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Sample records for head semiconductor compton

  1. Optimisation of a dual head semiconductor Compton camera using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, L. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cooper, R. J.; Cresswell, J. R.; Grint, A. N.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Scraggs, D. P.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lazarus, I.

    2009-06-01

    Conventional medical gamma-ray camera systems utilise mechanical collimation to provide information on the position of an incident gamma-ray photon. Systems that use electronic collimation utilising Compton image reconstruction techniques have the potential to offer huge improvements in sensitivity. Position sensitive high purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems are being evaluated as part of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) Compton camera system. Data have been acquired from the orthogonally segmented planar SmartPET detectors, operated in Compton camera mode. The minimum gamma-ray energy which can be imaged by the current system in Compton camera configuration is 244 keV due to the 20 mm thickness of the first scatter detector which causes large gamma-ray absorption. A simulation package for the optimisation of a new semiconductor Compton camera has been developed using the Geant4 toolkit. This paper will show results of preliminary analysis of the validated Geant4 simulation for gamma-ray energies of SPECT, 141 keV.

  2. Semiconductor detectors for Compton imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, LJ; Judson, D. S.; Kennedy, H.; Sweeney, A.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Nolan, P. J.; Sampson, J. A.; Burrows, I.; Groves, J.; Headspith, J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Simpson, J.; Bimson, W. E.; Kemp, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    An investigation is underway at the University of Liverpool to assess the suitability of two position sensitive semiconductor detectors as components of a Compton camera for nuclear medical imaging. The ProSPECTus project aims to improve image quality, provide shorter data acquisition times and lower patient doses by replacing conventional Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) systems. These mechanically collimated systems are employed to locate a radioactive tracer that has been administered to a patient to study specifically targeted physiological processes. The ProSPECTus system will be composed of a Si(Li) detector and a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector, a configuration deemed optimum using a validated Geant4 simulation package. Characterising the response of the detectors to gamma irradiation is essential in maximising the sensitivity and image resolution of the system. To this end, the performance of the HPGe ProSPECTus detector and a suitable Si(Li) detector has been assessed at the University of Liverpool. The energy resolution of the detectors has been measured and a surface scan of the Si(Li) detector has been performed using a finely collimated 241Am gamma ray source. Results from the investigation will be presented.

  3. Using triple gamma coincidences with a pixelated semiconductor Compton-PET scanner: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project presents a novel design using pixelated semiconductor detectors for nuclear medicine applications to achieve the intrinsic image quality limits set by physics. The conceptual design can be extended to a Compton gamma camera. The use of a pixelated CdTe detector with voxel sizes of 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 guarantees optimal energy and spatial resolution. However, the limited time resolution of semiconductor detectors makes it impossible to use Time Of Flight (TOF) with VIP PET. TOF is used in order to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using only the most probable portion of the Line-Of-Response (LOR) instead of its entire length. To overcome the limitation of CdTe time resolution, we present in this article a simulation study using β+-γ emitting isotopes with a Compton-PET scanner. When the β+ annihilates with an electron it produces two gammas which produce a LOR in the PET scanner, while the additional gamma, when scattered in the scatter detector, provides a Compton cone that intersects with the aforementioned LOR. The intersection indicates, within a few mm of uncertainty along the LOR, the origin of the beta-gamma decay. Hence, one can limit the part of the LOR used by the image reconstruction algorithm.

  4. Compton imaging with a planar semiconductor system using pulse shape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Anthony; Boston, Andrew J.; Boston, Helen C.; Cresswell, John P.; Dormand, Jamie; Ellis, Mark; Harkness, Laura J.; Jones, Martin; Judson, Daniel S.; Nolan, Paul J.; Oxley, David C.; Scraggs, David P.; Slee, Mike J.; Thandi, Amandeep

    2011-05-01

    Homeland security agencies have a requirement to locate and identify nuclear material. Compton cameras [1, 2] offer a more efficient method of gamma-ray detection than collimated detector systems. The resolution of the interaction positions within the detectors greatly influences the accuracy of a reconstructed Compton image. Utilizing digital electronics and applying pulse shape analysis [3] allows the spatial resolution to be enhanced beyond the pixel granularity in three dimensions. Analytically reconstructed Compton images from a range of radiation sources shall be presented with and without pulse shape analysis showing the improvements gained along with a discussion of our analysis methods.

  5. Recent Results From a Si/CdTe Semiconductor Compton Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Watanabe, S.; Takeda, S.; Oonuki, K.; Mitani, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Takashima, T.; Takahashi, T.; Tajima, H.; Sawamoto, N.; Fukazawa, Y.; Nomachi, M.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2007-01-23

    We are developing a Compton telescope based on high resolution Si and CdTe detectors for astrophysical observations in sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray region. Recently, we constructed a prototype Compton telescope which consists of six layers of double-sided Si strip detectors and CdTe pixel detectors to demonstrate the basic performance of this new technology. By irradiating the detector with gamma-rays from radio isotope sources, we have succeeded in Compton reconstruction of images and spectra. The obtained angular resolution is 3.9{sup o} (FWHM) at 511 keV, and the energy resolution is 14 keV (FWHM) at the same energy. In addition to the conventional Compton reconstruction, i.e., drawing cones in the sky, we also demonstrated a full reconstruction by tracking Compton recoil electrons using the signals detected in successive Si layers. By irradiating {sup 137}Cs source, we successfully obtained an image and a spectrum of 662 keV line emission with this method. As a next step, development of larger double-sided Si strip detectors with a size of 4 cm x 4 cm is underway to improve the effective area of the Compton telescope. We are also developing a new low-noise analog ASIC to handle the increasing number of channels. Initial results from these two new technologies are presented in this paper as well.

  6. Driver linac design for a femtosecond head-on inverse Compton scatteringX-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, N. Y.; Lau, W. K.; Liang, C. C.; Lee, A. P.; Cheng, W. C.; Yang, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    The feasibility of generating an ultra-short relativistic electron beam with a thermionic cathode rf gun driver linac for a femtosecond head-on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) X-ray source has been examined by space charge tracking throughout the entire beamline, from the cathode to the interaction point. It has been determined that GHz-repetition-rate electron pulses as short as 49 fs can be produced by compressing the energy-chirped beam from a 2998-MHz, 1.5-cell rf gun with an alpha magnet and an rf linac operating at the injection phase near the zero crossing. These electron pulses, with a 42-pC bunch charge, are accelerated to 27 MeV with an S-band traveling-wave constant-gradient linac structure for the ICS in an interaction chamber located downstream. The driver linac design that allows the operation of an ultra-short ICS X-ray source at a 0.7-Å wavelength, with a peak photon flux of 9.08×1017 photons/s, is presented in this paper.

  7. Effect of position resolution on LoR discrimination for a dual-head Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillam, John E.; Beveridge, Toby E.; Boston, Andrew J.; Boston, Helen C.; Cooper, Reynold J.; Hall, Chris J.; Mather, Andrew R.; Nolan, Paul J.; Lewis, Rob A.

    2007-04-01

    With the current increase in effective germanium semiconductor detection technology, a positron emission tomography system comprising two opposing HPGe detectors is under development. This type of detection offers not only improvement to some aspects of PET, but also the ability to record single-photon information in the detection process. This information can be used in stand-alone imaging, and also as an additional information source in the PET process. Discrimination based on this single-photon information was proposed; however, the effectiveness of this discrimination is dependent on the resolution of the single-photon information. Simulations of the detection system, in which the positional resolution of the interaction information is variable, was conducted. The single-photon information has then been used in the PET imaging process and its effect on image improvement shown. Much like mechanical collimation, electronic collimation may be used to remove false LoRs from an image, at the expense of efficiency. Moreover, unlike mechanical collimation, this trade off may be dynamically adjusted post data acquisition.

  8. The first demonstration of the concept of "narrow-FOV Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinohe, Yuto; Uchida, Yuusuke; Watanabe, Shin; Edahiro, Ikumi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kawano, Takafumi; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Takeda, Shin`ichiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Katsuragawa, Miho; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD), to be deployed on board the ASTRO-H satellite, has been developed to provide the highest sensitivity observations of celestial sources in the energy band of 60-600 keV by employing a detector concept which uses a Compton camera whose field-of-view is restricted by a BGO shield to a few degree (narrow-FOV Compton camera). In this concept, the background from outside the FOV can be heavily suppressed by constraining the incident direction of the gamma ray reconstructed by the Compton camera to be consistent with the narrow FOV. We, for the first time, demonstrate the validity of the concept using background data taken during the thermal vacuum test and the low-temperature environment test of the flight model of SGD on ground. We show that the measured background level is suppressed to less than 10% by combining the event rejection using the anti-coincidence trigger of the active BGO shield and by using Compton event reconstruction techniques. More than 75% of the signals from the field-of-view are retained against the background rejection, which clearly demonstrates the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. The estimated effective area of 22.8 cm2 meets the mission requirement even though not all of the operational parameters of the instrument have been fully optimized yet.

  9. Crystal Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Braverman, Joshua B.; Harrison, Mark J.; Hornback, Donald Eric; Fabris, Lorenzo; Newby, Jason

    2013-09-26

    Stand-off detection is one of the most important radiation detection capabilities for arms control and the control of illicit nuclear materials. For long range passive detection one requires a large detector and a means of “seeing through” the naturally occurring and varying background radiation, i.e. imaging. Arguably, Compton imaging is the best approach over much of the emission band suitable for long range detection. It provides not only imaging, but more information about the direction of incidence of each detected gamma-ray than the alternate approach of coded-aperture imaging. The directional information allows one to reduce the background and hence improve the sensitivity of a measurement. However, to make an efficient Compton imager requires localizing and measuring the simultaneous energy depositions when gamma-rays Compton scatter and are subsequently captured within a single, large detector volume. This concept has been demonstrated in semi-conductor detectors (HPGe, CZT, Si) but at ~ $1k/cm3 these materials are too expensive to build the large systems needed for standoff detection. Scintillator detectors, such as NaI(Tl), are two orders of magnitude less expensive and possess the energy resolution required to make such an imager. However, they do not currently have the ability to localize closely spaced, simultaneous energy depositions in a single large crystal. In this project we are applying a new technique that should, for the first time ever, allow cubic-millimeter event localization in a bulk scintillator crystal.

  10. 90° Compton and Rayleigh measurements and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, R.; Balogun, F.; Brunetti, A.; Cappio Borlino, C.

    2001-06-01

    A simple apparatus for measurement and imaging of objects using scattered X-rays was designed and constructed. This is composed of a well-collimated photon beam from an X-ray tube, a CZT thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detector and an ( x, y, ϑ) translation-rotation table containing the object to be studied. First, the output beam was monochromatized; studies on Compton and Rayleigh scattered radiation were then carried out, including the Compton profile. Then direct bremsstrahlung radiation of proper energy was employed, and energy intervals are selected where Rayleigh or Compton effects largely prevail. Compton images were finally obtained.

  11. Compton tomography system

    DOEpatents

    Grubsky, Victor; Romanoov, Volodymyr; Shoemaker, Keith; Patton, Edward Matthew; Jannson, Tomasz

    2016-02-02

    A Compton tomography system comprises an x-ray source configured to produce a planar x-ray beam. The beam irradiates a slice of an object to be imaged, producing Compton-scattered x-rays. The Compton-scattered x-rays are imaged by an x-ray camera. Translation of the object with respect to the source and camera or vice versa allows three-dimensional object imaging.

  12. Bin mode estimation methods for Compton camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Odaka, H.; Uemura, M.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.; Takeda, S.

    2014-10-01

    We study the image reconstruction problem of a Compton camera which consists of semiconductor detectors. The image reconstruction is formulated as a statistical estimation problem. We employ a bin-mode estimation (BME) and extend an existing framework to a Compton camera with multiple scatterers and absorbers. Two estimation algorithms are proposed: an accelerated EM algorithm for the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and a modified EM algorithm for the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. Numerical simulations demonstrate the potential of the proposed methods.

  13. Compton coincidence volumetric imaging: a new x-ray volumetric imaging modality based on Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochao

    2014-03-01

    Compton scattering is a dominant interaction during radiography and computed tomography x-ray imaging. However, the scattered photons are not used for extracting imaging information, but seriously degrade image quality. Here we introduce a new scheme that overcomes most of the problems associated with existing Compton scattering imaging schemes and allows Compton scattered photons to be effectively used for imaging. In our scheme, referred as Compton coincidence volumetric imaging (CCVI), a collimated monoenergetic x-ray beam is directed onto a thin semiconductor detector. A small portion of the photons is Compton scattered by the detector and their energy loss is detected. Some of the scattered photons intersect the imaging object, where they are Compton scattered a second time. The finally scattered photons are recorded by an areal energy resolving detector panel around the object. The two detectors work in coincidence mode. CCVI images the spatial electron density distribution in the imaging object. Similar to PET imaging, the event location can be located within a curve; therefore the imaging reconstruction algorithms are also similar to those of PET. Two statistical iterative imaging reconstruction algorithms are tested. Our study verifies the feasibility of CCVI in imaging acquisition and reconstruction. Various aspects of CCVI are discussed. If successfully implemented, it will offer a great potential for imaging dose reduction compared with x-ray CT. Furthermore, a CCVI modality will have no moving parts, which potentially offers cost reduction and faster imaging speed.

  14. Simulation for CZT Compton PET (Maximization of the efficiency for PET using Compton event)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-10-01

    Multiple interactions in positron emission tomography (PET) using scintillators are generally treated as noise events because each interacted position and energy of the multiple interactions cannot be obtained individually and the sequence of multiple scattering is not fully known. Therefore, the first interaction position, which is the crucial information for a PET image reconstruction, cannot be determined correctly. However, in the case of a pixelized semiconductor detector, such as CdZnTe, each specific position and energy information of multiple interactions can be obtained. Moreover, for the emission of two 511 keV radiations in PET, if one radiation deposits all the energy in one position (photoelectric effect) and the other radiation undergoes Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect, the sequence of Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect can be determined using the Compton scattering formula. Hence, the correct position of Compton scattering can be determined, and the Compton scattering effect, which is discarded in conventional PET systems can be recovered in the new system reported in this study. The PET system in this study, which was simulated using GATE 5.0 code, was composed of 20 mm×10 mm×10 mm CdZnTe detectors consisting of 1 mm×0.5 mm×2.5 mm pixels. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening, pixelization effect and energy broadening were estimated and compared. The pixelized effect was the main factor in increasing the angular uncertainty and was strongly dependent on the distance between the 1st and 2nd interaction positions. The effect of energy broadening to an angular resolution less than expected and that of Doppler broadening was minimal. The number of Compton events was double that of the photoelectric effect assuming full energy absorption. Therefore, the detection efficiency of this new PET system can be improved greatly because both the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are

  15. Results of a Si/Cdte Compton Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Oonuki, Kousuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Takefumi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nomachi, Masaharu; /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2005-09-23

    We have been developing a semiconductor Compton telescope to explore the universe in the energy band from several tens of keV to a few MeV. We use a Si strip and CdTe pixel detector for the Compton telescope to cover an energy range from 60 keV. For energies above several hundred keV, the higher efficiency of CdTe semiconductor in comparison with Si is expected to play an important role as an absorber and a scatterer. In order to demonstrate the spectral and imaging capability of a CdTe-based Compton Telescope, we have developed a Compton telescope consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors as a small scale prototype. With this prototype, we succeeded in reconstructing images and spectra by solving the Compton equation from 122 keV to 662 keV. The energy resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed spectra is 7.3 keV at 511 keV and 3.1 keV at 122 keV, respectively. The angular resolution obtained at 511 keV is measured to be 12.2{sup o}(FWHM).

  16. Timelike Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Horn, Tanja; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel

    2015-04-01

    Deeply Virtual Comtpon Scattering (DVCS) is deemed the simplest and cleanest way to access the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) of the nucleon. The DVCS process interferes with the Bethe-Heitler process allowing one to access the DVCS amplitudes. The imaginary part of the Compton amplitude is now relatively well understood, primarily through measurements of DVCS. However, much less is known about the real part of the amplitude. Time-like Compton Scattering (TCS) is the inverse process of DVCS and provides a new and promising way for probing the real part of the amplitude, and so constraining GPDs. Comparing data from Time-like Compton Scattering and the space-like DVCS process will also allow for testing the universality of GPDs. First studies of TCS using real tagged and quasi-real untagged photons were carried out at Jefferson Lab 6 GeV. In this talk, preliminary results on asymmetries and extraction of the real part of the CFF using photoproduction data and a comparison to electroproduction data will be presented. We will also discuss future plans for dilepton production at Jefferson Lab 12 GeV. Supported in part by NSF Grant PHY-1306227.

  17. A Compton profile representation for some second period elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Geoffrey; Olesinski, Stephan

    2011-09-01

    Compton profiles for the elements C, N and O, which are important both in medical science and security screening, are represented here as weighted sums of three Gaussians. Simple scaling relationships describe the dependence on atomic number ( Z) of the amplitudes and standard deviations of the component Gaussians, which are identified with the Compton profiles of the 1s, 2s and 2p orbitals. This representation of the Compton profile agrees with tabulated values for C, N and O to a rms deviation of the order of 1% of the mean profile amplitude over the momentum range 0≤ q≤4, where q is expressed in units of the hydrogen ground state momentum. This representation allows a "mean atomic number" for mixtures and compounds dominated by second period elements to be assigned on the basis of experimental measurements of the Doppler broadening of back-scattered X-ray K characteristic lines. Processed spectra of water and ethanol from a Compton spectrometer equipped with a room-temperature semiconductor detector are compared with the Compton profiles synthesized as suggested here, and a satisfactory agreement between the measured and theoretical mean atomic numbers and the profile shapes is found.

  18. Compton Polarization with Nustar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta

    In this study we assess the NuSTAR capabilities to detect polarized signals in the Compton regime, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison with observational data. Both NuSTAR focal plane detectors are equipped with high resolution pixilated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range 2.5-80 keV. These units have intrinsic polarization capabilities due to their high quality factor, very low background and scattering angles of ~90°, which is ideal for incident photon energies below 100 keV. However the sensitivity is limited by the very low efficiency of the CZT for Compton interactions and by intrinsic readout systematics, such as charge sharing between pixels. An additional source of degradation is the incompleteness of double events information in the science telemetry. We estimated the Minimum Detectable Polarization of cosmic sources as a function of intensity, and the results obtained were validated through the comparison with the first actual data from the Crab Nebula and Cygnus X-1. We also evaluated the count rate and the background expected for polarization measurements, comparing our estimates with the data measured in flight. Our simulations reproduce well the actual NuSTAR data, showing that the focal plane detectors should be able to detect polarization from highly polarized sources like the Crab and other potential bright sources, dominated by synchrotron and/or SSC emission. The background for polarization measurements was found to be negligible.

  19. Compton polarimetry revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, D.

    2015-11-01

    We compute the average polarisation asymmetry from the Klein-Nishina differential cross-section on free electrons at rest. As expected from the expression for the asymmetry, the average asymmetry is found to decrease like the inverse of the incident photon energy asymptotically at high energy. We then compute a simple estimator of the polarisation fraction that makes optimal use of all the kinematic information present in an event final state, by the use of "moments" method, and we compare its statistical power to that of a simple fit of the azimuthal distribution. In contrast to polarimetry with pair creation, for which we obtained an improvement by a factor of larger than two in a previous work, here for Compton scattering the improvement is only of 10-20%.

  20. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  1. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  2. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  3. Improvements to a Compton Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavness, Brandon; Gaskell, Dave; Dalton, Mark

    2011-10-01

    The Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Virginia, uses a polarized beam of electrons to perform research on the substructure of nuclei and nucleons. Jefferson Lab uses a relatively new Compton polarimeter to continuously measure the polarization of the electron beam delivered by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator. The Compton polarimeter determines beam polarization by colliding a high-power laser with the electron beam and measuring the scattered photons and electrons. The Compton polarimeter utilizes this asymmetry of Compton scattering rates to measure polarization to (+/-)1% every few hours. For an accurate measurement, the laser polarization and the position of the scattered photon cone must be well known. The focus of this project was to expand the instrumentation to monitor and control the Compton polarimeter with the intent of improving the electron beam polarization measurement. The individual components of the system are all working as intended, but the system as a whole will not be tested until beam operations resume. An improved measurement of the electron beam polarization will reduce the uncertainty of future experiments.

  4. The Compton Effect Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein, John

    2004-05-01

    In 1923 (Phil Mag. 46, 897.) A. H. Compton noted that the Compton effect produces a red shift for all wavelengths when the scattered electron is free and not bound to an atom or molecule. He suggested that the red shift in the visible spectrum at the limb of the sun is larger than that at the center due to the Compton effect from the greater number of free electrons in the sun's atmosphere along the line of sight. Kierein and Sharp (1968, Solar Physics 3, 450) quantified this and showed a good correlation of red shift observations with the variation in the number of these electrons along the line of sight from center to limb and suggested that the quasar red shift and cosmological red shift could be similarly explained. Grote Reber mapped and measured the background hectometric radiation and found it to be unexpectedly bright. In 1968 (J. Franklin Inst. 285,1), while describing these measurements and maps he explained this brightness as being due to the Compton effect causing the cosmological red shift and accelerating intergalactic electrons. The resulting universe is static. The predicted red shift from the Compton effect deviates from Hubble's law only at large red shifts.

  5. Compton scattering and generalized polarizabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.

    2005-05-06

    In recent years, real and virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon have attracted considerable interest from both the experimental and theoretical sides. Real Compton scattering gives access to the so-called electromagnetic polarizabilities containing the structure information beyond the global properties of the nucleon such as its charge, mass, and magnetic moment. These polarizabilities have an intuitive interpretation in terms of induced dipole moments and thus characterize the response of the constituents of the nucleon to a soft external stimulus. The virtual Compton scattering reaction e- p {yields} e- p{gamma} allows one to map out the local response to external fields and can be described in terms of generalized electromagnetic polarizabilities. A simple classical interpretation in terms of the induced electric and magnetic polarization densities is proposed. We will discuss experimental results for the polarizabilities of the proton and compare them with theoretical predictions.

  6. The Compton Observatory Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R. (Editor); Gehrels, Neil (Editor); Dennis, Brian (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The Compton Observatory Science Workshop was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23-25, 1991. The primary purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among scientists with interests in various areas of high energy astrophysics, with emphasis on the scientific capabilities of the Compton Observatory. Early scientific results, as well as reports on in-flight instrument performance and calibrations are presented. Guest investigator data products, analysis techniques, and associated software were discussed. Scientific topics covered included active galaxies, cosmic gamma ray bursts, solar physics, pulsars, novae, supernovae, galactic binary sources, and diffuse galactic and extragalactic emission.

  7. Timelike Compton Scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Paremuzyan, Rafayel G.

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated, that with exclusive final state, data from electron scattering experiments that are recorded with loose trigger requirements can be used to analyze photoproduction reactions. A preliminary results on Timelike Compton Scattering using the electroproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. In particular, using final state (pe{sup -}e{sup +}) photoproduction of vector mesons and timelike photon is studied. Angular asymmetries in Timelike Compton Scattering region is compared with model predictions in the framework of Generalized Parton Distribution.

  8. Semiconductor structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, Harold J. (Inventor); Woodall, Jerry M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A technique for fabricating a semiconductor heterostructure by growth of a ternary semiconductor on a binary semiconductor substrate from a melt of the ternary semiconductor containing less than saturation of at least one common ingredient of both the binary and ternary semiconductors wherein in a single temperature step the binary semiconductor substrate is etched, a p-n junction with specific device characteristics is produced in the binary semiconductor substrate by diffusion of a dopant from the melt and a region of the ternary semiconductor of precise conductivity type and thickness is grown by virtue of a change in the melt characteristics when the etched binary semiconductor enters the melt.

  9. First-Generation Hybrid Compact Compton Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M; Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Krings, T; Lange, D; Hull, E; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Protic, D; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-07

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are pursuing the development of a gamma-ray imaging system using the Compton effect. We have built our first generation hybrid Compton imaging system, and we have conducted initial calibration and image measurements using this system. In this paper, we present the details of the hybrid Compton imaging system and initial calibration and image measurements.

  10. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D.

    1994-06-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and the observing program of the first 2 years of the mission. Examples of early discoveries by Compton are enumerated, including the discovery that gamma-ray bursts are isotropic but spatially inhomogeneous in their distribution; the discovery of a new class of high-energy extragalacatic gamma-ray sources, the gamma-ray AGNs; the discovery of emission from SN 1987A in the nuclear line of Co-57; and the mapping of emission from Al-26 in the interstellar medium (ISM) near the Galactic center. Future observations will include deep surveys of selected regions of the sky, long-tem studies of individual objects, correlative studies of objects at gamma-ray and other energies, a Galactic plane survey at intermediate gamma-ray energies, and improved statistics on gamma-ray bursts to search for small anisotropies. After completion of the all-sky survey, a Guest Investigator program is in progress with guest observers' time share increasing from 30% upward for the late mission phases.

  11. A Compton camera for spectroscopic imaging from 100 keV to 1 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Earnhart, J.R.D.

    1998-12-31

    A review of spectroscopic imaging issues, applications, and technology is presented. Compton cameras based on solid state semiconductor detectors stands out as the best system for the nondestructive assay of special nuclear materials. A camera for this application has been designed based on an efficient specific purpose Monte Carlo code developed for this project. Preliminary experiments have been performed which demonstrate the validity of the Compton camera concept and the accuracy of the code. Based on these results, a portable prototype system is in development. Proposed future work is addressed.

  12. The Compton polarimeter for SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Fero, M.J.; The SLD Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    We report on the use of a Compton scattering based polarimeter to measure beam polarization near the e{sup +}e{sub -} interaction point at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). Measurement of the beam polarization to a statistical precision of {delta}P/P={plus_minus}3% requires approximately three minutes under normal conditions. An average beam polarization of 22.4{plus_minus}0.7%(syst.) was measured over the course of the 1992 polarized beam run.

  13. The Compton polarimeter for SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Fero, M.J. )

    1992-12-01

    We report on the use of a Compton scattering based polarimeter to measure beam polarization near the e[sup +]e[sub -] interaction point at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). Measurement of the beam polarization to a statistical precision of [delta]P/P=[plus minus]3% requires approximately three minutes under normal conditions. An average beam polarization of 22.4[plus minus]0.7%(syst.) was measured over the course of the 1992 polarized beam run.

  14. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  15. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  16. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  17. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  18. Synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchro-Compton theory to real compact radio sources, the question of a self-Compton origin of the X-rays in radio-loud quasars and active galactic nuclei, and the phenomenology of superluminal motion are discussed in a review of research concerning synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources. After examining the basic synchro-Compton theory of ideal sources, applications of the theory to real sources is discussed. It is concluded that the Compton problem and total energy requirements are not substantially mitigated by considering source structures more complicated than the multiple, uniform-component model used by most investigators. Also, alternatives to the standard model of superluminal motion are discussed, focusing on the assumptions usually made when interpreting superluminal sources.

  19. Inspection of reinforced concrete samples by Compton backscattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldo, E. M.; Appoloni, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Reinforced concrete structures require frequent monitoring to ensure the concrete quality during its service life and for evaluation of in situ existing conditions. Compton backscattering of gamma rays is a nondestructive technique used for material characterization and detection of defects and inclusions in materials and can be employed on reinforced concrete. The methodology allows one-sided inspection of large structures, is relatively inexpensive and can be portable. The concept is based on detection of backscattered radiation produced from a collimated beam aimed at the sample. By measuring the spectrum of these scattered gamma rays it is possible to determine local density perturbations. In this work we used the Compton backscattering technique to locate and measure steel, defects and crushed stone inside concrete. The samples were irradiated with gamma rays from a Ø2 mm diameter collimated 241Am (100 mCi) source and the inelastically scattered photons were recorded at an angle of 135° by a high resolution CdTe semiconductor detector. Scanning was achieved by lateral movement of the sample blocks across the source and detector field of view in steps of 1 mm. A previous optimization of the experimental setup was performed with Monte Carlo simulation. The results showed that it was possible to locate inclusions and defects with Ø8 mm positioned at a depth of 20 mm below the surface of the sample. It was observed that aggregates such as crushed stone could mask defects at specific points due to high attenuation of the incident and scattered beam.

  20. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  1. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than that of previous observations. The 16,000 kilogram observatory contains four instruments on a stabilized platform. The mission began normal operations on 16 May 1991 and is now over half-way through a full-sky survey. The mission duration is expected to be from six to ten years. A Science Support Center has been established at Goddard Space Flight Center for the purpose of supporting a vigorous Guest Investigator Program. New scientific results to date include: (1) the establishment of the isotropy, combined with spatial inhomogeneity, of the distribution of gamma-ray bursts in the sky; (2) the discovery of intense high energy (100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 3C 279 and other quasars and BL Lac objects, making these the most distant and luminous gamma-ray sources ever detected; (3) one of the first images of a gamma-ray burst; (4) the observation of intense nuclear and position-annihilation gamma-ray lines and neutrons from several large solar flares; and (5) the detection of a third gamma-ray pulsar, plus several other transient and pulsing hard X-ray sources.

  2. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory being released from the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-35 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered the Earth's atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, GRO's Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center, kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientist to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of star, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in BATSE's science program.

  3. Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This photograph shows the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO) being deployed by the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the STS-37 mission in April 1991. The GRO reentered Earth atmosphere and ended its successful mission in June 2000. For nearly 9 years, the GRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), designed and built by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), kept an unblinking watch on the universe to alert scientists to the invisible, mysterious gamma-ray bursts that had puzzled them for decades. By studying gamma-rays from objects like black holes, pulsars, quasars, neutron stars, and other exotic objects, scientists could discover clues to the birth, evolution, and death of stars, galaxies, and the universe. The gamma-ray instrument was one of four major science instruments aboard the Compton. It consisted of eight detectors, or modules, located at each corner of the rectangular satellite to simultaneously scan the entire universe for bursts of gamma-rays ranging in duration from fractions of a second to minutes. In January 1999, the instrument, via the Internet, cued a computer-controlled telescope at Las Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos, New Mexico, within 20 seconds of registering a burst. With this capability, the gamma-ray experiment came to serve as a gamma-ray burst alert for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and major gound-based observatories around the world. Thirty-seven universities, observatories, and NASA centers in 19 states, and 11 more institutions in Europe and Russia, participated in the BATSE science program.

  4. Hidden baryons: The physics of Compton composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Frederick J.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of the mass-energy of the Universe appears to be composed of Compton composites. How is it then that these composites are not frequently observed in experiments? This paper addresses this question, and others, by reviewing recent publications that: 1) introduced Compton composites, 2) showed how and where they are formed and 3) explained how they interact with other systems. Though ubiquitous in many physical situations, Compton composites are almost completely hidden in experiments due to their unique interaction characteristics. Still, their presence has been indirectly observed, though not interpreted as such until recently. Looking to the future, direct-detection experiments are proposed that could verify the composites' components. It is with deep sadness that I dedicate this paper to my mentor, collaborator, and friend, Dr. John R. Reitz, who passed away within days of the publication of our paper “Compton Composites Late in the Early Universe”.

  5. Neutron Compton scattering from selectively deuterated acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Fielding, A. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    With the aim of developing the application of neutron Compton scattering (NCS) to molecular systems of biophysical interest, we are using the Compton spectrometer EVS at ISIS to characterize the momentum distribution of protons in peptide groups. In this contribution we present NCS measurements of the recoil peak (Compton profile) due to the amide proton in otherwise fully deuterated acetanilide (ACN), a widely studied model system for H-bonding and energy transfer in biomolecules. We obtain values for the average width of the potential well of the amide proton and its mean kinetic energy. Deviations from the Gaussian form of the Compton profile, analyzed on the basis of an expansion due to Sears, provide data relating to the Laplacian of the proton potential.

  6. RELATIVISTIC ACCRETION MEDIATED BY TURBULENT COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle E-mail: socrates@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-08-10

    Black hole and neutron star accretion flows display unusually high levels of hard coronal emission in comparison to all other optically thick, gravitationally bound, turbulent astrophysical systems. Since these flows sit in deep relativistic gravitational potentials, their random bulk motions approach the speed of light, therefore allowing turbulent Comptonization to be an important effect. We show that the inevitable production of hard X-ray photons results from turbulent Comptonization in the limit where the turbulence is trans-sonic and the accretion power approaches the Eddington limit. In this regime, the turbulent Compton y-parameter approaches unity and the turbulent Compton temperature is a significant fraction of the electron rest mass energy, in agreement with the observed phenomena.

  7. Inverse compton effect: some consequences for quasars.

    PubMed

    Pfleiderer, J; Grewing, M

    1966-12-16

    The inverse Compton effect can transform enough energy of relativistic electrons into radiation so that an upper limit to the mean energy of the electrons is set. In quasars, the limit is too small to allow the production of any appreciable amount of synchrotron or inverse Compton radiation, unless either the distances are not cosmological or the lifetimes of the relativistic electrons are extremely short, of the order of hours.

  8. Compton scattering with low intensity radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Carroll

    2012-03-01

    Compton scattering experiments with gamma rays typically require a ``hot'' source (˜5mCi of Cs137) to observe the scattering as a function of angle. (See Ortec AN34 Experiment #10 Compton Scattering) Here a way is described to investigate Compton scattering with micro Curie level radioactive sources that are more commonly available in the undergraduate laboratory. A vertical-looking 2 inch coaxial hpGe detector, collimated with a 2 inch thick lead shield, was used. Cylindrical Al targets of various thicknesses were placed over the collimator and several available sources were placed around the target so that the average Compton scattering angle into the collimator was 90 deg. A peak could be observed at the expected energy for 90 deg. Compton scattering by doing 24 hour target-in minus target-out runs. The peak was broadened by the spread in the scattering angle due to the variation in the angle of the incoming gamma ray and the angular acceptance of the collimator. A rough analysis can be done by modeling the angular spread due to the geometry and correcting for the gamma ray absorption from the target center. Various target materials and sources can be used and some variation in average Compton scattering angle can be obtained by adjusting the geometry of the source and target.

  9. Gamma-ray burst polarization via Compton scattering process

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Jiang, Yunguo

    2014-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation and Compton scattering are widely accepted as the most likely emission mechanisms of some astrophysical phenomena, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. The measurement of the polarization of photons provides a useful tool to distinguish different emission mechanisms and structures of the emission region. Based on the differential cross section of a polarized photon scattered by an unpolarized electron of any initial momentum, we derive an analytical formula of polarization for beamed photons scattered by isotropic electrons with a power-law distribution. Numerical calculations are carried out in four special cases: electrons at rest, Thomson limit, head-on collision, and monochromatic electrons. It is found that the maximum polarization can be as high as 100% for low energy photons, if the electrons are at rest. Although polarization is highly suppressed due to the isotropic electrons, a maximum value of ∼10%-20% can still be achieved. The Compton scattering process can be used to explain the polarization of GRB 041219A and GRB 100826A.

  10. A storage ring based inverse Compton scattering angiography source?

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, E.B.

    1993-09-01

    Producing the 33.17 keV photons required for coronary angiography with synchrotron radiation requires a combination of a high energy storage ring with an extremely high field wiggler. Such a source may be too big and expensive to be installed in even the largest medical center. Something other than synchrotron radiation may be needed for a practical source. Inverse Compton scattering has been used in the LEGS experiment at NSLS and elsewhere to produce high energy photons. In this process, a head on collision between a low energy photon and a high energy electron transfers energy to the photon which is then emitted in approximately the direction of the incoming electron. For a given electron energy, more higher energy photons can be produced by this method than by synchrotron radiation. This suggests that inverse Compton scattering can possibly be used for a low cost angiography source. The prospects for such a source will be examined in this paper. Unfortunately, the results will show that although it is easy to obtain the required photon energy, an extremely complicated source will be needed to produce the required number of photons.

  11. Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Lin, P.T.

    1985-03-05

    A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer. 5 figs.

  12. Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Peter T.

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer.

  13. Semiconductor sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, Harry C. (Inventor); Lagowski, Jacek (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor sensor adapted to detect with a high degree of sensitivity small magnitudes of a mechanical force, presence of traces of a gas or light. The sensor includes a high energy gap (i.e., .about. 1.0 electron volts) semiconductor wafer. Mechanical force is measured by employing a non-centrosymmetric material for the semiconductor. Distortion of the semiconductor by the force creates a contact potential difference (cpd) at the semiconductor surface, and this cpd is determined to give a measure of the force. When such a semiconductor is subjected to illumination with an energy less than the energy gap of the semiconductors, such illumination also creates a cpd at the surface. Detection of this cpd is employed to sense the illumination itself or, in a variation of the system, to detect a gas. When either a gas or light is to be detected and a crystal of a non-centrosymmetric material is employed, the presence of gas or light, in appropriate circumstances, results in a strain within the crystal which distorts the same and the distortion provides a mechanism for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the gas or the light, as the case may be.

  14. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  15. Electron-tracking Compton gamma-ray camera for small animal and phantom imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Hiroo; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Michiaki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ueda, Masashi; Okada, Tomohisa; Kubo, Atsushi; Kunieda, Etuso; Nakahara, Tadaki; Kohara, Ryota; Miyazaki, Osamu; Nakazawa, Tetsuo; Shirahata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ogawa, Koichi; Togashi, Kaori; Saji, Hideo; Tanimori, Toru

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for medical use. Our ETCC has a wide energy dynamic range (200-1300 keV) and wide field of view (3 sr), and thus has potential for advanced medical use. To evaluate the ETCC, we imaged the head (brain) and bladder of mice that had been administered with F-18-FDG. We also imaged the head and thyroid gland of mice using double tracers of F-18-FDG and I-131 ions.

  16. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  17. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: mission status.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) is the second in NASA's series of Great Observatories. Compton has now been operating for over two and a half years, and has given a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made and continue to be made. The authors describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments and the observing programs for the first three years of the mission. During Phases 2 and 3 of the mission a Guest Investigator program has been in progress with the Guest Observers' time share increasing from 30% to over 50% for the later mission phases.

  18. A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer conceptual design is discussed for performing gamma spectral measurements in monodirectional gamma fields from 100 R per hour to 1,000,000 R per hour. Selectable Compton targets are used to scatter gamma photons onto an otherwise heavily shielded detector with changeable scattering efficiencies such that the count rate is maintained between 500 and 10,000 per second. Use of two sum-Compton coincident detectors, one for energies up to 1.5 MeV and the other for 600 keV to 10 MeV, will allow good peak to tail pulse height ratios to be obtained over the entire spectrum and reduces the neutron recoil background rate.

  19. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a final report for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program from 06/01/91-07/31/97. The topics include: 1) Solar Flare Neutron Spectra and Accelerated Ions; 2) Gamma Ray Lines From The Orion Complex; 3) Implications of Nuclear Line Emission From The Orion Complex; 4) Possible Sites of Nuclear Line Emission From Massive OB Associations; 5) Gamma-Ray Burst Repitition and BATSE Position Uncertainties; 6) Effects of Compton Scattering on BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra; and 7) Selection Biases on the Spectral and Temporal Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts.

  20. Timelike Compton Scattering - A First Look (CLAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel Nadel-Turonski

    2009-12-01

    A major goal of the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab is to map out the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) in the valence region. This is primarily done through Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), which provides the simplest and cleanest way of accessing the GPDs. However, the “inverse” process, Timelike Compton Scattering (TCS), can provide an important complement, in particular formeasuring the real part of the amplitude and understanding corrections at finite Q2. The first measurements of TCS have recently been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, using both tagged and untagged photon beams.

  1. The Compton effect: Transition to quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuewer, R. H.

    2000-11-01

    The discovery of the Compton effect at the end of 1922 was a decisive event in the transition to the new quantum mechanics of 1925-1926 because it stimulated physicists to examine anew the fundamental problem of the interaction between radiation and matter. I first discuss Albert Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis of 1905 and why physicists greeted it with extreme skepticism, despite Robert A. Millikan's confirmation of Einstein's equation of the photoelectric effect in 1915. I then follow in some detail the experimental and theoretical research program that Arthur Holly Compton pursued between 1916 and 1922 at the University of Minnesota, the Westinghouse Lamp Company, the Cavendish Laboratory, and Washington University that culminated in his discovery of the Compton effect. Surprisingly, Compton was not influenced directly by Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis, in contrast to Peter Debye and H.A. Kramers, who discovered the quantum theory of scattering independently. I close by discussing the most significant response to that discovery, the Bohr-Kramers-Slater theory of 1924, its experimental refutation, and its influence on the emerging new quantum mechanics.

  2. Investigating the Compton Effect with a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinderman, Jesusa Valdez

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation of the Compton effect designed to lead students to discover (1) the relationship of the electron's final kinetic energy to its angle of scattering and (2) the relationship between the scattering angles of the outgoing electron and photon. (MDH)

  3. Compton Scattering Sources and Applications at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Felicie; Anderson, S. G.; Anderson, G.; Bayramian, A.; Betts, S. M.; Cross, R. R.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Wu, S. S.; Hartemann, F. V.; Scarpetti, R.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-11-01

    We report the design and current status of a monoenergetic laser-based Compton scattering 0.5-2.5 MeV γ-ray source. Previous nuclear resonance fluorescence results and future linac and laser developments for the source are presented.

  4. [New medical imaging based on electron tracking Compton camera (ETCC)].

    PubMed

    Tanimori, Toru; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an Electron-Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC) for medical imaging due to its wide energy dynamic range (200-1,500keV) and wide field of view (FOV, 3 str). This camera has a potential of developing the new reagents. We have carried out several imaging reagent studies as examples; (1) 18F-FDG and 131I-MIBG simultaneous imaging for double clinical tracer imaging, (2) imaging of some minerals (Mn-54, Zn-65, Fe-59) in mouse and plants. In addition, ETCC has a potential of real-time monitoring of the Bragg peak location by imaging prompt gamma rays for the beam therapy. We carried out the water phantom experiment using 140MeV proton beam, and obtained the images of both 511 keV and high energy gamma rays (800-2,000keV). Here better correlation of the latter image to the Bragg peak has been observed. Another potential of ETCC is to reconstruct the 3D image using only one-head camera without rotations of both the target and camera. Good 3D images of the thyroid grant phantom and the mouse with tumor were observed. In order to advance those features to the practical use, we are improving the all components and then construct the multi-head ETCC system.

  5. High-Resolution Compton-Suppressed CZT Detector for Fission Products Identification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejd; J. K. Hartwell; Wade W. Scates

    2004-10-01

    Room temperature semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors are currently limited to total detector volumes of 1-2 cm3, which is dictated by the poor charge transport characteristics. Because of this size limitation one of the problems in accurately determining isotope identification is the enormous background from the Compton scattering events. Eliminating this background will not only increase the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements but also help us to resolve peaks buried under the background and peaks in close vicinity of others. We are currently developing a fission products detection system based on the Compton-suppressed CZT detector. In this application, the detection system is required to operate in high radiation fields. Therefore, a small 10x10x5 mm3 CZT detector is placed inside the center of a well-shielded 3" in diameter by 3" long Nal detector. So far we have been able to successfully reduce the Compton background by a factor of 5.4 for a 137Cs spectrum. This reduction of background will definitely enhance the quality of the gamma-ray spectrum in the information-rich energy range below 1 MeV, which consequently increases the detection sensitivity. In this work, we will discuss the performance of this detection system as well as its applications.

  6. A Si/CdTe Compton Camera for gamma-ray lens experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2005-12-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) have been regarded as promising semiconductor materials for hard X-ray and γ-ray detection. However, a considerable amount of charge loss in these detectors results in a reduced energy resolution. We have achieved a significant improvement in the spectral properties by forming the Schottky junction on the Te side of the CdTe wafer. With the further reduction of leakage current by an adoption of guard ring structure, we have demonstrated a CdTe pixel detector with high energy resolution and full charge collection capabilty. The detector has a pixel size of a few mm and a thickness of 0.5 - 1 mm. We apply this high resolution detector to a new silicon and CdTe Compton Camera which features high angular resolution. We also describe a concept of the stack detector which consists of many thin CdTe layers and provides sufficient efficiency for hard X-rays and gamma-rays up to several hundred keV maintaining good energy resolution. A narrow-FOV Compton telescope can be realized by installing a Si/CdTe Compton Camera inside the deep well of an active shield. This configuration is very suitable as focal plane detector for future focusing gamma-ray missions.

  7. Electronic properties of RDX and HMX: Compton scattering experiment and first-principles calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, B L; Jain, Pradeep; Sahariya, Jagrati; Heda, N L; Soni, Pramod

    2013-07-11

    The first-ever electron momentum density (EMD) measurements of explosive materials, namely, RDX (1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane, (CH2-N-NO2)3) and HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane, (CH2-N-NO2)4), have been reported using a 740 GBq (137)Cs Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profiles (CPs) are compared with the EMDs derived from linear combination of atomic orbitals with density functional theory. It is found that the CPs deduced from generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with Wu-Cohen exchange energies give a better agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles than those from local density approximation and other schemes of GGA. Further, Mulliken population, energy bands, partial and total density of states, and band gap have also been reported using GGA calculations. Present ground state calculations unambiguously show large band gap semiconductor nature of both RDX and HMX. A similar type of bonding in these materials is uniquely established using Compton data and density of states. It is also outstandingly consistent with the Mulliken population, which predicts almost equal amount of charge transfer (0.84 and 0.83 e(-)) from H1 + H2 + N2 to C1 + N1 + O1 + O2 in both the explosives.

  8. Science Flight Program of the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Steven

    This is the lead proposal for this program. We are proposing a 5-year program to perform the scientific flight program of the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT), consisting of a series of three (3) scientific balloon flights. NCT is a balloon-borne, wide-field telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky (0.2-5 MeV), performing high-resolution spectroscopy, wide-field imaging, and polarization measurements. NCT has been rebuilt as a ULDB payload under the current 2-year APRA grant. (In that proposal we stated our goal was to return at this point to propose the scientific flight program.) The NCT rebuild/upgrade is on budget and schedule to achieve flight-ready status in Fall 2013. Science: NCT will map the Galactic positron annihilation emission, shedding more light on the mysterious concentration of this emission uncovered by INTEGRAL. NCT will survey Galactic nucleosynthesis and the role of supernova and other stellar populations in the creation and evolution of the elements. NCT will map 26-Al and positron annihilation with unprecedented sensitivity and uniform exposure, perform the first mapping of 60-Fe, search for young, hidden supernova remnants through 44-Ti emission, and enable a host of other nuclear astrophysics studies. NCT will also study compact objects (in our Galaxy and AGN) and GRBs, providing novel measurements of polarization as well as detailed spectra and light curves. Design: NCT is an array of germanium gamma-ray detectors configured in a compact, wide-field Compton telescope configuration. The array is shielded on the sides and bottom by an active anticoincidence shield but is open to the 25% of the sky above for imaging, spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. The instrument is mounted on a zenith-pointed gondola, sweeping out ~50% of the sky each day. This instrument builds off the Compton telescope technique pioneered by COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. However, by utilizing modern germanium semiconductor strip detectors

  9. Head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child's head circumference Normal ranges for a child's sex and age (weeks, months), based on values that experts have obtained for normal growth rates of infants' and children's heads Measurement of the head circumference is an ...

  10. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  11. Compton scattering tomography in soil compaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, F. A.; Cruvinel, P. E.

    2003-06-01

    Compton scattering imaging technique is investigated as a possible tool in soil density distribution mapping for agricultural purposes. In Compton scattering tomography, the number of photons that had been inelastically scattered from a well-defined volume of a sample is employed as a non-destructive technique to display soil density distribution. Images are also shown, of soil samples, at two closely related densities. Good contrast is recorded between the various inserts and their host matrix. Line scans through the images showed good contrast resolution, shape and edge definition. Spatial resolution could be enhanced by the use of a focussing collimator on the detector. This will also serve to increase the solid angle subtended at the detector by the scattering volume, with a possible reduction in counting time at the same precision level.

  12. The tracks of the Compton effect.

    PubMed

    del Regato, J A

    1981-01-01

    The observation of scattered radiations of larger wavelength than the primary had been repeatedly rejected or explained away by many researchers, including Compton. After years of vacillations, he recognized the effect named after him and was the first to develop a quantal equation predicting the wavelength of scattered radiation. It became one of the most significant contributions to modern radiation physics, opening the doors of quantum mechanics.

  13. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Oldaker, Mark E.

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  14. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod

    2007-12-17

    The beam spin asymmetries of the reaction ep -> epg in the Bjorken regime were measured over a wide kinematical domain using the CLAS detector and a new lead-tungstate calorimeter. Through the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process with Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, those asymmetries provide constraints for the nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions models. The observed shapes are in agreement with twist-2 dominance predictions.

  15. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  16. Nonlinear Brightness Optimization in Compton Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Hartemann, Fred V.; Wu, Sheldon S. Q.

    2013-07-26

    In Compton scattering light sources, a laser pulse is scattered by a relativistic electron beam to generate tunable x and gamma rays. Because of the inhomogeneous nature of the incident radiation, the relativistic Lorentz boost of the electrons is modulated by the ponderomotive force during the interaction, leading to intrinsic spectral broadening and brightness limitations. We discuss these effects, along with an optimization strategy to properly balance the laser bandwidth, diffraction, and nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  17. Resonant Compton Physics for Magnetar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku, and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 - 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be the leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Scattering at ultra-relativistic energies leads to attractive simplifications in the analytics of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov basis states, focusing specifically on ground-state-ground-state scattering. Compton scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly relativistic pairs. Such environs necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, in which the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron leading to arbitrary Landau excitations of the intermediate and final states. Due to the rapid transitions of the excited-state to the ground-state, the initial electron is still assumed to be in the ground state. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization and spin dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is compared to the cross section obtained with spin-averaged widths. We present numerical results to show the comparisons to highlight the role of the spin-dependent widths of the resonances. The findings presented here will have applications to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.

  18. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  19. Compton scattering gamma-ray source optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Frederic; Wu, Sheldon; Albert, Félicie; Barty, Chris

    2012-10-01

    The interaction of a bright relativistic electron beam with an intense laser pulse via Compton scattering can generate tunable gamma-rays for precision nuclear photonics applications. The properties of the gamma-ray phase space will be outlined, in relation with the 6D electron bunch and 6D laser pulse phase space, along with collimation, nonlinear effects and other sources of spectral broadening. Optimization strategies will be outlines within the context of nuclear photonics applications.

  20. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  1. Ground calibrations of Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Liu, Zhong-Kai; Bandstra, Mark S.; Bellm, Eric C.; Liang, Jau-Shian; Perez-Becker, Daniel; Zoglauer, Andreas; Boggs, Steven E.; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Huang, Minghuey A.; Amman, Mark; Chiang, Shiuan-Juang; Hung, Wei-Che; Lin, Chih-Hsun; Luke, Paul N.; Run, Ray-Shine; Wunderer, Cornelia B.

    2010-07-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne soft gamma ray (0.2-10 MeV) telescope designed to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. The heart of NCT is an array of 12 cross-strip germanium detectors, designed to provide 3D positions for each photon interaction with full 3D position resolution to < 2 mm^3. Tracking individual interactions enables Compton imaging, effectively reduces background, and enables the measurement of polarization. The keys to Compton imaging with NCT's detectors are determining the energy deposited in the detector at each strip and tracking the gamma-ray photon interaction within the detector. The 3D positions are provided by the orthogonal X and Y strips, and by determining the interaction depth using the charge collection time difference (CTD) between the anode and cathode. Calibrations of the energy as well as the 3D position of interactions have been completed, and extensive calibration campaigns for the whole system were also conducted using radioactive sources prior to our flights from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico, USA in Spring 2009, and from Alice Springs, Australia in Spring 2010. Here we will present the techniques and results of our ground calibrations so far, and then compare the calibration results of the effective area throughout NCT's field of view with Monte Carlo simulations using a detailed mass model.

  2. Induced Compton-scattering effects in radiation-transport approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, D.R. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    The method of characteristics is used to solve radiation transport problems with induced Compton scattering effects included. The methods used to date have only addressed problems in which either induced Compton scattering is ignored, or problems in which linear scattering is ignored. Also, problems which include both induced Compton scattering and spatial effects have not been considered previously. The introduction of induced scattering into the radiation transport equation results in a quadratic nonlinearity. Methods are developed to solve problems in which both linear and nonlinear Compton scattering are important. Solutions to scattering problems are found for a variety of initial photon energy distributions.

  3. Electrons in semiconductors and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Paul Augustine

    In this thesis I will be presenting the results of my investigations into the electronic structure properties of various systems. The formalism used throughout is based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the local-density approximation (LDA), within the ab initio pseudopotential approximation for the valence wavefunctions, and the computations involve the solution of a self-consistent Schrodinger-like equation, which we solve by transforming this equation to reciprocal space and diagonalising the corresponding matrix. I organize these topics as follows: (1) The first chapter will be devoted to a discussion of the theoretical framework within which the calculations will be performed. First of all I will discuss the theory and history of the Compton profile. (2) In the second chapter, we shall study the computation of the Compton profiles of crystalline silicon. (3) Even without the pseudopotential approximation, the DFT-LDA formalism can include correlation between the various valence electrons only through an effective one-body potential in which these wavefunctions move. Thus it is very unlikely that the correct dynamical correlation between the valence electrons is present in the LDA wavefunctions. (4) In chapter four, we shall turn to a study of a novel material, carbon nanotubes, which have only recently been discovered. These nanotubes are long hollow cylinders formed by rolling up a graphene sheet (graphene is a single layer of graphite). When they occur individually they are called single-walled nanotubes, but they are also found to exist arranged concentrically around one central single-walled nanotube like the rings in a tree. These latter structures are called multi-walled nanotubes. Single-walled nanotubes are typically about 1 nm in diameter and many microns in length, and have exceptional mechanical strength. Depending on how the graphene sheet is rolled they may be metallic, small-gap semi-conductors or insulators. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  4. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mazouz; A. Camsonne; C. Munoz Camacho; C. Ferdi; G. Gavalian; E. Kuchina; M. Amarian; K. A. Aniol; M. Beaumel; H. Benaoum; P. Bertin; M. Brossard; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. Feuerbach; J.-M. Fieschi; S. Frullani; M. Garcon; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; J. Gomez; P. Gueye; P.A.M. Guichon; B. Guillon; O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; R. Igarashi; X. Jiang; H.S. Jo; L.J. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissiere; J.J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; H.-J. Lu; D.J. Margaziotis; Z.-E. Meziani; K. McCormick; R. Michaels; B. Michel; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; V. Nelyubin; M. Potokar; Y. Qiang; R.D. Ransome; J.-S. Real; B. Reitz; Y. Roblin; J. Roche; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; P.E. Ulmer; E. Voutier; K. Wang; L.B. Weinstein; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2007-12-01

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D$({\\vec e},e'\\gamma)X$ cross section measured at $Q^2$=1.9 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to $E_q$, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  5. Study of Compton vs. Photoelectric Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J B; Johnson, S C; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-07-09

    We have studied how often incoming photons interact via a Compton interaction and/or a photoelectric interaction as a function of energy and detector material Results are using a 1m{sup 3} detector, and discrete energy photons from 0.1 MeV up to 10 MeV. Essentially all of the lower energy photons interact at least once in a detector of this size. This is not the case at higher energies. Each detector, photon energy combination was simulated with 2000 photons.

  6. Compton scattering in ignited thermonuclear plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P J

    2008-03-28

    Inertially confined, ignited thermonuclear D-T plasmas will produce intense blackbody radiation at temperatures T greater, similar20 keV; it is shown that the injection of GeV electrons into the burning core can efficiently generate high-energy Compton scattering photons. Moreover, the spectrum scattered in a small solid angle can be remarkably monochromatic, due to kinematic pileup; a peak brightness in excess of 10;{30} photons/(mm(2) mrad(2) s 0.1% bandwidth) is predicted. These results are discussed within the context of the Schwinger field and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect.

  7. Biophysical applications of neutron Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Albergamo, F.; Hayward, R. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    Neutron Compton scattering (NCS) can be applied to measuring nuclear momentum distributions and potential parameters in molecules of biophysical interest. We discuss the analysis of NCS spectra from peptide models, focusing on the characterisation of the amide proton dynamics in terms of the width of the H-bond potential well, its Laplacian, and the mean kinetic energy of the proton. The Sears expansion is used to quantify deviations from the high-Q limit (impulse approximation), and line-shape asymmetry parameters are evaluated in terms of Hermite polynomials. Results on NCS from selectively deuterated acetanilide are used to illustrate this approach.

  8. Experimental confirmation of neoclassical Compton scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, V. V.; Yakunin, S. N.; Despotuli, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    Incoherent X-ray scattering spectra of diamond and silicon crystals recorded on the BESSY-2 electron storage ring have been analyzed. All spectral features are described well in terms of the neoclassical scattering theory without consideration for the hypotheses accepted in quantum electrodynamics. It is noted that the accepted tabular data on the intensity ratio between the Compton and Rayleigh spectral components may significantly differ from the experimental values. It is concluded that the development of the general theory (considering coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, and Bragg diffraction) must be continued.

  9. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouz, M.; Guillon, B.; Real, J.-S.; Voutier, E.

    2007-12-14

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e-vector,e{sup '}{gamma})X cross section measured at Q{sup 2}=1.9 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub B}=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to E{sub q}, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  10. The development of a Compton lung densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Madden, N.W.; Simon, D.S.

    1988-11-01

    A field instrument is being developed for the non-invasive determination of absolute lung density using unique Compton backscattering techniques. A system consisting of a monoenergetic gamma-ray beam and a shielded high resolution high-purity-germanium (HPGe) detector in a close-coupled geometry is designed to minimize errors due to multiple scattering and uncontrollable attenuation in the chestwall. Results of studies on system performance with phantoms, the optimization of detectors, and the fabrication of a practical gamma-ray source are presented. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  12. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... or prescription products. Over-the-counter shampoos and lotions containing pyrethrin (one brand name: Rid) or permethrin ( ... commonly used to treat head lice. Shampoos and lotions that kill head lice contain pesticides and other ...

  13. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  14. Optimization of a multiple-scattering Compton camera as a photon-tracking imager for 6-MV photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2014-06-01

    During radiation therapy, the irradiated position and the energy deposited in a patient must be monitored. In general, calculations before photon exposure or 2D measurements of the transmitted photons have been widely used for making dose estimates. In this paper, we propose a real-time 3D dose measurement using Compton imaging technology. On the basis of the Monte-Carlo method, we designed a multiple-scattering Compton camera system (MSCC) with semiconductor and scintillation detectors. The MSCC was constructed with two semiconductor detectors as scattering detectors and a cadmium-tungstate (CWO) scintillator detector as an absorber detector. The two planar semiconductor arrays, and the CWO array consisted of 40 × 40 pixels, each with a size of 1 × 1 × ɛ mm3, where ɛ is the variable thickness of the detectors. The design parameters, such as the types of semiconductors, detector thicknesses and distances between detectors, were optimized on the basis of the detection efficiency and angular resolution of reconstructed images for a point source. Under the optimized conditions, uncertainty factors in geometry and energy were estimated for various inter-detector distances. We used a source corresponding to photons scattered from a water phantom exposed to 6-MeV peak X-rays. According to our simulation results, the figure of merit, reached its maximum value when the inter-detector distance was 3 cm. In order to achieve a high FOM, we chose 1 cm as the optimum thickness for the scattering and absorbed detectors. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector showed the best performance among the simulated semiconductors. The position uncertainty caused by the pixelization effect was the major factor in degrading the angular resolution of the reconstructed images, and the degradation caused by energy broadening was less than expected. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening and incorrect sequencing were minimal compared with that of pixelization. Our

  15. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

  16. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, Sylvester; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The European Muon Collaboration (EMC) observed the first signs of a modification of the partonic structure of the nucleon when present in a nuclear medium. The precise nature of these effects, as well as their underlying cause, is yet to be determined. The generalized parton distribution (GPD) framework provides a powerful tool to study the partonic structure of nucleons inside a nucleus. Hard exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon off a nucleon, deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS), is presently considered the cleanest experimental access to the GPDs, through the Compton form factors (CFFs). This is especially the case for scattering off the spin-zero helium nucleus, where only a single CFF contributes to the process. The real and imaginary parts of this CFF can be constrained through the beam-spin asymmetry (BSA). We will present the first measurements of the DVCS process off 4He using the CEBAF 6 GeV polarized electron beam and the CLAS detector at JLab. The CLAS detector was supplemented with an inner electromagnetic calorimeter for photons produced at small angles, as well as a radial time projection chamber (RTPC) to detect low-energy recoil nuclei. This setup allowed for a clean measurement of the BSA in both the coherent and incoherent channels.

  17. Optimization Studies of a Compton Suppression Spectrometer Using Experimentally Validated Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    W. Scates; W. Scates; M. E. Mc Ilwain; R. Aryaeinejad

    2005-10-01

    Recent developments associated with room temperature semiconductor detectors and inorganic scintillators suggest that these detectors may be viable alternatives for the primary detector in a Compton Suppression Spectrometer (CSS). The room temperature operation of these detectors allows removal of a substantial amount of material from between primary and secondary detector and if properly designed and should afford substantially better suppression factors than can be achieved by germanium-based spectrometers. We have chosen to study the optimum properties of a CSS with a LaX3:Ce scintillator (where X is chloride or bromide) as the primary gamma ray detector. A Monte Carlo photon transport model is used to determine the optimum geometric properties of this spectrometer. To validate the assumptions and basic design of the Monte Carlo simulations, the energy distribution of a 137Cs point source is measured and simulated for two experimental systems. Comparison of the suppression factors for the measured and simulated data validates the model accuracy. A range of CSS physical parameters are studied to determine optimal detector geometry and to maximize the Compton suppression factor. These physical parameters and their optimum values are discussed.

  18. Optimization studies of a Compton suppression spectrometer using experimentally validated Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. McIlwain; W. Scate; J. K. Hartwell; R. Aryaeinejad

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments associated with room temperature semiconductor detectors and inorganic scintillators suggest that these detectors may be viable alternatives for the primary detector in a Compton Suppression Spectrometer (CSS). The room temperature operation of these detectors allows removal of a substantial amount of material from between primary and secondary detector, if properly designed and should afford substantially better suppression factors than can be achieved by germanium-based spectrometers. We have chosen to study the optimum properties of a CSS with a LaX3:Ce scintillator (where X is chloride or bromide) as the primary gamma ray detector. A Monte Carlo photon transport model is used to determine the optimum geometric properties of this spectrometer. To validate the assumptions and basic design of the Monte Carlo simulations, the energy distribution of a 137Cs point source is measured and simulated for two experimental systems. Comparison of the suppression factors for the measured and simulated data validates the model accuracy. A range of CSS physical parameters are studied to determine optimal detector geometry and to maximize the Compton suppression factor. These physical parameters and their optimum values are discussed.

  19. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from blazar jets - III. Compton-dominant blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, William J.; Cotter, Garret

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we develop the extended jet model of Potter & Cotter to model the simultaneous multiwavelength spectra of six Compton-dominant blazars. We include an accelerating parabolic base transitioning to a slowly decelerating conical jet with a geometry set by observations of M87 and consistent with simulations and theory. We investigate several jet models and find that the optically thick to thin synchrotron break in the radio spectrum requires the jet to first come into equipartition at large distances along the jet, consistent with the observed transition from parabolic to conical at 105Rs in the jet of M87. We confirm this result analytically and calculate the expected frequency core-shift relations for the models under consideration. We find that a parabolic jet transitioning to a ballistic conical jet at 105Rs, which starts in equipartition and becomes more particle dominated at larger distances, fits the multiwavelength data of the six blazars well, whilst an adiabatic equipartition conical section requires very large bulk Lorentz factors to reproduce the Compton dominance of the blazars. We find that all these blazars require high power (>1039 W), high bulk Lorentz factor (>20) jets observed close to the line of sight (<2°) as we expect from the blazar sequence and consistent with the results from Paper II. The inverse-Compton emission in our fits is due to inverse-Compton scattering of high-redshift cosmic microwave background photons at large distances along the jet due to the high bulk Lorentz factors of the jets. We postulate a new interpretation of the blazar sequence based on the radius of the transition region of the jet (where the jet is brightest in synchrotron emission) scaling linearly with black hole mass.

  20. Nucleon Compton scattering in the Dyson-Schwinger approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.

    2013-02-01

    We analyze the nucleon’s Compton scattering amplitude in the Dyson-Schwinger/Faddeev approach. We calculate a subset of diagrams that implements the nonperturbative handbag contribution as well as all t-channel resonances. At the quark level, these ingredients are represented by the quark Compton vertex whose analytic properties we study in detail. We derive a general form for a fermion two-photon vertex that is consistent with its Ward-Takahashi identities and free of kinematic singularities, and we relate its transverse part to the on-shell nucleon Compton amplitude. We solve an inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation for the quark Compton vertex in rainbow-ladder truncation and implement it in the nucleon Compton scattering amplitude. The remaining ingredients are the dressed quark propagator and the nucleon’s bound-state amplitude which are consistently solved from Dyson-Schwinger and covariant Faddeev equations. We verify numerically that the resulting quark Compton vertex and nucleon Compton amplitude both reproduce the πγγ transition form factor when the pion pole in the t channel is approached.

  1. Compton Radiation for Nuclear Waste Management and Transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulyak, E.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    Compton inverse radiation is emitted in the process of backscattering of the laser pulses off the relativistic electrons. This radiation possesses high spectral density and high energy of photons--in hard x-ray up to gammaray energy range--with moderate electron energies (hundreds of MeV up to 1 GeV) due to short wavelength of the laser radiation. The Compton radiation is well collimated: emitting within a narrow cone along the electron beam. A distinct property of the Compton inverse radiation is a steep high-energy cutoff of the spectrum and the maximal intensity just below the cutoff. The Compton sources can attain: spectral density up to 1014 gammas/(s 0.1%bandwidth) in MeV range of energies, and spectral brightness up to 1020 gammas/(smm2mr2 0.1% bw). Applicability of Compton sources for nuclear waste management and detection of radioisotopes and fissionable nuclides are discussed in the report. Also application limits of Compton gamma sources for transmutation of radioactive isotopes are estimated. A recently proposed subtracting method, in which two sets of data obtained by irradiating the object by the Compton beams with slightly different maximal energies are compared, will enhance resolution of detection radioactive elements at the 'atomic' (hundreds of keV) and the 'nuclear' (a few MeV) photon energies.

  2. The GSFC Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R.; Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.; Trombka, J.; Stacy, G.

    1983-01-01

    A new telescope is being developed at GSFC for the study of point sources of gamma rays in the energy range 1-30 MeV. Using the detection principle of a Compton scatter in a 2.5 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector followed by absorption in a 15 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector, the telescope uses a rocking collimator for field-of-view reduction and background subtraction. Background reduction techniques include lead-plastic scintillator shielding, pulse shape discrimination and Anger camera operation to both NaI detectors, as well as a time-of-flight measurement between them. The instrument configuration and status is described.

  3. The GSFC Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, R.; Fichtel, C.; Kniffen, D.; Trombka, J.; Stacy, G.

    1983-08-01

    A new telescope is being developed at GSFC for the study of point sources of gamma rays in the energy range 1-30 MeV. Using the detection principle of a Compton scatter in a 2.5 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector followed by absorption in a 15 cm thick NaI(Tl) detector, the telescope uses a rocking collimator for field-of-view reduction and background subtraction. Background reduction techniques include lead-plastic scintillator shielding, pulse shape discrimination and Anger camera operation to both NaI detectors, as well as a time-of-flight measurement between them. The instrument configuration and status is described.

  4. BLAZAR FLARES FROM COMPTON DRAGGED SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Omri; Levinson, Amir

    2015-08-10

    We compute the dynamics and emission of dissipative shells that are subject to a strong Compton drag, under simplifying assumptions about the dissipation mechanism. We show that under conditions prevailing in blazars, substantial deceleration is anticipated on sub-parsec and parsec scales in cases of rapid dissipation. Such episodes may be the origin of some of the flaring activity occasionally observed in gamma-ray blazars. The shape of the light curves thereby produced reflects the geometry of the emitting surface if the deceleration is very rapid, or the dynamics of the shell if the deceleration is delayed, or initially more gradual, owing, e.g., to continuous injection of energy and momentum.

  5. The Compton Mirror in NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poutanen, Juri; Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Magdziarz, Pawel

    1996-01-01

    We show that the sharp cutoff in the hard X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151, unusual for Seyfert 1 galaxies, can be reconciled with the average Seyfert 1 spectrum if we assume that the central source is completely hidden from our line of sight by the thick part of the accretion disk or by the broad emission-line clouds. The observed X-ray radiation is produced by scattering of the Seyfert 1 type spectrum in the higher, cooler parts of the accretion disk corona, or in a wind. A sharp cutoff appears as a result of the Compton recoil effect. This model naturally explains a discrepancy regarding the inclination of the central source, inferred to be low (face-on) from observations of the iron K-alpha emission line, but inferred to be high on the basis of optical and UV observations.

  6. Compton Profile Study of Intermetallic Ti{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, V.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2011-10-20

    The Compton scattering measurement on intermetallic alloy Ti{sub 3}Al is reported in this work. The measurement is made using 59.54 keV gamma-rays from Am{sup 241} source. Theoretical calculation of Compton profile is also performed employing CRYSTAL code within the framework of density functional theory to compare with the measurement. The theoretical profile of the alloy is also synthesized following the superposition model taking the published Compton profiles of elemental solids from the APW method. The experimental study of charge transfer in the alloys has also been done by performing the experimental Compton profile measurements on Ti and Al following the superposition model and charge transfer from Al to Ti is clearly seen on the alloy formation.

  7. Investigation of Compton profiles of molecular methane and ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao-Li; Xu, Long-Quan; Kang, Xu; Liu, Ya-Wei; Ni, Dong-Dong; Zhu, Lin-Fan; Yang, Ke Ma, Yong-Peng; Yan, Shuai

    2015-02-28

    The Compton profiles of methane and ethane molecules have been determined at an incident photon energy of 20 keV based on the third generation synchrotron radiation, and the statistical accuracy of 0.2% is achieved near p{sub z} = 0. The density functional theory with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set was used to calculate the Compton profiles of methane and ethane. The present experimental Compton profiles are in better agreement with the theoretical calculations in the whole p{sub z} region than the previous experimental results, which indicates that the present experimental Compton profiles are accurate enough to serve as the benchmark data for methane and ethane molecules.

  8. Evidence for virtual Compton scattering from the proton

    SciTech Connect

    van den Brand, J.F.J.; Ent, R.; Anthony, P.L.; Arnold, R.G.; Arrington, J.; Beise, E.J.; Belz, J.E.; Bosted, P.E.; Bulten, H.; Chapman, M.S.; Coulter, K.P.; Dietrich, F.S.; Epstein, M.; Filippone, B.W.; Gao, H.; Gearhart, R.A.; Geesaman, D.F.; Hansen, J.; Holt, R.J.; Jackson, H.E.; Jones, C.E.; Keppel, C.E.; Kinney, E.R.; Kuhn, S.; Lee, K.; Lorenzon, W.; Lung, A.; Makins, N.C.R.; Margaziotis, D.J.; McKeown, R.D.; Milner, R.G.; Mueller, B.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, J.; O`Neill, T.G.; Papavassiliou, V.; Petratos, G.G.; Potterveld, D.H.; Rock, S.E.; Spengos, M.; Szalata, Z.M.; Tao, L.H.; van Bibber, K.; Wasson, D.A.; White, J.L.; Zeidman, B. ||||||||||

    1995-11-01

    In virtual Compton scattering an electron is scattered off a nucleon such that the nucleon emits a photon. We show that these events can be selected experimentally, and present the first evidence for virtual Compton scattering from the proton in data obtained at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The angular and energy dependence of the data is well described by a calculation that includes the coherent sum of electron and proton radiation.

  9. Unified ab initio treatment of attosecond photoionization and Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, G. L.; Bondar, D. I.; Patchkovskii, S.; Corkum, P. B.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    2009-10-01

    We present a new theoretical approach to attosecond laser-assisted photo- and Compton ionization. Attosecond x-ray absorption and scattering are described by \\hat{\\mathscr{S}}^{(1,2)} -matrices, which are coherent superpositions of 'monochromatic' \\skew{3}\\hat{S}^{(1,2)} -matrices in a laser-modified Furry representation. Besides refining the existing theory of the soft x-ray photoelectron attosecond streak camera and spectral phase interferometry (ASC and ASPI), we formulate a theory of hard x-ray photoelectron and Compton ASC and ASPI. The resulting scheme has a simple structure and leads to closed-form expressions for ionization amplitudes. We investigate Compton electron interference in the separable Coulomb-Volkov continuum with both Coulomb and laser fields treated non-perturbatively. We find that at laser-field intensities below 1013 Wcm-2 normalized Compton lines almost coincide with the lines obtained in the laser-free regime. At higher intensities, attosecond interferences survive integration over electron momenta, and feature prominently in the Compton lines themselves. We define a regime where the electron ground-state density can be measured with controllable accuracy in an attosecond time interval. The new theory provides a firm basis for extracting photo- and Compton electron phases and atomic and molecular wavefunctions from experimental data.

  10. Why compton-suppressed germanium detector arrays?

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, R.M.

    1993-10-01

    Nuclear spectroscopic studies have provided a strong incentive to obtain {gamma}-ray detectors with increasingly better energy resolution, higher full-energy peak efficiencies, and greater sensitivity or resolving power. A major step was the introduction of Ge detectors in the early 60`s. But because of the low atomic number of Ge they have a poor response function; a majority of interacting gamma rays of moderate energy Compton scatter out of the detector leaving a large low-energy background. The remedy was to add a Compton-suppression shield made of NaI around the Ge crystal, and if interactions occurred simultaneously in the NaI scintillator and in the Ge detector to veto that event. Efficiencies also increased greatly when an English-Danish collaboration assembled five Ge detectors, each with a NaI suppressor, into the first array at the end of 1980. Obviously, a system of five such detectors gave much better statistics than the usual two bare detectors used for obtaining coincidence data (by a factor of 10). A few years later, another major improvement came with replacement of the NaI suppressors with shields made of the much denser bismuth germanate (BGO) as scintillator, as these could be thinner leading to arrays with of order 20 detectors. Use of such a large number of detectors led to the realization that for cascades of coincident gamma rays, as in going down a band, the improvement in the peak/background ratio observed and already appreciated in going from singles spectra to gated (double-) coincidence spectra continued when doubly-gated triple-coincidence data were compared for the first time to singly-gated double-coincidence ones. The higher-gated spectra were much cleaner and more selective, though with poorer statistics, and the advantages of higher folds and efficiencies led to the proposals for the larger 4{pi} arrays of today, Eurogam and GASP in Europe and Gammasphere in the U.S.

  11. Head injury.

    PubMed

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  12. Constraining the Parameters of Kpc-scale, Relativistic, Inverse Compton X-ray Jets in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Daniel A.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The X-ray emission from extended, kpc-scale jets is commonly explained as inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by the same population of electrons that emit the GHz radio spectrum. The radio and X-ray flux densities, and the assumption of equipartition of magnetic and relativisitic particle energy density, give three constraints to estimate four quantities of interest: the magnetic field, relativistic electron density, bulk Lorentz factor, and angle of the jet to our line of sight. Additional assumptions, such as setting the Lorentz factor equal to the Doppler factor, are generally used, e.g., to deduce the kinetic flux along the jet. We allow the angle to the line of sight to be a free parameter, and suggest a new constraint on the Lorentz factor and therefore also the Doppler factor. As the Lorentz factor increases, the photons we receive are increasingly those emitted back towards the AGN nucleus in the jet rest frame. However the cone of enhanced CMB density lies increasingly in the opposite direction. Eventually these photons no longer fall in the small cone satisfying the head-on approximation, which is built into the expressions for inverse-Compton emissivity, and the emitted spectrum would no longer have the standard form. Accordingly, the data can be used to deduce an upper limit to the Lorentz factor as a function of the angle to the line of sight. This research was funded in part by Chandra grant GO7-8107X

  13. Inverse compton scattering gamma ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, S.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Ruelas, M.; Jovanovic, I.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.

    2009-09-01

    Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) (e.g. U-235, Pu-239) can be detected by active interrogation with gamma rays (>6 MeV) through photofission. For long-range detection (˜1 km), an intense beam of gamma rays (˜10 14 per second) is required in order to produce measurable number of neutrons. The production of such fluxes of gamma rays, and in the pulse formats useful for detection, presents many technical challenges, and requires novel approaches to the accelerator and laser technology. RadiaBeam is currently designing a gamma ray source based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high-energy electron beam. To achieve this, improvements in photoinjector, linac, final focus, and laser system are planned. These enhanced sub-systems build on parallel work being performed at RadiaBeam, UCLA, and elsewhere. A high-repetition rate photoinjector, a high-gradient S-band linac, and a laser pulse recirculator will be used. The proposed system will be a transportable source of high-flux, high-energy quasi-monochromatic gamma rays for active interrogation of special nuclear materials.

  14. Scaling limit of deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Radyushkin

    2000-07-01

    The author outlines a perturbative QCD approach to the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process {gamma}{sup *}p {r_arrow} {gamma}p{prime} in the limit of vanishing momentum transfer t=(p{prime}{minus}p){sup 2}. The DVCS amplitude in this limit exhibits a scaling behavior described by a two-argument distributions F(x,y) which specify the fractions of the initial momentum p and the momentum transfer r {equivalent_to} p{prime}{minus}p carried by the constituents of the nucleon. The kernel R(x,y;{xi},{eta}) governing the evolution of the non-forward distributions F(x,y) has a remarkable property: it produces the GLAPD evolution kernel P(x/{xi}) when integrated over y and reduces to the Brodsky-Lepage evolution kernel V(y,{eta}) after the x-integration. This property is used to construct the solution of the one-loop evolution equation for the flavor non-singlet part of the non-forward quark distribution.

  15. New Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, D.S.

    1985-10-01

    Pulmonary edema is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical evaluation of pulmonary edema. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray. The ability to make safe, frequent lung density measurements could be very helpful for monitoring the course of P.E. at the hospital bedside or outpatient clinics, and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in clinical research. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Compact Laser Technology for Compton Scattering Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shverdin, M.; Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Bayramian, A.; Betts, S. M.; Ebbers, C.; Gibson, D.; Messerly, M.; Hartemann, F. V.; Siders, C. W.; McNabb, D. P.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2009-11-01

    We describe compact laser technology for Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) Compton scattering light source at LLNL. The high energy, 120W interaction laser utilizes chirped pulse amplification (CPA) in Nd:YAG to amplify a sub-nanometer bandwidth 20 μJ pulses from a fiber system to 1J. A novel pulse stretcher provides a dispersion of over 7000ps/nm to expand a several picosecond wide seed pulse to 6ns. After amplification, the pulse is recompressed to 10ps with a hyper-dispersive pulse compressor. We also describe a technique for over an order of magnitude increase in the generated gamma-ray flux by recirculation of the interaction laser pulse. This technique, termed Recirculation Injection by Nonlinear Gating (RING), consists of frequency doubling the incident laser pulse inside a dichroic mirror cavity. The resonator mirrors transmit at 1φ and reflect at 2φ. The 2^nd harmonic of the incident pulse then becomes trapped inside the cavity. To date, we demonstrated 14 times cavity enhancement of 180mJ, 10ps, 532nm laser pulses.

  17. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  18. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  19. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-27

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method are disclosed. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors. 9 figs.

  20. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  1. The results of the in-flight attitude sensor calibration for the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, W. S.; Eudell, A. H.; Kulp, L. S.; Lindrose, L. A.; Harman, R. R.

    1993-02-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was launched by the shuttle Atlantis in April 1991. This paper presents the results of the attitude sensor calibration that was performed during the early mission. The GSFC Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) performed an alignment calibration of the two fixed-head star trackers (FHST's) and two fine Sun sensors (FSS's) on board Compton GRO. The results show a 27-arcsecond shift between the bore sights of the FHST's with respect to prelaunch measurements. The alignments of the two FSS's shifted by 0.20 and 0.05 degree. During the same time period, the Compton GRO science teams performed an alignment calibration of the science instruments with respect to the attitude reported by the on board computer (OBC). In order to preserve these science alignments, FDF adjusted the overall alignments of the FHST's and FSS's, obtained by the FDF calibration, such that when up linked to the OBC, the shift in the OBC-determined attitude is minimized. FDF also calibrated the inertial reference unit (IRU), which consists of three dual-axis gyroscopes. The observed gyro bias matched the bias that was solved for by the OBC. This bias drifted during the first 6 days after release. The results of the FDF calibration of scale factor and alignment shifts showed changes that were of the same order as their uncertainties.

  2. The results of the in-flight attitude sensor calibration for the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. S.; Eudell, A. H.; Kulp, L. S.; Lindrose, L. A.; Harman, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was launched by the shuttle Atlantis in April 1991. This paper presents the results of the attitude sensor calibration that was performed during the early mission. The GSFC Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) performed an alignment calibration of the two fixed-head star trackers (FHST's) and two fine Sun sensors (FSS's) on board Compton GRO. The results show a 27-arcsecond shift between the bore sights of the FHST's with respect to prelaunch measurements. The alignments of the two FSS's shifted by 0.20 and 0.05 degree. During the same time period, the Compton GRO science teams performed an alignment calibration of the science instruments with respect to the attitude reported by the on board computer (OBC). In order to preserve these science alignments, FDF adjusted the overall alignments of the FHST's and FSS's, obtained by the FDF calibration, such that when up linked to the OBC, the shift in the OBC-determined attitude is minimized. FDF also calibrated the inertial reference unit (IRU), which consists of three dual-axis gyroscopes. The observed gyro bias matched the bias that was solved for by the OBC. This bias drifted during the first 6 days after release. The results of the FDF calibration of scale factor and alignment shifts showed changes that were of the same order as their uncertainties.

  3. Rapid Compton-thick/Compton-thin Transitions in the Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 1365

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risaliti, G.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Baldi, A.; Zezas, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present multiple Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the type 1.8 Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365, which shows the most dramatic X-ray spectral changes observed so far in an active galactic nucleus: the source switched from reflection-dominated to transmission-dominated and back in just 6 weeks. During this time the soft thermal component, arising from a approx. 1 kpc region around the center, remained constant. The reflection component is constant at all timescales, and its high flux relative to the primary component implies the presence of thick gas covering a large fraction of the solid angle. The presence of this gas, and the fast variability timescale, suggest that the Compton-thick to Compton-thin change is due to variation in the line-of-sight absorber rather than to extreme intrinsic emission variability. We discuss a structure of the circumuclear absorber/reflector that can explain the observed X-ray spectral and temporal properties.

  4. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  5. Direct conversion semiconductor detectors in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Joshua W.; Gu, Yi; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor detectors are playing an increasing role in ongoing research to improve image resolution, contrast, and quantitative accuracy in preclinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET). These detectors serve as a medium for direct detection of annihilation photons. Early clinical translation of this technology has shown improvements in image quality and tumor delineation for head and neck cancers, relative to conventional scintillator-based systems. After a brief outline of the basics of PET imaging and the physical detection mechanisms for semiconductor detectors, an overview of ongoing detector development work is presented. The capabilities of semiconductor-based PET systems and the current state of these devices are discussed.

  6. Semiconductor ohmic contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, Frank Zygmunt (Inventor); Kressel, Henry (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor device has one surface of P type conductivity material having a wide energy bandgap and a large crystal lattice parameter. Applied to the P type surface of the semiconductor device is a degenerate region of semiconductor material, preferably a group III-V semiconductor material, having a narrower energy bandgap. The degenerate region is doped with tin to increase the crystal lattice of the region to more closely approximate the crystal lattice of the one surface of the semiconductor device. The degenerate region is compensatingly doped with a P type conductivity modifier. An electrical contact is applied to one surface of the degenerate region forming an ohmic contact with the semiconductor device.

  7. New Spectral State of Supercritical Accretion Flow with Comptonizing Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Tomohisa; Ohsuga, Ken; Mineshige, Shin; Heinzeller, Dominikus; Takabe, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2009-08-01

    Supercritical accretion flows inevitably produce radiation-pressure driven outflows, which Compton up-scatter soft photons from the underlying accretion flow, thereby making hard emission. We performed two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supercritical accretion flows and outflows, while incorporating such Compton scattering effects, and demonstrated that there appears a new hard spectral state at higher photon luminosities than that of the slim-disk state. In this state, as the photon luminosity increases, the photon index decreases and the fraction of the hard emission increases. The Compton y-parameter is on the order of unity (and thus the photon index will be ˜2) when the apparent photon luminosity is ˜30LE (with LE being the Eddington luminosity) for nearly face-on sources. This explains the observed spectral hardening of the ULX NGC 1313 X-2 in its brightening phase, and thus supports the model of supercritical accretion onto stellar-mass black holes in this ULX.

  8. G. E. M. Jauncey and the Compton Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, John

    In late 1922 Arthur Holly Compton (1892-1962) discovered that an X-ray quantum of radiation undergoes a discrete change in wavelength when it experiences a billiard-ball collision with a single atomic electron, a phenomenon that became known as the Compton effect and for which he shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1927. But for more than five years before he made his discovery, Compton had analyzed X-ray scattering in terms of classical electrodynamics. I suggest that his colleague at Washington University in St. Louis, G. E. M. Jauncey (1888-1947), helped materially to persuade him to embrace the quantum interpretation of his X-ray scattering experiments.

  9. Inclusive and Exclusive Compton Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ales Psaker

    2005-12-31

    In our work, we describe two types of Compton processes. As an example of an inclusive process, we consider the high-energy photoproduction of massive muon pairs off the nucleon. We analyze the process in the framework of the QCD parton model, in which the usual parton distributions emerge as a tool to describe the nucleon in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. To study its exclusive version, a new class of phenomenological functions is required, namely, generalized parton distributions. They can be considered as a generalization of the usual parton distributions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) may be observed in hard exclusive reactions such as deeply virtual Compton scattering. We develop an extension of this particular process into the weak interaction sector. We also investigate a possible application of the GPD formalism to wide-angle real Compton scattering.

  10. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Grubelich, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length.

  11. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-01-19

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length. 3 figs.

  12. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1990-10-23

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  13. The scanning Compton polarimeter for the SLD experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-10-01

    For the 1994/95 run of the SLD experiment at SLAC, a Compton polarimeter measured the luminosity-weighted electron beam polarization to be (77.2 {+-} 0.5)%. This excellent accuracy is achieved by measuring the rate asymmetry of Compton-scattered electrons near the kinematic endpoint. The polarimeter takes data continuously while the electron and positron beams are in collision and achieves a statistical precision of better than 1% in a three minute run. To calibrate the polarimeter and demonstrate its accuracy, many scans are frequently done. These include scans of the laser polarization, the detector position with respect to the kinematic edge, and the laser power.

  14. A Compton scattering study of refractory niobium diborides.

    PubMed

    Bhamu, K C; Ahuja, B L

    2012-06-01

    Isotropic Compton profile of NbB(2) using 20 Ci (137)Cs Compton spectrometer is compared with our theoretical profiles obtained from the density functional theory (DFT) within the first and the second order generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT. A good agreement between GGA based profiles and the experiment validates the applicability of second order GGA in momentum densities. Energy bands, density of states and real space analysis of the experimental profile show metallic character of NbB(2).

  15. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factors $H_{Im}$ and $\\tilde{H}_{Im}$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.

  16. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factorsmore » $$H_{Im}$$ and $$\\tilde{H}_{Im}$$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.« less

  17. Compton scattering by a pion and off-shell effects

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Fearing, H.W. )

    1995-01-01

    We consider Compton scattering by a pion in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. We investigate off-shell effects in the [ital s]- and [ital u]-channel pole diagrams. For that purpose we perform a field transformation which, in comparison with the standard Gasser and Leutwyler Lagrangian, generates additional terms at order [ital p][sup 4] proportional to the lowest-order equation of motion. As a result of the equivalence theorem the two Lagrangians predict the same Compton scattering [ital S]-matrix even though they generate different off-shell form factors. We conclude that off-shell effects are not only model dependent but also representation dependent.

  18. Spin and orbital magnetization loops obtained using magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Koizumi, A.

    2013-02-25

    We present an application of magnetic Compton scattering (MCS) to decompose a total magnetization loop into spin and orbital magnetization contributions. A spin magnetization loop of SmAl{sub 2} was measured by recording the intensity of magnetic Compton scattering as a function of applied magnetic field. Comparing the spin magnetization loop with the total magnetization one measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer, the orbital magnetization loop was obtained. The data display an anti-coupled behavior between the spin and orbital magnetizations and confirm that the orbital part dominates the magnetization.

  19. Low-intensity nonlinear spectral effects in compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, Frederic V; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2010-09-24

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ⁻¹ is sufficiently small to satisfy A²Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources.

  20. Low-Intensity Nonlinear Spectral Effects in Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-09-01

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ-1 is sufficiently small to satisfy A2Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources.

  1. Low-intensity nonlinear spectral effects in compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, Frederic V; Albert, Félicie; Siders, Craig W; Barty, C P J

    2010-09-24

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized potential A approaches unity. In this Letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse Δϕ⁻¹ is sufficiently small to satisfy A²Δϕ≃1. A three-dimensional analysis, based on a local plane wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources. PMID:21230757

  2. Synthesis of semiconductor nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianfeng; Dobson, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe typical methods and provide detailed experimental protocols for synthesizing and processing various semiconductor nanoparticles which have potential application in biology and medicine. These include synthesis of binary semiconductor nanoparticles; core@shell nanoparticles and alloyed nanoparticles; size-selective precipitation to obtain monodisperse nanoparticles; and strategies for phase transfer of nanoparticles from organic solution to aqueous media. PMID:22791427

  3. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesch, J.; Franklin, G. B.; Quinn, B. P.; Paschke, K. D.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab's Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5 T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.

  4. Analytical reconstruction formula for one-dimensional Compton camera

    SciTech Connect

    Basko, R.; Zeng, G.L.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Compton camera has been proposed as an alternative to the Anger camera in SPECT. The advantage of the Compton camera is its high geometric efficiency due to electronic collimation. The Compton camera collects projections that are integrals over cone surfaces. Although some progress has been made toward image reconstruction from cone projections, at present no filtered backprojection algorithm exists. This paper investigates a simpler 2D version of the imaging problem. An analytical formula is developed for 2D reconstruction from data acquired by a 1D Compton camera that consists of two linear detectors, one behind the other. Coincidence photon detection allows the localization of the 2D source distribution to two lines in the shape of a {open_quotes}V{close_quotes} with the vertex on the front detector. A set of {open_quotes}V{close_quotes} projection data can be divided into subsets whose elements can be viewed as line-integrals of the original image added with its mirrored shear transformation. If the detector has infinite extent, reconstruction of the original image is possible using data from only one such subset. Computer simulations were performed to verify the newly developed algorithm.

  5. Gamma-spectrometry with Compton suppressed detectors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Schueck, C.; Hannachi, F.; Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N.; Paul, E.; Love, D.J.G.; Nolan, P.J.; Nelson, A.H.; Walker, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent results of experiments performed with two different Compton-suppressed detectors arrays in Daresbury and Berkeley (/sup 163,164/Yb and /sup 154/Er, respectively), are presented together with a brief description of the national French array presently under construction in Strasbourg. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  6. A Non-Relativistic Look at the Compton Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Steve; Giri, Sandeep; Zakrasek, Nicholas; Affatigato, Mario

    2014-01-01

    In a usual modern physics class the Compton effect is used as the pedagogical model for introducing relativity into quantum effects. The shift in photon wavelengths is usually introduced and derived using special relativity. Indeed, this works well for explaining the effect. However, in the senior author's class one of the student coauthors…

  7. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    SciTech Connect

    Defurne, Maxime

    2015-08-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q2=1.9 GeV2 effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed.

  8. Simulation and Analysis of Large-Scale Compton Imaging Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Manini, H A; Lange, D J; Wright, D M

    2006-12-27

    We perform simulations of two types of large-scale Compton imaging detectors. The first type uses silicon and germanium detector crystals, and the second type uses silicon and CdZnTe (CZT) detector crystals. The simulations use realistic detector geometry and parameters. We analyze the performance of each type of detector, and we present results using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves.

  9. Models of unsaturated Compton disks around supermassive black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P. T.; Thompson, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    Two inverse-Compton disk models for the hard X-ray spectra of quasi-stellar objects and active galactic nuclei are studied and compared. One is a slightly generalized version of the Shapiro, Lightman and Eardley optically thin disk model, and the other is a conduction-stabilized Corona model. Observational distinctions between the two models are discussed.

  10. Advanced Compton scattering light source R&D at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Anderson, G; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Gibson, D J; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M; Shverdin, M Y; Wu, S; Hartemann, F V; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-02-16

    We report the design and current status of a monoenergetic laser-based Compton scattering 0.5-2.5 MeV {gamma}-ray source. Previous nuclear resonance fluorescence results and future linac and laser developments for the source are presented. At MeV photon energies relevant for nuclear processes, Compton scattering light sources are attractive because of their relative compactness and improved brightness above 100 keV, compared to typical 4th generation synchrotrons. Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-Ray) light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A new precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. Based on the success of the previous Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays (T-REX) Compton scattering source at LLNL, the source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. After a brief presentation of successful nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) experiments done with T-REX, the new source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  11. Semiconductor active plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendach, Stefan; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Plasmonics is a research area in nanophotonics attracting increasing interest due to the potential applications in sensing and detecting, sub-wavelength confinement of light, integrated circuits, and many others. In particular, when plasmonic structures such as metal nanostructures or highly doped semiconductor particles are combined with active semiconductor materials and nanostructures, novel exciting physics and applications arise. This special section on semiconductor active plasmonics covers several of the most important and complementary directions in the field. First is the modification of the optical properties of a semiconductor nanostructure due to the close proximity of a metallic film or nanostructure. These arise from the formation hybrid plasmon/exciton states and may lead to enhanced spontaneous emission rates, directional far field emission patterns, strong coupling phenomena, and many more. Second is the realization of sub-wavelength scale nanolasers by coupling a semiconductor gain medium with a plasmonic metallic cavity. Particular emphasis is given on the major technical challenges in the fabrication of these nanolasers, such as device patterning, surface passivation, and metal deposition. While the above topics address mainly active structures and devices operating in the visible or near-infrared wavelength region, in the third, the enhanced THz extinction by periodic arrays of semiconductor particles is discussed. This is based on the build-up of surface plasmon resonances in the doped semiconductor particles which can be resonantly coupled and widely tuned by the carrier density in the semiconductor. We believe these highly diverse aspects give insight into the wide variety of new physics and applications that semiconductor active plasmonics is offering. Finally, we would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Alice Malhador, for their support, and we would also like to thank the contributors for their efforts and participation

  12. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Kevin F.

    2005-03-01

    This volume offers a solid foundation for understanding the most important devices used in the hottest areas of electronic engineering today, from semiconductor fundamentals to state-of-the-art semiconductor devices in the telecommunications and computing industries. Kevin Brennan describes future approaches to computing hardware and RF power amplifiers, and explains how emerging trends and system demands of computing and telecommunications systems influence the choice, design and operation of semiconductor devices. In addition, he covers MODFETs and MOSFETs, short channel effects, and the challenges faced by continuing miniaturization. His book is both an excellent senior/graduate text and a valuable reference for practicing engineers and researchers.

  13. Head Position and Internally Headed Relative Clauses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basilico, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines "Head Movement" in internally headed relative clauses (IHRCs). The article shows that in some cases, head movement to an external position need not take place and demonstrates that this movement of the head to a sentence-internal position results from the quantificational nature of IHRCs and Diesing's mapping hypothesis (1990, 1992). (56…

  14. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, P. G.; Torres-Espallardo, I.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gillam, J. E.; Lacasta, C.; Llosá, G.; Oliver, J. F.; Sala, P. R.; Solevi, P.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-02-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the reconstruction inverse problem. Jointly with prompt gamma, secondary neutrons and scattered photons, not strongly correlated with the dose map, can also reach the imaging detector and produce false events. These events deteriorate the image quality. Also, high intensity beams can produce particle accumulation in the camera, which lead to an increase of random coincidences, meaning events which gather measurements from different incoming particles. The noise scenario is expected to be different if double or triple events are used, and consequently, the reconstructed images can be affected differently by spurious data. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of false events in the reconstructed image, evaluating their impact in the determination of the beam particle ranges. A simulation study that includes misidentified events (neutrons and random coincidences) in the final image of a Compton Telescope for PT monitoring is presented. The complete chain of

  15. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Ortega, P G; Torres-Espallardo, I; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Gillam, J E; Lacasta, C; Llosá, G; Oliver, J F; Sala, P R; Solevi, P; Rafecas, M

    2015-03-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the reconstruction inverse problem. Jointly with prompt gamma, secondary neutrons and scattered photons, not strongly correlated with the dose map, can also reach the imaging detector and produce false events. These events deteriorate the image quality. Also, high intensity beams can produce particle accumulation in the camera, which lead to an increase of random coincidences, meaning events which gather measurements from different incoming particles. The noise scenario is expected to be different if double or triple events are used, and consequently, the reconstructed images can be affected differently by spurious data. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of false events in the reconstructed image, evaluating their impact in the determination of the beam particle ranges. A simulation study that includes misidentified events (neutrons and random coincidences) in the final image of a Compton Telescope for PT monitoring is presented. The complete chain of

  16. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  17. SLM based semiconductor maskwriter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Steffen; Jehle, Achim

    2015-09-01

    The high-end semiconductor mask fabrication is dominated by e-beam technology. But still more than 50% of all semiconductor masks are produced by laser writers. The current laser writers are based on the same technology that was used 25 years ago. They are reliable and fast but not very economical. Heidelberg Instruments has developed a new economical and fast laser writer based on the latest technologies.

  18. Strained-bond semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John D.

    1994-05-01

    Theories of strained-bond semiconductors and superconductors have been developed that promise to have significant impact on future electronic devices of interest to the Air Force. These include: (1) development of a theory of high-temperature superconductivity based on the idea of strained-layer superlattices, (2) elucidation of the physics of doping in Type-2 semiconductor superlattices, which is now central to the development of high-speed field-effect transistors, (3) a theory of dimerization and reconstruction on (001) semiconductor surfaces, (4) theory of Mobius transforms as applied to physics and remote sensing, (5) new understanding of how defects affect the vibrational properties of semiconductors, (6) new methods of efficiently computing the trajectories of atoms in semiconductors by a priori molecular dynamics, (7) elucidation of the criteria affecting quantum-well luminescence from Si, (8) models of the effects of vacancies in large-gap Al(x)Ga(1-x)N alloys, (9) physics of rare-earth-doped silicon, (10) models of Co adsorption to silicon surfaces, (11) theories of how defects affect the properties of large band-gap superlattices, and (12) models of the effects of electronic structure on the properties of semiconductors.

  19. Development of Compton Radiography Diagnostics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D S; Izumi, N; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Delettrez, J; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C

    2010-11-16

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60-200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton Radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {micro}m and {approx}10ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  20. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The state-of-the-art X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam produced by an X-band RF accelerator and a high-intensity laser pulse generated by chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) has been carried out by our research team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system is called "Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source". The applications include nuclear resonance fluorescence, medical imaging and therapy, and nuclear waste imaging and assay. One of the key factors in this system is how we know the interaction happened in the vacuum chamber, which is the spectrometer of electron beams. The other key factor is the interaction after the spectrometer, which is the outgoing X-ray. In this thesis, the work in the simulation for the result of the interaction between electrons and the laser, the calibration of spectrometer, and laser focus characterization are discussed.

  1. Hybrid Compton camera/coded aperture imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M.

    2012-04-10

    A system in one embodiment includes an array of radiation detectors; and an array of imagers positioned behind the array of detectors relative to an expected trajectory of incoming radiation. A method in another embodiment includes detecting incoming radiation with an array of radiation detectors; detecting the incoming radiation with an array of imagers positioned behind the array of detectors relative to a trajectory of the incoming radiation; and performing at least one of Compton imaging using at least the imagers and coded aperture imaging using at least the imagers. A method in yet another embodiment includes detecting incoming radiation with an array of imagers positioned behind an array of detectors relative to a trajectory of the incoming radiation; and performing Compton imaging using at least the imagers.

  2. Compton profile study of polycrystalline ZnBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Kothari, R. K.; Sharma, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    The first ever Compton profile study of polycrystalline ZnBr{sub 2} is presented in this paper. The measurement of polycrystalline sample of ZnBr{sub 2} is performed using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from an {sup 241}Am radioisotope. Theoretical calculations are performed following the Ionic model calculations for a number of configurations Zn{sup +x}Br{sub 2}{sup -x/2}(0.0{<=}x{<=}2.0 in step of 0.5) utilizing free atom profiles. The ionic model suggest transfer of 2.0 electrons from 4 s state of Zn to 4 p state of two Br atoms. The autocorrelation function B(z) is also derived from experiment and the most favoured ionic valence Compton profiles.

  3. External inverse-Compton Emission from Blazar Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Jennifer E.; Chiang, James; /SLAC

    2007-09-25

    According to leptonic models for the high-energy emission from blazars, relativistic electrons in the inner jets inverse-Compton scatter photons from a variety of sources. Seed photons are certainly introduced via the synchrotron process from the electrons themselves, but external sources of seed photons may also be present. In this paper, we present detailed derivations of the equations describing external inverse-Compton scattering from two sources of seed photons: direct emission from the accretion disk, and accretion disk photons that have scattered off the broad line region. For each source, we derive the seed photon spectrum incident on the jet, the single electron energy loss rate, and the emitted photon spectrum.

  4. Generalized Parton Distributions And Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering At Clas

    SciTech Connect

    De Masi, Rita

    2007-09-01

    The deeply virtual Compton scattering is the simplest process to access the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon. A dedicated large statistics experiment for the measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering with a 6 GeV polarized electron beam on a proton target has been performed at the Hall-B of Jefferson Laboratory with the CLAS spectrometer. The experiment covered a wide kinematic range, allowing the study of the beam spin asymmetry as function of the Bjorken variable xB, the Mandelstam variable t, the virtual photon four-momentum squared Q2 and the angle phi between leptonic and hadronic planes. The preliminary results are in agreement with previous measurements and with the predicted twist-2 dominance.

  5. COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2009-08-20

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  6. Comptonization Processes in Galactic and Extragalactic High Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-12-01

    I review the principal radiation mechanisms which can be responsible for the production of high energy emission of Galactic and extragalactic sources. The spectral properties of Comptonization processes are studied. I present a rigorous treatment of the problem in terms of the Boltzmann kinetic equation formalism. I also overview the different exact and approximate analytical and numerical techniques which decouple the photon transport in six dimensions to that in the configuration space and in energy space separately. CGRO, RXTE, SAX, XMM and CHANDRA observations of Galactic black hole, neutron star systems, and Seyfert nuclei show that their spectra can be fitted by thermal Comptonization models in the hard state, and two components in the soft state. In the latter case, these components show a blackbody like spectrum with the color temperature which is a fraction of keV and tens of eV for Galactic and extragalactic sources, respectively, and an extended power-law with spectral index between 1 and 2 (in the neutron star systems in their soft state this power-law component is not detected). I give arguments for an explanation of these two types of spectral states in the framework of the thermal and bulk motion Comptonization processes. Furthermore I demonstrate that the change of X-ray spectra during the soft-hard transition is related to the temperature of the bulk inflow. In other words the effect of the bulk Comptonization compared to thermal one is getting stronger when the plasma temperature drops below 10 keV. It is clear that the spectra emerging from the converging inflow are inevitable stamp of black hole sources where the strong gravitational field dominates the pressure forces.

  7. Compton Imaging Capabilities of AGATA for Background Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Doncel, M.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.

    2010-04-26

    In this work we present the results of the test performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) aiming to characterize the capabilities of the AGATA detectors to discriminate between different gamma source locations. AGATA detectors are position sensitive to the interaction points through Pulse Shape Analysis allowing location of the gamma sources by using Compton imaging algorithm. The final goal is to increase the array sensitivity reducing the background originated outside the AGATA target.

  8. Measuring Flash X-Ray Spectra with a Compton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Hunter, James; King, Nick; Merrill, Frank; Sedillo, Robert; Urbaitis, Algis; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. LA-UR-14-23602.

  9. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1988-03-11

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.; Goulding, Frederick S.

    1991-01-01

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons Compton backscattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to monimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering.

  11. Relativistic induced Compton scattering in synchrotron self-absorbed sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sincell, Mark W.; Krolik, Julian H.

    1994-01-01

    We present a model of the radio emission from synchrotron self-absorbed sources, including the effects of induced Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in the source. Order of magnitude estimates show that stimulated scattering becomes the dominant absorption process when (kT(sub B)/m(sub e) c(exp 2))Tau(sub T) greater than or approximately 1.0. Numerical simulations demonstrate that relativistic induced Compton scattering limits the brightness temperature of a self-absorbed synchroton sources to T(sub B) less than or approximately 2 x 10(exp 11) nu(exp -1/p + 3) (sub zero, 9) gamma(exp p + 2/p + 5) (sub min) K, where gamma(sub min) is the low-energy cutoff to the relativistic electron distribution with a power-law index of p. It can also significantly flatten the radio spectrum. The radio spectrum of the core of 3C 279 is well matched by a model in which stimulated scattering is important, and the additional constraint T(sub B) less than 2 x 10(exp 11)K may be important to the interpretation of the broadband spectra in variable extragalactic compact radio sources. Stimulated scattering reduces the amplitude of the radio frequency variability relative to the X-ray variability, an effect which can be detected by multiwavelength variability studies. Data for a sample of resolved compact radio cores indicate that it is inconsistent to neglect induced Compton scattering when inferring the physical parameters of the sources. The necessary generalizations to the standard synchrotron self-Compton theory are p resented.

  12. Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

  13. Detection of detachments and inhomogeneities in frescos by Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, A.; Cesareo, R.; Buccolieri, G.; Donativi, M.; Palamà, F.; Quarta, S.; De Nunzio, G.; Brunetti, A.; Marabelli, M.; Santamaria, U.

    2005-07-01

    A mobile instrument has been developed for the detection and mapping of detachments in frescos by using Compton back scattered photons. The instrument is mainly composed of a high energy X-ray tube, an X-ray detection system and a translation table. The instrument was first applied to samples simulating various detachment situations, and then transferred to the Vatican Museum to detect detachments and inhomogeneities in the stanza di Eliodoro, one of the "Raphael's stanze".

  14. An electromagnetic calorimeter for the JLab real compton scattering experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D J; Wojtsekhowski, B; Annand, J.R. M.; Chang, T -H; Chudakov, E; Danagoulian, A; Degtyarenko, P; Egiyan, K; Gilman, R; Gorbenko, V; Hines, J; Hovhannisyan, E; Hyde-Wright, C E; de Jager, C W; Ketikyan, A; Mamyan, V H; Michaels, R; Natham, A M; Nelyubin, V; Rachek, I; Roedelbrom, M; Petrosyan, A; Pomatsalyuk, R; Popov, V; Segal, J; Shestakov, Y; Templon, J; Voskanyan, H

    2011-07-01

    A lead–glass hodoscope calorimeter that was constructed for use in the Jefferson Lab Real Compton Scattering experiment is described. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6%/View the MathML source. Features of both the detector design and its performance in the high luminosity environment during the experiment are presented.

  15. Nucleon Compton Scattering with Two Space-Like Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; I. Akushevich; N.P. Merenkov

    2002-08-01

    We calculate two-photon exchange effects for elastic electron-proton scattering at high momentum transfers. The corresponding nucleon Compton amplitude is defined by two space-like virtual photons that appear to have significant virtualities. We make predictions for (a) a single-spin beam asymmetry, and (b) a single-spin target asymmetry or recoil proton polarization caused by an unpolarized electron beam.

  16. Magnetic properties of Ga doped cobalt ferrite: Compton scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Arvind; Sahariya, Jagrati; Mund, H. S.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2014-04-01

    We present the spin momentum density of Ga doped CoFe2O4 at 100 K using magnetic Compton scattering. The measurement has been performed using circularly polarized synchrotron radiations of 182.65 keV at SPring8, Japan. The experimental profile is decomposed into its constituent profile to determine the spin moment at individual sites. Co atom has the maximum contribution (about 58%) in the total spin moment of the doped CoFe2O4.

  17. Gamma-Ray Compton Light Source Development at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Frederic; Anderson, Scott; Gibson, David; Hagmann, Chris; Johnson, Micah; Jovanovic, Igor; Messerly, Mike; Pruet, Jason; Shverdin, Miro; Tremaine, Aaron; McNabb, Dennis; Siders, Craig; Barty, Chris

    2007-03-01

    A new class of tunable, monochromatic gamma-ray sources capable of operating at high peak and average brightness is currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photo-science and applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector. Key technologies, basic scaling laws, and recent experimental results will be presented, along with an overview of future research and development directions.

  18. The Compton Polarimeter in Hall C of Jefferson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Amrendra

    2013-04-01

    A new Compton polarimeter was installed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab and used during the Qweak experiment which aims to measure the weak charge of proton with a precision of 4.1%. In this polarimeter the electron beam collides with green laser light stored in a low gain Fabry-Perot Cavity; the scattered electrons are detected in 4 planes of a novel diamond micro strip detector while the back scattered photons are detected in a lead tungstate crystal. We extract the beam polarization by fitting the experimental asymmetry for each detector strip to the corresponding asymmetry calculated in QED. During the experiment, we took data to cross-calibrate Moller and Compton polarimeters in Hall C. We will share our preliminary conclusions from this comparison. In this talk, we will also present the results from Monte Carlo studies performed to estimate the systematic uncertainties of the polarization measurement along with comparing results from two independent extraction of the polarization involving very different time scales. The Compton polarimeter has achieved the design goals of 1% statistical uncertainty per hour and we expect to achieve less than 1% systematic uncertainty.

  19. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hirose, T.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  20. LASER-ELECTRON COMPTON INTERACTION IN PLASMA CHANNELS

    SciTech Connect

    POGORELSKY,I.V.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, we propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. We demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  1. Non-linear Compton Scattering in Short Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewska, Katarzyna; Kamiński, Jerzy

    2012-06-01

    The generation of short X-ray laser pulses attracts a great deal of attention. One of mechanisms to achieve this goal is the non-linear Compton scattering at very high laser powers. The majority of previous works on the non-linear Compton scattering have been devoted to the case when the incident laser field is treated as a monochromatic plane wave. There is, however, recent interest in analyzing the effect of a pulsed laser field on the non-linear Compton scattering [1-4]. We study the process for different durations of the incident laser pulse and compare it with the results for both a plane wave laser field and a laser pulse train. [4pt] [1] M. Boca and V. Florescu, Phys. Rev. A 80, 053403 (2009).[0pt] [2] M. Boca and V. Florescu, Eur. Phys. J. D 61, 446 (2011).[0pt] [3] D. Seipt and B. Kämpfer, Phys. Rev. A 83, 022101 (2011).[0pt] [4] F. Mackenroth and A. Di Piazza, Phys. Rev. A 83, 032106 (2011).

  2. The role of Compton scattering in scinti-mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Scopinaro, F.; Pergola, A.

    1996-12-31

    Functional breast imaging using {sup 99m}Tc MIBI is showing that this technique is able to detect cancer with more than 90% specificity. Using a dedicated gamma camera, with the breast under compression, i.e. in similar conditions of mammography, the detection of sub-centimeter cancers can be improved. A number of factors affects the detection of small cancers as: thickness of the breast, distance between tumor and collimator, cardiac activity. Radioactivity emitted from the body can obscure the breast activity mainly due to the large difference on radioactivity concentration. In this work we analyze the intensity and the energy distribution of Compton scattering coming from the breast by a Germanium detector and by a dedicated imager with a small FOV placed in a geometrical condition similar to mammography. In vivo measurements were performed in patients with a breast cancer ranging between 8 mm and 15 mm. Intensity of Compton scattering from 4 to 10 times greater than full energy peak events resulted. Measurements were compared with ones obtained by a phantom simulating the breast without chest activity demonstrating how large is the Compton contribution from the chest.

  3. High-resolution Compton line shapes: Fermi break of beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Huotari, S.; Monaco, G.; Sternemann, C.; Volmer, M.; Schuelke, W.

    2007-12-15

    The Be[110] Compton profile was measured with high resolution utilizing x rays with energy of 16-18 keV. The momentum resolution due to the experimental factors was set to 0.018 atomic units of momentum (a.u.). Electron final-state effects were estimated to have an approximate broadening effect of the spectral features equivalent to 0.028 a.u., resulting in a total momentum resolution of 0.033 a.u., i.e., more than a factor of 2 better than in previous Compton scattering studies. In this way, it was possible to study the ground-state momentum density of the electrons in metallic beryllium with a very high accuracy. As a result, the Fermi-surface-related fine structure is well observed in the experimental Compton profile and its derivative. However, the observed features are broader and less pronounced than anticipated by theoretical estimates. The remaining difference may be due to a non-negligible ground-state correlation and its effects on the momentum density and the Fermi surface of beryllium metal.

  4. Three-dimensional theory of weakly nonlinear Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.; Hartemann, F. V.

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in light sources when the wiggler parameter, or normalized 4-potential, A =e√-AμAμ /m0c, approaches unity. In this paper, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A if the fractional bandwidth of the undulator, Δϕ-1, is sufficiently small and satisfies the condition A2Δϕ ˜1. Consequences for the spectral brightness of Compton scattering light sources are outlined. Compton and Thomson scattering theories are compared with the Klein-Nishina cross-section formula to highlight differences in the case of narrow band gamma-ray operation. A weakly nonlinear Compton scattering theory is developed in one (plane wave) and three (local plane wave approximation) dimensions. Analytical models are presented and benchmarked against numerical calculations solving the Lorentz force equation with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Finally, narrow band gamma-ray spectra are calculated for realistic laser and electron beams.

  5. Compton DIV: Using a Compton-Based Gamma-Ray Imager for Design Information Verification of Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, M; Verbeke, J; Dougan, A; Wang, T; Decman, D

    2009-07-04

    A feasibility study has been performed to determine the potential usefulness of Compton imaging as a tool for design information verification (DIV) of uranium enrichment plants. Compton imaging is a method of gamma-ray imaging capable of imaging with a 360-degree field of view over a broad range of energies. These systems can image a room (with a time span on the order of one hour) and return a picture of the distribution and composition of radioactive material in that room. The effectiveness of Compton imaging depends on the sensitivity and resolution of the instrument as well the strength and energy of the radioactive material to be imaged. This study combined measurements and simulations to examine the specific issue of UF{sub 6} gas flow in pipes, at various enrichment levels, as well as hold-up resulting from the accumulation of enriched material in those pipes. It was found that current generation imagers could image pipes carrying UF{sub 6} in less than one hour at moderate to high enrichment. Pipes with low enriched gas would require more time. It was also found that hold-up was more amenable to this technique and could be imaged in gram quantities in a fraction of an hour. another questions arises regarding the ability to separately image two pipes spaced closely together. This depends on the capabilities of the instrument in question. These results are described in detail. In addition, suggestions are given as to how to develop Compton imaging as a tool for DIV.

  6. Method of doping a semiconductor

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Chiang Y.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    A method for doping semiconductor material. An interface is established between a solid electrolyte and a semiconductor to be doped. The electrolyte is chosen to be an ionic conductor of the selected impurity and the semiconductor material and electrolyte are jointly chosen so that any compound formed from the impurity and the semiconductor will have a free energy no lower than the electrolyte. A potential is then established across the interface so as to allow the impurity ions to diffuse into the semiconductor. In one embodiment the semiconductor and electrolyte may be heated so as to increase the diffusion coefficient.

  7. Head circumference (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area (above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head). During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  8. Photoinduced superconductivity in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Garry; Aron, Camille; Chamon, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    We show that optically pumped semiconductors can exhibit superconductivity. We illustrate this phenomenon in the case of a two-band semiconductor tunnel-coupled to broad-band reservoirs and driven by a continuous wave laser. More realistically, we also show that superconductivity can be induced in a two-band semiconductor interacting with a broad-spectrum light source. We furthermore discuss the case of a three-band model in which the middle band replaces the broad-band reservoirs as the source of dissipation. In all three cases, we derive the simple conditions on the band structure, electron-electron interaction, and hybridization to the reservoirs that enable superconductivity. We compute the finite superconducting pairing and argue that the mechanism can be induced through both attractive and repulsive interactions and is robust to high temperatures.

  9. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction.

  10. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction. PMID:26917151

  11. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction. PMID:26917151

  12. Superconductivity in doped semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustarret, E.

    2015-07-01

    A historical survey of the main normal and superconducting state properties of several semiconductors doped into superconductivity is proposed. This class of materials includes selenides, tellurides, oxides and column-IV semiconductors. Most of the experimental data point to a weak coupling pairing mechanism, probably phonon-mediated in the case of diamond, but probably not in the case of strontium titanate, these being the most intensively studied materials over the last decade. Despite promising theoretical predictions based on a conventional mechanism, the occurrence of critical temperatures significantly higher than 10 K has not been yet verified. However, the class provides an enticing playground for testing theories and devices alike.

  13. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  14. Semiconductor laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, M.C.

    1982-09-28

    A semiconductor laser diode is disclosed with a connection electrode consisting of a chromium/gold alloy on a highly-doped gallium arsenide layer. The gallium arsenide layer is strip shaped and overlies a further lesser doped layer of gallium aluminum arsenide. The chromium/gold contact has a low-resistance junction only in the region of the more highly doped layer so that a strip shaped restriction of the current path occurs in the semiconductor body. Accordingly, a laser-active zone which is only strip-shaped is achieved.

  15. Semiconductor surface protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method and a product for protecting semiconductor surfaces is disclosed. The protective coating material is prepared by heating a suitable protective resin with an organic solvent which is solid at room temperature and converting the resulting solution into sheets by a conventional casting operation. Pieces of such sheets of suitable shape and thickness are placed on the semiconductor areas to be coated and heat and vacuum are then applied to melt the sheet and to drive off the solvent and cure the resin. A uniform adherent coating, free of bubbles and other defects, is thus obtained exactly where it is desired.

  16. NRF Based Nondestructive Inspection System for SNM by Using Laser-Compton-Backscattering Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgaki, H.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Daito, I.; Zen, H.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kando, M.

    2015-10-01

    A non-destructive inspection system for special nuclear materials (SNMs) hidden in a sea cargo has been developed. The system consists of a fast screening system using neutron generated by inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device and an isotope identification system using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements with laser Compton backscattering (LCS) gamma-rays has been developed. The neutron flux of 108 n/sec has been achieved by the IEC in static mode. We have developed a modified neutron reactor noise analysis method to detect fission neutron in a short time. The LCS gamma-rays has been generated by using a small racetrack microtoron accelerator and an intense sub-nano second laser colliding head-on to the electron beam. The gamma-ray flux has been achieved more than 105 photons/s. The NRF gamma-rays will be measured using LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detector array whose performance has been measured by NRF experiment of U-235 in HIGS facility. The whole inspection system has been designed to satisfy a demand from the sea port.

  17. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  18. Testing of the BGO Compton-suppression detectors for gammasphere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Ahmad, I.; Annan, G.A.

    1995-08-01

    Gammasphere, the national {gamma}-ray facility, when completed will consist of 110 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors. The bismuth germanate (BGO) Compton-suppression detector system for each Ge detector consists of one tapered hexagonal BGO side shield and one slotted BGO back plug. Due to the geometry of the array, three types of annular shields are required. These types are referred to as B, C and D, and the array consists of 60, 30 and 20 of these units, respectively. Shield types B, C and D have a hexagonal geometry. They are divided into six optically separate sections, each with its own pair of photomultiplier tubes. Argonne assumed responsibility for the procurement and testing of the BGO Compton-suppression units. We received all detectors from the two vendors. In the past year, twenty-four of the B-type detectors were delivered to Stony Brook for evaluation tests. Since the number of crystals to test is quite large (six per detector), we involved undergraduate students working at ANL under the Department of Educational Programs (DEP) in this effort. The quality of students was excellent, and they played a major role in the performance testing of these detectors. Ninety-nine of the hexagonal side shields and 112 backplug detectors were shipped to LBL for use in Gammasphere. The remaining detectors did not meet the performance criteria when they were first delivered and tested and are either at the vendor being repaired or were returned to us for retesting. We anticipate that the remaining detectors will be ready for use in Gammasphere within the next few months.

  19. External inverse-Compton emission from jetted tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenbin; Kumar, Pawan

    2016-05-01

    The recent discoveries of Sw J1644+57 and Sw J2058+05 show that tidal disruption events (TDEs) can launch relativistic jets. Super-Eddington accretion produces a strong radiation field of order Eddington luminosity. In a jetted TDE, electrons in the jet will inverse-Compton scatter the photons from the accretion disc and wind (external radiation field). Motivated by observations of thermal optical-UV spectra in Sw J2058+05 and several other TDEs, we assume the spectrum of the external radiation field intercepted by the relativistic jet to be blackbody. Hot electrons in the jet scatter this thermal radiation and produce luminosities 1045-1048 erg s- 1 in the X/γ-ray band. This model of thermal plus inverse-Compton radiation is applied to Sw J2058+05. First, we show that the blackbody component in the optical-UV spectrum most likely has its origin in the super-Eddington wind from the disc. Then, using the observed blackbody component as the external radiation field, we show that the X-ray luminosity and spectrum are consistent with the inverse-Compton emission, under the following conditions: (1) the jet Lorentz factor is Γ ≃ 5-10; (2) electrons in the jet have a power-law distribution dN_e/dγ _e ∝ γ _e^{-p} with γmin ˜ 1 and p = 2.4; (3) the wind is mildly relativistic (Lorentz factor ≳ 1.5) and has isotropic-equivalent mass-loss rate ˜ 5 M⊙ yr- 1. We describe the implications for jet composition and the radius where jet energy is converted to radiation.

  20. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  1. Chemically Derivatized Semiconductor Photoelectrodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrighton, Mark S.

    1983-01-01

    Deliberate modification of semiconductor photoelectrodes to improve durability and enhance rate of desirable interfacial redox processes is discussed for a variety of systems. Modification with molecular-based systems or with metals/metal oxides yields results indicating an important role for surface modification in devices for fundamental study…

  2. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

  3. Physics of Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brütting, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    Organic semiconductors are of steadily growing interest as active components in electronics and optoelectronics. Due to their flexibility, low cost and ease-of-production they represent a valid alternative to conventional inorganic semiconductor technology in a number of applications, such as flat panel displays and illumination, plastic integrated circuits or solar energy conversion. Although first commercial applications of this technology are being realized nowadays, there is still the need for a deeper scientific understanding in order to achieve optimum device performance.This special issue of physica status solidi (a) tries to give an overview of our present-day knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Contributions from 17 international research groups cover various aspects of this field ranging from the growth of organic layers and crystals, their electronic properties at interfaces, their photophysics and electrical transport properties to the application of these materials in different devices like organic field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes.Putting together such a special issue one soon realizes that it is simply impossible to fully cover the whole area of organic semiconductors. Nevertheless, we hope that the reader will find the collection of topics in this issue useful for getting an up-to-date review of a field which is still developing very dynamically.

  4. Nonlinear single Compton scattering of an electron wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angioi, A.; Mackenroth, F.; Di Piazza, A.

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear single Compton scattering has been thoroughly investigated in the literature under the assumption that the electron initially has a definite momentum. Here, we study a more general initial state and consider the electron as a wave packet. In particular, we investigate the energy spectrum of the emitted radiation and show that, in typical experimental situations, some features of the spectra shown in previous works are almost completely washed out. Moreover, we show that, at comparable relative uncertainties, the one in the momentum of the incoming electron has a larger impact on the photon spectra at a fixed observation direction than the one on the laser frequency.

  5. Compton imager based on a single planar segmented HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaplanov, A.; Pettersson, J.; Cederwall, B.

    2007-10-01

    A collimator-free Compton imaging system has been developed based on a single high-purity germanium detector and used to generate images of radioactive sources emitting γ rays. The detector has a planar crystal with one pixellated contact with a total of 25 segments. Pulse shape analysis has been applied to achieve a 3D-position sensitivity of the detector. The first imaging results from this detector are presented, based on the reconstruction of events where a γ ray is fully absorbed after scattering between adjacent segments.

  6. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, David Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p ($\\vec{γ}$, γ' \\vec{p}$) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  7. Magnetic Bunch Compression for a Compact Compton Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gamage, B.; Satogata, Todd J.

    2013-12-01

    A compact electron accelerator suitable for Compton source applications is in design at the Center for Accelerator Science at Old Dominion University and Jefferson Lab. Here we discuss two options for transverse magnetic bunch compression and final focus, each involving a 4-dipole chicane with M_{56} tunable over a range of 1.5-2.0m with independent tuning of final focus to interaction point $\\beta$*=5mm. One design has no net bending, while the other has net bending of 90 degrees and is suitable for compact corner placement.

  8. Quantum radiation reaction effects in multiphoton Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Di Piazza, A; Hatsagortsyan, K Z; Keitel, C H

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  9. Compton scattering from positronium and validity of the impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaliman, Z.; Pisk, K.; Pratt, R. H.

    2011-05-15

    The cross sections for Compton scattering from positronium are calculated in the range from 1 to 100 keV incident photon energy. The calculations are based on the A{sup 2} term of the photon-electron or photon-positron interaction. Unlike in hydrogen, the scattering occurs from two centers and the interference effect plays an important role for energies below 8 keV. Because of the interference, the criterion for validity of the impulse approximation for positronium is more restrictive compared to that for hydrogen.

  10. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at JLab Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Voutier

    2007-04-16

    The deeply virtual Compton scattering reaction has been investigated in the Hall A of the Jefferson Laboratory by measuring longitudinally polarized (e,e'gamma) cross sections, in the valence quark region, for protons and neutrons. In the proton channel, experimental results strongly support the factorization of the cross section at Q2 as low as 2 GeV2, opening the path to systematic measurements of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). In the neutron case, preliminary data show sensitivity to the angular momentum of quarks.

  11. Large-Scale Compton Imaging for Wide-Area Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, D J; Manini, H A; Wright, D M

    2006-03-01

    We study the performance of a large-scale Compton imaging detector placed in a low-flying aircraft, used to search wide areas for rad/nuc threat sources. In this paper we investigate the performance potential of equipping aerial platforms with gamma-ray detectors that have photon sensitivity up to a few MeV. We simulate the detector performance, and present receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for a benchmark scenario using a {sup 137}Cs source. The analysis uses a realistic environmental background energy spectrum and includes air attenuation.

  12. Filtered back-projection algorithm for Compton telescopes

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Donald L.

    2008-03-18

    A method for the conversion of Compton camera data into a 2D image of the incident-radiation flux on the celestial sphere includes detecting coincident gamma radiation flux arriving from various directions of a 2-sphere. These events are mapped by back-projection onto the 2-sphere to produce a convolution integral that is subsequently stereographically projected onto a 2-plane to produce a second convolution integral which is deconvolved by the Fourier method to produce an image that is then projected onto the 2-sphere.

  13. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  14. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  15. A hard X-ray polarimeter utilizing Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, H.; Noma, M.; Niizeki, H.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a 50-cm-diam prototype of a novel Compton-scattering-type polarimeter for hard X-rays in the energy range 30-100 keV. The characteristics of the prototype polarimeter were investigated for various conditions. It was found that, with polarized X-rays from a simple polarizer, the detection efficiency and the modulation factor of the polarimeter with a 40-mm thick scatterer were 3.2 percent and 0.57 percent, respectively, at about 60 keV.

  16. Two-photon Compton process in pulsed intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seipt, Daniel; Kämpfer, Burkhard

    2012-05-01

    Based on strong-field QED in the Furry picture we use the Dirac-Volkov propagator to derive a compact expression for the differential emission probability of the two-photon Compton process in a pulsed intense laser field. The relation of real and virtual intermediate states is discussed, and the natural regularization of the on-shell contributions due to the finite laser pulse is highlighted. The inclusive two-photon spectrum is 2 orders of magnitude stronger than expected from a perturbative estimate.

  17. Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS). User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Landron, C.O.; Baldwin, G.T.

    1994-04-01

    The Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS) is a radiation diagnostic designed to determine the time-integrated energy spectrum between 100 keV -- 2 MeV of flash x-ray sources. This guide is intended as a reference for the routine operator of the TPCS. Contents include a brief overview of the principle of operation, detailed component descriptions, detailed assembly and disassembly procedures, guide to routine operations, and troubleshooting flowcharts. Detailed principle of operation, signal analysis and spectrum unfold algorithms are beyond the scope of this guide; however, the guide makes reference to sources containing this information.

  18. The equivalence of inverse Compton scattering and the undulator concept

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y,; /Fermilab

    2009-08-01

    Inverse Compton scattering is a method to produce very high frequency photon beam. However, the production mechanism can also be viewed as a undulator emission. This is because the electron sees electric and magnetic fields of the incident laser beam and is driven into transverse oscillatory motion in exactly the same way when the electron passes through a undulator consisting of alternating magnetic field. This note gives a detailed examination of the similarity about the two views. Equivalent undulator parameters are derived for the incident laser beam, as well as the differential cross section of photon emission.

  19. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  20. Development of a Compton camera for safeguards applications in a pyroprocessing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Young Su; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Seo, Hee; Park, Se-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2014-11-01

    The Compton camera has a potential to be used for localizing nuclear materials in a large pyroprocessing facility due to its unique Compton kinematics-based electronic collimation method. Our R&D group, KAERI, and Hanyang University have made an effort to develop a scintillation-detector-based large-area Compton camera for safeguards applications. In the present study, a series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed with Geant4 in order to examine the effect of the detector parameters and the feasibility of using a Compton camera to obtain an image of the nuclear material distribution. Based on the simulation study, experimental studies were performed to assess the possibility of Compton imaging in accordance with the type of the crystal. Two different types of Compton cameras were fabricated and tested with a pixelated type of LYSO (Ce) and a monolithic type of NaI(Tl). The conclusions of this study as a design rule for a large-area Compton camera can be summarized as follows: 1) The energy resolution, rather than position resolution, of the component detector was the limiting factor for the imaging resolution, 2) the Compton imaging system needs to be placed as close as possible to the source location, and 3) both pixelated and monolithic types of crystals can be utilized; however, the monolithic types, require a stochastic-method-based position-estimating algorithm for improving the position resolution.

  1. Nucleon polarizabilities: From Compton scattering to hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelstein, Franziska; Miskimen, Rory; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the general constraints based on unitarity, causality, discrete and continuous symmetries, which result in model-independent relations involving nucleon polarizabilities. We (re-)derive a variety of such relations and discuss their empirical value. The proton polarizability effects are presently the major sources of uncertainty in the assessment of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and hyperfine structure. Recent calculations of these effects are reviewed here in the context of the "proton-radius puzzle". We conclude with summary plots of the recent results and prospects for the near-future work.

  2. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  3. Inverse Compton X-ray signature of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2013-12-01

    Bright AGN frequently show ultrafast outflows (UFOs) with outflow velocities vout ˜ 0.1c. These outflows may be the source of AGN feedback on their host galaxies sought by galaxy formation modellers. The exact effect of the outflows on the ambient galaxy gas strongly depends on whether the shocked UFOs cool rapidly or not. This in turn depends on whether the shocked electrons share the same temperature as ions (one-temperature regime, 1T) or decouple (2T), as has been recently suggested. Here we calculate the inverse Compton spectrum emitted by such shocks, finding a broad feature potentially detectable either in mid-to-high energy X-rays (1T case) or only in the soft X-rays (2T). We argue that current observations of AGN do not seem to show evidence for the 1T component. The limits on the 2T emission are far weaker, and in fact it is possible that the observed soft X-ray excess of AGN is partially or fully due to the 2T shock emission. This suggests that UFOs are in the energy-driven regime outside the central few pc, and must pump considerable amounts of not only momentum but also energy into the ambient gas. We encourage X-ray observers to look for the inverse Compton components calculated here in order to constrain AGN feedback models further.

  4. The polarization effect of a laser in multiphoton Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Guo-Hua; Lü, Qing-Zheng; Teng, Ai-Ping; Li, Ying-Jun

    2014-05-01

    The multiphoton Compton scattering in a high-intensity laser beam is studied by using the laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics (QED) method, which is a non-perturbative theory for the interaction between a plane electromagnetic field and a charged particle. In order to analyze in the real experimental condition, a Lorentz transformation for the cross section of this process is derived between the laboratory frame and the initial rest frame of electrons. The energy of the scattered photon is analyzed, as well as the cross sections for different laser intensities and polarizations and different electron velocities. The angular distribution of the emitted photon is investigated in a special velocity of the electron, in which for a fixed number of absorbed photons, the electron energy will not change after the scattering in the lab frame. We obtain the conclusion that higher laser intensities suppress few-laser-photon absorption and enhance more-laser-photon absorption. A comparison between different polarizations is also made, and we find that the linearly polarized laser is more suitable to generate nonlinear Compton scattering.

  5. Compton profile study and electronic properties of tantalum diboride.

    PubMed

    Raykar, Veera; Bhamu, K C; Ahuja, B L

    2013-07-01

    We have reported the first-ever experimental Compton profile (CP) of TaB2 using 20 Ci(137)Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare the experimental data, we have also computed the theoretical CPs using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock (HF) within linear combination of the atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. In addition, we have reported energy bands and density of states of TaB2 using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) methods. A real space analysis of CP of TaB2 confirms its metallic character which is in tune with the cross-overs of Fermi level by energy bands and Fermi surface topology. A comparison of equal-valence-electron-density (EVED) experimental profiles of isoelectronic TaB2 and NbB2 show more covalent (or less ionic) character of TaB2 than that of NbB2 which is in agreement with available ionicity data.

  6. Virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, S.; Korchin, A.Y.; Koch, J.H.

    1996-08-01

    We investigate the low-energy behavior of the four-point Green{close_quote}s function {Gamma}{sup {mu}{nu}} describing virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon. Using Lorentz invariance, gauge invariance, and crossing symmetry, we derive the leading terms of an expansion of the operator in the four-momenta {ital q} and {ital q}{sup {prime}} of the initial and final photon, respectively. The model-independent result is expressed in terms of the electromagnetic form factors of the free nucleon, i.e., on-shell information which one obtains from electron-nucleon scattering experiments. Model-dependent terms appear in the operator at {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}{sup {prime}}), whereas the orders {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}) and {ital O}({ital q}{sub {alpha}}{sup {prime}}{ital q}{sub {beta}}{sup {prime}}) are contained in the low-energy theorem for {Gamma}{sup {mu}{nu}}, i.e., no new parameters appear. We discuss the leading terms of the matrix element and comment on the use of on-shell equivalent electromagnetic vertices in the calculation of {open_quote}{open_quote}Born terms{close_quote}{close_quote} for virtual Compton scattering. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: Lessons Learned in Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, G. A.; Joseph, G. W.; Behrens, H. W.; Asato, D. I.; Carlson, R. A.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory was the second of NASA's Great Observatories. At 17 1/2 tons. it was the heaviest astrophysical payload ever flown at the time of its launch on April 5, 1991 aboard the Space Shuttle. During initial, on-orbit priming of the spacecraft's monopropellant hydrazine propulsion system, a severe waterhammer transient was experienced. At that time, anomalous telemetry readings were received from on-board propulsion system instrumentation. This led to ground analyses and laboratory investigations as to the root cause of the waterhammer, potential damage to system integrity and functionality, and risks for switching from the primary (A-side) propulsion system to the redundant (B-side) system. The switchover to B-side was ultimately performed successfully and the spacecraft completed its basic and extended missions in this configuration. Nine years later, following a critical control gyroscope failure, Compton was safely deorbited and re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on June 4, 2000. Additional risk assessments concerning viability of A- and B-sides were necessary to provide confidence in attitude and delta-V authority and reliability to manage the precisely controlled reentry. This paper summarizes the design and operation of the propulsion system used on the spacecraft and provides "lessons learned" from the system engineering investigations into the propellant loading procedures, the initial priming anomaly, mission operations, and the commanded re-entry following the gyro failure.

  8. Design of a coded aperture Compton telescope imaging system (CACTIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovskii, Alexander; Clajus, Martin; Gottesman, Stephen R.; Malik, Hans; Schwartz, Kenneth; Tumer, Evren; Tumer, Tumay; Yin, Shi

    2010-08-01

    We have developed a prototype of a scalable high-resolution direction and energy sensitive gamma-ray detection system that operates in both coded aperture (CA) and Compton scatter (CS) modes to obtain optimal efficiency and angular resolution over a wide energy range. The design consists of an active coded aperture constructed from 52 individual CZT planar detectors each measuring 3×3×6 mm3 arranged in a MURA pattern on a 10×10 grid, with a monolithic 20×20×5 mm3 pixelated (8×8) CZT array serving as the focal plane. The combined mode is achieved by using the aperture plane array for both Compton scattering of high-energy photons and as a coded mask for low-energy radiation. The prototype instrument was built using two RENA-3 test systems, one each for the aperture and the focal plane, stacked on top of each other at a distance of 130 mm. The test systems were modified to coordinate (synchronize) readout and provide coincidence information of events within a user-adjustable 40-1,280 ns window. The measured angular resolution of the device is <1 deg (17 mrad) in CA mode and is predicted to be approximately 3 deg (54 mrad) in CS mode. The energy resolution of the CZT detectors is approximately 5% FWHM at 120 keV. We will present details of the system design and initial results for the calibration and performance of the prototype.

  9. A Monte Carlo evaluation of three Compton camera absorbers.

    PubMed

    Uche, C Z; Round, W H; Cree, M J

    2011-09-01

    We present a quantitative study on the performance of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and germanium (Ge) detectors as potential Compton camera absorbers. The GEANT4 toolkit was used to model the performance of these materials over the nuclear medicine energy range. CZT and Ge demonstrate the highest and lowest efficiencies respectively. Although the best spatial resolution was attained for Ge, its lowest ratio of single photoelectric to multiple interactions suggests that it is most prone to inter-pixel cross-talk. In contrast, CZT, which demonstrates the least positioning error due to multiple interactions, has a comparable spatial resolution with Ge. Therefore, we modelled a Compton camera system based on silicon (Si) and CZT as the scatterer and absorber respectively. The effects of the detector parameters of our proposed system on image resolution were evaluated and our results show good agreement with previous studies. Interestingly, spatial resolution which accounted for the least image degradation at 140.5 keV became the dominant degrading factor at 511 keV, indicating that the absorber parameters play some key roles at higher energies. The results of this study have validated the predictions by An et al. which state that the use of a higher energy gamma source together with reduction of the absorber segmentation to sub-millimetre could achieve the image resolution of 5 mm required in medical imaging.

  10. Development of Compton gamma-ray sources at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Hartemann, F. V.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M. J.; Prantil, M. A.; Wu, S.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2012-12-21

    Compact Compton scattering gamma-ray sources offer the potential of studying nuclear photonics with new tools. The optimization of such sources depends on the final application, but generally requires maximizing the spectral density (photons/eV) of the gamma-ray beam while simultaneously reducing the overall bandwidth on target to minimize noise. We have developed an advanced design for one such system, comprising the RF drive, photoinjector, accelerator, and electron-generating and electron-scattering laser systems. This system uses a 120 Hz, 250 pC, 2 ps, 0.35 mm mrad electron beam with 250 MeV maximum energy in an X-band accelerator scattering off a 150 mJ, 10 ps, 532 nm laser to generate 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} photons/eV/s/Sr at 0.5 MeV with an overall bandwidth of less than 1%. The source will be able to produce photons up to energies of 2.5 MeV. We also discuss Compton scattering gamma-ray source predictions given by numerical codes.

  11. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  12. A Diamond Micro-strip Electron Detector for Compton Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Amrendra

    2012-03-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to measure the weak charge of the proton with a precision of 4.1% by measuring the parity violating asymmetry in polarized electron-proton elastic scattering. Beam polarimetry is the largest experimental contribution to the error budget. A new Compton polarimeter was installed in Fall 2010 for a non-invasive and continuous monitoring of the electron beam polarization in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The Compton-scattered electrons are detected in four planes of diamond micro-strip detectors. This is the first use of diamond micro-strip detectors as a tracking device in a physics experiment. These detectors are read out using custom built electronic modules that include a pre-amplifier, a pulse shaping amplifier and a discriminator for each detector micro-strip. We use Field Programmable Gate Array based general purpose logic modules for event selection and histogramming. This polarimeter is being used for online monitoring of beam polarization in the experiment. We have achieved the design goals of 1% statistical uncertainity per hour and expect to achieve 1% systematic uncertainity. We will discuss the details of our polarimetry setup, the analysis approach and the preliminary results.

  13. Compton imaging with AGATA and SmartPET for DESPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, S.; Arnés, B. Q.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Davinson, T.; Gadea, A.; Harkness, L. J.; Judson, D. S.; Lazarus, I.; Nolan, P. J.; Page, R. D.; Prieto, A. H.; Simpson, J.

    2011-12-01

    DESPEC (DEcay SPECtroscopy) is a spectrometer, currently under construction, which is to be used at the FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) facility at GSI Darmstadt, Germany, as part of the NuSTAR (Nuclear STructure, Astrophysics and Reactions) project. Its goal is to analyse the decay of exotic nuclei produced via the Super-FRS (SUPERconducting FRagment Separator). The optimal configuration of certain elements of the spectrometer, namely a HPGe (High Purity Germanium) tracking array, is still under consideration. Work currently being carried out at the University of Liverpool using a segmented, coaxial HPGe detector (AGATA B009) and a pixelated, planar HPGe detector (SmartPET 1) in a Compton camera configuration aims to inform this process by providing insight into the potential performance of such a configuration. This will determine its suitability for the intended purpose, i.e. Compton reconstruction of gamma rays emitted from exotic nuclei implanted into the DESPEC implantation detector, AIDA (Advanced Implantation Detector Array). Preliminary results from this investigation, along with plans for the future direction of this work, are presented.

  14. Development of Compton gamma-ray sources at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Hartemann, F. V.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M. J.; Prantil, M. A.; Wu, S.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Compact Compton scattering gamma-ray sources offer the potential of studying nuclear photonics with new tools. The optimization of such sources depends on the final application, but generally requires maximizing the spectral density (photons/eV) of the gamma-ray beam while simultaneously reducing the overall bandwidth on target to minimize noise. We have developed an advanced design for one such system, comprising the RF drive, photoinjector, accelerator, and electron-generating and electron-scattering laser systems. This system uses a 120 Hz, 250 pC, 2 ps, 0.35 mm mrad electron beam with 250 MeV maximum energy in an X-band accelerator scattering off a 150 mJ, 10 ps, 532 nm laser to generate 5 × 1010 photons/eV/s/Sr at 0.5 MeV with an overall bandwidth of less than 1%. The source will be able to produce photons up to energies of 2.5 MeV. We also discuss Compton scattering gamma-ray source predictions given by numerical codes.

  15. The effect of relativistic Compton scattering on thermonuclear burn of pure deuterium fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemizad, A.; Nazirzadeh, M.; Khanbabaei, B.

    2016-08-01

    The relativistic effects of the Compton scattering on the thermonuclear burn-up of pure deuterium fuel in non-equilibrium plasma have been studied by four temperature (4T) theory. In the limit of low electron temperatures and photon energies, the nonrelativistic Compton scattering is valid and a convenient approximation, but in the high energy exchange rates between electrons and photons, is seen to break down. The deficiencies of the nonrelativistic approximation can be overcome by using the relativistic correction in the photons kinetic equation. In this research, we have utilized the four temperature (4T) theory to calculate the critical burn-up parameter for pure deuterium fuel, while the Compton scattering is considered as a relativistic phenomenon. It was shown that the measured critical burn-up parameter in ignition with relativistic Compton scattering is smaller than that of the parameter in the ignition with the nonrelativistic Compton scattering.

  16. Induced Compton Scattering by Relativistic Electrons in Magnetized Astrophysical Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sincell, Mark William

    1994-01-01

    The effects of stimulated scattering on high brightness temperature radiation are studied in two important contexts. In the first case, we assume that the radiation is confined to a collimated beam traversing a relativistically streaming magnetized plasma. When the plasma is cold in the bulk frame, stimulated scattering is only significant if the angle between the photon motion and the plasma velocity is less than gamma^{-1} , where gamma is the bulk Lorentz factor. Under the assumption that the center of the photon beam is parallel to the bulk motion, we calculate the scattering rate as a function of the angular spread of the beam and gamma. Magnetization changes the photon recoil, without which stimulated scattering has no effect. It also introduces a strong dependence on frequency and polarization: if the photon frequency matches the electron cyclotron frequency, the scattering rate of photons polarized perpendicular to the magnetic field can be substantially enhanced relative to Thomson, and if the photon frequency is much less than the cyclotron frequency the scattering is suppressed. Applying these calculations to pulsars, we find that stimulated scattering of the radio beam in the magnetized wind believed to exist outside the light cylinder can substantially alter the spectrum and polarization state of the radio signal. We suggest that the scattering rate is so high in some pulsars that the ability of the radio signal to penetrate the pulsar magnetosphere requires modification of either the conventional model of the magnetosphere or assumptions about the effects of stimulated scattering upon a beam. In the second case, we present a model of the radio emission from synchrotron self-absorbed sources, including the effects of induced Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in the source. Order of magnitude estimates show that stimulated scattering becomes the dominant absorption process when (kTB/m ec^2)tau_{T }_sp{~}> 0.1. Numerical simulations

  17. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Tull, Carolyn R.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  18. Semiconductor eutectic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yu, J. G.

    1986-12-01

    Two-phase semiconducting eutectics are potential device-materials. Of these, the SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic was chosen for studies in detail because it consists of multi-p/n-layers of SnSe and SnSe2 semiconductors. Since plasma frequency has not been detected in its infrared reflectance spectrum up to 40 micrometers of wavelength, it suggests that the SnSe-SnSe2 eutectic is a nondegenerate semiconductor. As-grown SnSe2 single crystals have hexagonal crystallographic structure and show n-type conductivity. Polycrystalline SnSe and SnSe2 films have been successfully prepared in vacuum using a close-space-vapor transport technique.

  19. Light amplification using semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, R.D.

    1987-06-01

    During the summer of 1953, John von Neumann discussed his ideas concerning light amplification using semiconductors with Edward Teller. In September of that year, von Neumann sent a manuscript containing his ideas and calculations on this subject to Teller for his comments. To the best of our knowledge, von Neumann did not take time to work further on these ideas, and the manuscript remained unpublished. These previously unpublished writings of John von Neumann on the subject of light amplification in semiconductors are printed as a service to the laser community. While von Neumann's original manuscript and his letter to Teller are available to anyone who visits the Library of Congress, it is much more convenient to have this paper appear in an archival journal.

  20. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  1. Tunable semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Tunable semiconductor lasers are disclosed requiring minimized coupling regions. Multiple laser embodiments employ ring resonators or ring resonator pairs using only a single coupling region with the gain medium are detailed. Tuning can be performed by changing the phase of the coupling coefficient between the gain medium and a ring resonator of the laser. Another embodiment provides a tunable laser including two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series and a reflector coupled to a gain medium.

  2. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  3. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  4. Synchronous semiconductor memory device

    SciTech Connect

    Onno, C.; Hirata, M.

    1989-11-21

    This patent describes a synchronous semiconductor memory device. It comprises: first latch means for latching a write command in synchronism with clock signal; second latch means for latching a write data in synchronism with the clock signal and for outputting two write process signals based on the write data latched thereby; pulse generating means for generating an internal write pulse signal based on the write command latched by the first latch means. The internal write pulse signal having a semiconductor memory device; write control means supplied with the internal write pulse signal and the write process signals for controlling write and read operations of the synchronous semiconductor memory device; memory means for storing the write data latched by the second latch means; and noise preventing means coupled to the second latch means and the write control means for supplying the write process signals to the write control means only in the write mode responsive to the internal write pulse signal and for setting the write process signals to fixed potentials during a time other than the write mode.

  5. Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

  6. A Compton camera application for the GAMOS GEANT4-based framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, L. J.; Arce, P.; Judson, D. S.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Cresswell, J. R.; Dormand, J.; Jones, M.; Nolan, P. J.; Sampson, J. A.; Scraggs, D. P.; Sweeney, A.; Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J.

    2012-04-01

    Compton camera systems can be used to image sources of gamma radiation in a variety of applications such as nuclear medicine, homeland security and nuclear decommissioning. To locate gamma-ray sources, a Compton camera employs electronic collimation, utilising Compton kinematics to reconstruct the paths of gamma rays which interact within the detectors. The main benefit of this technique is the ability to accurately identify and locate sources of gamma radiation within a wide field of view, vastly improving the efficiency and specificity over existing devices. Potential advantages of this imaging technique, along with advances in detector technology, have brought about a rapidly expanding area of research into the optimisation of Compton camera systems, which relies on significant input from Monte-Carlo simulations. In this paper, the functionality of a Compton camera application that has been integrated into GAMOS, the GEANT4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations, is described. The application simplifies the use of GEANT4 for Monte-Carlo investigations by employing a script based language and plug-in technology. To demonstrate the use of the Compton camera application, simulated data have been generated using the GAMOS application and acquired through experiment for a preliminary validation, using a Compton camera configured with double sided high purity germanium strip detectors. Energy spectra and reconstructed images for the data sets are presented.

  7. New developments in power semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper represents an overview of some recent power semiconductor developments and spotlights new technologies that may have significant impact for aircraft electric secondary power. Primary emphasis will be on NASA-Lewis-supported developments in transistors, diodes, a new family of semiconductors, and solid-state remote power controllers. Several semiconductor companies that are moving into the power arena with devices rated at 400 V and 50 A and above are listed, with a brief look at a few devices.

  8. Integrated devices including cleaved semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.Y.

    1987-11-17

    A process for fabricating a semiconductor device is described comprising semiconductor laser on a semiconductor substrate in which prior to cleaving the semiconductor substrate to form a facet of the semiconductor laser a hole is made in the substrate along the cleave plane so as to produce a stop cleave facet.

  9. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.

  10. Gauge invariance and Compton scattering from relativistic composite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Gross, F. |

    1993-09-01

    Using the Ward-Takahashi (W-T) identity and the Bethe-Salpeter (B-S) wave equation, we investigate the dynamical requirements imposed by electromagnetic gauge invariance on Compton scattering from relativistic composite system. The importance of off-shell rescattering in intermediate states, which is equivalent to final state interactions in inclusive processes, is clarified in the context of current conservation. It is shown that, if the nuclear force is nonlocal, there will be both two-photon interaction currents and rescattering contributions to terms involving one-photon interaction currents. We derive the two-body W-T identity for the two-photon interaction currents, and obtain explicit forms for the interaction current operators for three illustrative models of nuclear forces: (a) two-pion exchange forces with baryon resonances, (b) covariant separable forces, and (c) charged one-pion exchange.

  11. Virtual Compton scattering off the nucleon in chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmert, T.R.; Holstein, B.R.; Knoechlein, G.; Scherer, S.

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the spin-independent part of the virtual Compton scattering (VCS) amplitude off the nucleon within the framework of chiral perturbation theory. We perform a consistent calculation to third order in external momenta according to Weinberg`s power counting. With this calculation we can determine the second- and fourth-order structure-dependent coefficients of the general low-energy expansion of the spin-averaged VCS amplitude based on gauge invariance, crossing symmetry, and the discrete symmetries. We discuss the kinematical regime to which our calculation can be applied and compare our expansion with the multipole expansion by Guichon, Liu, and Thomas. We establish the connection of our calculation with the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon where it is possible. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Isothermal, Compton-heated coronae above accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of Compton-heated coronae above accretion disks is studied here by using analytic and numerical approaches are used here to determine the direct and scattered radiation reaching the base of the corona for a range of central source luminosities. It is found that the outer region of the corona is unaffected by multiple scattering in the interior, provided that the luminosity of the central source is sufficient below the Eddington limit. How attenuation and scattering by the corona affects the strength of chromospheric emission lines is determined, as is the condition for which the irradiation due to the central source exceeds the locally generated flux from the disk. Finally, it is shown that the stability analysis for irradiated accretion disks of Tuchman et al. is not substantially altered by the corona.

  13. Compton imaging with the PorGamRays spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judson, D. S.; Boston, A. J.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Hardie, A.; Harkness, L. J.; Jones, L. L.; Jones, M.; Lazarus, I.; Nolan, P. J.; Pucknell, V.; Rigby, S. V.; Seller, P.; Scraggs, D. P.; Simpson, J.; Slee, M.; Sweeney, A.; PorGamRays Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The PorGamRays project aims to develop a portable gamma-ray detection system with both spectroscopic and imaging capabilities. The system is designed around a stack of thin Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors. The imaging capability utilises the Compton camera principle. Each detector is segmented into 100 pixels which are read out through custom designed Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). This device has potential applications in the security, decommissioning and medical fields. This work focuses on the near-field imaging performance of a lab-based demonstrator consisting of two pixelated CZT detectors, each of which is bonded to a NUCAM II ASIC. Measurements have been made with point 133Ba and 57Co sources located ˜35 mm from the surface of the scattering detector. Position resolution of ˜20 mm FWHM in the x and y planes is demonstrated.

  14. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore » charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  15. Bursts of gamma rays from Compton scattering at cosmological distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Svensson, Roland; Paczynski, Bohdan

    1991-01-01

    Compton scattering of the microwave background photons by beams of ultrarelativistic electrons at large redshifts, z much greater than 1, is proposed as a source of some gamma-ray bursts. Such beams may be produced by cusps on superconducting cosmic strings. In the present model, a very narrow beam of ultrarelativistic electron-positron pairs scatters the microwave background photons into a very narrow beam of gamma rays. While the pairs lose energy, the beam of gamma rays opens up and sweeps the observer. The expected time variability and spectra of the resulting gamma-ray burst are calculated. The bursts have a rapid rise time, followed by a more gradual decline. The spectra are initially very hard and become softer during the decline.

  16. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering Beam-Spin Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod; R.A. Niyazov

    2008-01-24

    The beam spin asymmetries in the hard exclusive electroproduction of photons on the proton (ep -> epg) were measured over a wide kinematic range and with high statistical accuracy. These asymmetries result from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and of deeply virtual Compton scattering. Over the whole kinematic range (x_B from 0.11 to 0.58, Q^2 from 1 to 4.8 GeV^2, -t from 0.09 to 1.8 GeV^2), the azimuthal dependence of the asymmetries is compatible with expectations from leading-twist dominance, A = a*sin(phi)/[1+c*cos(phi)]. This extensive set of data can thus be used to constrain significantly the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon in the valence quark sector.

  17. Wide Angle Compton Scattering within the SCET factorization Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivel, Nikolay

    2016-03-01

    Existing data for the electromagnetic proton form factors and for the cross section of the wide angle Compton scattering (WACS) show that the hard two-gluon exchange mechanism (collinear factorization) is still not applicable in the kinematical region where Mandelstam variables s ~ -t ~ -u are about few GeV2. On the other hand these observables can be described in phenomenological models where spectator quarks are soft which assumes a large contribution due to the soft-overlap mechanism. It turns out that the simple QCD factorization picture is not complete and must also include the soft-overlap contribution which can be described as a certain matrix element in the soft collinear effective theory (SCET). Then the leading power contribution to WACS amplitude is described as a sum of the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. The existing experimental data allows one to check certain conclusions based on the assumption about dominant role of the soft-spectator mechanism.

  18. A Compton camera prototype for prompt gamma medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirolf, P. G.; Aldawood, S.; Böhmer, M.; Bortfeldt, J.; Castelhano, I.; Dedes, G.; Fiedler, F.; Gernhäuser, R.; Golnik, C.; Helmbrecht, S.; Hueso-González, F.; Kolff, H. v. d.; Kormoll, T.; Lang, C.; Liprandi, S.; Lutter, R.; Marinšek, T.; Maier, L.; Pausch, G.; Petzoldt, J.; Römer, K.; Schaart, D.; Parodi, K.

    2016-05-01

    Compton camera prototype for a position-sensitive detection of prompt γ rays from proton-induced nuclear reactions is being developed in Garching. The detector system allows to track the Comptonscattered electrons. The camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation absorber crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors acting as scatterers. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has been characterized with radioactive sources. Online commissioning measurements were performed with a pulsed deuteron beam at the Garching Tandem accelerator and with a clinical proton beam at the OncoRay facility in Dresden. The determination of the interaction point of the photons in the monolithic crystal was investigated.

  19. Commissioning of a Compton-Scattering-Based Gamma Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, David; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Messerly, Mike; Shverdin, Miro; McNabb, Dennis; Siders, Craig; Barty, Chris

    2009-11-01

    Recently a Compton-scattering based gamma-ray source, in which a high-intensity laser scatters off a high-brightness electron beam and emerges as a narrow-band gamma-ray beam, has been commissioned at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Operating at energies from 0.1 to 0.9 MeV, the source produces fluxes upwards of 10^6 photons/sec with a brightness of 10^ 15 photons/s/mm^2/mrad^2/0.1% BW. Presented here is a discussion of the design and performance of the laser and electron subsystems that are used to drive the source, and an overview of the parameters of the generated gamma-ray beam.

  20. Deeply virtual Compton scattering from gauge/gravity duality

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Miguel S.; Djuric, Marko

    2013-04-15

    We use gauge/gravity duality to study deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) in the limit of high center of mass energy at fixed momentum transfer, corresponding to the limit of low Bjorken x, where the process is dominated by the exchange of the pomeron. At strong coupling, the pomeron is described as the graviton Regge trajectory in AdS space, with a hard wall to mimic confinement effects. This model agrees with HERA data in a large kinematical range. The behavior of the DVCS cross section for very high energies, inside saturation, can be explained by a simple AdS black disk model. In a restricted kinematical window, this model agrees with HERA data as well.

  1. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  2. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  3. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  4. Compton suppressed LaBr3 detection system for use in nondestructive spent fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, S.; Heidrich, B.; Ünlü, K.

    2015-06-01

    Current methods for safeguarding and accounting for spent nuclear fuel in reprocessing facilities are extremely resource and time intensive. The incorporation of autonomous passive gamma-ray detectors into the procedure could make the process significantly less burdensome. In measured gamma-ray spectra from spent nuclear fuel, the Compton continuum from dominant fission product photopeaks obscure the lower energy lines from other isotopes. The application of Compton suppression to gamma-ray measurements of spent fuel may reduce this effect and allow other less intense, lower energy peaks to be detected, potentially improving the accuracy of multivariate analysis algorithms. Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel using HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl) primary detectors were performed. Irradiated fuel was measured in two configurations: as intact fuel elements viewed through a collimator and as feed solutions in a laboratory to simulate the measurement of a dissolved process stream. These two configurations allowed the direct assessment and quantification of the differences in measured gamma-ray spectra from the application of Compton suppression. In the first configuration, several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling times from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using the three collimated Compton suppression systems. In the second geometry, Compton suppressed measurements of two samples of Approved Test Material commercial fuel elements were recorded inside the guard detector annulus to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Compton suppression was found to improve measured gamma-ray spectra of spent fuel for multivariate analysis by notably lowering the Compton continuum from dominant photopeaks such as 137Cs and 140La, due to scattered interactions in the detector, which allowed more spectral features to be resolved. There was a

  5. Compton scattering of self-absorbed synchrotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, He; Lei, Wei-Hua; Wu, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Bing

    2013-11-01

    Synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scattering is an important emission mechanism in many astronomical sources, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and active galactic nuclei. We give a complete presentation of the analytical approximations for the Compton scattering of synchrotron emission with both weak and strong synchrotron self-absorption. All possible orders of the characteristic synchrotron spectral breaks (νa, νm and νc) are studied. In the weak self-absorption regime, i.e. νa < νc, the electron energy distribution is not modified by the self-absorption process. The shape of the SSC component broadly resembles that of synchrotron, but with the following features: The SSC flux increases linearly with frequency up to the SSC break frequency corresponding to the self-absorption frequency νa; and the presence of a logarithmic term in the high-frequency range of the SSC spectra makes it harder than the power-law approximation. In the strong absorption regime, i.e. νa > νc, heating of low-energy electrons due to synchrotron absorption leads to pile-up of electrons, and form a thermal component besides the broken power-law component. This leads to two-component (thermal + non-thermal) spectra for both the synchrotron and SSC spectral components. For νc < νa < νm, the spectrum is thermal (non-thermal) dominated if ν _a > √{ν _m ν _c} (ν _a < √{ν _m ν _c}). Similar to the weak-absorption regime, the SSC spectral component is broader than the simple broken power-law approximation. We derive the critical condition for strong absorption (electron pile-up), and discuss a case of GRB reverse shock emission in a wind medium, which invokes νa > max(νm, νc).

  6. Performance and promise of the Compton suppression well counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbottle, Garman; Cumming, J. B.

    1994-12-01

    Determination of gamma-ray activities in small environmental samples poses a challenge to measurement technologies: to achieve the lowest possible detection limits, an instrument must combine high efficiency with superior peak-to-background characteristics. These requirements are simultaneously met by a Compton-suppression well counter (CSWC) of intrinsic germanium. The Brookhaven CSWC has a 5-cm deep, 1-cm diameter well and active volume of ˜ 125 cm 3. It is positioned in the 3.3-in through-hole of 10 × 12 in NaI(Tl) crystal. This CSWC was first assembled in the mid 1980s, and used in several research studies: double β - decay of 48Ca, the radioactivity of 180mTa, and high-sensitivity neutron activation analysis of iridium in rocks and minerals. More recently it has been employed in environmental radioactivity research on the transport of the members of the uranium and thorium series in natural soils. The counter typically measures samples of ˜ 3 g of soil, has a peak-to-Compton ratio of ˜ 300:1, and a sensitivity for 235U of ˜ 50 ng. It can detect gamma rays of less than 30 keV, hence can be used to measure environmentally significant nuclides like 210Pb, 230Th and 241Am in small soil samples or soil fractions. Because of the simple geometry self-absorption corrections are straightforward. The paper will discuss the performance of this device, and the projected performance of an advanced model which will incorporate a number of changes materially increasing the sensitivity.

  7. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  8. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  9. Compton scattering imaging of a working battery using synchrotron high-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Itou, Masayoshi; Orikasa, Yuki; Gogyo, Yuma; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Results of studies on Compton scattering imaging using synchrotron high-energy X-rays are reported. The technique is applied to a discharging coin cell, and the intensity of Compton scattered X-rays from the inside of the cell has been measured as a function of position and time. The position-time intensity map captures the migration of lithium ions in the positive electrode and reveals the structural change due to the volume expansion of the electrode. This experiment is a critical step in developing synchrotron-based Compton scattering imaging for electrochemical cells at a product level.

  10. Gamma-ray burst spectra from photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration is given to a model of gamma-ray burst sources based on repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons. Relativistic electrons which are continuously produced in the source radiate the total power L supplied to them. Higher order Compton scatterings, which occur when L(soft) is much less than L make the model distinct. The spectrum having an X-ray energy index of about one results from the superposition of the spectral components from several orders of Compton scattering; the change of the slope at several hundred keV arises from the Klein-Nishina decline of the scattering cross section.

  11. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  12. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  13. Head Start Facilities Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Assessment Management, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    A quality Head Start facility should provide a physical environment responsive both to the needs of the children and families served and to the needs of staff, volunteers, and community agencies that share space with Head Start. This manual is a tool for Head Start grantees and delegate agencies for assessing existing facilities, making…

  14. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  15. Semiconductor superlattice photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, S. L.; Hess, K.; Coleman, J. J.; Leburton, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A superlattice photomultiplier and a photodetector based on the real space transfer mechanism were studied. The wavelength for the first device is of the order of a micron or flexible corresponding to the bandgap absorption in a semiconductor. The wavelength for the second device is in the micron range (about 2 to 12 microns) corresponding to the energy of the conduction band edge discontinuity between an Al/(sub x)Ga(sub 1-x)As and GaAs interface. Both devices are described.

  16. Deep levels in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, George D.

    1983-03-01

    The 3d transition element ion impurities in silicon are reviewed for the broad insight they provide in understanding deep levels in semiconductors. As interstitials, their interaction with the host tends to confine the d-levels to the forbidden gap, providing many deep states. The interaction at the substitutional site is best considered as an interaction with the lattice vacancy, into which the impurity is placed. This interaction tends to repel deep a1 and t2 levels from the gap. When the levels are present, they are mostly vacancy-like and the defect is likely to display the large lattice relaxations characteristic of the vacancy.

  17. Semiconductor structure and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinkel, Nancy A. (Inventor); Goldstein, Bernard (Inventor); Ettenberg, Michael (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor devices such as lasers which include a substrate with a channel therein with a clad layer overlying the substrate and filling the channel exhibit irregularities such as terraces in the surface of the clad layer which are detrimental to device performance. These irregularities are substantially eliminated by forming the channel in a surface of a buffer layer greater than about 4 micrometers thick on the substrate and forming the clad layer over the buffer layer and the channel. CW lasers incorporating the principles of the invention exhibit the highest output power in a single spatial mode and maximum output power which have been observed to date.

  18. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2001-12-21

    Semiconductor bulk crystals and multilayer structures with controlled isotopic composition have attracted much scientific and technical interest in the past few years. Isotopic composition affects a large number of physical properties, including phonon energies and lifetimes, bandgaps, the thermal conductivity and expansion coefficient and spin-related effects. Isotope superlattices are ideal media for self-diffusion studies. In combination with neutron transmutation doping, isotope control offers a novel approach to metal-insulator transition studies. Spintronics, quantum computing and nanoparticle science are emerging fields using isotope control.

  19. Semiconductor nanorod liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang-shi; Walda, Joost; Manna, Liberato; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2002-01-28

    Rodlike molecules form liquid crystalline phases with orientational order and positional disorder. The great majority of materials in which liquid crystalline phases have been observed are comprised of organic molecules or polymers, even though there has been continuing and growing interest in inorganic liquid crystals. Recent advances in the control of the sizes and shapes of inorganic nanocrystals allow for the formation of a broad class of new inorganic liquid crystals. Here we show the formation of liquid crystalline phases of CdSe semiconductor nanorods. These new liquid crystalline phases may have great importance for both application and fundamental study.

  20. Semiconductor devices incorporating multilayer interference regions

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, R.M.; Drummond, T.J.; Gourley, P.L.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-08-31

    A semiconductor high reflector comprising a number of thin alternating layers of semiconductor materials is electrically tunable and may be used as a temperature insensitive semiconductor laser in a Fabry-Perot configuration. 8 figs.

  1. Semiconductor devices incorporating multilayer interference regions

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Gourley, Paul L.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    A semiconductor high reflector comprising a number of thin alternating layers of semiconductor materials is electrically tunable and may be used as a temperature insensitive semiconductor laser in a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  2. Aqueous Based Semiconductor Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Jing, Lihong; Kershaw, Stephen V; Li, Yilin; Huang, Xiaodan; Li, Yingying; Rogach, Andrey L; Gao, Mingyuan

    2016-09-28

    This review summarizes traditional and recent nonconventional, bioinspired, methods for the aqueous synthesis of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The basic chemistry concepts are critically emphasized at the very beginning as these are strongly correlated with the selection of ligands and the optimal formation of aqueous QDs and their more sophisticated structures. The synergies of biomimetic and biosynthetic methods that can combine biospecific reactivity with the robust and strong optical responses of QDs have also resulted in new approaches to the synthesis of the nanoparticles themselves. A related new avenue is the recent extension of QD synthesis to form nanoparticles endowed with chiral optical properties. The optical characteristics of QD materials and their advanced forms such as core/shell heterostructures, alloys, and doped QDs are discussed: from the design considerations of optical band gap tuning, the control and reduction of the impact of surface traps, the consideration of charge carrier processes that affect emission and energy and charge transfer, to the impact and influence of lattice strain. We also describe the considerable progress in some selected QD applications such as in bioimaging and theranostics. The review concludes with future strategies and identification of key challenges that still need to be resolved in reaching very attractive, scalable, yet versatile aqueous syntheses that may widen the scope of commercial applications for semiconductor nanocrystals. PMID:27586892

  3. Isotopically engineered semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, E. E.

    1995-04-01

    Scientific interest, technological promise, and increased availability of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This review of mostly recent activities begins with an introduction to some past classical experiments which have been performed on isotopically controlled semiconductors. A review of the natural isotopic composition of the relevant elements follows. Some materials aspects resulting in part from the high costs of enriched isotopes are discussed next. Raman spectroscopy studies with a number of isotopically pure and deliberately mixed Ge bulk crystals show that the Brillouin-zone-center optical phonons are not localized. Their lifetime is almost independent of isotopic disorder, leading to homogeneous Raman line broadening. Studies with short period isotope superlattices consisting of alternating layers of n atomic planes of 70Ge and 74Ge reveal a host of zone-center phonons due to Brillouin-zone folding. At n≳40 one observes two phonon lines at frequencies corresponding to the bulk values of the two isotopes. In natural diamond, isotope scattering of the low-energy phonons, which are responsible for the thermal conductivity, is very strongly affected by small isotope disorder. Isotopically pure 12C diamond crystals exhibit thermal conductivities as high as 410 W cm-1 K-1 at 104 K, leading to projected values of over 2000 W cm-1 K-1 near 80 K. The changes in phonon properties with isotopic composition also weakly affect the electronic band structures and the lattice constants. The latter isotope dependence is most relevant for future standards of length based on crystal lattice constants. Capture of thermal neutrons by isotope nuclei followed by nuclear decay produces new elements, resulting in a very large number of possibilities for isotope selective doping of semiconductors. This neutron transmutation of isotope nuclei, already used

  4. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sanpietro, M.; Kemmer, J.; Dietl, H.; Holl, P.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements.

  5. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  6. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  7. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  8. Stripline mount for semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, N.R.; Holbrook, W.R.; Johnson, A.F. Jr.; Zacharias, A.

    1988-08-02

    An arrangement for coupling a semiconductor optical device to a signal source, is described, the arrangement comprising a stripline transmission path having a predetermined characteristic impedance Z/sub 0/; and resistance means connected in series with the stripline transmission path, chosen to provide impedance matching between the stripline transmission path and an associated semiconductor optical device.

  9. Compton scattering and nucleon polarisabilities in chiral EFT: Status and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2016-05-01

    We review theoretical progress and prospects for determining the nucleon's static dipole polarisabilities from Compton scattering on few-nucleon targets, including new values; see Refs. [1-5] for details and a more thorough bibliography.

  10. Electron Pattern Recognition using trigger mode SOI pixel sensor for Advanced Compton Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazoe, K.; Yoshihara, Y.; Fairuz, A.; Koyama, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takeda, A.; Tsuru, T.; Arai, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Compton imaging is a useful method for localizing sub MeV to a few MeV gamma-rays and widely used for environmental and medical applications. The direction of recoiled electrons in Compton scattering process provides the additional information to limit the Compton cones and increases the sensitivity in the system. The capability of recoiled electron tracking using trigger-mode Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) sensor is investigated with various radiation sources. The trigger-mode SOI sensor consists of 144 by 144 active pixels with 30 μm cells and the thickness of sensor is 500 μm. The sensor generates the digital output when it is hit by gamma-rays and 25 by 25 pixel pattern of surrounding the triggered pixel is readout to extract the recoiled electron track. The electron track is successfully observed for 60Co and 137Cs sources, which provides useful information for future electron tracking Compton camera.

  11. On the line-shape analysis of Compton profiles and its application to neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, G.; Krzystyniak, M.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical properties of Compton profiles are used in order to simplify the analysis of neutron Compton scattering experiments. In particular, the possibility to fit the difference of Compton profiles is discussed as a way to greatly decrease the level of complexity of the data treatment, making the analysis easier, faster and more robust. In the context of the novel method proposed, two mathematical models describing the shapes of differenced Compton profiles are discussed: the simple Gaussian approximation for harmonic and isotropic local potential, and an analytical Gauss-Hermite expansion for an anharmonic or anisotropic potential. The method is applied to data collected by VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS neutron and muon pulsed source (UK) on Copper and Aluminium samples at ambient and low temperatures.

  12. Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E. E.

    2010-07-15

    This paper is based on a tutorial presentation at the International Conference on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS-25) held in Saint Petersburg, Russia in July 2009. The tutorial focused on a review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, is the most prominent effect for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples.

  13. Least-Squares Deconvolution of Compton Telescope Data with the Positivity Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, William A.; Dixon, David D.; Tumer, O. Tumay; Zych, Allen D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a Direct Linear Algebraic Deconvolution (DLAD) approach to imaging of data from Compton gamma-ray telescopes. Imposition of the additional physical constraint, that all components of the model be non-negative, has been found to have a powerful effect in stabilizing the results, giving spatial resolution at or near the instrumental limit. A companion paper (Dixon et al. 1993) presents preliminary images of the Crab Nebula region using data from COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory.

  14. Calculating electron momentum densities and Compton profiles using the linear tetrahedron method.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, D; Billington, D; Haynes, T D; Millichamp, T E; Taylor, J W; Duffy, J A; Giblin, S R; Dewhurst, J K; Dugdale, S B

    2014-12-10

    A method for computing electron momentum densities and Compton profiles from ab initio calculations is presented. Reciprocal space is divided into optimally-shaped tetrahedra for interpolation, and the linear tetrahedron method is used to obtain the momentum density and its projections such as Compton profiles. Results are presented and evaluated against experimental data for Be, Cu, Ni, Fe3Pt, and YBa2Cu4O8, demonstrating the accuracy of our method in a wide variety of crystal structures.

  15. IS COMPTON COOLING SUFFICIENT TO EXPLAIN EVOLUTION OF OBSERVED QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN OUTBURST SOURCES?

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak E-mail: chakraba@bose.res.in

    2015-01-01

    In outburst sources, quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the α parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range suggested by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of observations.

  16. Compton scattering of electrons from optical pulses for quantum nondemolition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Friberg, S.R. ); Hawkins, R.J. )

    1995-01-01

    Compton scattering of electrons from photons destroys neither electrons nor photons, permitting quantum nondemolition measurements of the photon number. Here we consider a Compton scattering quantum nondemolition measurement of the photon number of an optical pulse traveling in a prepared optical fiber. A beam of electrons is directed through the evanescent field associated with the optical pulse, causing the electrons to scatter through an angle proportional to the pulse's photon number.

  17. Collective Evidence for Inverse Compton Emission from External Photons in High-Power Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first collective evidence that Fermi-detected jets of high kinetic power (L(sub kin)) are dominated by inverse Compton emission from upscattered external photons. Using a sample with a broad range in orientation angle, including radio galaxies and blazars, we find that very high power sources (L(sub kin) > 10(exp 45.5) erg/s) show a significant increase in the ratio of inverse Compton to synchrotron power (Compton dominance) with decreasing orientation angle, as measured by the radio core dominance and confirmed by the distribution of superluminal speeds. This increase is consistent with beaming expectations for external Compton (EC) emission, but not for synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission. For the lowest power jets (L(sub kin) < 10(exp 43.5) erg /s), no trend between Compton and radio core dominance is found, consistent with SSC. Importantly, the EC trend is not seen for moderately high power flat spectrum radio quasars with strong external photon fields. Coupled with the evidence that jet power is linked to the jet speed, this finding suggests that external photon fields become the dominant source of seed photons in the jet comoving frame only for the faster and therefore more powerful jets.

  18. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams.

    PubMed

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-21

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing (22)Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3-5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy. PMID:27352107

  19. DETECTION AND IMAGING OF THE CRAB NEBULA WITH THE NUCLEAR COMPTON TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bandstra, M. S.; Bellm, E. C.; Boggs, S. E.; Perez-Becker, D.; Zoglauer, A.; Chang, H.-K.; Chiu, J.-L.; Liang, J.-S.; Chang, Y.-H.; Liu, Z.-K.; Hung, W.-C.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Chiang, S. J.; Run, R.-S.; Lin, C.-H.; Amman, M.; Luke, P. N.; Jean, P.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Wunderer, C. B.

    2011-09-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne Compton telescope designed for the study of astrophysical sources in the soft gamma-ray regime (200 keV-20 MeV). NCT's 10 high-purity germanium crossed-strip detectors measure the deposited energies and three-dimensional positions of gamma-ray interactions in the sensitive volume, and this information is used to restrict the initial photon to a circle on the sky using the Compton scatter technique. Thus NCT is able to perform spectroscopy, imaging, and polarization analysis on soft gamma-ray sources. NCT is one of the next generation of Compton telescopes-the so-called compact Compton telescopes (CCTs)-which can achieve effective areas comparable to the Imaging Compton Telescope's with an instrument that is a fraction of the size. The Crab Nebula was the primary target for the second flight of the NCT instrument, which occurred on 2009 May 17 and 18 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. Analysis of 29.3 ks of data from the flight reveals an image of the Crab at a significance of 4{sigma}. This is the first reported detection of an astrophysical source by a CCT.

  20. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing 22Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3-5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy.

  1. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing 22Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3–5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy.

  2. Collective Evidence for Inverse Compton Emission from External Photons in High-power Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-06-01

    We present the first collective evidence that Fermi-detected jets of high kinetic power (L kin) are dominated by inverse Compton emission from upscattered external photons. Using a sample with a broad range in orientation angle, including radio galaxies and blazars, we find that very high power sources (L kin > 1045.5 erg s-1) show a significant increase in the ratio of inverse Compton to synchrotron power (Compton dominance) with decreasing orientation angle, as measured by the radio core dominance and confirmed by the distribution of superluminal speeds. This increase is consistent with beaming expectations for external Compton (EC) emission, but not for synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. For the lowest power jets (L kin < 1043.5 erg s-1), no trend between Compton and radio core dominance is found, consistent with SSC. Importantly, the EC trend is not seen for moderately high power flat spectrum radio quasars with strong external photon fields. Coupled with the evidence that jet power is linked to the jet speed, this finding suggests that external photon fields become the dominant source of seed photons in the jet comoving frame only for the faster and therefore more powerful jets.

  3. Adaptation of filtered back-projection to compton imaging with non-uniform azimuthal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyounggun; Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Wonho

    2016-05-01

    For Compton image reconstruction, analytic reconstruction methods such as filtered backprojection have been used for real-time imaging. The conventional filtered back-projection method assumes a uniformly distributed azimuthal response in the detector system. In this study, we applied filtered back-projection to the experimental data from detector systems with limited azimuthal angle coverage ranges and estimated the limitations of the analytic reconstruction methods when applied to these systems. For the system with a uniform azimuthal response, the images reconstructed by using filtered back-projection showed better angular resolutions than the images obtained by using simple back-projection did. However, when filtered back-projection was applied to reconstruct Compton images based on measurements performed by using Compton cameras with limited response geometries, the reconstructed images exhibited artifacts caused by the geometrical limitations. Our proposed method employs the Compton camera's rotation to overcome the angular response limitations; when the rotation method was applied in this study, the artifacts in the reconstructed images caused by angular response limitations were minimized. With this method, filtered back-projection can be applied to reconstruct real-time Compton images even when the radiation measurements are performed by using Compton cameras with non-uniform azimuthal response geometries.

  4. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams.

    PubMed

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-21

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing (22)Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3-5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy.

  5. Diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James R.

    1990-03-01

    Growth and physical properties of diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) were investigated. Growth included Bridgman, solid state recrystallization, and liquid phase epitaxy of Mercury(1-x)Manganese(x)Telluride and Mercury(1-x-y)Manganese(x)Cadmium(y)Telluride. Very uniform crystals were produced by solid state recrystallization. Physical properties studied included magnetization, optical response, and magnetotransport. From magnetization, the exchange interactions among magnetic ions have been deduced. Modulated spectroscopy gave details of the electronic structure of DMS and the quality of the material was indicated by the line widths. Magnetotransport, carried out in some cases to 30 T, showed a large negative magnetoresistance and subsequent increase. The Hg(1-x-y)Mn(x)Cd(y)Te has considerable promise for avalanche photodiodes between 1.2 and 1.8 micrometers.

  6. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  7. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s−1 mm−2 mrad−2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection. PMID:27405540

  8. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-13

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 10(22) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  9. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 10(22) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection. PMID:27405540

  10. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s‑1 mm‑2 mrad‑2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  11. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  12. FRONT-END ASIC FOR A SILICON COMPTON TELESCOPE.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; FRIED, J.; FROST, E.; PHLIPS, B.; VERNON, E.; WULF, E.A.

    2007-10-27

    We describe a front-end application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) developed for a silicon Compton telescope. Composed of 32 channels, it reads out signals in both polarities from each side of a Silicon strip sensor, 2 mm thick 27 cm long, characterized by a strip capacitance of 30 pF. Each front-end channel provides low-noise charge amplification, shaping with a stabilized baseline, discrimination, and peak detection with an analog memory. The channels can process events simultaneously, and the read out is sparsified. The charge amplifier makes uses a dual-cascode configuration and dual-polarity adaptive reset, The low-hysteresis discriminator and the multi-phase peak detector process signals with a dynamic range in excess of four hundred. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) below 200 electrons was measured at 30 pF, with a slope of about 4.5 electrons/pF at a peaking time of 4 {micro}s. With a total dissipated power of 5 mW the channel covers an energy range up to 3.2 MeV.

  13. Observation of enhanced Compton scattering in a supercavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, M.; Asakawa, M.; Chen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The enhanced Compton scattering in a supercavity has been observed experimentally. The supercavity with {approximately}99.99% reflectivity mirrors was used to confine the LD-pumped Nd:YAG laser light ({lambda} {approximately} 1.06 {mu} m, CW power {approximately} 500 mW, bandwidth <5kHz). The confined photons were scattered by 100kV electron beams generated from the laser-heated CW electrostatic accelerator. In this experiment, the scattered photon wavelength was in a visible range (<380nm). In order to increase the beam current and the system efficiency, the design of a beam recovery system is also in progress. As an alternative way to confine the laser power, a novel multi-pass optical resonator is being designed. 9MeV electron bunch from the rf linac with photoinjector will be used to interact with MW {approximately} TW high peak power laser pulse in the resonator. In this experiment, the scattered photon energy is in a x-ray regime. These experimental data is used to design the monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources for annihilation of the radioactive nuclear waste.

  14. Compton-backscattering x-ray source for coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray source utilizing Compton-backscattered (CB) photons in a 75-MeV electron storage ring containing an infrared FEL is proposed for producing 33.17-keV X-rays (Iodine K-edge) for coronary angiography. The X-ray intensity into a 4-mrad cone is computed as 7.21 [times] 10[sup 14]/sec for a 500-mA electron beam colliding with 0.2-J/bunch, 3.22-[mu]m photons from an in-ring IR-FEL at the 353.21-MHz rate of a SLAC-PEP 500-kW RF system. The resultant average flux at the patient is 6.4 [times] 10[sup 7] photons/pixel/4-msec aver a 12-cm diameter circle at 3-m from the interaction point for the 0.5 [times]0.5-mm[sup 2] pixel size of the present Si(Li) array of the BNL-SMERF Angiography Facility. This flux is 2.1 times larger than obtains at SMERF at a comparable source-to-patient distance and over an area sufficient to encompass the entire coronary region. However, the X-Ray energy spread due to kinematics alone is 2.63-keV, a factor of 35 larger then SMERF, and presents the major difficulty for the digital subtraction angiography method (DSA) envisioned.

  15. Compton-backscattering x-ray source for coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-12-01

    An X-ray source utilizing Compton-backscattered (CB) photons in a 75-MeV electron storage ring containing an infrared FEL is proposed for producing 33.17-keV X-rays (Iodine K-edge) for coronary angiography. The X-ray intensity into a 4-mrad cone is computed as 7.21 {times} 10{sup 14}/sec for a 500-mA electron beam colliding with 0.2-J/bunch, 3.22-{mu}m photons from an in-ring IR-FEL at the 353.21-MHz rate of a SLAC-PEP 500-kW RF system. The resultant average flux at the patient is 6.4 {times} 10{sup 7} photons/pixel/4-msec aver a 12-cm diameter circle at 3-m from the interaction point for the 0.5 {times}0.5-mm{sup 2} pixel size of the present Si(Li) array of the BNL-SMERF Angiography Facility. This flux is 2.1 times larger than obtains at SMERF at a comparable source-to-patient distance and over an area sufficient to encompass the entire coronary region. However, the X-Ray energy spread due to kinematics alone is 2.63-keV, a factor of 35 larger then SMERF, and presents the major difficulty for the digital subtraction angiography method (DSA) envisioned.

  16. Novel design of a parallax free Compton enhanced PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braem, A.; Chamizo, M.; Chesi, E.; Colonna, N.; Cusanno, F.; De Leo, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Joram, C.; Marrone, S.; Mathot, S.; Nappi, E.; Schoenahl, F.; Seguinot, J.; Weilhammer, P.; Zaidi, H.

    2004-06-01

    Molecular imaging by PET is a powerful tool in modern clinical practice for cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, improvements are needed with respect to the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the technique for its application to specific human organs (breast, prostate, brain, etc.), and to small animals. Presently, commercial PET scanners do not detect the depth of interaction of photons in scintillators, which results in a not negligible parallax error. We describe here a novel concept of PET scanner design that provides full three-dimensional (3D) gamma reconstruction with high spatial resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. It uses matrices of long scintillators read at both ends by hybrid photon detectors. This so-called 3D axial concept also enhances the gamma detection efficiency since it allows one to reconstruct a significant fraction of Compton scattered events. In this note, we describe the concept, a possible design and the expected performance of this new PET device. We also report about first characterization measurements of 10 cm long YAP:Ce scintillation crystals.

  17. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixie; Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Rondon, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    The applicability of pQCD to exclusive reactions at medium energies is a subject of considerable interest. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. In pQCD, three active quarks and two hard gluons are involved when describing RCS. But the cross sections do not agree with the pQCD predictions. In contrast, a handbag dominance model, involving only one single quark coupling to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs) does a good job of matching the cross section data. A measurement of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL was found inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the hand-bag mechanism. Further Miller's handbag approach, which including quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD and others which demands that KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL has been proposed to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. This experiment will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  18. Measurement of Compton scattering in phantoms by germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zasadny, K.R.; Koral, K.F. . Medical Center); Floyd, C.E. Jr.; Jaszczak, R.J. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1990-04-01

    Quantitative Anger-camera tomography requires correction for Compton scattering. The Anger camera spectral-fitting technique can measure scatter fractions at designated positions in an image allowing for correction. To permit verification of those measurements for {sup 131}I, the authors have determined scatter fractions with a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and various phantom configurations. The scatter fraction values for {sup 99m}Tc were also measured and are compared to results from Monte Carlo simulation. The phantom consisted of a 22.2 cm diameter {times} 18.6 cm high cylinder filled with water and a 6 cm diameter water-filled sphere placed at various locations inside the cylinder. Radioisotope is added to either the sphere or the cylinder. The source is collimated by an Anger camera collimator and the active area of the HPGe detector is defined by a 0.6 cm diameter hole in a lead shielding mask. Corrections include accounting for the HPGe detector efficiency as a function of gamma-ray energy, the finite energy resolution of detector and the HPGe detector energy resolution compared to that for a NaI(Tl) Anger camera.

  19. Advanced PET using both compton and photoelectric events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2012-08-01

    This study presents image reconstruction and evaluation of advanced positron emission tomography (PET) by using a simple backprojection and an maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method. Advanced PET can use not only the photoelectric effect but also the Compton scattering effect for image reconstruction; hence, the detection efficiency should be inherently higher than that of conventional PET. By using a voxelized cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, the detected position and deposited energy of the gamma ray were found precisely. With the position and energy information, the interaction sequence, which is one of the main factors to consider in the reconstruction of the source image, was identified correctly. The reconstruction algorithms were simple backprojection and MLEM methods, and three methods were used to evaluate the advanced PET compared with conventional PET, which uses the photoelectric effect only. The full widths at half maximum (FWHM) and the maximum counts of images reconstructed by using simple backprojection were calculated for comparison. Using an MLEM method, the FWHM and the relative standard deviation of the counts in the range of half of the FWHM around the maximum pixel were calculated at each iteration to evaluate the modalities quantitatively. For a 3D source phantom, the simple backprojection and the MLEM methods were applied to each modality, and the reconstructed images were compared with each other by using the relative standard deviation for each component of the reconstructed image and by using visual inspection.

  20. Compton imaging with thick Si and CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Mythili; Wulf, Eric A.; Phlips, Bernard; Krawczynski, Henric; Martin, Jerrad; Dowknott, Paul

    2012-08-01

    A Compton imaging telescope has been constructed using a 0.2 cm thick Silicon (Si) detector of active area 9.0×9.0 cm2 and a pixelated Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector of dimensions 2.0×2.0×0.5 cm3. The Si detector is double sided with 64 strips per side in two orthogonal directions. The CZT detector has 64 pixels of pitch 0.25 cm. We used several ASICs (32 channel) to read out both detectors. A 137Cs source was used in the study. The energy deposited in the Si and CZT detectors and the points of interaction of the γ-ray in both detectors were read out. We varied the position of the source as well as the vertical separation between the Si and CZT detectors and measured the angular resolution of the source image for the different configurations. The best angular resolution (1σ) was 2.4°. Monte Carlo simulations were run for similar detector configurations and agree with the experimental results.

  1. Gamma ray polarimetry. [compton scattering and pair production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, K. S.; Novick, R.

    1978-01-01

    Spectroscopic instruments currently being proposed may possess polarimetric capabilities which sould be nurtured and enhanced to permit characterization of basic emission mechanisms which are impossible using other techniques. Compton scattering and pair production detected the polarization of high energy (E is greater than 50 keV) protons in laboratory experiments. The polarization properties of a detection system consisting of 19 germanium crystals in a closed packed array are examined and the advantages of such a detector over Thompson scattering are discussed. The possiblity of using pair production to detect polarization of high energy gamma rays, and the associated modulation factors are discussed. The central difficulty involved in using pair production polarimeters in astrophysical applications is that the typical opening of the electron or positron direction with respect to the incident photon aircitron is small, of order E/sq mc. Multiple scattering in the material used to convert the photons to an electron positron pair causes deviations in the direction of the electron and positron.

  2. Realistic simulation of the Space-borne Compton Polarimeter POLAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hualin

    2016-07-01

    POLAR is a compact wide field space-borne detector dedicated for precise measurements of the linear polarization of hard x-rays emitted by transient sources. Its energy range sensitivity is optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). POLAR is developed by an international collaboration of China, Switzerland and Poland. It is planned to be launched into space in 2016 onboard the Chinese space laboratory TG2. The energy range of POLAR spans between 50 keV and 500 keV. POLAR detects gamma rays with an array of 1600 plastic scintillator bars read out by 25 muti-anode PMTs (MAPMTs). Polarization measurements use Compton scattering process and are based on detection of energy depositions in the scintillator bars. Reconstruction of the polarization degree and polarization angle of GRBs requires comparison of experimental modulation curves with realistic simulations of the full instrument response. In this paper we present a method to model and parameterize the detector response including efficiency of the light collection, contributions from crosstalk and non-uniformity of MAPMTs as well as dependency on low energy detection thresholds and noise from readout electronics. The performance of POLAR for determination of polarization is predicted with such realistic simulations and carefully cross-checked with dedicated laboratory tests.

  3. Deeply virtual Compton scattering and generalized parton distributions at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2008-11-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of real photons and mesons at high momentum transfer allows us to access the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The formalism of the GPDs provides a unified description of the hadronic structure in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular, the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), ep â e2p2Å , is one of the key reactions to determine the GPDs experimentally, as it is the simplest process that can be described in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS has been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. Beam-spin asymmetries, resulting from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and DVCS have been extracted over the widest kinematic range ever accessed for this reaction ( 1.2 < Q 2 < 3.7 (GeV/c 2, 0.09 < - t < 1.3 (GeV/c 2, 0.13 < x B < 0.46 . In this paper, the results obtained experimentally are shown and compared to GPD parametrizations.

  4. Compton Thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Perna, M.; Delvecchio, I.; Berta, S.; Brusa, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Comastri, A.

    2016-06-01

    I will present results we published in two recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A≈A 578A 120) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^{24} cm^{-2}) AGN, in the XMM-COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems. We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^{25} cm^{-2}), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field, and to the unrivaled XMM sensitivity. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line. The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.

  5. Hadron Optics: Diffraction Patterns in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S

    2006-05-16

    We show that the Fourier transform of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) amplitude with respect to the skewness variable {zeta} provides a unique way to visualize the light-front wavefunctions (LFWFs) of the target state in the boost-invariant longitudinal coordinate space variable ({sigma} = P{sup +}y{sup -}/2). The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics in which the dependence of the amplitude on {sigma} measures the physical size of the scattering center of a one-dimensional system. If one combines this longitudinal transform with the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitude with respect to the transverse momentum transfer {Delta}{sup {perpendicular}}, one can obtain a complete three-dimensional description of hadron optics at fixed light-front time {tau} = t + z/c. As a specific example, we utilize the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED to obtain the behavior of the DVCS amplitude for electron-photon scattering. We then simulate the wavefunctions for a hadron by differentiating the above LFWFs with respect to M{sup 2} and study the corresponding DVCS amplitudes in {sigma} space.

  6. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  7. Comptonization of thermal photons by relativistic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical calculation of gamma-ray emission produced by Compton scattering of relativistic electron beams on background thermal radiation, which includes spatial dependence of electron energy losses and cyclotron resonance scattering in a strong magnetic field. In the first version, the scattering is described by the fully relativistic Klein-Nishina cross section, but the magnetic field is neglected. In the second version, the scattering is described by the magnetic resonant cross section in the Thomson limit. It is found that when the magnetic field is not included, electron energy losses are important only at higher neutron star surface temperatures (T about 3,000,000 K). In the presence of a strong magnetic field, (10 to the 12th G), resonant scattering greatly increases electron energy losses, making scattering very efficient even at lower surface temperatures. Resulting photon and electron spectra for both cases ae discussed in relation to models for pulsar X-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  8. Laser Design for Next Generation Compton Scattering Source at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shverdin, Miro; Albert, Felicie; Anderson, Scott; Bayramian, Andy; Betts, Shawn; Cross, Rick; Ebbers, Chris; Gibson, David; Marsh, Roark; Messerly, Michael; Hartemann, Fred; Scarpetti, Ray; Siders, Craig; Barty, Chris

    2010-11-01

    We describe laser systems designed for the next generation Mono-Energetic Gamma-Ray (MEGa-ray) Compton scattering light source at LLNL. An 80 fs Yb:doped fiber oscillator seeds a photogun drive laser (PDL) and a high energy interaction system laser (ILS). Utilizing chirped pulse amplification (CPA) in fiber, the PDL will generate 80 μJ, spatially and temporally shaped pulses at 263 nm at 120 Hz precisely synchronized to the linac RF. The PDL system employs large mode photonic bandgap fibers and large area multi-layer dielectric gratings to generate over 1mJ per pulse with high recompression fidelity prior to frequency quadrupling. The high energy, 120 W ILS utilizes (CPA) in Nd:YAG to amplify a sub-nanometer bandwidth 20 μJ pulses from a fiber system to 1 J. A novel pulse stretcher provides a dispersion of over 7000 ps/nm to expand a several picosecond wide seed pulse to 6 ns. After amplification, the pulse is recompressed to 10 ps with a hyper-dispersive pulse compressor. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Beam-shape effects in nonlinear Compton and Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzl, T.; Seipt, D.; Kaempfer, B.

    2010-02-15

    We discuss intensity effects in collisions between beams of optical photons from a high-power laser and relativistic electrons. Our main focus is on the modifications of the emission spectra due to realistic finite-beam geometries. By carefully analyzing the classical limit we precisely quantify the distinction between strong-field QED Compton scattering and classical Thomson scattering. A purely classical, but fully covariant, calculation of the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron in a plane-wave laser field yields radiation into harmonics, as expected. This result is generalized to pulses of finite duration and explains the appearance of line broadening and harmonic substructure as an interference phenomenon. The ensuing numerical treatment confirms that strong focusing of the laser leads to a broad continuum while higher harmonics become visible only at moderate focusing, and hence lower intensity. We present a scaling law for the backscattered photon spectral density which facilitates averaging over electron beam phase space. Finally, we propose a set of realistic parameters such that the observation of intensity-induced spectral red shift, higher harmonics, and their substructure becomes feasible.

  10. Meteoric Head Echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajduk, A.; Galád, A.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the analysis of 3261 radar meteor head echoes observed during the Orionid and Lyrid periods by the high-power radar of the Springhill Meteor Observatory are given. Dependence of the occurence of head echoes on the geometrical factors and physical properties of the meteoroids has been studied. Increas of the head echo rates with the elevation of the shower radiant and with the velocity of meteoroids has been observed.

  11. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  12. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  13. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome is described. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending therethrough. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending therethrough, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending therethrough, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore therethrough, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening.

  14. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  15. Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

    2014-11-25

    Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

  16. State of the art in semiconductor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P. ); Gatti, E. )

    1989-01-01

    The state of the art in semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and x-ray astronomy is briefly reviewed. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; classical semiconductor diode detectors; and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of signal formation for both groups of detectors are described and their performance is compared. New developments of silicon detectors are reported here. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Performance evaluation and optimization for a newly developed digital list-mode data acquisition Compton suppression spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Keeshan, Benjamin; Mekarski, Pawel; Yi, Jing; Ungar, Kurt

    2013-11-01

    A comparative study was carried out between an analog timing and a digital list-mode data acquisition system for a Compton suppression spectrometer. The performance of both Compton suppression systems has been evaluated using the conventional, coincidence and anticoincidence spectra measured by (60)Co and (137)Cs point sources. The present study focuses on improving and optimizing the energy peak resolution and peak-to-Compton background ratios of the digital list-mode system.

  18. Contribution of inner shell Compton ionization to the X-ray fluorescence line intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    The Compton effect is a potential ionization mechanism of atoms. It produces vacancies in inner shells that are filled with the same mechanism of atomic relaxation as the one following photo-absorption. This contribution to X-ray fluorescence emission is frequently neglected because the total Compton cross-section is apparently much lower than the photoelectric one at useful X-ray energies. However, a more careful analysis suggests that is necessary to consider single shell cross sections (instead of total cross sections) as a function of energy. In this article these Compton cross sections are computed for the shells K, L1-L3 and M1-M5 in the framework of the impulse approximation. By comparing the Compton and the photoelectric cross-section for each shell it is then possible to determine the extent of the Compton correction to the intensity of the corresponding characteristic lines. It is shown that for the K shell the correction becomes relevant for excitation energies which are too high to be influent in X-ray spectrometry. In contrast, for L and M shells the Compton contribution is relevant for medium-Z elements and medium energies. To illustrate the different grades of relevance of the correction, for each ionized shell, the energies for which the Compton contribution reaches the extent levels of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100% of the photoelectric one are determined for all the elements with Z = 11-92. For practical applications it is provided a simple formula and fitting coefficients to compute average correction levels for the shells considered.

  19. Signal processing for semiconductor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

    1982-02-01

    A balanced perspective is provided on the processing of signals produced by semiconductor detectors. The general problems of pulse shaping to optimize resolution with constraints imposed by noise, counting rate and rise time fluctuations are discussed.

  20. Artificial atoms on semiconductor surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, W. A.; Zhu, X.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are called artificial atoms because of their atom-like discrete electronic structure resulting from quantum confinement. Artificial atoms can also be assembled into artificial molecules or solids, thus, extending the toolbox for material design. We address the interaction of artificial atoms with bulk semiconductor surfaces. These interfaces are model systems for understanding the coupling between localized and delocalized electronic structures. In many perceived applications, such as nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, and solar energy conversion, interfacing semiconductor nanocrystals to bulk materials is a key ingredient. Here, we apply the well established theories of chemisorption and interfacial electron transfer as conceptual frameworks for understanding the adsorption of semiconductor nanocrystals on surfaces, paying particular attention to instances when the nonadiabatic Marcus picture breaks down. We illustrate these issues using recent examples from our laboratory. PMID:21097704

  1. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chu-Hsuan; Liu, Chee Wee

    2010-01-01

    The major radiation of the Sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III–V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows. PMID:22163382

  2. Semiconductor technology program. Progress briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullis, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reviewed. Activities include: optical linewidth and thermal resistance measurements; device modeling; dopant density profiles; resonance ionization spectroscopy; and deep level measurements. Standardized oxide charge terminology is also described.

  3. Medical applications of semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancha, Sylvia D.; Keipert, Andreas; Prairie, Michael W.

    1994-06-01

    The High Power Semiconductor Laser Technology (HPSLT) program is currently developing, in-house, a belt pack medical laser. This compact semiconductor laser device provides the field paramedic or physician a unique portable laser capability. The pack consists of a completely self-contained laser system that fits inside a belt pack. Several other medical applications being investigated by the HPSLT program include urological applications, photodynamic therapy, and ophthalmic applications.

  4. Dye Sensitization of Semiconductor Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hartland, G. V.

    2003-01-13

    In this project electron transfer at semiconductor liquid interfaces was examined by ultrafast time-resolved and steady-state optical techniques. The experiments primarily yielded information about the electron transfer from titanium dioxide semiconductor particles to absorbed molecules. The results show that the rate of electron transfer depends on the structure of the molecule, and the crystalline phase of the particle. These results can be qualitatively explained by Marcus theory for electron transfer.

  5. Semiconductor crystal high resolution imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Craig S. (Inventor); Matteson, James (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A radiation imaging device (10). The radiation image device (10) comprises a subject radiation station (12) producing photon emissions (14), and at least one semiconductor crystal detector (16) arranged in an edge-on orientation with respect to the emitted photons (14) to directly receive the emitted photons (14) and produce a signal. The semiconductor crystal detector (16) comprises at least one anode and at least one cathode that produces the signal in response to the emitted photons (14).

  6. Head Injuries in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play a crucial role in injury prevention and initial treatment when injuries occur at school. The role of school nurses includes being knowledgeable about the management of head injuries, including assessment and initial treatment. The school nurse must be familiar with the outcomes of a head injury and know when further evaluation…

  7. Survey of cryogenic semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; McKeever, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Improved reliability and electronic performance can be achieved in a system operated at cryogenic temperatures because of the reduction in mechanical insult and in disruptive effects of thermal energy on electronic devices. Continuing discoveries of new superconductors with ever increasing values of T{sub c} above that of liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have provided incentive for developing semiconductor electronic systems that may also operate in the superconductor`s liquid nitrogen bath. Because of the interest in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) devices, liquid nitrogen is the cryogen of choice and LNT is the temperature on which this review is focused. The purpose of this survey is to locate and assemble published information comparing the room temperature (298 K), performance of commercially available conventional and hybrid semiconductor device with their performance at LNT (77K), to help establish their candidacy as cryogenic electronic devices specifically for use at LNT. The approach to gathering information for this survey included the following activities. Periodicals and proceedings were searched for information on the behavior of semiconductor devices at LNT. Telephone calls were made to representatives of semiconductor industries, to semiconductor subcontractors, to university faculty members prominent for their research in the area of cryogenic semiconductors, and to representatives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and NASA subcontractors. The sources and contacts are listed with their responses in the introduction, and a list of references appears at the end of the survey.

  8. Simulating nanoscale semiconductor devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Zhao, P.; Woolard, D. L.; Kelley, C. Tim; Lasater, Matthew S.

    2005-03-01

    The next generation of electronic devices will be developed at the nanoscale and molecular level, where quantum mechanical effects are observed. These effects must be accounted for in the design process for such small devices. One prototypical nanoscale semiconductor device under investigation is a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). Scientists are hopeful the quantum tunneling effects present in an RTD can be exploited to induce and sustain THz frequency current oscillations. To simulate the electron transport within the RTD, the Wigner-Poisson equations are used. These equations describe the time evolution of the electrons distribution within the device. In this paper, this model and a parameter study using this model will be presented. The parameter study involves calculating the steady-state current output from the RTD as a function of an applied voltage drop across the RTD and also calculating the stability of that solution. To implement the parameter study, the computational model was connected to LOCA (Library of Continuation Algorithms), a part of Sandia National Laboratories parallel solver project, Trilinos. Numerical results will be presented.

  9. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device is disclosed. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500 C to about 700 C for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal. 1 fig.

  10. Parity assignments in photon scattering using Compton polarimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneissl, U.

    The high selectivity of the Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence method in exciting dipole transitions in combination with the progress achieved in measuring polarization observables has led to a substantial amount of new experimental data concerning the distribution of magnetic and electric dipole strengths in deformed nuclei. Systematic experiments have been performed at the bremsstrahlung facility of the Stuttgart Dynamitron. Precise excitation energies, transition strengths, spins and decay branching ratios were deduced for numerous low lying dipole excitations in deformed rare earth nuclei. Measurements of the linear polarization of resonantly scattered photons using simultaneously two Compton polarimeters enabled model independent parity assignments. With this technique for the first time positive parities could be established for groups of states in the neighbouring deformed nuclei 150Nd, 160Gd, 162Dy. Most of these states are concentrated near 3 MeV and should be attributed to orbital isovector M1 excitations (often referred to as “ Scissors Mode”). The surprising novel result of the present systematic studies, however, was the first observation of enhanced electric dipole excitations in the same deformed nuclei at excitation energies of 2.414, 2.471, and 2.520 MeV, respectively. Furthermore, all three states systematically exhibit decay branching ratios which hint at K-mixing. The transition energies and the enhanced B( E1)↑ strengths of 3 to 5.10 -3e 2fm 2 support the interpretation in terms of the predicted new type of collective electric dipole excitations in deformed nuclei due to reflection asymmetric shapes like octupole deformations and/or cluster configurations.

  11. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Band, D. L.; Kippen, R. M.; Preece, R. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Matz, S. M.; Connors, A.

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations and that the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fitted by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared with this function is observed below approx. 15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the vf (sub v), spectrum, E (sub p), reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 plus or minus 110 keV, and then falls to approx. 300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above approx. 1 MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment), clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power law. Using the redshift value of greater than or equal to 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray energy exceeds 10 (exp 54) ergs.

  12. GAMMA-RAY COMPTON LIGHT SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-08-15

    A new class of tunable, monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources capable of operating at high peak and average brightness is currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photoscience and applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector. A prototype, capable of producing > 10{sup 8} 0.7 MeV photons in a single shot, with a fractional bandwidth of 1%, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is currently under construction at LLNL; this system will be used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments. A new symmetrized S-band rf gun, using a Mg photocathode, will produce up to 1 nC of charge in an 8 ps bunch, with a normalized emittance modeled at 0.8 mm.mrad; electrons are subsequently accelerated up to 120 MeV to interact with a 500 mJ, 10 ps, 355 nm laser pulse and generate {gamma}-rays. The laser front end is a fiber-based system, using corrugated-fiber Bragg gratings for stretching, and drives both the frequency-quadrupled photocathode illumination laser and the Nd:YAG interaction laser. Two new technologies are used in the laser: a hyper-Michelson temporal pulse stacker capable of producing 8 ps square UV pulses, and a hyper-dispersion compressor for the interaction laser. Other key technologies, basic scaling laws, and recent experimental results will also be presented, along with an overview of future research and development directions.

  13. A new Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, S.

    1986-02-01

    Pulmonary edema (PE) is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. The chest x-ray, the standard method for validating the presence of PE, is neither quantitative nor sensitive. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical use. To deal with the problem of attenuation along the beam paths, previous gamma-ray techniques require simultaneous measurement of transmitted and scattered beams. Since multiple scattering is a strong function of the density of the scattering medium and the mass distribution within the detection geometry, there will be inherent uncertainties in the system calibration unless it is performed on a body structure closely matched to that of each individual patient. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density, measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray.

  14. Coded-aperture Compton camera for gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Aaron M.

    This dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.

  15. The COMPTON Observatory: Reflections on its origins and history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Gehrels, N.

    1997-05-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was planned as a mission to make the first comprehensive study of the gamma-ray sky over the full gamma-ray spectrum. It followed on the heels of two successful small astronomy satellites with high energy gamma-ray telescopes, SAS-2 and COS-B, and the High Energy Astronomical Observatory (HEAO) with low-energy gamma-ray detectors. The guideline was to cover the spectrum from the high energy limit of the x-ray domain to the highest energies for which a detectable flux might be reasonably observed. The objective was to include transients as well as persistent sources. The efforts to get such a mission approved stands as a model for developing a consensus of the scientific community for a mission involving a relatively small community of observers. A broad and vigorous guest investigator program was a key element in this effort. The results of the guest investigator program are testimony to the wisdom of this plan. The great success of GRO (now the Compton Observatory) was a result of the dedicated efforts of a few individuals and a project management team that understood how to work with scientists. In spite of increasing budgetary pressure and long delays beyond their control, the project management brought GRO to its successful launch with a minimum of cost growth resulting from the delays. This development period set the stage for what has been one of the most successful scientific programs in NASA's history. The very exciting results presented at this conference by a very broad community of scientists is a testimony to the dedicated efforts of a small group of visionaries with the foresight to see the potential of such a mission.

  16. X-Rays Compton Detectors For Biomedical Application

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Fontana, Cristiano Lino; Moschini, Giuliano; Baldazzi, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Battistella, Andrea; Bello, Michele; Bollini, Dante; Bonvicini, Valter; Rashevsky, Alexander; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Vacchi, Andrea; Gennaro, Gisella; Uzunov, Nikolay

    2011-06-01

    Collimators are usually needed to image sources emitting X-rays that cannot be focused. Alternately, one may employ a Compton Camera (CC) and measure the direction of the incident X-ray by letting it interact with a thin solid, liquid or gaseous material (Tracker) and determine the scattering angle. With respect to collimated cameras, CCs allow higher gamma-ray efficiency in spite of lighter geometry, and may feature comparable spatial resolution. CCs are better when the X-ray energy is high and small setups are required. We review current applications of CCs to Gamma Ray Astronomy and Biomedical systems stressing advantages and drawbacks. As an example, we focus on a particular CC we are developing, which is designed to image small animals administered with marked pharmaceuticals, and assess the bio-distribution and targeting capability of these latter. This camera has to address some requirements: relatively high activity of the imaged objects; detection of gamma-rays of different energies that may range from 140 keV (Tc99m) to 511 keV; presence of gamma and beta radiation with energies up to 2 MeV in case of 188Re. The camera consists of a thin position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detector as Tracker, and a further downstream position-sensitive system employing scintillating crystals and a multi-anode photo-multiplier (Calorimeter). The choice of crystal, pixel size, and detector geometry has been driven by measurements and simulations with the tracking code GEANT4. Spatial resolution, efficiency and scope are discussed.

  17. Study of Compton suppression for use in spent nuclear fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Sarah

    The focus of this study has been to assess Compton suppressed gamma-ray detection systems for the multivariate analysis of spent nuclear fuel. This objective has been achieved using direct measurement of samples of irradiated fuel elements in two geometrical configurations with Compton suppression systems. In order to address the objective to quantify the number of additionally resolvable photopeaks, direct Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel in two configurations were performed: as intact fuel elements and as dissolved feed solutions. These measurements directly assessed and quantified the differences in measured gamma-ray spectrum from the application of Compton suppression. Several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling time from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using three Compton suppression systems that utilized different primary detectors: HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl). The application of Compton suppression using a LaBr3 primary detector to the measurement of the current core fuel element, which presented the highest count rate, allowed four additional spectral features to be resolved. In comparison, the HPGe-CSS was able to resolve eight additional photopeaks as compared to the standalone HPGe measurement. Measurements with the NaI(Tl) primary detector were unable to resolve any additional peaks, due to its relatively low resolution. Samples of Approved Test Material (ATM) commercial fuel elements were obtained from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The samples had been processed using the beginning stages of the PUREX method and represented the unseparated feed solution from a reprocessing facility. Compton suppressed measurements of the ATM fuel samples were recorded inside the guard detector annulus, to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Photopeak losses were observed in the measurements of the dissolved ATM

  18. Technical Note: Influence of Compton currents on profile measurements in small-volume ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, Sean; Sperling, Nicholas; Parsai, E. Ishmael; Holmes, Shannon

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This work is to evaluate the effects of Compton current generation in three small-volume ionization chambers on measured beam characteristics for electron fields. Methods: Beam scans were performed using Exradin A16, A26, and PTW 31014 microchambers. Scans with varying chamber components shielded were performed. Static point measurements, output factors, and cable only irradiations were performed to determine the contribution of Compton currents to various components of the chamber. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate why one microchamber showed a significant reduction in Compton current generation. Results: Beam profiles demonstrated significant distortion for two of the three chambers when scanned parallel to the chamber axis, produced by electron deposition within the wire. Measurements of ionization produced within the cable identified Compton current generation as the cause of these distortions. The size of the central collecting wire was found to have the greatest influence on the magnitude of Compton current generation. Conclusions: Microchambers can demonstrate significant (>5%) deviations from properties as measured with larger volume chambers (0.125 cm{sup 3} and above). These deviations can be substantially reduced by averaging measurements conducted at opposite polarities.

  19. An energy-subtraction Compton scatter camera design for in vivo medical imaging of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Rohe, R.C.; Valentine, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    A Compton scatter camera (CSC) design is proposed for imaging radioisotopes used as biotracers. A clinical version may increase sensitivity by a factor of over 100, while maintaining or improving spatial resolution, as compared with existing Anger cameras that use lead collimators. This novel approach is based on using energy subtraction ({Delta}E = E{sub 0} {minus} E{sub SC}, where E{sub 0}, {Delta}E, and E{sub SC} are the energy of the emitted gamma ray, the energy deposited by the initial Compton scatter, and the energy of the Compton scattered photon) to determine the amount of energy deposited in the primary system. The energy subtraction approach allows the requirement of high energy resolution to be placed on a secondary detector system instead of the primary detector system. Requiring primary system high energy resolution has significantly limited previous CSC designs for medical imaging applications. Furthermore, this approach is dependent on optimizing the camera design for data acquisition of gamma rays that undergo only one Compton scatter in a low-Z primary detector system followed by a total absorption of the Compton scattered photon in a high-Z secondary detector system. The proposed approach allows for a more compact primary detector system, a more simplified pulse processing interface, and a much less complicated detector cooling scheme as compared with previous CSC designs. Analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulation results for some specific detector materials and geometries are presented.

  20. Measuring the Spin-Polarizabilities of the Proton in Polarized Compton scattering at MAMI-Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskimen, Rory; A2 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    At O (ω3) four new structure constants are present in the nucleon Compton scattering amplitude; these are the spin-polarizabilities γE 1 E 1, γM 1 M 1, γE 1 M 2, and γM 1 E 2. The most model independent way to determine the spin-polarizabilities is by measuring a double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetry with polarized target and circularly polarized photons, and by measuring an in-plane/transverse-plane Compton scattering asymmetry with linearly polarized photons (Σ3) . This talk will present new Compton scattering asymmetry data taken in the Δ region by the A2 Collaboration using the Crystal Ball at Mainz, with transverse polarized proton target and circularly polarized photons, the Σ2 x asymmetry (1). A dispersion model and an EFT calculation of Compton scattering are used to fit the four spin-polarizabilities to the new experimental data on Σ2 x, earlier results (2) on Σ3, and previous determinations of γ0 and γπ. The results of the fits are compared with theoretical calculations.

  1. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, M.S.

    2005-11-22

    With the increase in demand for more efficient, higher-power, and higher-temperature operation of power converters, design engineers face the challenge of increasing the efficiency and power density of converters [1, 2]. Development in power semiconductors is vital for achieving the design goals set by the industry. Silicon (Si) power devices have reached their theoretical limits in terms of higher-temperature and higher-power operation by virtue of the physical properties of the material. To overcome these limitations, research has focused on wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), and diamond because of their superior material advantages such as large bandgap, high thermal conductivity, and high critical breakdown field strength. Diamond is the ultimate material for power devices because of its greater than tenfold improvement in electrical properties compared with silicon; however, it is more suited for higher-voltage (grid level) higher-power applications based on the intrinsic properties of the material [3]. GaN and SiC power devices have similar performance improvements over Si power devices. GaN performs only slightly better than SiC. Both SiC and GaN have processing issues that need to be resolved before they can seriously challenge Si power devices; however, SiC is at a more technically advanced stage than GaN. SiC is considered to be the best transition material for future power devices before high-power diamond device technology matures. Since SiC power devices have lower losses than Si devices, SiC-based power converters are more efficient. With the high-temperature operation capability of SiC, thermal management requirements are reduced; therefore, a smaller heat sink would be sufficient. In addition, since SiC power devices can be switched at higher frequencies, smaller passive components are required in power converters. Smaller heat sinks and passive components result in higher-power-density power converters

  2. Head Circumference and Neurocognitive Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon

    2015-07-01

    Investigators from Universities of Glasgow and Bristol, UK, determined the value of head circumference (HC) as a screening measure, the incidence of head centile shifting, and the relationship between extremes of head size and later neurodevelopmental problems. PMID:26933592

  3. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is ...

  4. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Reutzel, Edward W.

    1998-01-01

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure.

  5. Maneuvering impact boring head

    DOEpatents

    Zollinger, W.T.; Reutzel, E.W.

    1998-08-18

    An impact boring head may comprise a main body having an internal cavity with a front end and a rear end. A striker having a head end and a tail end is slidably mounted in the internal cavity of the main body so that the striker can be reciprocated between a forward position and an aft position in response to hydraulic pressure. A compressible gas contained in the internal cavity between the head end of the striker and the front end of the internal cavity returns the striker to the aft position upon removal of the hydraulic pressure. 8 figs.

  6. Radial head arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, M T; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2010-02-01

    In conclusion, radial head fractures with 3 or more fragments have a high incidence of complications when treated with ORIF including hardware failure, malunion, nonunion, and the need for re-operation. Radial head arthroplasty has demonstrated good success in the treatment of complex, comminuted radial head fractures which are not amenable to non-opeative treatment or ORIF. Success can be optimized by diligent surgical dissection, avoiding inadvertent nerve injury, placement of an appropriately sized implant, repair of associated injuries, and early protected motion. PMID:20214854

  7. Accurate, low-energy Compton polarimetry for Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Donald

    2012-03-01

    A new Compton polarimeter has recently been commissioned in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, to provide a non-invasive, continuous measurement of electron beam polarization. The new Compton polarimeter is currently measuring electron beam polarization for Qweak, an experiment with a strict error budget allowing a combined statistical and systematic error of only ±1% for beam polarization. Using well-established techniques we are able to determine electron beam polarization by measuring the scattering asymmetry of both the backscattered photons and the scattered electrons. Although the photon and electron detectors provide somewhat independent measurements they share the common systematic of the laser polarization. I discuss the optical setup for the photon target used in the Compton polarimeter and recent efforts in reducing systematic error in determination of laser polarization.

  8. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  9. A Compton scattering technique to determine wood density and locating defects in it

    SciTech Connect

    Tondon, Akash Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan; Singh, Mohinder

    2015-08-28

    A Compton scattering technique is presented to determine density and void location in the given wooden samples. The technique uses a well collimated gamma ray beam from {sup 137}Cs along with the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. First, a linear relationship is established between Compton scattered intensity and known density of chemical compounds, and then density of the wood is determined from this linear relation. In another experiment, the ability of penetration of gamma rays is explored to detect voids in wooden (low Z) sample. The sudden reduction in the Compton scattered intensities agrees well with the position and size of voids in the wooden sample. It is concluded that wood density and the voids of size ∼ 4 mm and more can be detected easily by this method.

  10. A graphical tool for an analytical approach of scattering photons by the Compton effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scannavino, Francisco A.; Cruvinel, Paulo E.

    2012-05-01

    The photons scattered by the Compton effect can be used to characterize the physical properties of a given sample due to the influence that the electron density exerts on the number of scattered photons. However, scattering measurements involve experimental and physical factors that must be carefully analyzed to predict uncertainty in the detection of Compton photons. This paper presents a method for the optimization of the geometrical parameters of an experimental arrangement for Compton scattering analysis, based on its relations with the energy and incident flux of the X-ray photons. In addition, the tool enables the statistical analysis of the information displayed and includes the coefficient of variation (CV) measurement for a comparative evaluation of the physical parameters of the model established for the simulation.

  11. Results of a first demonstrator prototype of a Compton prostate probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llosá, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Burdette, D.; Chesi, E.; Cindro, V.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Mikuž, M.; Modesto, P.; Rogers, W. L.; Steinberg, J.; Studen, A.; Weilhammer, P.; Zhang, L.; Žontar, D.

    2006-12-01

    A prostate probe based on the Compton imaging technique can outperform the methods currently employed for prostate imaging, improving early tumour detection, determination of its extent and follow-up of the response to treatment. Although nuclear imaging techniques have proven extremely valuable for this task in a wide variety of non-urologic cancers, present instrumentation is not adequate for prostate imaging. Compton imaging overcomes the resolution-efficiency tradeoff imposed by mechanical collimators, allowing both to improve simultaneously. A first Compton probe prototype has been developed, employing thick silicon sensors as scatter detectors, and its performance has been optimized. A series of measurements have been performed with 57Co and 133Ba sources. The results confirm the correct functioning of the prototype and the improvement of the spatial resolution with photon energy, low scattering angles and distance from the first to the second detector.

  12. On Compton reflection in the sources of the cosmic X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Zycki, Piotr T.; Svensson, Roland; Boldt, Elihu

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to recent models for the cosmic X-ray background that assume that it originates from unresolved AGN emitting spectra due to enhanced Compton reflection of a power-law photon spectrum incident on cold matter. The parameter space of the Compton reflection model is studied, and the allowed parameter space is found to be severely constrained by physical and cosmological effects. For an incident power-law energy index alpha is greater than about 1, the X-ray peak in the observed spectrum from a population of AGN is necessarily at an energy less than that of the observed peak. Two examples of improved fits to the X-ray background are shown. It is concluded that the Compton reflection models proposed to date do not provide a straightforward explanation of the X-ray background spectrum.

  13. Optimization of Compton-suppression and summing schemes for the TIGRESS HPGe detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Boston, A. J.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hyland, B.; Jones, B.; Maharaj, R.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Sarazin, F.; Scraggs, H. C.; Smith, M. B.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Watters, L. M.

    2007-04-01

    Methods of optimizing the performance of an array of Compton-suppressed, segmented HPGe clover detectors have been developed which rely on the physical position sensitivity of both the HPGe crystals and the Compton-suppression shields. These relatively simple analysis procedures promise to improve the precision of experiments with the TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS). Suppression schemes will improve the efficiency and peak-to-total ratio of TIGRESS for high γ-ray multiplicity events by taking advantage of the 20-fold segmentation of the Compton-suppression shields, while the use of different summing schemes will improve results for a wide range of experimental conditions. The benefits of these methods are compared for many γ-ray energies and multiplicities using a GEANT4 simulation, and the optimal physical configuration of the TIGRESS array under each set of conditions is determined.

  14. Image Artifacts Resulting from Gamma-Ray Tracking Algorithms Used with Compton Imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; He, Zhong

    2005-10-01

    For Compton imaging it is necessary to determine the sequence of gamma-ray interactions in a single detector or array of detectors. This can be done by time-of-flight measurements if the interactions are sufficiently far apart. However, in small detectors the time between interactions can be too small to measure, and other means of gamma-ray sequencing must be used. In this work, several popular sequencing algorithms are reviewed for sequences with two observed events and three or more observed events in the detector. These algorithms can result in poor imaging resolution and introduce artifacts in the backprojection images. The effects of gamma-ray tracking algorithms on Compton imaging are explored in the context of the 4π Compton imager built by the University of Michigan.

  15. A method for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays by Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2014-12-01

    A method was proposed for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays for compounds, alloys and mixtures. It is based on simulating interaction processes of gamma rays with target elements having atomic numbers from Z=1 to Z=92 using the MCSHAPE software. Intensities of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturation thicknesses and at a scattering angle of 90° were calculated for incident gamma rays of different energies. The obtained results showed that the intensity of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturations and mass absorption coefficients can be described by mathematical formulas. These were used to determine mass absorption coefficients for compound, alloys and mixtures with the knowledge of their Compton scattered intensities. The method was tested by calculating mass absorption coefficients for some compounds, alloys and mixtures. There is a good agreement between obtained results and calculated ones using WinXom software. The advantages and limitations of the method were discussed.

  16. Arthur Compton's 1941 Report on explosive fission of U-235: A look at the physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2007-12-01

    In November 1941, the third of three reports on atomic fission commissioned by Vannevar Bush through the National Academy of Sciences examined the prospects for explosive fission in U-235. This report, prepared by Arthur Compton, developed a model for estimating the critical mass and efficiency of an atomic bomb. I examine Compton's physics, attempt to discern the provenance of the numbers he adopted for various parameters, and compare his results with those yielded by a full diffusion-theory approach with contemporary values for the fission parameters. I conclude that Compton's physics is sound. A combination of somewhat optimistic parameter values and a conservative model for critical mass lead him to a numerical value for the bare critical radius of U-235 that is in fairly good accord with that yielded by diffusion theory. His estimated efficiency proved to be quite accurate for the Little Boy bomb.

  17. Resonant Compton cooling and annihilation line production in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Harding, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a synchrotron self-Compton emission model for gamma-ray bursts which produces narrow annihilation features for a variety of field strengths, primary electron injection energies, and injection rates. In this model, primary electrons are injected and cooled by synchrotron emission in a strong, homogeneous magnetic field, resulting in a pair cascade. Multiple resonant scattering with cyclotron photons efficiently traps and cools pairs in the ground state to an average energy where the Compton energy loss rate is zero, which is in agreement with previous estimates of a Compton temperature. The particle distributions in the ground state are determined by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the steady state. In the case of isotropic injection of primary electrons, a significant narrow-line feature appears in the overall emission. In the case of beamed injection, the annihilation line is broadened to the extent that it would not be observable.

  18. Galactic gamma rays produced by Compton scattering of cosmic ray electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Previous models of the Compton scattering of the galactic gamma rays have been based on starlight distributions determined from galactic mass models and a constant luminosity per unit mass. The fact that the spiral arms have a significantly higher photon density than does the base disk containing the bulk of the galactic mass has been neglected in calculating the Compton gamma-ray component. The inclusion of the spiral arm Compton component produces enhanced gamma-ray intensities along tangents to spiral arms. Irrespective of whether the cosmic-ray electron density is enhanced in the spiral arms, increased gamma-ray emission is produced along the spiral arm tangents due to increased photon density. Thus, cosmic ray sources are not necessarily located in the arms.

  19. Electronic properties of Laves phase ZrFe2 using Compton spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Samir; Kumar, Kishor; Dashora, Alpa; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-05-01

    First-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe2, using indigenous 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer, is presented. To analyze the experimental electron momentum density, we have deduced the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock scheme within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The energy bands and density of states are also calculated using LCAO prescription. The theoretical profile based on local density approximation gives a better agreement with the experimental profile than other reported schemes. The present investigations validate the inclusion of correlation potential of Perdew-Zunger in predicting the electronic properties of ZrFe2.

  20. High energy Compton spectroscopy and electronic structure of Laves phase ZrFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Samir; Kumar, Kishor; Arora, Gunjan; Bapna, Komal; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe2 using indigenous 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer. To annotate the experimental electron momentum density, we have calculated the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The spin-polarized energy bands and density of states are computed using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave methods. The revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional (for solids) based theoretical profile gives a marginally better agreement with the experimental profile as compared to other approximations considered in the present work. The Fermi surface topology of ZrFe2 is explained in terms of majority- and minority-spin energy bands.

  1. Compton sources for the observation of elastic photon-photon scattering events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micieli, D.; Drebot, I.; Bacci, A.; Milotti, E.; Petrillo, V.; Conti, M. Rossetti; Rossi, A. R.; Tassi, E.; Serafini, L.

    2016-09-01

    We present the design of a photon-photon collider based on conventional Compton gamma sources for the observation of elastic γ γ scattering. Two symmetric electron beams, generated by photocathodes and accelerated in linacs, produce two primary gamma rays through Compton backscattering with two high energy lasers. The elastic photon-photon scattering is analyzed by start-to-end simulations from the photocathodes to the detector. A new Monte Carlo code has been developed ad hoc for the counting of the QED events. Realistic numbers of the secondary gamma yield, obtained by using the parameters of existing or approved Compton devices, a discussion of the feasibility of the experiment and of the nature of the background are presented.

  2. Analysis of the electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} by Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahammad, F. M.; Mahammed, S. F.; Kumar, R.; Vijay, Y. K.; Sharma, B. K.; Sharma, G.

    2013-07-15

    The electronic structure of ZrO{sub 2} is studied using the Compton scattering technique. The first-ever Compton profile measurement on polycrystalline ZrO{sub 2} was obtained using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from the {sup 241}Am radioisotope. To explain the experimental data, we compute theoretical Compton profile values using the method of linear combination of atomic orbitals in the framework of density functional theory. The correlation scheme proposed by Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and the exchange scheme of Becke are considered. The ionic-model-based calculations for a number of configurations, i.e., Zr{sup +x}(O{sup -x/2}){sub 2} (0 {<=} x {<=} 2), are also performed to estimate the charge transfer on compound formation, and the study supports transfer of 1.5 electrons from Zr to O atoms.

  3. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S.

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  4. Compton thick active galactic nuclei in Chandra surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brightman, Murray; Nandra, Kirpal; Salvato, Mara; Hsu, Li-Ting; Aird, James; Rangel, Cyprian

    2014-09-01

    We present the results from an X-ray spectral analysis of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the Chandra Deep Field-South, All-wavelength Extended Groth-strip International Survey (AEGIS)-Deep X-ray survey (XD) and Chandra-Cosmic Evolution Surveys (COSMOS), focusing on the identification and characterization of the most heavily obscured, Compton thick (CT, NH > 1024 cm-2) sources. Our sample is comprised of 3184 X-ray selected extragalactic sources, which has a high rate of redshift completeness (96.6 per cent), and includes additional spectroscopic redshifts and improved photometric redshifts over previous studies. We use spectral models designed for heavily obscured AGN which self-consistently include all major spectral signatures of heavy absorption. We validate our spectral fitting method through simulations, identify CT sources not selected through this method using X-ray colours and take considerations for the constraints on NH given the low count nature of many of our sources. After these considerations, we identify a total of 100 CT AGN with best-fitting NH > 1024 cm-2 and NH constrained to be above 1023.5 cm-2 at 90 per cent confidence. These sources cover an intrinsic 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity range of 1042-3 × 1045 erg s-1 and a redshift range of z = 0.1-4. This sample will enable characterization of these heavily obscured AGN across cosmic time and to ascertain their cosmological significance. These survey fields are sites of extensive multiwavelength coverage, including near-infrared Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) data and far-infrared Herschel data, enabling forthcoming investigations into the host properties of CT AGN. Furthermore, by using the torus models to test different covering factor scenarios, and by investigating the inclusion of the soft scattered emission, we find evidence that the covering factor of the obscuring material decreases with LX for all redshifts, consistent with the receding torus model

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    MedlinePlus

    ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, ...

  6. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, Brown’s syndrome, orbital wall fractures, and restricted eye movement associated with thyroid eye disease. 2) Nystagmus: Some patients with nystagmus (jerky eye movements) will acquire a head turn or tilt if ...

  7. Head Lice: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... it may be necessary to use a second bottle. Pay special attention to instructions on the label ... or printed on the label. Nit (head lice egg) combs, often found in lice medicine packages, should ...

  8. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and neck cancer. Poor oral and dental hygiene . Poor care of the mouth and teeth has ... sore throat Foul mouth odor not explained by hygiene Hoarseness or change in voice Nasal obstruction or ...

  9. Overview of Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Baby Health Highlights: Sept. 13, 2016 Smokers' Perceptions May Play Role in Addiction Sugar Companies Shifted ... amount of oxygen given and the rate and depth of breaths given by the ventilator. The head ...

  10. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  11. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  12. Head tilt during driving.

    PubMed

    Zikovitz, D C; Harris, L R

    1999-05-01

    In order to distinguish between the use of visual and gravito-inertial force reference frames, the head tilt of drivers and passengers were measured as they went around corners at various speeds. The visual curvature of the corners were thus dissociated from the magnitude of the centripetal forces (0.30-0.77 g). Drivers' head tilts were highly correlated with the visually-available estimate of the curvature of the road (r2=0.86) but not with the centripetal force (r2<0.1). Passengers' head tilts were inversely correlated with the lateral forces (r2=0.3-0.7) and seem to reflect a passive sway. The strong correlation of the tilt of drivers' heads with a visual aspect of the road ahead, supports the use of a predominantly visual reference frame for the driving task. PMID:10722313

  13. Treating Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention. Head lice are most common among preschool children attending child care, elementary school children, and ... Emergency Preparedness International Programs News & Events Training & Continuing Education Inspections & Compliance Federal, State & Local Officials Consumers Health ...

  14. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and circulation. If necessary, begin rescue breathing and CPR . If the person's breathing and heart rate are normal but the person is unconscious, treat as if there is a spinal injury . Stabilize the head and neck by placing your ...

  15. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  16. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  17. Closing photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Hjalmarson, H.P.; O'Malley, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    One of the most important limitations of Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS) for pulsed power applications is the high laser powers required to activate the switches. In this paper, we discuss recent developments on two different aspects of GaAs PCSS that result in reductions in laser power by a factor of nearly 1000. The advantages of using GaAs over Si are many. First of all, the resistivity of GaAs can be orders of magnitude higher than that of the highest resistivity Si material, thus allowing GaAs switches to withstand dc voltages without thermal runaway. Secondly, GaAs has a higher carrier mobility than Si and, thus, is more efficient (per carrier). Finally, GaAs switches can have naturally fast (ns) opening times at room temperature and low fields, microsecond opening times at liquid nitrogen temperature of 77 K, or, on demand, closing and opening at high fields and room temperature by a mechanism called lock-on (see Ref. 1). By contrast, Si switches typically opening times of milliseconds. The amount of laser light required to trigger GaAs for lock-on, or at 77 K, is about three orders of magnitude lower than at room temperature. In this paper we describe the study of lock-on in GaAs and InP, as well as switching of GaAs at 77 K. We shall show that when GaAs is switched at 77 K, the carrier lifetime is about three orders of magnitude longer than it is at room temperature. We shall explain the change in lifetime in terms of the change in electron capture cross section of the deep levels in GaAs (these are defect or impurity levels in the band gap). In the second section, we describe the lock-on effect, now seen in GaAs and InP, and at fields as high as 70 kV/cm. We show how lock-on can be tailored by changing the GaAs temperature or by neutron bombardment. In the third section, we discuss possible lock-on mechanisms. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Study of X-Ray Polarization Due to Comptonization of Photons inside Thick Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Arka; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Ghosh, Himadri

    2016-07-01

    We study the Comptonization of Photons inside generalized relativistic thick disks. Relativistic and non- relativistic effect of Photon paths on the spectrum are computed. We include the polarization of photons induced by the Compton scattering. The degree of polarization for initially unpolarized and linearly polarized photons are calculated separately. Variation of X-ray polarization with number of scattering is presented. Finally, the polarimetric images of thick disk for different energy bands are shown. We compare our simulated results with outbursting black hole candidates. We are also adding effects of spin of the black hole on the degree of polarization. These results are useful for future missions which could measure polarization very accurately.

  19. Gravitation and Special Relativity from Compton Wave Interactions at the Planck Scale: An Algorithmic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper space is modeled as a lattice of Compton wave oscillators (CWOs) of near- Planck size. It is shown that gravitation and special relativity emerge from the interaction between particles Compton waves. To develop this CWO model an algorithmic approach was taken, incorporating simple rules of interaction at the Planck-scale developed using well known physical laws. This technique naturally leads to Newton s law of gravitation and a new form of doubly special relativity. The model is in apparent agreement with the holographic principle, and it predicts a cutoff energy for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that is consistent with observational data.

  20. Quality Control of Pavements and Tarmacs Using ({sup 137}Cs){gamma} Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, F.; Barros, H.; Bernal, M.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Palacios, D.; Greaves, E. D.; Viesti, G.

    2010-08-04

    The {gamma} Compton scattering over a volume of concrete has been studied in order to design an instrument for density measurements. It will be used for the quality control in road construction, where large surfaces must be monitored. The experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations of the {gamma} Compton scattering over homogeneous and inhomogeneous volumes of concrete are shown. MC simulations have been useful to optimize the values of several parameters to improve the experimental set up and to estimate the extension of the explored volume.

  1. Double electron ionization in Compton scattering of high energy photons by helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Mikhailov, A.I.

    1995-08-01

    The cross section for double-electron ionization of two-electron atoms and ions in Compton scattering of high energy photons is calculated. It is demonstrated that its dependence on the incoming photon frequency is the same as that for single-electron ionization. The ratio of {open_quotes}double-to-single{close_quotes} ionization in Compton scattering was found to be energy independent and almost identical with the corresponding value for photoionization. For the He atom it is 1.68%. This surprising result deserves experimental verification.

  2. Compton Scattering X-Ray Sources Driven by Laser Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Gibson, D J; Brown, W J; Rousse, A; Phuoc, K T; Pukhov, A

    2005-10-19

    Recent laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated the generation of femtosecond, nano-Coulomb, low emittance, nearly monokinetic relativistic electron bunches of sufficient quality to produce bright, tunable, ultrafast x-rays via Compton scattering. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented using a three-dimensional Compton scattering code and a laser-plasma interaction particle-in-cell code modeling the wakefield acceleration process; x-ray fluxes exceeding 10{sup 22} s{sup -1} are predicted, with a peak brightness > 10{sup 20} photons/(mm{sup 2} x mrad{sup 2} x s x 0.1% bandwidth).

  3. A software package for Stellar and solar Inverse Compton emission: StellarICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Elena; Strong, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    We present our software to compute gamma-ray emission from inverse-Compton scattering by cosmic-ray leptons in the heliosphere, as well as in the photospheres of stars. It includes a formulation of modulation in the heliosphere, but can be used for any user-defined modulation model. Profiles and spectra are output to FITS files in a variety of forms for convenient use. Also included are general-purpose inverse-Compton routines with other features like energy loss rates and emissivity for any user-defined target photon and lepton spectra. The software is publicly available and it is under continuing development.

  4. High intensity compact Compton X-ray sources: Challenges and potential of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, M.

    2014-07-01

    Thanks to the exceptional development of high power femtosecond lasers in the last 15 years, Compton based X-ray sources are in full development over the world in the recent years. Compact Compton sources are able to combine the compactness of the instrument with a beam of high intensity, high quality, tunable in energy. In various fields of applications such as biomedical science, cultural heritage preservation and material science researches, these sources should provide an easy working environment and the methods currently used at synchrotrons could be largely developed in a lab-size environment as hospitals, labs, or museums.

  5. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V−1 s−1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m−2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics. PMID:26620323

  6. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J.

    2015-12-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm2 V-1 s-1. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m-2 and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics.

  7. High mobility emissive organic semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Hantang; Dong, Huanli; Meng, Lingqiang; Jiang, Longfeng; Jiang, Lang; Wang, Ying; Yu, Junsheng; Sun, Yanming; Hu, Wenping; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    The integration of high charge carrier mobility and high luminescence in an organic semiconductor is challenging. However, there is need of such materials for organic light-emitting transistors and organic electrically pumped lasers. Here we show a novel organic semiconductor, 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA), which exhibits not only high emission with single crystal absolute florescence quantum yield of 41.2% but also high charge carrier mobility with single crystal mobility of 34 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on DPA give pure blue emission with brightness up to 6,627 cd m(-2) and turn-on voltage of 2.8 V. 2,6-Diphenylanthracene OLED arrays are successfully driven by DPA field-effect transistor arrays, demonstrating that DPA is a high mobility emissive organic semiconductor with potential in organic optoelectronics.

  8. Organic Semiconductors and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalasanan, M. N.

    2011-10-01

    Organic semiconductors in the form of evaporated or spin coated thin films have many optoelectronic applications in the present electronic industry. They are frequently used in many type of displays, photo detectors, photoconductors for photocopiers and photovoltaic cells. But many p-conjugated molecules and polymer based devices do not provide satisfactory device performance and operational stability. Most of these problems are related to the interfaces they make with other organic materials and electrodes and the low conductivity of the organic layers. The study of organic-metal and organic—organic interfaces as well as electrical doping of organic semiconductors are very important areas of research at present. In this talk, I will be discussing some of the recent advances in this field as well as some of our own results in the area of interface modification and electrical doping of organic semiconductors.

  9. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  10. A brief history of ... semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Tudor

    2005-09-01

    The development of studies in semiconductor materials is traced from its beginnings with Michael Faraday in 1833 to the production of the first silicon transistor in 1954, which heralded the age of silicon electronics and microelectronics. Prior to the advent of band theory, work was patchy and driven by needs of technology. However, the arrival of this successful quantum theory of solids, together with a concentration on the growth of pure silicon and germanium and an understanding of their properties, saw an explosion in activity in semiconductor studies that has continued to this day.

  11. Wide band gap semiconductor templates

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Stan, Liliana; Jia, Quanxi; DePaula, Raymond F.; Usov, Igor O.

    2010-12-14

    The present invention relates to a thin film structure based on an epitaxial (111)-oriented rare earth-Group IVB oxide on the cubic (001) MgO terminated surface and the ion-beam-assisted deposition ("IBAD") techniques that are amendable to be over coated by semiconductors with hexagonal crystal structures. The IBAD magnesium oxide ("MgO") technology, in conjunction with certain template materials, is used to fabricate the desired thin film array. Similarly, IBAD MgO with appropriate template layers can be used for semiconductors with cubic type crystal structures.

  12. The processing of semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Five experiments involving the processing of semiconductor materials were performed during the Skylab mission. After discussions on semiconductors and their unique electronic properties, and techniques of crystal growth, these five experiments are presented. Four melt growth experiments were attempted: (1) steady state growth and segregation under zero gravity (InSb); (2) seeded, containerless solidification of InSb; (3) influence of gravity-free solidification on microsegregation; and (4) directional solidification of InSb-GaSb alloys. One vapor growth experiment, crystal growth by vapor transport, was attempted.

  13. Cross calibration of the JLab, Hall C, Compton and Møller polarimeters and a study of systematic uncertainties of the Compton electron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Amrendra

    2014-03-01

    A Compton polarimeter was commissioned at Jefferson Lab, Hall C, for continuous non-invasive measurement of the electron beam polarization. It uses ~ 1 . 5 kW of green light for the e-> - γ-> scattering. The polarimeter has several planes of diamond micro-strip detectors to detect the Compton scattered electrons and a PbWO4 crystal for detecting back-scattered photons. It was successfully used to measure the electron beam polarization along with periodic polarization measurements by the standard Moller polarimeter. The diamond micro-strip electron detector provided a standalone measurement of the beam polarization with < 1 % statistical uncertainty per hour, for a 1.16 GeV, 180 μ A electron beam. The systematic uncertainties are projected to be better than 1%. We will discuss the various contributions to the systematic uncertainties for the electron detector. We also collected data at low current for a Moller-Compton cross calibration. The preliminary results from the analysis of these data will be presented. This work was supported by DOE grant number: DE-FG02-07ER41528 for ``Precision Measurements at Medium Energy.''

  14. RXTE Observation of Cygnus X-1: III. Implications for Compton Corona and ADAF Models. Report 3; Implications for Compton Corona and ADAF Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Wilms, Joern; Vaughan, Brian A.; Dove, James B.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1999-01-01

    We have recently shown that a 'sphere + disk' geometry Compton corona model provides a good description of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the hard/low state of Cygnus X-1. Separately, we have analyzed the temporal data provided by RXTE. In this paper we consider the implications of this timing analysis for our best-fit 'sphere + disk' Comptonization models. We focus our attention on the observed Fourier frequency-dependent time delays between hard and soft photons. We consider whether the observed time delays are: created in the disk but are merely reprocessed by the corona; created by differences between the hard and soft photon diffusion times in coronae with extremely large radii; or are due to 'propagation' of disturbances through the corona. We find that the time delays are most likely created directly within the corona; however, it is currently uncertain which specific model is the most likely explanation. Models that posit a large coronal radius [or equivalently, a large Advection Dominated Accretion Flow (ADAF) region] do not fully address all the details of the observed spectrum. The Compton corona models that do address the full spectrum do not contain dynamical information. We show, however, that simple phenomenological propagation models for the observed time delays for these latter models imply extremely slow characteristic propagation speeds within the coronal region.

  15. Method of preparing nitrogen containing semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Barber, Greg D.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2004-09-07

    A method of combining group III elements with group V elements that incorporates at least nitrogen from a nitrogen halide for use in semiconductors and in particular semiconductors in photovoltaic cells.

  16. Method and structure for passivating semiconductor material

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1981-01-01

    A structure for passivating semiconductor material comprises a substrate of crystalline semiconductor material, a relatively thin film of carbon disposed on a surface of the crystalline material, and a layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on the carbon film.

  17. Semiconductor Reliability--Another Field for Physicists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derman, Samuel; Anderson, Wallace T.

    1994-01-01

    Stresses that an important industrial area is product reliability, especially for semiconductors. Suggests that physics students would benefit from training in semiconductors: the many modes of failure, radiation effects, and electrical contact problems. (MVL)

  18. Missouri: Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Missouri's Early Head Start/Child Care Partnership Project expands access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for children birth to age 3 by developing partnerships between federal Head Start, EHS contractors, and child care providers. Head Start and EHS contractors that participate in the initiative provide services through community child care…

  19. Semiconductor electrode with improved photostability characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Arthur J.

    1987-01-01

    An electrode is disclosed for use in photoelectrochemical cells having an electrolyte which includes an aqueous constituent. The electrode includes a semiconductor and a hydrophobic film disposed between the semiconductor and the aqueous constituent. The hydrophobic film is adapted to permit charges to pass therethrough while substantially decreasing the activity of the aqueous constituent at the semiconductor surface thereby decreasing the photodegradation of the semiconductor electrode.

  20. Semiconductor electrode with improved photostability characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Frank, A.J.

    1985-02-19

    An electrode is described for use in photoelectrochemical cells having an electrolyte which includes an aqueous constituent. The electrode consists of a semiconductor and a hydrophobic film disposed between the semiconductor and the aqueous constituent. The hydrophobic film is adapted to permit charges to pass therethrough while substantially decreasing the activity of the aqueous constituent at the semiconductor surface thereby decreasing the photodegradation of the semiconductor electrode.

  1. Semiconductor devices having a recessed electrode structure

    DOEpatents

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2015-05-26

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  2. Semiconductor nanocrystal-based phagokinetic tracking

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A; Parak, Wolfgang J; Le Gros, Mark; Boudreau, Rosanne

    2014-11-18

    Methods for determining metabolic properties of living cells through the uptake of semiconductor nanocrystals by cells. Generally the methods require a layer of neutral or hydrophilic semiconductor nanocrystals and a layer of cells seeded onto a culture surface and changes in the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals are detected. The observed changes made to the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals can be correlated to such metabolic properties as metastatic potential, cell motility or migration.

  3. Diode having trenches in a semiconductor region

    DOEpatents

    Palacios, Tomas Apostol; Lu, Bin; Matioli, Elison de Nazareth

    2016-03-22

    An electrode structure is described in which conductive regions are recessed into a semiconductor region. Trenches may be formed in a semiconductor region, such that conductive regions can be formed in the trenches. The electrode structure may be used in semiconductor devices such as field effect transistors or diodes. Nitride-based power semiconductor devices are described including such an electrode structure, which can reduce leakage current and otherwise improve performance.

  4. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOEpatents

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2001-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  5. Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications

    DOEpatents

    Rajh, Tijana; Meshkov, Natalia; Nedelijkovic, Jovan M.; Skubal, Laura R.; Tiede, David M.; Thurnauer, Marion

    2002-01-01

    An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

  6. Semiconductor films on flexible iridium substrates

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2005-03-29

    A laminate semiconductor article includes a flexible substrate, an optional biaxially textured oxide buffer system on the flexible substrate, a biaxially textured Ir-based buffer layer on the substrate or the buffer system, and an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor. Ir can serve as a substrate with an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor thereon.

  7. Compton thick AGN in the XMM-COSMOS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, G.; Ranalli, P.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Georgakakis, A.; Delvecchio, I.; Akylas, T.; Berta, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Civano, F.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R.; Gruppioni, C.; Hasinger, G.; Iwasawa, K.; Koekemoer, A.; Lusso, E.; Marchesi, S.; Mainieri, V.; Merloni, A.; Mignoli, M.; Piconcelli, E.; Pozzi, F.; Rosario, D. J.; Salvato, M.; Silverman, J.; Trakhtenbrot, B.; Vignali, C.; Zamorani, G.

    2015-01-01

    Heavily obscured, Compton thick (CT, NH> 1024 cm-2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) may represent an important phase in AGN/galaxy co-evolution and are expected to provide a significant contribution to the cosmic X-ray background at its peak. However, unambiguously identifying CT AGN beyond the local Universe is a challenging task even in the deepest X-ray surveys, and given the expected low spatial density of these sources in the 2-10 keV band, large area surveys are needed to collect sizable samples. Through direct X-ray spectra analysis, we selected 39 heavily obscured AGN (NH>3 × 1023 cm-2) at bright X-ray fluxes (F2-10 ≳ 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2) in the 2 deg2 XMM-COSMOS survey. After selecting CT AGN based on the fit of a simple absorbed two power law model to the shallow XMM-Newton data, the presence of bona fide CT AGN was confirmed in 80% of the sources using deeper Chandra data and more complex models. The final sample comprises ten CT AGN (six of them also have a detected Fe Kα line with EW ~ 1 keV), spanning a wide range of redshifts (z ~ 0.1-2.5) and luminosity (L2-10 ~ 1043.5-1045 erg s-1) and is complemented by 29 heavily obscured AGN spanning the same redshift and luminosity range. We collected the rich multi-wavelength information available for all these sources, in order to study the distribution of super massive black hole and host properties, such as black hole mass (MBH), Eddington ratio (λEdd), stellar mass (M∗), specific star formation rate (sSFR) in comparison with a sample of unobscured AGN. We find that highly obscured sources tend to have significantly smaller MBH and higher λEdd with respect to unobscured sources, while a weaker evolution in M∗ is observed. The sSFR of highly obscured sources is consistent with the one observed in the main sequence of star forming galaxies, at all redshifts. We also present and briefly discuss optical spectra, broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and morphology for the sample of ten CT AGN. Both

  8. Head muscle development.

    PubMed

    Tzahor, Eldad

    2015-01-01

    The developmental paths that lead to the formation of skeletal muscles in the head are distinct from those operating in the trunk. Craniofacial muscles are associated with head and neck structures. In the embryo, these structures derive from distinct mesoderm populations. Distinct genetic programs regulate different groups of muscles within the head to generate diverse muscle specifications. Developmental and lineage studies in vertebrates and invertebrates demonstrated an overlap in progenitor populations derived from the pharyngeal mesoderm that contribute to certain head muscles and the heart. These studies reveal that the genetic program controlling pharyngeal muscles overlaps with that of the heart. Indeed cardiac and craniofacial birth defects are often linked. Recent studies suggest that early chordates, the last common ancestor of tunicates and vertebrates, had an ancestral pharyngeal mesoderm lineage that later during evolution gave rise to both heart and craniofacial structures. This chapter summarizes studies related to the origins, signaling, genetics, and evolution of the head musculature, highlighting its heterogeneous characteristics in all these aspects.

  9. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals.

    PubMed

    Collins, S P; Laundy, D; Connolley, T; van der Laan, G; Fabrizi, F; Janssen, O; Cooper, M J; Ebert, H; Mankovsky, S

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering--an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density--to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and the first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO3. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10(-5) of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin-orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample. PMID:26919371

  10. A likely inverse-Compton emission from the Type IIb SN 2013df.

    PubMed

    Li, K L; Kong, A K H

    2016-01-01

    The inverse-Compton X-ray emission model for supernovae has been well established to explain the X-ray properties of many supernovae for over 30 years. However, no observational case has yet been found to connect the X-rays with the optical lights as they should be. Here, we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source that is associated with a Type II-b supernova. Simultaneous emission enhancements have been found in both the X-ray and optical light curves twenty days after the supernova explosion. While the enhanced X-rays are likely dominated by inverse-Compton scatterings of the supernova's lights from the Type II-b secondary peak, we propose a scenario of a high-speed supernova ejecta colliding with a low-density pre-supernova stellar wind that produces an optically thin and high-temperature electron gas for the Comptonization. The inferred stellar wind mass-loss rate is consistent with that of the supernova progenitor candidate as a yellow supergiant detected by the Hubble Space Telescope, providing an independent proof for the progenitor. This is also new evidence of the inverse-Compton emission during the early phase of a supernova. PMID:27481538

  11. Establishing Site X: Letter, Arthur H. Compton to Enrico Fermi, September 14, 1942

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Compton, A. H.

    1942-09-01

    This letter from Compton to Fermi describes developments bearing on the establishment of site X (which, as of the letter date, is definitely determined as at the Tennessee Valley) for the construction of a pile and associated pilot plant buildings, describes the situation as of the letter date, and offers counsel as to how to proceed.

  12. Compton profiles and electronic structure of monoclinic zinc and cadmium tungstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, B. S.; Heda, N. L.; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    We report the first ever Compton scattering study of ZnWO4 and CdWO4 using 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer at momentum resolution of 0.34 a.u. To compare the experimental Compton profiles, we have also deduced the momentum densities using density functional theory (DFT) within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) methods. It is seen that the experimental Compton profiles of both the tungstates give a better agreement with LCAO-DFT calculations within generalized gradient approximation (GGA) employing Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation energies than other approximations included in the present work. Further, energy bands, density of states (DOS) and band gaps have also been calculated using LCAO-DFT-GGA-PBE scheme and full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. Both the computational schemes show a semiconducting nature of both the tungstates, with a direct band gap at Y point of Brillouin zone. Further, a relative nature of bonding on equal-valence-electron-density scale shows more covalent character in ZnWO4 than CdWO4 which reconciles with the conclusions drawn using integrated DOS and Mulliken's population data.

  13. A likely inverse-Compton emission from the Type IIb SN 2013df.

    PubMed

    Li, K L; Kong, A K H

    2016-08-02

    The inverse-Compton X-ray emission model for supernovae has been well established to explain the X-ray properties of many supernovae for over 30 years. However, no observational case has yet been found to connect the X-rays with the optical lights as they should be. Here, we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source that is associated with a Type II-b supernova. Simultaneous emission enhancements have been found in both the X-ray and optical light curves twenty days after the supernova explosion. While the enhanced X-rays are likely dominated by inverse-Compton scatterings of the supernova's lights from the Type II-b secondary peak, we propose a scenario of a high-speed supernova ejecta colliding with a low-density pre-supernova stellar wind that produces an optically thin and high-temperature electron gas for the Comptonization. The inferred stellar wind mass-loss rate is consistent with that of the supernova progenitor candidate as a yellow supergiant detected by the Hubble Space Telescope, providing an independent proof for the progenitor. This is also new evidence of the inverse-Compton emission during the early phase of a supernova.

  14. A compact Compton backscatter X-ray source for mammography and coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D.C.; Kinross-Wright, J.M.; Weber, M.E.; Volz, S.K.; Gierman, S.M.; Hayes, K.; Vernon, W.; Goldstein, D.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective is to generate a large flux of tunable, monochromatic x-rays for use in mammography and coronary angiography. The approach is based on Compton backscattering of an ultraviolet solid-state laser beam against the high-brightness 20-MeV electron beams from a compact linear accelerator. The direct Compton backscatter approach failed to produce a large flux of x-rays due to the low photon flux of the scattering solid-state laser. The authors have modified the design of a compact x-ray source to the new Compton backscattering geometry with use of a regenerative amplifier free-electron laser. They have successfully demonstrated the production of a large flux of infrared photons and a high-brightness electron beam focused in both dimensions for performing Compton backscattering in a regenerative amplifier geometry.

  15. Compton backscattering of intracavity storage ring free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Giannessi, L.; Torre, A.

    1995-12-31

    We discuss the{gamma}-ray production by Compton backscattering of intracavity storage ring Free-Electron Laser radiation. We use a semi-analytical model which provides the build up of the signal combined with the storage ring damping mechanism and derive simple relations yielding the connection between backscattered. Photons brightness and the intercavity laser equilibrium intensity.

  16. The Compton-Belkovich Region of the Moon: Remotely Sensed Observations and Lunar Sample Association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. J.; Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, D. J.; Lawson, S. L.; Prettyman, T. H.

    2002-01-01

    Clementine (UVVIS, FeO, and LWIR) data, and Lunar Prospector gamma-ray data for Th are compared with compositional data from lunar samples to show evidence of an association between the Compton-Belkovich high-Th anomaly and alkali anorthosites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. X-ray irradiated model stellar atmospheres. II. Comprehensive treatment of Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Rózańska, A.

    2000-11-01

    We present equations and details of the computer code for model atmosphere computations, in which we include both nonzero external illumination by very hard X-rays, and Compton scattering opacity and emissivity. We assume both radiative and hydrostatic equilibrium, and LTE equation of state. The code solves simultaneously transfer of thermal radiation emitted by a hot main sequence stellar atmosphere and incident hard X-rays of photon energy approaching electron rest mass. The equation of radiative transfer and remaining equations of equilibrium contain Compton scattering terms appropriate for scattering of photons of arbitrarily large initial energies. In our paper we consider Compton scattering of photons of energy up to 400 keV on free electrons in fully relativistic thermal motion. In this paper we consider illumination of a B3 V type star by isotropic X-rays of diluted thermal spectral distribution with temperature Trad=108 K. Two series of models are computed, hydrogen-helium models and iron rich models. Our results demonstrate, that the external illumination causes extreme temperature rise at least in the uppermost layers. Outgoing spectra exhibit: big UV bump, numerous H, He, and Fe b-f opacity jumps mostly in emission, and also reflected incident spectrum with Compton cut-off. The model spectra also reflect qualitatively spectral properties of the active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  18. A likely inverse-Compton emission from the Type IIb SN 2013df

    PubMed Central

    Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2016-01-01

    The inverse-Compton X-ray emission model for supernovae has been well established to explain the X-ray properties of many supernovae for over 30 years. However, no observational case has yet been found to connect the X-rays with the optical lights as they should be. Here, we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source that is associated with a Type II-b supernova. Simultaneous emission enhancements have been found in both the X-ray and optical light curves twenty days after the supernova explosion. While the enhanced X-rays are likely dominated by inverse-Compton scatterings of the supernova’s lights from the Type II-b secondary peak, we propose a scenario of a high-speed supernova ejecta colliding with a low-density pre-supernova stellar wind that produces an optically thin and high-temperature electron gas for the Comptonization. The inferred stellar wind mass-loss rate is consistent with that of the supernova progenitor candidate as a yellow supergiant detected by the Hubble Space Telescope, providing an independent proof for the progenitor. This is also new evidence of the inverse-Compton emission during the early phase of a supernova. PMID:27481538

  19. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals

    PubMed Central

    Collins, S. P.; Laundy, D.; Connolley, T.; van der Laan, G.; Fabrizi, F.; Janssen, O.; Cooper, M. J.; Ebert, H.; Mankovsky, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering – an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density – to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and the first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO3. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10−5 of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin–orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample. PMID:26919371

  20. Evaluation of detector material and radiation source position on Compton camera's ability for multitracer imaging.

    PubMed

    Uche, C Z; Round, W H; Cree, M J

    2012-09-01

    We present a study on the effects of detector material, radionuclide source and source position on the Compton camera aimed at realistic characterization of the camera's performance in multitracer imaging as it relates to brain imaging. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation software was used to model the physics of radiation transport and interactions with matter. Silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) detectors were evaluated for the scatterer, and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and cerium-doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr(3):Ce) were considered for the absorber. Image quality analyses suggest that the use of Si as the scatterer and CZT as the absorber would be preferred. Nevertheless, two simulated Compton camera models (Si/CZT and Si/LaBr(3):Ce Compton cameras) that are considered in this study demonstrated good capabilities for multitracer imaging in that four radiotracers within the nuclear medicine energy range are clearly visualized by the cameras. It is found however that beyond a range difference of about 2 cm for (113m)In and (18)F radiotracers in a brain phantom, there may be a need to rotate the Compton camera for efficient brain imaging.

  1. The limitations of resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Resonant Compton upscattering is commended as a mechanism that produces a hard gamma-ray spectrum while suppressing X-rays. This model, however, has severe physical and observational limitations. Effective X-ray suppression places a lower limit on the electron density; above this limit X-rays scatter multiple times, so the single-scattering approximation of this mechanism is invalid. Multiple scattering produces a spectrum that is much harder than the single-scattering spectrum. As the Thomson optical depth of a power-law electron beam approaches unity, photon spawning commences at a high rate and physically invalidates the underlying electron distribution. The Compton upscattering model is therefore only valid over a narrow range of electron densities. An observational consequence of this model is the absence of the third cyclotron resonance. Resonant scattering produces gamma-rays that propagate nearly along the magnetic field. The resonant cross section of the third harmonic, which is strongly angle dependent, falls below the Compton continuum for these gamma rays. The observation of a third cyclotron resonance in a gamma-ray burst spectrum would eliminate resonant Compton scattering as a gamma-ray burst process.

  2. Verification of Compton Collision and Klein-Nishina Formulas--An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singhal, R. P.; Burns, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment to verify the Compton collision formula and the angular dependance of the Klein-Nishina formula. Equipment used is a 1-mCi(137)Cs source, 2x2 in. NaI detector and a multichannel analyzer. Suitable for honor undergraduates. (Author/GA)

  3. Combining harmonic generation and laser chirping to achieve high spectral density in Compton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzić, Balša; Reeves, Cody; Krafft, Geoffrey A.

    2016-04-01

    Recently various laser-chirping schemes have been investigated with the goal of reducing or eliminating ponderomotive line broadening in Compton or Thomson scattering occurring at high laser intensities. As a next level of detail in the spectrum calculations, we have calculated the line smoothing and broadening expected due to incident beam energy spread within a one-dimensional plane wave model for the incident laser pulse, both for compensated (chirped) and unchirped cases. The scattered compensated distributions are treatable analytically within three models for the envelope of the incident laser pulses: Gaussian, Lorentzian, or hyperbolic secant. We use the new results to demonstrate that the laser chirping in Compton sources at high laser intensities: (i) enables the use of higher order harmonics, thereby reducing the required electron beam energies; and (ii) increases the photon yield in a small frequency band beyond that possible with the fundamental without chirping. This combination of chirping and higher harmonics can lead to substantial savings in the design, construction and operational costs of the new Compton sources. This is of particular importance to the widely popular laser-plasma accelerator based Compton sources, as the improvement in their beam quality enters the regime where chirping is most effective.

  4. Exclusive Vector Meson Production and Deep Virtual Compton Scattering in Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cazaroto, E. R.; Navarra, F. S.; Carvalho, F.; Kugeratski, M. S.; Goncalves, V. P.

    2010-11-12

    We calculate the nuclear cross section for coherent and incoherent deep virtual Compton scattering as well as for coherent and incoherent vector meson production for the mesons J/{Psi}, {phi} and {rho} within the QCD color dipole picture, including saturation effects. Theoretical estimates for scattering on both light and heavy nuclei are given over a wide range of energy.

  5. Next-to-leading order mass effects in QCD Compton process of polarized DIS

    SciTech Connect

    I. Akushevich; A.Ilyichev; N.Shumeiko

    2001-04-01

    The method originally developed for the exact calculations in QED theory is applied for the calculation of NLO effects in QCD Compton processes. QCD corrections to the structure functions and sum rules are obtained. Different interpretations of the NLO effects due to finite quark mass are discussed.

  6. A likely inverse-Compton emission from the Type IIb SN 2013df

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2016-08-01

    The inverse-Compton X-ray emission model for supernovae has been well established to explain the X-ray properties of many supernovae for over 30 years. However, no observational case has yet been found to connect the X-rays with the optical lights as they should be. Here, we report the discovery of a hard X-ray source that is associated with a Type II-b supernova. Simultaneous emission enhancements have been found in both the X-ray and optical light curves twenty days after the supernova explosion. While the enhanced X-rays are likely dominated by inverse-Compton scatterings of the supernova’s lights from the Type II-b secondary peak, we propose a scenario of a high-speed supernova ejecta colliding with a low-density pre-supernova stellar wind that produces an optically thin and high-temperature electron gas for the Comptonization. The inferred stellar wind mass-loss rate is consistent with that of the supernova progenitor candidate as a yellow supergiant detected by the Hubble Space Telescope, providing an independent proof for the progenitor. This is also new evidence of the inverse-Compton emission during the early phase of a supernova.

  7. The Financial Resource Allocation Process at Compton Community College: A Redirection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton Community Coll. Federation of Teachers, CA.

    This paper presents a historical portrait of the process of financial resource allocation at Compton Community College (CCC). Introductory material provides information on the college, its organization, and its budgeting and accounting procedures. Next, changes in finances occurring between 1974-75 and 1977-78 are outlined, including the growth of…

  8. A Brief History of ... Semiconductors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Tudor

    2005-01-01

    The development of studies in semiconductor materials is traced from its beginnings with Michael Faraday in 1833 to the production of the first silicon transistor in 1954, which heralded the age of silicon electronics and microelectronics. Prior to the advent of band theory, work was patchy and driven by needs of technology. However, the arrival…

  9. Hydroplane polishing of semiconductor crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, J. V.; Manfra, M. J.; Calawa, A. R.

    1981-08-01

    A new technique for obtaining optically flat, damage-free surfaces on semiconductor crystals has been developed. The polishing is very fast, being capable of removing over 30 μm of materials per minute in the case of GaAs and InP. Initial results indicate that the technique can also be used in the polishing of HgCdTe.

  10. 2010 Defects in Semiconductors GRC

    SciTech Connect

    Shengbai Zhang

    2011-01-06

    Continuing its tradition of excellence, this Gordon Conference will focus on research at the forefront of the field of defects in semiconductors. The conference will have a strong emphasis on the control of defects during growth and processing, as well as an emphasis on the development of novel defect detection methods and first-principles defect theories. Electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors will be discussed in detail. In contrast to many conferences, which tend to focus on specific semiconductors, this conference will deal with point and extended defects in a broad range of electronic materials. This approach has proved to be extremely fruitful for advancing fundamental understanding in emerging materials such as wide-band-gap semiconductors, oxides, sp{sup 2} carbon based-materials, and photovoltaic/solar cell materials, and in understanding important defect phenomena such as doping bottleneck in nanostructures and the diffusion of defects and impurities. The program consists of about twenty invited talks and a number of contributed poster sessions. The emphasis should be on work which has yet to be published. The large amount of discussion time provides an ideal forum for dealing with topics that are new and/or controversial.

  11. Semiconductor-based optical refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2002-01-01

    Optical refrigerators using semiconductor material as a cooling medium, with layers of material in close proximity to the cooling medium that carries away heat from the cooling material and preventing radiation trapping. In addition to the use of semiconducting material, the invention can be used with ytterbium-doped glass optical refrigerators.

  12. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  13. (Magnetic properties of doped semiconductors)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Research continued on the transport behavior of doped semiconductors on both sides of the metal-insulator transition, and the approach to the transition from both the insulating and the metallic side. Work is described on magneto resistance of a series of metallic Si:B samples and CdSe. (CBS)

  14. Electronic spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    Semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the bulk exciton show substantial quantum confinement effects. Recent experiments including Stark effect, resonance Raman, valence band photoemission, and near edge X-ray adsorption will be used to put together a picture of the nanocrystal electronic states.

  15. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  16. Electron beam pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Electron-beam-pumped semiconductor ultra-violet optical sources (ESUVOSs) are disclosed that use ballistic electron pumped wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The sources may produce incoherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped light emitting triodes (ELETs). The sources may produce coherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped laser triodes (ELTs). The ELTs may take the form of electron-beam-pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (EVCSEL) or edge emitting electron-beam-pumped lasers (EEELs). The semiconductor medium may take the form of an aluminum gallium nitride alloy that has a mole fraction of aluminum selected to give a desired emission wavelength, diamond, or diamond-like carbon (DLC). The sources may be produced from discrete components that are assembled after their individual formation or they may be produced using batch MEMS-type or semiconductor-type processing techniques to build them up in a whole or partial monolithic manner, or combination thereof.

  17. High-speed semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, S. M.

    An introduction to the physical principles and operational characteristics of high-speed semiconductor devices is presented. Consideration is given to materials and technologies for high-speed devices, device building blocks, the submicron MOSFET, homogeneous field-effect transistors, and heterostructure field-effect transistors. Also considered are quantum-effect devices, microwave diodes, and high-speed photonic devices.

  18. Semiconductor technology program: Progress briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, K. F.; Scace, R. I.; Walters, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices, is discussed. Silicon and silicon based devices are emphasized. Highlighted activities include semiinsulating GaAs characterization, an automatic scanning spectroscopic ellipsometer, linewidth measurement and coherence, bandgap narrowing effects in silicon, the evaluation of electrical linewidth uniformity, and arsenicomplanted profiles in silicon.

  19. Optical bistability in semiconductor microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, A.; Karr, J.Ph.; Giacobino, E.; Eleuch, H.

    2004-02-01

    We report the observation of polaritonic bistability in semiconductor microcavities in the strong-coupling regime. The origin of bistability is the polariton-polariton interaction, which gives rise to a Kerr-like nonlinearity. The experimental results are in good agreement with a simple model taking transverse effects into account.

  20. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    1992-07-21

    A method is disclosed for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B[sub x]O[sub y] are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T[sub m1] of the oxide of boron (T[sub m1]=723 K for boron oxide B[sub 2]O[sub 3]), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T[sub m2] of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm[sup 2]. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 [mu]m. 7 figs.

  1. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  2. Head segmentation in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kuratani, Shigeru; Schilling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Classic theories of vertebrate head segmentation clearly exemplify the idealistic nature of comparative embryology prior to the 20th century. Comparative embryology aimed at recognizing the basic, primary structure that is shared by all vertebrates, either as an archetype or an ancestral developmental pattern. Modern evolutionary developmental (Evo-Devo) studies are also based on comparison, and therefore have a tendency to reduce complex embryonic anatomy into overly simplified patterns. Here again, a basic segmental plan for the head has been sought among chordates. We convened a symposium that brought together leading researchers dealing with this problem, in a number of different evolutionary and developmental contexts. Here we give an overview of the outcome and the status of the field in this modern era of Evo-Devo. We emphasize the fact that the head segmentation problem is not fully resolved, and we discuss new directions in the search for hints for a way out of this maze. PMID:20607135

  3. Lubricating the swordfish head.

    PubMed

    Videler, John J; Haydar, Deniz; Snoek, Roelant; Hoving, Henk-Jan T; Szabo, Ben G

    2016-07-01

    The swordfish is reputedly the fastest swimmer on Earth. The concave head and iconic sword are unique characteristics, but how they contribute to its speed is still unknown. Recent computed tomography scans revealed a poorly mineralised area near the base of the rostrum. Here we report, using magnetic resonance imaging and electron microscopy scanning, the discovery of a complex organ consisting of an oil-producing gland connected to capillaries that communicate with oil-excreting pores in the skin of the head. The capillary vessels transport oil to abundant tiny circular pores that are surrounded by denticles. The oil is distributed from the pores over the front part of the head. The oil inside the gland is identical to that found on the skin and is a mixture of methyl esters. We hypothesize that the oil layer, in combination with the denticles, creates a super-hydrophobic layer that reduces streamwise friction drag and increases swimming efficiency. PMID:27385753

  4. Shaking head means "no".

    PubMed

    Weiler, Stefan; Offinger, Alexander; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2013-09-10

    A 45-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department because of twitching of the head. The patient took a tablet of sumatriptan every 3-4 h because of increasing head pain after a car accident. Owing to depression, the patient was on long-term treatment with venlafaxine. The patient presented as hypertensive, tachycardic, with dyskinesia and spontaneous myoclonic movements of the right sternocleidomastoid muscle. In a CT scan of the head and cervical spine any fractures, bleeding or damage of the vessels after the accident could be ruled out. After discontinuation of all serotonergic agents, administration of lorazepam symptoms resolved 24 h after the last intake of sumatriptan. Serotonin syndrome is a clinical diagnosis, which requires a high-index of diagnostic suspicion. Clinical features include a broad spectrum of symptoms ranging from mild to life-threatening manifestations. Management is based on removal of precipitating drugs and symptomatic care including benzodiazepines.

  5. Advanced Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Michael S.; Maki, Paul A.; Kolodzey, James

    2007-06-01

    I. Wide band gap devices. Wide-Bandgap Semiconductor devices for automotive applications / M. Sugimoto ... [et al.]. A GaN on SiC HFET device technology for wireless infrastructure applications / B. Green ... [et al.]. Drift velocity limitation in GaN HEMT channels / A. Matulionis. Simulations of field-plated and recessed gate gallium nitride-based heterojunction field-effect transistors / V. O. Turin, M. S. Shur and D. B. Veksler. Low temperature electroluminescence of green and deep green GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / Y. Li ... [et al.]. Spatial spectral analysis in high brightness GaInN/GaN light emitting diodes / T. Detchprohm ... [et al.]. Self-induced surface texturing of Al2O3 by means of inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching in Cl2 chemistry / P. Batoni ... [et al.]. Field and termionic field transport in aluminium gallium arsenide heterojunction barriers / D. V. Morgan and A. Porch. Electrical characteristics and carrier lifetime measurements in high voltage 4H-SiC PiN diodes / P. A. Losee ... [et al.]. Geometry and short channel effects on enhancement-mode n-Channel GaN MOSFETs on p and n- GaN/sapphire substrates / W. Huang, T. Khan and T. P. Chow. 4H-SiC Vertical RESURF Schottky Rectifiers and MOSFETs / Y. Wang, P. A. Losee and T. P. Chow. Present status and future Directions of SiGe HBT technology / M. H. Khater ... [et al.]Optical properties of GaInN/GaN multi-quantum Wells structure and light emitting diode grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy / J. Senawiratne ... [et al.]. Electrical comparison of Ta/Ti/Al/Mo/Au and Ti/Al/Mo/Au Ohmic contacts on undoped GaN HEMTs structure with AlN interlayer / Y. Sun and L. F. Eastman. Above 2 A/mm drain current density of GaN HEMTs grown on sapphire / F. Medjdoub ... [et al.]. Focused thermal beam direct patterning on InGaN during molecular beam epitaxy / X. Chen, W. J. Schaff and L. F. Eastman -- II. Terahertz and millimeter wave devices. Temperature-dependent microwave performance of

  6. Foreign body detection in food materials using compton scattered x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Nigel James Bruce

    This thesis investigated the application of X-ray Compton scattering to the problem of foreign body detection in food. The methods used were analytical modelling, simulation and experiment. A criterion was defined for detectability, and a model was developed for predicting the minimum time required for detection. The model was used to predict the smallest detectable cubes of air, glass, plastic and steel. Simulations and experiments were performed on voids and glass in polystyrene phantoms, water, coffee and muesli. Backscatter was used to detect bones in chicken meat. The effects of geometry and multiple scatter on contrast, signal-to-noise, and detection time were simulated. Compton scatter was compared with transmission, and the effect of inhomogeneity was modelled. Spectral shape was investigated as a means of foreign body detection. A signal-to-noise ratio of 7.4 was required for foreign body detection in food. A 0.46 cm cube of glass or a 1.19 cm cube of polystyrene were detectable in a 10 cm cube of water in one second. The minimum time to scan a whole sample varied as the 7th power of the foreign body size, and the 5th power of the sample size. Compton scatter inspection produced higher contrasts than transmission, but required longer measurement times because of the low number of photon counts. Compton scatter inspection of whole samples was very slow compared to production line speeds in the food industry. There was potential for Compton scatter in applications which did not require whole-sample scanning, such as surface inspection. There was also potential in the inspection of inhomogeneous samples. The multiple scatter fraction varied from 25% to 55% for 2 to 10 cm cubes of water, but did not have a large effect on the detection time. The spectral shape gave good contrasts and signal-to-noise ratios in the detection of chicken bones.

  7. Comptonization of diffuse ambient radiation by a relativistic jet: The source of gamma rays from blazars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rees, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) observations of blazars have revealed strong, variable gamma-ray fluxes with no signatures of gamma-ray absorption by pair production. This radiation probably originates from the inner parts of relativistic jets which are aimed nearly toward us. On sub-parsec scales, the jet will be pervaded by radiation from the broad-line region, as well as by photons from the central continuum source (some of which will be scattered by thermal plasma). In a frame moving with the relativistic outflow, the energy of this ambient radiation would be enhanced. This radiation would be Comptonized by both cold and relativistic electrons in the jet, yielding (in the observer's frame) a collimated beam of X-rays and gamma rays. On the assumption that this process dominates self-Comptonization of synchrotron radiation, we develop a self-consistent model for variable gamma-ray emission, involving a single population of relativistic electrons accelerated by a disturbance in the jet. The spectral break between the X-ray and gamma-ray band, observed in 3C 279 and deduced for other blazars, results from inefficient radiative cooling of lower energy electrons. The existence of such a break strongly favors a model involving Comptonization of an external radiation field over a synchrotron self-Compton model. We derive constraints on such model parameters as the location and speed of the source, its dimensions and internal physical parameters, the maximum photon energies produced in the source, and the density and distribution of ambient radiation. Finally, we discuss how observations might discriminate between our model and alternative ones invoking Comptonization of ambient radiation.

  8. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  9. COOLING RATES FOR RELATIVISTIC ELECTRONS UNDERGOING COMPTON SCATTERING IN STRONG MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Gonthier, Peter L. E-mail: zw1@rice.edu

    2011-05-20

    For inner magnetospheric models of hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission in high-field pulsars and magnetars, resonant Compton upscattering is anticipated to be the most efficient process for generating continuum radiation. This is in part due to the proximity of a hot soft photon bath from the stellar surface to putative radiation dissipation regions in the inner magnetosphere. Moreover, because the scattering process becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency, the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson value by over two orders of magnitude, thereby enhancing the efficiency of continuum production and the cooling of relativistic electrons. This paper presents computations of the electron cooling rates for this process, which are needed for resonant Compton models of non-thermal radiation from such highly magnetized pulsars. The computed rates extend previous calculations of magnetic Thomson cooling to the domain of relativistic quantum effects, sampled near and above the quantum critical magnetic field of 44.13 TG. This is the first exposition of fully relativistic, quantum magnetic Compton cooling rates for electrons, and it employs both the traditional Johnson and Lippmann cross section and a newer Sokolov and Ternov (ST) formulation of Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields. Such ST formalism is formally correct for treating spin-dependent effects that are important in the cyclotron resonance and has not been addressed before in the context of cooling by Compton scattering. The QED effects are observed to profoundly lower the rates below extrapolations of the familiar magnetic Thomson results, as expected, when recoil and Klein-Nishina reductions become important.

  10. Rocket injector head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A high number of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen orifices per unit area are provided in an injector head designed to give intimate mixing and more thorough combustion. The injector head comprises a main body portion, a cooperating plate member as a flow chamber for one propellant, a cooperating manifold portion for the second propellant, and an annular end plate for enclosing an annular propellant groove formed around the outer edge of the body. All the openings for one propellant are located at the same angle with respect to a radial plane to permit a short combustion chamber.

  11. The effect of Compton drag on the dynamics of dissipative Poynting-dominated flows: implications for the unification of radio loud AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, A.; Globus, N.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of a dissipative Poynting-dominated flow subject to a radiation drag due to Compton scattering of ambient photons by relativistic electrons accelerated in reconnecting current sheets is studied. It is found that the efficiency at which magnetic energy is converted to radiation is limited to a maximum value of ɛc = 3ldis σ0/4(σ0 + 1), where σ0 is the initial magnetization of the flow and ldis ≤ 1 the fraction of initial Poynting flux that can dissipate. The asymptotic Lorentz factor satisfies Γ∞ ≥ Γ0(1 + ldis σ0/4), where Γ0 is the initial Lorentz factor. This limit is approached in cases where the cooling time is shorter than the local dissipation time. A somewhat smaller radiative efficiency is expected if radiative losses are dominated by synchrotron and Synchrotron Self-Compton emissions. It is suggested that under certain conditions magnetic field dissipation may occur in two distinct phases: On small scales, asymmetric magnetic fields that are advected into the polar region and dragged out by the outflow dissipate to a more stable configuration. The dissipated energy is released predominantly as gamma rays. On much larger scales, the outflow encounters a flat density profile medium and re-collimates. This leads to further dissipation and wobbling of the jet head by the kink instability, as found recently in 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Within the framework of a model proposed recently to explain the dichotomy of radio loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), this scenario can account for the unification of gamma-ray blazars with Fanaroff-Riley type I and Fanaroff-Riley type II radio sources.

  12. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1992-12-31

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups: Classical semiconductor diode detectors and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported.

  13. Back-side readout semiconductor photomultiplier

    DOEpatents

    Choong, Woon-Seng; Holland, Stephen E

    2014-05-20

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to semiconductor photomultipliers. In one aspect, a device includes a p-type semiconductor substrate, the p-type semiconductor substrate having a first side and a second side, the first side of the p-type semiconductor substrate defining a recess, and the second side of the p-type semiconductor substrate being doped with n-type ions. A conductive material is disposed in the recess. A p-type epitaxial layer is disposed on the second side of the p-type semiconductor substrate. The p-type epitaxial layer includes a first region proximate the p-type semiconductor substrate, the first region being implanted with p-type ions at a higher doping level than the p-type epitaxial layer, and a second region disposed on the first region, the second region being doped with p-type ions at a higher doping level than the first region.

  14. Design of Terahertz-Wave Spectrophotometry by Compton Backscattering Using Relativistic Electron Bunches and their Coherent Synchrotron Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Norihiro; Kuroda, Ryunosuke; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    We propose a new terahertz-wave spectrophotometry by Compton backscattering using relativistic electron bunches and coherent radiations generated by them. The terahertz-wave spectrophotometry can be realized simultaneously with Compton backscattering, where the characteristics in the terahertz-wave region are converted to those in the visible and ultraviolet regions. The number of Compton backscattered photons is estimated to be more than 100 counts per second with a wavelength divergence of 5% in the visible and ultraviolet regions using the compact S-band linac at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. This spectrophotometry becomes significant in energy recovery linacs.

  15. A Bulk Comptonization Model for the Prompt GRB Emission and its Relation to the Fermi GRB Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-01-01

    We present a model in which the GRB prompt emission at E E(sub peak) is due to bulk Comptonization by the relativistic blast wave motion of either its own synchrotron photons of ambient photons of the stellar configuration that gave birth to the GRB. The bulk Comptonization process then induces the production of relativistic electrons of Lorentz factor equal to that of the blast wave through interactions with its ambient protons. The inverse compton emission of these electrons produces a power law component that extends to multi GeV energies in good agreement with the LAT GRB observations.

  16. The diffuse galactic gamma radiation: The Compton contribution and component separation by energy interval and galactic coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation to be expected from cosmic ray interactions with matter and photons was examined. Particular emphasis is placed on the Compton emission. Both the photon density in and near the visible region and that in the region are deduced from the estimates of the emission functions throughout the Galaxy. The blackbody radiation is also included in the estimate of the total Compton emission. The result suggests that the gamma ray Compton radiation from cosmic ray ineractions with galactic visible and infrared photons is substantially larger than previously believed.

  17. MULTIPLE SHAFT TOOL HEAD

    DOEpatents

    Colbert, H.P.

    1962-10-23

    An improved tool head arrangement is designed for the automatic expanding of a plurality of ferruled tubes simultaneously. A plurality of output shafts of a multiple spindle drill head are driven in unison by a hydraulic motor. A plurality of tube expanders are respectively coupled to the shafts through individual power train arrangements. The axial or thrust force required for the rolling operation is provided by a double acting hydraulic cylinder having a hollow through shaft with the shaft cooperating with an internally rotatable splined shaft slidably coupled to a coupling rigidly attached to the respectlve output shaft of the drill head, thereby transmitting rotary motion and axial thrust simultaneously to the tube expander. A hydraulic power unit supplies power to each of the double acting cylinders through respective two-position, four-way valves, under control of respective solenoids for each of the cylinders. The solenoids are in turn selectively controlled by a tool selection control unit which in turn is controlled by signals received from a programmed, coded tape from a tape reader. The number of expanders that are extended in a rolling operation, which may be up to 42 expanders, is determined by a predetermined program of operations depending upon the arrangement of the ferruled tubes to be expanded in the tube bundle. The tape reader also supplies dimensional information to a machine tool servo control unit for imparting selected, horizontal and/or vertical movement to the tool head assembly. (AEC)

  18. Imaging of head trauma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Sandra; Gupta, Rajiv; Ptak, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is an indispensable part of the initial assessment and subsequent management of patients with head trauma. Initially, it is important for diagnosing the extent of injury and the prompt recognition of treatable injuries to reduce mortality. Subsequently, imaging is useful in following the sequelae of trauma. In this chapter, we review indications for neuroimaging and typical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols used in the evaluation of a patient with head trauma. We review the role of CT), the imaging modality of choice in the acute setting, and the role of MRI in the evaluation of patients with head trauma. We describe an organized and consistent approach to the interpretation of imaging of these patients. Important topics in head trauma, including fundamental concepts related to skull fractures, intracranial hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, penetrating trauma, cerebrovascular injuries, and secondary effects of trauma, are reviewed. The chapter concludes with advanced neuroimaging techniques for the evaluation of traumatic brain injury, including use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS), techniques which are still under development. PMID:27432678

  19. Sculpting Ceramic Heads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapiro, Maurice

    1983-01-01

    Clay sculpture is difficult to produce because of the requirements of kiln firing. The problems can be overcome by modeling the original manikin head and making a plaster mold, pressing molding slabs of clay into the plaster mold to form the hollow clay armature, and sculpting on the armature. (IS)

  20. Orion Touchdown Heading Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    At touchdown Orion must be aligned so that the crew person's feet are forward in the direction of the horizontal velocity. To ensure that this requirement is met active heading control is being implemented on the Orion crew module. This technique reduces probability of roll-over during splashdown, assures axial loads on the crew at touchdown, and alleviates structural requirements on impact allowing for a light-weight structural design. On-board sensors are used to measure current vehicle orientation and horizontal velocity used in generation of the heading error signal. Linear velocity measured by the IMU drifts while under parachutes due to wind gusts and has to be corrected by GPS; this makes GPS critical for successful landing. Jet fire logic is achieved by use of a phase-plane and commands are realized by using roll jets from the reaction control system (RCS); using pre existing hardware eliminates additional hardware and structural requirements. Touchdown performance is measured by an orientation envelope that was co-developed with structures so that the performance requirements overlap adding system redundancy. Heading control also introduces new difficulties to be addressed such as parachute line twist torque as well as increasing vehicle sensitivity to wind shifts and sea states. Solving these difficulties requires added complexity to flight software as well as increasing the propellant required to achieve successful touchdown. while offering promising results, the criticality of GPS along with a significant propellant cost raises questions on the effectiveness of using touchdown heading control.

  1. Reactor pressure vessel vented head

    DOEpatents

    Sawabe, James K.

    1994-01-11

    A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

  2. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies.

  3. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Matthew P.; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5–10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies. PMID:27577091

  4. Hypersonic modes in nanophononic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Hepplestone, S P; Srivastava, G P

    2008-09-01

    Frequency gaps and negative group velocities of hypersonic phonon modes in periodically arranged composite semiconductors are presented. Trends and criteria for phononic gaps are discussed using a variety of atomic-level theoretical approaches. From our calculations, the possibility of achieving semiconductor-based one-dimensional phononic structures is established. We present results of the location and size of gaps, as well as negative group velocities of phonon modes in such structures. In addition to reproducing the results of recent measurements of the locations of the band gaps in the nanosized Si/Si{0.4}Ge{0.6} superlattice, we show that such a system is a true one-dimensional hypersonic phononic crystal.

  5. Radiation Effects on Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangyu

    In order to observe and analyze the behavior of semiconductor devices under radiation exposure, a real time measurement system has been built so that investigations can be carried out before, during, and after radiation exposure. The system consists of an IBM personal computer with IEEE488 I/O interface board and various Hewlett-Packard instruments. Real time measurement and device parameter characterization programs have been written to accommodate the study. Such a system provides the ability to do not only direct and dynamic measurements, but also comprehensive parameter analyses for semiconductor devices. It is well known that MOS devices are vulnerable to radiation produced ionization. Many MOS device parameters are radiation sensitive. Based on real time measurement results and the mathematical model of a CMOS inverter, a radiation hardening design method has been developed. With the example of noise margin optimization, the concept of desensitizing device parameters is expected to minimize radiation damage to MOS integrated circuits.

  6. Dimensional crossover in semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Matthew P; Chatterjee, Rusha; Si, Jixin; Jankó, Boldizsár; Kuno, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor nanostructure syntheses provide unprecedented control over electronic quantum confinement and have led to extensive investigations of their size- and shape-dependent optical/electrical properties. Notably, spectroscopic measurements show that optical bandgaps of one-dimensional CdSe nanowires are substantially (approximately 100 meV) lower than their zero-dimensional counterparts for equivalent diameters spanning 5-10 nm. But what, exactly, dictates the dimensional crossover of a semiconductor's electronic structure? Here we probe the one-dimensional to zero-dimensional transition of CdSe using single nanowire/nanorod absorption spectroscopy. We find that carrier electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in establishing dimensional crossover. Moreover, the critical length at which this transition occurs is governed by the aspect ratio-dependent interplay between carrier confinement and dielectric contrast/confinement energies. PMID:27577091

  7. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  8. Selective Etching of Semiconductor Glassivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, N.

    1982-01-01

    Selective etching technique removes portions of glassivation on a semi-conductor die for failure analysis or repairs. A periodontal needle attached to a plastic syringe is moved by a microprobe. Syringe is filled with a glass etch. A drop of hexane and vacuum pump oil is placed on microcircuit die and hexane is allowed to evaporate leaving a thin film of oil. Microprobe brings needle into contact with area of die to be etched.

  9. Acoustoelectric effect in semiconductor superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, S. Y.; Allotey, F. K. A.; Adjepong, S. K.

    1993-10-01

    Acoustoelectric effect in semiconductor superlattice has been studied for acoustic wave whose wavelength lambda = 2pi/q is smaller than the mean free path of the electrons l (where ql approaches 1). Unlike the homogeneous bulk material where Weinreich relation is independent of the wave number q in the superlattice we observe a dependence on q i.e. spatial dispersion. In the presence of applied constant field E a threshold value was obtained where the acoustoelectric current changes direction.

  10. Cooling and mounting power semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, P.

    1980-04-01

    The article examines the process of heat dissipation from power semiconductors. It is shown that for the relationship between temperature loading and dissipation it is possible to take an 'Ohm's law of heat abduction' to define the thermal impedance. The computation of the optimal size for a heatsink is demonstrated in detail. Discussion covers the types of heat dissipation such as heat radiation, heat conduction, and convection. Finally, some factors to consider during installation are examined.

  11. Technology Roadmaps for Compound Semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Herbert S.

    2000-01-01

    The roles cited for compound semiconductors in public versions of existing technology roadmaps from the National Electronics Manufacturing Initiative, Inc., Optoelectronics Industry Development Association, Microelectronics Advanced Research Initiative on Optoelectronic Interconnects, and Optoelectronics Industry and Technology Development Association (OITDA) are discussed and compared within the context of trends in the Si CMOS industry. In particular, the extent to which these technology roadmaps treat compound semiconductors at the materials processing and device levels will be presented for specific applications. For example, OITDA’s Optical Communications Technology Roadmap directly connects the information demand of delivering 100 Mbit/s to the home to the requirement of producing 200 GHz heterojunction bipolar transistors with 30 nm bases and InP high electron mobility transistors with 100 nm gates. Some general actions for progress towards the proposed International Technology Roadmap for Compound Semiconductors (ITRCS) and methods for determining the value of an ITRCS will be suggested. But, in the final analysis, the value added by an ITRCS will depend on how industry leaders respond. The technical challenges and economic opportunities of delivering high quality digital video to consumers provide concrete examples of where the above actions and methods could be applied. PMID:27551615

  12. CT angiography - head and neck

    MedlinePlus

    Computed tomography angiography - brain; CTA - skull; CTA - cranial; TIA-CTA head; Stroke-CTA head; Computed tomography angiography - neck; CTA - neck; Vertebral artery - CTA; Carotid artery stenosis - CTA; ...

  13. Head Injury Screening Tests Approved

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160556.html Head Injury Screening Tests Approved Assess brain function after possible concussions To use the sharing features ... HealthDay News) -- New computer software to assess the brain's function after a traumatic head injury have been approved ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  15. Heads Up to High School Sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Juvenil HEADS UP to School Sports Online Concussion Training Coaches Parents Athletes Sports Officials HEADS UP to Schools School Nurses Teachers, Counselors, and School Professionals Parents HEADS UP ...

  16. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  17. Design and First Results of the CoDeX Liquid-Xenon Compton-Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Brian; Cahn, Sidney; Bernard, Ethan; Boulton, Elizabeth; Destefano, Nicholas; Edwards, Blair; Hackenburg, Ariana; Horn, Markus; Larsen, Nicole; Nikkel, James; Wahl, Christopher; Gai, Moshe; McKinsey, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    CoDeX (Compton-imaging Detector in Xenon) is an R&D Compton gamma-ray imaging detector that uses 30 kg of xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Time projection relative to the initial scintillation signal provides the vertical interaction positions, and either PMT-sensed gas electroluminescence or a charge-sensitive amplifier quantifies the drifted ionization signal. Detector features to enable Compton imaging are a pair of instrumented wire grids added to sense the horizontal position of clouds of drifted electrons that traverse the detector. Each wire is individually amplified in the cold xenon environment. Design choices addressing the thermodynamic and xenon purity constraints of this system will be discussed. We will also discuss the mechanical designs, engineering challenges, and performance of this Compton-imaging detector.

  18. EDITORIAL: Enhance your outlook with Compound Semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedrock, Claire

    2007-12-01

    An overwhelming proportion of the articles published in this journal come under the heading of applied research. In this field research findings impact tomorrow's products, and so it's important to keep tabs on these developments. Grant applications, for example, can carry extra weight when the potential benefits to industry are outlined alongside the gains to fundamental science. What's more, it's just plain interesting to track how key breakthroughs in understanding can drive improvements in commercial devices. Within our publication group we offer free resources that can help you keep pace with trends in part of this sector. Compound Semiconductor magazine and its associated website, compoundsemiconductor.net, cover III-V, III-N, SiC and SiGe research in academia and industry, alongside all the business news and key manufacturing technology. A high proportion of our authoritative and timely content is exclusive, and you can access it for free by completing a simple registration procedure at compoundsemiconductor.net. Three examples of feature articles published this year in Compound Semiconductor include: • Non-polar GaN reaches tipping point by Steven DenBaars, Shuji Nakamura and Jim Speck from the University of California, Santa Barbara. Although conventional GaN LEDs are a great commercial success, they suffer from an intrinsic weakness—internal electric fields that pull apart the electrons and holes and ultimately limit efficiency. However, this problem can be overcome by growing nitrides on alternate crystal planes. Although early attempts were unsuccessful, due to high defect densities in the epilayers, this is not the case with growth on the latest Mitsubishi substrates that can lead to external quantum efficiencies of 45%. In this article the authors describe the development of their non-polar material, and their promising results for LEDs and laser diodes. • Inverting the triple junction improves efficiency and flexibility by Paul Sharps and

  19. Minnesota: Early Head Start Initiatiive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Minnesota provides supplemental state funding to existing federal Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) grantees to increase their capacity to serve additional infants, toddlers, and pregnant women. The initiative was started in 1997 when the state legislature earmarked $1 million of the general state Head Start supplemental funds for children…

  20. Maryland Early Head Start Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Law and Social Policy, Inc. (CLASP), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, Maryland has provided state supplemental funds to Head Start and Early Head Start (EHS) programs to improve access. Local EHS programs may use funds, through child care partnerships, to extend the EHS day or year. Maryland's approach to building on EHS includes: (1) Increase the capacity of existing Head Start and EHS programs to…