gregory J; Corwin, Allison; McCoy, A Jeanene; Stamper, M Andrew

    2008-06-01

    The clinical efficacy of becaplermin (Regranex, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc., Raritan, New Jersey 08869) on head and lateral line erosion syndrome (HLLES) in ocean surgeonfish (Acanthurus bahianus) was examined in a two-part study to determine suitable application frequencies of the drug and the effects of the environment on outcome of treatments. In the first part of the study, 12 ocean surgeonfish with prior HLLES were equally divided into three treatment groups, varying in application frequency of becaplermin: 1) one application, 2) three applications every 3 wk, and 3) no applications. After 9 wk, it was determined through photograph and computer analysis that fish treated with becaplermin did heal significantly more than the fish that were not treated. No significant difference was found when comparing the two treatment regimes; therefore, a one-time treatment of becaplermin was just as effective as the three-time application, reducing cost of the treatment, staff labor, and stress to the animals. In the second part of the study, the effect of the water environment on HLLES development was documented before and after a one-time treatment of becaplermin. When fish were treated and placed into a system known to cause HLLES, the becaplermin treatment had no effect on reducing the HLLES progression, whereas treated fish that were placed into a system that did not cause HLLES showed a significant decrease in erosion after the treatment. Therefore, treating fish being placed into a HLLES-causing system serves no beneficial purpose to healing HLLES. PMID:18634205

  15. Hereditary and environmental risk factors; clinical and laboratory risk matters for head and neck, especially oral, cancer and precancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N W; Warnakulasuriy, S; Tavassoli, M

    1996-02-01

    The continuing high incidence and mortality of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract in South Asia, parts of France and central Europe, together with a rising incidence and mortality from a lower base elsewhere in the Western world, stimulates continuing research on risk factors and risk markers. Tobaccos (smoked and smokeless), heavy alcohol consumption, and areca nut remain the dominant risk factors, with confirmation of the protective effects of diets rich in antioxidants. There is emerging evidence of a small, but real, risk associated with occupational and other air pollution, and with family, part of which may be hereditary. Markers in peripheral blood and saliva are underexploited. Clinical staging and histological grading methods continue to be refined, with improved prognostic value, much aided by newer and simpler methods for estimating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Data on the significance of viral genes are still inadequate, but there is good progress describing the epidemiology of chromosomal abnormalities and abberations of a growing list of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes. Unfortunately, as yet, these have only limited longitudinal or prognostic data.

  16. [Predict factors associated with malnutrition from patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) in head and neck cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Arribas, L; Hurtós, L; Milà, R; Fort, E; Peiró, I

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: La valoración global subjetiva generada por el paciente (VGS-GP) es una herramienta validada para la valoración nutricional de los pacientes oncológicos. Objetivo: El objetivo de nuestro estudio es conocer la prevalencia de desnutrición de los pacientes con cáncer de cabeza y cuello en el momento del diagnóstico y evaluar los factores pronósticos independientes de desnutrición a partir de la VGS-GP. Material y métodos: Todos los pacientes ambulatorios que fueron evaluados por el Comité de Tumores de Cabeza y Cuello para diagnóstico primario, estadiaje y decisión terapéutica fueron evaluados a través de la VGSGP. Se excluyeron recidivas tumorales y segundas neoplasias. Resultados: Se evaluaron 64 pacientes (55 hombres y 9 mujeres) con una edad media de 63 2013s y un índice de masa corporal (IMC) de 25,3 kg/m(2). Después de realizar la VGS-GP se observó que el 43,8% presentaban desnutrición o riesgo de padecerla. Los síntomas más frecuentes en el momento del diagnóstico fueron la disfagia (48,4%) y la anorexia (26.6%). Dentro de la VGS-GP, los principales factores pronósticos (p<0,001) fueron el porcentaje de pérdida de peso, los niveles de albúmina, el valor del IMC y la presencia de disfagia y/o anorexia. Conclusiones: Parámetros como el IMC, la pérdida de peso y las cifras de albúmina en el momento del diagnóstico de cáncer de cabeza y cuello, son factores predictivos independientes para el diagnóstico de desnutrición, así como la presencia de anorexia o disfagia.

  17. Irradiation-Induced Regulation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type-1 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Six Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lines of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Artman, Tuuli; Schilling, Daniela; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in neo-angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the irradiation-induced regulation of PAI-1 and VEGF in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines of varying radiation sensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six cell lines derived from SCCHN were investigated in vitro. The colorimetric AlamarBlue assay was used to detect metabolic activity of cell lines during irradiation as a surrogate marker for radiation sensitivity. PAI-1 and VEGF secretion levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 24, 48, and 72 h after irradiation with 0, 2, 6, and 10 Gy. The direct radioprotective effect of exogenous PAI-1 was measured using the clonogenic assay. For regulation studies, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha), or both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha were downregulated using siRNA. Results: Although baseline levels varied greatly, irradiation led to a comparable dose-dependent increase in PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in all six cell lines. Addition of exogenous stable PAI-1 to the low PAI-1-expressing cell lines, XF354 and FaDu, did not lead to a radioprotective effect. Downregulation of TGF-beta1 significantly decreased VEGF secretion in radiation-sensitive XF354 cells, and downregulation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha reduced PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in radiation-resistant SAS cells. Conclusions: Irradiation dose-dependently increased PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in all SCCHN cell lines tested regardless of their basal levels and radiation sensitivity. In addition, TGF-beta1 and HIF-1alpha could be partly responsible for VEGF and PAI-1 upregulation after irradiation.

  18. A comparative study of small field total scatter factors and dose profiles using plastic scintillation detectors and other stereotactic dosimeters: The case of the CyberKnife

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, J.; Beliveau-Nadeau, D.; Chung, E.; Seuntjens, J.; Theriault, D.; Archambault, L.; Beddar, S.; Beaulieu, L.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Small-field dosimetry is challenging, and the main limitations of most dosimeters are insufficient spatial resolution, water nonequivalence, and energy dependence. The purpose of this study was to compare plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) to several commercial stereotactic dosimeters by measuring total scatter factors and dose profiles on a CyberKnife system. Methods: Two PSDs were developed, having sensitive volumes of 0.196 and 0.785 mm{sup 3}, and compared with other detectors. The spectral discrimination method was applied to subtract Cerenkov light from the signal. Both PSDs were compared to four commercial stereotactic dosimeters by measuring total scatter factors, namely, an IBA dosimetry stereotactic field diode (SFD), a PTW 60008 silicon diode, a PTW 60012 silicon diode, and a microLion. The measured total scatter factors were further compared with those of two independent Monte Carlo studies. For the dose profiles, two commercial detectors were used for the comparison, i.e., a PTW 60012 silicon diode and Gafchromics EBT2. Total scatter factors for a CyberKnife system were measured in circular fields with diameters from 5 to 60 mm. Dose profiles were measured for the 5- and 60-mm cones. The measurements were performed in a water tank at a 1.5-cm depth and an 80-cm source-axis distance. Results: The total scatter factors measured using all the detectors agreed within 1% with the Monte Carlo values for cones of 20 mm or greater in diameter. For cones of 10-20 mm in diameter, the PTW 60008 silicon diode was the only dosimeter whose measurements did not agree within 1% with the Monte Carlo values. For smaller fields (<10 mm), each dosimeter type showed different behaviors. The silicon diodes over-responded because of their water nonequivalence; the microLion and 1.0-mm PSD under-responded because of a volume-averaging effect; and the 0.5-mm PSD was the only detector within the uncertainties of the Monte Carlo simulations for all the cones. The

  19. The Head-Injured College Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Cooper B.

    Intended for use by professionals as well as head-injured college students and their families, the text provides basic information about head injuries, brain anatomy, the effects of injury to the various areas of the brain, and the major factors in recovery and rehabilitation. It examines the viability of college attendance for the head-injured…

  20. Working memory units are all in your head: Factors that influence whether features or objects are the favored units.

    PubMed

    Vergauwe, Evie; Cowan, Nelson

    2015-09-01

    We compared two contrasting hypotheses of how multifeatured objects are stored in visual working memory (vWM); as integrated objects or as independent features. A new procedure was devised to examine vWM representations of several concurrently held objects and their features and our main measure was reaction time (RT), allowing an examination of the real-time search through features and/or objects in an array in vWM. Response speeds to probes with color, shape, or both were studied as a function of the number of memorized colored shapes. Four testing groups were created by varying the instructions and the way in which probes with both color and shape were presented. The instructions explicitly either encouraged or discouraged the use of binding information and the task-relevance of binding information was further suggested by presenting probes with both color and shapes as either integrated objects or independent features. Our results show that the unit used for retrieval from vWM depends on the testing situation. Search was fully object-based only when all factors support that basis of search, in which case retrieving 2 features took no longer than retrieving a single feature. Otherwise, retrieving 2 features took longer than retrieving a single feature. Additional analyses of change detection latency suggested that, even though different testing situations can result in a stronger emphasis on either the feature dimension or the object dimension, neither one disappears from the representation and both concurrently affect change detection performance. PMID:25705873

  1. Measurement of the neutron's electric form factor G(E)(n) via doubly polarized, quasi-elastic scattering at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Wesselmann

    2004-11-01

    We determined the electric form factor of the neutron GEn via the reaction d(e,e?n)p using a longitudinally polarized electron beam and a frozen, polarized 15ND3 target at Jefferson Lab. The knocked out neutrons were detected in a segmented plastic scintillator in coincidence with the quasi-elastically scattered electrons which were tracked in Hall C's High Momentum Spectrometer. To extract GEn, we compared the experimental beam-target asymmetry with theoretical calculations based on different GEn models. We report the results of the fall 2001 run at Q2=0.5 and 1.0 (GeV/c)2.

  2. Intraoperative fluorescence delineation of head and neck cancer with a fluorescent anti-epidermal growth factor receptor nanobody.

    PubMed

    van Driel, P B A A; van der Vorst, J R; Verbeek, F P R; Oliveira, S; Snoeks, T J A; Keereweer, S; Chan, B; Boonstra, M C; Frangioni, J V; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P M P; Vahrmeijer, A L; Lowik, C W G M

    2014-06-01

    Intraoperative near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is a technology with high potential to provide the surgeon with real-time visualization of tumors during surgery. Our study explores the feasibility for clinical translation of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting nanobody for intraoperative imaging and resection of orthotopic tongue tumors and cervical lymph node metastases. The anti-EGFR nanobody 7D12 and the negative control nanobody R2 were conjugated to the NIR fluorophore IRDye800CW (7D12-800CW and R2-800CW). Orthotopic tongue tumors were induced in nude mice using the OSC-19-luc2-cGFP cell line. Tumor-bearing mice were injected with 25 µg 7D12-800CW, R2-800CW or 11 µg 800CW. Subsequently, other mice were injected with 50 or 75 µg of 7D12-800CW. The FLARE imaging system and the IVIS spectrum were used to identify, delineate and resect the primary tumor and cervical lymph node metastases. All tumors could be clearly identified using 7D12-800CW. A significantly higher tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) was observed in mice injected with 7D12-800CW compared to mice injected with R2-800CW and 800CW. The highest average TBR (2.00 ± 0.34 and 2.72 ± 0.17 for FLARE and IVIS spectrum, respectively) was observed 24 hr after administration of the EGFR-specific nanobody. After injection of 75 µg 7D12-800CW cervical lymph node metastases could be clearly detected. Orthotopic tongue tumors and cervical lymph node metastases in a mouse model were clearly identified intraoperatively using a recently developed fluorescent EGFR-targeting nanobody. Translation of this approach to the clinic would potentially improve the rate of radical surgical resections.

  3. Importance of patient, tumour and treatment related factors on quality of life in head and neck cancer patients after definitive treatment.

    PubMed

    Alicikus, Zumre Arican; Akman, Fadime; Ataman, Ozlem Uruk; Dag, Nihal; Orcin, Esmahan; Bakis, Betul; Kinay, Munir

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess patient, tumour and treatment related factors on quality of life (QoL) outcomes of patients who received definitive or postoperative radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy for head and neck (H&N) cancer. In this cross-sectional study, 110 H&N cancer patients were evaluated in follow-up visit and were asked to fill out the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QoL Core Questionnaire (QLQ-C-30) and H&N Module (QLQ-H&N35). Patients were also graded for their late side effects using EORTC/RTOG scoring system. The QLQ C-30 and QLQ-H&N35 mean scores were compared using ANOVA analysis for these variables: age, gender, occupation, educational status, social security status, place of residence, tumour localization, clinical stage, comorbidity, Karnofsky performance score, treatment modality and side effects. Median follow-up was 29 (4-155) months. Tumour localization was significant factor affecting physical (P = 0.03), social (P = 0.01), cognitive (P = 0.002) functioning. Treatment modality had significant impact on the physical (P = 0.02) and cognitive scores (P = 0.008). Global QoL was affected significantly by disease stage (P = 0.01) and occupation (P = 0.01). The QLQ-H&N35 scores were found significantly higher in patients with moderate/severe late morbidity. Tumour localization and the treatment modality are the most important factors affecting the QoL of H&N cancer patients treated definitively.

  4. Risk Factors of Ototoxicity After Cisplatin-Based Chemo-Irradiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Multivariate Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zuur, Charlotte L. . E-mail: cl.zuur@vumc.nl; Simis, Yvonne J.; Lansdaal, Pauline E.; Hart, Augustinus A.; Rasch, Coen R.; Schornagel, Jan H.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Balm, Alfons J.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: Cisplatin chemo-irradiation is increasingly used in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The objective of this study is to determine risk factors of ototoxicity due to intra-arterial high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: A prospective analysis of hearing thresholds at low and (ultra) high frequencies obtained before, during, and after treatment in 146 patients. Treatment consisted of intra-arterial infusion of high-dose cisplatin (150 mg/m{sup 2}, four courses) with sodium thiosulfate rescue and concurrent radiation therapy (70 Gy). Patient and chemoradiation variables were studied in a multivariate analysis. Results: After treatment, 23% of the ears were under consideration for hearing aids because of therapy. Twenty-two percent of the patients developed an increase in air-bone gap >10 dB during or after therapy. In the multivariate explanatory analysis, cumulative dose of cisplatin and radiation therapy, and young age displayed a causal relationship with increased sensorineural hearing loss during and after therapy (p < 0.001). In the multivariate prediction analysis, pretreatment hearing level of the concerning ear was identified as an independent predictive factor for hearing capability after therapy (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Both cisplatin and radiation therapy were proven to induce sensorineural hearing loss, in this study with short-term follow-up. Of all patient and treatment variables studied, the patients pretreatment hearing level appeared to be the main predictive factor for hearing capability after high-dose intra-arterial cisplatin chemoradiation.

  5. NUTRITIONAL, MICROBIOLOGICAL, AND THERAPEUTIC FACTORS RELATED TO MUCOSITIS IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS: A COHORT STUDY.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Fernández-Natal, Isabel; Calleja-Fernández, Alicia; Parras-Padilla, Trinidad; Cano-Rodríguez, Isidoro; Prieto-Alonso, Begoña; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D

    2015-09-01

    Objetivo: el objetivo fue demostrar si la modalidad de tratamiento, el estado nutricional y la flora orofaríngea contribuyen al desarrollo de mucositis en pacientes con cáncer de cabeza y cuello tratados con radioterapia. Métodos: estudio de cohorte de pacientes con cáncer de cabeza y cuello (CyC) tratados con radioterapia. El estado nutricional se evaluó utilizando VGS, IMC e IMM. Se realizó un frotis bucal antes de la radioterapia para el cultivo de bacterias y levaduras. Se evaluó la mucositis usando los criterios de la OMS. Se calcularon el riesgo relativo (RR) y su IC del 95%. Resultados: el estudio incluyó a 35 pacientes, 74,3% hombres, 63,8 (9,9) años de edad, y 34,3% desnutridos. Los tumores estaban localizados en laringe (40,0%), boca (25,7%) y faringe (11,4%). El tratamiento consistió en 66,0 Gy de radiación, quimioterapia (60,0%) y cirugía (57,1%). Se encontraron bacterias en 28,6%, incluyendo Staphylococcus aureus (8,6%) y Escherichia coli (8,6%). Se encontró Candida spp. en el 35,3%. La mucositis fue más frecuente en los pacientes con radioterapia radical [100% vs. 65%, p = 0,01; RR = 1,54 (IC95% 1,12 a 2,12)]. Ni VGS, IMC ni IMM se relacionaron con el desarrollo o la gravedad de la mucositis. Los cultivos positivos para bacterias antes de la radioterapia se relacionaron con mucositis severa [44,4% vs. 12%, p = 0,039; RR = 4,17 (IC95% 1,22 a 14,24)], pero no hubo ninguna relación con la presencia de levaduras. La cirugía no se asoció con la aparición de las cepas estudiadas de bacterias. Conclusión: la colonización bacteriana de la orofaringe antes de la radioterapia puede ser un factor para la mucositis graves en pacientes con cáncer CyC.

  6. Head Position and Internally Headed Relative Clauses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basilico, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines "Head Movement" in internally headed relative clauses (IHRCs). The article shows that in some cases, head movement to an external position need not take place and demonstrates that this movement of the head to a sentence-internal position results from the quantificational nature of IHRCs and Diesing's mapping hypothesis (1990, 1992). (56…

  7. Gelsolin-mediated activation of PI3K/Akt pathway is crucial for hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell scattering in gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Baohua; Deng, Shuo; Loo, Ser Yue; Datta, Arpita; Yap, Yan Lin; Yan, Benedict; Ooi, Chia Huey; Dinh, Thuy Duong; Zhuo, Jingli; Tochhawng, Lalchhandami; Gopinadhan, Suma; Jegadeesan, Tamilarasi; Tan, Patrick; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Yong, Wei Peng; Soong, Richie; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Goh, Yaw Chong; Lobie, Peter E.; Yang, Henry; Kumar, Alan Prem; Maciver, Sutherland K.; So, Jimmy B.Y.; Yap, Celestial T.

    2016-01-01

    In gastric cancer (GC), the main subtypes (diffuse and intestinal types) differ in pathological characteristics, with diffuse GC exhibiting early disseminative and invasive behaviour. A distinctive feature of diffuse GC is loss of intercellular adhesion. Although widely attributed to mutations in the CDH1 gene encoding E-cadherin, a significant percentage of diffuse GC do not harbor CDH1 mutations. We found that the expression of the actin-modulating cytoskeletal protein, gelsolin, is significantly higher in diffuse-type compared to intestinal-type GCs, using immunohistochemical and microarray analysis. Furthermore, in GCs with wild-type CDH1, gelsolin expression correlated inversely with CDH1 gene expression. Downregulating gelsolin using siRNA in GC cells enhanced intercellular adhesion and E-cadherin expression, and reduced invasive capacity. Interestingly, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced increased gelsolin expression, and gelsolin was essential for HGF-medicated cell scattering and E-cadherin transcriptional repression through Snail, Twist and Zeb2. The HGF-dependent effect on E-cadherin was found to be mediated by interactions between gelsolin and PI3K-Akt signaling. This study reveals for the first time a function of gelsolin in the HGF/cMet oncogenic pathway, which leads to E-cadherin repression and cell scattering in gastric cancer. Our study highlights gelsolin as an important pro-disseminative factor contributing to the aggressive phenotype of diffuse GC. PMID:27058427

  8. Gelsolin-mediated activation of PI3K/Akt pathway is crucial for hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell scattering in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Baohua; Deng, Shuo; Loo, Ser Yue; Datta, Arpita; Yap, Yan Lin; Yan, Benedict; Ooi, Chia Huey; Dinh, Thuy Duong; Zhuo, Jingli; Tochhawng, Lalchhandami; Gopinadhan, Suma; Jegadeesan, Tamilarasi; Tan, Patrick; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Yong, Wei Peng; Soong, Richie; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Goh, Yaw Chong; Lobie, Peter E; Yang, Henry; Kumar, Alan Prem; Maciver, Sutherland K; So, Jimmy B Y; Yap, Celestial T

    2016-05-01

    In gastric cancer (GC), the main subtypes (diffuse and intestinal types) differ in pathological characteristics, with diffuse GC exhibiting early disseminative and invasive behaviour. A distinctive feature of diffuse GC is loss of intercellular adhesion. Although widely attributed to mutations in the CDH1 gene encoding E-cadherin, a significant percentage of diffuse GC do not harbor CDH1 mutations. We found that the expression of the actin-modulating cytoskeletal protein, gelsolin, is significantly higher in diffuse-type compared to intestinal-type GCs, using immunohistochemical and microarray analysis. Furthermore, in GCs with wild-type CDH1, gelsolin expression correlated inversely with CDH1 gene expression. Downregulating gelsolin using siRNA in GC cells enhanced intercellular adhesion and E-cadherin expression, and reduced invasive capacity. Interestingly, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced increased gelsolin expression, and gelsolin was essential for HGF-medicated cell scattering and E-cadherin transcriptional repression through Snail, Twist and Zeb2. The HGF-dependent effect on E-cadherin was found to be mediated by interactions between gelsolin and PI3K-Akt signaling. This study reveals for the first time a function of gelsolin in the HGF/cMet oncogenic pathway, which leads to E-cadherin repression and cell scattering in gastric cancer. Our study highlights gelsolin as an important pro-disseminative factor contributing to the aggressive phenotype of diffuse GC.

  9. Aureolegraph internal scattering correction.

    PubMed

    DeVore, John; Villanucci, Dennis; LePage, Andrew

    2012-11-20

    Two methods of determining instrumental scattering for correcting aureolegraph measurements of particulate solar scattering are presented. One involves subtracting measurements made with and without an external occluding ball and the other is a modification of the Langley Plot method and involves extrapolating aureolegraph measurements collected through a large range of solar zenith angles. Examples of internal scattering correction determinations using the latter method show similar power-law dependencies on scattering, but vary by roughly a factor of 8 and suggest that changing aerosol conditions during the determinations render this method problematic. Examples of corrections of scattering profiles using the former method are presented for a range of atmospheric particulate layers from aerosols to cumulus and cirrus clouds.

  10. Aureolegraph internal scattering correction.

    PubMed

    DeVore, John; Villanucci, Dennis; LePage, Andrew

    2012-11-20

    Two methods of determining instrumental scattering for correcting aureolegraph measurements of particulate solar scattering are presented. One involves subtracting measurements made with and without an external occluding ball and the other is a modification of the Langley Plot method and involves extrapolating aureolegraph measurements collected through a large range of solar zenith angles. Examples of internal scattering correction determinations using the latter method show similar power-law dependencies on scattering, but vary by roughly a factor of 8 and suggest that changing aerosol conditions during the determinations render this method problematic. Examples of corrections of scattering profiles using the former method are presented for a range of atmospheric particulate layers from aerosols to cumulus and cirrus clouds. PMID:23207299

  11. Application of the incomplete Cholesky factorization preconditioned Krylov subspace method to the vector finite element method for 3-D electromagnetic scattering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Huang, Ting-Zhu; Jing, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Yong

    2010-02-01

    The incomplete Cholesky (IC) factorization preconditioning technique is applied to the Krylov subspace methods for solving large systems of linear equations resulted from the use of edge-based finite element method (FEM). The construction of the preconditioner is based on the fact that the coefficient matrix is represented in an upper triangular compressed sparse row (CSR) form. An efficient implementation of the IC factorization is described in detail for complex symmetric matrices. With some ordering schemes our IC algorithm can greatly reduce the memory requirement as well as the iteration numbers. Numerical tests on harmonic analysis for plane wave scattering from a metallic plate and a metallic sphere coated by a lossy dielectric layer show the efficiency of this method.

  12. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BcbHLHpol functions as a positive regulator of pollen development in non-heading Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongkun; Li, Ying; Zhang, Changwei; Duan, Weike; Huang, Feiyi; Hou, Xilin

    2014-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a common trait in higher plants, and several transcription factors regulate pollen development. Previously, we obtained a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, BcbHLHpol, via suppression subtractive hybridization in non-heading Chinese cabbage. However, the regulatory function of BcbHLHpol during anther and pollen development remains unclear. In this study, BcbHLHpol was cloned, and its tissue-specific expression profile was analyzed. The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that BcbHLHpol was highly expressed in maintainer buds and that the transcripts of BcbHLHpol significantly decreased in the buds of pol CMS. A virus-induced gene silencing vector that targets BcbHLHpol was constructed and transformed into Brassica campestris plants to further explore the function of BcbHLHpol. Male sterility and short stature were observed in BcbHLHpol-silenced plants. The degradation of tapetal cells was inhibited in BcbHLHpol-silenced plants, and nutrients were insufficiently supplied to the microspore. These phenomena resulted in pollen abortion. This result indicates that BcbHLHpol functions as a positive regulator in pollen development. Yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed that BcbHLHpol interacted with BcSKP1 in the nucleus. This finding suggests that BcbHLHpol and BcSKP1 are positive coordinating regulators of pollen development. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that BcbHLHpol and BcSKP1 can be induced at low temperatures. Thus, we propose that BcbHLHpol is necessary for meiosis. This study provides insights into the regulatory functions of the BcbHLHpol network during anther development. PMID:25147023

  13. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  14. SU-E-T-246: MU Model Implementation for a Passively Scattered Proton Beam: Inclusion of the Bolus Gap and Nozzle Extension Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R; Ghebremedhin, A; Gordon, I; Patyal, B; Piskulich, F.; LeMaster, Brett

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement an MU model for a passively scattered proton beam, and eliminate the need for patient specific calibrations for field sizes from 3cm to 15cm. This would enable consistent and timely calibrations for a wide variety of patient portals, streamlining the treatment process. Methods: Measurements were initially made using a Standard Imaging A-16 ion chamber and a modified water tank to determine the bolus gap factors (BGF) for multiple combinations of aperture size, bolus thickness, and air gap. The BGF was then separated into two component factors: the bolus thickness factor (BTF) and the nozzle extension factor (NEF). Polynomial curves were generated using the measured data to produce BTF tables for air gaps from 0cm to 30cm and for bolus thicknesses from 0cm to 10cm, and NEF tables for the full range of clinically used nozzle extensions. Additionally, data tables were created for every factor that affects beam output in the MU model. The MUs were then modeled for 487 patient portals and retrospectively compared to the MUs generated from the physical calibrations previously performed. Results: Of the 487 patient portals tested, 100% of the portals used for the comparison were within 2.5% from the MUs generated using a physical calibration, and 95.9% of the MU model portals tested were within 2%. The patient portals tested had field sizes ranging from 2.1cm to 10.1cm, with air gaps from 2cm to 25cm. Output factors for field sizes below 3cm with irregularly shaped fields demonstrated inconsistent results and will be further studied. Conclusion: The most problematic output factor, the BGF, was modeled accurately and consistently using the lowest order polynomial curve fits and interpolation between measured data. The study results demonstrate the robustness of the MU model and the potential for saving valuable personnel and beam time.

  15. Effects of spaceflight on the murine mandible: Possible factors mediating skeletal changes in non-weight bearing bones of the head.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payal; Stabley, John N; Behnke, Bradley J; Allen, Matthew R; Delp, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Spaceflight-induced remodeling of the skull is characterized by greater bone volume, mineral density, and mineral content. To further investigate the effects of spaceflight on other non-weight bearing bones of the head, as well as to gain insight into potential factors mediating the remodeling of the skull, the purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on mandibular bone properties. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown 15d on the STS-131 Space Shuttle mission (n=8) and 13d on the STS-135 mission (n=5) or remained as ground controls (GC). Upon landing, mandibles were collected and analyzed via micro-computed tomography for tissue mineralization, bone volume (BV/TV), and distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the alveolar crest (CEJ-AC). Mandibular mineralization was not different between spaceflight (SF) and GC mice for either the STS-131 or STS-135 missions. Mandibular BV/TV (combined cortical and trabecular bone) was lower in mandibles from SF mice on the STS-131 mission (80.7±0.8%) relative to that of GC (n=8) animals (84.2±1.2%), whereas BV/TV from STS-135 mice was not different from GC animals (n=7). The CEJ-AC distance was shorter in mandibles from STS-131 mice (0.217±0.004mm) compared to GC animals (0.283±0.009mm), indicating an anabolic (or anti-catabolic) effect of spaceflight, while CEJ-AC distance was similar between STS-135 and GC mice. These findings demonstrate that mandibular bones undergo skeletal changes during spaceflight and are susceptible to the effects of weightlessness. However, adaptation of the mandible to spaceflight is dissimilar to that of the cranium, at least in terms of changes in BV/TV.

  16. Heat acclimation increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha and erythropoietin receptor expression: implication for neuroprotection after closed head injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Shein, Na'ama A; Horowitz, Michal; Alexandrovich, Alexander G; Tsenter, Jeanna; Shohami, Esther

    2005-11-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that long-term exposure to moderately high ambient temperature (heat acclimation, HA) mediates cross-tolerance to various types of subsequently applied stress. The transcriptional activator hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has been implicated in playing a critical role in HA. It also regulates the expression of Erythropoietin (Epo), whose neuroprotective effects have been shown in a variety of brain injuries. The aim of the present study was to examine whether HA exerts a beneficial effect on the outcome of closed head injury (CHI) in mice and to explore the possible involvement of HIF-1 and Epo in this process. Heat acclimated mice and matched normothermic controls were subjected to CHI or sham surgery. Postinjury motor and cognitive parameters of acclimated mice were compared with those of controls. Mice were killed at various time points after injury or sham surgery and brain levels of HIF-1alpha, the inducible subunit of HIF-1, Epo, and the specific erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) were analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Motor and cognitive functions of acclimated mice were significantly better than those of controls. Heat acclimation was found to induce a significant increase in expression of nuclear HIF-1alpha and EpoR. The EpoR/Epo ratio was also significantly higher in acclimated mice as compared with controls. Nuclear HIF-1alpha and EpoR were higher in the acclimated group at 4 h after injury as well. The improved outcome of acclimated mice taken together with the basal and postinjury upregulation of the examined proteins suggests the involvement of this pathway in HA-induced neuroprotection.

  17. Effects of spaceflight on the murine mandible: Possible factors mediating skeletal changes in non-weight bearing bones of the head.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payal; Stabley, John N; Behnke, Bradley J; Allen, Matthew R; Delp, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Spaceflight-induced remodeling of the skull is characterized by greater bone volume, mineral density, and mineral content. To further investigate the effects of spaceflight on other non-weight bearing bones of the head, as well as to gain insight into potential factors mediating the remodeling of the skull, the purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on mandibular bone properties. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown 15d on the STS-131 Space Shuttle mission (n=8) and 13d on the STS-135 mission (n=5) or remained as ground controls (GC). Upon landing, mandibles were collected and analyzed via micro-computed tomography for tissue mineralization, bone volume (BV/TV), and distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the alveolar crest (CEJ-AC). Mandibular mineralization was not different between spaceflight (SF) and GC mice for either the STS-131 or STS-135 missions. Mandibular BV/TV (combined cortical and trabecular bone) was lower in mandibles from SF mice on the STS-131 mission (80.7±0.8%) relative to that of GC (n=8) animals (84.2±1.2%), whereas BV/TV from STS-135 mice was not different from GC animals (n=7). The CEJ-AC distance was shorter in mandibles from STS-131 mice (0.217±0.004mm) compared to GC animals (0.283±0.009mm), indicating an anabolic (or anti-catabolic) effect of spaceflight, while CEJ-AC distance was similar between STS-135 and GC mice. These findings demonstrate that mandibular bones undergo skeletal changes during spaceflight and are susceptible to the effects of weightlessness. However, adaptation of the mandible to spaceflight is dissimilar to that of the cranium, at least in terms of changes in BV/TV. PMID:26545335

  18. Integrating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Assay With Clinical Parameters Improves Risk Classification for Relapse and Survival in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Christine H.; Hammond, Elizabeth M.; Trotti, Andy M.; Wang Huijun; Spencer, Sharon; Zhang Huazhong; Cooper, Jay; Jordan, Richard; Rotman, Marvin H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been consistently found to be an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR) after radiotherapy. We assessed the extent by which it can refine risk classification for overall survival (OS) and LRR in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: EGFR expression in locally advanced HNSCC was measured by immunohistochemistry in a series of patients randomized to receive accelerated or conventional radiation regimens in a Phase III trial. Subsequently, data of the two series were pooled (N = 533) for conducting a recursive partitioning analysis that incorporated clinical parameters (e.g., performance status, primary site, T and N categories) and four molecular markers (EGFR, p53, Ki-67, and microvessel density). Results: This study confirmed that patients with higher than median levels of tumor EGFR expression had a lower OS (relative risk [RR]: 1.90, p = 0.0010) and a higher LRR (RR: 1.91, p = 0.0163). Of the four markers analyzed, only EGFR was found to contribute to refining classification of patients into three risk classes with distinct OS and LRR outcomes. The addition of EGFR to three clinical parameters could identify patients having up to a fivefold difference in the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Adding pretreatment EGFR expression data to known robust clinical prognostic variables improved the estimation of the probability for OS and LRR after radiotherapy. Its use for stratifying or selecting patients with defined tumor feature and pattern of relapse for enrollment into clinical trials testing specific therapeutic strategy warrants further investigation.

  19. Development of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I in head and brain of chick embryos: Autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Bassas, L.; Girbau, M.; Lesniak, M.A.; Roth, J.; de Pablo, F. )

    1989-11-01

    In whole brain of chick embryos insulin receptors are highest at the end of embryonic development, while insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptors dominate in the early stages. These studies provided evidence for developmental regulation of both types of receptors, but they did not provide information on possible differences between brain regions at each developmental stage or within one region at different embryonic ages. We have now localized the specific binding of (125I)insulin and (125I)IGF-I in sections of head and brain using autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometric analysis. Embryos have been studied from the latter part of organogenesis (days 6 and 12) through late development (day 18, i.e. 3 days before hatching), and the binding patterns have been compared with those in the adult brain. At all ages the binding of both ligands was to discrete anatomical regions. Interestingly, while in late embryos and adult brain the patterns of (125I)insulin and (125I) IGF-I binding were quite distinct, in young embryos both ligands showed very similar localization of binding. In young embryos the retina and lateral wall of the growing encephalic vesicles had the highest binding of both (125I)insulin and (125I)IGF-I. In older embryos, as in the adult brain, insulin binding was high in the paleostriatum augmentatum and molecular layer of the cerebellum, while IGF-I binding was prominent in the hippocampus and neostriatum. The mapping of receptors in a vertebrate embryo model from early prenatal development until adulthood predicts great overlap in any possible function of insulin and IGF-I in brain development, while it anticipates differential localized actions of the peptides in the mature brain.

  20. High Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Amplification Factor Obtained with Silver Printed Circuit Boards and the Influence of Phenolic Resins for the Characterization of the Pesticide Thiram.

    PubMed

    Silva de Almeida, Francylaine; Bussler, Larissa; Marcio Lima, Sandro; Fiorucci, Antonio Rogério; da Cunha Andrade, Luis Humberto

    2016-07-01

    In this work, low-cost substrates with rough silver surfaces were prepared from commercial copper foil-covered phenolic board (CPB) and an aqueous solution of AgNO3, and were used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) measurements. A maximum SERS amplification factor of 1.2 × 10(7) was obtained for Rhodamine 6G (R6G), and use of the CPB resulted in a detection limit for Thiram pesticide of 0.5 µmol L(-1) The minimum detection level was limited by residual traces of phenolic groups that originated from the substrate resin, which became solubilized in the aqueous Ag(+) solution. It was found that the bands corresponding to the impurities had less influence in the Thiram analysis, which could be explained by the high affinity of sulfur for Ag surfaces. The influence of impurities in the SERS analyses therefore depended on the linkage between the rough silver surface and the analyte. The findings demonstrated the ease and effectiveness of using CPB to prepare a nanostructured surface for SERS.

  1. High Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Amplification Factor Obtained with Silver Printed Circuit Boards and the Influence of Phenolic Resins for the Characterization of the Pesticide Thiram.

    PubMed

    Silva de Almeida, Francylaine; Bussler, Larissa; Marcio Lima, Sandro; Fiorucci, Antonio Rogério; da Cunha Andrade, Luis Humberto

    2016-07-01

    In this work, low-cost substrates with rough silver surfaces were prepared from commercial copper foil-covered phenolic board (CPB) and an aqueous solution of AgNO3, and were used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) measurements. A maximum SERS amplification factor of 1.2 × 10(7) was obtained for Rhodamine 6G (R6G), and use of the CPB resulted in a detection limit for Thiram pesticide of 0.5 µmol L(-1) The minimum detection level was limited by residual traces of phenolic groups that originated from the substrate resin, which became solubilized in the aqueous Ag(+) solution. It was found that the bands corresponding to the impurities had less influence in the Thiram analysis, which could be explained by the high affinity of sulfur for Ag surfaces. The influence of impurities in the SERS analyses therefore depended on the linkage between the rough silver surface and the analyte. The findings demonstrated the ease and effectiveness of using CPB to prepare a nanostructured surface for SERS. PMID:27279502

  2. Heading in Soccer: Integral Skill or Grounds for Cognitive Dysfunction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkendall, Donald T.; Garrett, William E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how purposeful heading of soccer balls and head injuries affect soccer players' cognitive dysfunction. Cognitive deficits may occur for many reasons. Heading cannot be blamed when details of the actual event and impact are unknown. Concussions are the most common head injury in soccer and a factor in cognitive deficits and are probably…

  3. A Preliminary Report on X-Ray Photoabsorption Coefficients andAtomic Scattering Factors for 92 Elements in the 10-10,000 eVRegion

    SciTech Connect

    Henke, B.L.; Davis, J.C.; Gullikson, E.M.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1988-11-01

    Based on currently available photoabsorption measurements and recent theoretical calculations by Doolen and Liberman (Physica Scripta 36, 77 (1987)), a revised (from ADNDT 27, 1 (1982)) best-fit determination of the photoabsorption cross sections is presented here for the elements Z=1 to Z=92 in the 10-10,000 eV range. The photoabsorption data used include those described in the Lockheed and DOE listings of research abstracts for the past ten years and those which have been recently added to the comprehensive NBS Measured Data Base (NBSIR 86-3461, Hubbell et al.). The best-fit curves are compared with both the compilation of measurements and the calculations by Doolen and Liberman. Using the photoabsorption curves, the atomic scattering factors have been calculated for the energy range 50-10,000 eV and are also presented in this report.

  4. Impact of body-mass factors on setup displacement in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiotherapy using daily on-line image guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the impact of body-mass factors (BMF) before radiotherapy and changes during radiotherapy on the magnitude of setup displacement in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods The clinical data of 30 patients with HNC was analyzed using the alignment data from daily on-line on-board imaging from image-guided radiotherapy. BMFs included body weight, body height, and the circumference and bilateral thickness of the neck. Changes in the BMFs during treatment were retrieved from cone beam computed tomography at the 10th and 20th fractions. Setup errors for each patient were assessed by systematic error (SE) and random error (RE) through the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and medial-lateral (ML) directions, and couch rotation (CR). Using the median values of the BMFs as a cutoff, the impact of the factors on the magnitude of displacement was assessed by the Mann–Whitney U test. Results A higher body weight before radiotherapy correlated with a greater AP-SE (p = 0.045), SI-RE (p = 0.023), and CR-SE (p = 0.033). A longer body height was associated with a greater SI-RE (p = 0.002). A performance status score of 1 or 2 was related to a greater AP-SE (p = 0.043), AP-RE (p = 0.015), and SI-RE (p = 0.043). Among the ratios of the BMFs during radiotherapy, the values at the level of mastoid tip at the 20th fraction were associated with greater setup errors. Conclusions To reduce setup errors in patients with HNC receiving RT, the use of on-line image-guided radiotherapy is recommended for patients with a large body weight or height, and a performance status score of 1–2. In addition, adaptive planning should be considered for those who have a large reduction ratio in the circumference (<1) and thickness (<0.94) over the level of the mastoid tip during the 20th fraction of treatment. PMID:24411006

  5. Head circumference (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area (above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head). During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  6. Lidar multiple scattering factors inferred from CALIPSO lidar and IIR retrievals of semi-transparent cirrus cloud optical depths over oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.; Trepte, C. R.; Dubuisson, P.

    2015-07-01

    Cirrus cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm are compared to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flying on board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent two-way transmittance through the cloud. An evaluation of the CALIOP multiple scattering factor is inferred from these comparisons after assessing and correcting biases in IIR and CALIOP optical depths reported in version 3 data products. In particular, the blackbody radiance taken in the IIR version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40 % as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. It is discussed that this behavior can be explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT applied to correct the measured apparent two-way transmittance for contribution of forward-scattering. While the CALIOP version 3 retrievals hold ηT fixed at 0.6, this study shows that ηT varies with temperature (and hence cloud particle size) from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for single-layered semi-transparent cirrus clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP

  7. Scattering amplitudes and static atomic correction factors for the composition-sensitive 002 reflection in sphalerite ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Schowalter, M; Müller, K; Rosenauer, A

    2012-01-01

    Modified atomic scattering amplitudes (MASAs), taking into account the redistribution of charge due to bonds, and the respective correction factors considering the effect of static atomic displacements were computed for the chemically sensitive 002 reflection for ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors. MASAs were derived from computations within the density functional theory formalism. Binary eight-atom unit cells were strained according to each strain state s (thin, intermediate, thick and fully relaxed electron microscopic specimen) and each concentration (x = 0, …, 1 in 0.01 steps), where the lattice parameters for composition x in strain state s were calculated using continuum elasticity theory. The concentration dependence was derived by computing MASAs for each of these binary cells. Correction factors for static atomic displacements were computed from relaxed atom positions by generating 50 × 50 × 50 supercells using the lattice parameter of the eight-atom unit cells. Atoms were randomly distributed according to the required composition. Polynomials were fitted to the composition dependence of the MASAs and the correction factors for the different strain states. Fit parameters are given in the paper.

  8. Iterative scatter correction based on artifact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Hohmann, Steffen; Bertram, Matthias

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we propose a novel scatter correction methodology for X-ray based cone-beam CT that allows to combine the advantages of projection-based and volume-based correction approaches. The basic idea is to use a potentially non-optimal projection-based scatter correction method and to iteratively optimize its performance by repeatedly assessing remaining scatter-induced artifacts in intermediately reconstructed volumes. The novel approach exploits the fact that due to the flatness of the scatter-background, compensation itself is most easily performed in the projection-domain, while the scatter-induced artifacts can be better observed in the reconstructed volume. The presented method foresees to evaluate the scatter correction efficiency after each iteration by means of a quantitative measure characterizing the amount of residual cupping and to adjust the parameters of the projection-based scatter correction for the next iteration accordingly. The potential of this iterative scatter correction approach is demonstrated using voxelized Monte Carlo scatter simulations as ground truth. Using the proposed iterative scatter correction method, remarkable scatter correction performance was achieved both using simple parametric heuristic techniques as well as by optimizing previously published scatter estimation schemes. For the human head, scatter induced artifacts were reduced from initially 148 HU to less than 8.1 HU to 9.1 HU for different studied methods, corresponding to an artifact reduction exceeding 93%.

  9. SU-E-T-72: Commissioning of a Standardized SRS Cone Set: Determination of the Bolus Gap Factors in a Passively Scattered Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R; Gordon, I; Ghebremedhin, A; Wroe, A; Schulte, R; Bush, D; Slater, J; Patyal, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the proton output factors for an SRS cone set using standardized apertures and varied range compensators (bolus blanks); specifically, to determine the best method for modeling the bolus gap factor (BGF) and eliminate the need for patient specific calibrations. Methods: A Standard Imaging A-16 chamber was placed in a Plastic Water phantom to measure the change in dose/MU with different treatment combinations for a proton SRS cone, using standardized apertures and range compensators. Measurements were made with all apertures in the SRS cone set, with four different range compensator thicknesses and five different air gaps between the end of the SRS cone and the surface of the phantom. The chamber was located at iso-center and maintained at a constant depth at the center of modulation for all measurements. Each aperture was placed in the cone to measure the change in MU needed to maintain constant dose at the chamber, as the air gap was increased with different thicknesses of bolus. Results: The dose/MU varied significantly with decreasing aperture size, increasing bolus thickness, or increasing air gap. The measured data was fitted with the lowest order polynomials that accurately described the data, to create a model for determining the change in output for any potential combination of devices used to treat a patient. For a given standardized aperture, the BGF could be described by its constituent factors: the bolus thickness factor (BTF) and the nozzle extension factor (NEF). Conclusion: The methods used to model the dose at the calibration point could be used to accurately predict the change in output for SRS proton beams due to the BGF, eliminating the need for patient specific calibrations. This method for modeling SRS treatments could also be applied to model other treatments using passively scattered proton beams.

  10. Target position relative to the head is essential for predicting head movement during head-free gaze pursuit.

    PubMed

    C Pallus, Adam; G Freedman, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Gaze pursuit is the coordinated movement of the eyes and head that allows humans and other foveate animals to track moving objects. The control of smooth pursuit eye movements when the head is restrained is relatively well understood, but how the eyes coordinate with concurrent head movements when the head is free remains unresolved. In this study, we describe behavioral tasks that dissociate head and gaze velocity during head-free pursuit in monkeys. Existing models of gaze pursuit propose that both eye and head movements are driven only by the perceived velocity of the visual target and are therefore unable to account for these data. We show that in addition to target velocity, the positions of the eyes in the orbits and the retinal position of the target are important factors for predicting head movement during pursuit. When the eyes are already near their limits, further pursuit in that direction will be accompanied by more head movement than when the eyes are centered in the orbits, even when target velocity is the same. The step-ramp paradigm, often used in pursuit tasks, produces larger or smaller head movements, depending on the direction of the position step, while gaze pursuit velocity is insensitive to this manipulation. Using these tasks, we can reliably evoke head movements with peak velocities much faster than the target's velocity. Under these circumstances, the compensatory eye movements, which are often called counterproductive since they rotate the eyes in the opposite direction, are essential to maintaining accurate gaze velocity.

  11. A simple, direct method for x-ray scatter estimation and correction in digital radiography and cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Siewerdsen, J.H.; Daly, M.J.; Bakhtiar, B.

    2006-01-15

    X-ray scatter poses a significant limitation to image quality in cone-beam CT (CBCT), resulting in contrast reduction, image artifacts, and lack of CT number accuracy. We report the performance of a simple scatter correction method in which scatter fluence is estimated directly in each projection from pixel values near the edge of the detector behind the collimator leaves. The algorithm operates on the simple assumption that signal in the collimator shadow is attributable to x-ray scatter, and the 2D scatter fluence is estimated by interpolating between pixel values measured along the top and bottom edges of the detector behind the collimator leaves. The resulting scatter fluence estimate is subtracted from each projection to yield an estimate of the primary-only images for CBCT reconstruction. Performance was investigated in phantom experiments on an experimental CBCT benchtop, and the effect on image quality was demonstrated in patient images (head, abdomen, and pelvis sites) obtained on a preclinical system for CBCT-guided radiation therapy. The algorithm provides significant reduction in scatter artifacts without compromise in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). For example, in a head phantom, cupping artifact was essentially eliminated, CT number accuracy was restored to within 3%, and CNR (breast-to-water) was improved by up to 50%. Similarly in a body phantom, cupping artifact was reduced by at least a factor of 2 without loss in CNR. Patient images demonstrate significantly increased uniformity, accuracy, and contrast, with an overall improvement in image quality in all sites investigated. Qualitative evaluation illustrates that soft-tissue structures that are otherwise undetectable are clearly delineated in scatter-corrected reconstructions. Since scatter is estimated directly in each projection, the algorithm is robust with respect to system geometry, patient size and heterogeneity, patient motion, etc. Operating without prior information, analytical modeling

  12. Building Successful Home Visitor-Mother Relationships and Reaching Program Goals in Two Early Head Start Programs: A Qualitative Look at Contributing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, Sheila J.; Summers, Jean Ann; Thornburg, Kathy R.; Ispa, Jean M.; Lane, Valeri J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two qualitative studies, conducted independently in two Early Head Start programs, exploring the reasons given by mothers and home visitors for family success or lack of success in achieving program goals and for engagement in the mother-home visitor relationship. Several patterns pertaining to family issues and…

  13. Distinct Factors Associated with Head Start Mothers' Self-Report of Perceived Low Positive and High Negative Maternal Expressiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Nicole Megan

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: There is growing acknowledgment of the need for parenting interventions to address early-onset behavior and emotional concerns. Favorable child outcomes have been linked to parents' responsiveness and positive expressiveness. Given the theoretical and empirical link between perceptions and actual behavior, Head Start…

  14. Inhibition of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB by a mutant inhibitor-κBα attenuates resistance of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to TNF-α caspase-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Duffey, D C; Crowl-Bancroft, C V; Chen, Z; Ondrey, F G; Nejad-Sattari, M; Dong, G; Van Waes, C

    2000-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cytokine that can induce cell death of different cancers via a cellular cascade of proteases, the caspases. However, TNF-α has been detected in tumour and serum of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and tumour cell lines derived from this environment often exhibit resistance to TNF-α-induced cell death. Cell death mediated by TNF-α and caspases may be inhibited by cytoprotective genes regulated by transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We recently showed that NF-κB is constitutively activated in HNSCC, and that inhibition of NF-κB by expression of a nondegradable mutant inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBαM, markedly decreased survival and growth of HNSCC cells in vivo. In the present study, we examined the TNF-α sensitivity and response of HNSCC with constitutively active NF-κB, and of HNSCC cells in which NF-κB is inhibited by stable expression of a dominant negative mutant inhibitor, IκBαM. Human lines UM-SCC-9, 11B and 38, previously shown to exhibit constitutive activation of NF-κB, were found to be highly resistant to growth inhibition by up to 104U/ml of TNF-α in 5 day MTT assay. These TNF-α resistant HNSCC lines expressed TNF receptor I, and exhibited constitutive and TNF-α-inducible activation of NF-κB as demonstrated by nuclear localization of NF-κB p65 by immunohistochemistry. UM-SCC-9 I11 cells which stably expressed an inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBαm, were susceptible to TNF-α-induced growth inhibition. DNA cell cycle analysis revealed that TNF-α induced growth inhibition was associated with accumulation of cells with sub-G0/G1 DNA content. Cell death was demonstrated by trypan blue staining, and was blocked by caspase inhibitor. We conclude that HNSCC that exhibit constitutive and TNF-α-inducible activation of transcription factor NF-κB are resistant to TNF-α, and that inhibition of NF-κB sensitizes HNSCC to TNF-α caspase-mediated cytotoxicity. The demonstration of

  15. Monte Carlo study of the effects of system geometry and antiscatter grids on cone-beam CT scatter distributions

    PubMed Central

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Badal, A.; Kyprianou, I. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Vaquero, J. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proliferation of cone-beam CT (CBCT) has created interest in performance optimization, with x-ray scatter identified among the main limitations to image quality. CBCT often contends with elevated scatter, but the wide variety of imaging geometry in different CBCT configurations suggests that not all configurations are affected to the same extent. Graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are employed over a range of imaging geometries to elucidate the factors governing scatter characteristics, efficacy of antiscatter grids, guide system design, and augment development of scatter correction. Methods: A MC x-ray simulator implemented on GPU was accelerated by inclusion of variance reduction techniques (interaction splitting, forced scattering, and forced detection) and extended to include x-ray spectra and analytical models of antiscatter grids and flat-panel detectors. The simulator was applied to small animal (SA), musculoskeletal (MSK) extremity, otolaryngology (Head), breast, interventional C-arm, and on-board (kilovoltage) linear accelerator (Linac) imaging, with an axis-to-detector distance (ADD) of 5, 12, 22, 32, 60, and 50 cm, respectively. Each configuration was modeled with and without an antiscatter grid and with (i) an elliptical cylinder varying 70–280 mm in major axis; and (ii) digital murine and anthropomorphic models. The effects of scatter were evaluated in terms of the angular distribution of scatter incident upon the detector, scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), artifact magnitude, contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and visual assessment. Results: Variance reduction yielded improvements in MC simulation efficiency ranging from ∼17-fold (for SA CBCT) to ∼35-fold (for Head and C-arm), with the most significant acceleration due to interaction splitting (∼6 to ∼10-fold increase in efficiency). The benefit of a more extended geometry was evident by virtue of a larger air gap—e.g., for a 16 cm

  16. Head nurse or hotel manager?

    PubMed

    McAlvanah, M

    1989-01-01

    The responsibility of making room assignments for patients can be both a challenging and frustrating experience for a head nurse. Many factors must be considered when making room assignments while consumer dissatisfaction with the process must be handled creatively and with understanding. PMID:2734042

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of osteopontin in advanced head-and-neck cancer: Prognostic role and correlation with oxygen electrode measurements, hypoxia-inducible-factor-1{alpha}-related markers, and hemoglobin levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bache, Matthias; Reddemann, Rolf; Said, Harun M.; Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen; Taubert, Helge; Becker, Axel; Kuhnt, Thomas; Haensgen, Gabriele; Dunst, Juergen; Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The tumor-associated glycoprotein osteopontin (OPN) is discussed as a plasma marker of tumor hypoxia. However, the association of immunohistochemical OPN expression in tumor sections with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), the hypoxia-related markers hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), or hemoglobin and systemic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels has not been investigated. Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue sections of 34 patients with advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with radiotherapy were assessed by immunochemistry for the expression of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX. Relationship of OPN expression with tumor oxygenation parameters (HF5, median pO{sub 2}), HIF-1{alpha} and CA IX expression, hemoglobin and serum VEGF level, and clinical parameters was studied. Results: Bivariate analysis showed a significant correlation of positive OPN staining with low hemoglobin level (p = 0.02), high HIF-1{alpha} expression (p = 0.02), and high serum vascular endothelial growth factor level (p = 0.02) for advanced head-and-neck cancer. Furthermore, considering the 31 Stage IV patients, the median pO{sub 2} correlated significantly with the OPN expression (p = 0.02). OPN expression alone had only a small impact on prognosis. However, in a univariate Cox proportional hazard regression model, the expression of either OPN or HIF-1{alpha} or CA IX was associated with a 4.1-fold increased risk of death (p = 0.02) compared with negativity of all three markers. Conclusion: Osteopontin expression detected immunohistochemically is associated with oxygenation parameters in advanced head-and-neck cancer. When the results of OPN, HIF-1{alpha}, and CA IX immunohistochemistry are combined into a hypoxic profile, a strong and statistically significant impact on overall survival is found.

  18. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  19. A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, Christopher M; Liu, C; Stone, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  20. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  1. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  2. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  3. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  4. Head Start Facilities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    A quality Head Start facility should provide a physical environment responsive both to the needs of the children and families served and to the needs of staff, volunteers, and community agencies that share space with Head Start. This manual is a tool for Head Start grantees and delegate agencies for assessing existing facilities, making…

  5. Optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds over oceans from CALIPSO infrared radiometer and lidar measurements, and an evaluation of the lidar multiple scattering factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.; Trepte, C. R.; Dubuisson, P.

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides a detailed evaluation of cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm and comparisons to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flying on-board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite. The blackbody radiance taken in the IIR Version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are then compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent 2-way transmittance through the cloud. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40% as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. This behavior is explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT to be applied to correct the measured transmittance, which is taken equal to 0.6 in the CALIOP Version 3 algorithm, and which is found here to vary with temperature (and hence cloud particle size) from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP depolarization ratios and particle habits derived from IIR measurements.

  6. Dietary myo-inositol modulates immunity through antioxidant activity and the Nrf2 and E2F4/cyclin signalling factors in the head kidney and spleen following infection of juvenile fish with Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Hu, Kai; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of the dietary vitamin myo-inositol (MI), on the immunity and structural integrity of the head kidney and spleen following infection of fish with the major freshwater pathogen bacterial Aeromonas hydrophila. The results demonstrated for the first time that MI deficiency depressed the lysozyme and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and the complement 3 (C3) and C4 contents in the head kidney and spleen compared with the optimal MI levels, indicating that MI deficiency decreased the immunity of these important fish immune organs. The depression in immunity due to MI deficiency was partially related to oxidative damage [indicated by increases in the malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl (PC) contents] that was in turn partially due to the decreased glutathione (GSH) content and the disturbances in antioxidant enzyme activities [total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), CuZnSOD, MnSOD, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR)]. MI deficiency inhibited the antioxidant-related gene transcription [CuZnSOD, MnSOD, CAT, GPx1a, GR and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)] in the head kidney and spleen following infection of the fish with A. hydrophila. The oxidative damage due to MI deficiency also resulted in the inhibition of proliferation-associated signalling (cyclin D1, cyclin A, cyclin E and E2F4). Thus, MI deficiency partially inhibited damage repair. Excessive MI exhibited negative effects that were similar to MI deficiency, whereas the optimal MI content reversed those indicators. These observations indicated that an MI deficiency or excess could cause depression of the immune system that might be partially related to oxidative damage, antioxidant disturbances, and the inhibition of the proliferation-associated signalling in the head kidney and spleen following infection of fish with A. hydrophila. Finally, the optimal MI levels were 660.7 (based on ACP) and 736.8 mg kg(-1) diet (based

  7. Sea-urchin-like Au nanocluster with surface-enhanced raman scattering in detecting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status of malignant pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Guo, Ting; Lu, Qiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Zhong, Daixing; Zhang, Zhipei; Ni, Yunfeng; Han, Yong; Cui, Daxiang; Li, Xiaofei; Huang, Lijun

    2015-01-14

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are common in patients with lung adenocarcinomas and are associated with sensitivity to the small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). For 10%-50% of the patients who experienced malignant pleural effusion (MPE), pathological diagnosis might rely exclusively on finding lung cancer cells in the MPE. Current methods based on polymerase chain reaction were utilized to test EGFR mutation status of MPE samples, but the accuracy of the test data was very low, resulting in many patients losing the chance of TKIs treatment. Herein, we synthesized the sea-urchin-like Au nanocluster (AuNC) with an average diameter of 92.4 nm, composed of 15-nm nanopricks. By introducing abundant sharp nanopricks, the enhancement factor of AuNC reached at 1.97 × 10(7). After capped with crystal violet (CV), polyethylene glycol, and EGFR mutation specific antibody, the AuNC-EGFR had excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity and EGFR mutation targeted recognition capability in lung cancer cells. Characteristic SERS signal at 1617 cm(-1) of CV was linear correlation with the number of H1650 cells, demonstrating the minimum detection limit as 25 cells in a 1-mL suspension. The gold mass in single H1650 cells exposed to AuNC-E746_750 for 2 h ranged from 208.6 pg to 231.4 pg, which approximately corresponded to 56-62 AuNCs per cell. Furthermore, SERS was preclinically utilized to test EGFR mutation status in MPE samples from 35 patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Principal component analysis (PCA) and the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm were constructed for EGFR mutation diagnostic analysis, yielding an overall accuracy of 90.7%. SERS measurement based on sea-urchin-like AuNC was an efficient method for EGFR mutation detection in MPE, and it might show great potential in applications such as predicting gene typing of clinical lung cancer in the near future.

  8. TaLHY, a 1R-MYB Transcription Factor, Plays an Important Role in Disease Resistance against Stripe Rust Fungus and Ear Heading in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijin; Chen, Jieming; Su, Yongying; Liu, Hanmei; Chen, Yanger; Luo, Peigao; Du, Xiaogang; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01

    LHY (late elongated hypocotyl) is an important gene that regulates and controls biological rhythms in plants. Additionally, LHY is highly expressed in the SSH (suppression subtractive hybridization) cDNA library-induced stripe rust pathogen (CYR32) in our previous research. To identify the function of the LHY gene in disease resistance against stripe rust, we used RACE-PCR technology to clone TaLHY in the wheat variety Chuannong19. The cDNA of TaLHY is 3085 bp long with an open reading frame of 1947 bp. TaLHY is speculated to encode a 70.3 kDa protein of 648 amino acids , which has one typical plant MYB-DNA binding domain; additionally, phylogenetic tree shows that TaLHY has the highest homology with LHY of Brachypodium distachyon(BdLHY-like). Quantitative fluorescence PCR indicates that TaLHY has higher expression in the leaf, ear and stem of wheat but lower expression in the root. Infestation of CYR32 can result in up-regulated expression of TaLHY, peaking at 72 h. Using VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) technology to disease-resistant wheat in the fourth leaf stage, plants with silenced TaLHY cannot complete their heading stage. Through the compatible interaction with the stripe rust physiological race CYR32, Chuannong 19 loses its immune capability toward the stripe rust pathogen, indicating that TaLHY may regulate and participate in the heading of wheat, as well as the defense responses against stripe rust infection.

  9. TaLHY, a 1R-MYB Transcription Factor, Plays an Important Role in Disease Resistance against Stripe Rust Fungus and Ear Heading in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijin; Chen, Jieming; Su, Yongying; Liu, Hanmei; Chen, Yanger; Luo, Peigao; Du, Xiaogang; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Huaiyu

    2015-01-01

    LHY (late elongated hypocotyl) is an important gene that regulates and controls biological rhythms in plants. Additionally, LHY is highly expressed in the SSH (suppression subtractive hybridization) cDNA library-induced stripe rust pathogen (CYR32) in our previous research. To identify the function of the LHY gene in disease resistance against stripe rust, we used RACE-PCR technology to clone TaLHY in the wheat variety Chuannong19. The cDNA of TaLHY is 3085 bp long with an open reading frame of 1947 bp. TaLHY is speculated to encode a 70.3 kDa protein of 648 amino acids , which has one typical plant MYB-DNA binding domain; additionally, phylogenetic tree shows that TaLHY has the highest homology with LHY of Brachypodium distachyon(BdLHY-like). Quantitative fluorescence PCR indicates that TaLHY has higher expression in the leaf, ear and stem of wheat but lower expression in the root. Infestation of CYR32 can result in up-regulated expression of TaLHY, peaking at 72 h. Using VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing) technology to disease-resistant wheat in the fourth leaf stage, plants with silenced TaLHY cannot complete their heading stage. Through the compatible interaction with the stripe rust physiological race CYR32, Chuannong 19 loses its immune capability toward the stripe rust pathogen, indicating that TaLHY may regulate and participate in the heading of wheat, as well as the defense responses against stripe rust infection. PMID:26010918

  10. Identification of genetic loci underlying the phenotypic constructs of autism spectrum disorders Running head: Genetic loci for latent factors in ASD

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Qing; Georgiades, Stelios; Duku, Eric; Thompson, Ann; Devlin, Bernie; Cook, Edwin H.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Szatmari, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the underlying phenotypic constructs in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and to identify genetic loci that are linked to these empirically derived factors. Method Exploratory factor analysis was applied to two datasets with 28 selected Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) algorithm items. The first dataset was from the Autism Genome Project (AGP) phase I (1,236 ASD subjects from 618 families); the second was from the AGP phase II (804 unrelated ASD subjects). Variables derived from the factor analysis were then used as quantitative traits in genome-wide variance components linkage analyses. Results Six factors, joint attention, social interaction and communication, non-verbal communication, repetitive sensory-motor behaviour, peer interaction, and compulsion/restricted interests, were retained for both datasets. There was good agreement between the factor loading patterns from the two datasets. All factors showed familial aggregation. Suggestive evidence for linkage was obtained for the joint attention factor on 11q23. Genome-wide significant evidence for linkage was obtained for the repetitive sensory-motor behaviour factor on 19q13.3. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the underlying phenotypic constructs based on the ADI-R algorithm items are replicable in independent datasets; and the empirically derived factors are suitable and informative in genetic studies of ASD. PMID:21703496

  11. Effects of the environmental factors on the casein micelle structure studied by cryo transmission electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering/ultrasmall-angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchin, Stéphane; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Pignon, Frédéric; Léonil, Joëlle

    2007-01-01

    Casein micelles are colloidal protein-calcium-transport complexes whose structure has not been unequivocally elucidated. This study used small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering (USAXS) as well as cryo transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) to provide fine structural details on their structure. Cryo-TEM observations of native casein micelles fractionated by differential centrifugation showed that colloidal calcium phosphate appeared as nanoclusters with a diameter of about 2.5nm. They were uniformly distributed in a homogeneous tangled web of caseins and were primarily responsible for the intensity distribution in the SAXS profiles at the highest q vectors corresponding to the internal structure of the casein micelles. A specific demineralization of casein micelles by decreasing the pH from 6.7 to 5.2 resulted in a reduced granular aspect of the micelles observed by cryo-TEM and the existence of a characteristic point of inflection in SAXS profiles. This supports the hypothesis that the smaller substructures detected by SAXS are colloidal calcium phosphate nanoclusters rather than putative submicelles.

  12. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Janice K. . E-mail: janice.ryu@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 {mu}g/m{sup 2} or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer.

  13. Self-Regulation and Self-Worth of Black Children Reared in Economically Stressed, Rural, Single Mother-Headed Families: The Contribution of Risk and Protective Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murry, Velma McBride; Brody, Gene H.

    1999-01-01

    Examines risk and protective factors to identify processes in rural, single-parent families that are linked with positive child outcomes. Protective domains promoted greater child self-regulation; parenting protective factors promoted greater self-regulation. Maternal risk had the greatest negative effect on child self-worth. Results also reveal…

  14. Regional and field-specific factors affect the composition of fusarium head blight pathogens in subtropical no-till wheat agroecosystem of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Del Ponte, Emerson M; Spolti, Piérri; Ward, Todd J; Gomes, Larissa B; Nicolli, Camila P; Kuhnem, Paulo R; Silva, Cleiltan N; Tessmann, Dauri J

    2015-02-01

    A multiyear survey of >200 wheat fields in Paraná (PR) and Rio Grande do Sul (RS) states was conducted to assess the extent and distribution of Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) diversity in the southern Brazilian wheat agroecosystem. Five species and three trichothecene genotypes were found among 671 FGSC isolates from Fusarium head blight (FHB)-infected wheat heads: F. graminearum (83%) of the 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON) genotype, F. meridionale (12.8%) and F. asiaticum (0.4%) of the nivalenol (NIV) genotype, and F. cortaderiae (2.5%) and F. austroamericanum (0.9%) with either the NIV or the 3-ADON genotype. Regional differences in FGSC composition were observed, with F. meridionale and the NIV type being significantly (P<0.001) more prevalent in PR (>28%) than in RS (≤9%). Within RS, F. graminearum was overrepresented in fields below 600 m in elevation and in fields with higher levels of FHB incidence (P<0.05). Species composition was not significantly influenced by previous crop or the stage of grain development at sampling. Habitat-specific differences in FGSC composition were evaluated in three fields by characterizing a total of 189 isolates collected from corn stubble, air above the wheat canopy, and symptomatic wheat kernels. Significant differences in FGSC composition were observed among these habitats (P<0.001). Most strikingly, F. meridionale and F. cortaderiae of the NIV genotype accounted for the vast majority (>96%) of isolates from corn stubble, whereas F. graminearum with the 15-ADON genotype was dominant (>84%) among isolates from diseased wheat kernels. Potential differences in pathogenic fitness on wheat were also suggested by a greenhouse competitiveness assay in which F. graminearum was recovered at much higher frequency (>90%) than F. meridionale from four wheat varieties inoculated with an equal mixture of F. graminearum and F. meridionale isolates. Taken together, the data presented here suggest that FGSC composition and

  15. SU-E-T-298: Small Field Total Scatter Factors Using a Commercial Scintillator Detector: Calibration Parameters Are Not Independent of Field Size

    SciTech Connect

    Jornet, N; Carrasco de Fez, P; Jordi, O; Latorre-Musoll, A; Eudaldo, T; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Ribas Morales, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy in total scatter factor (Sc,p) determination for small fields using commercial plastic scintillator detector (PSD). The manufacturer's spectral discrimination method to subtract Cerenkov light from the signal is discussed. Methods: Sc,p for field sizes ranging from 0.5 to 10 cm were measured using PSD Exradin (Standard Imaging) connected to two channel electrometer measuring the signals in two different spectral regions to subtract the Cerenkov signal from the PSD signal. A Pinpoint ionisation chamber 31006 (PTW) and a non-shielded semiconductor detector EFD (Scanditronix) were used for comparison. Measures were performed for a 6 MV X-ray beam. The Sc,p are measured at 10 cm depth in water for a SSD=100 cm and normalized to a 10'10 cm{sup 2} field size at the isocenter. All detectors were placed with their symmetry axis parallel to the beam axis.We followed the manufacturer's recommended calibration methodology to subtract the Cerenkov contribution to the signal as well as a modified method using smaller field sizes. The Sc,p calculated by using both calibration methodologies were compared. Results: Sc,p measured with the semiconductor and the PinPoint detectors agree, within 1.5%, for field sizes between 10'10 and 1'1 cm{sup 2}. Sc,p measured with the PSD using the manufacturer's calibration methodology were systematically 4% higher than those measured with the semiconductor detector for field sizes smaller than 5'5 cm{sup 2}. By using a modified calibration methodology for smalls fields and keeping the manufacturer calibration methodology for fields larger than 5'5cm{sup 2} field Sc,p matched semiconductor results within 2% field sizes larger than 1.5 cm. Conclusion: The calibration methodology proposed by the manufacturer is not appropriate for dose measurements in small fields. The calibration parameters are not independent of the incident radiation spectrum for this PSD. This work was partially financed by grant 2012 of

  16. Perfusion Estimated With Rapid Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates Inversely With Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pimonidazole Staining in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Stephanie B.; Betts, Guy; Bonington, Suzanne C.; Homer, Jarrod J.; Slevin, Nick J.; Kershaw, Lucy E.; Valentine, Helen; West, Catharine M.L.; Buckley, David L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze, in a pilot study, rapidly acquired dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data with a general two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model and correlate parameters obtained with measurements of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were scanned before surgery. The DCE-MRI data were acquired with 1.5-s temporal resolution and analyzed using the two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model to obtain estimates of parameters including perfusion and permeability surface area. Twelve to 16 h before surgery, patients received an intravenous injection of pimonidazole. Samples taken during surgery were used to determine the level of pimonidazole staining using immunohistochemistry and VEGF expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Correlations between the biological and imaging data were examined. Results: Of the seven tumors fully analyzed, those that were poorly perfused tended to have high levels of pimonidazole staining (r = -0.79, p = 0.03) and VEGF expression (r = -0.82, p = 0.02). Tumors with low permeability surface area also tended to have high levels of hypoxia (r = -0.75, p = 0.05). Hypoxic tumors also expressed higher levels of VEGF (r = 0.82, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Estimates of perfusion obtained with rapid DCE-MRI data in patients with head-and-neck cancer correlate inversely with pimonidazole staining and VEGF expression.

  17. High density lipoproteins down-regulate transcriptional expression of pro-inflammatory factors and oxidative burst in head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Franz; Casado, Alin; Amthauer, Rodolfo; Concha, Margarita I

    2013-07-01

    Teleosts are the first group of vertebrates possessing an acquired immune system; however, it is less developed than in mammals and is highly influenced by environmental changes. Therefore, innate immunity effectors play a more critical role in survival of pathogen-challenged fish. In a previous study we showed that trout high density lipoprotein (HDL), and its major apolipoprotein (ApoA-I) are widely expressed in primary defense barriers and other immune-relevant tissues, displaying important antibacterial activity in vitro. Here we show that trout HDL inhibits both basal and LPS-induced transcript expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, and the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (A-SAA), in head kidney leukocytes (HLK) from rainbow trout. In addition, trout HDL was able to block the respiratory burst of PMA-stimulated HKL, at physiological concentrations and in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, this effect was only partially mimicked by supra-physiologic concentrations of the HDL-transported carotenoid, astaxanthin. These results constitute the first data suggesting that in addition to its antimicrobial activity, HDL would have a relevant immunomodulatory role in salmonid fish. PMID:23597873

  18. Atom scattering from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, W. W.

    In the initial portion of this dissertation studies of Ar scattering from Ru(0001) at thermal and hyperthermal energies are compared to calculations with classical scattering theory. These data exhibited a number of characteristics that are unusual in comparison to other systems for which atomic beam experiments have been carried out under similar conditions. The measured energy losses were unusually small. Some of the angular distributions exhibited an anomalous shoulder feature in addition to a broad peak near the specular direction and quantum mechanical diffraction was observed under conditions for which it was not expected. Many of the unusual features observed in the measurements are explained, but only upon using an effective surface mass of 2.3 Ru atomic masses, which implies collective effects in the Ru crystal. The large effective mass, because it leads to substantially larger Debye-Waller factors, explains and confirms the observations of diffraction features. It also leads to the interesting conclusion that Ru is a metal for which atomic beam scattering measurements in the purely quantum mechanical regime, where diffraction and single-phonon creation are dominant, should be possible not only with He atoms, but with many other atomic species with larger masses. A useful theoretical expression for interpreting and analyzing observed scattering intensity spectra for atomic and molecular collisions with surfaces is the differential reflection coefficient for a smooth, vibrating surface. This differential reflection coefficient depends on a parameter, usually expressed in dimensions of velocity, that arises due to correlated motions of neighboring regions of the surface and can be evaluated if the polarization vectors of the phonons near the surface are known. As a part of this dissertation experimental conditions are suggested under which this velocity paramenter may be more precisely measured than it has been in the past. Experimental data for scattering

  19. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  20. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome is described. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending therethrough. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending therethrough, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending therethrough, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore therethrough, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening.

  1. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  2. Estimating the Analytical and Surface Enhancement Factors in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS): A Novel Physical Chemistry and Nanotechnology Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, Ioana E.; Alnajjar, Khadijeh S.; Monahan, Jennifer L.; Stahler, Adam; Hunter, Nora E.; Weaver, Kent M.; Baker, Joshua D.; Meyerhoefer, Allie J.; Dolson, David A.

    2012-01-01

    A novel laboratory experiment was successfully implemented for undergraduate and graduate students in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. The main goal of the experiment was to rigorously determine the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based sensing capabilities of colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). These were quantified by…

  3. Scattering fidelity in elastodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorin, T.; Seligman, T. H.; Weaver, R. L.

    2006-01-01

    The recent introduction of the concept of scattering fidelity causes us to revisit the experiment by Lobkis and Weaver [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 254302 (2003)]. There, the “distortion” of the coda of an acoustic signal is measured under temperature changes. This quantity is, in fact, the negative logarithm of scattering fidelity. We reanalyze their experimental data for two samples, and we find good agreement with random matrix predictions for the standard fidelity. Usually, one may expect such an agreement for chaotic systems, only. While the first sample may indeed be assumed chaotic, for the second sample, a perfect cuboid, such an agreement is surprising. For the first sample, the random matrix analysis yields perturbation strengths compatible with semiclassical predictions. For the cuboid, the measured perturbation strengths are by a common factor of (5)/(3) too large. Apart from that, the experimental curves for the distortion are well reproduced.

  4. (Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high {Tc} superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect.

  5. Animal Models of Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cernak, Ibolja

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are used to elucidate primary and secondary sequelae underlying human head injury in an effort to identify potential neuroprotective therapies for developing and adult brains. The choice of experimental model depends upon both the research goal and underlying objectives. The intrinsic ability to study injury-induced changes in behavior, physiology, metabolism, the blood/tissue interface, the blood brain barrier, and/or inflammatory- and immune-mediated responses, makes in vivo TBI models essential for neurotrauma research. Whereas human TBI is a highly complex multifactorial disorder, animal trauma models tend to replicate only single factors involved in the pathobiology of head injury using genetically well-defined inbred animals of a single sex. Although such an experimental approach is helpful to delineate key injury mechanisms, the simplicity and hence inability of animal models to reflect the complexity of clinical head injury may underlie the discrepancy between preclinical and clinical trials of neuroprotective therapeutics. Thus, a search continues for new animal models, which would more closely mimic the highly heterogeneous nature of human TBI, and address key factors in treatment optimization. PMID:16389305

  6. Salivary gland carcinoma in Denmark 1990-2005: outcome and prognostic factors. Results of the Danish Head and Neck Cancer Group (DAHANCA).

    PubMed

    Bjørndal, Kristine; Krogdahl, Annelise; Therkildsen, Marianne Hamilton; Overgaard, Jens; Johansen, Jørgen; Kristensen, Claus A; Homøe, Preben; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Andersen, Elo; Bundgaard, Troels; Primdahl, Hanne; Lambertsen, Karin; Andersen, Lisbeth Juhler; Godballe, Christian

    2012-02-01

    To describe outcome and prognostic factors in a national Danish series of patients treated for salivary gland carcinoma. From three Danish nation-wide registries and supplementary patient records, 871 patients diagnosed with primary major or minor salivary gland carcinoma in the period from 1990 to 2005 were identified. A total of 796 (91%) histological specimens were revised according to the WHO 2005 classification. The median follow-up time was 78 months. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (38%) experienced recurrence. Crude survival, disease-specific survival and recurrence-free survival after 5 and 10 years were 66%, 76%, 64% and 51%, 69%, 58%, respectively. In multivariate analysis age, latency, stage, microscopic margins, vascular invasion and histological grade were all independent prognostic factors with regards to crude and disease-specific survival. Stage, microscopic margins, vascular invasion and histological grade were independent prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival. Age over 61 years, latency under 8 months, stage 3+4 disease, involved or close microscopic margins, vascular invasion and high histological grade are all independent prognostic factors with a negative impact on survival in salivary gland carcinoma patients. This knowledge can be helpful in guiding clinicians in daily work and choice of treatment across the large variety of salivary gland carcinoma subtypes. PMID:21968090

  7. Factors Associated With Incidence of "?Inappropriate"? Ambulance Transport in Rural Areas in Cases of Moderate to Severe Head Injury in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Muus, Kyle

    2005-01-01

    Context: Ambulance transport of pediatric trauma patients to designated trauma centers in cases of moderate and severe injury is not always performed, which has been shown to result in poor treatment outcomes. Determination of factors involved in inappropriate patient transport, especially in rural areas, remains an important avenue of research.…

  8. Factors Associated with Incidence of "Inappropriate" Ambulance Transport in Rural Areas in Cases of Moderate to Severe Head Injury in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Muus, Kyle

    2005-01-01

    Context: Ambulance transport of pediatric trauma patients to designated trauma centers in cases of moderate and severe injury is not always performed, which has been shown to result in poor treatment outcomes. Determination of factors involved in inappropriate patient transport, especially in rural areas, remains an important avenue of research.…

  9. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  10. Fusarium graminearum Possesses Virulence Factors Common to Fusarium Head Blight of Wheat and Seedling Rot of Soybean but Differing in Their Impact on Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Sella, Luca; Gazzetti, Katia; Castiglioni, Carla; Schäfer, Wilhelm; Favaron, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a toxigenic fungal pathogen that causes Fusarium head blight (FHB) and crown rot on cereal crops worldwide. This fungus also causes damping-off and crown and root rots at the early stage of crop development in soybean cultivated in North and South America. Several F. graminearum genes were investigated for their contribution to FHB in cereals but no inherent study is reported for the dicotyledonous soybean host. In this study we determined the disease severity on soybean seedlings of five single gene disrupted mutants of F. graminearum, previously characterized in wheat spike infection. Three of these mutants are impaired on a specific function as the production of deoxynivalenol (DON, Δtri5), lipase (ΔFgl1), and xylanase (Δxyl03624), while the remaining two are MAP kinase mutants (ΔFgOS-2, Δgpmk1), which are altered in signaling pathways. The mutants that were reduced in virulence (Δtri5, ΔFgl1, and ΔFgOS-2) or are avirulent (Δgpmk1) on wheat were correspondently less virulent or avirulent in soybean seedlings, as shown by the extension of lesions and seedling lengths. The Δxyl03624 mutant was as virulent as the wild type mirroring the behavior observed in wheat. However, a different ranking of symptom severity occurred in the two hosts: the ΔFgOS-2 mutant, that infects wheat spikelets similarly to Δtri5 and ΔFgl1 mutants, provided much reduced symptoms in soybean. Differently from the other mutants, we observed that the ΔFgOS-2 mutant was several fold more sensitive to the glyceollin phytoalexin suggesting that its reduced virulence may be due to its hypersensitivity to this phytoalexin. In conclusion, lipase and DON seem important for full disease symptom development in soybean seedlings, OS-2 and Gpmk1 MAP kinases are essential for virulence, and OS-2 is involved in conferring resistance to the soybean phytoalexin.

  11. Methods and apparatus for transparent display using scattering nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Qiu, Wenjun; Zhen, Bo; Shapira, Ofer; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-05-10

    Transparent displays enable many useful applications, including heads-up displays for cars and aircraft as well as displays on eyeglasses and glass windows. Unfortunately, transparent displays made of organic light-emitting diodes are typically expensive and opaque. Heads-up displays often require fixed light sources and have limited viewing angles. And transparent displays that use frequency conversion are typically energy inefficient. Conversely, the present transparent displays operate by scattering visible light from resonant nanoparticles with narrowband scattering cross sections and small absorption cross sections. More specifically, projecting an image onto a transparent screen doped with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the image wavelength(s) yields an image on the screen visible to an observer. Because the nanoparticles scatter light at only certain wavelengths, the screen is practically transparent under ambient light. Exemplary transparent scattering displays can be simple, inexpensive, scalable to large sizes, viewable over wide angular ranges, energy efficient, and transparent simultaneously.

  12. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant inhibitor-kappaBalpha of nuclear factor-kappaB in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma inhibits survival, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Duffey, D C; Chen, Z; Dong, G; Ondrey, F G; Wolf, J S; Brown, K; Siebenlist, U; Van Waes, C

    1999-07-15

    We demonstrated recently that constitutive expression of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is correlated with activation of transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB/Rel A (p50/p65), which binds the promoter region within each of the genes encoding this repertoire of cytokines. NF-kappaB can be activated after signal-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor-kappaBalpha and has been reported to promote cell survival and growth. In the present study, we expressed a phosphorylation site mutant of inhibitor-kappaBalpha (IkappaBalphaM) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines UM-SCC-9, -11B, and -38 to determine the effect of inhibition of NF-kappaB on cytokine expression, cell survival in vitro, and growth in vivo. After transfection with IKBalphaM, only a few UM-SCC-9 clones were obtained that stably expressed the mutant IkappaB, suggesting that expression of a mutant IkappaBalpha may affect survival of the transfected UM-SCC cell lines. After cotransfection of IkappaBalphaM with a Lac-Z reporter, we found that the number of surviving beta-galactosidase-positive cells in the three cell lines was reduced by 70-90% when compared with controls transfected with vector lacking the insert. In UM-SCC-9 cells that stably expressed IkappaBalphaM, inhibition of constitutive and tumor necrosis factor-a induced NF-kappaB activation, and production of all four cytokines was observed. Although UM-SCC-9 IkappaBalphaM-transfected cells proliferated at the same rate as vector-transfected cells in vitro, a significant reduction in growth of tumor xenografts was observed in SCID mice in vivo. The decreased growth of UM-SCC-9 IkappaBalphaM-transfected tumor cells accompanied decreased immunohistochemical detection of the activated form of NF-kappaB in situ. These results provide evidence that NF-KB and IkappaBalpha play an important role in

  13. Genetic variants in the tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) do not contribute but Death Receptor (DR4) genes may contribute to susceptibility to head and neck cancer in Pakistani population.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, R; Mansoor, Q; Farooqi, A A; Shahzad, S; Fayyaz, S; Ismail, M

    2015-01-01

    TRAIL mediated signaling in cancer cells has emerged as one amongst the most deeply studied molecular phenomenon. Recent breakthroughs have shown that overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins, inactivation of pro-apoptotic proteins, transcriptional downregulation of TRAIL, DR4/DR5, degradation of DR/DR5 are some of the mechanisms which dramatically abrogate TRAIL induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Data obtained through genetic studies has highlighted highly polymorphic nature of DR4 and in accordance with this concept, we investigated the association between Head and Neck Cancer and polymorphisms in TRAIL (1595 C/T) and DR4 (C626G and A1322G) gene. We selected 100 patients with Head and Neck Cancer and 100 healthy, sex and age matched volunteers randomly. C626G and A1322G in DR4 gene were analyzed using Polymerase Change Reaction (PCR) - Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) techniques respectively. For TRAIL gene 1595 C>T genotypes, there was no statistically significant role of homozygous CC or TT in Head and Neck cancer. CC was 58% in patients and 49% in controls. CT was 30% in patients and 43% in controls. TT was 12% in patients and 8% in controls. Allele frequency for C was noted to be 0.73 (patients) and 0.705 (controls), p-value (1). For T, 0.025 (patients) and 0.001(controls), p-value (0.88). The genotyping for DR4 gene 626 C>G polymorphism was done for 100 head and neck cancer patients and 100 age and sex matched healthy controls. All the genotypes for the polymorphism were in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. For DR4626 C>G genotype, CC was 10% in patients and 2% in controls. GC was 63% in patients and 40% in controls. GG was 27% in patients and 58% in controls. Interestingly, in DR4 genotyping, CC was predisposing factor and GG acted as a protective factor. Allele frequency for C was noted to be 0.41 (patients) and 0.22 (controls), p-value (0.81). For G, 0.585 (patients) and 0.78 (controls), p

  14. Head Circumference and Neurocognitive Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Universities of Glasgow and Bristol, UK, determined the value of head circumference (HC) as a screening measure, the incidence of head centile shifting, and the relationship between extremes of head size and later neurodevelopmental problems. PMID:26933592

  15. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is ...

  16. Risk factors for recurrent nerve palsy after thyroid surgery: a national study of patients treated at Danish departments of ENT Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Sørensen, Christian Hjort; Schytte, Sten; Trolle, Waldemar; Helweg-Larsen, Jens; Barfoed, Lisa; Kristiansen, Larry; Sørensen, Vibeke Zederkof; Samuelsen, Grethe; Pedersen, Henrik Baymler

    2014-08-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is a well-known and serious complication to thyroid surgery. The objective was to estimate the frequency of post-thyroidectomy RLN palsy and to identify possible risk factors. Based on the Danish national thyroid surgery database, 6,859 patients treated with thyroid surgery from 1 January 2001 to the 31 December 2008 at the Danish departments of ENT-HNS were analyzed. Unilateral RLN palsy was found in 2.1 % and bilateral in 0.1 %. In benign histology, RLN palsies were registered in 1.3 %. Malignant histology and accordingly neck dissection were the most predominant risk factors with a relative risk (RR) of 5.4 and 5.8, respectively. In benign cases previous performed thyroid surgery had a RR of 10.4. High volume departments with more than 150 thyroid procedures per year seem to perform significantly better. Malignant histology, neck dissection and previous performed thyroid surgery are the strongest predictors for RLN palsy and patient information should be given accordingly. Incomplete resections should be reserved for isthmectomy only. Centralization of thyroid surgery in larger units might improve quality. PMID:24132654

  17. Laser scattering by transcranial rat brain illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2012-06-01

    Due to the great number of applications of Low-Level-Laser-Therapy (LLLT) in Central Nervous System (CNS), the study of light penetration through skull and distribution in the brain becomes extremely important. The aim is to analyze the possibility of precise illumination of deep regions of the rat brain, measure the penetration and distribution of red (λ = 660 nm) and Near Infra-Red (NIR) (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light and compare optical properties of brain structures. The head of the animal (Rattus Novergicus) was epilated and divided by a sagittal cut, 2.3 mm away from mid plane. This section of rat's head was illuminated with red and NIR lasers in points above three anatomical structures: hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal cortex. A high resolution camera, perpendicularly positioned, was used to obtain images of the brain structures. Profiles of scattered intensities in the laser direction were obtained from the images. There is a peak in the scattered light profile corresponding to the skin layer. The bone layer gives rise to a valley in the profile indicating low scattering coefficient, or frontal scattering. Another peak in the region related to the brain is an indication of high scattering coefficient (μs) for this tissue. This work corroborates the use of transcranial LLLT in studies with rats which are subjected to models of CNS diseases. The outcomes of this study point to the possibility of transcranial LLLT in humans for a large number of diseases.

  18. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  19. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  20. Radial head arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, M T; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2010-02-01

    In conclusion, radial head fractures with 3 or more fragments have a high incidence of complications when treated with ORIF including hardware failure, malunion, nonunion, and the need for re-operation. Radial head arthroplasty has demonstrated good success in the treatment of complex, comminuted radial head fractures which are not amenable to non-opeative treatment or ORIF. Success can be optimized by diligent surgical dissection, avoiding inadvertent nerve injury, placement of an appropriately sized implant, repair of associated injuries, and early protected motion. PMID:20214854

  1. Compressional head waves in attenuative formations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.H.; Chang, C.

    1994-12-31

    The attenuation of compressional head waves in a fluid-filled borehole is studied with the branch-cut integration method. The borehole fluid and solid formation are both assumed lossy with quality factors Q{sub f}({omega}) for the fluid, and Q{sub c}({omega}) and Q{sub s}({omega}) for the compressional and shear waves in the solid, respectively. The branch-cut integration method used in this work is an extension of that for a lossless medium. With this branch-cut integration method, the authors can isolate the groups of individual arrivals such as the compressional head waves and shear head waves, and study the attenuation of those particular wavefields in lossy media. This study, coupled with experimental work to be performed, may result in an effective way of measuring compressional head wave attenuation in the field.

  2. Scatter-based magnetic resonance elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazoglou, Sebastian; Xu, Chao; Hamhaber, Uwe; Siebert, Eberhard; Bohner, Georg; Klingebiel, Randolf; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2009-04-01

    Elasticity is a sensitive measure of the microstructural constitution of soft biological tissues and increasingly used in diagnostic imaging. Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) uniquely allows in vivo measurement of the shear elasticity of brain tissue. However, the spatial resolution of MRE is inherently limited as the transformation of shear wave patterns into elasticity maps requires the solution of inverse problems. Therefore, an MRE method is introduced that avoids inversion and instead exploits shear wave scattering at elastic interfaces between anatomical regions of different shear compliance. This compliance-weighted imaging (CWI) method can be used to evaluate the mechanical consistency of cerebral lesions or to measure relative stiffness differences between anatomical subregions of the brain. It is demonstrated that CWI-MRE is sensitive enough to reveal significant elasticity variations within inner brain parenchyma: the caudate nucleus (head) was stiffer than the lentiform nucleus and the thalamus by factors of 1.3 ± 0.1 and 1.7 ± 0.2, respectively (P < 0.001). CWI-MRE provides a unique method for characterizing brain tissue by identifying local stiffness variations.

  3. Arthroplasty in Femoral Head Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Dong Cheol; Jung, Kwangyoung

    2014-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive joint disease requiring early hip arthroplasty. The polyethylene-metal design using a 22-mm femoral head component, introduced by Charnley in 1950, has been widely used for over half a century. Since then, different materials with the capacity to minimize friction between bearing surfaces and various cement or cementless insert fixations have been developed. Although the outcome of second and third generation designs using better bearing materials and technologies has been favorable, less favorable results are seen with total hip arthroplasty in young patients with osteonecrosis. Selection of appropriate materials for hip arthroplasty is important for any potential revisions that might become inevitable due to the limited durability of a prosthetic hip joint. Alternative hip arthroplasties, which include hemiresurfacing arthroplasty and bipolar hemiarthroplasty, have not been found to have acceptable outcomes. Metal-on-metal resurfacing has recently been suggested as a feasible option for young patients with extra physical demands; however, concerns about complications such as hypersensitivity reaction or pseudotumor formation on metal bearings have emerged. To ensure successful long-term outcomes in hip arthroplasty, factors such as insert stabilization and surfaces with less friction are essential. Understanding these aspects in arthroplasty is important to selection of proper materials and to making appropriate decisions for patients with osteonecrosis of the femoral head. PMID:27536561

  4. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, ...

  6. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, Brown’s syndrome, orbital wall fractures, and restricted eye movement associated with thyroid eye disease. 2) Nystagmus: Some patients with nystagmus (jerky eye movements) will acquire a head turn or tilt if ...

  7. Head Lice: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... it may be necessary to use a second bottle. Pay special attention to instructions on the label ... or printed on the label. Nit (head lice egg) combs, often found in lice medicine packages, should ...

  8. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and neck cancer. Poor oral and dental hygiene . Poor care of the mouth and teeth has ... sore throat Foul mouth odor not explained by hygiene Hoarseness or change in voice Nasal obstruction or ...

  9. Overview of Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Baby Health Highlights: Sept. 13, 2016 Smokers' Perceptions May Play Role in Addiction Sugar Companies Shifted ... amount of oxygen given and the rate and depth of breaths given by the ventilator. The head ...

  10. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  11. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  12. Head tilt during driving.

    PubMed

    Zikovitz, D C; Harris, L R

    1999-05-01

    In order to distinguish between the use of visual and gravito-inertial force reference frames, the head tilt of drivers and passengers were measured as they went around corners at various speeds. The visual curvature of the corners were thus dissociated from the magnitude of the centripetal forces (0.30-0.77 g). Drivers' head tilts were highly correlated with the visually-available estimate of the curvature of the road (r2=0.86) but not with the centripetal force (r2<0.1). Passengers' head tilts were inversely correlated with the lateral forces (r2=0.3-0.7) and seem to reflect a passive sway. The strong correlation of the tilt of drivers' heads with a visual aspect of the road ahead, supports the use of a predominantly visual reference frame for the driving task. PMID:10722313

  13. Treating Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention. Head lice are most common among preschool children attending child care, elementary school children, and ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  14. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing and CPR . If the person's breathing and heart rate are normal but the person is unconscious, treat as if there is a spinal injury . Stabilize the head and neck by placing your ...

  15. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  16. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  17. Selective uptake and imaging of aptamer- and antibody-conjugated hollow nanospheres targeted to epidermal growth factor receptors overexpressed in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Melancon, Marites Pasuelo; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Rui; Xiong, Chiyi; Allen, Peter; Wen, Xiaoxia; Huang, Qian; Wallace, Michael; Myers, Jeffrey N; Stafford, R Jason; Liang, Dong; Ellington, Andrew D; Li, Chun

    2014-05-27

    The purpose of this study was to compare the binding affinity and selective targeting of aptamer- and antibody-coated hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) targeted to epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR). EGFR-targeting aptamers were conjugated to HAuNS (apt-HAuNS) by attaching a thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA to the HAuNS and then adding the complementary RNA targeted to EGFR. Apt-HAuNS was characterized in terms of size, surface charge, absorption, and number of aptamers per particle. The in vivo pharmacokinetics, in vivo biodistribution, and micro-SPECT/CT imaging of (111)In-labeled apt-HAuNS and anti-EGFR antibody (C225)-conjugated HAuNS were evaluated in nude mice bearing highly malignant human OSC-19 oral tumors. (111)In-labeled PEG-HAuNS was used as a control (n = 5/group). Apt-HAuNS did not have an altered absorbance profile or size (λmax = 800 nm; diameter = 55 nm) compared to C225-HAuNS or PEG-HAuNS. The surface charge became more negative upon conjugation of the aptamer (-51.4 vs -19.0 for PEG-HAuNS and -25.0 for C225-HAuNS). The number of aptamers/particle was ∼250. In vitro cell binding and in vivo biodistribution showed selective binding of the apt-HAuNS to EGFR. μSPECT/CT imaging confirmed that there was more tumor uptake of apt-HAuNS than C225-HAuNS. Aptamer is a promising ligand for image-guided delivery of nanoparticles for treatment of tumor cells overexpressing EGFR.

  18. Intrabeam scattering in the HEB

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    A study of Intrabeam Scattering (IBS) in the High Energy Booster (HEB) is presented. Piwinski`s formulas for IBS are presented and evaluated for the HEB. A computer code written to evaluate Piwinski`s formulas is discussed. The result of the study is that IBS should not be a problem for the HEB, although the safety factor is not enormous.

  19. Recurrent Catastrophic Ceramic Femoral Head Failure in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tai, S. M. M.; Parker, L.; de Roeck, N. J.; Skinner, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Fracture of a modern ceramic head component in total hip replacement is an uncommon but catastrophic complication. Hence, the occurrence of a second ceramic head fracture in the same hip replacement of an individual represents a perishingly rare event. We present the case as a means of highlighting potential risk factors for ceramic head fracture and suggest possible management strategies in such cases. PMID:24991441

  20. TH-A-18C-04: Ultrafast Cone-Beam CT Scatter Correction with GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y; Bai, T; Yan, H; Ouyang, L; Wang, J; Pompos, A; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Zhou, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Scatter artifacts severely degrade image quality of cone-beam CT (CBCT). We present an ultrafast scatter correction framework by using GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and prior patient CT image, aiming at automatically finish the whole process including both scatter correction and reconstructions within 30 seconds. Methods: The method consists of six steps: 1) FDK reconstruction using raw projection data; 2) Rigid Registration of planning CT to the FDK results; 3) MC scatter calculation at sparse view angles using the planning CT; 4) Interpolation of the calculated scatter signals to other angles; 5) Removal of scatter from the raw projections; 6) FDK reconstruction using the scatter-corrected projections. In addition to using GPU to accelerate MC photon simulations, we also use a small number of photons and a down-sampled CT image in simulation to further reduce computation time. A novel denoising algorithm is used to eliminate MC scatter noise caused by low photon numbers. The method is validated on head-and-neck cases with simulated and clinical data. Results: We have studied impacts of photo histories, volume down sampling factors on the accuracy of scatter estimation. The Fourier analysis was conducted to show that scatter images calculated at 31 angles are sufficient to restore those at all angles with <0.1% error. For the simulated case with a resolution of 512×512×100, we simulated 10M photons per angle. The total computation time is 23.77 seconds on a Nvidia GTX Titan GPU. The scatter-induced shading/cupping artifacts are substantially reduced, and the average HU error of a region-of-interest is reduced from 75.9 to 19.0 HU. Similar results were found for a real patient case. Conclusion: A practical ultrafast MC-based CBCT scatter correction scheme is developed. The whole process of scatter correction and reconstruction is accomplished within 30 seconds. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01), The Core Technology Research

  1. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  2. Expressions for Form Factors for Inelastic Scattering and Charge Exchange in Plane-Wave, Distorted-Wave, and Coupled-Channels Reaction Formalisms

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F S

    2006-09-25

    This document is intended to facilitate calculation of inelastic scattering and charge-exchange cross sections in a variety of reaction models, including the plane-wave and distorted-wave approximations and the full coupled-channels treatments. Expressions are given for the coupling potentials between the relevant channels in both coordinate and momentum space. In particular, it is expected that the plane-wave calculations should be useful as a check on the correctness of coupled-channels calculations. The Fourier transform methods used to calculate the plane-wave approximation cross sections are also intended to be used to generate the transition potentials for coupled-channels codes, using a folding model with local effective interactions. Specific expressions are given for calculating transition densities for the folding model in the random phase approximation (RPA).

  3. Dynamic structure factor [S(Q,ω)] of the S=1 quasi-one-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet: Neutron-scattering study on AgVP2S6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutka, H.; Payen, C.; Molinié, P.; Soubeyroux, J. L.; Colombet, P.; Taylor, A. D.

    1991-07-01

    The spin correlations of the S=1 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chains in AgVP2S6 have been studied by neutron scattering at temperatures of the order of T~10-2 J/kB. On the polycrystalline samples, with a careful choice of experimental conditions, we have observed a Haldane gap of Eg=26 meV at the antiferromagnetic point at q=π. The excitation spectra are consistent with a mode that has a spin-wave velocity C=150 meV and a correlation length ξ~=5.5, close to C/Eg. These results are in quantitative agreement with the predictions and numerical results on the Haldane state.

  4. Scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT: analysis of voxelized patient simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, Jens; Bertram, Matthias

    2006-03-01

    This paper presents a systematic assessment of scattered radiation in flat-detector based cone-beam CT. The analysis is based on simulated scatter projections of voxelized CT images of different body regions allowing to accurately quantify scattered radiation of realistic and clinically relevant patient geometries. Using analytically computed primary projection data of high spatial resolution in combination with Monte-Carlo simulated scattered radiation, practically noise-free reference data sets are computed with and without inclusion of scatter. The impact of scatter is studied both in the projection data and in the reconstructed volume for the head, thorax, and pelvis regions. Currently available anti-scatter grid geometries do not sufficiently compensate scatter induced cupping and streak artifacts, requiring additional software-based scatter correction. The required accuracy of scatter compensation approaches increases with increasing patient size.

  5. “Time is brain” the Gifford factor - or: Why do some civilian gunshot wounds to the head do unexpectedly well? A case series with outcomes analysis and a management guide

    PubMed Central

    Lin, David J.; Lam, Fred C.; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Ajith; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Review of intracranial gunshot wounds (GSWs) undergoing emergent neurosurgical intervention despite a very low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission in order to identify predictors of good outcome, with correlates to recent literature. Methods: A retrospective review of select cases of GSWs presenting to our trauma center over the past 5 years with poor GCS requiring emergent neurosurgical intervention and a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Results: Out of a total of 17 patients who went to the operating room (OR) for GSW to the head during this period, 4 cases with a GCS < 5 on admission were identified. All cases required a hemicraniectomy to alleviate cerebral swelling. Two cases presented with a unilaterally blown pupil due to raised intracranial pressure. The remaining 2 cases had equal and reactive pupils. One patient with a GCS of 3 and a significant bilateral pattern of parenchymal bullet injury was initially assessed in moribund status but rallied and received a delayed hemicraniectomy on day 7. Three out of 4 patients are functionally independent at 1-year follow-up. The fourth patient who received a delayed decompression remains wheelchair dependent. Conclusion: Victims of GSWs can have good outcomes despite having a very poor admission GCS score and papillary abnormalities. Factors predicting good outcomes include the following: time from injury to surgical intervention of < 1 h; injury to noneloquent brain; and absence of injury to midbrain, brainstem, and major vessels. PMID:23061014

  6. Porcine Head Response to Blast

    PubMed Central

    Shridharani, Jay K.; Wood, Garrett W.; Panzer, Matthew B.; Capehart, Bruce P.; Nyein, Michelle K.; Radovitzky, Raul A.; Bass, Cameron R. ‘Dale’

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the frequency of traumatic brain injuries related to blast exposure. However, the mechanisms that cause blast neurotrauma are unknown. Blast neurotrauma research using computational models has been one method to elucidate that response of the brain in blast, and to identify possible mechanical correlates of injury. However, model validation against experimental data is required to ensure that the model output is representative of in vivo biomechanical response. This study exposes porcine subjects to primary blast overpressures generated using a compressed-gas shock tube. Shock tube blasts were directed to the unprotected head of each animal while the lungs and thorax were protected using ballistic protective vests similar to those employed in theater. The test conditions ranged from 110 to 740 kPa peak incident overpressure with scaled durations from 1.3 to 6.9 ms and correspond approximately with a 50% injury risk for brain bleeding and apnea in a ferret model scaled to porcine exposure. Instrumentation was placed on the porcine head to measure bulk acceleration, pressure at the surface of the head, and pressure inside the cranial cavity. Immediately after the blast, 5 of the 20 animals tested were apneic. Three subjects recovered without intervention within 30 s and the remaining two recovered within 8 min following respiratory assistance and administration of the respiratory stimulant doxapram. Gross examination of the brain revealed no indication of bleeding. Intracranial pressures ranged from 80 to 390 kPa as a result of the blast and were notably lower than the shock tube reflected pressures of 300–2830 kPa, indicating pressure attenuation by the skull up to a factor of 8.4. Peak head accelerations were measured from 385 to 3845 G’s and were well correlated with peak incident overpressure (R2 = 0.90). One SD corridors for the surface pressure, intracranial pressure (ICP), and head acceleration are

  7. Head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Tzahor, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    The developmental paths that lead to the formation of skeletal muscles in the head are distinct from those operating in the trunk. Craniofacial muscles are associated with head and neck structures. In the embryo, these structures derive from distinct mesoderm populations. Distinct genetic programs regulate different groups of muscles within the head to generate diverse muscle specifications. Developmental and lineage studies in vertebrates and invertebrates demonstrated an overlap in progenitor populations derived from the pharyngeal mesoderm that contribute to certain head muscles and the heart. These studies reveal that the genetic program controlling pharyngeal muscles overlaps with that of the heart. Indeed cardiac and craniofacial birth defects are often linked. Recent studies suggest that early chordates, the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates, had an ancestral pharyngeal mesoderm lineage that later during evolution gave rise to both heart and craniofacial structures. This chapter summarizes studies related to the origins, signaling, genetics, and evolution of the head musculature, highlighting its heterogeneous characteristics in all these aspects.

  8. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Giebink, Noel C.

    2015-01-31

    concentrator optical efficiency was found to decrease significantly with increasing aperture width beyond 0.5 m due to parasitic waveguide out-coupling loss and low-level absorption that become dominant at larger scale. A heat transfer model was subsequently implemented to predict collector fluid heat gain and outlet temperature as a function of flow rate using the optical model as a flux input. It was found that the aperture width size limitation imposed by the optical efficiency characteristics of the waveguide limits the absolute optical power delivered to the heat transfer element per unit length. As compared to state-of-the-art parabolic trough CPV system aperture widths approaching 5 m, this limitation leads to an approximate factor of order of magnitude increase in heat transfer tube length to achieve the same heat transfer fluid outlet temperature. The conclusion of this work is that scattering solar thermal concentration cannot be implemented at the scale and efficiency required to compete with the performance of current parabolic trough CSP systems. Applied within the alternate context of CPV, however, the results of this work have likely opened up a transformative new path that enables quasi-static, high efficiency CPV to be implemented on rooftops in the form factor of traditional fixed-panel photovoltaics.

  9. Architecture of the Mediator head module

    SciTech Connect

    Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Calero, Guillermo; Cai, Gang; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Yamada, Kentaro; Cardelli, Francesco; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Berger, Imre; Kornberg, Guy Lorch; Asturias, Francisco J.; Kornberg, Roger D.; Takagi, Yuichiro

    2011-09-06

    Mediator is a key regulator of eukaryotic transcription, connecting activators and repressors bound to regulatory DNA elements with RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator comprises 25 subunits with a total mass of more than one megadalton (refs 5, 6) and is organized into three modules, called head, middle/arm and tail. Our understanding of Mediator assembly and its role in regulating transcription has been impeded so far by limited structural information. Here we report the crystal structure of the essential Mediator head module (seven subunits, with a mass of 223 kilodaltons) at a resolution of 4.3 angstroms. Our structure reveals three distinct domains, with the integrity of the complex centred on a bundle of ten helices from five different head subunits. An intricate pattern of interactions within this helical bundle ensures the stable assembly of the head subunits and provides the binding sites for general transcription factors and Pol II. Our structural and functional data suggest that the head module juxtaposes transcription factor IIH and the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest subunit of Pol II, thereby facilitating phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of Pol II. Our results reveal architectural principles underlying the role of Mediator in the regulation of gene expression.

  10. Effects of Soccer Heading on Brain Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Carolina; Lasmar, Rodrigo Pace; Caramelli, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with more than 265 million players worldwide, including professional and amateur ones. Soccer is unique in comparison to other sports, as it is the only sport in which participants purposely use their head to hit the ball. Heading is considered as an offensive or defensive move whereby the player's unprotected head is used to deliberately impact the ball and direct it during play. A soccer player can be subjected to an average of 6-12 incidents of heading the ball per competitive game, where the ball reaches high velocities. Moreover, in practice sessions, heading training, which involves heading the ball repeatedly at low velocities, is common. Although the scientific community, as well as the media, has focused on the effects of concussions in contact sports, the role of subconcussive impacts, as it can occur during heading, has recently gained attention, considering that it may represent an additional mechanism of cumulative brain injury. The purpose of this study is to review the existing literature regarding the effects of soccer heading on brain structure and function. Only in the last years, some investigations have addressed the impact of heading on brain structure, by using neuroimaging techniques. Similarly, there have been some recent studies investigating biochemical markers of brain injury in soccer players. There is evidence of association between heading and abnormal brain structure, but the data are still preliminary. Also, some studies have suggested that subconcussive head impacts, as heading, could cause cognitive impairment, whereas others have not corroborated this finding. Questions persist as to whether or not heading is deleterious to cognitive functioning. Further studies, especially with longitudinal designs, are needed to clarify the clinical significance of heading as a cause of brain injury and to identify risk factors. Such investigations might contribute to the establishment of safety

  11. Effects of Soccer Heading on Brain Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ana Carolina; Lasmar, Rodrigo Pace; Caramelli, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with more than 265 million players worldwide, including professional and amateur ones. Soccer is unique in comparison to other sports, as it is the only sport in which participants purposely use their head to hit the ball. Heading is considered as an offensive or defensive move whereby the player’s unprotected head is used to deliberately impact the ball and direct it during play. A soccer player can be subjected to an average of 6–12 incidents of heading the ball per competitive game, where the ball reaches high velocities. Moreover, in practice sessions, heading training, which involves heading the ball repeatedly at low velocities, is common. Although the scientific community, as well as the media, has focused on the effects of concussions in contact sports, the role of subconcussive impacts, as it can occur during heading, has recently gained attention, considering that it may represent an additional mechanism of cumulative brain injury. The purpose of this study is to review the existing literature regarding the effects of soccer heading on brain structure and function. Only in the last years, some investigations have addressed the impact of heading on brain structure, by using neuroimaging techniques. Similarly, there have been some recent studies investigating biochemical markers of brain injury in soccer players. There is evidence of association between heading and abnormal brain structure, but the data are still preliminary. Also, some studies have suggested that subconcussive head impacts, as heading, could cause cognitive impairment, whereas others have not corroborated this finding. Questions persist as to whether or not heading is deleterious to cognitive functioning. Further studies, especially with longitudinal designs, are needed to clarify the clinical significance of heading as a cause of brain injury and to identify risk factors. Such investigations might contribute to the establishment of safety

  12. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Here again, a basic segmental plan for the head has been sought among chordates. We convened a symposium that brought together leading researchers dealing with this problem, in a number of different evolutionary and developmental contexts. Here we give an overview of the outcome and the status of the field in this modern era of Evo-Devo. We emphasize the fact that the head segmentation problem is not fully resolved, and we discuss new directions in the search for hints for a way out of this maze. PMID:20607135

  13. Lubricating the swordfish head.

    PubMed

    Videler, John J; Haydar, Deniz; Snoek, Roelant; Hoving, Henk-Jan T; Szabo, Ben G

    2016-07-01

    The swordfish is reputedly the fastest swimmer on Earth. The concave head and iconic sword are unique characteristics, but how they contribute to its speed is still unknown. Recent computed tomography scans revealed a poorly mineralised area near the base of the rostrum. Here we report, using magnetic resonance imaging and electron microscopy scanning, the discovery of a complex organ consisting of an oil-producing gland connected to capillaries that communicate with oil-excreting pores in the skin of the head. The capillary vessels transport oil to abundant tiny circular pores that are surrounded by denticles. The oil is distributed from the pores over the front part of the head. The oil inside the gland is identical to that found on the skin and is a mixture of methyl esters. We hypothesize that the oil layer, in combination with the denticles, creates a super-hydrophobic layer that reduces streamwise friction drag and increases swimming efficiency. PMID:27385753

  14. Shaking head means "no".

    PubMed

    Weiler, Stefan; Offinger, Alexander; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2013-09-10

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department because of twitching of the head. The patient took a tablet of sumatriptan every 3-4 h because of increasing head pain after a car accident. Owing to depression, the patient was on long-term treatment with venlafaxine. The patient presented as hypertensive, tachycardic, with dyskinesia and spontaneous myoclonic movements of the right sternocleidomastoid muscle. In a CT scan of the head and cervical spine any fractures, bleeding or damage of the vessels after the accident could be ruled out. After discontinuation of all serotonergic agents, administration of lorazepam symptoms resolved 24 h after the last intake of sumatriptan. Serotonin syndrome is a clinical diagnosis, which requires a high-index of diagnostic suspicion. Clinical features include a broad spectrum of symptoms ranging from mild to life-threatening manifestations. Management is based on removal of precipitating drugs and symptomatic care including benzodiazepines.

  15. Division Heads and Role Strain Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, William M.

    1984-01-01

    Reports on a study of the extent to which ambiguous and conflicting circumstances contribute to role strain perceptions among community college division heads. Clarifies how working conditions and personal attributes affect job expectations. Finds experience, age, outlook, and job satisfaction to be strong influential factors. (DMM)

  16. Traumatic Head Injury: Dimensions of Family Responsivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarski, John J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five parents or spouses of head-injured patients were studied to: (1) determine differences among various family types on clinically relevant dimensions of family functioning, based on Olson's Circumplex model, and (2) establish the validity of three assessment methods. Results showed family functioning to be an important factor in recovery.…

  17. Head Start Teachers' Beliefs about Language and Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hindman, Annemarie H.; Wasik, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the nature of Head Start teachers' beliefs about early literacy and the teacher background factors that relate to these beliefs. Twenty-eight Head Start teachers were given the Preschool Teacher Literacy Beliefs Questionnaire (TBQ) and a background questionnaire. Reliable belief subscales reflecting code, oral language,…

  18. Head Position Preference in the Human Newborn: A New Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronnqvist, Louise; Hopkins, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Studied head position preference in 20 newborns differing by Cesarean or vaginal delivery and sex. Found that neither factor accounted for differences. The head turned right more often and was maintained longer in this position during quiet wakefulness, regardless of scoring method. When using global scoring, duration of midline position was…

  19. Inhibition of nuclear factor-{kappa}B and target genes during combined therapy with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Van Waes, Carter . E-mail: vanwaesc@nidcd.nih.gov; Chang, Angela A.; Lebowitz, Peter F.; Druzgal, Colleen H.; Chen, Zhong; Elsayed, Yusri A.; Sunwoo, John B.; Rudy, Susan; Morris, John C.; Mitchell, James B.; Camphausen, Kevin; Gius, David; Adams, Julian; Sausville, Edward A.; Conley, Barbara A.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE) on transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and target genes and the feasibility of combination therapy with reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: The tolerability and response to bortezomib 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and 0.9 mg/m{sup 2} given twice weekly concurrent with daily reirradiation to 50-70 Gy was explored. Blood proteasome inhibition and NF-{kappa}B-modulated cytokines and factors were measured. Proteasome inhibition, nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B phospho-p65, apoptosis, and expression of NF-{kappa}B-modulated mRNAs were compared in serial biopsies from accessible tumors. Results: The maximally tolerated dose was exceeded, and study was limited to 7 and 2 patients, respectively, given bortezomib 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and 0.9 mg/m{sup 2}/dose with reirradiation. Grade 3 hypotension and hyponatremia were dose limiting. Mucositis was Grade 3 or less and was delayed. The mean blood proteasome inhibition at 1, 24, and 48 h after 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} was 32%, 16%, and 7% and after 0.9 mg/m{sup 2} was 56%, 26%, and 14%, respectively. Differences in proteasome and NF-{kappa}B activity, apoptosis, and expression of NF-{kappa}B-modulated cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis factor mRNAs were detected in 2 patients with minor tumor reductions and in serum NF-{kappa}B-modulated cytokines in 1 patient with a major tumor reduction. Conclusions: In combination with reirradiation, the maximally tolerated dose of bortezomib was exceeded at a dose of 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and the threshold of proteasome inhibition. Although this regimen with reirradiation is not feasible, bortezomib induced detectable differences in NF-{kappa}B localization, apoptosis, and NF-{kappa}B-modulated genes and cytokines in tumor and serum in association with tumor reduction, indicating that other schedules of bortezomib combined with primary

  20. Quantifying entanglement with scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, O.; Epping, M.; Kampermann, H.; Bruß, D.; Plenio, M. B.; Cramer, M.

    2014-03-01

    We show how the entanglement contained in states of spins arranged on a lattice may be lower bounded with observables arising in scattering experiments. We focus on the partial differential cross section obtained in neutron scattering from magnetic materials but our results are sufficiently general such that they may also be applied to, e.g., optical Bragg scattering from ultracold atoms in optical lattices or from ion chains. We discuss resonating valence bond states and ground and thermal states of experimentally relevant models—such as the Heisenberg, Majumdar-Ghosh, and XY models—in different geometries and with different spin numbers. As a by-product, we find that for the one-dimensional XY model in a transverse field such measurements reveal factorization and the quantum phase transition at zero temperature.

  1. Rocket injector head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A high number of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen orifices per unit area are provided in an injector head designed to give intimate mixing and more thorough combustion. The injector head comprises a main body portion, a cooperating plate member as a flow chamber for one propellant, a cooperating manifold portion for the second propellant, and an annular end plate for enclosing an annular propellant groove formed around the outer edge of the body. All the openings for one propellant are located at the same angle with respect to a radial plane to permit a short combustion chamber.

  2. Parity Violation in ep scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Souder

    2005-10-01

    We review the program of parity violation in the scattering of polarized electrons at JLab. Results are presented from recent experiments measuring the weak form factors, which in turn measure the contribution of strange quarks to the elastic form factors. In addition, we discuss the physics of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering, which will become possible with the upgrade of the JLab energy to 12 GeV.

  3. Efficient scatter distribution estimation and correction in CBCT using concurrent Monte Carlo fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Bootsma, G. J.; Verhaegen, F.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray scatter is a significant impediment to image quality improvements in cone-beam CT (CBCT). The authors present and demonstrate a novel scatter correction algorithm using a scatter estimation method that simultaneously combines multiple Monte Carlo (MC) CBCT simulations through the use of a concurrently evaluated fitting function, referred to as concurrent MC fitting (CMCF). Methods: The CMCF method uses concurrently run MC CBCT scatter projection simulations that are a subset of the projection angles used in the projection set, P, to be corrected. The scattered photons reaching the detector in each MC simulation are simultaneously aggregated by an algorithm which computes the scatter detector response, S{sub MC}. S{sub MC} is fit to a function, S{sub F}, and if the fit of S{sub F} is within a specified goodness of fit (GOF), the simulations are terminated. The fit, S{sub F}, is then used to interpolate the scatter distribution over all pixel locations for every projection angle in the set P. The CMCF algorithm was tested using a frequency limited sum of sines and cosines as the fitting function on both simulated and measured data. The simulated data consisted of an anthropomorphic head and a pelvis phantom created from CT data, simulated with and without the use of a compensator. The measured data were a pelvis scan of a phantom and patient taken on an Elekta Synergy platform. The simulated data were used to evaluate various GOF metrics as well as determine a suitable fitness value. The simulated data were also used to quantitatively evaluate the image quality improvements provided by the CMCF method. A qualitative analysis was performed on the measured data by comparing the CMCF scatter corrected reconstruction to the original uncorrected and corrected by a constant scatter correction reconstruction, as well as a reconstruction created using a set of projections taken with a small cone angle. Results: Pearson’s correlation, r, proved to be a

  4. Radiation Dose to the Lens of the Eye from Computed Tomography Scans of the Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januzis, Natalie Ann

    factors were derived for each scanner individually, but also were derived with the combined data from the two scanners as a means to investigate the feasibility of a scanner-independent method. Using the scanner-independent method to derive the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor from the effective head diameter, most of the fitted lens dose values fell within 10-15% of the measured values from the phantom study, suggesting that this is a fairly accurate method of estimating lens dose from the CTDIvol with knowledge of the patient's head size. Second, the dose reduction potential of organ-based tube current modulation (OB-TCM) and its effect on the CTDIvol-to-lens dose estimation method was investigated. The lens dose was measured with MOSFET dosimeters placed within the same six anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms were scanned with the five clinical head CT protocols with OB-TCM enabled on the one scanner model at our institution equipped with this software. The average decrease in lens dose with OB-TCM ranged from 13.5 to 26.0%. Using the size-specific method to derive the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor from the effective head diameter for protocols with OB-TCM, the majority of the fitted lens dose values fell within 15-18% of the measured values from the phantom study. Third, the effect of gantry angulation on lens dose was investigated by measuring the lens dose with TLDs placed within the six anthropomorphic phantoms. The 2-dimensional spatial distribution of dose within the areas of the phantoms containing the orbit was measured with radiochromic film. A method was derived to determine the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor based upon distance from the primary beam scan range to the lens. The average dose to the lens region decreased substantially for almost all the phantoms (ranging from 67 to 92%) when the orbit was exposed to scattered radiation compared to the primary beam. The effectiveness of this method to reduce lens dose is highly

  5. Penetrating wounds of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Jahrsdoerfer, R A; Johns, M E; Cantrell, R W

    1979-12-01

    Wounding capability of bullets is primarily releated to velocity. Bullet mass and shape, and specific gravity of body tissues being struck by the missile, are lesser factors. Seventy cases of penetrating wounds of the head and neck were treated during a six-year period. Vascular injuries were more common with neck wounds, while face and head injuries (extracranial) were similar to maxillofacial trauma. It is recognized that hemorrhage at the base of the skull is difficult to treat, and contemporary training in temporal bone and base of skull surgery is mandatory for the critical management of these wounds.

  6. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-02-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism.

  7. MULTIPLE SHAFT TOOL HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Colbert, H.P.

    1962-10-23

    An improved tool head arrangement is designed for the automatic expanding of a plurality of ferruled tubes simultaneously. A plurality of output shafts of a multiple spindle drill head are driven in unison by a hydraulic motor. A plurality of tube expanders are respectively coupled to the shafts through individual power train arrangements. The axial or thrust force required for the rolling operation is provided by a double acting hydraulic cylinder having a hollow through shaft with the shaft cooperating with an internally rotatable splined shaft slidably coupled to a coupling rigidly attached to the respectlve output shaft of the drill head, thereby transmitting rotary motion and axial thrust simultaneously to the tube expander. A hydraulic power unit supplies power to each of the double acting cylinders through respective two-position, four-way valves, under control of respective solenoids for each of the cylinders. The solenoids are in turn selectively controlled by a tool selection control unit which in turn is controlled by signals received from a programmed, coded tape from a tape reader. The number of expanders that are extended in a rolling operation, which may be up to 42 expanders, is determined by a predetermined program of operations depending upon the arrangement of the ferruled tubes to be expanded in the tube bundle. The tape reader also supplies dimensional information to a machine tool servo control unit for imparting selected, horizontal and/or vertical movement to the tool head assembly. (AEC)

  8. Imaging of head trauma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sandra; Gupta, Rajiv; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is an indispensable part of the initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with head trauma. Initially, it is important for diagnosing the extent of injury and the prompt recognition of treatable injuries to reduce mortality. Subsequently, imaging is useful in following the sequelae of trauma. In this chapter, we review indications for neuroimaging and typical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols used in the evaluation of a patient with head trauma. We review the role of CT), the imaging modality of choice in the acute setting, and the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with head trauma. We describe an organized and consistent approach to the interpretation of imaging of these patients. Important topics in head trauma, including fundamental concepts related to skull fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, penetrating trauma, cerebrovascular injuries, and secondary effects of trauma, are reviewed. The chapter concludes with advanced neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of traumatic brain injury, including use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS), techniques which are still under development. PMID:27432678

  9. Sculpting Ceramic Heads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapiro, Maurice

    1983-01-01

    Clay sculpture is difficult to produce because of the requirements of kiln firing. The problems can be overcome by modeling the original manikin head and making a plaster mold, pressing molding slabs of clay into the plaster mold to form the hollow clay armature, and sculpting on the armature. (IS)

  10. Orion Touchdown Heading Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    At touchdown Orion must be aligned so that the crew person's feet are forward in the direction of the horizontal velocity. To ensure that this requirement is met active heading control is being implemented on the Orion crew module. This technique reduces probability of roll-over during splashdown, assures axial loads on the crew at touchdown, and alleviates structural requirements on impact allowing for a light-weight structural design. On-board sensors are used to measure current vehicle orientation and horizontal velocity used in generation of the heading error signal. Linear velocity measured by the IMU drifts while under parachutes due to wind gusts and has to be corrected by GPS; this makes GPS critical for successful landing. Jet fire logic is achieved by use of a phase-plane and commands are realized by using roll jets from the reaction control system (RCS); using pre existing hardware eliminates additional hardware and structural requirements. Touchdown performance is measured by an orientation envelope that was co-developed with structures so that the performance requirements overlap adding system redundancy. Heading control also introduces new difficulties to be addressed such as parachute line twist torque as well as increasing vehicle sensitivity to wind shifts and sea states. Solving these difficulties requires added complexity to flight software as well as increasing the propellant required to achieve successful touchdown. while offering promising results, the criticality of GPS along with a significant propellant cost raises questions on the effectiveness of using touchdown heading control.

  11. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  12. Experimental magnetic form factors in Co3V2O8 : A combined study of ab initio calculations, magnetic Compton scattering, and polarized neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, N.; Zbiri, M.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.; Stunault, A.; Ressouche, E.; Hansen, T. C.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Johnson, M. R.; Fuess, H.; Ehrenberg, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Itou, M.; Gillon, B.; Wolf, Th.; Rodríguez-Velamazan, J. A.; Sánchez-Montero, J.

    2009-03-01

    We present a combination of ab initio calculations, magnetic Compton scattering, and polarized neutron experiments, which elucidate the density distribution of unpaired electrons in the kagome staircase system Co3V2O8 . Ab initio wave functions were used to calculate the spin densities in real and momentum spaces, which show good agreement with the respective experiments. It has been found that the spin polarized orbitals are equally distributed between the t2g and the eg levels for the spine (s) Co ions while the eg orbitals of the cross-tie (c) Co ions only represent 30% of the atomic spin density. Furthermore, the results reveal that the magnetic moments of the cross-tie Co ions, which are significantly smaller than those of the spine Co ions in the zero-field ferromagnetic structure, do not saturate by applying an external magnetic field of 2 T along the easy axis a . In turn, the increasing bulk magnetization, which can be observed by field dependent macroscopic measurements, originates from induced magnetic moments on the O and V sites. The refined individual magnetic moments are μ(Coc)=1.54(4)μB , μ(Cos)=2.87(3)μB , μ(V)=0.41(4)μB , μ(O1)=0.05(5)μB , μ(O2)=0.35(5)μB , and μ(O3)=0.36(5)μB combining to the same macroscopic magnetization value, which was previously only attributed to the Co ions.

  13. Magnetism in the actinides: the role of neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron scattering has played a crucial and unique role of elucidating the magnetism in actinide compounds. Examples are given of elastic scattering to determine magnetic structures, measure spatial correlations in the critical regime, and magnetic form factors, and of inelastic scattering to measure the (often elusive) spin excitations. Some future directions will be discussed.

  14. Scattering from binary optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricks, Douglas W.

    1993-01-01

    There are a number of sources of scattering in binary optics: etch depth errors, line edge errors, quantization errors, roughness, and the binary approximation to the ideal surface. These sources of scattering can be systematic (deterministic) or random. In this paper, scattering formulas for both systematic and random errors are derived using Fourier optics. These formulas can be used to explain the results of scattering measurements and computer simulations.

  15. Approximations for photoelectron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, V.

    1989-04-01

    The errors of several approximations in the theoretical approach of photoelectron scattering are systematically studied, in tungsten, for electron energies ranging from 10 to 1000 eV. The large inaccuracies of the plane-wave approximation (PWA) are substantially reduced by means of effective scattering amplitudes in the modified small-scattering-centre approximation (MSSCA). The reduced angular momentum expansion (RAME) is so accurate that it allows reliable calculations of multiple-scattering contributions for all the energies considered.

  16. No acute changes in postural control after soccer heading

    PubMed Central

    Broglio, S; Guskiewicz, K; Sell, T; Lephart, S

    2004-01-01

    Background: Soccer heading has been proposed as a potential cause of cerebral dysfunction. Objective: To examine the acute effects of two types of soccer heading on postural control. Methods: Collegiate soccer players were randomly assigned to one of four groups: control, linear heading, simulated rotational heading, or rotational heading. Each subject completed a baseline postural stability assessment on day 1. On day 2 the same assessment was completed for the control subjects. The simulated rotational heading group completed a simulated heading drill before postural stability testing. The linear and rotational heading groups performed a heading drill with 20 balls at 88.71 km/h (55 mph), before postural stability testing. Separate one between (group), three within (surface, eyes, and day), mixed model, repeated measures analyses of variance were conducted on values for total sway and mean centre of pressure. Results: The mixed model analysis of variance of results showed no significant differences (p>0.05) for the interactions of interest for either variable. Results suggest no acute changes in measures of postural control in soccer players completing either a linear or rotational soccer heading drill of 20 balls at a fixed speed. Conclusion: Non-significant interactions between surface, eyes, day, and group indicate that sensory interaction of the balance mechanism components are not be compromised by the heading drill. This research supports previous studies suggesting that there are no acute risks associated with routine soccer heading. A direct comparison between these findings and those suggesting long term chronic deficits, however, cannot be made. Other studies that report chronic cerebral deficits in soccer players may have resulted from factors other than soccer heading and warrant further examination. PMID:15388539

  17. Olfactory dysfunction in head injured workers.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Rutka, J

    1999-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction following trauma has been widely reported and is currently compensable according to existing American Medical Association guidelines when it occurs in the occupational setting. Its presence and the risk factors for its development, however, have not been clearly delineated in occupationally head injured workers. In order to assess this phenomenon, a series of 365 consecutive head injured workers from 1993-1997 was assessed in order to determine the incidence of post-traumatic olfactory dysfunction and its association with the severity of the head injury, the mechanism of injury and other neurotological abnormalities in the same cohort group. Olfactory dysfunction was identified in 13.7% (9.3% with anosmia, 4.4% with hyposmia/dysosmia). It was more likely where the loss of consciousness > 1 h (p < 0.002), in more severe head injuries (grades II-V) (p < 0.001) and when skull fracture (p < 0.001) occurred. The direction of the blow applied to the skull did not influence its presence, although radiologically confirmed skull fractures in the frontal, occipital, skull base and midface were twice as likely as temporal and parietal fractures to result in an olfactory change. From a neurotologic perspective, approximately 21.9% of head injured workers were determined to have recognizable evidence of cochleovestibular dysfunction. Olfactory dysfunction as a physical finding post-head injury compares favourably with the presence of post-traumatic benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV) and its atypical variants in 11.2% of head injured workers. PMID:10445080

  18. Measurements of the {Delta}(1232) transition form factor and the ratio {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} from inelastic electron-proton and electron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.E.; Andivahis, L.; Lung, A.; Arnold, R.G.; Keppel, C.; Rock, S.E.; Spengos, M.; Szalata, Z.; Tao, L.H.; Stuart, L.M.; Gomez, J.; Stuart, L.M.; Dietrich, F.S.; Chang, C.C.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.; Peterson, G.A.; Rokni, S.H.; Dodge, W.R.; Griffioen, K.A.; Petratos, G.G.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Stuart, L.M.; Gearhart, R.; Kuhn, S.E.; Alster, J.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Hyde-Wright, C.E.; Swartz, K.

    1998-08-01

    Measurements of inclusive electron-scattering cross sections using hydrogen and deuterium targets in the region of the {Delta}(1232) resonance are reported. A global fit to these new data and previous data in the resonance region is also reported for the proton. Transition form factors have been extracted from the proton cross sections for this experiment over the four-momentum transfer squared range 1.64{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}6.75 (GeV/c){sup 2} and from previous data over the range 2.41{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}9.82 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The results confirm previous reports that the {Delta}(1232) transition form factor decreases more rapidly with Q{sup 2} than expected from perturbative QCD. The ratio of {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} in the {Delta}(1232) resonance region has been extracted from the deuteron data for this experiment in the range 1.64{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}3.75 (GeV/c){sup 2} and for a previous experiment in the range 2.4{lt}Q{sup 2}{lt}7.9 (GeV/c){sup 2}. A study has been made of the model dependence of these results. This ratio {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} for {Delta}(1232) production is slightly less than unity, while {sigma}{sub n}/{sigma}{sub p} for the nonresonant cross sections is approximately 0.5, which is consistent with deep inelastic scattering results. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Near infrared scattering by sunlit terrestrial clouds.

    PubMed

    Blau, H H; Espinola, R P; Reifenstein, E C

    1966-04-01

    Absolute intensity (radiance) spectra of solar radiation scattered by clouds were obtained in the 1.15-micro to 3.6-micro region as a function of cloud type, cloud altitude, and scattering angle. The angular dependence of cloud scattering was determined at a number of wavelengths between 1.15 micro and 3.6 micro. From 2.6 micro to 2.9 micro, here water and ice are strongly absorbing and single scattering dominates, scattering efficiency increases nearly tenfold as the scattering angle decreases from 150 degrees to 45 degrees , in agreement with theory. At shorter and longer wavelengths, scattering efficiency increases by about a factor of three over the same range of scattering angles. Characteristic minima are observed in spectra of ice clouds at 1.5 micro, 2.0 micro, and 2.8 micro, which are related to absorptions in the bulk material at the same wavelengths. The 1.5-micro and 2-micro minima are absent in spectra of liquid-water clouds, even though the absorption characteristics of bulk water and ice are very similar. The differences in scattering behavior are explained on the basis of particle size.

  20. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., <1/5th of a typical diagnostic head CT). CBCT images are available ~15 seconds after scan completion (~1 min acquisition) and reviewed at bedside using custom 3D visualization software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  1. Narrow-headed garter snake (Thamnophis rufipunctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    The narrow-headed garter snake is a harmless, nonvenomous snake that is distinguished by its elongated, triangular-shaped head and the red or dark spots on its olive to tan body. Today, the narrow-headed garter snake is a species of special concern in the United States because of its decline over much of its historic range. Arizona's Oak Creek has historically contained the largest population of narrow-headed garter snakes in the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Arizona Game and Fish Department jointly funded research by USGS scientists in Oak Creek to shed light on the factors causing declining population numbers. The research resulted in better understanding of the snake's habitat needs, winter and summer range, and dietary habits. Based on the research findings, the U.S. Forest Service has developed recommendations that visitors and local residents can adopt to help slow the decline of the narrow-headed garter snake in Oak Creek.

  2. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - brain; CTA - skull; CTA - cranial; TIA-CTA head; Stroke-CTA head; Computed tomography angiography - neck; CTA - neck; Vertebral artery - CTA; Carotid artery stenosis - CTA; ...

  3. Head Injury Screening Tests Approved

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160556.html Head Injury Screening Tests Approved Assess brain function after possible concussions To use the sharing features ... HealthDay News) -- New computer software to assess the brain's function after a traumatic head injury have been approved ...

  4. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  5. Heads Up to High School Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  6. Scattering in optical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Musikant, S.

    1983-01-01

    Topics discussed include internal scattering and surface scattering, environmental effects, and various applications. Papers are presented on scattering in ZnSe laser windows, the far-infrared reflectance spectra of optical black coatings, the effects of standard optical shop practices on scattering, and the damage susceptibility of ring laser gyro class optics. Attention is also given to the infrared laser stimulated desorption of pyridine from silver surfaces, to electrically conductive black optical paint, to light scattering from an interface bubble, and to the role of diagnostic testing in identifying and resolving dimensional stability problems in electroplated laser mirrors.

  7. Heads or tails: how do chemically substituted fullerenes melt?

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jeff; Mukhopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Bresme, Fernando; Fernandez-Alonso, Felix

    2016-06-29

    We address the question as to whether the melting of chemically substituted fullerenes is driven by the dynamics of the fullerene moiety (the head) or the substituted sub-unit (the tail). To this end, we have performed quasielastic neutron-scattering experiments and classical molecular-dynamics simulations as a function of temperature on the prototypical fullerene derivative phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. To enable a direct and quantitative comparison between experimental and simulation data, dynamic structure factors for the latter have been calculated from atomic trajectories and further convolved with the known instrument response. A detailed analysis of the energy- and momentum-transfer dependence of this observable in the quasielastic regime shows that melting is entirely driven by temperature-activated tail motions. We also provide quantitative estimates of the activation energy for this process as the material first enters a plastic-crystalline phase, followed by the emergence of a genuine liquid at higher temperatures. PMID:27087579

  8. Evaluation of Factors in Relation with the Non-Compliance to Curative Intent Radiotherapy among Patients of Head and Neck Carcinoma: A Study from the Kumaon Region of India

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash Chandra; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Pant, Nirdosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Radiotherapy (RT)-based curative regimens for head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) deliver a dose of 66–70 Gray (Gy) over a period of 6–7 weeks, and incomplete treatments are unlikely to result in cure. Non-compliance to RT is major contributory factor to treatment failure. Aims: To assess the proportion of patients who do not complete planned treatment after initiation of curative RT. This study also aims to explore a possible relationship of non-compliance due to socio-economic, disease-related and treatment-related factors. Materials and Methods: The records of HNSCC patients treated from January 2012–December 2013 were audited. Data from the treatment records were to collect patient-related, disease-related, and social demographic parameters. Of the patients who had not completed treatment, the reasons behind the same were investigated. Results: Of the 324 patients of HNSCC who were initiated on radical RT, a total of 76 patients were found to have discontinued treatment without authorization of the treating clinician. There was no significant predilection for treatment non-compliance with regards to patient age, educational status, religion, site of the disease, use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, or use of concurrent chemotherapy. There tended to be a higher association of treatment non-compliance among patients residing >100 km away from the treatment center, patients hailing from hilly regions, patients without the below poverty line (BPL) card, unemployed patients, and patients with stage IV-A/B disease. Of the 76 patients who did not complete treatment, telephonic questionnaire could be obtained from 54 patients. Causes for non-compliance included preference for traditional healers (22.2%), fear of toxicity (7.4%), logistic reasons (18.5%), financial reasons (24.1%), and lack of interest/faith in RT (5.6%). Conclusion: There is a high incidence of treatment default among patients of HNSCC during RT in this region. The revelation

  9. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  10. Maryland Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, Maryland has provided state supplemental funds to Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) programs to improve access. Local EHS programs may use funds, through child care partnerships, to extend the EHS day or year. Maryland's approach to building on EHS includes: (1) Increase the capacity of existing Head Start and EHS programs to…

  11. MAGNETIC RECORDING HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, L.C.

    1958-06-17

    An electromagetic recording head is described for simultaneous recording of a plurality of signals within a small space on a magnetically semsitized medium. Basically the head structure comprises a non-magnetic centerpiece provided with only first and second groups of spaced cut-out slots respectively on opposite sides of the centerpiece. The two groups of slots are in parallel alignment and the slots of one group are staggered with respect to the slots of the other group so that one slot is not directly opposite another slot. Each slot has a magnet pole piece disposed therein and cooperating with a second pole and coil to provide a magnetic flux gap at the upper end of the slot. As a tape is drawn over the upper end of the centerpiece the individual magnetic circuits are disposed along its width to provide means for simultaneously recording information on separate portions, tracks. of the tape.

  12. Head injury and mortality in the homeless.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Thomas M; Laurie, Marie; Oddy, Michael; Menzies, Mark; Stewart, Elaine; Wainman-Lefley, Jessica

    2015-01-15

    Risk factors for head injury are also risk factors for becoming homeless but there is little research on this vulnerable group, who can be neglected by health services that specialize in acquired brain injury. This study investigates the prevalence of admissions to hospital with a head injury in the homeless and associations with later mortality. It compares homeless people with and without a record of hospitalized head injury (HHI) and the Glasgow population. Data were obtained from a U.K. National Health Service strategy to enhance care of the homeless. This included development and production of local registers of homeless people. In Glasgow, the initiative took place over a seven-year period (2004-2010) and comprised 40 general practitioner (family practice) services in the locality of 55 homeless hostels. The register was linked to hospital admissions with head injury recorded in Scottish Medical Records and to the General Register of Scotland, which records deaths. A total of 1590 homeless people was registered in general practitioner (family doctor) returns. The prevalence of admission to hospital with head injury in the homeless over a 30-year period (13.5%) was 5.4 times higher than in the Glasgow population. In the homeless with HHI, 33.6% died in the seven-year census period, compared with 13.9% in the homeless with no hospitalized HI (NHHI). The standardized mortality ratio for HHI (4.51) was more than twice that for NHHI (2.08). The standardized mortality ratio for HHI aged 15-34 (17.54) was particularly high. These findings suggest that HHI is common in the homeless relative to the general population and is a risk factor for late mortality in the homeless population. PMID:25010750

  13. Magnetized stimulated scattering in pulsar winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincell, Mark W.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of stimulated scattering on a collimated high brightness temperature beam of photons traversing a relativistically streaming magnetized plasma are studied. Under the assumption that the center of the photon beam is parallel to the bulk motion, we calculate the scattering rate as a function of the angular spread of the beam and the Lorentz factor gamma. Magnetization changes the photon recoil, without which stimulated scattering has no effect. It also introduces a strong dependence on frequency and polarization: if the photon frequency matches the electron cyclotron frequency, the scattering rate of photons polarized perpendicular to the magnetic field can be substantially enhanced relative to Thomson, and if the photon frequency is much less than the cyclotron frequency, the scattering is suppressed. Applying these calculations to pulsars, we find that stimulated scattering of the radio beam in the magnetized wind believed to exist outside the light cylinder can substantially alter the spectrum and polarization state of the radio signal. We suggest that the scattering rate is so high in some pulsars that the ability of the radio signal to penetrate the pulsar magnetosphere requires modification of either the conventional model of the magnetosphere or assumptions about the effects of stimulated scattering upon a beam.

  14. Black Hole Scattering via Spectral Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemente, P. C. M.; de Oliveira, H. P.; Rodrigues, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present an alternative method to solve the problem of scattering by a black hole by adapting the spectral code originally developed by Boyd (Comp Phys 4:83, 1990). In order to show the effectiveness and versatility of the algorithm, we solve the scattering by Schwarzschild, standard acoustic, and charged black holes. We recover the partial and total absorption cross sections and, in the case of charged black holes, the conversion factor of eletromagnetic and gravitational waves. We also study the exponential decay of the reflection coefficient, which is a general feature of any scattering problem.

  15. Combination treatment of biomechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for the osteonecrosis of the femoral head: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qiang; Wang, Weidong; Xu, Taotao; Zhang, Shanxing; Xiao, Luwei; Chen, Di; Jin, Hongting; Tong, Peijian

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the benefits of combination treatment with mechanical support and targeted intra-arterial infusion of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) via the medial circumflex femoral artery on the progression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). Fifty-five patients (89 hips) with early and intermediate stage ONFH were recruited and randomly assigned to combination treatment or mechanical support treatment (control group). All hips received mechanical support treatment (porous tantalum rod implantation). Then, hips in the combination treatment group were performed targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs. At each follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) and Association Research Circulation Osseous (ARCO) classification were used to evaluate the symptoms and progression of osteonecrosis. Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was assessed as an endpoint at each follow-up. At 36 months, 9 of the 41 hips (21.95%) in the control group progressed to clinical failure and underwent THA whereas only 3 of the 48 hips (6.25%) in the combination treatment group required THA (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference in the survival time between the two groups (log-rank test; p = 0.025). Compared to the control group, combination treatment significantly improved the HHS at 36 months (p = 0.003). At the final follow-up examination, radiological progression was noted in 13 of 41 hips (31.71%) for the control group, but in only 4 of 48 hips (8.33%) for the combination treatment group (p = 0.005). The overall collapse rates were 15.15% (5/33 hips) and 8.11% (3/37 hips) in the control and combination treatment groups, respectively. Targeted intra-arterial infusion of PBSCs is capable of enhancing the efficacy of biomechanical support in the treatment of ONFH. This clinical trial confirmed that the combination treatment might be a safe and feasible

  16. Phase I trial of dacomitinib, a pan-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) inhibitor, with concurrent radiotherapy and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (XDC-001).

    PubMed

    Prawira, Amy; Brana-Garcia, Irene; Spreafico, Anna; Hope, Andrew; Waldron, John; Razak, Albiruni R Abdul; Chen, Eric X; Jang, Raymond; O'Sullivan, Brian; Giuliani, Meredith; Bayley, Andrew; Cho, John; Wang, Lisa; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Siu, Lillian L; Hansen, Aaron R

    2016-10-01

    Background Curative-intent, non-surgical treatment options for locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN) include radiotherapy with/without chemotherapy or radiotherapy with cetuximab. This single institution phase I dose escalation trial tested the pan-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dacomitinib, in combination with standard cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods Patients received oral dacomitinib once daily at 3 protocol-defined dose levels (15 mg, 30 mg, and 45 mg). Cisplatin was given intravenously at 100 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 70Gy in 35 daily fractions to the primary and nodal disease. Dose escalation was performed using a standard 3 + 3 design. Results Twelve patients with LA-SCCHN were enrolled between January 2013 and August 2014. No dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed in the 15 mg and 30 mg dose levels. In the 45 mg dose level, one of four evaluable patients developed a DLT with intolerable grade 2 diarrhea requiring discontinuation of therapy. Adverse events (AEs) attributed to dacomitinib alone include diarrhea, hypertension, and acneiform and maculopapular rash. The most common non-hematological AEs include weight loss, diarrhea, dry mouth, mucositis, nausea, hypoalbuminemia, and hyponatremia. Frequency and severity of AEs did not increase with increasing dose levels of dacomitinib. All patients completed the full course of radiotherapy on schedule and the median dose of cisplatin was 200 mg/m(2), which is comparable to historical standards. Of the 10 patients evaluable for response, 1 patient relapsed with metastatic disease. Conclusions The triple combination has a tolerable side effect profile and dose levels 15 mg and 30 mg were cleared safely. The addition of dacomitinib did not preclude delivery of standard chemoradiotherapy. Studies testing the

  17. Measuring head circumference

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide an evidence-based update emphasizing the importance of measuring head circumference (HC) in infants, with a focus on microcephaly. Quality of evidence PubMed and EMBASE (OvidSP) were searched. Search terms used were head circumference and infants and measurement; microcephaly and infants and measurement; idiopathic microcephaly and infants; and congenital microcephaly and infants. Most of the references for this review were published in 2000 or later. Most evidence is level II. Main message Serial measurement of HC should be incorporated into routine well-child care. Measure the distance around the back of the child’s head with a nonelastic tape measure held above the eyebrows and ears, and plot the measurement on an age- and sex-appropriate growth chart. Microcephaly is HC more than 2 SD below the mean. The most common disability associated with microcephaly is intellectual delay; other common concomitant conditions include epilepsy, cerebral palsy, language delay, strabismus, ophthalmologic disorders, and cardiac, renal, urinary tract, and skeletal anomalies. An interdisciplinary approach to microcephaly is warranted. Although there are no specific interventions to enhance brain growth, dietary or surgical interventions might be helpful in some cases. Infants with microcephaly who show developmental delays might benefit from early intervention programs or developmental physical and occupational therapy. Conclusion Early identification of HC concerns by family physicians can be a critical first step in identifying disorders such as microcephaly, leading to referral to pediatric specialists and, as needed, provision of family-centred early intervention services. PMID:26505062

  18. Validation of practical diffusion approximation for virtual near infrared spectroscopy using a digital head phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oki, Yosuke; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Okada, Eiji

    2009-03-01

    Light propagation in the digital head phantom for virtual near infrared spectroscopy and imaging is calculated by diffusion theory. In theory, diffusion approximation is not valid in a low-scattering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layer around the brain. The optical path length and spatial sensitivity profile predicted by the finite element method based upon the diffusion theory are compared with those predicted by the Monte Carlo method to validate a practical implementation of diffusion approximation to light propagation in an adult head. The transport scattering coefficient of the CSF layer is varied from 0.01 to 1.0 mm-1 to evaluate the influence of that layer on the error caused by diffusion approximation. The error is practically ignored and the geometry of the brain surface such as the sulcus structure in the digital head phantom scarcely affects the error when the transport scattering coefficient of the CSF layer is greater than 0.3 mm-1.

  19. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Maung, Khin Maung; Wilson, John W.; Buck, Warren W.

    1989-01-01

    The derivations of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation and Watson multiple scattering are given. A simple optical potential is found to be the first term of that series. The number density distribution models of the nucleus, harmonic well, and Woods-Saxon are used without t-matrix taken from the scattering experiments. The parameterized two-body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are presented. The eikonal approximation was chosen as our solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  20. Head-neck taper corrosion in hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hussenbocus, S; Kosuge, D; Solomon, L B; Howie, D W; Oskouei, R H

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction.

  1. Head-Neck Taper Corrosion in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hussenbocus, S.; Kosuge, D.; Solomon, L. B.; Howie, D. W.; Oskouei, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction. PMID:25954757

  2. Radiation Dose to the Lens of the Eye from Computed Tomography Scans of the Head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januzis, Natalie Ann

    factors were derived for each scanner individually, but also were derived with the combined data from the two scanners as a means to investigate the feasibility of a scanner-independent method. Using the scanner-independent method to derive the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor from the effective head diameter, most of the fitted lens dose values fell within 10-15% of the measured values from the phantom study, suggesting that this is a fairly accurate method of estimating lens dose from the CTDIvol with knowledge of the patient's head size. Second, the dose reduction potential of organ-based tube current modulation (OB-TCM) and its effect on the CTDIvol-to-lens dose estimation method was investigated. The lens dose was measured with MOSFET dosimeters placed within the same six anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantoms were scanned with the five clinical head CT protocols with OB-TCM enabled on the one scanner model at our institution equipped with this software. The average decrease in lens dose with OB-TCM ranged from 13.5 to 26.0%. Using the size-specific method to derive the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor from the effective head diameter for protocols with OB-TCM, the majority of the fitted lens dose values fell within 15-18% of the measured values from the phantom study. Third, the effect of gantry angulation on lens dose was investigated by measuring the lens dose with TLDs placed within the six anthropomorphic phantoms. The 2-dimensional spatial distribution of dose within the areas of the phantoms containing the orbit was measured with radiochromic film. A method was derived to determine the CTDIvol-to-lens dose conversion factor based upon distance from the primary beam scan range to the lens. The average dose to the lens region decreased substantially for almost all the phantoms (ranging from 67 to 92%) when the orbit was exposed to scattered radiation compared to the primary beam. The effectiveness of this method to reduce lens dose is highly

  3. Head stabilization in herons.

    PubMed

    Katzir, G; Schechtman, E; Carmi, N; Weihs, D

    2001-07-01

    We examined head stabilization in relation to body mass and length of legs in four heron species (little egrets, Egretta garzetta; night herons, Nycticorax nycticorax; squacco herons, Ardeola ralloides; and cattle egrets, Bubulcus ibis: Aves: Ardeidae). Head stabilization, under controlled, sinusoidal, perch perturbations was mostly elicited at frequencies lower than 1 Hz. Maximal perturbation amplitudes sustained were positively correlated with leg length and maximal perturbation frequencies sustained were negatively correlated with body mass and with leg length. The species differed significantly in average maximal perturbation amplitudes sustained. Combinations of amplitude and frequency for which stabilization was achieved were bounded by a decreasing concave "envelope" curve in the frequency-amplitude plane, with inter specific differences in "envelope". As physical constraints, we tested maximal vertical acceleration, which translates into a line defined by the product of frequency2 x amplitude, and maximal vertical velocity, which translates into a line defined by the product of frequency x amplitude. Both relations were in good agreement with the experimental results for all but squacco herons. The results support predictions based on mechanical considerations and may explain the predominance of motor patterns employed by herons while foraging.

  4. Positron scattering from vinyl acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, L.; Zecca, A.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-09-01

    Using a Beer-Lambert attenuation approach, we report measured total cross sections (TCSs) for positron scattering from vinyl acetate (C4H6O2) in the incident positron energy range 0.15-50 eV. In addition, we also report an independent atom model with screening corrected additivity rule computation results for the TCSs, differential and integral elastic cross sections, the positronium formation cross section and inelastic integral cross sections. The energy range of these calculations is 1-1000 eV. While there is a reasonable qualitative correspondence between measurement and calculation for the TCSs, in terms of the energy dependence of those cross sections, the theory was found to be a factor of ˜2 larger in magnitude at the lower energies, even after the measured data were corrected for the forward angle scattering effect.

  5. Head injuries in helmeted child bicyclists.

    PubMed Central

    Grimard, G.; Nolan, T.; Carlin, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the characteristics and the severity of head and facial injuries to helmeted child bicyclists, and whether the helmet contributed to the injury, and to study factors related to bicycle accidents. DESIGN: Retrospective review of two case series. Children sustaining head injury while not wearing helmets were studied as a form of reference group. SETTING: Large paediatric teaching hospital. SUBJECTS: 34 helmeted child bicyclists and 155 non-helmeted bicyclists, aged 5-14 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of injuries, type of injuries, injury severity score, deaths, and accident circumstances. RESULTS: 79% of the head injuries of the helmeted child group were mild and two thirds of these had facial injuries. Children in the helmet group were in a greater proportion of bike-car collisions than the no helmet group and at least 15% of the helmets were lost on impact. There were no injuries secondary to the helmet. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the head injuries sustained by the helmeted children were of mild severity and there was no evidence to suggest that the helmet contributed to injury. Nevertheless, consideration should be given to designing a facial protector for the bicycle helmet and to improvement of the fastening device. PMID:9345988

  6. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, J.K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

  7. Sperm head phenotype and male fertility in ram semen.

    PubMed

    Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; García-Álvarez, O; Montoro, V; Soler, A J; Fernández-Santos, M R; Roldan, E R S; Pérez-Guzmán, M D; Garde, J J

    2015-12-01

    Although there is ample evidence for the effects of sperm head shape on sperm function, its impact on fertility has not been explored in detail at the intraspecific level in mammals. Here, we assess the relationship between sperm head shape and male fertility in a large-scale study in Manchega sheep (Ovis aries), which have not undergone any selection for fertility. Semen was collected from 83 mature rams, and before insemination, head shapes were measured for five parameters: area, perimeter, length, width, and p2a (perimeter(2)/2×π×area) using a computer-assisted sperm morphometric analysis. In addition, a cluster analysis using sperm head length and p2a factor was performed to determine sperm subpopulations (SPs) structure. Our results show the existence of four sperm SPs, which present different sperm head phenotype: SP1 (large and round), SP2 (short and elongated), SP3 (shortest and round), and SP4 (large and the most elongated). No relationships were found between males' fertility rates and average values of sperm head dimensions. However, differences in fertility rates between rams were strongly associated to the proportion of spermatozoa in an ejaculate SP with short and elongated heads (P < 0.001). These findings show how the heterogeneity in sperm head shape of the ejaculate has an effect on reproductive success, and highlight the important role of modulation of the ejaculate at the intraspecific level.

  8. Sperm head phenotype and male fertility in ram semen.

    PubMed

    Maroto-Morales, A; Ramón, M; García-Álvarez, O; Montoro, V; Soler, A J; Fernández-Santos, M R; Roldan, E R S; Pérez-Guzmán, M D; Garde, J J

    2015-12-01

    Although there is ample evidence for the effects of sperm head shape on sperm function, its impact on fertility has not been explored in detail at the intraspecific level in mammals. Here, we assess the relationship between sperm head shape and male fertility in a large-scale study in Manchega sheep (Ovis aries), which have not undergone any selection for fertility. Semen was collected from 83 mature rams, and before insemination, head shapes were measured for five parameters: area, perimeter, length, width, and p2a (perimeter(2)/2×π×area) using a computer-assisted sperm morphometric analysis. In addition, a cluster analysis using sperm head length and p2a factor was performed to determine sperm subpopulations (SPs) structure. Our results show the existence of four sperm SPs, which present different sperm head phenotype: SP1 (large and round), SP2 (short and elongated), SP3 (shortest and round), and SP4 (large and the most elongated). No relationships were found between males' fertility rates and average values of sperm head dimensions. However, differences in fertility rates between rams were strongly associated to the proportion of spermatozoa in an ejaculate SP with short and elongated heads (P < 0.001). These findings show how the heterogeneity in sperm head shape of the ejaculate has an effect on reproductive success, and highlight the important role of modulation of the ejaculate at the intraspecific level. PMID:26318229

  9. Head motions while riding roller coasters: Implications for brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI between daily activities and roller coaster riding. Three dimensional head motions were measured during three different roller coaster rides, a pillow fight, and car crash simulations. Data was analyzed and compared to published data using similar analyses of head motions. An 8.05m/s car crash lead to the largest head injury criterion measure (HIC15) of 28.1 and head impact factor (HIP) of 3.41, over six times larger than the roller coaster rides of 4.1 and 0.36. Notably, the linear and rotational components of head acceleration during roller coaster rides were milder than those induced by many common activities. As such, there appears to be an extremely low risk of TBI due to the head motions induced by roller coaster rides. PMID:19901817

  10. Is there a relationship between head posture and craniomandibular pain?

    PubMed

    Visscher, C M; De Boer, W; Lobbezoo, F; Habets, L L M H; Naeije, M

    2002-11-01

    An often-suggested factor in the aetiology of craniomandibular disorders (CMD) is an anteroposition of the head. However, the results of clinical studies to the relationship between CMD and head posture are contradictory. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to determine differences in head posture between well-defined CMD pain patients with or without a painful cervical spine disorder and healthy controls. The second aim was to determine differences in head posture between myogenous and arthrogenous CMD pain patients and controls. Two hundred and fifty persons entered the study. From each person, a standardized oral history was taken and blind physical examinations of the masticatory system and of the neck were performed. The participants were only included into one of the subgroups when the presence or absence of their symptoms was confirmed by the results of the physical examination. Head posture was quantified using lateral photographs and a lateral radiograph of the head and the cervical spine. After correction for age and gender effects, no difference in head posture was found between any of the patient and non-patient groups (P > 0.27). Therefore, this study does not support the suggestion that painful craniomandibular disorders, with or without a painful cervical spine disorder, are related to head posture. PMID:12453255

  11. Extracting the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches in measured head related impulse responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raykar, Vikas C.; Duraiswami, Ramani; Yegnanarayana, B.

    2005-07-01

    The head related impulse response (HRIR) characterizes the auditory cues created by scattering of sound off a person's anatomy. The experimentally measured HRIR depends on several factors such as reflections from body parts (torso, shoulder, and knees), head diffraction, and reflection/diffraction effects due to the pinna. Structural models (Algazi et al., 2002; Brown and Duda, 1998) seek to establish direct relationships between the features in the HRIR and the anatomy. While there is evidence that particular features in the HRIR can be explained by anthropometry, the creation of such models from experimental data is hampered by the fact that the extraction of the features in the HRIR is not automatic. One of the prominent features observed in the HRIR, and one that has been shown to be important for elevation perception, are the deep spectral notches attributed to the pinna. In this paper we propose a method to robustly extract the frequencies of the pinna spectral notches from the measured HRIR, distinguishing them from other confounding features. The method also extracts the resonances described by Shaw (1997). The techniques are applied to the publicly available CIPIC HRIR database (Algazi et al., 2001c). The extracted notch frequencies are related to the physical dimensions and shape of the pinna.

  12. Limitations in scatter propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, E. W.

    1982-04-01

    A short description of the main scatter propagation mechanisms is presented; troposcatter, meteor burst communication and chaff scatter. For these propagation modes, in particular for troposcatter, the important specific limitations discussed are: link budget and resulting hardware consequences, diversity, mobility, information transfer and intermodulation and intersymbol interference, frequency range and future extension in frequency range for troposcatter, and compatibility with other services (EMC).

  13. Firing Properties of Rat Lateral Mammillary Single Units: Head Direction, Head Pitch, and Angular Head Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Stackman, Robert W.; Taube, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    Many neurons in the rat anterodorsal thalamus (ADN) and postsubiculum (PoS) fire selectively when the rat points its head in a specific direction in the horizontal plane, independent of the animal’s location and ongoing behavior. The lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN) are interconnected with both the ADN and PoS and, therefore, are in a pivotal position to influence ADN/PoS neurophysiology. To further understand how the head direction (HD) cell signal is generated, we recorded single neurons from the LMN of freely moving rats. The majority of cells discharged as a function of one of three types of spatial correlates: (1) directional heading, (2) head pitch, or (3) angular head velocity (AHV). LMN HD cells exhibited higher peak firing rates and greater range of directional firing than that of ADN and PoS HD cells. LMN HD cells were modulated by angular head velocity, turning direction, and anticipated the rat’s future HD by a greater amount of time (~95 msec) than that previously reported for ADN HD cells (~25 msec). Most head pitch cells discharged when the rostrocaudal axis of the rat’s head was orthogonal to the horizontal plane. Head pitch cell firing was independent of the rat’s location, directional heading, and its body orientation (i.e., the cell discharged whenever the rat pointed its head up, whether standing on all four limbs or rearing). AHV cells were categorized as fast or slow AHV cells depending on whether their firing rate increased or decreased in proportion to angular head velocity. These data demonstrate that LMN neurons code direction and angular motion of the head in both horizontal and vertical planes and support the hypothesis that the LMN play an important role in processing both egocentric and allocentric spatial information. PMID:9787007

  14. Does dimeticone clear head lice?

    PubMed

    2007-07-01

    Head lice infestation is common and mainly affects children of primary school age. Treatments include licensed topical preparations containing conventional chemical insecticides and medical devices. Each of these fail to eradicate head lice in some patients and resistance is a problem with chemical insecticides. Dimeticone 4% lotion (Hedrin - Thornton & Ross) is a new treatment licensed "for the eradication of head lice infestations". Here we consider its place in the context of other options.

  15. Head Lice: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  16. Head Lice: Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment FAQs Malathion FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ... Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Epidemiology & Risk Factors Disease Biology Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals ...

  17. Evaluation of scatter mitigation strategies for x-ray cone-beam CT: impact of scatter subtraction and anti-scatter grids on contrast-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Lasio, Giovanni; Evans, Joshua; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2007-03-01

    The large contribution of scatter to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) x-ray projections significantly degrades image quality, both through streaking and cupping artifacts and by loss of low contrast boundary detectability. The goal of this investigation is to compare the efficacy of three widely used scatter mitigation methods: subtractive scatter correction (SSC); anti-scatter grids (ASG); and beam modulating with bowtie filters; for improving signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and cupping artifacts. A simple analytic model was developed to predict scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) and CNR as a function of cylindrical phantom thickness. In addition, CBCT x-ray projections of a CatPhan QA phantom were measured, using a Varian CBCT imaging system, and computed, using an inhouse Monte Carlo photon-transport code to more realistically evaluate the impact of scatter mitigation techniques. Images formed with uncorrected sinograms acquired without ASGs and bow-tie filter show pronounced cupping artifacts and loss of contrast. Subtraction of measured scatter profiles restores image uniformity and CT number accuracy, but does not improve CNR, since the improvement in contrast almost exactly offset by the increase in relative x-ray noise. ASGs were found to modestly improve CNR (up to 20%, depending ASG primary transmission and selectivity) only in body scans, while they can reduce CNR for head phantoms where SPR is low.

  18. Grandparent Headed Families and Head Start: Developing Effective Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannison, Linda L.; Smith, Andrea B.

    Numerous challenges face the growing number of grandparent-headed households, including isolation from friends and social supports, and difficulties in caring for grandchildren exhibiting multiple needs. This paper describes a pilot program in which a university and a large county-wide Head Start program formed a partnership to focus on serving…

  19. The potential and limitations of utilising head impact injury models to assess the likelihood of significant head injury in infants after a fall.

    PubMed

    Cory, C Z; Jones, M D; James, D S; Leadbeatter, S; Nokes, L D

    2001-12-01

    The use of engineering principles in assessing head injury scenarios is of increasing significance in investigations into suspected child abuse. A fall scenario is often given as the history for a head injury to an infant. This paper addresses the basic engineering principles and factors to be considered when calculating the severity of a head impact after free-fall. The application of head injury models (HIMs) to ascertain the forces involved in childhood head injuries from impact is also discussed. Previous studies including Duhaime et al. [J. Neurosurg. 66 (1987) 409] and Nokes et al. [Forensic Sci. Int. 79 (1995) 85] have utilised HIMs for this purpose: this paper reviews those models most widely documented.The HIM currently considered the 'state-of-the-art' is the head injury criterion (HIC) and it is suggested that this model should be utilised for assessing head impact injury in child abuse cases where appropriate.

  20. NASA head sworn in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James C. Fletcher was sworn in on May 12, 1986, as administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). At a news conference after he was sworn in, Fletcher said that NASA would deal with both its technical problems and its procedural problems before the shuttle will fly again. According to press accounts, he stressed that funds should be made available to replace the Challenger orbiter, which was lost in an explosion on January 28.Fletcher, who had also headed the agency from 1971 to 1977, succeeds James M. Beggs, who was indicted in December 1985 for conspiring to defraud the federal government while serving as a senior executive at the General Dynamics Corporation.

  1. Chryse 'Alien Head'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    26 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an impact crater in Chryse Planitia, not too far from the Viking 1 lander site, that to seems to resemble a bug-eyed head. The two odd depressions at the north end of the crater (the 'eyes') may have formed by wind or water erosion. This region has been modified by both processes, with water action occurring in the distant past via floods that poured across western Chryse Planitia from Maja Valles, and wind action common occurrence in more recent history. This crater is located near 22.5oN, 47.9oW. The 150 meter scale bar is about 164 yards long. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  2. Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beuthan, J; Netz, U; Minet, O; Mueller, G; Scheel, A; Henniger, J

    2002-11-30

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}, absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results. (laser biology and medicine)

  3. Calculates Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel.

    1989-11-10

    Version 00 THRUSH computes the thermal neutron scattering kernel by the phonon expansion method for both coherent and incoherent scattering processes. The calculation of the coherent part is suitable only for calculating the scattering kernel for heavy water.

  4. Materials for a Stirling engine heater head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, J. E.; Lehmann, G. A.; Emigh, S. G.

    1990-01-01

    Work done on the 25-kW advanced Stirling conversion system (ASCS) terrestrial solar program in establishing criteria and selecting materials for the engine heater head and heater tubes is described. Various mechanisms contributing to incompatibility between materials are identified and discussed. Large thermal gradients, coupled with requirements for long life (60,000 h at temperature) and a large number of heatup and cooldown cycles (20,000) drive the design from a structural standpoint. The pressurized cylinder is checked for creep rupture, localized yielding, reverse plasticity, creep and fatigue damage, and creep ratcheting, in addition to the basic requirements for bust and proof pressure. In general, creep rupture and creep and fatigue interaction are the dominant factors in the design. A wide range of materials for the heater head and tubes was evaluated. Factors involved in the assessment were strength and effect on engine efficiency, reliability, and cost. A preliminary selection of Inconel 713LC for the heater head is based on acceptable structural properties but driven mainly by low cost. The criteria for failure, the structural analysis, and the material characteristics with basis for selection are discussed.

  5. Kaon-nucleus scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Byungsik; Buck, Warren W.; Maung, Khin M.

    1989-01-01

    Two kinds of number density distributions of the nucleus, harmonic well and Woods-Saxon models, are used with the t-matrix that is taken from the scattering experiments to find a simple optical potential. The parameterized two body inputs, which are kaon-nucleon total cross sections, elastic slope parameters, and the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the forward elastic scattering amplitude, are shown. The eikonal approximation was chosen as the solution method to estimate the total and absorptive cross sections for the kaon-nucleus scattering.

  6. Kansas: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Kansas Early Head Start (KEHS) provides comprehensive services following federal Head Start Program Performance Standards for pregnant women and eligible families with children from birth to age 4. KEHS was implemented in 1998 using Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) quality set-aside dollars augmented by a transfer of federal…

  7. Nebraska: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 1999, Nebraska's Early Head Start Infant/Toddler Quality Initiative has supported Early Head Start (EHS) and community child care partnerships to improve the quality and professionalism of infant and toddler care. EHS programs apply to receive funding to establish partnerships with center-based or home-based child care.The initiative has…

  8. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor); Goodfriend, Roger (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup-shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduces breakage thereof.

  9. The Start of Head Start

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The creation of the Head Start program occurred at break-neck speed with many dramatic turns and many colorful players. No one tells the story better than Edward Zigler in "Head Start: The Inside Story of America's Most Successful Educational Experiment"--a detailed and personal, behind the scenes look at the program's inception. From this…

  10. Vision Screening For Head Starters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Celia

    To determine which children in the Head Start program may have vision problems, Head Start teachers and staff do vision "screening." This booklet demonstrates how to do the screening using the Snellen "E Chart." Trouble signs that the test administrator should be aware of are listed, and vision scores are explained simply. Amblyopia is defined,…

  11. Interview with Joe F. Head

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Kim

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Joe F. Head, Dean of University Admissions and Enrollment Services at Kennesaw State University (KSU) in Georgia, who has more than 35 years of experience in admissions and enrollment services. After completing an M.Ed. in higher education at Georgia Southern University, Head immediately landed a position as…

  12. Be-heading the Word.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Laurie

    1990-01-01

    Examines the notion of "head" in syntax and the extent to which it extends to morphology in English, and discusses the notion of headedness and percolation. The argument is made that percolation in English does not work, casting doubt on the notion of head in morphology. (34 references) (GLR)

  13. Idiopathic head tremor in English bulldogs.

    PubMed

    Guevar, Julien; De Decker, Steven; Van Ham, Luc M L; Fischer, Andrea; Volk, Holger A

    2014-02-01

    Idiopathic head tremor (IHT) syndrome is a recognized but poorly characterized movement disorder in English bulldogs (EBs). The data analyzed were collected via a detailed online questionnaire and video recordings. Thirty-eight percent of the population demonstrated IHT. The first presentation was early in life. There was no sex or neutered status predisposition. The condition disappeared with time in 50% of the cases. The direction of the head movement was vertical or horizontal. The number of episodes per day and the duration of the episodes were greatly variable. The majority of episodes occurred at rest. Most of the episodes were unpredictable. And there was no alteration of the mental status for most dogs during the episodes. Stress has been reported as a suspected trigger factor. IHT in EBs can be considered an idiopathic paroxysmal movement disorder. PMID:24375621

  14. Head-Up Displays and Attention Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Risser, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    The primary role of head-up displays (HUDs) is to provide primary flight, navigation, and guidance information to the pilot in a forward field-of-view on a head-up transparent screen. Therefore, this theoretically allows for optimal control of an aircraft through the simultaneous scanning of both instrument data and the out-the-window scene. However, despite significant aviation safety benefits afforded by HUDs, a number of accidents have shown that their use does not come without costs. The human factors community has identified significant issues related to the pilot distribution of near and far domain attentional resources because of the compellingness of symbology elements on the HUD; a concern termed, attention or cognitive capture. The paper describes the phenomena of attention capture and presents a selected survey of the literature on the etiology and potential prescriptions.

  15. Dense Plasma X-ray Scattering: Methods and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; Lee, H J; Davis, P; Doppner, T; Falcone, R W; Fortmann, C; Hammel, B A; Kritcher, A L; Landen, O L; Lee, R W; Munro, D H; Redmer, R; Weber, S

    2009-08-19

    We have developed accurate x-ray scattering techniques to measure the physical properties of dense plasmas. Temperature and density are inferred from inelastic x-ray scattering data whose interpretation is model-independent for low to moderately coupled systems. Specifically, the spectral shape of the non-collective Compton scattering spectrum directly reflects the electron velocity distribution. In partially Fermi degenerate systems that have been investigated experimentally in laser shock-compressed beryllium, the Compton scattering spectrum provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. We show that forward scattering spectra that observe collective plasmon oscillations yield densities in agreement with Compton scattering. In addition, electron temperatures inferred from the dispersion of the plasmon feature are consistent with the ion temperature sensitive elastic scattering feature. Hence, theoretical models of the static ion-ion structure factor and consequently the equation of state of dense matter can be directly tested.

  16. Head Start Impact Study: First Year Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael; Bell, Stephen; Cook, Ronna; Heid, Camilla; Lopez, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The Congressionally-mandated Head Start Impact Study is being conducted across 84 nationally representative grantee/delegate agencies. Approximately 5,000 newly entering 3- and 4-year-old children applying for Head Start were randomly assigned to either a Head Start group that had access to Head Start program services or to a non-Head Start group…

  17. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  18. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  19. Intra-beam scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwinski, A.

    Intra-beam scattering is analysed and the rise times or damping times of the beam dimensions are derived. The theoretical results are compared with experimental values obtained on the CERN AA and SPS machines.

  20. Environment scattering in GADRAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Thoreson, Gregory G.; Mitchell, Dean J; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Harding, Lee T.

    2013-09-01

    Radiation transport calculations were performed to compute the angular tallies for scattered gamma-rays as a function of distance, height, and environment. Greens Functions were then used to encapsulate the results a reusable transformation function. The calculations represent the transport of photons throughout scattering surfaces that surround sources and detectors, such as the ground and walls. Utilization of these calculations in GADRAS (Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software) enables accurate computation of environmental scattering for a variety of environments and source configurations. This capability, which agrees well with numerous experimental benchmark measurements, is now deployed with GADRAS Version 18.2 as the basis for the computation of scattered radiation.

  1. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostics Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostics Workshop was held July 25-26, 1995 at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The purpose of the workshop was to foster timely exchange of information and expertise acquired by researchers and users of laser based Rayleigh scattering diagnostics for aerospace flow facilities and other applications. This Conference Publication includes the 12 technical presentations and transcriptions of the two panel discussions. The first panel was made up of 'users' of optical diagnostics, mainly in aerospace test facilities, and its purpose was to assess areas of potential applications of Rayleigh scattering diagnostics. The second panel was made up of active researchers in Rayleigh scattering diagnostics, and its purpose was to discuss the direction of future work.

  2. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory experimental set - up for studying the behaviour of sediment in presence of a turbulent field with zero mean flow is compared with the behaviour of turbidity currents [1] . Particular interest is shown on the initiation of sediment motion and in the sediment lift - off. The behaviour of the turbidity current in a flat ground is compared with the zero mean flow oscilating grid generated turbulence as when wave flow lifts off suspended sediments [2,3]. Some examples of the results obtained with this set-up relating the height of the head of the turbidity current to the equilibrium level of stirred lutoclines are shown. A turbulent velocity u' lower than that estimated by the Shield diagram is required to start sediment motion. The minimum u' required to start sediment lift - off, is a function of sediment size, cohesivity and resting time. The lutocline height depends on u', and the vorticity at the lutocline seems constant for a fixed sediment size [1,3]. Combining grid stirring and turbidty current head shapes analyzed by means of advanced image analysis, sediment vertical fluxes and settling speeds can be measured [4,5]. [1] D. Hernandez Turbulent structure of turbidity currents and sediment transport Ms Thesis ETSECCPB, UPC. Barcelona 2009. [2] A. Sánchez-Arcilla; A. Rodríguez; J.C. Santás; J.M. Redondo; V. Gracia; R. K'Osyan; S. Kuznetsov; C. Mösso. Delta'96 Surf-zone and nearshore measurements at the Ebro Delta. A: International Conference on Coastal Research through large Scale Experiments (Coastal Dynamics '97). University of Plymouth, 1997, p. 186-187. [3] P. Medina, M. A. Sánchez and J. M. Redondo. Grid stirred turbulence: applications to the initiation of sediment motion and lift-off studies Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Part B: Hydrology, Oceans and Atmosphere. 26, Issue 4, 2001, Pages 299-304 [4] M.O. Bezerra, M. Diez, C. Medeiros, A. Rodriguez, E. Bahia., A. Sanchez-Arcilla and J.M. Redondo. Study on the influence of waves on

  3. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  4. Positron-rubidium scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mceachran, R. P.; Horbatsch, M.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    A 5-state close-coupling calculation (5s-5p-4d-6s-6p) was carried out for positron-Rb scattering in the energy range 3.7 to 28.0 eV. In contrast to the results of similar close-coupling calculations for positron-Na and positron-K scattering the (effective) total integrated cross section has an energy dependence which is contrary to recent experimental measurements.

  5. Imaging back scattered and near back scattered light in ignition scale plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R.K.; Back, C.A.; Glenzer, S.H.; Moody, J.D.

    1996-05-07

    Diagnostics have been developed and fielded at the Nova laser facility that image scattered light in the vicinity of the final laser focusing lens. The absolute calibration of optical components exposed to the target debris have been achieved by a combination of routine in situ calibration and maintenance. The scattering observed from plasmas relevant to ignition experiments indicates that light scattered just outside the lens can be larger than that collected by the lens, and is a significant factor in the energy balance when the f number is high.

  6. Elastic scattering of hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2013-01-01

    Colliding high-energy hadrons either produce new particles or scatter elastically with their quantum numbers conserved and no other particles produced. We consider the latter case here. Although inelastic processes dominate at high energies, elastic scattering contributes considerably (18-25%) to the total cross section. Its share first decreases and then increases at higher energies. Small-angle scattering prevails at all energies. Some characteristic features can be seen that provide information on the geometrical structure of the colliding particles and the relevant dynamical mechanisms. The steep Gaussian peak at small angles is followed by the exponential (Orear) regime with some shoulders and dips, and then by a power-law decrease. Results from various theoretical approaches are compared with experimental data. Phenomenological models claiming to describe this process are reviewed. The unitarity condition predicts an exponential fall for the differential cross section with an additional substructure to occur exactly between the low momentum transfer diffraction cone and a power-law, hard parton scattering regime under high momentum transfer. Data on the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear parts of amplitudes at extremely small angles provide the value of the real part of the forward scattering amplitude. The real part of the elastic scattering amplitude and the contribution of inelastic processes to the imaginary part of this amplitude (the so-called overlap function) are also discussed. Problems related to the scaling behavior of the differential cross section are considered. The power-law regime at highest momentum transfer is briefly described.

  7. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and head position during sleep.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Kohichiro; Ogita, Hideaki; Funabiki, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether any particular head positions during sleep are associated with BPPV, head position during sleep was monitored for 3 days in 50 BPPV patients after the disappearance of positional nystagmus and in 25 normal control subjects. A gravity sensor was attached to the center of the subject's forehead at home. The positional angle of the head was measured at 5-second intervals during sleep. In BPPV, the posterior semicircular canal was involved in 40 patients and the lateral semicircular canal in 10 patients. Recurrence was found in 22 of 50 BPPV patients. BPPV patients with recurrence were significantly more likely to sleep in the affected-ear-down 45-degree head position than were patients with no history of recurrence (P< 0.02). When the head is in the affected-ear-down 45-degree head position, the non-ampullated half of the posterior semicircular canal and the non-ampullated half of the lateral semicircular canal are nearly in the earth-vertical position, making it easier for detached otoconia to fall into the posterior or lateral semicircular canal and to agglomerate and attain a certain size in the lowest portion of each semicircular canal. Our findings showed that the affected-ear-down 45-degree head position during sleep could be an etiological factor of BPPV, more particularly in patients with recurrent BPPV. PMID:23142834

  8. Sentence comprehension following moderate closed head injury in adults.

    PubMed

    Leikin, Mark; Ibrahim, Raphiq; Aharon-Peretz, Judith

    2012-09-01

    The current study explores sentence comprehension impairments among adults following moderate closed head injury. It was hypothesized that if the factor of syntactic complexity significantly affects sentence comprehension in these patients, it would testify to the existence of syntactic processing deficit along with working-memory problems. Thirty-six adults (18 closed head injury patients and 18 healthy controls matched in age, gender, and IQ) participated in the study. A picture-sentence matching task together with various tests for memory, language, and reading abilities were used to explore whether sentence comprehension impairments exist as a result of a deficit in syntactic processing or of working-memory dysfunction. Results indicate significant impairment in sentence comprehension among adults with closed head injury compared with their non-head-injured peers. Results also reveal that closed head injury patients demonstrate considerable decline in working memory, short-term memory, and semantic knowledge. Analysis of the results shows that memory impairment and syntactic complexity contribute significantly to sentence comprehension difficulties in closed head injury patients. At the same time, the presentation mode (spoken or written language) was found to have no effect on comprehension among adults with closed head injury, and their reading abilities appear to be relatively intact.

  9. Kernel Integration Code System--Multigroup Gamma-Ray Scattering.

    1988-02-15

    GGG (G3) is the generic designation for a series of computer programs that enable the user to estimate gamma-ray scattering from a point source to a series of point detectors. Program output includes detector response due to each source energy, as well as a grouping by scattered energy in addition to a simple, unscattered beam result. Although G3 is basically a single-scatter program, it also includes a correction for multiple scattering by applying a buildupmore » factor for the path segment between the point of scatter and the detector point. Results are recorded with and without the buildup factor. Surfaces, defined by quadratic equations, are used to provide for a full three-dimensional description of the physical geometry. G3 evaluates scattering effects in those situations where more exact techniques are not economical. G3 was revised by Bettis and the name was changed to indicate that it was no longer identical to the G3 program. The name S3 was chosen since the scattering calculation has three steps: calculation of the flux arriving at the scatterer from the point source, calculation of the differential scattering cross section, and calculation of the scattered flux arriving at the detector.« less

  10. Structural Interpretations of Static Light Scattering Patterns of Fractal Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Lambert; Thill; Ginestet; Audic; Bottero

    2000-08-15

    A method based on static light scattering by fractal aggregates is introduced to extract structural information. In this study, we determine the scattered intensity by a fractal aggregate calculating the Structure and the Form factors noted, respectively, S(q) and F(q). We use the approximation of the mean field Mie scattering by fractal aggregates (R. Botet, P. Rannou, and M. Cabane, appl. opt. 36, 8791, 1997). This approximation is validated by a comparison of the scattering and extinction cross sections values calculated using, on the one hand, Mie theory with a mean optical index n) and, on the other hand, the mean field approximation. Scattering and extinction cross sections values differ by about 5%. We show that the mean environment of primary scatterers characterized by the optical index n(s) must be taken into account to interpret accurately the scattering pattern from fractal aggregates. Numerical simulations were done to evaluate the influence of the fractal dimension values (D(f)>2) and of the radius of gyration or the number of primary particles within the aggregates (N=50 to 250) on the scatterers' mean optical contrast (n(s)/n). This last parameter plays a major role in determining the Form factor F(q) which corresponds to the primary particles' scattering. In associating the mean optical index (n) to structural characteristics, this work provides a theoretical framework to be used to provide additional structural information from the scattering pattern of a fractal aggregate (cf. Part II). Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  12. Keeping Your Head On Target

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Aaron L.; Zee, David S.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the human brain controls eye movements are reasonably well understood, but those for the head less so. Here, we show that the mechanisms for keeping the head aimed at a stationary target follow strategies similar to those for holding the eyes steady on stationary targets. Specifically, we applied the neural integrator hypothesis that originally was developed for holding the eyes still in eccentric gaze positions to describe how the head is held still when turned toward an eccentric target. We found that normal humans make head movements consistent with the neural integrator hypothesis, except that additional sensory feedback is needed, from proprioceptors in the neck, to keep the head on target. We also show that the complicated patterns of head movements in patients with cervical dystonia can be predicted by deficits in a neural integrator for head motor control. These results support ideas originally developed from animal studies that suggest fundamental similarities between oculomotor and cephalomotor control, as well as a conceptual framework for cervical dystonia that departs considerably from current clinical views. PMID:23825431

  13. Eye and head motion during head turns in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    Eye-head motion was studied pre-, in- and postflight during single voluntary head turns. A transient increase in vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain occurred early in the flight, but later trended toward normal. This increased gain was produced by a relative increase in eye counterrotation velocity. Asymmetries in gain with right and left turns also occurred, caused by asymmetries in eye counterrotation velocities. These findings were remarkably similar to those from Soviet primate studies using gaze fixation targets, except the human study trended more rapidly toward normal. These findings differ substantially from those measuring VOR gain by head oscillation, in which no significant changes were found inflight. No visual disturbances were noted in either test condition or in normal activities. These head turn studies are the only ones to date documenting any functional change in VOR in weightlessness.

  14. Hangman's fracture in head injury.

    PubMed

    Umebese, P F; Orhewere, F A

    1989-09-01

    Five patients with fracture of pedicle of axis vertebra as a complication of head injury are reported. The ages of the patients ranged from 16-25 years and all of them were victims of road traffic accidents. The head injuries were moderately severe requiring admission. The average Glasgow Coma Scale sum on admission was 11. Simple non-operative management in a well padded stiff collar with sand bags supporting the head in a neutral position in bed resulted in full recovery without complication after an average of 4 weeks recumbency.

  15. Anaphylaxis Due to Head Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bruner, Heather C.; Bruner, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Both anaphylaxis and head injury are often seen in the emergency department, but they are rarely seen in combination. We present a case of a 30-year-old woman who presented with anaphylaxis with urticaria and angioedema following a minor head injury. The patient responded well to intramuscular epinephrine without further complications or airway compromise. Prior case reports have reported angioedema from hereditary angioedema during dental procedures and maxillofacial surgery, but there have not been any cases of first-time angioedema or anaphylaxis due to head injury. PMID:25987924

  16. Giant scattering cones in obscured quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obied, Georges; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin

    2016-03-01

    We analyse Hubble Space Telescope observations of scattering regions in 20 luminous obscured quasars at 0.24 < z < 0.65 (11 new observations and nine archival ones) observed at rest frame ˜3000 Å. We find spectacular 5-10 kpc-scale scattering regions in almost all cases. The median scattering efficiency at this wavelength (the ratio of observed to estimated intrinsic flux) is 2.3, and 73 per cent of the observed flux at this wavelength is due to scattered light, which if unaccounted for may strongly bias estimates of quasar hosts' star formation rates. Modelling these regions as illuminated dusty cones, we estimate the radial density distributions of the interstellar medium as well as the geometric properties of circumnuclear quasar obscuration - inclinations and covering factors. Small derived opening angles (median half-angle and standard deviation 27° ± 9°) are inconsistent with a 1:1 type 1/type 2 ratio. We suggest that quasar obscuration is patchy and that the observer has an ˜40 per cent chance of seeing a type 1 source even through the obscuration. We estimate median density profile of the scattering medium to be nH = 0.04-0.5 (1 kpc/r)2 cm-3, depending on the method. Quasars in our sample likely exhibit galaxy-wide winds, but if these consist of optically thick clouds then only a small fraction of the wind mass ( ≲ 10 per cent) contributes to scattering.

  17. Counting heads in Cairo.

    PubMed

    1994-09-14

    Representatives of 182 nations gathered in Cairo in September, 1994, at the Un Conference on Population and Development. The resulting 113-page Draft Program of Action contains sober discussions on demographic issues, including projections of population increase in the decades ahead. It focuses on the potential growth of famine, disease, warfare, environmental degradation, and general human misery if the world's population cannot be stabilized at around 8 billion in the next 20 years. The 1994 figure stands at about 5.7 billion, and there will be 12.5 billion people if no action is taken. Previous conferences hosted under the UN helped spark a remarkable decline in fertility rates, especially in Indonesia and Thailand. Even in populous Bangladesh, some 40% of women now use contraceptives, while the fertility rate has dropped from 7 to 4.2 in 2 decades. The proposals debated in Cairo include sustainable development, gender equality, and the empowerment of women. Whatever the country or culture, fertility rates tend to fall dramatically as women become more educated. This has been borne out almost everywhere, most notably in Japan and Singapore. The conference has been criticized by the Vatican as advocating an international standard for easy abortion, encouraging sex education for teenagers, and sanctioning marriages other than between a man and a woman. Some conservative Muslim thinkers have also complained that it promotes Western values and fosters illicit sex. Many supporters of population planning have argued that the empowerment of women will reduce the incidence of abortion. The Cairo document will alienate many across Asia with its references to the plurality of family forms, including the large number of households headed by single parents. The one goal on which everyone can agree is the need to promote policies that will stabilize the global headcount.

  18. MISSE Scattered Atomic Oxygen Characterization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2006-01-01

    An experiment designed to measure the atomic oxygen (AO) erosion profile of scattered AO was exposed to Low Earth Orbital (LEO) AO for almost four years as part of the Materials International Space Station Experiment 1 and 2 (MISSE 1 and 2). The experiment was flown in MISSE Passive Experiment Carrier 2 (PEC 2), Tray 1, attached to the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) Quest Airlock. The experiment consisted of an aperture disk lid of Kapton H (DuPont) polyimide coated on the space exposed surface with a thin AO durable silicon dioxide film. The aperture lid had a small hole in its center to allow AO to enter into a chamber and impact a base disk of aluminum. The AO that scattered from the aluminum base could react with the under side of the aperture lid which was coated sporadically with microscopic sodium chloride particles. Scattered AO erosion can occur to materials within a spacecraft that are protected from direct AO attack but because of apertures in the spacecraft the AO can attack the interior materials after scattering. The erosion of the underside of the Kapton lid was sufficient to be able to use profilometry to measure the height of the buttes that remained after washing off the salt particles. The erosion pattern indicated that peak flux of scattered AO occurred at and angle of approximately 45 from the incoming normal incidence on the aluminum base unlike the erosion pattern predicted for scattering based on Monte Carlo computational predictions for AO scattering from Kapton H polyimide. The effective erosion yield for the scattered AO was found to be a factor of 0.214 of that for direct impingement on Kapton H polyimide.

  19. Applications of phase conjugate mirror to Thomson scattering diagnostics (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Hatae, T.; Naito, O.; Nakatsuka, M.; Yoshida, H.

    2006-10-15

    A high performance phase conjugate mirror based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS-PCM) has been applied to the Thomson scattering system in the JT-60U tokamak for the first time in order to improve the measurement performance. A SBS-PCM realized a high reflectivity of 95% at a high input power of 145 W (2.9 J, 50 Hz). Using the SBS-PCM, two methods have been developed to increase the intensity of scattered light. For the first method, we have developed a new optical design to provide a double-pass scattering method with the SBS-PCM. A laser beam passing through the plasma is reflected by the SBS-PCM. The reflected beam passes the plasma again along the same path by means of the phase conjugation of the optically nonlinear stimulated Brillouin scattering process. The double-pass Thomson scattering method using the SBS-PCM has demonstrated an increase of the scattered light by a factor of 1.6 compared with the single-pass scattering method in JT-60U. A multipass Thomson scattering method in which the laser beam can be confined between a couple of SBS-PCMs is also proposed. It is estimated that the multipass scattering method generates the scattered light more than several times as large as that of the single-pass scattering method. For the second method, a high-average-power yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser system has been developed using the SBS-PCM. The SBS-PCM effectively compensated thermal degradation at two amplifier lines, and the average power was increased by a factor of >8 from 45 W (1.5 J, 30 Hz) to 373 W (7.46 J, 50 Hz). A Nd:YAG laser (5 J, 100 Hz) for the edge Thomson scattering in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) has been designed based on the result.

  20. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-08-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  1. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  2. Heater head for stirling engine

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1985-07-09

    A monolithic heater head assembly which augments cast fins with ceramic inserts which narrow the flow of combustion gas and obtains high thermal effectiveness with the assembly including an improved flange design which gives greater durability and reduced conduction loss.

  3. Zero torque gear head wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  4. Montessori Head Start Implementation Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifford, Alcillia; Kahn, David

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of the Montessori method in Head Start programs, focusing on educational environment, teacher training, parent involvement, and funding. Outlines the phased implementation of a Montessori program and provides a list of Montessori publications and organizations. (MDM)

  5. Chest infection following head and neck surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Morton, R P; Mellow, C G; Dorman, E B

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a pilot study which examined factors associated with chest infection following head and neck surgery. The overall rate of chest infection was 11%, but was 20% in those patients having a tracheotomy. No infection developed in patients with an intact airway. Other factors which emerged as possibly important were the duration of surgery and heavy regular alcohol intake. We recommend that prophylactic antibiotics be continued for at least 48 h in patients requiring a tracheotomy as part of their head and neck surgery. This is against the trend of shorter antibiotic regimens recommended for prevention of wound infections.

  6. Head and neck cancer in two American presidents: Case reports.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Mea A; Wang, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    Two former U.S. presidents, Ulysses S. Grant and Grover Cleveland, were diagnosed with head and neck cancer in 1884 and 1893, respectively. A historical review of the risk factors, diagnoses, and treatments is examined and compared with modern-day interpretations. A comparison was made using the original diagnoses with today's equivalent diagnosis. Different treatment outcomes at the time of the original diagnoses relative to today's treatment are reviewed. Clinicians must be familiar with risk factors, signs, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of head and neck cancer. PMID:22313921

  7. Knowledge and Screening of Head and Neck Cancer Among American Indians in South Dakota

    PubMed Central

    Deschler, Daniel; Sargent, Michele; Emerick, Kevin; Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh; Petereit, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We established the level of awareness of risk factors and early symptoms of head and neck cancer among American Indians in South Dakota and determined whether head and neck cancer screening detected clinical findings in this population. Methods. We used the European About Face survey. We added questions about human papillomavirus, a risk factor for head and neck cancer, and demographics. Surveys were administered at 2 public events in 2011. Participants could partake in a head and neck cancer screening at the time of survey administration. Results. Of the 205 American Indians who completed the survey, 114 participated in the screening. Mean head and neck cancer knowledge scores were 26 out of 44. Level of education was the only factor that predicted higher head and neck cancer knowledge (b = 0.90; P = .01). Nine (8%) people had positive head and neck cancer screening examination results. All abnormal clinical findings were in current or past smokers (P = .06). Conclusions. There are gaps in American Indian knowledge of head and neck cancer risk factors and symptoms. Community-based head and neck cancer screening in this population is feasible and may be a way to identify early abnormal clinical findings in smokers. PMID:25320895

  8. Cutting head for ultrasonic lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anguluo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument is described. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduce breakage thereof.

  9. Electromagnetic scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, J. F.; Farrell, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic scattering theory is discussed with emphasis on the general stochastic variational principle (SVP) and its applications. The stochastic version of the Schwinger-type variational principle is presented, and explicit expressions for its integrals are considered. Results are summarized for scalar wave scattering from a classic rough-surface model and for vector wave scattering from a random dielectric-body model. Also considered are the selection of trial functions and the variational improvement of the Kirchhoff short-wave approximation appropriate to large size-parameters. Other applications of vector field theory discussed include a general vision theory and the analysis of hydromagnetism induced by ocean motion across the geomagnetic field. Levitational force-torque in the magnetic suspension of the disturbance compensation system (DISCOS), now deployed in NOVA satellites, is also analyzed using the developed theory.

  10. MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

    2004-07-30

    Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science

  11. Interstellar Dust Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, K. D.

    2004-05-01

    Studies of dust scattering properties in astrophysical objects with Milky Way interstellar dust are reviewed. Such objects are reflection nebulae, dark clouds, and the Diffuse Galactic Light (DGL). To ensure their basic quality, studies had to satisfy four basic criteria to be included in this review. These four criteria significantly reduced the scatter in dust properties measurements, especially in the case of the DGL. Determinations of dust scattering properties were found to be internally consistent for each object type as well as consistent between object types. The 2175 Å bump is seen as an absorption feature. Comparisons with dust grain models find general agreement with significant disagreements at particular wavelengths (especially in the far-ultraviolet). Finally, unanswered questions and future directions are enumerated.

  12. Dynamic Scattering Mode LCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * CELL DESIGNING * EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS IN NEMATICS RELATED WITH DYNAMIC SCATTERING * Experimental Observations at D.C. Field and Electrode Effects * Experimental Observation at Low Frequency A.C. Fields * Homogeneously Aligned Nematic Regime * Williams Domains * Dynamic Scattering * Experimental Observation at High Frequency A.C. Field * Other Experimental Observations * THEORETICAL INTERPRETATIONS * Felici Model * Carr-Helfrich Model * D.C. Excitation * Dubois-Violette, de Gennes and Parodi Model * Low Freqency or Conductive Regime * High Frequency or Dielectric Regime * DYNAMIC SCATTERING IN SMECRIC A PHASE * ELECTRO-OPTICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND LIMITATIONS * Contrast Ratio vs. Voltage, Viewing Angle, Cell Gap, Wavelength and Temperature * Display Current vs. Voltage, Cell Gap and Temperature * Switching Time * Effect of Alignment * Effect of Conductivity, Temperature and Frequency * Addressing of DSM LCDs * Limitations of DSM LCDs * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  13. Scattering Of Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P; Roth, R

    2009-12-15

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches.We present a new ab initio many-body approach which derives from the combination of the ab initio no-core shell model with the resonating-group method [4]. By complementing a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters, this approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. We will discuss applications to neutron and proton scattering on sand light p-shell nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and outline the progress toward the treatment of more complex reactions.

  14. Universal statistics of the scattering coefficient of chaotic microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Antonsen, Thomas M. Jr.; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M.

    2005-05-01

    We consider the statistics of the scattering coefficient S of a chaotic microwave cavity coupled to a single port. We remove the nonuniversal effects of the coupling from the experimental S data using the radiation impedance obtained directly from the experiments. We thus obtain the normalized scattering coefficient whose probability density function (PDF) is predicted to be universal in that it depends only on the loss (quality factor) of the cavity. We compare experimental PDFs of the normalized scattering coefficients with those obtained from random matrix theory (RMT), and find excellent agreement. The results apply to scattering measurements on any wave chaotic system.

  15. FEFF5: An ab initio multiple scattering XAFS code

    SciTech Connect

    Rehr, J.J.; Zabinsky, S.I.

    1992-12-31

    FEFF5 is an efficient automated code which calculates multiple scattering (MS) curved wave XAFS spectra for molecules and solids. The theoretical ingredients and approximations contained in the code are revised, with the aim of describing the how XAFS spectra are efficiently simulated. The FEFF5 code consists of 4 independent modules: a scattering potential and phase shift module, a path finder module, a scattering amplitude module and an XAFS module. Multiple scattering Debye-Waller factors are built in using a correlated Debye model.

  16. Recurrence relations of Kummer functions and Regge string scattering amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jen-Chi; Mitsuka, Yoshihiro

    2013-04-01

    We discover an infinite number of recurrence relations among Regge string scattering amplitudes [11, 30] of different string states at arbitrary mass levels in the open bosonic string theory. As a result, all Regge string scattering amplitudes can be algebraically solved up to multiplicative factors. Instead of decoupling zero-norm states in the fixed angle regime, the calculation is based on recurrence relations and addition theorem of Kummer functions of the second kind. These recurrence relations among Regge string scattering amplitudes are dual to linear relations or symmetries among high-energy fixed angle string scattering amplitudes discovered previously.

  17. Universal statistics of the scattering coefficient of chaotic microwave cavities.

    PubMed

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Anlage, Steven M

    2005-05-01

    We consider the statistics of the scattering coefficient S of a chaotic microwave cavity coupled to a single port. We remove the nonuniversal effects of the coupling from the experimental S data using the radiation impedance obtained directly from the experiments. We thus obtain the normalized scattering coefficient whose probability density function (PDF) is predicted to be universal in that it depends only on the loss (quality factor) of the cavity. We compare experimental PDFs of the normalized scattering coefficients with those obtained from random matrix theory (RMT), and find excellent agreement. The results apply to scattering measurements on any wave chaotic system.

  18. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Cho, Seungryong; Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: A beam-blocker composed of multiple strips is a useful gadget for scatter correction and/or for dose reduction in cone-beam CT (CBCT). However, the use of such a beam-blocker would yield cone-beam data that can be challenging for accurate image reconstruction from a single scan in the filtered-backprojection framework. The focus of the work was to develop an analytic image reconstruction method for CBCT that can be directly applied to partially blocked cone-beam data in conjunction with the scatter correction. Methods: The authors developed a rebinned backprojection-filteration (BPF) algorithm for reconstructing images from the partially blocked cone-beam data in a circular scan. The authors also proposed a beam-blocking geometry considering data redundancy such that an efficient scatter estimate can be acquired and sufficient data for BPF image reconstruction can be secured at the same time from a single scan without using any blocker motion. Additionally, scatter correction method and noise reduction scheme have been developed. The authors have performed both simulation and experimental studies to validate the rebinned BPF algorithm for image reconstruction from partially blocked cone-beam data. Quantitative evaluations of the reconstructed image quality were performed in the experimental studies. Results: The simulation study revealed that the developed reconstruction algorithm successfully reconstructs the images from the partial cone-beam data. In the experimental study, the proposed method effectively corrected for the scatter in each projection and reconstructed scatter-corrected images from a single scan. Reduction of cupping artifacts and an enhancement of the image contrast have been demonstrated. The image contrast has increased by a factor of about 2, and the image accuracy in terms of root-mean-square-error with respect to the fan-beam CT image has increased by more than 30%. Conclusions: The authors have successfully demonstrated that the

  19. Dropped-head in recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, Matteo; Pennisi, Elena Maria; Bruttini, Mirella; Bizzarri, Veronica; Bucci, Elisabetta; Morino, Stefania; Talerico, Caterina; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Renieri, Alessandra; Antonini, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented a dropped head, caused by severe neck extensor weakness that had started two years before. She had also developed a mild degree of dysphagia, rhinolalia, eyelid ptosis and proximal limb weakness during the last months. EMG revealed myopathic changes. Muscle MRI detected fatty infiltration in the posterior neck muscles and tongue. Muscle biopsy revealed fiber size variations, sporadic rimmed vacuoles, small scattered angulated fibers and a patchy myofibrillar network. Genetic analysis revealed homozygous (GCN)11 expansions in the PABPN1 gene that were consistent with recessive oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). There are a few reports of the recessive form, which has a later disease onset with milder symptoms and higher clinical variability than the typical dominantly inherited form. This patient, who is the first Italian and the eighth worldwide reported case of recessive OPMD, is also the first case of OPMD with dropped-head syndrome, which thus expands the clinical phenotype of recessive OPMD.

  20. Ghost Head Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth.

    The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas.

    NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000.

    The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas.

    In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center

  1. Head Pose Estimation Using Multilinear Subspace Analysis for Robot Human Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Tonislav; Matthies, Larry; Vasilescu, M. Alex O.

    2009-01-01

    Mobile robots, operating in unconstrained indoor and outdoor environments, would benefit in many ways from perception of the human awareness around them. Knowledge of people's head pose and gaze directions would enable the robot to deduce which people are aware of the its presence, and to predict future motions of the people for better path planning. To make such inferences, requires estimating head pose on facial images that are combination of multiple varying factors, such as identity, appearance, head pose, and illumination. By applying multilinear algebra, the algebra of higher-order tensors, we can separate these factors and estimate head pose regardless of subject's identity or image conditions. Furthermore, we can automatically handle uncertainty in the size of the face and its location. We demonstrate a pipeline of on-the-move detection of pedestrians with a robot stereo vision system, segmentation of the head, and head pose estimation in cluttered urban street scenes.

  2. THE IMPACT OF CONCURRENT GRANULOCYTE MACROPHAGE-COLONY STIMULATING FACTOR ON QUALITY OF LIFE IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER PATIENTS: RESULTS OF THE RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO-CONTROLED RADIATION THERAPY ONCOLOGY GROUP 9901 TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Stephanie; James, Jennifer L.; Scarantino, Charles; Movsas, Benjamin; Valicenti, Richard K.; Fortin, Andre; Pollock, JonDavid; Kim, Harold; Brachman, David G.; Berk, Lawrence B.; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled, trial evaluating the efficacy of GM-CSF in reducing mucosal injury and symptom burden from curative radiotherapy for head-and-neck (H&N) cancer. Methods Eligible patients with H&N cancer receiving radiation encompassing ≥ 50% of the oral cavity or oropharynx received subcutaneous GM-CSF or placebo. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed using the RTOG modified University of Washington H&N symptom questionnaire at baseline, 4, 13, 26 and 48 weeks from radiation initiation. Results Of 125 eligible patients, 114 were evaluable for QoL (58 GM-CSF, 56 placebo). Patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and baseline symptom scores were well balanced between the treatment arms. At the end of the acute period (13 weeks) patients in both arms reported negative change in total symptom score indicating increase in symptom burden relative to baseline (mean −18.4 GM-CSF, −20.8 placebo). There was no difference in change in total symptom score (p>0.05) or change in mucous, pain, eating, or activity domain scores (p>0.01) between patients in the GM-CSF and placebo arms. Analysis limited to patients treated per protocol or with an acceptable protocol deviation also found no difference in change in total symptom score (p>0.05) or change in domain scores (p>0.01) between treatment arms. Provider assessment of acute mucositis during treatment did not correlate with patient-reported mucous domain and total symptom scores (p>0.05) Conclusion GM-CSF administered concurrently during head-and-neck radiation does not appear to significantly improve patient-reported QoL symptom burden. PMID:24492945

  3. Spatially resolved scattering polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Kohlgraf-Owens, Thomas; Dogariu, Aristide

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate a compact, spatially resolved polarimeter based on a coherent optical fiber bundle coupled with a thin layer of scattering centers. The use of scattering for polarization encoding allows the polarimeter to work across broad angular and spectral domains. Optical fiber bundles provide high spatial resolution of the incident field. Because neighboring elements of the bundle interact with the incident field differently, only a single interaction of the fiber bundle with the unknown field is needed to perform the measurement. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate the capability to perform imaging polarimetry. PMID:19412259

  4. Raman scattering studies of pollutant systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwiesow, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Results and techniques for laboratory measurements of Raman scattering cross sections and depolarization ratios of atmospheric gases as a function of the incident photon energy are discussed. Referred to N2, the cross section of H2O changes by a factor of 2 as the incident photon energy is changed by 5%. Less striking results are obtained for SO2, NO and other atmospheric gases. Tentative results are given for spectral features of scattering from polluted air-water interfaces. Raman lidar is assessed as a potentially useful aid in remote sensing of atmospheric and water-borne pollution distributions at least in near-source concentrations.

  5. Quantum Chromodynamics and Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. Keith

    2016-10-01

    This article first describes the parton model which was the precursor of the QCD description of hard scattering processes. After the discovery of QCD and asymptotic freedom, the first successful applications were to Deep Inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The subsequent application of QCD to processes with two initial state hadrons required the understanding and proof of factorization. To take the fledgling theory and turn it into the robust calculational engine it has become today, required a number of technical and conceptual developments which will be described. Prospects for higher loop calculations are also reviewed.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron scattering instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    A library of Monte Carlo subroutines has been developed for the purpose of design of neutron scattering instruments. Using small-angle scattering as an example, the philosophy and structure of the library are described and the programs are used to compare instruments at continuous wave (CW) and long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) neutron facilities. The Monte Carlo results give a count-rate gain of a factor between 2 and 4 using time-of-flight analysis. This is comparable to scaling arguments based on the ratio of wavelength bandwidth to resolution width.

  7. Scattering from polymer networks under elongational strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaneborg, C.; Grest, G. S.; Everaers, R.

    2005-12-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations are used to sample the single-chain form factor of labelled sub-chains in model polymer networks under elongational strain. We observe very similar results for randomly cross-linked and for randomly end-linked networks with the same average strand length and see no indication of lozenge-like scattering patterns reported for some experimental systems. Our data analysis shows that a recent variant of the tube model quantitatively describes scattering in the Guinier regime as well as the macroscopic elastic properties. The observed failure of the theory outside the Guinier regime is shown to be due to non-Gaussian pair-distance distributions.

  8. Scattering from polymer networks under elongational strain.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Svaneborg, Carsten; Everaers, Ralf

    2005-06-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations are used to sample the single-chain form factor of labelled sub-chains in model polymer networks under elongational strain. We observe very similar results for randomly cross-linked and for randomly end-linked networks with the same average strand length and see no indication of lozenge-like scattering patterns reported for some experimental systems. Our data analysis shows that a recent variant of the tube model quantitatively describes scattering in the Guinier regime as well as the macroscopic elastic properties. The observed failure of the theory outside the Guinier regime is shown to be due to non-Gaussian pair-distance distributions.

  9. Rainbow-enhanced forward and backward glory scattering.

    PubMed

    Langley, D S; Morrell, M J

    1991-08-20

    When the refractive index m of a sphere is such that rainbows occur in the forward or backward direction, the glory scattering becomes exceptionally strong. A number of these refractive-index values have been determined from the geometry of ray paths. A physical-optics model of the scattering leads to an a(2)x(4/3) dependence in the scattered irradiance, where a is the radius of the sphere, and x = ka is the size parameter. Normal glory scattering gives an irradiance proportional to x. Mie theory computations illustrate the presence of rainbow glories at predicted m values and the x(4/3) irradiance factor. As in normal glory scattering, the rainbow-enhanced glory light contains a strong cross-polarized component. Experiments using single glass spheres immersed in liquids show the predicted cross-polarized scattering with a sensitive dependence on m. PMID:20706411

  10. [Illustrations of visceral referred pain. "Head-less" Head's zones].

    PubMed

    Henke, C; Beissner, F

    2011-04-01

    Reviewing anatomical, physiological and neurological standard literature for illustrations of referred visceral pain only one type of illustration can frequently be found, which is referred to as Treves and Keith. In fact, the original illustration as a model for most current pictures stems from the German edition of Sir Frederick Treves' famous book "Surgical Applied Anatomy" from 1914, which was reillustrated for didactical reasons for the German readership. While neither Treves and Keith nor the German illustrator Otto Kleinschmidt ever published any work on referred pain this illustration must have been adapted or copied from older sources by the illustrator. Therefore the comprehensive systematic original works before 1914 were reviewed, namely those of Sir Henry Head and Sir James Mackenzie. Due to the name of the phenomenon in the German literature of Head's zones, the illustrations were expected to be based mainly on Head's work. However, a comparison of all available illustrations led to the conclusion that Kleinschmidt chiefly used information from Mackenzie as a model for his illustration. Due to the inexact reproduction of Mackenzie's work by the illustrator some important features were lost that had been reported by the original authors. These include the phenomenon of Head's maximum points, which nowadays has fallen into oblivion.Therefore current charts, based on the illustration by Kleinschmidt from 1914, lack experimental evidence and appear to be a simplification of the observational results of both Head's and Mackenzie's original systematic works.

  11. Pion-pion scattering amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Pelaez, J.R.; Yndurain, F.J.

    2005-04-01

    We obtain reliable {pi}{pi} scattering amplitudes consistent with experimental data, both at low and high energies, and fulfilling appropriate analyticity properties. We do this by first fitting experimental low energy (s{sup 1/2}{<=}1.42 GeV) phase shifts and inelasticities with expressions that incorporate analyticity and unitarity. In particular, for the S wave with isospin 0, we discuss in detail several sets of experimental data. This provides low energy partial wave amplitudes that summarize the known experimental information. Then, we impose Regge behavior as follows from factorization and experimental data for the imaginary parts of the scattering amplitudes at higher energy, and check fulfillment of dispersion relations up to 0.925 GeV. This allows us to improve our fits. The ensuing {pi}{pi} scattering amplitudes are then shown to verify dispersion relations up to 1.42 GeV, as well as s-t-u crossing sum rules and other consistency conditions. The improved parametrizations therefore provide a reliable representation of pion-pion amplitudes with which one can test chiral perturbation theory calculations, pionium decays, or use as input for CP-violating K decays. In this respect, we find [a{sub 0}{sup (0)}-a{sub 0}{sup (2)}]{sup 2}=(0.077{+-}0.008)M{sub {pi}}{sup -2} and {delta}{sub 0}{sup (0)}(m{sub K}{sup 2})-{delta}{sub 0}{sup (2)}(m{sub K}{sup 2})=52.9{+-}1.6{sup o}.

  12. The effects of compensator design on scatter distribution and magnitude: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bootsma, G. J.; Verhaegen, F.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2011-03-01

    X-ray scatter has a significant impact on image quality in kV cone-beam CT (CBCT), its effects include: CT number inaccuracy, streak and cupping artifacts, and loss of contrast. Compensators provide a method for not only decreasing the magnitude of the scatter distribution, but also reducing the structure found in the scatter distribution. Recent Monte Carlo (MC) simulations examining X-ray scatter in CBCT projection images have shown that the scatter distribution in x-ray imaging contains structure largely induced by coherent scattering. In order to maximize the reduction of x-ray scatter induced artifacts a decrease in the magnitude and structure of the scatter distribution is sought through optimal compensator design. A flexible MC model that allows for separation of scattered and primary photons has been created to simulate the CBCT imaging process. The CBCT MC model is used to investigate the effectiveness of compensators in decreasing the magnitude and structure of the scatter distribution in CBCT projection images. The influence of the compensator designs on the scatter distribution are evaluated for different anatomy (abdomen, pelvis, and head and neck) and viewing angles using a voxelized anthropomorphic phantom. The effect of compensator material composition on the amount of contamination photons in an open field is also investigated.

  13. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... protected by protective helmets. (b) Criteria for head protection. (1) The employer must provide...

  14. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  15. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  16. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... Institute, Z89.1-1969, Safety Requirements for Industrial Head Protection. (c) Helmets for the...

  18. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  19. 29 CFR 1917.93 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Head protection. 1917.93 Section 1917.93 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Personal Protection § 1917.93 Head protection. (a) The employer shall ensure that each... the head from falling objects. (b)(1) The employer must ensure that head protection complies with...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.100 - Head protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Head protection. 1926.100 Section 1926.100 Labor... § 1926.100 Head protection. (a) Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head... Institute, Z89.1-1969, Safety Requirements for Industrial Head Protection. (c) Helmets for the...