Science.gov

Sample records for head semiconductor compton

  1. Using triple gamma coincidences with a pixelated semiconductor Compton-PET scanner: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project presents a novel design using pixelated semiconductor detectors for nuclear medicine applications to achieve the intrinsic image quality limits set by physics. The conceptual design can be extended to a Compton gamma camera. The use of a pixelated CdTe detector with voxel sizes of 1 × 1 × 2 mm3 guarantees optimal energy and spatial resolution. However, the limited time resolution of semiconductor detectors makes it impossible to use Time Of Flight (TOF) with VIP PET. TOF is used in order to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using only the most probable portion of the Line-Of-Response (LOR) instead of its entire length. To overcome the limitation of CdTe time resolution, we present in this article a simulation study using β+-γ emitting isotopes with a Compton-PET scanner. When the β+ annihilates with an electron it produces two gammas which produce a LOR in the PET scanner, while the additional gamma, when scattered in the scatter detector, provides a Compton cone that intersects with the aforementioned LOR. The intersection indicates, within a few mm of uncertainty along the LOR, the origin of the beta-gamma decay. Hence, one can limit the part of the LOR used by the image reconstruction algorithm.

  2. Recent Results From a Si/CdTe Semiconductor Compton Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Watanabe, S.; Takeda, S.; Oonuki, K.; Mitani, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Takashima, T.; Takahashi, T.; Tajima, H.; Sawamoto, N.; Fukazawa, Y.; Nomachi, M.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2007-01-23

    We are developing a Compton telescope based on high resolution Si and CdTe detectors for astrophysical observations in sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray region. Recently, we constructed a prototype Compton telescope which consists of six layers of double-sided Si strip detectors and CdTe pixel detectors to demonstrate the basic performance of this new technology. By irradiating the detector with gamma-rays from radio isotope sources, we have succeeded in Compton reconstruction of images and spectra. The obtained angular resolution is 3.9{sup o} (FWHM) at 511 keV, and the energy resolution is 14 keV (FWHM) at the same energy. In addition to the conventional Compton reconstruction, i.e., drawing cones in the sky, we also demonstrated a full reconstruction by tracking Compton recoil electrons using the signals detected in successive Si layers. By irradiating {sup 137}Cs source, we successfully obtained an image and a spectrum of 662 keV line emission with this method. As a next step, development of larger double-sided Si strip detectors with a size of 4 cm x 4 cm is underway to improve the effective area of the Compton telescope. We are also developing a new low-noise analog ASIC to handle the increasing number of channels. Initial results from these two new technologies are presented in this paper as well.

  3. Inverse Compton for Compton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suortti, Pekka

    2016-04-01

    A novel concept for a high resolution Compton spectrometer is introduced. 88 keV radiation from an Inverse Compton Compact Source is focused using crossed cylindrically bent Laue-type Si perfect crystals, and dispersed on the sample with a constant energy gradient. Dispersion is compensated exactly at a Ge crystal analyzer, so that the same wavelength shift is observed for all wavelengths of the incident beam. The ThomX source is used as a concrete example. Detailed dimensions and flux estimates at successive locations of the spectrometer are given, and the performance is compared with the dispersion compensating spectrometer at ID15 of the ESRF. The momentum resolution is better than 0.1 atomic units in both cases. The intensity of scattering with the compact source is an order of magnitude smaller, but still adequate for high resolution Compton profile measurements.

  4. The first demonstration of the concept of "narrow-FOV Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichinohe, Yuto; Uchida, Yuusuke; Watanabe, Shin; Edahiro, Ikumi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kawano, Takafumi; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Takeda, Shin`ichiro; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Katsuragawa, Miho; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD), to be deployed on board the ASTRO-H satellite, has been developed to provide the highest sensitivity observations of celestial sources in the energy band of 60-600 keV by employing a detector concept which uses a Compton camera whose field-of-view is restricted by a BGO shield to a few degree (narrow-FOV Compton camera). In this concept, the background from outside the FOV can be heavily suppressed by constraining the incident direction of the gamma ray reconstructed by the Compton camera to be consistent with the narrow FOV. We, for the first time, demonstrate the validity of the concept using background data taken during the thermal vacuum test and the low-temperature environment test of the flight model of SGD on ground. We show that the measured background level is suppressed to less than 10% by combining the event rejection using the anti-coincidence trigger of the active BGO shield and by using Compton event reconstruction techniques. More than 75% of the signals from the field-of-view are retained against the background rejection, which clearly demonstrates the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. The estimated effective area of 22.8 cm2 meets the mission requirement even though not all of the operational parameters of the instrument have been fully optimized yet.

  5. Dialkoxybithiazole: a new building block for head-to-head polymer semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xugang; Quinn, Jordan; Chen, Zhihua; Usta, Hakan; Zheng, Yan; Xia, Yu; Hennek, Jonathan W; Ortiz, Rocío Ponce; Marks, Tobin J; Facchetti, Antonio

    2013-02-06

    Polymer semiconductors have received great attention for organic electronics due to the low fabrication cost offered by solution-based printing techniques. To enable the desired solubility/processability and carrier mobility, polymers are functionalized with hydrocarbon chains by strategically manipulating the alkylation patterns. Note that head-to-head (HH) linkages have traditionally been avoided because the induced backbone torsion leads to poor π-π overlap and amorphous film microstructures, and hence to low carrier mobilities. We report here the synthesis of a new building block for HH linkages, 4,4'-dialkoxy-5,5'-bithiazole (BTzOR), and its incorporation into polymers for high performance organic thin-film transistors. The small oxygen van der Waals radius and intramolecular S(thiazolyl)···O(alkoxy) attraction promote HH macromolecular architectures with extensive π-conjugation, low bandgaps (1.40-1.63 eV), and high crystallinity. In comparison to previously reported 3,3'-dialkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene (BTOR), BTzOR is a promising building block in view of thiazole geometric and electronic properties: (a) replacing (thiophene)C-H with (thiazole)N reduces steric encumbrance in -BTzOR-Ar- dyads by eliminating repulsive C-H···H-C interactions with neighboring arene units, thereby enhancing π-π overlap and film crystallinity; and (b) thiazole electron-deficiency compensates alkoxy electron-donating characteristics, thereby lowering the BTzOR polymer HOMO versus that of the BTOR analogues. Thus, the new BTzOR polymers show substantial hole mobilities (0.06-0.25 cm(2)/(V s)) in organic thin-film transistors, as well as enhanced I(on):I(off) ratios and greater ambient stability than the BTOR analogues. These geometric and electronic properties make BTzOR a promising building block for new classes of polymer semiconductors, and the synthetic route to BTzOR reported here should be adaptable to many other bithiazole-based building blocks.

  6. Study of the polarimetric performance of a Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera for the Hitomi satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuta, Junichiro; Edahiro, Ikumi; Watanabe, Shin; Odaka, Hirokazu; Uchida, Yusuke; Uchida, Nagomi; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Habata, Sho; Ichinohe, Yuto; Kitaguchi, Takao; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Yuasa, Takayuki; Itou, Masayoshi

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-ray polarization offers a unique probe into the geometry of the γ-ray emission process in celestial objects. The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) onboard the X-ray observatory Hitomi is a Si/CdTe Compton camera and is expected to be an excellent polarimeter, as well as a highly sensitive spectrometer due to its good angular coverage and resolution for Compton scattering. A beam test of the final-prototype for the SGD Compton camera was conducted to demonstrate its polarimetric capability and to verify and calibrate the Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument. The modulation factor of the SGD prototype camera, evaluated for the inner and outer parts of the CdTe sensors as absorbers, was measured to be 0.649-0.701 (inner part) and 0.637-0.653 (outer part) at 122.2 keV and 0.610-0.651 (inner part) and 0.564-0.592 (outer part) at 194.5 keV at varying polarization angles with respect to the detector. This indicates that the relative systematic uncertainty of the modulation factor is as small as ∼ 3 % .

  7. Development of Gamma-Ray Compton Imager Using Room-Temperature 3-D Position Sensitive Semiconductor Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong He; David Whe; Glenn Knoll

    2003-05-14

    During the three years of this project, two 3-dimensional position sensitive CdZnTe spectrometers were upgraded in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. A prototype Compton-scattering gamma-ray imager was assembled using the two upgraded CdZnTe detectors. The performance of both gamma-ray spectrometers were individually tested. The angular resolution and detection sensitivity of the imaging system were measured using both a point and a line-shaped 137 Cs radiation source. The measurement results are consistent with that obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations performed during the early phase of the project.

  8. Crystal Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Braverman, Joshua B.; Harrison, Mark J.; Hornback, Donald Eric; Fabris, Lorenzo; Newby, Jason

    2013-09-26

    Stand-off detection is one of the most important radiation detection capabilities for arms control and the control of illicit nuclear materials. For long range passive detection one requires a large detector and a means of “seeing through” the naturally occurring and varying background radiation, i.e. imaging. Arguably, Compton imaging is the best approach over much of the emission band suitable for long range detection. It provides not only imaging, but more information about the direction of incidence of each detected gamma-ray than the alternate approach of coded-aperture imaging. The directional information allows one to reduce the background and hence improve the sensitivity of a measurement. However, to make an efficient Compton imager requires localizing and measuring the simultaneous energy depositions when gamma-rays Compton scatter and are subsequently captured within a single, large detector volume. This concept has been demonstrated in semi-conductor detectors (HPGe, CZT, Si) but at ~ $1k/cm3 these materials are too expensive to build the large systems needed for standoff detection. Scintillator detectors, such as NaI(Tl), are two orders of magnitude less expensive and possess the energy resolution required to make such an imager. However, they do not currently have the ability to localize closely spaced, simultaneous energy depositions in a single large crystal. In this project we are applying a new technique that should, for the first time ever, allow cubic-millimeter event localization in a bulk scintillator crystal.

  9. Connecting Compton and Gravitational Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstein, Barry R.

    2017-01-01

    The study of Compton scattering—S + γ → S + γ—at MAMI and elsewhere has led to a relatively successful understanding of proton structure via its polarizabilities. The recent observation of gravitational radiation observed by LIGO has raised the need for a parallel understanding of gravitational Compton scattering—S + g → S + g—and we show here how it can be obtained from ordinary Compton scattering by use of the double copy theorem.

  10. Compton tomography system

    DOEpatents

    Grubsky, Victor; Romanoov, Volodymyr; Shoemaker, Keith; Patton, Edward Matthew; Jannson, Tomasz

    2016-02-02

    A Compton tomography system comprises an x-ray source configured to produce a planar x-ray beam. The beam irradiates a slice of an object to be imaged, producing Compton-scattered x-rays. The Compton-scattered x-rays are imaged by an x-ray camera. Translation of the object with respect to the source and camera or vice versa allows three-dimensional object imaging.

  11. Blazar Compton Efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, J. A.; Browne, I. W. A.; Peel, M. W.

    2012-03-01

    The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has dramatically increased the number of gamma-ray blazars known and means that for the first time, a large sample of blazars selected by the strength of their inverse Compton emission exists. We have cross-identified the blazars listed in the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL) with the CRATES radio catalogue. Using the 8.4 GHz flux density as a proxy for the jet power, we have computed their Compton efficiencies, a measure of the ability of the jet to convert the power in the ultrarelativistic jet electrons into gamma-rays through the inverse Compton process. We have compared the Compton efficiencies of the two blazar subsets, BL Lacs and FSRQs, and find no evidence that they are different. We also do not find an anti-correlation between Compton efficiency and synchrotron peak frequency.

  12. A novel PET scanner with semiconductor detectors may improve diagnostic accuracy in the metastatic survey of head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Takei, Toshiki; Shiga, Tohru; Morimoto, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Wataru; Umegaki, Kikuo; Matsuzaki, Kazuki; Okamoto, Shozo; Magota, Keiichi; Hara, Toshihiro; Fukuda, Satoshi; Tamaki, Nagara

    2013-01-01

    Our research group developed new PET scanner with semiconductor detectors for high spatial resolution with low scatter noise. On head and neck cancer (HNC) surgery, FDG-PET may often provide false-positive findings in cervical node involvements. Accordingly, we assessed diagnostic accuracy using this new scanner in the HNC patients as compared with the conventional lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) PET. We prospectively studied FDG imaging in 35 HNC patients by both semiconductor PET and LSO-PET. At 60 min after (18)F-FDG injection, two PET scans were obtained using both scanners consecutively and in random order. Two nuclear medicine specialists scored FDG abnormalities using 5 point scale system for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. 63 suspected of metastatic or recurrent lesions were evaluated and correlated by the final confirmation by pathological findings or clinical courses (malignant 26/benign 37). Semiconductor PET showed sensitivity of 92.3 % (24/26), specificity of 51.4 % (19/37), and accuracy of 68.2 % (43/63), while LSO-PET showed sensitivity of 84.6 % (22/26), specificity of 16.2 %(6/37), and accuracy of 44.4 % (28/63), respectively. Especially, semiconductor PET accurately diagnosed as true negative in the 13 of 14 lesions only detected by LSO-PET. ROC analyses revealed the diagnostic superiority of semiconductor PET from location of- and area under curve particularly in the study of small (≤10 mm) lesions. A new novel semiconductor PET scanner can increase diagnostic accuracy with reduction in false positive findings in the HNC patients mainly due to higher spatial resolution and lower noise than the LSO-PET. This new technology can lead to more accurate diagnosis and the more optimal therapeutic tactics in head and neck surgery.

  13. Timelike Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    T. Horn, Y. Illieva, F. J. Klein, P. Nadel‐Turonski, R. Paremuzyan, S. Stepanyan

    2011-10-01

    Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) have become a key concept in our studies of hadron structure in QCD. The measurement of suitable experimental observables and the extraction of GPDs from these data is one of the high priority 12 GeV programs at Jefferson Lab. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is generally thought of as the most promising channel for probing GPDs in the valence quark region. However, the inverse process, Timelike Compton Scattering (TCS) can provide an important complementary measurement, in particular of the real part of the Compton amplitude and power corrections at intermediate values of Q2. The first studies of TCS using real tagged and quasi-real untagged photons were performed in Hall B at Jefferson Lab.

  14. Compton scattering by nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütt, M.-Th.; L'vov, A. I.; Milstein, A. I.; Schumacher, M.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of Compton scattering by even-even nuclei from giant-resonance to nucleon-resonance energies and the status of experimental and theoretical researches in this field are outlined. The description of Compton scattering by nuclei starts from different complementary approaches, namely from second-order S-matrix and from dispersion theories. Making use of these, it is possible to incorporate into the predicted nuclear scattering amplitudes all the information available from other channels, viz. photon-nucleon and photon-meson channels, and to efficiently make use of models of the nucleon, the nucleus and the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The total photoabsorption cross section constrains the nuclear scattering amplitude in the forward direction. The specific information obtained from Compton scattering therefore stems from the angular dependence of the nuclear scattering amplitude, providing detailed insight into the dynamics of the nuclear and nucleon degrees of freedom and into the interplay between them. Nuclear Compton scattering in the giant-resonance energy-region provides information on the dynamical properties of the in-medium mass of the nucleon. Most prominently, the electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon in the nuclear medium can be extracted from nuclear Compton scattering data obtained in the quasi-deuteron energy-region. In our description of this latter process special emphasis is laid upon the exploration of many-body and two-body effects entering into the nuclear dynamics. Recent results are presented for two-body effects due to the mesonic seagull amplitude and due to the excitation of nucleon internal degrees of freedom accompanied by meson exchanges. Due to these studies the in-medium electromagnetic polarizabilities are by now well understood, whereas the understanding of nuclear Compton scattering in the Δ-resonance range is only at the beginning. Furthermore, phenomenological methods how to include retardation effects in the

  15. Simulation for CZT Compton PET (Maximization of the efficiency for PET using Compton event)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-10-01

    Multiple interactions in positron emission tomography (PET) using scintillators are generally treated as noise events because each interacted position and energy of the multiple interactions cannot be obtained individually and the sequence of multiple scattering is not fully known. Therefore, the first interaction position, which is the crucial information for a PET image reconstruction, cannot be determined correctly. However, in the case of a pixelized semiconductor detector, such as CdZnTe, each specific position and energy information of multiple interactions can be obtained. Moreover, for the emission of two 511 keV radiations in PET, if one radiation deposits all the energy in one position (photoelectric effect) and the other radiation undergoes Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect, the sequence of Compton scattering followed by the photoelectric effect can be determined using the Compton scattering formula. Hence, the correct position of Compton scattering can be determined, and the Compton scattering effect, which is discarded in conventional PET systems can be recovered in the new system reported in this study. The PET system in this study, which was simulated using GATE 5.0 code, was composed of 20 mm×10 mm×10 mm CdZnTe detectors consisting of 1 mm×0.5 mm×2.5 mm pixels. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening, pixelization effect and energy broadening were estimated and compared. The pixelized effect was the main factor in increasing the angular uncertainty and was strongly dependent on the distance between the 1st and 2nd interaction positions. The effect of energy broadening to an angular resolution less than expected and that of Doppler broadening was minimal. The number of Compton events was double that of the photoelectric effect assuming full energy absorption. Therefore, the detection efficiency of this new PET system can be improved greatly because both the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are

  16. Compton scattering overview

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V

    2008-12-01

    An overview of linear and nonlinear Compton scattering is presented, along with a comparison with Thomson scattering. Two distinct processes play important roles in the nonlinear regime: multi-photon interactions, leading to the generation of harmonics, and radiation pressure, yielding a downshift of the radiated spectral features. These mechanisms, their influence on the source brightness, and different modeling strategies are also briefly discussed.

  17. Results of a Si/Cdte Compton Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Oonuki, Kousuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Takefumi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nomachi, Masaharu; /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2005-09-23

    We have been developing a semiconductor Compton telescope to explore the universe in the energy band from several tens of keV to a few MeV. We use a Si strip and CdTe pixel detector for the Compton telescope to cover an energy range from 60 keV. For energies above several hundred keV, the higher efficiency of CdTe semiconductor in comparison with Si is expected to play an important role as an absorber and a scatterer. In order to demonstrate the spectral and imaging capability of a CdTe-based Compton Telescope, we have developed a Compton telescope consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors as a small scale prototype. With this prototype, we succeeded in reconstructing images and spectra by solving the Compton equation from 122 keV to 662 keV. The energy resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed spectra is 7.3 keV at 511 keV and 3.1 keV at 122 keV, respectively. The angular resolution obtained at 511 keV is measured to be 12.2{sup o}(FWHM).

  18. The Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Steven E.; NCT Collaboration

    2011-09-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray (0.2-10 MeV) telescope designed to perform wide-field imaging, high-resolution spectroscopy, and novel polarization analysis of astrophysical sources. NCT employs a novel Compton telescope design, utilizing 12 high spectral resolution germanium detectors, with the ability to localize photon interaction in three dimensions. NCT underwent its first science flight from Fort Sumner, NM in Spring 2009, and was partially destroyed during a second launch attempt from Alice Spring, Australia in Spring 2010. We will present an overview of the NCT program, including results from the Spring 2009 flight, as well as status and plans for the NCT program.

  19. Elastic pion Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, R.V.; Berg, D.; Chandlee, C.; Cihangir, S.; Ferbel, T.; Huston, J.; Jensen, T.; Kornberg, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Ohshima, T.

    1984-03-01

    We present evidence for elastic pion Compton scattering as observed via the Primakoff process on nulcear targets. We find production cross sections for ..pi../sup -/A..--> pi../sup -/..gamma..A on lead and copper of 0.249 +- 0.027 and 0.029 +- 0.006 mb, respectively, in agreement with the values expected from the one-photon-exchange mechanism of 0.268 +- 0.018 and 0.035 +- 0.004 mb in the region of our experimental acceptance. This reaction provides a clean test of the Primakoff formalism.

  20. Compton Polarization with Nustar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta

    In this study we assess the NuSTAR capabilities to detect polarized signals in the Compton regime, through the use of Monte Carlo simulations and comparison with observational data. Both NuSTAR focal plane detectors are equipped with high resolution pixilated CZT arrays, sensitive in the energy range 2.5-80 keV. These units have intrinsic polarization capabilities due to their high quality factor, very low background and scattering angles of ~90°, which is ideal for incident photon energies below 100 keV. However the sensitivity is limited by the very low efficiency of the CZT for Compton interactions and by intrinsic readout systematics, such as charge sharing between pixels. An additional source of degradation is the incompleteness of double events information in the science telemetry. We estimated the Minimum Detectable Polarization of cosmic sources as a function of intensity, and the results obtained were validated through the comparison with the first actual data from the Crab Nebula and Cygnus X-1. We also evaluated the count rate and the background expected for polarization measurements, comparing our estimates with the data measured in flight. Our simulations reproduce well the actual NuSTAR data, showing that the focal plane detectors should be able to detect polarization from highly polarized sources like the Crab and other potential bright sources, dominated by synchrotron and/or SSC emission. The background for polarization measurements was found to be negligible.

  1. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-03-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities.

  2. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  3. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  4. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  5. Observation of Nonlinear Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kotseroglou, T.

    2003-12-19

    This experiment tests Quantum Electrodynamics in the strong field regime. Nonlinear Compton scattering has been observed during the interaction of a 46.6 GeV electron beam with a 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} laser beam. The strength of the field achieved was measured by the parameter {eta} = e{var_epsilon}{sub rms}/{omega}mc = 0.6. Data were collected with infrared and green laser photons and circularly polarized laser light. The timing stabilization achieved between the picosecond laser and electron pulses has {sigma}{sub rms} = 2 ps. A strong signal of electrons that absorbed up to 4 infrared photons (or up to 3 green photons) at the same point in space and time, while emitting a single gamma ray, was observed. The energy spectra of the scattered electrons and the nonlinear dependence of the electron yield on the field strength agreed with the simulation over 3 orders of magnitude. The detector could not resolve the nonlinear Compton scattering from the multiple single Compton scattering which produced rates of scattered electrons of the same order of magnitude. Nevertheless, a simulation has studied this difference and concluded that the scattered electron rates observed could not be accounted for only by multiple ordinary Compton scattering; nonlinear Compton scattering processes are dominant for n {ge} 3.

  6. GRETINA as a Compton Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, P. C.; Weisshaar, D.; Gade, A.; Wiens, A.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Campbell, C. M.; Clark, R. M.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; Fallon, P.; Lee, I. Y.; Rissanen, J.; Tabor, S. L.; Tripathi, V.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; David, H. M.; Lauritsen, T.; Zhu, S.; Chowdhury, P.; Lister, C. J.; Merchan, E.; Prasher, V. S.; Miller, D.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of GRETINA as a polarimeter using the tracking technique has been done by examing the gamma-rays emitted from polarized states following the 24Mg(p,p') reaction. Here we consider GRETINA as a traditional Compton polarimeter, where the intensity of the scattered radiation measured between physical detecting elements is used to determine its polarization sensitivity using techniques developed over the past decades. This provides a direct basic measure of the linear polarization of the array independent of the signal-decomposition and tracking algorithms, and directly comparable to traditional Compton polarimeters. The performance of GRETINA as a traditional Compton-polarimeter will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and Office of Nuclear Physics under Contracts Number DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL) and Number DE-AC02-06CH11357(ANL).

  7. Status and Perspectives of Compton Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajima, Ryoichi

    Generation of high-energy photons via collision of relativistic electron and laser beams is known as inverse Compton scattering or laser Compton scattering. Compton sources, photon sources based on Compton scattering, have been developed in the world to realize high-flux/high-brightness X-ray/gamma-ray sources and exploit applications with energy-tunable and narrow-bandwidth photon beams from these sources. Recent progress of electron accelerator and laser technologies will open a new era in Compton sources. An electron beam of small emittance and high-average current contributes to improving spectral brightness of Compton scattered photons. Flux of generating photons is also increased by a high-power laser together with apparatus such as laser enhancement cavity. We overview the current status of Compton sources including an experiment carried out at the Compact ERL, which is the first demonstration of Compton scattering by combination of an energy-recovery linac and a laser enhancement cavity.

  8. The Compton Observatory Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrader, Chris R. (Editor); Gehrels, Neil (Editor); Dennis, Brian (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The Compton Observatory Science Workshop was held in Annapolis, Maryland on September 23-25, 1991. The primary purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas and information among scientists with interests in various areas of high energy astrophysics, with emphasis on the scientific capabilities of the Compton Observatory. Early scientific results, as well as reports on in-flight instrument performance and calibrations are presented. Guest investigator data products, analysis techniques, and associated software were discussed. Scientific topics covered included active galaxies, cosmic gamma ray bursts, solar physics, pulsars, novae, supernovae, galactic binary sources, and diffuse galactic and extragalactic emission.

  9. Timelike Compton Scattering at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Paremuzyan, Rafayel G.

    2014-01-01

    It is demonstrated, that with exclusive final state, data from electron scattering experiments that are recorded with loose trigger requirements can be used to analyze photoproduction reactions. A preliminary results on Timelike Compton Scattering using the electroproduction data from the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. In particular, using final state (pe{sup -}e{sup +}) photoproduction of vector mesons and timelike photon is studied. Angular asymmetries in Timelike Compton Scattering region is compared with model predictions in the framework of Generalized Parton Distribution.

  10. First-Generation Hybrid Compact Compton Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M; Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Krings, T; Lange, D; Hull, E; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Protic, D; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-07

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are pursuing the development of a gamma-ray imaging system using the Compton effect. We have built our first generation hybrid Compton imaging system, and we have conducted initial calibration and image measurements using this system. In this paper, we present the details of the hybrid Compton imaging system and initial calibration and image measurements.

  11. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and the observing program of the first 2 years of the mission. Examples of early discoveries by Compton are enumerated, including the discovery that gamma-ray bursts are isotropic but spatially inhomogeneous in their distribution; the discovery of a new class of high-energy extragalacatic gamma-ray sources, the gamma-ray AGNs; the discovery of emission from SN 1987A in the nuclear line of Co-57; and the mapping of emission from Al-26 in the interstellar medium (ISM) near the Galactic center. Future observations will include deep surveys of selected regions of the sky, long-tem studies of individual objects, correlative studies of objects at gamma-ray and other energies, a Galactic plane survey at intermediate gamma-ray energies, and improved statistics on gamma-ray bursts to search for small anisotropies. After completion of the all-sky survey, a Guest Investigator program is in progress with guest observers' time share increasing from 30% upward for the late mission phases.

  12. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D.

    1994-06-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Compton) is the second in NASA's series of great Observatories. Launched on 1991 April 5, Compton represents a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made. We describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments, and the observing program of the first 2 years of the mission. Examples of early discoveries by Compton are enumerated, including the discovery that gamma-ray bursts are isotropic but spatially inhomogeneous in their distribution; the discovery of a new class of high-energy extragalacatic gamma-ray sources, the gamma-ray AGNs; the discovery of emission from SN 1987A in the nuclear line of Co-57; and the mapping of emission from Al-26 in the interstellar medium (ISM) near the Galactic center. Future observations will include deep surveys of selected regions of the sky, long-tem studies of individual objects, correlative studies of objects at gamma-ray and other energies, a Galactic plane survey at intermediate gamma-ray energies, and improved statistics on gamma-ray bursts to search for small anisotropies. After completion of the all-sky survey, a Guest Investigator program is in progress with guest observers' time share increasing from 30% upward for the late mission phases.

  13. Double Compton scatter telescope calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, B.; Simone, J.; Green, M.; Long, J.; Zanrosso, E.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Calibration techniques for a medium energy gamma ray telescope are described. Gain calibration using Compton edge spectra involves comparisons of pulse height spectra with spectra simulated by a Monte Carlo computer code which includes Compton scattering and pair production, plural scattering and variable energy resolution, and cell size. The telescope considered comprises 56 cells of liquid scintillator in four size groups, with a total liquid volume of 325 l; each cell has its own photomultiplier tube. Energy and angular resolutions and the PMT gain calibration procedure are verified with double scatter data for monoenergetic gamma rays at a known location. Detection probabilities for any cell combination in the two telescope arrays are calculated per steradian as a function of the scattering for a number of different energies with a Van de Graaff accelerator.

  14. Double Compton scatter telescope calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, B.; Simone, J.; Green, M.; Long, J.; Zanrosso, E.; Zych, A. D.; White, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    Calibration techniques for a medium energy gamma ray telescope are described. Gain calibration using Compton edge spectra involves comparisons of pulse height spectra with spectra simulated by a Monte Carlo computer code which includes Compton scattering and pair production, plural scattering and variable energy resolution, and cell size. The telescope considered comprises 56 cells of liquid scintillator in four size groups, with a total liquid volume of 325 l; each cell has its own photomultiplier tube. Energy and angular resolutions and the PMT gain calibration procedure are verified with double scatter data for monoenergetic gamma rays at a known location. Detection probabilities for any cell combination in the two telescope arrays are calculated per steradian as a function of the scattering for a number of different energies with a Van de Graaff accelerator.

  15. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  16. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  17. Semiconductor heterostructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, Harold John (Inventor); Woodall, Jerry MacPherson (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A technique for fabricating a semiconductor heterostructure by growth of a ternary semiconductor on a binary semiconductor substrate from a melt of the ternary semiconductor containing less than saturation of at least one common ingredient of both the binary and ternary semiconductors wherein in a single temperature step the binary semiconductor substrate is etched, a p-n junction with specific device characteristics is produced in the binary semiconductor substrate by diffusion of a dopant from the melt and a region of the ternary semiconductor of precise conductivity type and thickness is grown by virtue of a change in the melt characteristics when the etched binary semiconductor enters the melt.

  18. Semiconductor structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, Harold J. (Inventor); Woodall, Jerry M. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A technique for fabricating a semiconductor heterostructure by growth of a ternary semiconductor on a binary semiconductor substrate from a melt of the ternary semiconductor containing less than saturation of at least one common ingredient of both the binary and ternary semiconductors wherein in a single temperature step the binary semiconductor substrate is etched, a p-n junction with specific device characteristics is produced in the binary semiconductor substrate by diffusion of a dopant from the melt and a region of the ternary semiconductor of precise conductivity type and thickness is grown by virtue of a change in the melt characteristics when the etched binary semiconductor enters the melt.

  19. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  20. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  1. All-sky Compton imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Ballmoos, Peter; Boggs, Steven E.; Jean, Pierre; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The All-Sky Compton Imager (ASCI) is a mission concept for MeV Gamma-Ray astronomy. It consists of a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors, shielded only by a plastic anticoicidence, and weighting less than 100 kg. Situated on a deployable structure at a distance of 10 m from the spacecraft orbiting at L2 or in a HEO, the ASCI not only avoids albedo- and spacecraft-induced background, but it benefits from a continuous all-sky exposure. The modest effective area is more than compensated by the 4 π field-of-view. Despite its small size, ASCI's γ-ray line sensitivity after its nominal lifetime of 3 years is ~ 10-6 ph cm-2 s-1 at 1 MeV for every γ-ray source in the sky. With its high spectral and 3-D spatial resolution, the ASCI will perform sensitive γray spectroscopy and polarimetry in the energy band 100 keV-10 MeV. The All-Sky Compton Imager is particularly well suited to the task of measuring the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background - and simultaneously covering the wide range of science topics in gamma-ray astronomy.

  2. Synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchro-Compton theory to real compact radio sources, the question of a self-Compton origin of the X-rays in radio-loud quasars and active galactic nuclei, and the phenomenology of superluminal motion are discussed in a review of research concerning synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources. After examining the basic synchro-Compton theory of ideal sources, applications of the theory to real sources is discussed. It is concluded that the Compton problem and total energy requirements are not substantially mitigated by considering source structures more complicated than the multiple, uniform-component model used by most investigators. Also, alternatives to the standard model of superluminal motion are discussed, focusing on the assumptions usually made when interpreting superluminal sources.

  3. Synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchro-Compton theory to real compact radio sources, the question of a self-Compton origin of the X-rays in radio-loud quasars and active galactic nuclei, and the phenomenology of superluminal motion are discussed in a review of research concerning synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources. After examining the basic synchro-Compton theory of ideal sources, applications of the theory to real sources is discussed. It is concluded that the Compton problem and total energy requirements are not substantially mitigated by considering source structures more complicated than the multiple, uniform-component model used by most investigators. Also, alternatives to the standard model of superluminal motion are discussed, focusing on the assumptions usually made when interpreting superluminal sources.

  4. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  5. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) was launched by the Space Shuttle Atlantis on 5 April 1991. The spacecraft and instruments are in good health and returning exciting results. The mission provides nearly six orders of magnitude in spectral coverage, from 30 keV to 30 GeV, with sensitivity over the entire range an order of magnitude better than that of previous observations. The 16,000 kilogram observatory contains four instruments on a stabilized platform. The mission began normal operations on 16 May 1991 and is now over half-way through a full-sky survey. The mission duration is expected to be from six to ten years. A Science Support Center has been established at Goddard Space Flight Center for the purpose of supporting a vigorous Guest Investigator Program. New scientific results to date include: (1) the establishment of the isotropy, combined with spatial inhomogeneity, of the distribution of gamma-ray bursts in the sky; (2) the discovery of intense high energy (100 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 3C 279 and other quasars and BL Lac objects, making these the most distant and luminous gamma-ray sources ever detected; (3) one of the first images of a gamma-ray burst; (4) the observation of intense nuclear and position-annihilation gamma-ray lines and neutrons from several large solar flares; and (5) the detection of a third gamma-ray pulsar, plus several other transient and pulsing hard X-ray sources.

  6. External Compton Scattering in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, Justin

    2017-08-01

    In many low-peaked blazars, especially flat spectrum radio quasars, it is thought that the gamma-rays are produced through the Compton scattering of seed photons external to the jet, most likely from the broad line region and dust torus. I will present detailed, realistic models of broad line regions and dust tori, useful for computation of Compton scattering. I will discuss the location of the gamma-ray emitting region in the context of Compton-scattering of these seed radiation fields.

  7. Neutron Compton scattering from selectively deuterated acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Fielding, A. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    With the aim of developing the application of neutron Compton scattering (NCS) to molecular systems of biophysical interest, we are using the Compton spectrometer EVS at ISIS to characterize the momentum distribution of protons in peptide groups. In this contribution we present NCS measurements of the recoil peak (Compton profile) due to the amide proton in otherwise fully deuterated acetanilide (ACN), a widely studied model system for H-bonding and energy transfer in biomolecules. We obtain values for the average width of the potential well of the amide proton and its mean kinetic energy. Deviations from the Gaussian form of the Compton profile, analyzed on the basis of an expansion due to Sears, provide data relating to the Laplacian of the proton potential.

  8. Performance of the IBIS Compton mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segreto, Alberto

    2004-10-01

    The IBIS instrument launched on board the ESA INTEGRAL observatory on October 2002 is a coded mask telescope composed by two position sensitive detection planes, one with 16384 Cadmium Telluride pixels (ISGRI) and the other with 4096 Caesium Iodide pixels (PICsIT). Events detected in coincidence in the two detector layers are flagged as generated by Compton scattered photons and can be then processed and filtered using the Compton kinematic equations. The analysis of these data is, however, quite complex, mainly due to the presence of a great number of fake events generated by random coincidences between uncorrelated ISGRI and PICsIT events; if this component is not subtracted with great accuracy, false source detections can be produced. In this work, we present the performance (spectral and imaging) obtainable from the IBIS Compton data, by analyzing ground calibration acquisitions. We also analyze the IBIS Compton flight data relative to the Crab observation, to determine its scientific capabilities.

  9. RELATIVISTIC ACCRETION MEDIATED BY TURBULENT COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle E-mail: socrates@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-08-10

    Black hole and neutron star accretion flows display unusually high levels of hard coronal emission in comparison to all other optically thick, gravitationally bound, turbulent astrophysical systems. Since these flows sit in deep relativistic gravitational potentials, their random bulk motions approach the speed of light, therefore allowing turbulent Comptonization to be an important effect. We show that the inevitable production of hard X-ray photons results from turbulent Comptonization in the limit where the turbulence is trans-sonic and the accretion power approaches the Eddington limit. In this regime, the turbulent Compton y-parameter approaches unity and the turbulent Compton temperature is a significant fraction of the electron rest mass energy, in agreement with the observed phenomena.

  10. Hidden baryons: The physics of Compton composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Frederick J.

    2016-06-01

    A large fraction of the mass-energy of the Universe appears to be composed of Compton composites. How is it then that these composites are not frequently observed in experiments? This paper addresses this question, and others, by reviewing recent publications that: 1) introduced Compton composites, 2) showed how and where they are formed and 3) explained how they interact with other systems. Though ubiquitous in many physical situations, Compton composites are almost completely hidden in experiments due to their unique interaction characteristics. Still, their presence has been indirectly observed, though not interpreted as such until recently. Looking to the future, direct-detection experiments are proposed that could verify the composites' components. It is with deep sadness that I dedicate this paper to my mentor, collaborator, and friend, Dr. John R. Reitz, who passed away within days of the publication of our paper “Compton Composites Late in the Early Universe”.

  11. Next Generation Compton Telescope Design Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phlips, Bernard F.; Grove, J. Eric; Johnson, W. Neil; Woolf, Richard S.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-04-01

    The next generation Compton telescope faces many challenges in achieving the desired sensitivity in the 1-10 MeV energy band. Fine spectral and imaging performance point to the use of semiconducting detectors. Practical issues point to the use of scintillation detectors. We will discuss positive developments and disappointments encountered over the last few years of Compton Telescope development at NRL. This research is supported by the Chief of Naval Research.

  12. Using Compton scattering for random coincidence rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; Chmeissani, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) project presents a new approach for the design of nuclear medicine imaging devices by using highly segmented pixel CdTe sensors. CdTe detectors can achieve an energy resolution of ≈ 1% FWHM at 511 keV and can be easily segmented into submillimeter sized voxels for optimal spatial resolution. These features help in rejecting a large part of the scattered events from the PET coincidence sample in order to obtain high quality images. Another contribution to the background are random events, i.e., hits caused by two independent gammas without a common origin. Given that 60% of 511 keV photons undergo Compton scattering in CdTe (i.e. 84% of all coincidence events have at least one Compton scattering gamma), we present a simulation study on the possibility to use the Compton scattering information of at least one of the coincident gammas within the detector to reject random coincidences. The idea uses the fact that if a gamma undergoes Compton scattering in the detector, it will cause two hits in the pixel detectors. The first hit corresponds to the Compton scattering process. The second hit shall correspond to the photoelectric absorption of the remaining energy of the gamma. With the energy deposition of the first hit, one can calculate the Compton scattering angle. By measuring the hit location of the coincident gamma, we can construct the geometric angle, under the assumption that both gammas come from the same origin. Using the difference between the Compton scattering angle and the geometric angle, random events can be rejected.

  13. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  14. Imaging through Compton scattering and pair creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfelder, Volker; Kanbach, Gottfried

    Compton telescopes and pair-creation telescopes are the most successful instruments used in space-based γ-ray astronomy in the energy range from ≈ 0.3 MeV to u8776 30 GeV. The principles of measurement of both kinds of telescopes are explained and an overview of early Compton and pair telescopes is given. The properties and capabilities of COMPTEL and EGRET aboard NASA"s CGRO are described. These two instruments have performed the first-ever all-sky survey in γ-ray astronomy above 1 MeV. The other two CGRO instruments OSSE and BATSE have complemented these surveys towards lower energies (for this purpose, the omnidirectionally sensitive BATSE instrument used its capability to monitor hard X-ray sources >20 keV by means of Earth occultation). Finally, the outlook for future Compton and pair creation telescopes is given.

  15. The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: mission status.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chipman, E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (Compton) is the second in NASA's series of Great Observatories. Compton has now been operating for over two and a half years, and has given a dramatic increase in capability over previous gamma-ray missions. The spacecraft and scientific instruments are all in good health, and many significant discoveries have already been made and continue to be made. The authors describe the capabilities of the four scientific instruments and the observing programs for the first three years of the mission. During Phases 2 and 3 of the mission a Guest Investigator program has been in progress with the Guest Observers' time share increasing from 30% to over 50% for the later mission phases.

  16. Timelike Compton Scattering - A First Look (CLAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel Nadel-Turonski

    2009-12-01

    A major goal of the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab is to map out the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) in the valence region. This is primarily done through Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), which provides the simplest and cleanest way of accessing the GPDs. However, the “inverse” process, Timelike Compton Scattering (TCS), can provide an important complement, in particular formeasuring the real part of the amplitude and understanding corrections at finite Q2. The first measurements of TCS have recently been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab, using both tagged and untagged photon beams.

  17. Analytic reconstruction of Compton scattering tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiajun; Chi, Zheru; Wang, Yuanmei

    1999-08-01

    Compton scattering can be used to determine the electron densities of tissues for medical applications and those of materials for industrial applications. Much work has been devoted in solving the reconstruction problem. Norton proposed an analytic transform method for the reconstruction of Compton scattering tomography [J. Appl. Phys. 76, 2007 (1994)]. However, it is difficult to relate the response function presented by Norton to the measurement quantity. The aim of this article is to present an improved form of the detector response function which corresponds to the actual measurement and to verify the validation of the transform method for this problem.

  18. Quasi-thermal comptonization and GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Celotti, A.

    1999-09-01

    Quasi-thermal Comptonization in internal shocks formed between relativistic shells can account for the high energy emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRB). This is the dominant cooling mechanism if the typical energy of the emitting particles is achieved either through the balance between heating and cooling or as a result of electron-positron (e(+/-) ) pair production. Both processes yield sub/mildly relativistic energies. In this case the synchrotron spectrum is self-absorbed, providing the seed photons for the Comptonization process, whose spectrum is flat [F(nu ) ~ const], ending either in an exponential cutoff or a Wien peak.

  19. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a final report for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest Investigator Program from 06/01/91-07/31/97. The topics include: 1) Solar Flare Neutron Spectra and Accelerated Ions; 2) Gamma Ray Lines From The Orion Complex; 3) Implications of Nuclear Line Emission From The Orion Complex; 4) Possible Sites of Nuclear Line Emission From Massive OB Associations; 5) Gamma-Ray Burst Repitition and BATSE Position Uncertainties; 6) Effects of Compton Scattering on BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra; and 7) Selection Biases on the Spectral and Temporal Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts.

  20. Electron-tracking Compton gamma-ray camera for small animal and phantom imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabuki, Shigeto; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Amano, Hiroo; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Miuchi, Kentaro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Michiaki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ueda, Masashi; Okada, Tomohisa; Kubo, Atsushi; Kunieda, Etuso; Nakahara, Tadaki; Kohara, Ryota; Miyazaki, Osamu; Nakazawa, Tetsuo; Shirahata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ogawa, Koichi; Togashi, Kaori; Saji, Hideo; Tanimori, Toru

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) for medical use. Our ETCC has a wide energy dynamic range (200-1300 keV) and wide field of view (3 sr), and thus has potential for advanced medical use. To evaluate the ETCC, we imaged the head (brain) and bladder of mice that had been administered with F-18-FDG. We also imaged the head and thyroid gland of mice using double tracers of F-18-FDG and I-131 ions.

  1. Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Lin, P.T.

    1985-03-05

    A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer. 5 figs.

  2. Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Peter T.

    1985-01-01

    A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer.

  3. Investigating the Compton Effect with a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinderman, Jesusa Valdez

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation of the Compton effect designed to lead students to discover (1) the relationship of the electron's final kinetic energy to its angle of scattering and (2) the relationship between the scattering angles of the outgoing electron and photon. (MDH)

  4. Overview of the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Becker, Daniel A.; Liu, Z.; Boggs, S. E.; NCT Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray (0.2-10 MeV) telescope designed to study astrophysical sources of nuclear line emission and polarization. It consists of twelve high spectral resolution 3D Germanium Detectors that track gamma-ray Compton scatter interactions. Tracking technologies provide dramatic improvements in Compton efficiency and sensitivity: with less than 1% of the detector volume of COMPTEL, NCT achieves a similar effective area. NCT is breaking new ground in the measurement of polarized gamma-ray emission from astrophysical sources, while simultaneously providing a testing platform for novel event analysis, background reduction, and imaging techniques for modern Compton telescopes. NCT is currently being prepared for a 36-hour flight from New Mexico in September 2008, followed by a long duration flight from Australia in December 2009. On these science flights, NCT will map the galactic positron annihilation, Al-26, and Fe-60 emission, and perform a discovery study of polarization from all classes of gamma-ray sources. We will present an overview of the NCT instrument and the planned flight program.

  5. Modeling Compton Scattering in the Linear Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelmar, Rebeka

    2016-09-01

    Compton scattering is the collision of photons and electrons. This collision causes the photons to be scattered with increased energy and therefore can produce high-energy photons. These high-energy photons can be used in many other fields including phase contrast medical imaging and x-ray structure determination. Compton scattering is currently well understood for low-energy collisions; however, in order to accurately compute spectra of backscattered photons at higher energies relativistic considerations must be included in the calculations. The focus of this work is to adapt a current program for calculating Compton backscattered radiation spectra to improve its efficiency. This was done by first translating the program from Matlab to python. The next step was to implement a more efficient adaptive integration to replace the trapezoidal method. A new program was produced that operates at less than a half of the speed of the original. This is important because it allows for quicker analysis, and sets the stage for further optimization. The programs were developed using just one particle, while in reality there are thousands of particles involved in these collisions. This means that a more efficient program is essential to running these simulations. The development of this new and efficient program will lead to accurate modeling of Compton sources as well as their improved performance.

  6. The Compton effect: Transition to quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuewer, R. H.

    2000-11-01

    The discovery of the Compton effect at the end of 1922 was a decisive event in the transition to the new quantum mechanics of 1925-1926 because it stimulated physicists to examine anew the fundamental problem of the interaction between radiation and matter. I first discuss Albert Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis of 1905 and why physicists greeted it with extreme skepticism, despite Robert A. Millikan's confirmation of Einstein's equation of the photoelectric effect in 1915. I then follow in some detail the experimental and theoretical research program that Arthur Holly Compton pursued between 1916 and 1922 at the University of Minnesota, the Westinghouse Lamp Company, the Cavendish Laboratory, and Washington University that culminated in his discovery of the Compton effect. Surprisingly, Compton was not influenced directly by Einstein's light-quantum hypothesis, in contrast to Peter Debye and H.A. Kramers, who discovered the quantum theory of scattering independently. I close by discussing the most significant response to that discovery, the Bohr-Kramers-Slater theory of 1924, its experimental refutation, and its influence on the emerging new quantum mechanics.

  7. QCD Coherence in Direct Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoze, V. A.; Lebedev, A. I.; Vazdik, J. A.

    The color coherence effects are studied for direct processes of γp interactions at high energies using PYTHIA Monte-Carlo simulation and perturbative QCD approach. Sub-processes of QED and QCD Compton scattering on quarks leading to jet topology of photoproduction events are considered. It is shown that the coherence leads to drag phenomenon in the interjet region.

  8. Investigating the Compton Effect with a Spreadsheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinderman, Jesusa Valdez

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer simulation of the Compton effect designed to lead students to discover (1) the relationship of the electron's final kinetic energy to its angle of scattering and (2) the relationship between the scattering angles of the outgoing electron and photon. (MDH)

  9. Semiconductor sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, Harry C. (Inventor); Lagowski, Jacek (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor sensor adapted to detect with a high degree of sensitivity small magnitudes of a mechanical force, presence of traces of a gas or light. The sensor includes a high energy gap (i.e., .about. 1.0 electron volts) semiconductor wafer. Mechanical force is measured by employing a non-centrosymmetric material for the semiconductor. Distortion of the semiconductor by the force creates a contact potential difference (cpd) at the semiconductor surface, and this cpd is determined to give a measure of the force. When such a semiconductor is subjected to illumination with an energy less than the energy gap of the semiconductors, such illumination also creates a cpd at the surface. Detection of this cpd is employed to sense the illumination itself or, in a variation of the system, to detect a gas. When either a gas or light is to be detected and a crystal of a non-centrosymmetric material is employed, the presence of gas or light, in appropriate circumstances, results in a strain within the crystal which distorts the same and the distortion provides a mechanism for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the gas or the light, as the case may be.

  10. Semiconductor photoelectrochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Byvik, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    Semiconductor photoelectrochemical reactions are investigated. A model of the charge transport processes in the semiconductor, based on semiconductor device theory, is presented. It incorporates the nonlinear processes characterizing the diffusion and reaction of charge carriers in the semiconductor. The model is used to study conditions limiting useful energy conversion, specifically the saturation of current flow due to high light intensity. Numerical results describing charge distributions in the semiconductor and its effects on the electrolyte are obtained. Experimental results include: an estimate rate at which a semiconductor photoelectrode is capable of converting electromagnetic energy into chemical energy; the effect of cell temperature on the efficiency; a method for determining the point of zero zeta potential for macroscopic semiconductor samples; a technique using platinized titanium dioxide powders and ultraviolet radiation to produce chlorine, bromine, and iodine from solutions containing their respective ions; the photoelectrochemical properties of a class of layered compounds called transition metal thiophosphates; and a technique used to produce high conversion efficiency from laser radiation to chemical energy.

  11. Macroporous Semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Föll, Helmut; Leisner, Malte; Cojocaru, Ala; Carstensen, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Pores in single crystalline semiconductors come in many forms (e.g., pore sizes from 2 nm to > 10 µm; morphologies from perfect pore crystal to fractal) and exhibit many unique properties directly or as nanocompounds if the pores are filled. The various kinds of pores obtained in semiconductors like Ge, Si, III-V, and II-VI compound semiconductors are systematically reviewed, emphasizing macropores. Essentials of pore formation mechanisms will be discussed, focusing on differences and some open questions but in particular on common properties. Possible applications of porous semiconductors, including for example high explosives, high efficiency electrodes for Li ion batteries, drug delivery systems, solar cells, thermoelectric elements and many novel electronic, optical or sensor devices, will be introduced and discussed.

  12. High-Resolution Compton-Suppressed CZT Detector for Fission Products Identification

    SciTech Connect

    R. Aryaeinejd; J. K. Hartwell; Wade W. Scates

    2004-10-01

    Room temperature semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors are currently limited to total detector volumes of 1-2 cm3, which is dictated by the poor charge transport characteristics. Because of this size limitation one of the problems in accurately determining isotope identification is the enormous background from the Compton scattering events. Eliminating this background will not only increase the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements but also help us to resolve peaks buried under the background and peaks in close vicinity of others. We are currently developing a fission products detection system based on the Compton-suppressed CZT detector. In this application, the detection system is required to operate in high radiation fields. Therefore, a small 10x10x5 mm3 CZT detector is placed inside the center of a well-shielded 3" in diameter by 3" long Nal detector. So far we have been able to successfully reduce the Compton background by a factor of 5.4 for a 137Cs spectrum. This reduction of background will definitely enhance the quality of the gamma-ray spectrum in the information-rich energy range below 1 MeV, which consequently increases the detection sensitivity. In this work, we will discuss the performance of this detection system as well as its applications.

  13. Electronic properties of RDX and HMX: Compton scattering experiment and first-principles calculation.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, B L; Jain, Pradeep; Sahariya, Jagrati; Heda, N L; Soni, Pramod

    2013-07-11

    The first-ever electron momentum density (EMD) measurements of explosive materials, namely, RDX (1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane, (CH2-N-NO2)3) and HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane, (CH2-N-NO2)4), have been reported using a 740 GBq (137)Cs Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profiles (CPs) are compared with the EMDs derived from linear combination of atomic orbitals with density functional theory. It is found that the CPs deduced from generalized gradient approximation (GGA) with Wu-Cohen exchange energies give a better agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles than those from local density approximation and other schemes of GGA. Further, Mulliken population, energy bands, partial and total density of states, and band gap have also been reported using GGA calculations. Present ground state calculations unambiguously show large band gap semiconductor nature of both RDX and HMX. A similar type of bonding in these materials is uniquely established using Compton data and density of states. It is also outstandingly consistent with the Mulliken population, which predicts almost equal amount of charge transfer (0.84 and 0.83 e(-)) from H1 + H2 + N2 to C1 + N1 + O1 + O2 in both the explosives.

  14. Science Flight Program of the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Steven

    This is the lead proposal for this program. We are proposing a 5-year program to perform the scientific flight program of the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT), consisting of a series of three (3) scientific balloon flights. NCT is a balloon-borne, wide-field telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky (0.2-5 MeV), performing high-resolution spectroscopy, wide-field imaging, and polarization measurements. NCT has been rebuilt as a ULDB payload under the current 2-year APRA grant. (In that proposal we stated our goal was to return at this point to propose the scientific flight program.) The NCT rebuild/upgrade is on budget and schedule to achieve flight-ready status in Fall 2013. Science: NCT will map the Galactic positron annihilation emission, shedding more light on the mysterious concentration of this emission uncovered by INTEGRAL. NCT will survey Galactic nucleosynthesis and the role of supernova and other stellar populations in the creation and evolution of the elements. NCT will map 26-Al and positron annihilation with unprecedented sensitivity and uniform exposure, perform the first mapping of 60-Fe, search for young, hidden supernova remnants through 44-Ti emission, and enable a host of other nuclear astrophysics studies. NCT will also study compact objects (in our Galaxy and AGN) and GRBs, providing novel measurements of polarization as well as detailed spectra and light curves. Design: NCT is an array of germanium gamma-ray detectors configured in a compact, wide-field Compton telescope configuration. The array is shielded on the sides and bottom by an active anticoincidence shield but is open to the 25% of the sky above for imaging, spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. The instrument is mounted on a zenith-pointed gondola, sweeping out ~50% of the sky each day. This instrument builds off the Compton telescope technique pioneered by COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. However, by utilizing modern germanium semiconductor strip detectors

  15. Si/CdTe Compton Telescope combined with Active Collimator as the Soft Gamma-ray Detector for the 'NeXT' mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazuhiro, N.; Tadayuki, T.; Shin, W.; Tune, K.; Greg, M.; Hiroyasu, T.; Yasushi, F.; Masaharu, N.; Motohide, K.; Kazuo, M.; Makoto, T.; Yukikatsu, T.; Jun, K.; NeXT SGD Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD) is a new generation compton telescope aiming at an order of magnitude improvement of sensitivity at the energy band of 80-1000 keV. The SGD is proposed to be launched at 2010-11, onboard the Japanese new astronomy satellite ``NeXT." Novel idea of the SGD is to use a Si/CdTe semiconductor multi-layer compton telescope within the low background environment achieved by the deep active shield with a narrow opening angle. Because compton telescope hosts an imaging capability, any residual backgrounds, such as the activation of the main detector itself, can by rejected by requiring the compton scattering angle to be consistent with the opening angle of the shield, which is about 4 degree with current design. The key technologies of the SGD are the deep active shield which is a direct heritage of the Hard X-ray Detector onboard Astro-E2 mission, and the newly developed Si/CdTe compton telescope. Current design of the Si/CdTe compton telescope consists of 24 layers of 0.5 mm thick double-sided-silicon-strip-detector (DSSD) as a scatterer, surrounded by thin and thick CdTe pixel detectors with a total thickness of 5 mm as an absorber. The design is optimized for detecting gamma-rays at about 100-700 keV when operated at compton mode. We present the results from the first prototype of Si/CdTe compton telescope, made of a 300 um thick DSSD and 0.5 mm thick CdTe pixel detectors. We also present the estimated performance of the SGD with current design, and possible improvements in the future.

  16. New results from Compton spectrometer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Webb, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Over the past three years, a Compton spectrometer has successfully measured the x-ray spectra of intense radiographic sources. In this method, a collimated beam of x-rays incident on a convertor foil ejects Compton electrons. A collimator in the entrance to the spectrometer selects the forward-scattered electrons, which enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The position of the electrons at the magnet's focal plane is proportional to the square root of their momentum, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. The spectrometer is a neodymium-iron magnet which measures spectra in the less than 1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In addition, a new spectrometer has been constructed that is a samarium-cobalt magnet with a calculated energy range of 50 keV to 4 MeV. The spectrometers have been fielded at both continuous and pulsed power facilities. Recent experimental results will be presented.

  17. Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1986-01-01

    The relativistic cross section for Compton scattering by electrons in strong magnetic fields is derived. The results confirm and extend earlier work which has treated only transitions to the lowest or first excited Landau levels. For the teragauss field strengths expected in neutron star magnetospheres, the relative rates for excited state transitions are found to be significant, especially for incident photon energies several times the cyclotron frequency. Since these transitions must result in the rapid emission of one or more cyclotron photons as well as the Compton-scattered photon, the scattering process actually becomes a photon 'splitting' mechanism which acts to soften hard photon spectra, and also provides a specific mechanism for populating higher Landau levels in the electron distribution function. The results should be significant for models of gamma-ray bursters and pulsating X-ray sources.

  18. Angle-averaged Compton cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, G.H.

    1983-01-01

    The scattering of a photon by an individual free electron is characterized by six quantities: ..cap alpha.. = initial photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..cap alpha../sub s/ = scattered photon energy in units of m/sub 0/c/sup 2/; ..beta.. = initial electron velocity in units of c; phi = angle between photon direction and electron direction in the laboratory frame (LF); theta = polar angle change due to Compton scattering, measured in the electron rest frame (ERF); and tau = azimuthal angle change in the ERF. We present an analytic expression for the average of the Compton cross section over phi, theta, and tau. The lowest order approximation to this equation is reasonably accurate for photons and electrons with energies of many keV.

  19. Resonant Compton Physics for Magnetar Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ickes, Jesse; Gonthier, Peter L.; Eiles, Matthew; Baring, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Various telescopes including RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku, and Fermi have detected steady non-thermal X-ray emission in the 10 - 200 keV band from strongly magnetic neutron stars known as magnetars. Magnetic inverse Compton scattering is believed to be the leading candidate for the production of this intense X-ray radiation. Scattering at ultra-relativistic energies leads to attractive simplifications in the analytics of the magnetic Compton cross section. We have recently addressed such a case by developing compact analytic expressions using correct spin-dependent widths acquired through the implementation of Sokolov & Ternov basis states, focusing specifically on ground-state-ground-state scattering. Compton scattering in magnetar magnetospheres can cool electrons down to mildly relativistic energies. Moreover, soft gamma-ray flaring in magnetars may involve strong Comptonization in expanding clouds of mildly relativistic pairs. Such environs necessitate the development of more general magnetic scattering cross sections, in which the incoming photons acquire substantial incident angles relative to the field in the rest frame of the electron leading to arbitrary Landau excitations of the intermediate and final states. Due to the rapid transitions of the excited-state to the ground-state, the initial electron is still assumed to be in the ground state. The cross sections treat the plethora of harmonic resonances associated with various cyclotron transitions between Landau states. Polarization and spin dependence of the cross section for the four scattering modes is compared to the cross section obtained with spin-averaged widths. We present numerical results to show the comparisons to highlight the role of the spin-dependent widths of the resonances. The findings presented here will have applications to various neutron star problems, including computation of Eddington luminosities and polarization mode-switching rates in transient magnetar fireballs.

  20. Virtual Compton Scattering: Results from Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    L. Van Hoorebeke

    2003-05-01

    Virtual Compton Scattering o013 the proton has been studied at Q 2 -values of 1:0 and 1:9 (GeV=c) 2 in Hall A at the Thomas Je013erson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). Data were taken below and above the pion production threshold as well as in the resonance region. Results obtained below pion threshold at Q 2 = 1:0 (GeV=c) 2 are presented in this paper.

  1. Nonlinear Brightness Optimization in Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, Fred V.; Wu, Sheldon S. Q.

    2013-07-01

    In Compton scattering light sources, a laser pulse is scattered by a relativistic electron beam to generate tunable x and gamma rays. Because of the inhomogeneous nature of the incident radiation, the relativistic Lorentz boost of the electrons is modulated by the ponderomotive force during the interaction, leading to intrinsic spectral broadening and brightness limitations. These effects are discussed, along with an optimization strategy to properly balance the laser bandwidth, diffraction, and nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  2. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod

    2007-12-17

    The beam spin asymmetries of the reaction ep -> epg in the Bjorken regime were measured over a wide kinematical domain using the CLAS detector and a new lead-tungstate calorimeter. Through the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process with Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, those asymmetries provide constraints for the nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions models. The observed shapes are in agreement with twist-2 dominance predictions.

  3. Nonlinear Brightness Optimization in Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, Fred V.; Wu, Sheldon S. Q.

    2013-07-26

    In Compton scattering light sources, a laser pulse is scattered by a relativistic electron beam to generate tunable x and gamma rays. Because of the inhomogeneous nature of the incident radiation, the relativistic Lorentz boost of the electrons is modulated by the ponderomotive force during the interaction, leading to intrinsic spectral broadening and brightness limitations. We discuss these effects, along with an optimization strategy to properly balance the laser bandwidth, diffraction, and nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  4. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  5. Nonlinear brightness optimization in compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Hartemann, Fred V; Wu, Sheldon S Q

    2013-07-26

    In Compton scattering light sources, a laser pulse is scattered by a relativistic electron beam to generate tunable x and gamma rays. Because of the inhomogeneous nature of the incident radiation, the relativistic Lorentz boost of the electrons is modulated by the ponderomotive force during the interaction, leading to intrinsic spectral broadening and brightness limitations. These effects are discussed, along with an optimization strategy to properly balance the laser bandwidth, diffraction, and nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  6. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  7. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Oldaker, Mark E.

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  8. Laser pulsing in linear Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Krafft, G. A.; Johnson, E.; Deitrick, K.; ...

    2016-12-16

    Previous work on calculating energy spectra from Compton scattering events has either neglected considering the pulsed structure of the incident laser beam, or has calculated these effects in an approximate way subject to criticism. In this paper, this problem has been reconsidered within a linear plane wave model for the incident laser beam. By performing the proper Lorentz transformation of the Klein-Nishina scattering cross section, a spectrum calculation can be created which allows the electron beam energy spread and emittance effects on the spectrum to be accurately calculated, essentially by summing over the emission of each individual electron. Such anmore » approach has the obvious advantage that it is easily integrated with a particle distribution generated by particle tracking, allowing precise calculations of spectra for realistic particle distributions in collision. The method is used to predict the energy spectrum of radiation passing through an aperture for the proposed Old Dominion University inverse Compton source. In addition, as discussed in the body of the paper, many of the results allow easy scaling estimates to be made of the expected spectrum. A misconception in the literature on Compton scattering of circularly polarized beams is corrected and recorded.« less

  9. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric J.-M.

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  10. THEORY OF COMPTON SCATTERING BY ANISOTROPIC ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Poutanen, Juri; Vurm, Indrek E-mail: indrek.vurm@oulu.f

    2010-08-15

    Compton scattering plays an important role in various astrophysical objects such as accreting black holes and neutron stars, pulsars, relativistic jets, and clusters of galaxies, as well as the early universe. In most of the calculations, it is assumed that the electrons have isotropic angular distribution in some frame. However, there are situations where the anisotropy may be significant due to the bulk motions, or where there is anisotropic cooling by synchrotron radiation or an anisotropic source of seed soft photons. Here we develop an analytical theory of Compton scattering by anisotropic distribution of electrons that can significantly simplify the calculations. Assuming that the electron angular distribution can be represented by a second-order polynomial over the cosine of some angle (dipole and quadrupole anisotropies), we integrate the exact Klein-Nishina cross section over the angles. Exact analytical and approximate formulae valid for any photon and electron energies are derived for the redistribution functions describing Compton scattering of photons with arbitrary angular distribution by anisotropic electrons. The analytical expressions for the corresponding photon scattering cross section on such electrons, as well as the mean energy of scattered photons, its dispersion, and radiation pressure force are also derived. We apply the developed formalism to the accurate calculations of the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effects for arbitrary electron distributions.

  11. Advanced Source Deconvolution Methods for Compton Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoglauer, Andreas

    The next generation of space telescopes utilizing Compton scattering for astrophysical observations is destined to one day unravel the mysteries behind Galactic nucleosynthesis, to determine the origin of the positron annihilation excess near the Galactic center, and to uncover the hidden emission mechanisms behind gamma-ray bursts. Besides astrophysics, Compton telescopes are establishing themselves in heliophysics, planetary sciences, medical imaging, accelerator physics, and environmental monitoring. Since the COMPTEL days, great advances in the achievable energy and position resolution were possible, creating an extremely vast, but also extremely sparsely sampled data space. Unfortunately, the optimum way to analyze the data from the next generation of Compton telescopes has not yet been found, which can retrieve all source parameters (location, spectrum, polarization, flux) and achieves the best possible resolution and sensitivity at the same time. This is especially important for all sciences objectives looking at the inner Galaxy: the large amount of expected sources, the high background (internal and Galactic diffuse emission), and the limited angular resolution, make it the most taxing case for data analysis. In general, two key challenges exist: First, what are the best data space representations to answer the specific science questions? Second, what is the best way to deconvolve the data to fully retrieve the source parameters? For modern Compton telescopes, the existing data space representations can either correctly reconstruct the absolute flux (binned mode) or achieve the best possible resolution (list-mode), both together were not possible up to now. Here we propose to develop a two-stage hybrid reconstruction method which combines the best aspects of both. Using a proof-of-concept implementation we can for the first time show that it is possible to alternate during each deconvolution step between a binned-mode approach to get the flux right and a

  12. The GEANT low energy Compton scattering (GLECS) package for use in simulating advanced Compton telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippen, R. Marc

    2004-02-01

    Compton γ-ray imaging is inherently based on the assumption of γ-rays scattering with free electrons. In reality, the non-zero momentum of target electrons bound in atoms blurs this ideal scattering response in a process known as Doppler broadening. The design and understanding of advanced Compton telescopes, thus, depends critically on the ability to accurately account for Doppler broadening effects. For this purpose, a Monte Carlo package that simulates detailed Doppler broadening has been developed for use with the powerful, general-purpose GEANT3 and GEANT4 radiation transport codes. This paper describes the design of this package, and illustrates results of comparison with selected experimental data.

  13. Spin momentum density of Nd using Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahariya, Jagrati; Dashora, Alpa; Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.; Tiwari, Shailja; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2013-02-05

    Spin momentum density of Nd has been measured at 6K temperature using magnetic Compton scattering. The individual contribution of different electronic states, in the formation of total spin moment, is deduced from the analysis of magnetic Compton profile. The electron-specific spin moments deduced from the experimental Compton data are compared with the theoretical results obtained from full potential linearized augmented plane wave method and are found to be in good agreement.

  14. The assessment of geometrical effects on Compton profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gigante, G.E.; Hanson, A.L.

    1988-10-01

    Energy dispersive measurements of Compton scattered x rays for analyses have become important with the development of high efficiency, high energy resolution detectors for 50--200 keV x rays. The Compton scattered x ray peak is an inherently broad peak resulting in part from the momentum distribution of the target electrons, referred to as the Compton profile. Hence, information from the width of the Compton peak can be used to study the momentum distribution. The actual peak width also depends on geometrical and attenuation effects. We have begun to assess the geometrical effects and present some of the results. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  15. EXTERNAL COMPTON EMISSION IN BLAZARS OF NONLINEAR SYNCHROTRON SELF-COMPTON-COOLED ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, Michael; Schlickeiser, Reinhard E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2012-12-20

    The origin of the high-energy component in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazars is still something of a mystery. While BL Lac objects can be successfully modeled within the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) scenario, the SED of low-peaked flat spectrum radio quasars is more difficult to reproduce. Their high-energy component needs the abundance of strong external photon sources, giving rise to stronger cooling via the inverse Compton (IC) channel, and thus to a powerful component in the SED. Recently, we have been able to show that such a powerful inverse Compton component can also be achieved within the SSC framework. This, however, is only possible if the electrons cool by SSC, which results in a nonlinear process, since the cooling depends on an energy integral over the electrons. In this paper, we aim to compare the nonlinear SSC framework with the external Compton (EC) output by calculating analytically the EC component with the underlying electron distribution being either linearly or nonlinearly cooled. Due to the additional linear cooling of the electrons with the external photons, higher number densities of electrons are required to achieve nonlinear cooling, resulting in more powerful IC components. If the electrons initially cool nonlinearly, the resulting SED can exhibit a dominant SSC over the EC component. However, this dominance depends strongly on the input parameters. We conclude that, with the correct time-dependent treatment, the SSC component should be taken into account in modeling blazar flares.

  16. Experimental confirmation of neoclassical Compton scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aristov, V. V.; Yakunin, S. N.; Despotuli, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    Incoherent X-ray scattering spectra of diamond and silicon crystals recorded on the BESSY-2 electron storage ring have been analyzed. All spectral features are described well in terms of the neoclassical scattering theory without consideration for the hypotheses accepted in quantum electrodynamics. It is noted that the accepted tabular data on the intensity ratio between the Compton and Rayleigh spectral components may significantly differ from the experimental values. It is concluded that the development of the general theory (considering coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, and Bragg diffraction) must be continued.

  17. Study of Compton vs. Photoelectric Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J B; Johnson, S C; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Beiersdorfer, P

    2004-07-09

    We have studied how often incoming photons interact via a Compton interaction and/or a photoelectric interaction as a function of energy and detector material Results are using a 1m{sup 3} detector, and discrete energy photons from 0.1 MeV up to 10 MeV. Essentially all of the lower energy photons interact at least once in a detector of this size. This is not the case at higher energies. Each detector, photon energy combination was simulated with 2000 photons.

  18. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazouz, M.; Camsonne, A.; Camacho, C. Muñoz; Ferdi, C.; Gavalian, G.; Kuchina, E.; Amarian, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Feuerbach, R.; Fieschi, J.-M.; Frullani, S.; Garçon, M.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Gueye, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Guillon, B.; Hansen, O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissiere, G.; Lerose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meziani, Z.-E.; McCormick, K.; Michaels, R.; Michel, B.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Potokar, M.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Réal, J.-S.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Ulmer, P. E.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2007-12-01

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e→,e'γ)X cross section measured at Q2=1.9GeV2 and xB=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to Eq, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  19. Deeply virtual compton scattering off the neutron.

    PubMed

    Mazouz, M; Camsonne, A; Camacho, C Muñoz; Ferdi, C; Gavalian, G; Kuchina, E; Amarian, M; Aniol, K A; Beaumel, M; Benaoum, H; Bertin, P; Brossard, M; Chen, J-P; Chudakov, E; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; de Jager, C W; Deur, A; Feuerbach, R; Fieschi, J-M; Frullani, S; Garçon, M; Garibaldi, F; Gayou, O; Gilman, R; Gomez, J; Gueye, P; Guichon, P A M; Guillon, B; Hansen, O; Hayes, D; Higinbotham, D; Holmstrom, T; Hyde, C E; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; Jiang, X; Jo, H S; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Laveissiere, G; Lerose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Lu, H-J; Margaziotis, D J; Meziani, Z-E; McCormick, K; Michaels, R; Michel, B; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Nanda, S; Nelyubin, V; Potokar, M; Qiang, Y; Ransome, R D; Réal, J-S; Reitz, B; Roblin, Y; Roche, J; Sabatié, F; Saha, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Ulmer, P E; Voutier, E; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2007-12-14

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e,e'gamma)X cross section measured at Q2=1.9 GeV2 and xB=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to E_{q}, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  20. Simulated performance of a germanium Compton telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Steven E.; Jean, Pierre

    2001-09-01

    To build upon the goals of the upcoming INTEGRAL mission, the next generation soft γ-ray (0.2-20 MeV) observatory will require improved sensitivity to nuclear line emission while maintaining high spectral resolution. We present the simulated performance of a germanium Compton telescope (GCT) design, which will allow a factor of ten improvement in sensitivity over INTEGRAL/SPI. We also discuss a number of issues concerning reconstruction techniques and event cuts, and demonstrate how these affect the overall performance of the telescope.

  1. Deeply virtual Compton scattering and nucleon structure

    SciTech Connect

    M. Garcon

    2006-11-01

    Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) is the tool of choice to study Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD) in the nucleon. After a general introduction to the subject, a review of experimental results from various facilities is given. Following the first encouraging results, new generation dedicated experiments now allow unprecedented precision and kinematical coverage. Several new results were presented during the conference, showing significant progress in this relatively new field. Prospects for future experiments are presented. The path for the experimental determination of GPDs appears now open.

  2. Biophysical applications of neutron Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Albergamo, F.; Hayward, R. L.; Middendorf, H. D.

    Neutron Compton scattering (NCS) can be applied to measuring nuclear momentum distributions and potential parameters in molecules of biophysical interest. We discuss the analysis of NCS spectra from peptide models, focusing on the characterisation of the amide proton dynamics in terms of the width of the H-bond potential well, its Laplacian, and the mean kinetic energy of the proton. The Sears expansion is used to quantify deviations from the high-Q limit (impulse approximation), and line-shape asymmetry parameters are evaluated in terms of Hermite polynomials. Results on NCS from selectively deuterated acetanilide are used to illustrate this approach.

  3. The development of a Compton lung densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Madden, N.W.; Simon, D.S.

    1988-11-01

    A field instrument is being developed for the non-invasive determination of absolute lung density using unique Compton backscattering techniques. A system consisting of a monoenergetic gamma-ray beam and a shielded high resolution high-purity-germanium (HPGe) detector in a close-coupled geometry is designed to minimize errors due to multiple scattering and uncontrollable attenuation in the chestwall. Results of studies on system performance with phantoms, the optimization of detectors, and the fabrication of a practical gamma-ray source are presented. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouz, M.; Guillon, B.; Real, J.-S.; Voutier, E.

    2007-12-14

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e-vector,e{sup '}{gamma})X cross section measured at Q{sup 2}=1.9 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub B}=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to E{sub q}, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  5. Elastic Compton Scattering from 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaryan, Arman; Griesshammer, Harald W.; Phillips, Daniel R.; Strandberg, Bruno; McGovern, Judith A.; Shukla, Deepshikha

    2017-01-01

    We study elastic Compton scattering on 3He using chiral effective field theory (χEFT) at photon energies from 60 MeV to approximately 120 MeV. Experiments to measure this process have been proposed for both MAMI at Mainz and the HI γS facility at TUNL. I will present the revised results of a full calculation at third order in the expansion (O (Q3)). The amplitude involves a sum of both one- and two-nucleon Compton-scattering mechanisms. We have recently computed the fourth-order two-nucleon diagrams. The numerical impact they have on the cross-section results will be discussed. I will also present results in which amplitudes used so far are augmented by the leading effects from Δ (1232) degrees of freedom, a step which has already been performed for the proton and deuteron processes. Both cross sections and doubly-polarized asymmetries will be presented, and the sensitivity of these observables to the values of neutron scalar and spin polarizabilities will be assessed. This material is based upon work supported in part by DOE and George Washington University.

  6. Laser pulsing in linear Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, G. A.; Johnson, E.; Deitrick, K.; Terzić, B.; Kelmar, R.; Hodges, T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Delayen, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Previous work on calculating energy spectra from Compton scattering events has either neglected considering the pulsed structure of the incident laser beam, or has calculated these effects in an approximate way subject to criticism. In this paper, this problem has been reconsidered within a linear plane wave model for the incident laser beam. By performing the proper Lorentz transformation of the Klein-Nishina scattering cross section, a spectrum calculation can be created which allows the electron beam energy spread and emittance effects on the spectrum to be accurately calculated, essentially by summing over the emission of each individual electron. Such an approach has the obvious advantage that it is easily integrated with a particle distribution generated by particle tracking, allowing precise calculations of spectra for realistic particle distributions "in collision." The method is used to predict the energy spectrum of radiation passing through an aperture for the proposed Old Dominion University inverse Compton source. Many of the results allow easy scaling estimates to be made of the expected spectrum.

  7. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Glenzer, S. H.; Neumayer, P.; Doppner, T.; ...

    2008-06-12

    Here, Compton scattering techniques have been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, whilemore » in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.« less

  8. Recent results from Compton spectrometer experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Webb, Timothy J.

    2016-09-01

    During the previous three years, a Compton spectrometer has successfully measured the x-ray spectra of both continuous and flash radiographic sources. In this method, a collimated beam of x-rays incident on a convertor foil ejects Compton electrons. A collimator in the entrance to the spectrometer selects the forward-scattered electrons, which enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The position of the electrons at the magnet's focal plane is proportional to the square root of their momentum, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. The spectrometer is a neodymium-iron magnet which measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was experimentally tested with the 44 MeV Short-Pulse Electron LINAC at the Idaho Accelerator Center. The measured values are mostly consistent with the design specification and historical values of the greater of 1% or 0.1 MeV. Experimental results from this study are presented in these proceedings.

  9. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosten, Sylvester; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The European Muon Collaboration (EMC) observed the first signs of a modification of the partonic structure of the nucleon when present in a nuclear medium. The precise nature of these effects, as well as their underlying cause, is yet to be determined. The generalized parton distribution (GPD) framework provides a powerful tool to study the partonic structure of nucleons inside a nucleus. Hard exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon off a nucleon, deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS), is presently considered the cleanest experimental access to the GPDs, through the Compton form factors (CFFs). This is especially the case for scattering off the spin-zero helium nucleus, where only a single CFF contributes to the process. The real and imaginary parts of this CFF can be constrained through the beam-spin asymmetry (BSA). We will present the first measurements of the DVCS process off 4He using the CEBAF 6 GeV polarized electron beam and the CLAS detector at JLab. The CLAS detector was supplemented with an inner electromagnetic calorimeter for photons produced at small angles, as well as a radial time projection chamber (RTPC) to detect low-energy recoil nuclei. This setup allowed for a clean measurement of the BSA in both the coherent and incoherent channels.

  10. Recent results from the Compton Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Michelson, P.F.; Hansen, W.W.

    1994-12-01

    The Compton Observatory is an orbiting astronomical observatory for gamma-ray astronomy that covers the energy range from about 30 keV to 30 GeV. The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET), one of four instruments on-board, is capable of detecting and imaging gamma radiation from cosmic sources in the energy range from approximately 20 MeV to 30 GeV. After about one month of tests and calibration following the April 1991 launch, a 15-month all sky survey was begun. This survey is now complete and the Compton Observatory is well into Phase II of its observing program which includes guest investigator observations. Among the highlights from the all-sky survey discussed in this presentation are the following: detection of five pulsars with emission above 100 MeV; detection of more than 24 active galaxies, the most distant at redshift greater than two; detection of many high latitude, unidentified gamma-ray sources, some showing significant time variability; detection of at least two high energy gamma-ray bursts, with emission in one case extending to at least 1 GeV. EGRET has also detected gamma-ray emission from solar flares up to energies of at least 2 GeV and has observed gamma-rays from the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  11. Deeply virtual Compton scattering at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Biselli, Angela S.

    2016-08-01

    The generalized parton distributions (GPDs) have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of their elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) on a proton or neutron ($N$), $e N \\rightarrow e' N' \\gamma$, is the process more directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. The amplitudes of DVCS and Bethe-Heitler, the process where a photon is emitted by either the incident or scattered electron, can be accessed via cross-section measurements or exploiting their interference which gives rise to spin asymmetries. Spin asymmetries, cross sections and cross-section differences can be connected to different combinations of the four leading-twist GPDs (${H}$, ${E}$, ${\\tilde{H}}$, ${\\tilde{E}}$) for each quark flavors, depending on the observable and on the type of target. This paper gives an overview of recent experimental results obtained for DVCS at Jefferson Laboratory in the halls A and B. Several experiments have been done extracting DVCS observables over large kinematics regions. Multiple measurements with overlapping kinematic regions allow to perform a quasi-model independent extraction of the Compton form factors, which are GPDs integrals, revealing a 3D image of the nucleon.

  12. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

  13. Optimization of a multiple-scattering Compton camera as a photon-tracking imager for 6-MV photon therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taewoong; Yoon, Changyeon; Lee, Wonho

    2014-06-01

    During radiation therapy, the irradiated position and the energy deposited in a patient must be monitored. In general, calculations before photon exposure or 2D measurements of the transmitted photons have been widely used for making dose estimates. In this paper, we propose a real-time 3D dose measurement using Compton imaging technology. On the basis of the Monte-Carlo method, we designed a multiple-scattering Compton camera system (MSCC) with semiconductor and scintillation detectors. The MSCC was constructed with two semiconductor detectors as scattering detectors and a cadmium-tungstate (CWO) scintillator detector as an absorber detector. The two planar semiconductor arrays, and the CWO array consisted of 40 × 40 pixels, each with a size of 1 × 1 × ɛ mm3, where ɛ is the variable thickness of the detectors. The design parameters, such as the types of semiconductors, detector thicknesses and distances between detectors, were optimized on the basis of the detection efficiency and angular resolution of reconstructed images for a point source. Under the optimized conditions, uncertainty factors in geometry and energy were estimated for various inter-detector distances. We used a source corresponding to photons scattered from a water phantom exposed to 6-MeV peak X-rays. According to our simulation results, the figure of merit, reached its maximum value when the inter-detector distance was 3 cm. In order to achieve a high FOM, we chose 1 cm as the optimum thickness for the scattering and absorbed detectors. A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector showed the best performance among the simulated semiconductors. The position uncertainty caused by the pixelization effect was the major factor in degrading the angular resolution of the reconstructed images, and the degradation caused by energy broadening was less than expected. The angular uncertainties caused by Doppler broadening and incorrect sequencing were minimal compared with that of pixelization. Our

  14. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission from blazar jets - III. Compton-dominant blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, William J.; Cotter, Garret

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we develop the extended jet model of Potter & Cotter to model the simultaneous multiwavelength spectra of six Compton-dominant blazars. We include an accelerating parabolic base transitioning to a slowly decelerating conical jet with a geometry set by observations of M87 and consistent with simulations and theory. We investigate several jet models and find that the optically thick to thin synchrotron break in the radio spectrum requires the jet to first come into equipartition at large distances along the jet, consistent with the observed transition from parabolic to conical at 105Rs in the jet of M87. We confirm this result analytically and calculate the expected frequency core-shift relations for the models under consideration. We find that a parabolic jet transitioning to a ballistic conical jet at 105Rs, which starts in equipartition and becomes more particle dominated at larger distances, fits the multiwavelength data of the six blazars well, whilst an adiabatic equipartition conical section requires very large bulk Lorentz factors to reproduce the Compton dominance of the blazars. We find that all these blazars require high power (>1039 W), high bulk Lorentz factor (>20) jets observed close to the line of sight (<2°) as we expect from the blazar sequence and consistent with the results from Paper II. The inverse-Compton emission in our fits is due to inverse-Compton scattering of high-redshift cosmic microwave background photons at large distances along the jet due to the high bulk Lorentz factors of the jets. We postulate a new interpretation of the blazar sequence based on the radius of the transition region of the jet (where the jet is brightest in synchrotron emission) scaling linearly with black hole mass.

  15. Deuteron Compton scattering: a random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, H. W.

    2005-05-01

    In this sketch, some recent developments in Compton scattering off the deuteron are reviewed. The strong energy-dependence of the scalar magnetic dipole polarisability βM1 turns out to be crucial to understand the data from Saskatoon at 94 MeV. Chiral Effective Field Theory is used to extract the static iso-scalar dipole polarisabilities as ᾱs = 12.6 ± 1.4stat ± 1.0wavefu and β¯s = 2.3 ± 1.7stat ± 0.8wavefu, in units of 10-4 fm3. Therefore, proton and neutron polarisabilities are identical within error bars. For details and a better list of references, consult e.g. Refs. [1, 2].

  16. Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchuk, M. I.; L'vov, A. I.

    2000-07-01

    Deuteron Compton scattering below pion photoproduction threshold is considered in the framework of the nonrelativistic diagrammatic approach with the Bonn OBE potential. A complete gauge-invariant set of diagrams is taken into account which includes resonance diagrams without and with NN-rescattering and diagrams with one- and two-body seagulls. The seagull operators are analyzed in detail, and their relations with free- and bound-nucleon polarizabilities are discussed. It is found that both dipole and higher-order polarizabilities of the nucleon are required for a quantitative description of recent experimental data. An estimate of the isospin-averaged dipole electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon and the polarizabilities of the neutron is obtained from the data.

  17. The Compton Mirror in NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poutanen, Juri; Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Magdziarz, Pawel

    1996-01-01

    We show that the sharp cutoff in the hard X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151, unusual for Seyfert 1 galaxies, can be reconciled with the average Seyfert 1 spectrum if we assume that the central source is completely hidden from our line of sight by the thick part of the accretion disk or by the broad emission-line clouds. The observed X-ray radiation is produced by scattering of the Seyfert 1 type spectrum in the higher, cooler parts of the accretion disk corona, or in a wind. A sharp cutoff appears as a result of the Compton recoil effect. This model naturally explains a discrepancy regarding the inclination of the central source, inferred to be low (face-on) from observations of the iron K-alpha emission line, but inferred to be high on the basis of optical and UV observations.

  18. Compton scattering vertex for massive scalar QED

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.; Delbourgo, R.; Tejeda-Yeomans, M. E.

    2009-08-15

    We investigate the Compton scattering vertex of charged scalars and photons in scalar quantum electrodynamics (SQED). We carry out its nonperturbative construction consistent with Ward-Fradkin-Green-Takahashi identity which relates 3-point vertices to the 4-point ones. There is an undetermined part which is transverse to one or both the external photons, and needs to be evaluated through perturbation theory. We present in detail how the transverse part at the 1-loop order can be evaluated for completely general kinematics of momenta involved in covariant gauges and dimensions. This involves the calculation of genuine 4-point functions with three massive propagators, the most nontrivial integrals reported in this paper. We also discuss possible applications of our results.

  19. BLAZAR FLARES FROM COMPTON DRAGGED SHELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, Omri; Levinson, Amir

    2015-08-10

    We compute the dynamics and emission of dissipative shells that are subject to a strong Compton drag, under simplifying assumptions about the dissipation mechanism. We show that under conditions prevailing in blazars, substantial deceleration is anticipated on sub-parsec and parsec scales in cases of rapid dissipation. Such episodes may be the origin of some of the flaring activity occasionally observed in gamma-ray blazars. The shape of the light curves thereby produced reflects the geometry of the emitting surface if the deceleration is very rapid, or the dynamics of the shell if the deceleration is delayed, or initially more gradual, owing, e.g., to continuous injection of energy and momentum.

  20. Nucleon Compton scattering in the Dyson-Schwinger approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.

    2013-02-01

    We analyze the nucleon’s Compton scattering amplitude in the Dyson-Schwinger/Faddeev approach. We calculate a subset of diagrams that implements the nonperturbative handbag contribution as well as all t-channel resonances. At the quark level, these ingredients are represented by the quark Compton vertex whose analytic properties we study in detail. We derive a general form for a fermion two-photon vertex that is consistent with its Ward-Takahashi identities and free of kinematic singularities, and we relate its transverse part to the on-shell nucleon Compton amplitude. We solve an inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation for the quark Compton vertex in rainbow-ladder truncation and implement it in the nucleon Compton scattering amplitude. The remaining ingredients are the dressed quark propagator and the nucleon’s bound-state amplitude which are consistently solved from Dyson-Schwinger and covariant Faddeev equations. We verify numerically that the resulting quark Compton vertex and nucleon Compton amplitude both reproduce the πγγ transition form factor when the pion pole in the t channel is approached.

  1. Compton Radiation for Nuclear Waste Management and Transmutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulyak, E.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    Compton inverse radiation is emitted in the process of backscattering of the laser pulses off the relativistic electrons. This radiation possesses high spectral density and high energy of photons--in hard x-ray up to gammaray energy range--with moderate electron energies (hundreds of MeV up to 1 GeV) due to short wavelength of the laser radiation. The Compton radiation is well collimated: emitting within a narrow cone along the electron beam. A distinct property of the Compton inverse radiation is a steep high-energy cutoff of the spectrum and the maximal intensity just below the cutoff. The Compton sources can attain: spectral density up to 1014 gammas/(s 0.1%bandwidth) in MeV range of energies, and spectral brightness up to 1020 gammas/(smm2mr2 0.1% bw). Applicability of Compton sources for nuclear waste management and detection of radioisotopes and fissionable nuclides are discussed in the report. Also application limits of Compton gamma sources for transmutation of radioactive isotopes are estimated. A recently proposed subtracting method, in which two sets of data obtained by irradiating the object by the Compton beams with slightly different maximal energies are compared, will enhance resolution of detection radioactive elements at the 'atomic' (hundreds of keV) and the 'nuclear' (a few MeV) photon energies.

  2. Nucleon Compton Scaterring in the perturbative Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard

    2004-11-01

    Results of perturbative calculation for nucleon Compton scattering are presented. The calculations consider both the case of the incoming photon being real and the case of the incoming photon being virtual. Hard scattering amplitudes are calculated using a software package developed at NC State Universityfootnote[1]A. Pang and C.-R. Ji, Computers in Physics Vol 9 (No. 6), Nov/Dec 1995 p589-593footnote[2]A. Pang and C.-R. Ji, J. Comp. Phys. 115, 267 (1994). The integrations required to calculate total cross section are made following the approach of Kronfeld and Nizicfootnote[3]A. Kronfeld and B. Nizic, Phys. Rev. D 44, 3445 (1991). Poles are split into a real principal part plus an imaginary delta function. The delta functions are evaluated explicitly by hand; principal part integrations are evaluated numerically, after making a variable transformation to render the integrand finite over the range of integration. For the real photon case, there are five previous calculations to consider, each of which produced a different result.^3footnote[4]E. Maina and G. Farrar, Phys. Lett. B 206, 120 (1988).footnote[5]G. Farrar and H. Zhang, Phys. Rev. D 41, 3348 (1990).footnote[6]M. Vanderhaeghen, P. Guichon, and J. Van de Wiele, presented at workshop on virtual Compton scattering, Clermont-Ferrand, France, 1996.footnote[7]T. Brooks and L. Dixon, Phys. Rev. D 62, 114021 (2000). There is an agreement with the results of Brooks and Dixon.^7 For the virtual photon case, the new result is compared with that of Farrar and Zhang.^5 Since there are differences, we discuss which result is more believable and why. For the deeply virtual case (DVCS), comparison is made with other non-pertubative methods using GPDs.

  3. Virtual Nucleon Compton Scattering in Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Richard; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2004-10-01

    Results of perturbative calculation for nucleon Compton scattering are presented. The calculations consider both the case of the incoming photon being real and the case of the incoming photon being virtual. Hard scattering amplitudes are calculated using a software package developed at NC State University footnote[1]A. Pang and C.-R. Ji, Computers in Physics Vol 9 (No. 6), Nov/Dec 1995 p589-593footnote[2]A. Pang and C.-R. Ji, J. Comp. Phys. 115, 267 (1994). The integrations required to calculate total cross section are made following the approach of Kronfeld and Nizicfootnote[3]A. Kronfeld and B. Nizic, Phys. Rev. D 44, 3445 (1991). Poles are split into a real principal part plus an imaginary delta function. The delta functions are evaluated explicitly by hand; principal part integrations are evaluated numerically, after making a variable transformation to render the integrand finite over the range of integration. For the real photon case, there are five previous calculations to consider, each of which produced a different resultfootnote[3]A. Kronfeld and B. Nizic, Phys. Rev. D 44, 3445 (1991)footnote[4]E. Maina and G. Farrar, Phys. Lett. B 206, 120 (1988)footnote[5]G. Farrar and H. Zhang, Phys. Rev. D 41, 3348 (1990)footnote[6]M. Vanderhaeghen, P. Guichon, and J. Van de Wiele, presented at workshop on virtual Compton scattering, Clermont-Ferrand, France, 1996footnote[7]T. Brooks and L. Dixon, Phys. Rev. D 62, 114021 (2000). There is an agreement with the results of Brooks and Dixonfootnote[7]T. Brooks and L. Dixon, Phys. Rev. D 62, 114021 (2000). For the virtual photon case, the new result is compared with that of Farrar and Zhang footnote[5]G. Farrar and H. Zhang, Phys. Rev. D 41, 3348 (1990). Since there are differences, we discuss which result is more believable and why. For the deeply virtual case (DVCS), comparison is made with other non-pertubative methods using GPDs.

  4. Low Noise Double-Sided Silicon Strip Detector for Multiple-Compton Gamma-ray Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Hiroyasu

    2002-12-03

    A Semiconductor Multiple-Compton Telescope (SMCT) is being developed to explore the gamma-ray universe in an energy band 0.1-20 MeV, which is not well covered by the present or near-future gamma-ray telescopes. The key feature of the SMCT is the high energy resolution that is crucial for high angular resolution and high background rejection capability. We have developed prototype modules for a low noise Double-sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSD) system which is an essential element of the SMCT. The geometry of the DSSD is optimized to achieve the lowest noise possible. A new front-end VLSI device optimized for low noise operation is also developed. We report on the design and test results of the prototype system. We have reached an energy resolution of 1.3 keV (FWHM) for 60 keV and 122 keV at 0 C.

  5. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  6. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Head Lice Head Lice Condition Family HealthKids and Teens Share Head Lice Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Causes4. Prevention5. ...

  7. Head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child's head circumference. Normal ranges for a child's sex and age (weeks, months), based on values that experts have obtained for normal growth rates of infants' and children's heads. Measurement of the head circumference is an ...

  8. Compton Profile Study of Intermetallic Ti3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, V.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Joshi, K. B.; Sharma, B. K.

    2011-10-01

    The Compton scattering measurement on intermetallic alloy Ti3Al is reported in this work. The measurement is made using 59.54 keV gamma-rays from Am241 source. Theoretical calculation of Compton profile is also performed employing CRYSTAL code within the framework of density functional theory to compare with the measurement. The theoretical profile of the alloy is also synthesized following the superposition model taking the published Compton profiles of elemental solids from the APW method. The experimental study of charge transfer in the alloys has also been done by performing the experimental Compton profile measurements on Ti and Al following the superposition model and charge transfer from Al to Ti is clearly seen on the alloy formation.

  9. Investigation of Compton profiles of molecular methane and ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao-Li; Xu, Long-Quan; Kang, Xu; Liu, Ya-Wei; Ni, Dong-Dong; Zhu, Lin-Fan; Yang, Ke Ma, Yong-Peng; Yan, Shuai

    2015-02-28

    The Compton profiles of methane and ethane molecules have been determined at an incident photon energy of 20 keV based on the third generation synchrotron radiation, and the statistical accuracy of 0.2% is achieved near p{sub z} = 0. The density functional theory with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set was used to calculate the Compton profiles of methane and ethane. The present experimental Compton profiles are in better agreement with the theoretical calculations in the whole p{sub z} region than the previous experimental results, which indicates that the present experimental Compton profiles are accurate enough to serve as the benchmark data for methane and ethane molecules.

  10. Compton Profile Study of Intermetallic Ti{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, V.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Sharma, B. K.; Joshi, K. B.

    2011-10-20

    The Compton scattering measurement on intermetallic alloy Ti{sub 3}Al is reported in this work. The measurement is made using 59.54 keV gamma-rays from Am{sup 241} source. Theoretical calculation of Compton profile is also performed employing CRYSTAL code within the framework of density functional theory to compare with the measurement. The theoretical profile of the alloy is also synthesized following the superposition model taking the published Compton profiles of elemental solids from the APW method. The experimental study of charge transfer in the alloys has also been done by performing the experimental Compton profile measurements on Ti and Al following the superposition model and charge transfer from Al to Ti is clearly seen on the alloy formation.

  11. Compton scatter imaging: A tool for historical exploration.

    PubMed

    Harding, G; Harding, E

    2010-06-01

    This review discusses the principles and technological realisation of a technique, termed Compton scatter imaging (CSI), which is based on spatially resolved detection of Compton scattered X-rays. The applicational focus of this review is to objects of historical interest. Following a historical survey of CSI, a description is given of the major characteristics of Compton X-ray scatter. In particular back-scattered X-rays allow massive objects to be imaged, which would otherwise be too absorbing for the conventional transmission X-ray technique. The ComScan (an acronym for Compton scatter scanner) is a commercially available backscatter imaging system, which is discussed here in some detail. ComScan images from some artefacts of historical interest, namely a fresco, an Egyptian mummy and a mediaeval clasp are presented and their use in historical analysis is indicated. The utility of scientific and technical advance for not only exploring history, but also restoring it, is briefly discussed.

  12. Unified ab initio treatment of attosecond photoionization and Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, G. L.; Bondar, D. I.; Patchkovskii, S.; Corkum, P. B.; Bandrauk, A. D.

    2009-10-01

    We present a new theoretical approach to attosecond laser-assisted photo- and Compton ionization. Attosecond x-ray absorption and scattering are described by \\hat{\\mathscr{S}}^{(1,2)} -matrices, which are coherent superpositions of 'monochromatic' \\skew{3}\\hat{S}^{(1,2)} -matrices in a laser-modified Furry representation. Besides refining the existing theory of the soft x-ray photoelectron attosecond streak camera and spectral phase interferometry (ASC and ASPI), we formulate a theory of hard x-ray photoelectron and Compton ASC and ASPI. The resulting scheme has a simple structure and leads to closed-form expressions for ionization amplitudes. We investigate Compton electron interference in the separable Coulomb-Volkov continuum with both Coulomb and laser fields treated non-perturbatively. We find that at laser-field intensities below 1013 Wcm-2 normalized Compton lines almost coincide with the lines obtained in the laser-free regime. At higher intensities, attosecond interferences survive integration over electron momenta, and feature prominently in the Compton lines themselves. We define a regime where the electron ground-state density can be measured with controllable accuracy in an attosecond time interval. The new theory provides a firm basis for extracting photo- and Compton electron phases and atomic and molecular wavefunctions from experimental data.

  13. The MEGA advanced Compton telescope project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, P. F.; Andritschke, R.; Kanbach, G.; Schönfelder, V.; Schopper, F.; Zoglauer, A.

    2002-07-01

    The goal of the Medium Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy (MEGA) telescope is to improve sensitivity at medium gamma-ray energies (0.4-50 MeV) by at least an order of magnitude over that of COMPTEL. This will be achieved with a new compact design that allows for a very wide field of view, permitting a sensitive all-sky survey and the monitoring of transient and variable sources. The key science objectives for MEGA include the investigation of cosmic high-energy particle accelerators, studies of nucleosynthesis sites using gamma-ray lines, and determination of the large-scale structure of galactic and cosmic diffuse background emission. MEGA records and images gamma-ray events by completely tracking both Compton and pair creation interactions in a tracker of double-sided silicon strip detectors and a calorimeter of CsI crystals able to resolve in three dimensions. We present initial laboratory calibration results from a small prototype MEGA telescope.

  14. Scaling limit of deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    A. Radyushkin

    2000-07-01

    The author outlines a perturbative QCD approach to the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process {gamma}{sup *}p {r_arrow} {gamma}p{prime} in the limit of vanishing momentum transfer t=(p{prime}{minus}p){sup 2}. The DVCS amplitude in this limit exhibits a scaling behavior described by a two-argument distributions F(x,y) which specify the fractions of the initial momentum p and the momentum transfer r {equivalent_to} p{prime}{minus}p carried by the constituents of the nucleon. The kernel R(x,y;{xi},{eta}) governing the evolution of the non-forward distributions F(x,y) has a remarkable property: it produces the GLAPD evolution kernel P(x/{xi}) when integrated over y and reduces to the Brodsky-Lepage evolution kernel V(y,{eta}) after the x-integration. This property is used to construct the solution of the one-loop evolution equation for the flavor non-singlet part of the non-forward quark distribution.

  15. New Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, D.S.

    1985-10-01

    Pulmonary edema is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical evaluation of pulmonary edema. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray. The ability to make safe, frequent lung density measurements could be very helpful for monitoring the course of P.E. at the hospital bedside or outpatient clinics, and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in clinical research. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, Francois-Xavier

    2008-10-01

    As the lightest of all baryons, and the single stable hadron, the proton can be considered as the simplest laboratory tool to investigate the non-perturbative stucture of QCD. The interest in the nucleon structure has been renewed over the past decade, due to the development of the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) formalism. The cleanest process to test the GPDs is Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, which is the electroproduction of photons in the Bjorken regime of large Q^2 and ν, at fixed xB and small t. In order to access this process, the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) has been upgraded by the addition of a new calorimeter to detect photons at small angles. I will present an overview of the E1-DVCS experiment, starting from the conception and construction of the equipment to simulations and data taking. I will show results for the Beam Spin Asymmetry, which is linked to GPDs. I will conclude by giving perspectives on GPDs measurements at 6 and 12 GeV with CLAS.

  17. Performance of a Low Noise Front-end ASIC for Si/CdTe Detectors in Compton Gamma-ray Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, H

    2004-03-29

    Compton telescopes based on semiconductor technologies are being developed to explore the gamma-ray universe in an energy band 0.1-20 MeV, which is not well covered by the present or near-future gamma-ray telescopes. The key feature of such Compton telescopes is the high energy resolution that is crucial for high angular resolution and high background rejection capability. The energy resolution around 1 keV is required to approach physical limit of the angular resolution due to Doppler broadening. We have developed a low noise front-end ASIC (Application-Specific Integrated Circuit), VA32TA, to realize this goal for the readout of Double-sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSD) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detector which are essential elements of the semiconductor Compton telescope. We report on the design and test results of the VA32TA. We have reached an energy resolution of 1.3 keV (FWHM) for 60 keV and 122 keV at 0 C with a DSSD and 1.7 keV (FWHM) with a CdTe detector.

  18. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL–matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  19. Spectra of clinical CT scanners using a portable Compton spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duisterwinkel, H. A.; Abbema, J. K. van; Kawachimaru, R.; Paganini, L.; Graaf, E. R. van der; Brandenburg, S.; Goethem, M. J. van

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Spectral information of the output of x-ray tubes in (dual source) computer tomography (CT) scanners can be used to improve the conversion of CT numbers to proton stopping power and can be used to advantage in CT scanner quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to design, validate, and apply a compact portable Compton spectrometer that was constructed to accurately measure x-ray spectra of CT scanners. Methods: In the design of the Compton spectrometer, the shielding materials were carefully chosen and positioned to reduce background by x-ray fluorescence from the materials used. The spectrum of Compton scattered x-rays alters from the original source spectrum due to various physical processes. Reconstruction of the original x-ray spectrum from the Compton scattered spectrum is based on Monte Carlo simulations of the processes involved. This reconstruction is validated by comparing directly and indirectly measured spectra of a mobile x-ray tube. The Compton spectrometer is assessed in a clinical setting by measuring x-ray spectra at various tube voltages of three different medical CT scanner x-ray tubes. Results: The directly and indirectly measured spectra are in good agreement (their ratio being 0.99) thereby validating the reconstruction method. The measured spectra of the medical CT scanners are consistent with theoretical spectra and spectra obtained from the x-ray tube manufacturer. Conclusions: A Compton spectrometer has been successfully designed, constructed, validated, and applied in the measurement of x-ray spectra of CT scanners. These measurements show that our compact Compton spectrometer can be rapidly set-up using the alignment lasers of the CT scanner, thereby enabling its use in commissioning, troubleshooting, and, e.g., annual performance check-ups of CT scanners.

  20. Compton Thick AGN in the COSMOS field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Cosmos Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    I will present the results we published in a couple of recent papers (Lanzuisi et al. 2015, A&A 573A 137, Lanzuisi et al. 2015, arXiv 1505.01153) on the properties of X-ray selected Compton Thick (CT, NH>10^24 cm^-2) AGN, in the COSMOS survey. We exploited the rich multi-wavelength dataset available in this field, to show that CT AGN tend to harbor smaller, rapidly growing SMBH with respect to unobscured AGN, and have a higher chance of being hosted by star-forming, merging and post-merger systems.We also demonstrated the detectability of even more heavily obscured AGN (NH>10^25 cm^-2), thanks to a truly multi-wavelength approach in the same field. The extreme source detected in this way shows strong evidences of ongoing powerful AGN feedback, detected as blue-shifted wings of high ionization optical emission lines such as [NeV] and [FeVII], as well as of the [OIII] emission line.The results obtained from these works point toward a scenario in which highly obscured AGN occupy a peculiar place in the galaxy-AGN co-evolution process, in which both the host and the SMBH rapidly evolve toward the local relations.We will also present estimates on the detectability of such extreme sources up to redshift ~6-7 with Athena. Combining the most up to date models for the Luminosity Function of CT AGN at high z, aggressive data analysis techniques on faint sources, and the current Athena survey design, we demonstrate that we will detect, and recognize as such, a small (few to ten) but incredibly valuable sample of CT AGN at such high redshift.

  1. Inverse Compton Scattering in Mildly Relativistic Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, S. M.; Birkinshaw, M.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effect of inverse Compton scattering in mildly relativistic static and moving plasmas with low optical depth using Monte Carlo simulations, and calculated the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the cosmic background radiation. Our semi-analytic method is based on a separation of photon diffusion in frequency and real space. We use Monte Carlo simulation to derive the intensity and frequency of the scattered photons for a monochromatic incoming radiation. The outgoing spectrum is determined by integrating over the spectrum of the incoming radiation using the intensity to determine the correct weight. This method makes it possible to study the emerging radiation as a function of frequency and direction. As a first application we have studied the effects of finite optical depth and gas infall on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (not possible with the extended Kompaneets equation) and discuss the parameter range in which the Boltzmann equation and its expansions can be used. For high temperature clusters (k(sub B)T(sub e) greater than or approximately equal to 15 keV) relativistic corrections based on a fifth order expansion of the extended Kompaneets equation seriously underestimate the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at high frequencies. The contribution from plasma infall is less important for reasonable velocities. We give a convenient analytical expression for the dependence of the cross-over frequency on temperature, optical depth, and gas infall speed. Optical depth effects are often more important than relativistic corrections, and should be taken into account for high-precision work, but are smaller than the typical kinematic effect from cluster radial velocities.

  2. The results of the in-flight attitude sensor calibration for the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. S.; Eudell, A. H.; Kulp, L. S.; Lindrose, L. A.; Harman, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was launched by the shuttle Atlantis in April 1991. This paper presents the results of the attitude sensor calibration that was performed during the early mission. The GSFC Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) performed an alignment calibration of the two fixed-head star trackers (FHST's) and two fine Sun sensors (FSS's) on board Compton GRO. The results show a 27-arcsecond shift between the bore sights of the FHST's with respect to prelaunch measurements. The alignments of the two FSS's shifted by 0.20 and 0.05 degree. During the same time period, the Compton GRO science teams performed an alignment calibration of the science instruments with respect to the attitude reported by the on board computer (OBC). In order to preserve these science alignments, FDF adjusted the overall alignments of the FHST's and FSS's, obtained by the FDF calibration, such that when up linked to the OBC, the shift in the OBC-determined attitude is minimized. FDF also calibrated the inertial reference unit (IRU), which consists of three dual-axis gyroscopes. The observed gyro bias matched the bias that was solved for by the OBC. This bias drifted during the first 6 days after release. The results of the FDF calibration of scale factor and alignment shifts showed changes that were of the same order as their uncertainties.

  3. The results of the in-flight attitude sensor calibration for the Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, W. S.; Eudell, A. H.; Kulp, L. S.; Lindrose, L. A.; Harman, R. R.

    1993-02-01

    The Arthur Holly Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was launched by the shuttle Atlantis in April 1991. This paper presents the results of the attitude sensor calibration that was performed during the early mission. The GSFC Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) performed an alignment calibration of the two fixed-head star trackers (FHST's) and two fine Sun sensors (FSS's) on board Compton GRO. The results show a 27-arcsecond shift between the bore sights of the FHST's with respect to prelaunch measurements. The alignments of the two FSS's shifted by 0.20 and 0.05 degree. During the same time period, the Compton GRO science teams performed an alignment calibration of the science instruments with respect to the attitude reported by the on board computer (OBC). In order to preserve these science alignments, FDF adjusted the overall alignments of the FHST's and FSS's, obtained by the FDF calibration, such that when up linked to the OBC, the shift in the OBC-determined attitude is minimized. FDF also calibrated the inertial reference unit (IRU), which consists of three dual-axis gyroscopes. The observed gyro bias matched the bias that was solved for by the OBC. This bias drifted during the first 6 days after release. The results of the FDF calibration of scale factor and alignment shifts showed changes that were of the same order as their uncertainties.

  4. A new technique to efficiently select Compton-thick AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severgnini, P.; Caccianiga, A.; Della Ceca, R.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: We present a new efficient diagnostic method, based on mid-infrared and X-ray data, to select local (z < 0.1) Compton-thick AGN with the aim of estimating their surface and space density. Methods: We define a region in the X-ray-to-mid-IR [F(2-12 keV)/F25ν25] vs. X-ray color (HR) plane associated to Compton-thick AGN, i.e. [F(2-12 keV)/F25ν25] < 0.02 and HR > - 0.2. On the basis of this selection method we build up a sample of 43 Compton-thick AGN candidates using data from IRAS Point Source and 2XMM-Newton catalogues. In order to test the efficiency of the proposed method in selecting Compton-thick AGN we use the results of the X-ray spectral analysis performed on all the sources of our sample (presented in a parallel work). After taking into account the different selection effects, we have estimated the number of Compton-thick in the local Universe and their density down to the IRAS flux limit of F25 = 0.5 Jy. Results: We find that the diagnostic plot proposed here is an efficient method to select Compton-thick AGN in the nearby Universe since ~84% of the sources populating the proposed Compton-thick region are actually Compton-thick AGN. Twenty percent are newly-discovered Compton-thick AGN. We then estimate the surface density of Compton-thick AGN down to the IRAS PSC catalogue flux limit (F25 = 0.5 Jy) that turns out to be ρCT ~ 3 × 10-3 src deg-2. After estimating an equivalent IR-to-hard-X-ray limiting flux, we compare our result with those found with Swift-BAT. We find that the surface density derived here is a factor 4 above the density computed in the hard X-ray surveys. This difference is ascribed, at least in part, to a significant contribution (~60-90%) of the star-forming activity to the total 25 μm emission for the sources in our sample. By considering only the 25 μm AGN emission, we estimate a surface density of Compton-thick AGN which is consistent with the results found by hard X-ray surveys. Finally, we estimated the co-moving space

  5. Preliminary Results on Compton Electrons in Silicon Drift Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conka-Nurdan, T.; Nurdan, K.; Laihem, K.; Walenta, A. H.; Fiorini, C.; Freisleben, B.; Hornel, N.; Pavel, N. A.; Struder, L.

    2004-10-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDD) with on-chip electronics have found many applications in different fields. A detector system has recently been designed and built to study the electrons from Compton scatter events in such a detector. The reconstruction of the Compton electrons is a crucial issue for Compton imaging. The equipment consists of a monolithic array of 19 channel SDDs and an Anger camera. Photons emitted from a finely collimated source undergo Compton scattering within the SDD where the recoil electron is absorbed. The scattered photon is subsequently observed by photoelectric absorption in the second detector. The coincidence events are used to get the energy, position, and direction of the Compton electrons. Because the on-chip transistors provide the first stage amplification, the SDDs provide outstanding noise performance and fast shaping, so that very good energy resolution can be obtained even at room temperature. The drift detectors require a relatively low number of readout channels for large detector areas. Custom-designed analog and digital electronics provide fast readout of the SDDs. The equipment is designed such that the measurements can be done in all detector orientations and kinematical conditions. The first results obtained with this detector system will be presented in this paper.

  6. SU-E-I-63: Performance Study of An Electron-Tracking Compton Camera for Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kabuki, S; Kimura, H; Kubo, H; Ogawa, K; Kunieda, E; Tanimori, T

    2012-06-01

    Conventional gamma-ray detector, PET and SPECT, have the limitation of energy and field of view. These limitations are major problems of studying for a new medical imaging. Therefore, we have developed the new imaging detector which is an electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC). A reconstruction method of Compton camera (CC) is using the physics principle. Because of using physics principle, CC can have a wide energy dynamic range and wide field of view. Conventional CC, however, cannot catch Compton recoil electron tracks, and this is one of the reasons of low imaging power. We have developed a time projection chamber (TPC) using micro pixel chamber (μPIC) as the new detector for ETCC. The μPIC is 2-dimensional gaseous detector and this position resolution is less than 400 μm. Using this detector, ETCC can get electron tracks which are generated from Compton scattering. In this paper, we show the prototype ETCC performance and imaging results. ETCC achieved a wide energy dynamic range (200-1300keV) and wide field of view (3 steradian). Also we succeeded in imaging new imaging reagents using mice as follows; (1) F-18-FDG (511 keV) and I-131-MIBG (364 keV) simultaneous imaging for double clinical tracer imaging, (2) Zn-65- porphyrin (1116 keV) imaging for high energy gamma-ray imaging and, (3) imaging of some minerals (Mn-54, Zn-65) in mice and so on. And we succeeded in 3-D imaging which has imaged only one direction using one head camera. We have developed the ETCC for new medical imaging device and succeeded in imaging the some imaging reagents. We started to develop the new ETCC which can image the mouse within 30 min. Thus, this detector has the possibility of new medical imaging. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Inclusive and Exclusive Compton Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Psaker, Ales

    2005-12-01

    In our work, we describe two types of Compton processes. As an example of an inclusive process, we consider the high-energy photoproduction of massive muon pairs off the nucleon. We analyze the process in the framework of the QCD parton model, in which the usual parton distributions emerge as a tool to describe the nucleon in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. To study its exclusive version, a new class of phenomenological functions is required, namely, generalized parton distributions. They can be considered as a generalization of the usual parton distributions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) may be observed in hard exclusive reactions such as deeply virtual Compton scattering. We develop an extension of this particular process into the weak interaction sector. We also investigate a possible application of the GPD formalism to wide-angle real Compton scattering.

  8. Thermal Comptonization and Disk Thermal Reprocessing in NGC3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, James; Blaes, Omer; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present an application of the thermal Comptonization/disk reprocessing model recently proposed by Zdziarski, Lubiniski, and Smith. We show that the absence of strong optical variations in the presence of strong concurrent X-ray variations, similar to those found by Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) monitoring observations of NGC 3516, can be explained by changing the geometry of the Comptonizing plasma rather than the accretion disk itself. The total X-ray luminosity of the Comptonizing plasma must decrease as its spatial extent increases. In contrast, the disk inner radius must be roughly fixed in order not to produce optical/ultraviolet color variations stronger than observed. By including emission due to internal viscous dissipation in the disk, we can roughly match the optical and X-ray flux levels and variability amplitudes seen from NGC 3516 during the HST/RXTE campaign.

  9. G. E. M. Jauncey and the Compton Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkin, John

    In late 1922 Arthur Holly Compton (1892-1962) discovered that an X-ray quantum of radiation undergoes a discrete change in wavelength when it experiences a billiard-ball collision with a single atomic electron, a phenomenon that became known as the Compton effect and for which he shared the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1927. But for more than five years before he made his discovery, Compton had analyzed X-ray scattering in terms of classical electrodynamics. I suggest that his colleague at Washington University in St. Louis, G. E. M. Jauncey (1888-1947), helped materially to persuade him to embrace the quantum interpretation of his X-ray scattering experiments.

  10. GAMCOTE: a prototype for an advanced Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Séréville, N.; Tatischeff, V.; Laurent, P.; Bertoli, W.; Brulin, G.; Dormard, J.-J.; Dosme, N.; Faul, T.; Genolini, B.; Gibelin, L.; Gostojić, A.; Grave, X.; Hamadache, C.; Karkour, N.; Kiener, J.; Lafay, X.; Legay, E.; Limousin, O.; Linget, D.; Maier, D.; Oger, R.; Peyré, J.; Rauly, E.; Rosier, P.; Santos, C.; Torrentó, A.-S.; Le Ven, V.; Wanlin, E.

    2016-07-01

    Astronomy in the MeV gamma-ray band (0.1 - 100 MeV) holds a rich promise for elucidating many fundamental questions concerning the most violent cosmic phenomena. The next generation of gamma-ray space instrument could be a Compton and pair-creation telescope made of two main parts: a silicon tracker optimized for Compton scattering of cosmic gamma rays and a calorimeter that absorbs the scattered photons. We present here the first results of GAMCOTE, a GAMma-ray COmpton TElescope prototype which includes thick double sided silicon strip detectors coupled to a LaBr3:Ce crystal read by a 64 multi-anode photomultiplier tube.

  11. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... fit, and maintain the right helmet for specific sports. Concussion Laws Learn about Return to Play and other ...

  12. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  13. Photoelectrosynthesis at semiconductor electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Nozik, A. J.

    1980-12-01

    The general principles of photoelectrochemistry and photoelectrosynthesis are reviewed and some new developments in photoelectrosynthesis are discussed. Topics include energetics of semiconductor-electrolyte interfaces(band-edge unpinning); hot carrier injection at illuminated semiconductor-electrolyte junctions; derivatized semiconductor electrodes; particulate photoelectrochemical systems; layered compounds and other new materials; and dye sensitization. (WHK)

  14. Semiconductor ohmic contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, F. Z.; Kressel, H.

    1977-01-01

    Contact formed on p-type surface of semiconductor laser has several advantages: highly conductive degenerate region and narrow band gap provides surface for good metal-to-semiconductor contact; lattice parameter of GaAs is 5.6533 A; improved lattice match eases interface strain which reduces interface cracking of semiconductor material.

  15. Theoretical Compton profile of diamond, boron nitride and carbon nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Julio C.; Quevedo, Carlos R.; Gomez, José M.; Di Rocco, Héctor O.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, we used the generalized gradient approximation method to determine the electron wave functions and theoretical Compton profiles of the following super-hard materials: diamond, boron nitride (h-BN), and carbon nitride in its two known phases: βC3N4 and gC3N4 . In the case of diamond and h-BN, we compared our theoretical results with available experimental data. In addition, we used the Compton profile results to determine cohesive energies and found acceptable agreement with previous experiments.

  16. Imaging Performance of the Si/Ge Hybrid Compton Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Cunningham, M; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Hull, E; Lange, D; Manini, H; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-10

    The point spread function (PSF) of a fully-instrumented silicon/germanium Compton telescope has been measured as a function of energy and angle. Overall, the resolution ranged from 3{sup o} to 4{sup o} FWHM over most of the energy range and field of view. The various contributions to the resolution have been quantified. These contributions include the energy uncertainty and position uncertainty of the detector; source energy; Doppler broadening; and the 1/r broadening characteristic of Compton back-projection. Furthermore, a distortion of the PSF is observed for sources imaged off-axis from the detector. These contributions are discussed and compared to theory and simulations.

  17. Next Generation Laser-Compton Gamma-ray Beam Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying

    2014-09-01

    Since late 1970s, laser driven Compton gamma-ray beam facilities have been developed, contradicted and operated around the world for basic science research in nuclear physics and astrophysics, and for applied research in the areas of national security and industrial applications. Currently, TUNL's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) located at Duke University campus is the most intense Compton gamma-ray beam facility dedicated for scientific research. Driven by a high power storage ring Free-Electron Laser (FEL), HIGS produces nearly monochromatic, highly polarized gamma-ray beams from 1 to 100 MeV, with its peak performance of total flux up to few 1E10 g/s and a spectral flux of more than 1E3 g/s/eV in the few MeV to 10 MeV region. The next generation Compton gamma-ray sources will be developed using advanced laser technologies. This talk will provide an overview of new Compton gamma-beam projects, including the ELI-NP (Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics) project in Romania and the HIGS upgrade project - HIGS2. Since late 1970s, laser driven Compton gamma-ray beam facilities have been developed, contradicted and operated around the world for basic science research in nuclear physics and astrophysics, and for applied research in the areas of national security and industrial applications. Currently, TUNL's High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) located at Duke University campus is the most intense Compton gamma-ray beam facility dedicated for scientific research. Driven by a high power storage ring Free-Electron Laser (FEL), HIGS produces nearly monochromatic, highly polarized gamma-ray beams from 1 to 100 MeV, with its peak performance of total flux up to few 1E10 g/s and a spectral flux of more than 1E3 g/s/eV in the few MeV to 10 MeV region. The next generation Compton gamma-ray sources will be developed using advanced laser technologies. This talk will provide an overview of new Compton gamma-beam projects, including the ELI-NP (Extreme Light

  18. A Compton scattering study of refractory niobium diborides.

    PubMed

    Bhamu, K C; Ahuja, B L

    2012-06-01

    Isotropic Compton profile of NbB(2) using 20 Ci (137)Cs Compton spectrometer is compared with our theoretical profiles obtained from the density functional theory (DFT) within the first and the second order generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and the hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT. A good agreement between GGA based profiles and the experiment validates the applicability of second order GGA in momentum densities. Energy bands, density of states and real space analysis of the experimental profile show metallic character of NbB(2).

  19. Compton scattering of blackbody photons by relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Pjanka, Patryk

    2013-12-01

    We present simple and accurate analytical formulas for the rates of Compton scattering by relativistic electrons integrated over the energy distribution of blackbody seed photons. Both anisotropic scattering, in which blackbody photons arriving from one direction are scattered by an anisotropic electron distribution into another direction, and scattering of isotropic seed photons are considered. Compton scattering by relativistic electrons off blackbody photons from either stars or cosmic microwave background takes place, in particular, in microquasars, colliding-wind binaries, supernova remnants, interstellar medium and the vicinity of the Sun.

  20. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    DOE PAGES

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factorsmore » $$H_{Im}$$ and $$\\tilde{H}_{Im}$$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.« less

  1. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Barbara L; Weiner, Leonard B

    2002-09-01

    Head lice infestation is associated with little morbidity but causes a high level of anxiety among parents of school-aged children. This statement attempts to clarify issues of diagnosis and treatment of head lice and makes recommendations for dealing with head lice in the school setting.

  2. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1997-05-27

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method are disclosed. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors. 9 figs.

  3. Unitary lens semiconductor device

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1997-01-01

    A unitary lens semiconductor device and method. The unitary lens semiconductor device is provided with at least one semiconductor layer having a composition varying in the growth direction for unitarily forming one or more lenses in the semiconductor layer. Unitary lens semiconductor devices may be formed as light-processing devices such as microlenses, and as light-active devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and resonant cavity photodetectors.

  4. A test of local Lorentz invariance with Compton scattering asymmetry

    DOE PAGES

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Narayan, Amrendra; Dutta, Dipangkar

    2016-12-14

    Here, we report on a measurement of the constancy and anisotropy of the speed of light relative to the electrons in photon-electron scattering. We also used the Compton scattering asymmetry measured by the new Compton polarimeter in Hall~C at Jefferson Lab to test for deviations from unity of the vacuum refractive index (more » $n$). For photon energies in the range of 9 - 46 MeV, we obtain a new limit of $$1-n < 1.4 \\times 10^{-8}$$. In addition, the absence of sidereal variation over the six month period of the measurement constrains any anisotropies in the speed of light. These constitute the first study of Lorentz invariance using Compton asymmetry. Within the minimal standard model extension framework, our result yield limits on the photon and electron coefficients $$\\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{YZ}, c_{TX}, \\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{ZX}$$, and $$c_{TY}$$. Though, these limits are several orders of magnitude larger than the current best limits, they demonstrate the feasibility of using Compton asymmetry for tests of Lorentz invariance. For future parity violating electron scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab we will use higher energy electrons enabling better constraints.« less

  5. A test of local Lorentz invariance with Compton scattering asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Narayan, Amrendra; Dutta, Dipangkar

    2016-12-14

    Here, we report on a measurement of the constancy and anisotropy of the speed of light relative to the electrons in photon-electron scattering. We also used the Compton scattering asymmetry measured by the new Compton polarimeter in Hall~C at Jefferson Lab to test for deviations from unity of the vacuum refractive index ($n$). For photon energies in the range of 9 - 46 MeV, we obtain a new limit of $1-n < 1.4 \\times 10^{-8}$. In addition, the absence of sidereal variation over the six month period of the measurement constrains any anisotropies in the speed of light. These constitute the first study of Lorentz invariance using Compton asymmetry. Within the minimal standard model extension framework, our result yield limits on the photon and electron coefficients $\\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{YZ}, c_{TX}, \\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{ZX}$, and $c_{TY}$. Though, these limits are several orders of magnitude larger than the current best limits, they demonstrate the feasibility of using Compton asymmetry for tests of Lorentz invariance. For future parity violating electron scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab we will use higher energy electrons enabling better constraints.

  6. Exploring the Dynamics of a Quantum-Mechanical Compton Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandes, Martin; Carretero, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    In 1913, when American physicist Arthur Compton was an undergraduate, he invented a simple way to measure the rotation rate of the Earth with a tabletop-sized experiment. The experiment consisted of a large diameter circular ring of thin glass tubing filled with water and oil droplets. After placing the ring in a plane perpendicular to the surface of the Earth and allowing the fluid mixture of oil and water to come to rest, he then abruptly rotated the ring, flipping it 180 degrees about an axis passing through its own plane. The result of the experiment was that the water acquired a measurable drift velocity due to the Coriolis effect arising from the daily rotation of the Earth about its own axis. Compton measured this induced drift velocity by observing the motion of the oil droplets in the water with a microscope. This device, which is now named after him, is known as a Compton generator. The fundamental research objective of this project is to explore the dynamics of a quantum-mechanical analogue to the classical Compton generator experiment through the use of numerical simulations. We present our preliminary results on this system and the future direction of the project. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation Grant Number ACI-1053575.

  7. Compton Community College Campus Climate Survey, Fall 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton Community Coll., CA.

    A campus climate survey was conducted at Compton Community College in California to assess students' attitudes towards departments, staff, and their experiences at the college. Questionnaires were administered in-class to 6% (n=308) of the study body. The 91-item questionnaire covered academic advising and counseling effectiveness; academic…

  8. A Non-Relativistic Look at the Compton Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Steve; Giri, Sandeep; Zakrasek, Nicholas; Affatigato, Mario

    2014-01-01

    In a usual modern physics class the Compton effect is used as the pedagogical model for introducing relativity into quantum effects. The shift in photon wavelengths is usually introduced and derived using special relativity. Indeed, this works well for explaining the effect. However, in the senior author's class one of the student coauthors…

  9. A Non-Relativistic Look at the Compton Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Steve; Giri, Sandeep; Zakrasek, Nicholas; Affatigato, Mario

    2014-01-01

    In a usual modern physics class the Compton effect is used as the pedagogical model for introducing relativity into quantum effects. The shift in photon wavelengths is usually introduced and derived using special relativity. Indeed, this works well for explaining the effect. However, in the senior author's class one of the student coauthors…

  10. Unification of synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, W.H.G.; Barber, D.P.; Chen, P.

    1995-03-24

    This article describes a new approach to radiation theory. This theory, expounded by Lieu and Axford, uses the concept of inverse Compton scattering to explain with unprecedented simplicity all the classical and quantum electrodynamic properties of synchrotron radiation, unifying two fundamental processes in physics. Ramifications of this theory are also discussed. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  11. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    SciTech Connect

    Defurne, Maxime

    2015-08-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q2=1.9 GeV2 effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed.

  12. Models of unsaturated Compton disks around supermassive black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P. T.; Thompson, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    Two inverse-Compton disk models for the hard X-ray spectra of quasi-stellar objects and active galactic nuclei are studied and compared. One is a slightly generalized version of the Shapiro, Lightman and Eardley optically thin disk model, and the other is a conduction-stabilized Corona model. Observational distinctions between the two models are discussed.

  13. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benesch, J.; Franklin, G. B.; Quinn, B. P.; Paschke, K. D.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab's Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5 T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.

  14. Gamma-spectrometry with Compton suppressed detectors arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Schueck, C.; Hannachi, F.; Chapman, R.; Lisle, J.C.; Mo, J.N.; Paul, E.; Love, D.J.G.; Nolan, P.J.; Nelson, A.H.; Walker, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent results of experiments performed with two different Compton-suppressed detectors arrays in Daresbury and Berkeley (/sup 163,164/Yb and /sup 154/Er, respectively), are presented together with a brief description of the national French array presently under construction in Strasbourg. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  15. A New Comptonization Model for Weakly Magnetized Accreting NS LMXBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paizis, A.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.; Frontera, F.; Cocchi, M.; Ferrigno, C.

    2009-05-01

    We have developed a new Comptonization model to propose, for the first time, a self consistent physical interpretation of the complex spectral evolution seen in NS LMXBs. The model and its application to LMXBs are presented and compared to the Simbol-X expected capabilities.

  16. On the Compton scattering redistribution function in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Różańska, A.; Majczyna, A.; Należyty, M.

    2017-08-01

    Compton scattering is the dominant opacity source in hot neutron stars, accretion discs around black holes and hot coronae. We collected here a set of numerical expressions of the Compton scattering redistribution functions (RFs) for unpolarized radiation, which are more exact than the widely used Kompaneets equation. The principal aim of this paper is the presentation of the RF by Guilbert, which is corrected for the computational errors in the original paper. This corrected RF was used in the series of papers on model atmosphere computations of hot neutron stars. We have also organized four existing algorithms for the RF computations into a unified form ready to use in radiative transfer and model atmosphere codes. The exact method by Nagirner & Poutanen was numerically compared to all other algorithms in a very wide spectral range from hard X-rays to radio waves. Sample computations of the Compton scattering RFs in thermal plasma were done for temperatures corresponding to the atmospheres of bursting neutron stars and hot intergalactic medium. Our formulae are also useful to study the Compton scattering of unpolarized microwave background radiation in hot intracluster gas and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We conclude that the formulae by Guilbert and the exact quantum mechanical formulae yield practically the same RFs for gas temperatures relevant to the atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars, T ≤ 108 K.

  17. Models of unsaturated Compton disks around supermassive black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E. P. T.; Thompson, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    Two inverse-Compton disk models for the hard X-ray spectra of quasi-stellar objects and active galactic nuclei are studied and compared. One is a slightly generalized version of the Shapiro, Lightman and Eardley optically thin disk model, and the other is a conduction-stabilized Corona model. Observational distinctions between the two models are discussed.

  18. A test of local Lorentz invariance with Compton scattering asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Narayan, Amrendra; Dutta, Dipangkar

    2016-11-01

    We report on a measurement of the constancy and anisotropy of the speed of light relative to the electrons in photon-electron scattering. We used the Compton scattering asymmetry measured by the new Compton polarimeter in Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab) to test for deviations from unity of the vacuum refractive index (n). For photon energies in the range of 9-46 MeV, we obtain a new limit of 1 - n < 1.4 × 10-8. In addition, the absence of sidereal variation over the six-month period of the measurement constrains any anisotropies in the speed of light. These constitute the first study of Lorentz invariance (LI) using Compton asymmetry. Within the minimal Standard Model extension (MSME) framework, our result yield limits on the photon and electron coefficients κ˜0+Y Z, cTX, κ˜0+ZX and cTY. Although these limits are several orders of magnitude larger than the current best limits, they demonstrate the feasibility of using Compton asymmetry for tests of LI. Future parity-violating electron-scattering experiments at JLab will use higher energy electrons enabling better constraints.

  19. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Benesch, Jay F.; Franklin, Gregg B.; Quinn, Brian P.; ...

    2015-11-30

    Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab’s Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5more » T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR) from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.« less

  20. Gamma-ray bursts from synchrotron self-Compton emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Boris E.; Poutanen, Juri

    2004-08-01

    The emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still a matter of debate. The standard synchrotron energy spectrum of cooling electrons FE~E-1/2 is much too soft to account for the majority of the observed spectral slopes. An alternative in the form of quasi-thermal Comptonization in a high-compactness source has difficulties in reproducing the peak of the observed photon distribution below a few hundred keV. We show here that for typical parameters expected in the GRB ejecta the observed spectra in the 20-1000 keV energy range can be produced by inverse Compton scattering of the synchrotron radiation in a partially self-absorbed regime. If the particles are continuously accelerated/heated over the lifetime of a source rather than being instantly injected, a prominent peak develops in their distribution at a Lorentz factor γ~ 30-100, where synchrotron and inverse-Compton losses are balanced by acceleration and heating due to synchrotron self-absorption. The synchrotron peak should be observed at 10-100 eV, whereas the self-absorbed low-energy tail with FE~E2 can produce the prompt optical emission (as in the case of GRB 990123). The first Compton scattering radiation by nearly monoenergetic electrons can then be as hard as FE~E1, reproducing the hardness of most of the observed GRB spectra. The second Compton peak should be observed in the high-energy gamma-ray band, possibly being responsible for the 10-100 MeV emission detected in GRB 941017. A significant electron-positron pair production reduces the available energy per particle, moving the spectral peaks to lower energies as the burst progresses. The regime is very robust, operates in a broad range of parameter space and can explain most of the observed GRB spectra and their temporal evolution.

  1. Measuring multimegavolt pulsed voltages using Compton-generated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.; Pereira, N. R.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Young, F. C.

    2004-01-01

    The "Compton-Hall" voltmeter is a radiation-based voltage diagnostic that has been developed to measure voltages on high-power (TW) pulsed generators. The instrument collimates photons generated from bremsstrahlung produced in the diode onto an aluminum target to generate Compton-generated electrons. Permanent magnets bend the Compton electron orbits that escape the target toward a silicon pin diode detector. A GaAs photoconductive detector (PCD) detects photons that pass through the Compton target. The diode voltage is determined from the ratio of the electron dose in the pin detector to the x-ray dose in the PCD. The Integrated Tiger Series of electron-photon transport codes is used to determine the relationship between the measured dose ratio and the diode voltage. Variations in the electron beam's angle of incidence on the bremsstrahlung target produce changes in the shape of the photon spectrum that lead to large variations in the voltage inferred from the voltmeter. The voltage uncertainty is minimized when the voltmeter is fielded at an angle of 45° with respect to the bremsstrahlung target. In this position, the photon spectra for different angles of incidence all converge onto a single spectrum reducing the uncertainty in the voltage to less than 10% for voltages below 4 MV. Higher and lower voltages than the range considered in this article can be measured by adjusting the strength of the applied magnetic field or the position of the electron detector relative to the Compton target. The instrument was fielded on the Gamble II pulsed-power generator configured with a plasma opening switch. Measurements produced a time-dependent voltage with a peak (3.7 MV) that agrees with nuclear activation measurements and a pulse shape that is consistent with the measured radiation pulse shape.

  2. A Practical Review of the Kompaneets Equation and its Application to Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    D.G. Shirk

    2006-05-15

    In this study, we explore both inverse Compton and Compton scattering processes using the Chang and Cooper scheme to form a deterministic solution of the Kompaneets equation. We examine the individual terms of the Kompaneets equation and illustrate their effect on the equilibrium solution. We use two examples (a Gaussian line profile and a Planck profile) to illustrate the advective and diffusive properties of the Kompaneets operator. We also explore both inverse Compton scattering and Compton scattering, and discuss and illustrate the Bose-Einstein condensation feature of the Compton scattering spectrum.

  3. Direct conversion semiconductor detectors in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Joshua W.; Gu, Yi; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-05-01

    Semiconductor detectors are playing an increasing role in ongoing research to improve image resolution, contrast, and quantitative accuracy in preclinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET). These detectors serve as a medium for direct detection of annihilation photons. Early clinical translation of this technology has shown improvements in image quality and tumor delineation for head and neck cancers, relative to conventional scintillator-based systems. After a brief outline of the basics of PET imaging and the physical detection mechanisms for semiconductor detectors, an overview of ongoing detector development work is presented. The capabilities of semiconductor-based PET systems and the current state of these devices are discussed.

  4. Semirelativity in semiconductors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Wlodek

    2017-09-01

    An analogy between behavior of electrons in narrow-gap semiconductors (NGS) and relativistic electrons in vacuum is reviewed. Energy band structures \\varepsilon ≤ft(\\mathbf{k}\\right) are considered for various NGS materials and their correspondence to the energy-momentum relation in special relativity is emphasized. It is indicated that special relativity for vacuum is analogous to a two-band \\mathbf{k}\\centerdot \\mathbf{p} description for NGS. The maximum electron velocity in NGS is u≃ 1× {{10}8}~\\text{cm}~{{\\text{s}}-1} , which corresponds to the light velocity in vacuum. An effective mass of charge carriers in semiconductors is introduced, relating their velocity to quasimomentum and it is shown that this mass depends on electron energy (or velocity) in a way similar to the mass of free relativistic electrons. In \\text{H}{{\\text{g}}1-x}\\text{C}{{\\text{d}}x}\\text{Te} alloys one can reach vanishing energy gap at which electrons and light holes become three-dimensional massless Dirac fermions. A wavelength {λz} is defined for NGS, in analogy to the Compton wavelength in relativistic quantum mechanics. It is estimated that {λz} is on the order of tens of Angstroms in typical semiconducting materials which is experimentally confirmed in tunneling experiments on energy dispersion in the forbidden gap. Statistical properties of the electron gas in NGS are calculated and their similarity is demonstrated to those of the Juttner gas of relativistic particles. Interband electron tunneling in NGS is described and shown to be in close analogy to the predicted but unobserved tunneling between negative and positive energies resulting from the Dirac equation for free electrons. It is demonstrated that the relativistic analogy holds for orbital and spin properties of electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field. In particular, it is shown that the spin magnetic moment of both NGS electrons and relativistic electrons approaches zero with increasing

  5. Semirelativity in semiconductors: a review.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Wlodek

    2017-09-20

    An analogy between behavior of electrons in narrow-gap semiconductors (NGS) and relativistic electrons in vacuum is reviewed. Energy band structures [Formula: see text] are considered for various NGS materials and their correspondence to the energy-momentum relation in special relativity is emphasized. It is indicated that special relativity for vacuum is analogous to a two-band [Formula: see text] description for NGS. The maximum electron velocity in NGS is [Formula: see text], which corresponds to the light velocity in vacuum. An effective mass of charge carriers in semiconductors is introduced, relating their velocity to quasimomentum and it is shown that this mass depends on electron energy (or velocity) in a way similar to the mass of free relativistic electrons. In [Formula: see text] alloys one can reach vanishing energy gap at which electrons and light holes become three-dimensional massless Dirac fermions. A wavelength [Formula: see text] is defined for NGS, in analogy to the Compton wavelength in relativistic quantum mechanics. It is estimated that [Formula: see text] is on the order of tens of Angstroms in typical semiconducting materials which is experimentally confirmed in tunneling experiments on energy dispersion in the forbidden gap. Statistical properties of the electron gas in NGS are calculated and their similarity is demonstrated to those of the Juttner gas of relativistic particles. Interband electron tunneling in NGS is described and shown to be in close analogy to the predicted but unobserved tunneling between negative and positive energies resulting from the Dirac equation for free electrons. It is demonstrated that the relativistic analogy holds for orbital and spin properties of electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field. In particular, it is shown that the spin magnetic moment of both NGS electrons and relativistic electrons approaches zero with increasing energy. This conclusion is confirmed experimentally for NGS. Electrons

  6. Coherent spectroscopy of semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Steven T

    2008-03-31

    The coherent optical response of semiconductors has been the subject of substantial research over the last couple of decades. The interest has been motivated by unique aspects of the interaction between light and semiconductors that are revealed by coherent techniques. The ability to probe the dynamics of charge carriers has been a significant driver. This paper presents a review of selected results in coherent optical spectroscopy of semiconductors.

  7. Semiconductor microcavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.; Warren, M.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1994-02-01

    New kinds of semiconductor microcavity lasers are being created by modern semiconductor technologies like molecular beam epitaxy and electron beam lithography. These new microcavities exploit 3-dimensional architectures possible with epitaxial layering and surface patterning. The physical properties of these microcavities are intimately related to the geometry imposed on the semiconductor materials. Among these microcavities are surface-emitting structures which have many useful properties for commercial purposes. This paper reviews the basic physics of these microstructured lasers.

  8. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-01-19

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length. 3 figs.

  9. Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Grubelich, Mark C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length.

  10. Interconnected semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Grimmer, Derrick P.; Paulson, Kenneth R.; Gilbert, James R.

    1990-10-23

    Semiconductor layer and conductive layer formed on a flexible substrate, divided into individual devices and interconnected with one another in series by interconnection layers and penetrating terminals.

  11. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Ortega, P G; Torres-Espallardo, I; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Gillam, J E; Lacasta, C; Llosá, G; Oliver, J F; Sala, P R; Solevi, P; Rafecas, M

    2015-03-07

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the reconstruction inverse problem. Jointly with prompt gamma, secondary neutrons and scattered photons, not strongly correlated with the dose map, can also reach the imaging detector and produce false events. These events deteriorate the image quality. Also, high intensity beams can produce particle accumulation in the camera, which lead to an increase of random coincidences, meaning events which gather measurements from different incoming particles. The noise scenario is expected to be different if double or triple events are used, and consequently, the reconstructed images can be affected differently by spurious data. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of false events in the reconstructed image, evaluating their impact in the determination of the beam particle ranges. A simulation study that includes misidentified events (neutrons and random coincidences) in the final image of a Compton Telescope for PT monitoring is presented. The complete chain of

  12. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, P. G.; Torres-Espallardo, I.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Gillam, J. E.; Lacasta, C.; Llosá, G.; Oliver, J. F.; Sala, P. R.; Solevi, P.; Rafecas, M.

    2015-02-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the reconstruction inverse problem. Jointly with prompt gamma, secondary neutrons and scattered photons, not strongly correlated with the dose map, can also reach the imaging detector and produce false events. These events deteriorate the image quality. Also, high intensity beams can produce particle accumulation in the camera, which lead to an increase of random coincidences, meaning events which gather measurements from different incoming particles. The noise scenario is expected to be different if double or triple events are used, and consequently, the reconstructed images can be affected differently by spurious data. The aim of the present work is to study the effect of false events in the reconstructed image, evaluating their impact in the determination of the beam particle ranges. A simulation study that includes misidentified events (neutrons and random coincidences) in the final image of a Compton Telescope for PT monitoring is presented. The complete chain of

  13. Performance evaluation of MACACO: a multilayer Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Barrio, John; Etxebeste, Ane; Ortega, Pablo G.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2017-09-01

    Compton imaging devices have been proposed and studied for a wide range of applications. We have developed a Compton camera prototype which can be operated with two or three detector layers based on monolithic lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 ) crystals coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), to be used for proton range verification in hadron therapy. In this work, we present the results obtained with our prototype in laboratory tests with radioactive sources and in simulation studies. Images of a 22 Na and an 88 Y radioactive sources have been successfully reconstructed. The full width half maximum of the reconstructed images is below 4 mm for a 22 Na source at a distance of 5 cm.

  14. Development of Compton Radiography Diagnostics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D S; Izumi, N; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Delettrez, J; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C

    2010-11-16

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60-200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton Radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {micro}m and {approx}10ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  15. The Compton-thick Growth of Supermassive Black Holes constrained

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Johannes; Georgakakis, Antonis; Nandra, Kirpal; Brightman, Murray; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Liu, Zhu; Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Rangel, Cyprian; Aird, James

    2017-08-01

    A heavily obscured growth phase of supermassive black holes (SMBH) is thought to be important in the co-evolution with galaxies. X-rays provide a clean and efficient selection of unobscured and obscured AGN. Recent work with deeper observations and improved analysis methodology allowed us to extend constraints to Compton-thick number densities. We present the first luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN at z=0.5-4 and constrain the overall mass density locked into black holes over cosmic time, a fundamental constraint for cosmological simulations. Recent studies including ours find that the obscuration is redshift and luminosity-dependent in a complex way, which rules out entire sets of obscurer models. A new paradigm, the radiation-lifted torus model, is proposed, in which the obscurer is Eddington-rate dependent and accretion creates and displaces torus clouds. We place observational limits on the behaviour of this mechanism.

  16. Wave-particle duality of radiation in Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisk, Krunoslav; Kaliman, Zoran; Erceg, Nataša

    2016-12-01

    In this work we analyze the wave-particle aspects of radiation in (incoherent) Compton scattering in the radiation energy range from 2-100 keV. From the calculated cross sections of the scattering from the electron (positron), hydrogen and positronium we construct the interpretation functions (IFs), where our assertion is that the Compton scattering from the free electron (positron) is an established example of the particle behavior of radiation. These IFs estimate the possibility of the interpretation of radiation in terms of waves or particles in an analogy with the analysis carried out in the coherent scattering of light. Based on these IFs we propose a new criterion for the estimation of the validity of the impulse approximation (IA).

  17. Modeling the Compton Hump Reverberation Observed in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoormann, Janie; Beheshtipour, Banafsheh; Krawczynski, Henric

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, observations of the Iron K alpha reverberation in supermassive black holes have provided a new way to probe the inner accretion flow. Furthermore, a time lag between the direct coronal emission and the reprocessed emission forming the Compton Hump in AGN has been observed. In order to model this Compton Hump reverberation we performed general relativistic ray tracing studies of the accretion disk surrounding supermassive black holes, taking into account both the radial and angular dependence of the ionization parameter. We are able to model emission not only from a lamp-post corona but also implementing 3D corona geometries. Using these results we are able to model the observed data to gain additional insight into the geometry of the corona and the structure of the inner accretion disk.

  18. A nonlinear plasma retroreflector for single pulse Compton backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Kaganovich, D.; Gordon, D.; Hafizi, B.; Helle, M.; Penano, J.; Ting, A.

    2015-02-01

    Compton scattered x-rays can be generated using a configuration consisting of a single ultrashort laser pulse and a shaped gas target. Upon ionization the gas target serves as a plasma mirror that reflects the incident pulse providing a counter-propagating electromagnetic wiggler. While plasma mirrors are often conceived as linear Fresnel reflectors, we demonstrate that for high-intensity, ultrashort laser pulses the reflection results from two distinct nonlinear mechanisms. At lower densities, the reflection arises from the emission of an electromagnetic pulse during the saturation of the absolute Raman instability at the quarter critical surface. At higher densities the reflection of the pulse from the critical surface sets up a density fluctuation that acts as a Bragg-like reflector. These mechanisms, occurring in a non-perturbative regime of laser-plasma interactions, are examined numerically in order to characterize the Compton scattered radiation.

  19. Low-Intensity Nonlinear Spectral Effects in Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Siders, C W; Barty, C P

    2010-02-23

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized 4-potential, A = e{radical}-A{sub {mu}}A{sup {mu}}/m{sub 0}c approaches unity. In this letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse, {Delta}{phi}{sup -1}, is sufficiently small to satisfy A{sup 2} {Delta}{phi} {approx_equal} 1. A three dimensional analysis, based on a local plane-wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources.

  20. Inverse-Compton gamma rays in the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemen, J. B. G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Compton gamma rays with energies 1 MeV largely results from scattering between electrons, with energies 100 MeV, and photons in the optical and infrared range and the 2.7 K universal blackbody radiation. An empirical model of the inverse Compton (IC) gamma ray production in the Galaxy is presented, using the most recent estimate of the interstellar electron spectrum given by Webber and a combination of optical and infrared observations to determine the galactic distribution of the various components of the interstellar photon field. The present analysis has an improved precision since the spectral distribution of the IC source function as well as that of the interstellar photon field are more accurately taken into account. The exact evaluation of the IC process is applied and different electron distribution models are considered.

  1. Compton profile study of polycrystalline ZnBr{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Dhaka, M. S.; Sharma, G.; Mishra, M. C.; Kothari, R. K.; Sharma, B. K.

    2010-12-01

    The first ever Compton profile study of polycrystalline ZnBr{sub 2} is presented in this paper. The measurement of polycrystalline sample of ZnBr{sub 2} is performed using 59.54 keV gamma-rays emanating from an {sup 241}Am radioisotope. Theoretical calculations are performed following the Ionic model calculations for a number of configurations Zn{sup +x}Br{sub 2}{sup -x/2}(0.0{<=}x{<=}2.0 in step of 0.5) utilizing free atom profiles. The ionic model suggest transfer of 2.0 electrons from 4 s state of Zn to 4 p state of two Br atoms. The autocorrelation function B(z) is also derived from experiment and the most favoured ionic valence Compton profiles.

  2. External inverse-Compton Emission from Blazar Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Jennifer E.; Chiang, James; /SLAC

    2007-09-25

    According to leptonic models for the high-energy emission from blazars, relativistic electrons in the inner jets inverse-Compton scatter photons from a variety of sources. Seed photons are certainly introduced via the synchrotron process from the electrons themselves, but external sources of seed photons may also be present. In this paper, we present detailed derivations of the equations describing external inverse-Compton scattering from two sources of seed photons: direct emission from the accretion disk, and accretion disk photons that have scattered off the broad line region. For each source, we derive the seed photon spectrum incident on the jet, the single electron energy loss rate, and the emitted photon spectrum.

  3. Development of Compton radiography of inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hey, D. S.; Iglesias, C.; Izumi, N.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Sorce, C.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2011-05-15

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60 to 200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {mu}m and {approx}10 ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D nonuniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  4. COMPACT, TUNABLE COMPTON SCATTERING GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C J; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2009-08-20

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable gamma-ray source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by the linac interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. The source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence lines in various isotopes; applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented.

  5. Performance evaluation of MACACO: a multilayer Compton camera.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Enrique; Barrio, John; Etxebeste, Ane; Ortega, Pablo G; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2017-08-22

    Compton imaging devices have been proposed and studied for a wide range of applications. We have developed a Compton camera prototype which can be operated with two or three detector layers based on monolithic lanthanum bromide ([Formula: see text]) crystals coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), to be used for proton range verification in hadron therapy. In this work, we present the results obtained with our prototype in laboratory tests with radioactive sources and in simulation studies. Images of a [Formula: see text]Na and an [Formula: see text]Y radioactive sources have been successfully reconstructed. The full width half maximum of the reconstructed images is below 4 mm for a [Formula: see text]Na source at a distance of 5 cm.

  6. Hybrid Compton camera/coded aperture imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Mihailescu, Lucian [Livermore, CA; Vetter, Kai M [Alameda, CA

    2012-04-10

    A system in one embodiment includes an array of radiation detectors; and an array of imagers positioned behind the array of detectors relative to an expected trajectory of incoming radiation. A method in another embodiment includes detecting incoming radiation with an array of radiation detectors; detecting the incoming radiation with an array of imagers positioned behind the array of detectors relative to a trajectory of the incoming radiation; and performing at least one of Compton imaging using at least the imagers and coded aperture imaging using at least the imagers. A method in yet another embodiment includes detecting incoming radiation with an array of imagers positioned behind an array of detectors relative to a trajectory of the incoming radiation; and performing Compton imaging using at least the imagers.

  7. Precise polarization measurements via detection of compton scattered electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Dutta, Dipangkar; Gaskell, David J.; Narayan, Amrendra

    2014-01-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low Q{sup 2} of a longitudinally polarized electron beam off a proton target. One of the dominant experimental systematic uncertainties in Qweak will result from determining the beam polarization. A new Compton polarimeter was installed in the fall of 2010 to provide a non-invasive and continuous monitoring of the electron beam polarization in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The Compton-scattered electrons are detected in four planes of diamond micro-strip detectors. We have achieved the design goals of <1% statistical uncertainty per hour and expect to achieve <1% systematic uncertainty.

  8. Back Compton Scattering in Strong Uniform Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W.; Huang Wei; Yan Mulin

    2006-11-02

    In this paper, we show that there is a Non-Commutative Plane (NCP) in the perpendicular magnetic fields in the accelerator, and the QED with NCP (QED-NCP) has been formulated. Being similar to the theory of quantum Hall effects, an effective filling factor f(B) is introduced, which characters the possibility occupied the LLL state by the electrons living on NCP. The back Compton scattering amplitudes of QED-NCP are derived, and the differential cross sections for the process with fixed initial polarizing electrons and photons are calculated. We propose to precisely measure the polarization dependent differential cross sections of the back Compton scattering in the perpendicular magnetic fields experimentally, which may lead to reveal the effects of QED with NCP. This should be interesting and remarkable. The existing Spring-8's data have been analyzed primitively, and some hints for QED-NCP effects are seen.

  9. Compton scattering off proton in the third resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xu; Lenske, H.

    2017-09-01

    Compton scattering off the proton in the third resonance region is analyzed for the first time, owing to the full combined analysis of pion- and photo-induced reactions in a coupled-channel effective Lagrangian model with K-matrix approximation. Two isospin I = 3 / 2 resonances D33 (1700) and F35 (1930) are found to be essential in the range of 1.6-1.8 GeV. The recent beam asymmetry data of Compton scattering from the GRAAL facility are used to determine the helicity couplings of these resonances, and strong constraints are coming also from πN and KΣ photoproduction data. The possible spin and parity of new narrow resonances is discussed.

  10. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Po-Chun

    The state-of-the-art X-ray source based on inverse-Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam produced by an X-band RF accelerator and a high-intensity laser pulse generated by chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) has been carried out by our research team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This system is called "Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source". The applications include nuclear resonance fluorescence, medical imaging and therapy, and nuclear waste imaging and assay. One of the key factors in this system is how we know the interaction happened in the vacuum chamber, which is the spectrometer of electron beams. The other key factor is the interaction after the spectrometer, which is the outgoing X-ray. In this thesis, the work in the simulation for the result of the interaction between electrons and the laser, the calibration of spectrometer, and laser focus characterization are discussed.

  11. Molecular Semiconductors: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mello, John; Halls, Jonathan James Michael

    2005-10-01

    Introducing the fundamental ideas and concepts behind organic semiconductors, this book provides a clear impression of the broad range of research activities currently underway. Aimed specifically at new entrant doctoral students from a wide variety of backgrounds, including chemistry, physics, electrical engineering and materials science, it also represents an ideal companion text to undergraduate courses in organic semiconductors.

  12. The Construction of Compton Tensors in Scalar QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Bernard L. G.; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2017-01-01

    Current conservation is a vital condition in electrodynamics. We review the literature concerning the ways to ensure that the formalism used in calculating amplitudes for the scattering of charged particles is in compliance with current conservation. For the case of electron scattering off a scalar and a spin-1/2 target as well as Compton scattering on a scalar target, we present some novelties besides reviewing the literature.

  13. Detection of detachments and inhomogeneities in frescos by Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, A.; Cesareo, R.; Buccolieri, G.; Donativi, M.; Palamà, F.; Quarta, S.; De Nunzio, G.; Brunetti, A.; Marabelli, M.; Santamaria, U.

    2005-07-01

    A mobile instrument has been developed for the detection and mapping of detachments in frescos by using Compton back scattered photons. The instrument is mainly composed of a high energy X-ray tube, an X-ray detection system and a translation table. The instrument was first applied to samples simulating various detachment situations, and then transferred to the Vatican Museum to detect detachments and inhomogeneities in the stanza di Eliodoro, one of the "Raphael's stanze".

  14. 4π FOV compact Compton camera for nuclear material investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonho; Lee, Taewoong

    2011-10-01

    A compact Compton camera with a 4π field of view (FOV) was manufactured using the design parameters optimized with the effective choice of gamma-ray interaction order determined from a Monte Carlo simulation. The camera consisted of six CsI(Na) planar scintillators with a pixelized structure that was coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (H8500) consisting of multiple anodes connected to custom-made circuits. The size of the scintillator and each pixel was 4.4×4.4×0.5 and 0.2×0.2×0.5 cm, respectively. The total size of each detection module was only 5×5×6 cm and the distance between the detector modules was approximately 10 cm to maximize the camera performance, as calculated by the simulation. Therefore, the camera is quite portable for examining nuclear materials in areas, such as harbors or nuclear power plants. The non-uniformity of the multi-anode PMTs was corrected using a novel readout circuit. Amplitude information of the signals from the electronics attached to the scintillator-coupled multi-anode PMTs was collected using a data acquisition board (cDAQ-9178), and the timing information was sent to a FPGA (SPARTAN3E). The FPGA picked the rising edges of the timing signals, and compared the edges of the signals from six detection modules to select the coincident signal from a Compton pair only. The output of the FPGA triggered the DAQ board to send the effective Compton events to a computer. The Compton image was reconstructed, and the performance of the 4π FOV Compact camera was examined.

  15. Dual color x-rays from Thomson or Compton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Ferrario, M.; Maroli, C.; Rau, J. V.; Ronsivalle, C.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Venturelli, M.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the possibility of producing two color X or γ radiation by Thomson/Compton back-scattering between a high intensity laser pulse and a two-energy level electron beam, constituted by a couple of beamlets separated in time and/or energy obtained by a photoinjector with comb laser techniques and linac velocity bunching. The parameters of the Thomson source at SPARC_LAB have been simulated, proposing a set of values for a realistic experiments.

  16. Dual color x rays from Thomson or Compton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Ferrario, M.; Gatti, G.; Maroli, C.; Rau, J. V.; Ronsivalle, C.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Venturelli, M.

    2014-02-01

    We analyze the possibility of producing two-color x or γ radiation by Thomson/Compton backscattering between a high intensity laser pulse and a two-energy level electron beam, constituted by a couple of beamlets separated in time and/or energy obtained by a photoinjector with comb laser techniques and linac velocity bunching. The parameters of the Thomson source at SPARC_LAB have been simulated, proposing a set of realistic experiments.

  17. The electromagnetic calorimeter in JLab Real Compton Scattering Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Shahinyan; Eugene Chudakov; A. Danagoulian; P. Degtyarenko; K. Egiyan; V. Gorbenko; J. Hines; E. Hovhannisyan; Ch. Hyde; C.W. de Jager; A. Ketikyan; V. Mamyan; R. Michaels; A.M. Nathan; V. Nelyubin; I. Rachek; M. Roedelbrom; A. Petrosyan; R. Pomatsalyuk; V. Popov; J. Segal; Yu. Shestakov; J. Templon; H. Voskanyan; B. Wojtsekhowski

    2007-04-16

    A hodoscope calorimeter comprising of 704 lead-glass blocks is described. The calorimeter was constructed for use in the JLab Real Compton Scattering experiment. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6\\%/$\\sqrt{E_\\gamma \\, [GeV]}$, respectively. Design features and performance parameters during the experiment are presented.

  18. The Compton-Schwarzschild correspondence from extended de Broglie relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Carr, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    The Compton wavelength gives the minimum radius within which the mass of a particle may be localized due to quantum effects, while the Schwarzschild radius gives the maximum radius within which the mass of a black hole may be localized due to classial gravity. In a mass-radius diagram, the two lines intersect near the Planck point ( l P , m P ), where quantum gravity effects become significant. Since canonical (non-gravitational) quantum mechanics is based on the concept of wave-particle duality, encapsulated in the de Broglie relations, these relations should break down near ( l P , m P ). It is unclear what physical interpretation can be given to quantum particles with energy E ≫ m P c 2, since they correspond to wavelengths λ ≪ l P or time periods τ ≪ t P in the standard theory. We therefore propose a correction to the standard de Broglie relations, which gives rise to a modified Schrödinger equation and a modified expression for the Compton wavelength, which may be extended into the region E ≫ m P c 2. For the proposed modification, we recover the expression for the Schwarzschild radius for E ≫ m P c 2 and the usual Compton formula for E ≪ m P c 2. The sign of the inequality obtained from the uncertainty principle reverses at m ≈ m P , so that the Compton wavelength and event horizon size may be interpreted as minimum and maximum radii, respectively. We interpret the additional terms in the modified de Broglie relations as representing the self-gravitation of the wave packet.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.; Goulding, Frederick S.

    1991-01-01

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons Compton backscattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to monimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1988-03-11

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Deeply virtual Compton scattering: How to test handbag dominance?

    SciTech Connect

    Gousset, T.; Diehl, M.; Ralston, J. P.

    1998-05-29

    We propose detailed tests of the handbag approximation in exclusive deeply virtual Compton scattering. Those tests make no use of any prejudice about parton correlations in the proton which are basically unknown objects and beyond the scope of perturbative QCD. Since important information on the proton substructure can be gained in the regime of light cone dominance we consider that such a class of tests is of special relevance.

  2. Deeply virtual Compton scattering: How to test handbag dominance?

    SciTech Connect

    Gousset, T.; Gousset, T.; Diehl, M.; Pire, B.; Diehl, M.

    1998-05-01

    We propose detailed tests of the handbag approximation in exclusive deeply virtual Compton scattering. Those tests make no use of any prejudice about parton correlations in the proton which are basically unknown objects and beyond the scope of perturbative QCD. Since important information on the proton substructure can be gained in the regime of light cone dominance we consider that such a class of tests is of special relevance. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of virtual Compton scattering below pion threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, P.; Van Hoorebeke, L.; Fonvieille, H.; D'Hose, N.; Bertin, P. Y.; Bensafa, I.; Degrande, N.; Distler, M.; Di Salvo, R.; Doria, L.; Friedrich, J. M.; Friedrich, J.; Hyde-Wright, Ch.; Jaminion, S.; Kerhoas, S.; Laveissière, G.; Lhuillier, D.; Marchand, D.; Merkel, H.; Roche, J.; Tamas, G.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Van de Vyver, R.; Van de Wiele, J.; Walcher, Th.

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes the Monte Carlo simulation developed specifically for the Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) experiments below pion threshold that have been performed at MAMI and JLab. This simulation generates events according to the (Bethe-Heitler + Born) cross-section behaviour and takes into account all relevant resolution-deteriorating effects. It determines the "effective" solid angle for the various experimental settings which are used for the precise determination of the photon electroproduction absolute cross-section.

  4. Gamma-Deuteron Compton Scattering in Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jiunn-Wei Chen; Harald W. Griesshammer; Martin J. Savage; Roxanne P. Springer

    1998-12-01

    The differential cross section for {gamma}-deuteron Compton scattering is computed to next-to-leading order (NLO) in an effective field theory that describes nucleon-nucleon interactions below the pion production threshold. Contributions at NLO include the nucleon isoscalar electric polarizability from its 1/m{sub {pi}} behavior in the chiral limit. The parameter free prediction of the {gamma}-deuteron differential cross section at NLO is in good agreement with data.

  5. Compton Observatory OSSE Studies of Supernovae and Novae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    Washington DC 20024 ABSTRACT A primary objective of the Compton Observatory is the direct study of explo- sive nucleosynthesis in supernovae and classical...our best chance to detect -rays from 22Na, a unique nucleosynthesis byproduct of the explosive hydrogen burning thought to power classical novae. The...radio, x-ray), or might go into PdV work. As for the last two e ects in the list, we doubt, based on straightforward nucleosynthesis arguments,9 that

  6. Coded-Aperture Compton Camera for Gamma-Ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Aaron M.; Williams, John G.

    2016-02-01

    A novel gamma-ray imaging system is demonstrated, by means of Monte Carlo simulation. Previous designs have used either a coded aperture or Compton scattering system to image a gamma-ray source. By taking advantage of characteristics of each of these systems a new design can be implemented that does not require a pixelated stopping detector. Use of the system is illustrated for a simulated radiation survey in a decontamination and decommissioning operation.

  7. An electromagnetic calorimeter for the JLab real compton scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. J.; Shahinyan, A.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Chang, T.-H.; Chudakov, E.; Danagoulian, A.; Degtyarenko, P.; Egiyan, K.; Gilman, R.; Gorbenko, V.; Hines, J.; Hovhannisyan, E.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; de Jager, C. W.; Ketikyan, A.; Mamyan, V. H.; Michaels, R.; Nathan, A. M.; Nelyubin, V.; Rachek, I.; Roedelbrom, M.; Petrosyan, A.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Popov, V.; Segal, J.; Shestakov, Y.; Templon, J.; Voskanyan, H.

    2011-07-01

    A lead-glass hodoscope calorimeter that was constructed for use in the Jefferson Lab Real Compton Scattering experiment is described. The detector provides a measurement of the coordinates and the energy of scattered photons in the GeV energy range with resolutions of 5 mm and 6%/ √{Eγ GeV}. Features of both the detector design and its performance in the high luminosity environment during the experiment are presented.

  8. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Hirose, T.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  9. Compton scattering off elementary spin (3/2) particles

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Acosta, E. G.; Napsuciale, M.

    2009-09-01

    We calculate Compton scattering off an elementary spin (3/2) particle in a recently proposed framework for the description of high spin fields based on the projection onto eigensubspaces of the Casimir operators of the Poincare group. We also calculate this process in the conventional Rarita-Schwinger formalism. Both formalisms yield the correct Thomson limit but the predictions for the angular distribution and total cross section differ beyond this point. We point out that the average squared amplitudes in the forward direction for Compton scattering off targets with spin s=0, (1/2), 1 are energy independent and have the common value 4e{sup 4}. As a consequence, in the rest frame of the particle the differential cross section for Compton scattering in the forward direction is energy independent and coincides with the classical squared radius. We show that these properties are also satisfied by a spin (3/2) target in the Poincare projector formalism but not by the Rarita-Schwinger spin (3/2) particle.

  10. "Stereo Compton cameras" for the 3-D localization of radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, K.; Kataoka, J.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujita, T.; Kishimoto, A.; Ohsuka, S.; Nakamura, S.; Adachi, S.; Hirayanagi, M.; Uchiyama, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Kato, T.

    2014-11-01

    The Compton camera is a viable and convenient tool used to visualize the distribution of radioactive isotopes that emit gamma rays. After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in 2011, there is a particularly urgent need to develop "gamma cameras", which can visualize the distribution of such radioisotopes. In response, we propose a portable Compton camera, which comprises 3-D position-sensitive GAGG scintillators coupled with thin monolithic MPPC arrays. The pulse-height ratio of two MPPC-arrays allocated at both ends of the scintillator block determines the depth of interaction (DOI), which dramatically improves the position resolution of the scintillation detectors. We report on the detailed optimization of the detector design, based on Geant4 simulation. The results indicate that detection efficiency reaches up to 0.54%, or more than 10 times that of other cameras being tested in Fukushima, along with a moderate angular resolution of 8.1° (FWHM). By applying the triangular surveying method, we also propose a new concept for the stereo measurement of gamma rays by using two Compton cameras, thus enabling the 3-D positional measurement of radioactive isotopes for the first time. From one point source simulation data, we ensured that the source position and the distance to the same could be determined typically to within 2 meters' accuracy and we also confirmed that more than two sources are clearly separated by the event selection from two point sources of simulation data.

  11. Rosseland and Flux Mean Opacities for Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutanen, Juri

    2017-02-01

    Rosseland mean opacity plays an important role in theories of stellar evolution and X-ray burst models. In the high-temperature regime, when most of the gas is completely ionized, the opacity is dominated by Compton scattering. Our aim here is to critically evaluate previous works on this subject and to compute the exact Rosseland mean opacity for Compton scattering over a broad range of temperature and electron degeneracy parameter. We use relativistic kinetic equations for Compton scattering and compute the photon mean free path as a function of photon energy by solving the corresponding integral equation in the diffusion limit. As a byproduct we also demonstrate the way to compute photon redistribution functions in the case of degenerate electrons. We then compute the Rosseland mean opacity as a function of temperature and electron degeneracy and present useful approximate expressions. We compare our results to previous calculations and find a significant difference in the low-temperature regime and strong degeneracy. We then proceed to compute the flux mean opacity in both free-streaming and diffusion approximations, and show that the latter is nearly identical to the Rosseland mean opacity. We also provide a simple way to account for the true absorption in evaluating the Rosseland and flux mean opacities.

  12. Compact Laser-Compton X-ray Source at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoonwoo; Marsh, Roark; Gibson, David; Anderson, Gerald; Barty, Christopher; Tajima, Toshiki

    2016-10-01

    The scaling of laser-Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources is dependent upon high-current, low-emittance accelerator operation and implementation of efficient laser-electron interaction architectures. Laser-Compton X-rays have been produced using the unique compact X-band linear accelerator at LLNL operated in a novel multibunch mode, and results agree extremely well with modeling predictions. An Andor X-ray CCD camera and image plates have been calibrated and used to characterize the 30 keV laser-Compton X-ray beam. The X-ray source size and the effect of scintillator blur have been measured. K-edge absorption measurements using thin metallic foils confirm the production of narrow energy spread X-rays and results validate X-ray image simulations. Future plans for medically relevant imaging will be discussed with facility upgrades to enable 250 keV X-ray production. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. Three-dimensional theory of weakly nonlinear Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.; Hartemann, F. V.

    2011-01-15

    Nonlinear effects are known to occur in light sources when the wiggler parameter, or normalized 4-potential, A=e{radical}(-A{sub {mu}}A{sup {mu}})/m{sub 0}c, approaches unity. In this paper, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A if the fractional bandwidth of the undulator, {Delta}{phi}{sup -1}, is sufficiently small and satisfies the condition A{sup 2{Delta}{phi}{approx}}1. Consequences for the spectral brightness of Compton scattering light sources are outlined. Compton and Thomson scattering theories are compared with the Klein-Nishina cross-section formula to highlight differences in the case of narrow band gamma-ray operation. A weakly nonlinear Compton scattering theory is developed in one (plane wave) and three (local plane wave approximation) dimensions. Analytical models are presented and benchmarked against numerical calculations solving the Lorentz force equation with a fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Finally, narrow band gamma-ray spectra are calculated for realistic laser and electron beams.

  14. Unsaturated Comptonization of isotropic photon spectra by relativistic electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, Abraham; Mckee, Christopher F.; Lahav, Ofer

    1991-01-01

    The multiple scattering approach for evaluating the transformation of an arbitrary soft photon spectrum as a result of unsaturated Compton scatterings in a medium of relativistic electrons is explored. The medium is assumed to be infinite and spatially homogeneous but may be time-dependent, and the photons are isotropic. It is shown that the distortion of a radiation spectrum can be described analytically in a compact form using the Fourier transform of the single-scattering probability. In the nonrelativistic case, the validity of the known analytical results derived from the Kompaneets (1957) equation is extended to arbitrary electron distribution functions and photon spectra. For relativistic electrons, simple expressions are obtained for the total energy that is transferred from the electrons to the photons and for the distortion in the Rayleigh-Jeans regime of a blackbody spectrum. It is demonstrated that the treatment applies to Comptonization in a relativistic jet and that Comptonization of very soft trapped photons by semirelativistic electrons in an expanding medium leads naturally to a log Gaussian spectrum, of the form observed in blazars.

  15. An information theoretic synthesis and analysis of Compton profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Stephen B.; Gadre, Shridhar R.

    1981-11-01

    The information theoretic technique of entropy maximization is applied to Compton profile (CP) data, employing single and double distribution moments Compton profile J(q). The quality of resulting maximum entropy profiles is judged by how well they predict familiar CP quantities—moments, the profiles' magnitude at the origin J(0), and the width at half-maximum q0.5. Information theoretic quantities—Shannon entropies, information contents, and surprisals—are also presented. Based upon the ''sum'' constraint Compton profiles. The average momentum constraint contains the most information of all moment expectation values, as judged by its predictive capacity and by the information theory measures.

  16. The Compton Polarimeter in Hall C of Jefferson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Amrendra

    2013-04-01

    A new Compton polarimeter was installed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab and used during the Qweak experiment which aims to measure the weak charge of proton with a precision of 4.1%. In this polarimeter the electron beam collides with green laser light stored in a low gain Fabry-Perot Cavity; the scattered electrons are detected in 4 planes of a novel diamond micro strip detector while the back scattered photons are detected in a lead tungstate crystal. We extract the beam polarization by fitting the experimental asymmetry for each detector strip to the corresponding asymmetry calculated in QED. During the experiment, we took data to cross-calibrate Moller and Compton polarimeters in Hall C. We will share our preliminary conclusions from this comparison. In this talk, we will also present the results from Monte Carlo studies performed to estimate the systematic uncertainties of the polarization measurement along with comparing results from two independent extraction of the polarization involving very different time scales. The Compton polarimeter has achieved the design goals of 1% statistical uncertainty per hour and we expect to achieve less than 1% systematic uncertainty.

  17. Compton DIV: Using a Compton-Based Gamma-Ray Imager for Design Information Verification of Uranium Enrichment Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, M; Verbeke, J; Dougan, A; Wang, T; Decman, D

    2009-07-04

    A feasibility study has been performed to determine the potential usefulness of Compton imaging as a tool for design information verification (DIV) of uranium enrichment plants. Compton imaging is a method of gamma-ray imaging capable of imaging with a 360-degree field of view over a broad range of energies. These systems can image a room (with a time span on the order of one hour) and return a picture of the distribution and composition of radioactive material in that room. The effectiveness of Compton imaging depends on the sensitivity and resolution of the instrument as well the strength and energy of the radioactive material to be imaged. This study combined measurements and simulations to examine the specific issue of UF{sub 6} gas flow in pipes, at various enrichment levels, as well as hold-up resulting from the accumulation of enriched material in those pipes. It was found that current generation imagers could image pipes carrying UF{sub 6} in less than one hour at moderate to high enrichment. Pipes with low enriched gas would require more time. It was also found that hold-up was more amenable to this technique and could be imaged in gram quantities in a fraction of an hour. another questions arises regarding the ability to separately image two pipes spaced closely together. This depends on the capabilities of the instrument in question. These results are described in detail. In addition, suggestions are given as to how to develop Compton imaging as a tool for DIV.

  18. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't stop crying complains of head and neck pain (younger or nonverbal children may be more fussy) ... vision pupils of unequal size weakness or paralysis neck pain or stiffness seizure If your child is unconscious: ...

  19. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  20. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  1. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  2. Head Tilt

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco ...

  3. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... object that's stuck in the wound. previous continue Concussions Concussions — the temporary loss of normal brain function due ... also a type of internal head injury. Repeated concussions can permanently damage the brain. In many cases, ...

  4. CsI Calorimeter for a Compton-Pair Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Eric J.

    We propose to build and test a hodoscopic CsI(Tl) scintillating-crystal calorimeter for a medium-energy γ-ray Compton and pair telescope. The design and technical approach for this calorimeter relies deeply on heritage from the Fermi LAT CsI Calorimeter, but it dramatically improves the low-energy performance of that design by reading out the scintillation light with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), making the technology developed for Fermi applicable in the Compton regime. While such a hodoscopic calorimeter is useful for an entire class of medium-energy γ-ray telescope designs, we propose to build it explicitly to support beam tests and balloon flight of the Proto-ComPair telescope, the development and construction of which was funded in a four-year APRA program beginning in 2015 ("ComPair: Steps to a Medium Energy γ-ray Mission" with PI J. McEnery of GSFC). That award did not include funding for its CsI calorimeter subsystem, and this proposal is intended to cover that gap. ComPair is a MIDEX-class instrument concept to perform a high-sensitivity survey of the γ-ray sky from 0.5 MeV to 500 MeV. ComPair is designed to provide a dramatic increase in sensitivity relative to previous instruments in this energy range (predominantly INTEGRAL/SPI and Compton COMPTEL), with the same transformative sensitivity increase – and corresponding scientific return– that the Fermi Large Area Telescope provided relative to Compton EGRET. To enable transformative science over a broad range of MeV energies and with a wide field of view, ComPair is a combined Compton telescope and pair telescope employing a silicon-strip tracker (for Compton scattering and pair conversion and tracking) and a solid-state CdZnTe calorimeter (for Compton absorption) and CsI calorimeter (for pair calorimetry), surrounded by a plastic scintillator anti-coincidence detector. Under the current proposal, we will complete the detailed design, assembly, and test of the CsI calorimeter for the risk

  5. A Compton imaging device for radioactive material detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, A. S.; Baird, W.; Kippen, R. Marc; Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Sullivan, J. P.

    2004-01-01

    The most serious terrorist threat we face today may come from radiological dispersion devices and unsecured nuclear weapons. It is imperative for national security that we develop and implement radiation detection technology capable of locating and tracking nuclear material moving across and within our borders. Many radionuclides emit gamma rays in the 0.2-3 MeV range. Unfortunately, current gamma ray detection technology is inadequate for providing precise and efficient measurements of localized radioactive sources. Common detectors available today suffer from large background rates and have only minimal ability to localize the position of the source without the use of mechanical collimators, which reduces efficiency. Imaging detectors using the Compton scattering process have the potential to provide greatly improved sensitivity through their ability to reject off-source background. We are developing a prototype device to demonstrate the Compton imaging technology. The detector consists of several layers of pixelated silicon detectors followed by an array of CsI crystals coupled to photodiodes. Here we present the concept of our detector design and results from Monte Carlo simulations of our prototype detector. Development of technologies for detecting and characterizing radiation from various nuclear materials is important for many fields, including homeland security, astrophysics, and medical imaging. Unfortunately, in many cases we now largely use detection technologies that were developed in the 1960s. While sufficient for some purposes, these technologies have proved inadequate for remote sensing of radioactive nuclear materials - a crucial capability required for enhanced homeland security. Passive gamma ray detection is the most direct means of providing this capability, but current detectors are severely limited in sensitivity and detection range due to confusion from off-source backgrounds, and they cannot precisely localize sources when they are

  6. Gate simulation of Compton Ar-Xe gamma-camera for radionuclide imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubov, L. Yu; Belyaev, V. N.; Berdnikova, A. K.; Bolozdynia, A. I.; Akmalova, Yu A.; Shtotsky, Yu V.

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulations of cylindrical Compton Ar-Xe gamma camera are described in the current report. Detection efficiency of cylindrical Ar-Xe Compton camera with internal diameter of 40 cm is estimated as1-3%that is 10-100 times higher than collimated Anger’s camera. It is shown that cylindrical Compton camera can image Tc-99m radiotracer distribution with uniform spatial resolution of 20 mm through the whole field of view.

  7. Design and Modeling of a Compton-Suppressed Phoswich Detector for Radioxenon Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    modeled using MCNPX Version 2.5.0. The Compton suppression mechanism is integrated into the phoswich design to effectively reduce the Compton continuum...background radiation was modeled using MCNPX Version 2.5.0. The Compton suppression mechanism is integrated into the phoswich design to effectively reduce...be calculated through regions of interest corresponding to the four xenon radioisotopes in the 2D spectrum. An alternative solution to measure

  8. Slow Light Semiconductor Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-02

    we demonstrate a semiconductor laser with a spectral linewidth of 18 kHz in the telecom band around 1:55um. The views, opinions and/or findings...we demonstrate a semiconductor laser with a spectral linewidth of 18 kHz in the telecom band around 1:55um. Further, the large intracavity field...hybrid Si/III- V platforms Abstract The semiconductor laser is the principal light source powering the world-wide optical fiber network . Ever

  9. Introduction to Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Kevin F.

    2005-03-01

    This volume offers a solid foundation for understanding the most important devices used in the hottest areas of electronic engineering today, from semiconductor fundamentals to state-of-the-art semiconductor devices in the telecommunications and computing industries. Kevin Brennan describes future approaches to computing hardware and RF power amplifiers, and explains how emerging trends and system demands of computing and telecommunications systems influence the choice, design and operation of semiconductor devices. In addition, he covers MODFETs and MOSFETs, short channel effects, and the challenges faced by continuing miniaturization. His book is both an excellent senior/graduate text and a valuable reference for practicing engineers and researchers.

  10. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction. PMID:26917151

  11. Densitometry and temperature measurement of combustion gas by X-ray Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Nobuyuki; Itou, Masayoshi; Tomita, Eiji; Suzuki, Kosuke; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of combustion gas by high-energy X-ray Compton scattering is reported. The intensity of Compton-scattered X-rays has shown a position dependence across the flame of the combustion gas, allowing us to estimate the temperature distribution of the combustion flame. The energy spectra of Compton-scattered X-rays have revealed a significant difference across the combustion reaction zone, which enables us to detect the combustion reaction. These results demonstrate that high-energy X-ray Compton scattering can be employed as an in situ technique to probe inside a combustion reaction.

  12. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  13. Semiconductor Solar Superabsorbers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yiling; Huang, Lujun; Cao, Linyou

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the maximal enhancement of solar absorption in semiconductor materials by light trapping promises the development of affordable solar cells. However, the conventional Lambertian limit is only valid for idealized material systems with weak absorption, and cannot hold for the typical semiconductor materials used in solar cells due to the substantial absorption of these materials. Herein we theoretically demonstrate the maximal solar absorption enhancement for semiconductor materials and elucidate the general design principle for light trapping structures to approach the theoretical maximum. By following the principles, we design a practical light trapping structure that can enable an ultrathin layer of semiconductor materials, for instance, 10 nm thick a-Si, absorb > 90% sunlight above the bandgap. The design has active materials with one order of magnitude less volume than any of the existing solar light trapping designs in literature. This work points towards the development of ultimate solar light trapping techniques. PMID:24531211

  14. Physics of Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brütting, Wolfgang

    2005-08-01

    Filling the gap in the literature currently available, this book presents an overview of our knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Contributions from 18 international research groups cover various aspects of this field, ranging from the growth of organic layers and crystals, their electronic properties at interfaces, their photophysics and electrical transport properties to the application of these materials in such different devices as organic field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes. From the contents: * Excitation Dynamics in Organic Semiconductors * Organic Field-Effect Transistors * Spectroscopy of Organic Semiconductors * Interfaces between Organic Semiconductors and Metals * Analysis and Modeling of Devices * Exciton Formation and Energy Transfer in Organic Light Emitting Diodes * Deposition and Characterization

  15. SILICON CARBIDE FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This state-of-the-art survey on silicon carbide for semiconductors includes a bibliography of the most important references published as of the end...of 1964. The various methods used for growing silicon carbide single crystals are reviewed, as well as their properties and devices fabricated from...them. The fact that the state of-the-art of silicon carbide semiconductors is not further advanced may be attributed to the difficulties of growing

  16. External inverse-Compton emission from jetted tidal disruption events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenbin; Kumar, Pawan

    2016-05-01

    The recent discoveries of Sw J1644+57 and Sw J2058+05 show that tidal disruption events (TDEs) can launch relativistic jets. Super-Eddington accretion produces a strong radiation field of order Eddington luminosity. In a jetted TDE, electrons in the jet will inverse-Compton scatter the photons from the accretion disc and wind (external radiation field). Motivated by observations of thermal optical-UV spectra in Sw J2058+05 and several other TDEs, we assume the spectrum of the external radiation field intercepted by the relativistic jet to be blackbody. Hot electrons in the jet scatter this thermal radiation and produce luminosities 1045-1048 erg s- 1 in the X/γ-ray band. This model of thermal plus inverse-Compton radiation is applied to Sw J2058+05. First, we show that the blackbody component in the optical-UV spectrum most likely has its origin in the super-Eddington wind from the disc. Then, using the observed blackbody component as the external radiation field, we show that the X-ray luminosity and spectrum are consistent with the inverse-Compton emission, under the following conditions: (1) the jet Lorentz factor is Γ ≃ 5-10; (2) electrons in the jet have a power-law distribution dN_e/dγ _e ∝ γ _e^{-p} with γmin ˜ 1 and p = 2.4; (3) the wind is mildly relativistic (Lorentz factor ≳ 1.5) and has isotropic-equivalent mass-loss rate ˜ 5 M⊙ yr- 1. We describe the implications for jet composition and the radius where jet energy is converted to radiation.

  17. Testing of the BGO Compton-suppression detectors for gammasphere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Ahmad, I.; Annan, G.A.

    1995-08-01

    Gammasphere, the national {gamma}-ray facility, when completed will consist of 110 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors. The bismuth germanate (BGO) Compton-suppression detector system for each Ge detector consists of one tapered hexagonal BGO side shield and one slotted BGO back plug. Due to the geometry of the array, three types of annular shields are required. These types are referred to as B, C and D, and the array consists of 60, 30 and 20 of these units, respectively. Shield types B, C and D have a hexagonal geometry. They are divided into six optically separate sections, each with its own pair of photomultiplier tubes. Argonne assumed responsibility for the procurement and testing of the BGO Compton-suppression units. We received all detectors from the two vendors. In the past year, twenty-four of the B-type detectors were delivered to Stony Brook for evaluation tests. Since the number of crystals to test is quite large (six per detector), we involved undergraduate students working at ANL under the Department of Educational Programs (DEP) in this effort. The quality of students was excellent, and they played a major role in the performance testing of these detectors. Ninety-nine of the hexagonal side shields and 112 backplug detectors were shipped to LBL for use in Gammasphere. The remaining detectors did not meet the performance criteria when they were first delivered and tested and are either at the vendor being repaired or were returned to us for retesting. We anticipate that the remaining detectors will be ready for use in Gammasphere within the next few months.

  18. Development of a 4-mirror optical cavity for an inverse Compton scattering experiment in the STF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka; Aryshev, Alexander; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Urakawa, Junji

    2014-05-01

    To obtain high-brightness quasi-monochromatic X-rays via inverse Compton scattering (ICS), an optical cavity for intensifying laser beams was designed and implemented in a new beam line at the KEK Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) accelerator. The optical cavity adopts a planar configuration consisting of 4 mirrors. This confocal type resonator provides stable laser storage even with a long mirror distance, enabling head-on collision with the electron beams. To overcome the well-known astigmatism problems of the planar-type optical cavity, two forcibly bendable cylindrical mirrors were introduced instead of flat mirrors. With this new function for laser profile adjustment, an almost round laser profile at the waist point in the accelerator environment was successfully achieved. Estimated waist sizes were 43.7 μm for the horizontal and 50.8 μm for the vertical dimensions. The feedback control of this 4-mirror optical cavity worked with a stiff plate supporting all 4 mirrors. 1.7×103 finesse and 2.8-kW stored power for a 1-ms duration with 5 Hz were achieved.

  19. NRF Based Nondestructive Inspection System for SNM by Using Laser-Compton-Backscattering Gamma-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgaki, H.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Daito, I.; Zen, H.; Kii, T.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Hajima, R.; Hayakawa, T.; Shizuma, T.; Kando, M.

    2015-10-01

    A non-destructive inspection system for special nuclear materials (SNMs) hidden in a sea cargo has been developed. The system consists of a fast screening system using neutron generated by inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device and an isotope identification system using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements with laser Compton backscattering (LCS) gamma-rays has been developed. The neutron flux of 108 n/sec has been achieved by the IEC in static mode. We have developed a modified neutron reactor noise analysis method to detect fission neutron in a short time. The LCS gamma-rays has been generated by using a small racetrack microtoron accelerator and an intense sub-nano second laser colliding head-on to the electron beam. The gamma-ray flux has been achieved more than 105 photons/s. The NRF gamma-rays will be measured using LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detector array whose performance has been measured by NRF experiment of U-235 in HIGS facility. The whole inspection system has been designed to satisfy a demand from the sea port.

  20. Semiconductor detectors for soft γ-ray astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrun, François

    2006-07-01

    The study of γ-ray bursts, compact objects, nucleosynthesis and supernova remnants triggers the most interest today in the soft γ-ray domain. These topics have various experimental requirements with emphasis either on imaging or on spectroscopy. Recent progress has shown the great potential of semiconductor detectors for both applications at the expense of classical scintillators such as NaI or CsI. They also gave insight into their long-term in-orbit behaviour. Room temperature semiconductor detectors, particularly CdTe and CdZnTe, are confirmed as the best choice for imaging applications. As illustrated by the INTEGRAL/ISGRI camera, the CdTe stability is better than expected; its internal background is comparable to that of scintillators, and the spectroscopic degradation in space is slow with a lifetime of about 40 years on an eccentric orbit. Cooled germanium detectors offer the best energy resolution but degrade more rapidly under the cosmic-ray irradiation. However, the INTEGRAL/SPI spectrometer has demonstrated that periodic in-orbit annealings, allowing for a full recovery of the energy resolution, can maintain the spectroscopic performance over several years. Most future projects, focussing on coded mask or Compton telescopes, will take advantage of the semiconductor technology, particularly that related to the ambient temperature detectors.

  1. Compton scattering from positronium and validity of the impulse approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaliman, Z.; Pisk, K.; Pratt, R. H.

    2011-05-15

    The cross sections for Compton scattering from positronium are calculated in the range from 1 to 100 keV incident photon energy. The calculations are based on the A{sup 2} term of the photon-electron or photon-positron interaction. Unlike in hydrogen, the scattering occurs from two centers and the interference effect plays an important role for energies below 8 keV. Because of the interference, the criterion for validity of the impulse approximation for positronium is more restrictive compared to that for hydrogen.

  2. Study of Compton scattering of gamma rays from atomic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B.

    2011-12-01

    In the present work, measurements are made on the intensity and angular distribution of Compton scattered gamma rays of energy 279 keV from K-shell electrons of tin at scattering angles ranging from 30° to 150° and also determined the K-shell to free electron differential collision, absorption and scattering cross section ratio. For this purpose, two NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors working in coincidence with 30 nsec resolving time are used to record the events. The experimental results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical data.

  3. Einstein-Ehrenfest's radiation theory and Compton-Debye's kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Antonio V.; França, Humberto M.

    1992-02-01

    Einstein and Ehrenfest's radiation theory is modified in order to take into account the effects of the random zero-point fields, characteristic of classical stochastic electrodynamics, in a system of classical molecules interacting with thermal radiation. This is done by replacing the Einstein concept of “random spontaneous emission” by the concept of stimulated emission by the random zero-point fields. As a result, Compton and Debye's kinematic relations are obtained within the realm of a completely classical theory, that is, without having to consider the wave-particle duality for the molecules or the radiation.

  4. Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS). User`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Landron, C.O.; Baldwin, G.T.

    1994-04-01

    The Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS) is a radiation diagnostic designed to determine the time-integrated energy spectrum between 100 keV -- 2 MeV of flash x-ray sources. This guide is intended as a reference for the routine operator of the TPCS. Contents include a brief overview of the principle of operation, detailed component descriptions, detailed assembly and disassembly procedures, guide to routine operations, and troubleshooting flowcharts. Detailed principle of operation, signal analysis and spectrum unfold algorithms are beyond the scope of this guide; however, the guide makes reference to sources containing this information.

  5. Magnetic Bunch Compression for a Compact Compton Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gamage, B.; Satogata, Todd J.

    2013-12-01

    A compact electron accelerator suitable for Compton source applications is in design at the Center for Accelerator Science at Old Dominion University and Jefferson Lab. Here we discuss two options for transverse magnetic bunch compression and final focus, each involving a 4-dipole chicane with M_{56} tunable over a range of 1.5-2.0m with independent tuning of final focus to interaction point $\\beta$*=5mm. One design has no net bending, while the other has net bending of 90 degrees and is suitable for compact corner placement.

  6. Large-Scale Compton Imaging for Wide-Area Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, D J; Manini, H A; Wright, D M

    2006-03-01

    We study the performance of a large-scale Compton imaging detector placed in a low-flying aircraft, used to search wide areas for rad/nuc threat sources. In this paper we investigate the performance potential of equipping aerial platforms with gamma-ray detectors that have photon sensitivity up to a few MeV. We simulate the detector performance, and present receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for a benchmark scenario using a {sup 137}Cs source. The analysis uses a realistic environmental background energy spectrum and includes air attenuation.

  7. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) Superpressure Balloon Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Steven E.

    2014-08-01

    The Compton Spectrometer and Image (COSI) is a ULDB-borne soft gamma-ray telescope (0.2-5 MeV) designed to probe the origins of Galactic positrons, uncover sites of nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy, and perform pioneering studies of gamma-ray polarization in a number of source classes. COSI uses a compact Compton telescope design, resulting from a decade of development under NASA’s ROSES program - a modern take on techniques successfully pioneered by COMPTEL on CGRO. COSI performs groundbreaking science by combining improvements in sensitivity, spectral resolution, and sky coverage. The COSI instrument and flight systems have been designed for flight on NASA’s 18 MCF superpressure balloon (SPB). We are now beginning a series science flights to fulfill the COSI science goals: a SPB in 2014 from Antarctica, followed by two 100-day ULDB flights from New Zealand.COSI is a wide-field survey telescope designed to perform imaging, spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. It employs a novel Compton telescope design utilizing a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors (GeDs) to resolve individual gamma-ray interactions with high spectral and spatial resolution. The COSI array is housed in a common vacuum cryostat cooled by a mechanical cryocooler. An active CsI Shield encloses the cryostat on the sides and bottom. The FoV of the instrument covers 25% of the full sky at a given moment.The COSI instrument builds upon considerable heritage from the previous Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) balloon instrument that underwent a successful technology demonstration flight in June 2005 from Fort Sumner, NM, a successful “first light” science flight from Fort Sumner in May 2009, and a launch campaign from Alice Springs, Australia in June 2010, where it unfortunately suffered a launch mishap. COSI has been upgraded from the previous NCT instrument by conversion to a detector configuration optimized for polarization sensitivity and addition of a cryocooler to remove

  8. Limits on Lorentz violation from synchrotron and inverse Compton sources.

    PubMed

    Altschul, B

    2006-05-26

    We derive new bounds on Lorentz violations in the electron sector from existing data on high-energy astrophysical sources. Synchrotron and inverse Compton data give precisely complementary constraints. The best bound on a specific combination of electron Lorentz-violating coefficients is at the 6 x 10(-20) level, and independent bounds are available for all the Lorentz-violating c coefficients at the 2 x 10(-14)level or better. This represents an improvement in some bounds by 14 orders of magnitude.

  9. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, David Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p ($\\vec{γ}$, γ' \\vec{p}$) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  10. The Compton-Getting effect for low energy particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.

    1974-01-01

    It was found that the traditional first-order Compton-Getting effect, which relates particle distributions as observed in two frames of reference moving with constant relative velocity, is inadequate for the description of low energy particles (less than a few hundred keV/nucleon) in the solar system. An exact procedure is given for recovering both isotropic and anisotropic distributions in the solar wind frame from observations made in a spacecraft frame. The method was illustrated by analyzing a particle event observed on IPM-7.

  11. COSI: The Compton Spectrometer and Imager Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John; Jean, Pierre; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Boggs, Steven; Zoglauer, A.; Von Ballmoos, Peter; Amman, Mark; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Chang, Yuan-Hann.; Chou, Yi; Kierans, Carolyn; Lin, Chih-Hsun.; Lowell, Alex; Shang, Jie-Rou.; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Yang, Chien-Ying

    The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), which was formerly known as the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT), is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray telescope (0.2-5 MeV) designed to probe the origins of Galactic positrons, uncover sites of nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy, and perform pioneering studies of gamma-ray polarization in a number of source classes. COSI uses a compact Compton telescope design, resulting from a decade of development under NASA's ROSES program - a modern take on techniques successfully pioneered by COMPTEL on CGRO. We have rebuilt the COSI instrument and flight systems, upgraded for balloon flights and improved polarization sensitivity. We will present the redesign of COSI and the overall goals of the 5-year science program. Three science flights are planned to fulfill the COSI science goals: an LDB in 2014 from Antarctica on a superpressure balloon (SuperCOSI), followed by two 100-day ULDB flights from New Zealand. COSI is a wide-field survey telescope designed to perform imaging, spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. It employs a novel Compton telescope design utilizing a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors (GeDs) to resolve individual gamma-ray interactions with high spectral and spatial resolution. The COSI array is housed in a common vacuum cryostat cooled by a mechanical cryocooler. An active CsI shield encloses the cryostat on the sides and bottom. The FoV of the instrument covers 25% of the full sky at a given moment. The COSI instrument is mature, building upon considerable heritage from the previous NCT balloon instrument that underwent a successful technology demonstration flight in June 2005 from Fort Sumner, NM, a successful "first light" science flight from Fort Sumner in May 2009, and quickly turned around and delivered on time for a launch campaign from Alice Springs, Australia in June 2010, where it unfortunately suffered a launch mishap. The NCT instrument and Flight System are being rebuilt under the NASA

  12. Quantum Radiation Reaction Effects in Multiphoton Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Di Piazza, A.; Hatsagortsyan, K. Z.; Keitel, C. H.

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  13. Compton scattering by mesons in nuclei: Experiment on 208Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrberg, K.; Martin, G.; Häger, D.; Ludwig, M.; Schumacher, M.; Andersson, B.-E.; Blomqvist, K. I.; Ruijter, H.; Sandell, A.; Schröder, B.; Hayward, E.; Nilsson, L.; Zorro, R.

    1992-10-01

    Using 58 and 73 MeV tagged photons and scattering angles from 60° to 150°, it is shown that it is possible to observe Compton scattering by "mesons in nuclei" through an incomplete cancellation of the mesonic (exchange-current) seagull amplitude by parts of the nuclear resonance amplitude related to the giant-dipole resonance of 208Pb. This phenomenon is a property of an extended nucleus and, therefore, cannot be studied on the deuteron. Predictions of the exchange from factor which determines the angular distribution of the exchange seagull amplitude are compared with experimental data.

  14. Meson-induced correlations of nucleons in nuclear Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Huett, M.; Milstein, A.I.

    1998-01-01

    The nonresonant (seagull) contribution to the nuclear Compton amplitude at low energies is strongly influenced by nucleon correlations arising from meson exchange. We study this problem in a modified Fermi gas model, where nuclear correlation functions are obtained with the help of perturbation theory. The dependence of the mesonic seagull amplitude on the nuclear radius is investigated and the influence of a realistic nuclear density on this amplitude is discussed. We found that different form factors appear for the static part (proportional to the enhancement constant {kappa}) of the mesonic seagull amplitude and for the parts, which contain the contribution from electromagnetic polarizabilities. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Meson-induced correlations of nucleons in nuclear Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hütt, M.-Th.; Milstein, A. I.

    1998-01-01

    The nonresonant (seagull) contribution to the nuclear Compton amplitude at low energies is strongly influenced by nucleon correlations arising from meson exchange. We study this problem in a modified Fermi gas model, where nuclear correlation functions are obtained with the help of perturbation theory. The dependence of the mesonic seagull amplitude on the nuclear radius is investigated and the influence of a realistic nuclear density on this amplitude is discussed. We found that different form factors appear for the static part (proportional to the enhancement constant κ) of the mesonic seagull amplitude and for the parts, which contain the contribution from electromagnetic polarizabilities.

  16. POSSIBLE EXPERIMENTS ON WAVE FUNCTION LOCALIZATION DUE TO COMPTON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Danilov, Viatcheslav V; Gorlov, Timofey V; Liu, Yun; Shishlo, Andrei P; Nagaitsev,

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of a particle s wave function in the process of radiation or light scattering is a longstanding problem. Its solution will give a clue on processes that form, for example, wave functions of electrons constantly emitting synchrotron radiation quanta in storage rings. On a more global scale, it may shed light on wave function collapse due to the process of measurement. In this paper we consider various experimental options using Fermilab electron beams and a possible electron beam from the SNS linac and lasers to detect electron wave function change due to Compton scattering.

  17. Magnetic properties of Ga doped cobalt ferrite: Compton scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Arvind Mund, H. S.; Ahuja, B. L.; Sahariya, Jagrati; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.

    2014-04-24

    We present the spin momentum density of Ga doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} at 100 K using magnetic Compton scattering. The measurement has been performed using circularly polarized synchrotron radiations of 182.65 keV at SPring8, Japan. The experimental profile is decomposed into its constituent profile to determine the spin moment at individual sites. Co atom has the maximum contribution (about 58%) in the total spin moment of the doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  18. Anisotropies of magnetic Compton profiles in Co /Pd multilayer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, H.; Ota, M.; Itoh, F.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Koizumi, A.

    2006-02-01

    Anisotropies of spin-projected wave functions are measured on a Pd /Co multilayer system by measuring magnetic Compton profiles. The anisotropies of the wave functions are decomposed into the contributions of Co 3d states and Pd 4d states using an atomic model by a Hartree-Fock calculation assuming uniaxial (cylindrical) symmetry. Perpendicular anisotropy in Pd /Co multilayers is dominated by the anisotropy of Co 3d states; states with both magnetic quantum number ∣m∣=2 and ∣m∣=1 contribute.

  19. A hard X-ray polarimeter utilizing Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, H.; Noma, M.; Niizeki, H.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a 50-cm-diam prototype of a novel Compton-scattering-type polarimeter for hard X-rays in the energy range 30-100 keV. The characteristics of the prototype polarimeter were investigated for various conditions. It was found that, with polarized X-rays from a simple polarizer, the detection efficiency and the modulation factor of the polarimeter with a 40-mm thick scatterer were 3.2 percent and 0.57 percent, respectively, at about 60 keV.

  20. Direct linear algebraic deconvolution imaging of Compton telescope data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, D. D.; Buchholz, J.; O'Neill, T. J.; Tümer, O. T.; White, R. S.; Zych, A. D.; Wheaton, W. A.

    A general direct linear algebraic deconvolution method for imaging Compton gamma-ray telescope event data is described. This method gives an image of the gamma ray source distribution that is linearly related to the binned event data. Two algorithms for imposing the positivity constraint are investigated and compared; the Non-negative Least Squares method of Lawson and Hanson (1974) and the Inequality Constrained Generalized Least Squares method of Werner (1990). The latter is applied here to CGRO COMPTEL event data for Viewing Period # 1 centered on the Crab Nebula. Preliminary flux images and their statistical significant are presented.

  1. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.J.; Annand, J.R.M.; Mamyan, V.H.; Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Camsonne, A.; Laveissiere, G.; Bosted, P.; Paschke, K.; Calarco, J.R.; Chang, G.C.; Horn, T.; Savvinov, N.; Chang, T.-H.; Danagoulian, A.; Nathan, A.M.; Roedelbronn, M.; Chen, J.-P.

    2005-06-24

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 GeV{sup 2} and t=-4.0 GeV{sup 2} via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in disagreement with a prediction of perturbative QCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism, but agree well with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton.

  2. Filtered back-projection algorithm for Compton telescopes

    DOEpatents

    Gunter, Donald L.

    2008-03-18

    A method for the conversion of Compton camera data into a 2D image of the incident-radiation flux on the celestial sphere includes detecting coincident gamma radiation flux arriving from various directions of a 2-sphere. These events are mapped by back-projection onto the 2-sphere to produce a convolution integral that is subsequently stereographically projected onto a 2-plane to produce a second convolution integral which is deconvolved by the Fourier method to produce an image that is then projected onto the 2-sphere.

  3. Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Discusses an art project in which students created drawings of mop heads. Explains that the approach of drawing was more important than the subject. States that the students used the chiaroscuro technique, used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, in which light appears out of the darkness. (CMK)

  4. Cone Heads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The author, a middle school art teacher, describes a sculpture project lesson involving Cone Heads (sculptures made from cardboard cones). Discussion of caricatures with exaggerated facial features and interesting profiles helped students understand that the more expressive the face, the better. This project took approximately four to five…

  5. Magnetic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoshima, Tokihiko

    Figure 6.1 shows how rapidly the areal density of hard disk drives (HDD) has been increasing over the past 20 years [1]. Several critical innovations were necessary to bring about such rapid progress in the field of magnetic recording [2]. One of the most significant innovations from the viewpoint of material improvement was the electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni80Fe20), which was introduced by IBM in 1979 as the core material of a thin-film inductive head to increase the magnetic recording density [3]. After the introduction of the magneto-resistive (MR) element as the read head and the electrodeposited permalloy as the write head by IBM in 1991 [4], the rate of increase in the recording density of HDDs jumped from 30% per year to 60% per year. Recently, a giant magneto-resistive (GMR) element has been used for the read element instead of the MR element. The rate of increase in the recording density jumped to over 100% per year in 1999, which is an incredible rate of increase. Since 2002, however, the rate of increase has decreased to 30%; thus, new innovations are required to maintain the rate of increase. In 2004, the practical use of perpendicular magnetic recording instead of longitudinal magnetic recording was announced [5]. This system is a critical innovation for developing high-performance HDD systems with high-recording density. The design of the magnetic recording head was changed because of the change of the recording system.

  6. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  7. Determination of Rest Mass Energy of the Electron by a Compton Scattering Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasannakumar, S.; Krishnaveni, S.; Umesh, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a simple Compton scattering experiment which may be carried out in graduate and undergraduate laboratories to determine the rest mass energy of the electron. In the present experiment, we have measured the energies of the Compton scattered gamma rays with a NaI(Tl) gamma ray spectrometer coupled to a 1 K multichannel analyzer at…

  8. Algorithms to identify detector Compton scatter in PET modules

    SciTech Connect

    Comanor, K.A.; Virador, P.R.G.; Moses, W.W.

    1996-08-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation, the authors investigate algorithms to identify and correct for detector Compton scatter in hypothetical PET modules with 3 x 3 x 30 mm BGO crystals coupled to individual photosensors. Rather than assume a particular design, they study three classes of detectors: (1) with energy resolution limited by counting statistics, (2) with energy resolution limited by electronic noise, and (3) with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement capability. For the first two classes, selecting the channel with the highest signal as the crystal of interaction yields a 22--25% misidentification fraction (MIF) for all reasonable noise fwhm to signal (N/S) ratios (i.e. < 0.5 at 511 keV). Algorithms that attempt to correctly position events that undergo forward Compton scatter using only energy information can reduce the MIF to 12%, and can be easily realized with counting statistics limited detectors but can only be achieved with very low noise values for noise limited detectors. When using position of interaction to identify forward scatter, a MIF of 12% can be obtained if the detector has good energy and position resolution.

  9. Double Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at Jefferson Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camsonne, Alexandre; Solid Ddvcs Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) are a more general formalism englobing the concept of elastic form factor (FF) and parton distributions (PDFs) introducing a third independent variable called skewdness xi in addition to usual x_bj and t variables which are defined for the PDFs. Those distributions thus contain more information than the FF and PDFs allowing to give a more spatial and dynamical description of the nucleon. To measure GPDs one has to measure exclusive reaction. The simplest exclusive reaction is the exclusive production of photons or Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering. One drawback of this measurement is that the real photon constrains the measurement of the GPDs to the line xi =x. The Doubly Virtual Compton Scattering (DDVCS) is the similar process involving a virtual photon in the final state. This virtual photon decays into a dilepton pair allowing some values of xi different than x_bj. High luminosity is required since cross sections are smaller by a factor 100. I will present options to try to measure the DDVCS process particularly in the dimuon channel using the JLab 12 GeV beam.

  10. Inverse Compton X-ray signature of AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, Martin A.; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2013-12-01

    Bright AGN frequently show ultrafast outflows (UFOs) with outflow velocities vout ˜ 0.1c. These outflows may be the source of AGN feedback on their host galaxies sought by galaxy formation modellers. The exact effect of the outflows on the ambient galaxy gas strongly depends on whether the shocked UFOs cool rapidly or not. This in turn depends on whether the shocked electrons share the same temperature as ions (one-temperature regime, 1T) or decouple (2T), as has been recently suggested. Here we calculate the inverse Compton spectrum emitted by such shocks, finding a broad feature potentially detectable either in mid-to-high energy X-rays (1T case) or only in the soft X-rays (2T). We argue that current observations of AGN do not seem to show evidence for the 1T component. The limits on the 2T emission are far weaker, and in fact it is possible that the observed soft X-ray excess of AGN is partially or fully due to the 2T shock emission. This suggests that UFOs are in the energy-driven regime outside the central few pc, and must pump considerable amounts of not only momentum but also energy into the ambient gas. We encourage X-ray observers to look for the inverse Compton components calculated here in order to constrain AGN feedback models further.

  11. Compton Gamma Ray Observatory: Lessons Learned in Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, G. A.; Joseph, G. W.; Behrens, H. W.; Asato, D. I.; Carlson, R. A.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory was the second of NASA's Great Observatories. At 17 1/2 tons. it was the heaviest astrophysical payload ever flown at the time of its launch on April 5, 1991 aboard the Space Shuttle. During initial, on-orbit priming of the spacecraft's monopropellant hydrazine propulsion system, a severe waterhammer transient was experienced. At that time, anomalous telemetry readings were received from on-board propulsion system instrumentation. This led to ground analyses and laboratory investigations as to the root cause of the waterhammer, potential damage to system integrity and functionality, and risks for switching from the primary (A-side) propulsion system to the redundant (B-side) system. The switchover to B-side was ultimately performed successfully and the spacecraft completed its basic and extended missions in this configuration. Nine years later, following a critical control gyroscope failure, Compton was safely deorbited and re-entered the Earth's atmosphere on June 4, 2000. Additional risk assessments concerning viability of A- and B-sides were necessary to provide confidence in attitude and delta-V authority and reliability to manage the precisely controlled reentry. This paper summarizes the design and operation of the propulsion system used on the spacecraft and provides "lessons learned" from the system engineering investigations into the propellant loading procedures, the initial priming anomaly, mission operations, and the commanded re-entry following the gyro failure.

  12. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  13. Nucleon polarizabilities: From Compton scattering to hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelstein, Franziska; Miskimen, Rory; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the general constraints based on unitarity, causality, discrete and continuous symmetries, which result in model-independent relations involving nucleon polarizabilities. We (re-)derive a variety of such relations and discuss their empirical value. The proton polarizability effects are presently the major sources of uncertainty in the assessment of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and hyperfine structure. Recent calculations of these effects are reviewed here in the context of the "proton-radius puzzle". We conclude with summary plots of the recent results and prospects for the near-future work.

  14. Timelike Virtual Compton Scattering from Electron-Positron Radiative Annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasev, Andrei; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Carlson, Carl E.; Mukherjee, Asmita; /Indian Inst. Tech., Mumbai

    2009-03-31

    We propose measurements of the deeply virtual Compton amplitude (DVCS) {gamma}* {yields} H{bar H}{gamma} in the timelike t = (p{sub H} + p{sub {bar H}}){sup 2} > 0 kinematic domain which is accessible at electron-positron colliders via the radiative annihilation process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} H{bar H}{gamma}. These processes allow the measurement of timelike deeply virtual Compton scattering for a variety of H{bar H} hadron pairs such as {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, and D{bar D} as well as p{bar p}. As in the conventional spacelike DVCS, there are interfering coherent amplitudes contributing to the timelike processes involving C = - form factors. The interference between the amplitudes measures the phase of the C = + timelike DVCS amplitude relative to the phase of the timelike form factors and can be isolated by considering the forward-backward e{sup +} {leftrightarrow} e{sup -} asymmetry. The J = 0 fixed pole contribution which arises from the local coupling of the two photons to the quark current plays a special role. As an example we present a simple model.

  15. Timelike Virtual Compton Scattering from Electron-Positron Radiative Annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanaciev,Andrei Afanasev, Stanley J. Brodsky, Carl E. Carlson, Asmita Mukherjee

    2010-02-01

    We propose measurements of the deeply virtual Compton amplitude (DVCS), gamma* to H H-bar gamma, in the timelike t = (p_{H} + p_{H-bar})^2 > 0 kinematic domain which is accessible at electron-positron colliders via the radiative annihilation process e+ e- to H H-bar gamma. These processes allow the measurement of timelike deeply virtual Compton scattering for a variety of H H-bar hadron pairs such as pi+ pi-, K+ K-, and D D-bar as well as p p-bar. As in the conventional spacelike DVCS, there are interfering coherent amplitudes contributing to the timelike processes involving C= - form factors. The interference between the amplitudes measures the phase of the C=+ timelike DVCS amplitude relative to the phase of the timelike form factors and can be isolated by considering the forward-backward e+ \\leftrightarrow e- asymmetry. The J=0 fixed pole contribution which arises from the local coupling of the two photons to the quark current plays a special role. As an example we present a simple model.

  16. Higher-dimensional catastrophes in nonlinear Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharin, Vasily; Seipt, Daniel; Rykovanov, Sergey

    2016-10-01

    The Compton scattering of the light on the accelerated electron beam is a valuable tool for generating tunable wide range X- and γ-radiation.However, the cross-section of the scattering is relatively low. That is, in order to obtain bright X-rays one naturally may consider increasing the intensity of the incident light. Passing to relativistic values of laser intensity significantly changes scattering mechanism. Precise QED analysis of the scattered spectra leads to the study of the corresponding elements of S-matrix. Evaluation is usually performed numerically (except cases of specific pulse shapes and scattering angles). We argue that the problem of extracting the scattered spectra in nonlinear Compton scattering of the pulse can be reformulated in terms of studying properties of projection map of specific surfaces associated to the pulse. They are stable with respect to initial conditions, and the brightest regions of the spectrum appear to be in correspondence with the singularities of the projection map, also known as caustics in pure mathematics, diffraction optics and cosmology. Work was supported by the Helmholtz Association (Helmholtz Young Investigators group VH-NG-1037).

  17. Compton suppression gamma-counting: The effect of count rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T.

    1984-01-01

    Past research has shown that anti-coincidence shielded Ge(Li) spectrometers enhanced the signal-to-background ratios for gamma-photopeaks, which are situated on high Compton backgrounds. Ordinarily, an anti- or non-coincidence spectrum (A) and a coincidence spectrum (C) are collected simultaneously with these systems. To be useful in neutron activation analysis (NAA), the fractions of the photopeak counts routed to the two spectra must be constant from sample to sample to variations must be corrected quantitatively. Most Compton suppression counting has been done at low count rate, but in NAA applications, count rates may be much higher. To operate over the wider dynamic range, the effect of count rate on the ratio of the photopeak counts in the two spectra (A/C) was studied. It was found that as the count rate increases, A/C decreases for gammas not coincident with other gammas from the same decay. For gammas coincident with other gammas, A/C increases to a maximum and then decreases. These results suggest that calibration curves are required to correct photopeak areas so quantitative data can be obtained at higher count rates. ?? 1984.

  18. Using MCNP for Compton Scattering Calculations with BGO Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Board, Jeremy; Womble, Phillip; Barzilov, Alexander

    2007-04-01

    Compton scattering is the process wherein photons scatter on the electrons within a material. In a detector, some of these scattered photons leave the detector with only part of their full energy. This creates a continuum which changes the signal to noise ratio with a gamma ray spectrum. For high resolution detectors such as high purity Ge (HPGe) solid state gamma ray detectors, a secondary detector surrounds the HPGe. The purpose of the secondary detector (made of a high Z material) is to detect the scattered photons. When both detectors have coincident photon events, a special circuit stops the data acquisition from acquiring the signal from the HPGe. Our goal is to design the optimal Compton ``suppressor'' using bismuth germinate scintillators for gamma rays whose energies are much larger than 1 MeV. Currently such suppressors are designed for energies less than 2 MeV. We are using the Monte Carlo N-particle code to calculate the amount of photon scattering in the HPGe into geometry of BGO surrounding the HPGe crystal. We are estimating both photon and electron fluence through the volume of BGO.

  19. Energy measurement of electron beams by Compton scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    1995-01-01

    A method has been proposed to utilize the well-known Compton scattering process as a tool to measure the centroid energy of a high energy electron beam at the 0.01% level. It is suggested to use the Compton scattering of an infrared laser off the electron beam, and then to measure the energy of the scattered gamma-rays very precisely using solid-state detectors. The technique proposed is applicable for electron beams with energies from 200 MeV to 16 GeV using presently available lasers. This technique was judged to be the most viable of all those proposed for beam energy measurements at the nearby Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). Plans for a prototype test of the technique are underway, where the main issues are the possible photon backgrounds associated with an electron accelerator and the electron and laser beam stabilities and diagnostics. The bulk of my ASEE summer research has been spent utilizing the expertise of the staff at the Aerospace Electronics Systems Division at LaRC to assist in the design of the test. Investigations were made regarding window and mirror transmission and radiation damage issues, remote movement of elements in ultra-high vacuum conditions, etc. The prototype test of the proposed laser backscattering method is planned for this December.

  20. Compton Reflection in AGN with Simbol-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, V.; Courvoisier, T. J.-L.; Gehrels, N.; Lubiński, P.; Malzac, J.; Petrucci, P. O.; Shrader, C. R.; Soldi, S.

    2009-05-01

    AGN exhibit complex hard X-ray spectra. Our current understanding is that the emission is dominated by inverse Compton processes which take place in the corona above the accretion disk, and that absorption and reflection in a distant absorber play a major role. These processes can be directly observed through the shape of the continuum, the Compton reflection hump around 30 keV, and the iron fluorescence line at 6.4 keV. We demonstrate the capabilities of Simbol-X to constrain complex models for cases like MCG-05-23-016, NGC 4151, NGC 2110, and NGC 4051 in short (10 ksec) observations. We compare the simulations with recent observations on these sources by INTEGRAL, Swift and Suzaku. Constraining reflection models for AGN with Simbol-X will help us to get a clear view of the processes and geometry near to the central engine in AGN, and will give insight to which sources are responsible for the Cosmic X-ray background at energies >20 keV.

  1. Anomalous neutron Compton scattering cross sections in ammonium hexachlorometallates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzystyniak, M.; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Lerch, M.; Lalowicz, Z. T.; Szymocha, A.

    2007-03-01

    The authors have performed neutron Compton scattering measurements on ammonium hexachloropalladate (NH4)2PdCl6 and ammonium hexachlorotellurate (NH4)2TeCl6. Both substances belong to the family of ammonium metallates. The aim of the experiment was to investigate the possible role of electronic environment of a proton on the anomaly of the neutron scattering intensity. The quantity of interest that was subject to experimental test was the reduction factor of the neutron scattering intensities. In both samples, the reduction factor was found to be smaller than unity, thus indicating the anomalous neutron Compton scattering from protons. Interestingly, the anomaly decreases with decreasing scattering angle and disappears at the lowest scattering angle (longest scattering time). The dependence of the amount of the anomaly on the scattering angle (scattering time) is the same in both substances (within experimental error). Also, the measured widths of proton momentum distributions are equal in both metallates. This is consistent with the fact that the attosecond proton dynamics of ammonium cations is fairly well decoupled from the dynamics of the sublattice of the octahedral anions PdCl62- and TeCl62-, respectively. The hypothesis is put forward that proton-electron decoherence processes are responsible for the considered effect. Decoherence processes may have to do rather with the direct electronic environment of ammonium protons and not with the electronic structure of the metal-chlorine bond.

  2. Simple analytic expressions for correcting the factorizable formula for Compton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2016-05-01

    The factorizable form of the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA) expression for Compton scattering doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) becomes progressively less accurate as the binding energy of the ejected electron increases. This expression, which we call the RKJ approximation, makes it possible to obtain the Compton profile (CP) from measured DDCS. We have derived three simple analytic expressions, each which can be used to correct the RKJ error for the atomic K-shell CP obtained from DDCS for any atomic number Z. The expression which is the most general is valid over a broad range of energy ω and scattering angle θ, a second expression which is somewhat simpler is valid at very high ω but over most θ, and the third which is the simplest is valid at small θ over a broad range of ω. We demonstrate that such expressions can yield a CP accurate to within a 1% error over 99% of the electron momentum distribution range of the Uranium K-shell CP. Since the K-shell contribution dominates the extremes of the whole atom CP (this is where the error of RKJ can exceed an order of magnitude), this region can be of concern in assessing the bonding properties of molecules as well as semiconducting materials.

  3. Feasibility Study of Compton Scattering Enhanced Multiple Pinhole Imager for Nuclear Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L. J.; Rogers, W. L.; Clinthorne, N. H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of a Compton scattering enhanced (CSE) multiple pinhole imaging system for gamma rays with energy of 140keV or higher. This system consists of a multiple-pinhole collimator, a position sensitive scintillation detector as used in standard Gamma camera, and a Silicon pad detector array, inserted between the collimator and the scintillation detector. The problem of multiplexing, normally associated with multiple pinhole system, is reduced by using the extra information from the detected Compton scattering events. In order to compensate for the sensitivity loss, due to the low probability of detecting Compton scattered events, the proposed detector is designed to collect both Compton scattering and Non-Compton events. It has been shown that with properly selected pinhole spacing, the proposed detector design leads to an improved image quality.

  4. The effect of relativistic Compton scattering on thermonuclear burn of pure deuterium fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemizad, A.; Nazirzadeh, M.; Khanbabaei, B.

    2016-08-15

    The relativistic effects of the Compton scattering on the thermonuclear burn-up of pure deuterium fuel in non-equilibrium plasma have been studied by four temperature (4T) theory. In the limit of low electron temperatures and photon energies, the nonrelativistic Compton scattering is valid and a convenient approximation, but in the high energy exchange rates between electrons and photons, is seen to break down. The deficiencies of the nonrelativistic approximation can be overcome by using the relativistic correction in the photons kinetic equation. In this research, we have utilized the four temperature (4T) theory to calculate the critical burn-up parameter for pure deuterium fuel, while the Compton scattering is considered as a relativistic phenomenon. It was shown that the measured critical burn-up parameter in ignition with relativistic Compton scattering is smaller than that of the parameter in the ignition with the nonrelativistic Compton scattering.

  5. Method of doping a semiconductor

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Chiang Y.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    A method for doping semiconductor material. An interface is established between a solid electrolyte and a semiconductor to be doped. The electrolyte is chosen to be an ionic conductor of the selected impurity and the semiconductor material and electrolyte are jointly chosen so that any compound formed from the impurity and the semiconductor will have a free energy no lower than the electrolyte. A potential is then established across the interface so as to allow the impurity ions to diffuse into the semiconductor. In one embodiment the semiconductor and electrolyte may be heated so as to increase the diffusion coefficient.

  6. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-06-01

    After an incubation'' period in the 1970's and early 80's, during which the first hydrogen related centers were discovered and characterized in ultra-pure germanium, a sharp increase of research activity occurred after the discovery of shallow acceptor passivation in crystalline silicon. The aim of this review is to convey an insight into the rich, multifaceted physics and materials science which has emerged from the vast variety of experimental and theoretical studies of hydrogen in semiconductors. In order to arrive at the current understanding of hydrogen related phenomena in a logical way, each chapter will start with a brief review of the major experimental and theoretical advances of the past few years. Those who are interested to learn more about this fascinating area of semiconductor research are referred to reviews, to a number of conference proceedings volumes, and to an upcoming book which will contain authoritative chapters on most aspects of hydrogen in crystalline semiconductors. Some of the early art of semiconductor device processing can finally be put on a scientific foundation and new ways of arriving at advanced device structures begin to use what we have learned from the basic studies of hydrogen in semiconductors. 92 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Automated S/TEM metrology on advanced semiconductor gate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, M.; Arjavac, J.; Horspool, D. N.; Nakahara, K.; Deeb, C.; Hobbs, C.

    2012-03-01

    Alternate techniques for obatining metrology data from advanced semiconductor device structures may be required. Automated STEM-based dimensional metrology (CD-STEM) was developed for complex 3D geometries in read/write head metrology in teh hard disk drive industry. It has been widely adopted, and is the process of record for metrology. Fully automated S/TEM metrology on advanced semiconductor gate structures is viable, with good repeatability and robustness. Consistent automated throughput of 10 samples per hour was achieved. Automated sample preparation was developed with sufficient throughput and quality to support the automated CD-STEM.

  8. Semiconductor surface protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method and a product for protecting semiconductor surfaces is disclosed. The protective coating material is prepared by heating a suitable protective resin with an organic solvent which is solid at room temperature and converting the resulting solution into sheets by a conventional casting operation. Pieces of such sheets of suitable shape and thickness are placed on the semiconductor areas to be coated and heat and vacuum are then applied to melt the sheet and to drive off the solvent and cure the resin. A uniform adherent coating, free of bubbles and other defects, is thus obtained exactly where it is desired.

  9. New unorthodox semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Board, K.

    1985-12-01

    A range of new semiconductor devices, including a number of structures which rely entirely upon new phenomena, are discussed. Unipolar two-terminal devices, including impurity-controlled barriers and graded composition barriers, are considered, as are new transistor structures, including the hot-electron camel transistor, the planar-doped barrier transistor, the thermionic emission transistor, and the permeable base transistor. Regenerative switching devices are addressed, including the metal-tunnel insulator-semiconductor switch, the polysilicon switch, MIS, and MISIM switching structures, and the triangular-barrier switch. Heterostructure devices are covered, including the heterojunction bipolar transistor, the selectively doped heterojunction transistor, heterojunction lasers, and quantum-well structures.

  10. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  11. Quantum Transport in Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    SRS i 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Transport in Semiconductors 5. FUNDING NUMBER söMtos-rizk-ooss 6. AUTHOR(S) D. K. Ferry ©fte ELECTE...OF ABSTRACT UL NSN 7540-01-280-5500 O 1 9 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Presented by ANSI Std «9-18 298-102 Final Report Quantum Transport in... Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices This final report describes a program of research investigating quantum effects which become important in

  12. The Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) balloon project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Sharma, Tejaswita; Legere, Jason S.; Bancroft, Christopher M.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Wright, Alex M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a project to develop new medium-energy gamma-ray instrumentation by constructing and flying a balloon-borne Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts. There is a need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from approximately 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. We believe that directly building on the legacy of COMPTEL, using relatively robust, low-cost, off-the-shelf technologies, is the most promising path for such a mission. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), Cerium Bromide (CeBr3), and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. We have conducted two balloon flights of prototype instruments to test these technologies. The first, in 2011, demonstrated that a Compton telescope consisting of an liquid organic scintillator scattering layer and a LaBr3 calorimeter effectively rejects background under balloon-flight conditions, using time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination. The second, in 2014, showed that a telescope using an organic stilbene crystal scattering element and a LaBr3 calorimeter with SiPM readouts can achieve similar ToF performance. We are now constructing a much larger balloon instrument, an Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) with SiPM readout, with the goal of imaging the Crab Nebula at MeV energies in a one-day flight. We expect a 4σ detection up to 1 MeV in a single transit. We present calibration results of the first detector modules, and updated simulations of the balloon instrument sensitivity. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the energy, timing, and position resolution of this technology are sufficient to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the mediumenergy gamma-ray band, were it to be

  13. Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

  14. Compton-dragged Gamma-Ray Bursts Associated with Supernovae.

    PubMed

    Lazzati; Ghisellini; Celotti; Rees

    2000-01-20

    It is proposed that the gamma-ray photons that characterize the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts are produced through the Compton-drag process, which is caused by the interaction of a relativistic fireball with a very dense soft photon bath. If gamma-ray bursts are indeed associated with supernovae, then the exploding star can provide enough soft photons for radiative drag to be effective. This model accounts for the basic properties of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the overall energetics, the peak frequency of the spectrum, and the fast variability, with an efficiency that can exceed 50%. In this scenario, there is no need for particle acceleration in relativistic collisionless shocks. Furthermore, although the Poynting flux may be important in accelerating the outflow, no magnetic field is required in the gamma-ray production. The drag also naturally limits the relativistic expansion of the fireball to Gamma less, similar104.

  15. Searching for Compton-thick AGN with INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virani, S. N.; Treister, E.; Urry, C. M.; Maccarone, T.; Bird, T.; Beckmann, V.; Lira, P.; Coppi, P.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The 30 keV peak in the X-ray background strongly suggests there should be a large number of highly obscured AGN in the local universe. However, the exact number of these objects remains unknown, even though they could nearly double the space density of supermassive black holes. These Compton-thick AGN can be detected in the hard X-rays with INTEGRAL. As part of the current observing cycle, we were awarded 2 Msec to perform INTEGRAL imaging of the XMM-LSS field in order to find highly obscured AGN in the local Universe. In this paper, we present preliminary results for the ˜1 Ms of IBIS data obtained so far, including new hard X-ray detections of AGN. We also present the 20---200 keV spectra of the brightest AGN including the z<0.1 Seyfert galaxies NGC 788, NGC 1068, and NGC 1142.

  16. Compton Scattering at the NLC and Large Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman

    1999-07-20

    We study Compton scattering, {gamma}e {yields} {gamma}e, in the context of the recent proposal for Weak Scale Quantum Gravity (WSQG) with large extra dimensions. It is shown that, with an ultraviolet cutoff M{sub S} {approx} 1 TeV for the effective gravity theory, the cross section for this process at the Next Linear Collider (NLC) deviates from the prediction of the Standard Model significantly. Our results suggest that, for typical proposed NLC energies and luminosities, WSQG can be tested in the range 4 TeV {approx}< M{sub S} {approx}< 16 TeV, making {gamma}e {yields} {gamma}e an important test channel.

  17. A Compton camera prototype for prompt gamma medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirolf, P. G.; Aldawood, S.; Böhmer, M.; Bortfeldt, J.; Castelhano, I.; Dedes, G.; Fiedler, F.; Gernhäuser, R.; Golnik, C.; Helmbrecht, S.; Hueso-González, F.; Kolff, H. v. d.; Kormoll, T.; Lang, C.; Liprandi, S.; Lutter, R.; Marinšek, T.; Maier, L.; Pausch, G.; Petzoldt, J.; Römer, K.; Schaart, D.; Parodi, K.

    2016-05-01

    Compton camera prototype for a position-sensitive detection of prompt γ rays from proton-induced nuclear reactions is being developed in Garching. The detector system allows to track the Comptonscattered electrons. The camera consists of a monolithic LaBr3:Ce scintillation absorber crystal, read out by a multi-anode PMT, preceded by a stacked array of 6 double-sided silicon strip detectors acting as scatterers. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has been characterized with radioactive sources. Online commissioning measurements were performed with a pulsed deuteron beam at the Garching Tandem accelerator and with a clinical proton beam at the OncoRay facility in Dresden. The determination of the interaction point of the photons in the monolithic crystal was investigated.

  18. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.

  19. Prototype of a single probe Compton camera for laparoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.; Sakuma, I.

    2017-02-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) is performed using a real-time surgery navigation system with three-dimensional (3D) position tracking of surgical tools. IGS is fast becoming an important technology for high-precision laparoscopic surgeries, in which the field of view is limited. In particular, recent developments in intraoperative imaging using radioactive biomarkers may enable advanced IGS for supporting malignant tumor removal surgery. In this light, we develop a novel intraoperative probe with a Compton camera and a position tracking system for performing real-time radiation-guided surgery. A prototype probe consisting of Ce :Gd3 Al2 Ga3 O12 (GAGG) crystals and silicon photomultipliers was fabricated, and its reconstruction algorithm was optimized to enable real-time position tracking. The results demonstrated the visualization capability of the radiation source with ARM = ∼ 22.1 ° and the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  20. Atomic and molecular diamagnetic susceptibilities from Compton scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadre, Shridhar R.; Pathak, Rajeev K.

    1990-04-01

    A procedure is proposed for the extraction of molar Larmor diamagnetic susceptibilities χL=-N0e2/(6mc2) (N0 is the Avogadro number) for closed-shell atomic and molecular systems, starting exclusively from their electron momentum densities derived from experimental or theoretical Compton profile data. This procedure is essentially founded on a transcription of the coordinate-space nonlocal-density approximation (NLDA) of Gadre and Chakravorty [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 2224 (1987)] to momentum space. Numerical tests of this scheme to a variety of closed-shell systems yield decent estimates of their values which compare well with their experimental or theoretical counterparts.

  1. Isothermal, Compton-heated coronae above accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of Compton-heated coronae above accretion disks is studied here by using analytic and numerical approaches are used here to determine the direct and scattered radiation reaching the base of the corona for a range of central source luminosities. It is found that the outer region of the corona is unaffected by multiple scattering in the interior, provided that the luminosity of the central source is sufficient below the Eddington limit. How attenuation and scattering by the corona affects the strength of chromospheric emission lines is determined, as is the condition for which the irradiation due to the central source exceeds the locally generated flux from the disk. Finally, it is shown that the stability analysis for irradiated accretion disks of Tuchman et al. is not substantially altered by the corona.

  2. Isothermal, Compton-heated coronae above accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, Eve C.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of Compton-heated coronae above accretion disks is studied here by using analytic and numerical approaches are used here to determine the direct and scattered radiation reaching the base of the corona for a range of central source luminosities. It is found that the outer region of the corona is unaffected by multiple scattering in the interior, provided that the luminosity of the central source is sufficient below the Eddington limit. How attenuation and scattering by the corona affects the strength of chromospheric emission lines is determined, as is the condition for which the irradiation due to the central source exceeds the locally generated flux from the disk. Finally, it is shown that the stability analysis for irradiated accretion disks of Tuchman et al. is not substantially altered by the corona.

  3. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; Campese, T.; Fedurin, M.; Murokh, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sakai, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Swinson, C.

    2016-12-01

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this paper reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. With the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.

  4. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Seder, E; Biselli, A; Pisano, S; Niccolai, S; Smith, G D; Joo, K; Adhikari, K; Amaryan, M J; Anderson, M D; Anefalos Pereira, S; Avakian, H; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bono, J; Boiarinov, S; Bosted, P; Briscoe, W; Brock, J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Carlin, C; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Colaneri, L; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crabb, D; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Filippi, A; Fleming, J A; Fradi, A; Garillon, B; Garçon, M; Gevorgyan, N; Ghandilyan, Y; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Harrison, N; Hattawy, M; Hirlinger Saylor, N; Holtrop, M; Hughes, S M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Joosten, S; Keith, C D; Keller, D; Khachatryan, G; Khandaker, M; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Koirala, S; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Lenisa, P; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meekins, D G; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Montgomery, R; Moody, C I; Moutarde, H; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C; Nadel-Turonski, P; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L L; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Peng, P; Phelps, W; Pogorelko, O; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Puckett, A J R; Ripani, M; Rizzo, A; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Roy, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Senderovich, I; Simonyan, A; Skorodumina, I; Sokhan, D; Sparveris, N; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Sytnik, V; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Tian, Y; Ungaro, M; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Wei, X; Weinstein, L B; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zonta, I

    2015-01-23

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6 GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep→e^{'}p^{'}γ events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q^{2}, x_{B}, t, and ϕ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of generalized parton distributions, at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight into the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. These results also bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even generalized parton distributions.

  5. Longitudinal Target-Spin Asymmetries for Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, W.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Carlin, C.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hirlinger Saylor, N.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Senderovich, I.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Tian, Y.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zonta, I.; CLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6 GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target, and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for e p →e'p'γ events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2 , xB, t , and ϕ , for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of generalized parton distributions, at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight into the spatial distribution of the axial charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. These results also bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even generalized parton distributions.

  6. Hybrid coded aperture and Compton imaging using an active mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. J.; Wallace, M. S.; Galassi, M. C.; Hoover, A. S.; Mocko, M.; Palmer, D. M.; Tornga, S. R.; Kippen, R. M.; Hynes, M. V.; Toolin, M. J.; Harris, B.; McElroy, J. E.; Wakeford, D.; Lanza, R. C.; Horn, B. K. P.; Wehe, D. K.

    2009-09-01

    The trimodal imager (TMI) images gamma-ray sources from a mobile platform using both coded aperture (CA) and Compton imaging (CI) modalities. In this paper we will discuss development and performance of image reconstruction algorithms for the TMI. In order to develop algorithms in parallel with detector hardware we are using a GEANT4 [J. Allison, K. Amako, J. Apostolakis, H. Araujo, P.A. Dubois, M. Asai, G. Barrand, R. Capra, S. Chauvie, R. Chytracek, G. Cirrone, G. Cooperman, G. Cosmo, G. Cuttone, G. Daquino, et al., IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-53 (1) (2006) 270] based simulation package to produce realistic data sets for code development. The simulation code incorporates detailed detector modeling, contributions from natural background radiation, and validation of simulation results against measured data. Maximum likelihood algorithms for both imaging methods are discussed, as well as a hybrid imaging algorithm wherein CA and CI information is fused to generate a higher fidelity reconstruction.

  7. Relativistic effects in double ionization of helium via Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliman, Zoran; Pisk, Krunoslav

    2017-08-01

    In this article we present the relativistic calculations, based on the QED theory, for double ionization of helium by the Compton scattering. In particular, we calculate the contribution of the spin-flip amplitude to the total cross section. Due to this amplitude the final triplet spin state of the ejected electrons is possible. In the calculations based on the non-relativistic A2 term of the electron-photon interaction only the singlet spin state for the final electrons is allowed. We further assume the shake-off mechanism for process of double ionization. For the ground state of helium we use both the non-correlated and highly correlated wave function. We also discuss a degree of the scattered photon polarization in correlation with the formation of spin triplet state. Our calculations cover the photon impact energy range from 150 to 1000 keV.

  8. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; ...

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore » charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  9. Deeply virtual Compton scattering from gauge/gravity duality

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Miguel S.; Djuric, Marko

    2013-04-15

    We use gauge/gravity duality to study deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) in the limit of high center of mass energy at fixed momentum transfer, corresponding to the limit of low Bjorken x, where the process is dominated by the exchange of the pomeron. At strong coupling, the pomeron is described as the graviton Regge trajectory in AdS space, with a hard wall to mimic confinement effects. This model agrees with HERA data in a large kinematical range. The behavior of the DVCS cross section for very high energies, inside saturation, can be explained by a simple AdS black disk model. In a restricted kinematical window, this model agrees with HERA data as well.

  10. Compton Scattering and Photo-absorption Sum Rules on Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshteyn, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new ``constituent quark model'' sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition we extract the J=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high energy proton data we find that the J=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman. We discuss phenomenological implications of this new result.

  11. Compton scattering from nuclei and photo-absorption sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2011-12-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new “constituent quark model” sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition, we extract the α=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high-energy proton data, we find that the α=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman.

  12. Compton imaging with the PorGamRays spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judson, D. S.; Boston, A. J.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Cullen, D. M.; Hardie, A.; Harkness, L. J.; Jones, L. L.; Jones, M.; Lazarus, I.; Nolan, P. J.; Pucknell, V.; Rigby, S. V.; Seller, P.; Scraggs, D. P.; Simpson, J.; Slee, M.; Sweeney, A.; PorGamRays Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The PorGamRays project aims to develop a portable gamma-ray detection system with both spectroscopic and imaging capabilities. The system is designed around a stack of thin Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors. The imaging capability utilises the Compton camera principle. Each detector is segmented into 100 pixels which are read out through custom designed Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). This device has potential applications in the security, decommissioning and medical fields. This work focuses on the near-field imaging performance of a lab-based demonstrator consisting of two pixelated CZT detectors, each of which is bonded to a NUCAM II ASIC. Measurements have been made with point 133Ba and 57Co sources located ˜35 mm from the surface of the scattering detector. Position resolution of ˜20 mm FWHM in the x and y planes is demonstrated.

  13. FPGA-based data acquisition system for a Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdan, K.; Çonka-Nurdan, T.; Besch, H. J.; Freisleben, B.; Pavel, N. A.; Walenta, A. H.

    2003-09-01

    A data acquisition (DAQ) system with custom back-plane and custom readout boards has been developed for a Compton camera prototype. The DAQ system consists of two layers. The first layer has units for parallel high-speed analog-to-digital conversion and online data pre-processing. The second layer has a central board to form a general event trigger and to build the data structure for the event. This modularity and the use of field programmable gate arrays make the whole DAQ system highly flexible and adaptable to modified experimental setups. The design specifications, the general architecture of the Trigger and DAQ system and the implemented readout protocols are presented in this paper.

  14. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-09-21

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  15. Physics of Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brütting, Wolfgang

    2004-05-01

    Organic semiconductors are of steadily growing interest as active components in electronics and optoelectronics. Due to their flexibility, low cost and ease-of-production they represent a valid alternative to conventional inorganic semiconductor technology in a number of applications, such as flat panel displays and illumination, plastic integrated circuits or solar energy conversion. Although first commercial applications of this technology are being realized nowadays, there is still the need for a deeper scientific understanding in order to achieve optimum device performance.This special issue of physica status solidi (a) tries to give an overview of our present-day knowledge of the physics behind organic semiconductor devices. Contributions from 17 international research groups cover various aspects of this field ranging from the growth of organic layers and crystals, their electronic properties at interfaces, their photophysics and electrical transport properties to the application of these materials in different devices like organic field-effect transistors, photovoltaic cells and organic light-emitting diodes.Putting together such a special issue one soon realizes that it is simply impossible to fully cover the whole area of organic semiconductors. Nevertheless, we hope that the reader will find the collection of topics in this issue useful for getting an up-to-date review of a field which is still developing very dynamically.

  16. Semiconductor Nanocrystal Photonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-31

    Hahn, H. Du, and T. D. Krauss, "Photoluminescence enhancement of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots embedded in a monolithic microcavity," Appl... DBRs ). The colloidal NC suspension was spun-coat into a 95-nm thick layer in the center of the cavity and then the other layers forming the top DBR

  17. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

  18. Chemically Derivatized Semiconductor Photoelectrodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrighton, Mark S.

    1983-01-01

    Deliberate modification of semiconductor photoelectrodes to improve durability and enhance rate of desirable interfacial redox processes is discussed for a variety of systems. Modification with molecular-based systems or with metals/metal oxides yields results indicating an important role for surface modification in devices for fundamental study…

  19. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Sakai, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.; Williams, O.; ...

    2015-06-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to γ-ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by themore » ps CO2 laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5L<0.7, which due to the quadratic dependence of the strength of nonlinear phenomena on aL permits sufficient effects not observed in past 2nd harmonic study with aL ≈ 0.3 laser [M. Babzien et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 054802 (2006)]. The angular spectral characteristics are revealed using K-, L-edge, and high energy attenuation filters. The observation indicates existence of the electrons’ longitudinal motion through frequency redshifting understood as the mass shift effect. The 3rd harmonic radiation has been observed containing on-axis x-ray component that is directly associated with the induced figure-8 motion. These are further supported by an initial evidence of off-axis 2nd harmonic radiation produced in a circularly polarized laser wave field. Total x-ray photon number per pulse, scattered by 65 MeV electron beam of 0.3 nC, at the interaction point is measured to be approximately 109.« less

  20. Deeply virtual Compton scattering at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Cornelis De Jager; Javier Gomez; Jens-ole Hansen; John Lerose; Robert Michaels; Joseph Mitchell; Arunava Saha; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; J. Berthot; Pierre Bertin; Alexandre Deur; Rachele Di Salvo; Lawrence Weinstein; Werner Boeglin; Pete Markowitz; Jeffrey Templon; Paul Gueye; Ting Chang; Alan Nathan; Raffaele De Leo; Luigi Lagamba; Moskov Amarian; Evaristo Cisbani; Salvatore Frullani; Franco Garibaldi; R. Iommi; Mauro Iodice; Guido Urciuoli; Marc Vanderhaeghen; Douglas Higinbotham; Xiaodong Jiang; Pierre Guichon; Yves Roblin; Gail Dodge; Christophe Jutier; Charles Hyde-wright; Franck Sabatie; Luminita Todor; Paul Ulmer

    2000-06-01

    The authors propose a measurement of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process (DVCS) ep {yields} ep{gamma} in Hall A at Jefferson Lab with a 6 GeV beam. The authors are able to explore the onset of Q{sup 2} scaling, by measuring a beam helicity asymmetry for Q{sup 2} ranging from 1.5 to 2.5 GeV{sup 2} at x{sub B} {approx} 0.35. At this kinematics, the asymmetry is dominated by the DVCS Bethe-Heitler (BH) interference, which is proportional to the imaginary part of the DVCS amplitude amplified by the full magnitude of the BH amplitude. The imaginary part of the DVCS amplitude is expected to scale early. Indeed, the imaginary part of the forward Compton amplitude measured in deep inelastic scattering (via the optical theorem) scales at Q{sup 2} as low as 1 GeV{sup 2}. If the scaling regime is reached, they make an 8% measurement of the skewed parton distributions (SPD) contributing to the DVCS amplitude. Also, this experiment allows them to separately estimate the size of the higher-twist effects, since they are only suppressed by an additional factor 1/Q compared to the leading-twist term, and have a different angular dependence. They use a polarized electron beam and detect the scattered electron in the HRSe, the real photon in an electromagnetic calorimeter (under construction) and the recoil proton in a shielded scintillator array (to be constructed). This allows them to determine the difference in cross-sections for electrons of opposite helicities. This observable is directly linked to the SPD's. The authors estimate that 25 days of beam (600 hours) are needed to achieve this goal.

  1. Analysis of a proposed Compton backscatter imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.; Jacoby, B.

    1992-12-01

    Imaging techniques which require access to only one side of the object being viewed are potentially useful in situations where conventional projection radiography and tomography cannot be applied, such as looking for voids in a large container where access to the back of the object is inconvenient or even impossible. One-sided imaging techniques are currently being used in nondestructive evaluation of surfaces and shallow subsurface structures. In this work we present both analytical calculations and detailed Monte Carlo simulations aimed at assessing the capability of a proposed Compton backscatter imaging technique designed to detect and characterize voids located several centimeters below the surface of a solid. The proposed technique, based on a scheme suggested by Farmer and Collins, encodes the spatial position and structure of voids in a solid in the energy spectrum of the Compton-scattered photons as recorded by a high resolution detector. Our calculations model a {sup 137}Cs source projecting a 1 mm{sup 2} pencil beam of 662 keV gammas into a target slab at an incident angle of 45{degrees} and a collimated detector (also oriented at 45{degrees} with respect to the surface) which views the beam path at a central angle of 90{degrees}. The detector collimator is modeled here as a triangular slit viewing a 2.54 cm (1.000``) segment of the beam path at a depth of 2 cm below the surface of the slab. Our results suggest that the proposed technique should be capable of an absolute position resolution of {approx} 0.25 mm ({approx} 0.010``) for isolated voids and an overall object resolution of {approx} 1.00 Ip/mm ({approx} 0.04``). The predicted signal contrast for voids packed with various contraband materials will be discussed as well as multiple scattering contributions to the predicted yields.

  2. Observation of redshifting and harmonic radiation in inverse Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Pogorelsky, I.; Williams, O.; O'Shea, F.; Barber, S.; Gadjev, I.; Duris, J.; Musumeci, P.; Fedurin, M.; Korostyshevsky, A.; Malone, B.; Swinson, C.; Stenby, G.; Kusche, K.; Babzien, M.; Montemagno, M.; Jacob, P.; Zhong, Z.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse Compton scattering of laser photons by ultrarelativistic electron beam provides polarized x- to γ -ray pulses due to the Doppler blueshifting. Nonlinear electrodynamics in the relativistically intense linearly polarized laser field changes the radiation kinetics established during the Compton interaction. These are due to the induced figure-8 motion, which introduces an overall redshift in the radiation spectrum, with the concomitant emission of higher order harmonics. To experimentally analyze the strong field physics associated with the nonlinear electron-laser interaction, clear modifications to the angular and wavelength distributions of x rays are observed. The relativistic photon wave field is provided by the ps CO2 laser of peak normalized vector potential of 0.5

  3. Compton suppressed LaBr3 detection system for use in nondestructive spent fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, S.; Heidrich, B.; Ünlü, K.

    2015-06-01

    Current methods for safeguarding and accounting for spent nuclear fuel in reprocessing facilities are extremely resource and time intensive. The incorporation of autonomous passive gamma-ray detectors into the procedure could make the process significantly less burdensome. In measured gamma-ray spectra from spent nuclear fuel, the Compton continuum from dominant fission product photopeaks obscure the lower energy lines from other isotopes. The application of Compton suppression to gamma-ray measurements of spent fuel may reduce this effect and allow other less intense, lower energy peaks to be detected, potentially improving the accuracy of multivariate analysis algorithms. Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel using HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl) primary detectors were performed. Irradiated fuel was measured in two configurations: as intact fuel elements viewed through a collimator and as feed solutions in a laboratory to simulate the measurement of a dissolved process stream. These two configurations allowed the direct assessment and quantification of the differences in measured gamma-ray spectra from the application of Compton suppression. In the first configuration, several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling times from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using the three collimated Compton suppression systems. In the second geometry, Compton suppressed measurements of two samples of Approved Test Material commercial fuel elements were recorded inside the guard detector annulus to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Compton suppression was found to improve measured gamma-ray spectra of spent fuel for multivariate analysis by notably lowering the Compton continuum from dominant photopeaks such as 137Cs and 140La, due to scattered interactions in the detector, which allowed more spectral features to be resolved. There was a

  4. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  5. Inverse-Compton Emission from the Lobes of 3C 353

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    v2.2) Inverse- Compton emission from the lobes of 3C 353 J.L. Goodger,1⋆ M.J. Hardcastle,1 J.H. Croston,1 N.E. Kassim2 and R.A. Perley3 1University of...Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801, USA ABSTRACT X-ray emission due to inverse- Compton scattering of microwave background photons...by electrons in the lobes of powerful radio galaxies has now been seen in a large number of objects. Combining an inverse- Compton model for the lobe

  6. Cryogenic system for X-ray Compton scattering measurements of superfluid helium below 2 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akira; Koizumi, Akihisa; Kawasaki, Ikuto; Sumiyama, Akihiko; Itou, Masayoshi; Sakurai, Yoshiharu

    2017-07-01

    A cryostat was constructed for high-resolution X-ray Compton scattering measurements at temperature down to 1.7 K, in order to investigate superfluid helium-4. Compton profiles of helium were measured using synchrotron X-rays for gas and liquid phases, respectively. In the measurement of the liquid phase, we succeeded in measuring the Compton profile of the superfluid helium at 1.7 K. Comparison of the results with theoretical calculation reveals importance of many-body effects beyond the mean-field treatment of electron systems.

  7. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian F

    2011-05-16

    Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, and of lower socioeconomic group. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: benzyl alcohol, dimeticone, herbal and essential oils, insecticide combinations, isopropyl myristate, ivermectin, lindane, malathion, mechanical removal by combing ("bug busting"), oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole, TMP-SMX), permethrin, phenothrin, pyrethrum, and spinosad.

  8. Head lice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, and of lower socioeconomic group. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: benzyl alcohol, dimeticone, herbal and essential oils, insecticide combinations, isopropyl myristate, ivermectin, lindane, malathion, mechanical removal by combing ("bug busting"), oral trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole, TMP-SMX), permethrin, phenothrin, pyrethrum, and spinosad. PMID:21575285

  9. Head lice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Head louse infection is diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch (but a few may take longer, up to 13 days) and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings or of lower socioeconomic group. Factors such as longer hair make diagnosis and treatment more difficult. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of physically acting treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found six studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 1,2-octanediol, dimeticone, herbal and essential oils, and isopropyl myristate. PMID:25587918

  10. Light amplification using semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, R.D.

    1987-06-01

    During the summer of 1953, John von Neumann discussed his ideas concerning light amplification using semiconductors with Edward Teller. In September of that year, von Neumann sent a manuscript containing his ideas and calculations on this subject to Teller for his comments. To the best of our knowledge, von Neumann did not take time to work further on these ideas, and the manuscript remained unpublished. These previously unpublished writings of John von Neumann on the subject of light amplification in semiconductors are printed as a service to the laser community. While von Neumann's original manuscript and his letter to Teller are available to anyone who visits the Library of Congress, it is much more convenient to have this paper appear in an archival journal.

  11. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Tull, Carolyn R.; Vilkelis, Gintas

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  12. Stretchable Organic Semiconductor Devices.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yan; Zhang, Xinwen; Xie, Linghai; Qi, Dianpeng; Chandran, Bevita K; Chen, Xiaodong; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Stretchable electronics are essential for the development of intensely packed collapsible and portable electronics, wearable electronics, epidermal and bioimplanted electronics, 3D surface compliable devices, bionics, prosthesis, and robotics. However, most stretchable devices are currently based on inorganic electronics, whose high cost of fabrication and limited processing area make it difficult to produce inexpensive, large-area devices. Therefore, organic stretchable electronics are highly attractive due to many advantages over their inorganic counterparts, such as their light weight, flexibility, low cost and large-area solution-processing, the reproducible semiconductor resources, and the easy tuning of their properties via molecular tailoring. Among them, stretchable organic semiconductor devices have become a hot and fast-growing research field, in which great advances have been made in recent years. These fantastic advances are summarized here, focusing on stretchable organic field-effect transistors, light-emitting devices, solar cells, and memory devices.

  13. Thermosize potentials in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabetoglu, S.; Sisman, A.

    2017-09-01

    A thermosize junction consists of two different sized structures made using the same material. Classical and quantum thermosize effects (CTSEs and QTSEs), which are opposite to each other, induce a thermosize potential in a thermosize junction. A semi-analytical method is proposed to calculate thermosize potentials in wide ranges of degeneracy and confinement by considering both CTSEs and QTSEs in thermosize junctions made using semiconductors. Dependencies of thermosize potential on temperature, size, and degeneracy are examined. It is shown that a potential difference in millivolt scale can be induced as a combined effect of CTS and QTS. The highest potential is obtained in nondegenerate limit where the full analytical solution is obtained. The model can be used to design semiconductor thermosize devices for a possible experimental verification of CTSEs and QTSEs, which may lead to new nano energy conversion devices.

  14. Three dimensional strained semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Voss, Lars; Conway, Adam; Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Leao, Cedric Rocha; Shao, Qinghui

    2016-11-08

    In one embodiment, an apparatus includes a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and at least one thin film in contact with at least one exterior surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the three dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a three dimensional structure comprising a semiconductor material, and depositing at least one thin film on at least one surface of the three dimensional structure for inducing a strain in the structure, the thin film being characterized as providing at least one of: an induced strain of at least 0.05%, and an induced strain in at least 5% of a volume of the structure.

  15. Nucleon Spin-Averaged Forward Virtual Compton Tensor at Large $Q^2$

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Richard J.; Paz, Gil

    2016-11-29

    The nucleon spin-averaged forward virtual Compton tensor determines important physical quantities such as electromagnetically-induced mass differences of nucleons, and two-photon exchange contributions in hydrogen spectroscopy. It depends on two kinematic variables: $\

  16. On the Compton clock and the undulatory nature of particle mass in graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolce, Donatello; Perali, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    In undulatory mechanics the rest mass of a particle is associated to a rest periodicity known as Compton periodicity. In carbon nanotubes the Compton periodicity is determined geometrically, through dimensional reduction, by the circumference of the curled-up dimension, or by similar spatial constraints to the charge carrier wave function in other condensed matter systems. In this way the Compton periodicity is effectively reduced by several orders of magnitude with respect to that of the electron, allowing for the possibility to experimentally test foundational aspects of quantum mechanics. We present a novel powerful formalism to derive the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, in agreement with the results known in literature, from simple geometric and relativistic considerations about the Compton periodicity as well as a dictionary of analogies between particle and graphene physics.

  17. News on Compton Scattering γX → γX in Chiral EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    We review theoretical progress and prospects to understand the nucleon's static dipole polarisabilities from Compton scattering on few-nucleon targets, including new values; see Refs. [1-5] for details and a more thorough bibliography.

  18. Compton scattering and nucleon polarisabilities in chiral EFT: Status and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2016-05-01

    We review theoretical progress and prospects for determining the nucleon's static dipole polarisabilities from Compton scattering on few-nucleon targets, including new values; see Refs. [1-5] for details and a more thorough bibliography.

  19. Compton rejection for HPGe detectors via real-time pulse shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beckedahl, D; Blair, J J; Friensehner, A; Kammeraad, J E; Kreek, S A; Payne, B; Schmid, G J

    1998-07-31

    A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-developed pulse shape analysis (PSA) technique which performs real-time Compton suppression in High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors without the use of anti-coincidence detectors is described. Some preliminary measurements of a variety of sources with a standard HPGe detector system and our prototype PSA algorithm have been made and indicate that a reduction in Compton continuum can be achieved via PSA. These measurements represent an initial assessment of the effectiveness of the prototype PSA system for the improvement of spectral quality and future improvements are expected. Additional work is progressing to optimize the effectiveness of the algorithm for Compton rejection in standard HPGe detectors. Work is also progressing to extend the methodology to segmented HPGe detectors which could potentially yield significantly better Compton rejection and gamma-ray ima

  20. Effect of Compton scattering on the double-to-single photoionization ratio in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagurton, M.; Bartlett, R. J.; Samson, J. A. R.; He, Z. X.; Morgan, D.

    1995-10-01

    The effect of Compton scattering on the ratio of double-to-single ionization from photon impact in helium has been measured for 2.1<=hν<=5.5 keV using a time-of-flight ion spectrometer with a high relative collection efficiency for Compton ions. Single ionization from Compton scattering is found to contribute measurably to a reduction in the ionization ratio for hν>~3.5 keV. Our measurements are compared with predictions based on recent calculations of the single and double ionization cross sections for photoabsorption and Compton scattering by Hino et al. [Phys. Rev. A 48, 1271 (1993), Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1620 (1994)], Andersson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 50 (1993)], and Surić et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 790 (1994)].

  1. On the line-shape analysis of Compton profiles and its application to neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanelli, G.; Krzystyniak, M.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical properties of Compton profiles are used in order to simplify the analysis of neutron Compton scattering experiments. In particular, the possibility to fit the difference of Compton profiles is discussed as a way to greatly decrease the level of complexity of the data treatment, making the analysis easier, faster and more robust. In the context of the novel method proposed, two mathematical models describing the shapes of differenced Compton profiles are discussed: the simple Gaussian approximation for harmonic and isotropic local potential, and an analytical Gauss-Hermite expansion for an anharmonic or anisotropic potential. The method is applied to data collected by VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS neutron and muon pulsed source (UK) on Copper and Aluminium samples at ambient and low temperatures.

  2. Electron Pattern Recognition using trigger mode SOI pixel sensor for Advanced Compton Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazoe, K.; Yoshihara, Y.; Fairuz, A.; Koyama, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takeda, A.; Tsuru, T.; Arai, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Compton imaging is a useful method for localizing sub MeV to a few MeV gamma-rays and widely used for environmental and medical applications. The direction of recoiled electrons in Compton scattering process provides the additional information to limit the Compton cones and increases the sensitivity in the system. The capability of recoiled electron tracking using trigger-mode Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) sensor is investigated with various radiation sources. The trigger-mode SOI sensor consists of 144 by 144 active pixels with 30 μm cells and the thickness of sensor is 500 μm. The sensor generates the digital output when it is hit by gamma-rays and 25 by 25 pixel pattern of surrounding the triggered pixel is readout to extract the recoiled electron track. The electron track is successfully observed for 60Co and 137Cs sources, which provides useful information for future electron tracking Compton camera.

  3. Development of TOF-PET using Compton scattering by plastic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramoto, M.; Nakamori, T.; Kimura, S.; Gunji, S.; Takakura, M.; Kataoka, J.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a time-of-flight (TOF) technique using plastic scintillators which have fast decay time of a few ns for positron emission tomography (PET). While the photoelectric absorption probability of the plastic for 511 keV gamma rays are extremely low due to its small density and effective atomic number, the cross section of Compton scattering is comparable to that of absorption by conventional inorganic scintillators. We thus propose TOF-PET using Compton scattering with plastic scintillators (Compton-PET), and performed fundamental experiments towards exploration of the Compton-PET capability. We demonstrated that the plastic scintillators achieved the better time resolution in comparison to LYSO(Ce) and GAGG(Ce) scintillators. In addition we evaluated the depth-of-interaction resolving capability with the plastic scintillators.

  4. Tunable semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Tunable semiconductor lasers are disclosed requiring minimized coupling regions. Multiple laser embodiments employ ring resonators or ring resonator pairs using only a single coupling region with the gain medium are detailed. Tuning can be performed by changing the phase of the coupling coefficient between the gain medium and a ring resonator of the laser. Another embodiment provides a tunable laser including two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series and a reflector coupled to a gain medium.

  5. Metal Contacts in Semiconductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    surfaces, Pnotoelectron spe troscopy, Auger electron spectro- I scopy, Schottky barriers, ohmic contacts, Defects in semiconductors, Cadmium * telluride...Indium phosphide, Gallium arsenide, Gallium Selenide . j 20. ABSTR ACT (roothat ow rees esh " neceay and td..ity by block -. b*w) SThe application of...angstroms. Also, provided one eliminates the systems where cadmium outdiffusion into high work function metals occurs then good agreement between the

  6. Chemically Derivatized Semiconductor Photoelectrodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Journal of Chemical Education . l.i LA. Is. KEY WOROS (Coneinuo onm Few*,@*.oldsI noede eeand identify by block number) semiconductors, photoelectrodes...Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 Prepared for publication in the Journal of Chemical Education June 1, 1983 Reproduction...use of metals or metal oxides coated onto the photoelectrode surface. [Prepared for publication in the Journal of Chemical Education .

  7. Semiconductor projectile impact detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shriver, E. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A semiconductor projectile impact detector is described for use in determining micrometeorite presence, as well as its flux and energy comprising a photovoltaic cell which generates a voltage according to the light and heat emitted by the micrometeorites upon impact. A counter and peak amplitude measuring device were used to indicate the number of particules which strike the surface of the cell as well as the kinetic energy of each of the particles.

  8. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, Eugene E.

    2006-06-19

    The following article is an edited transcript based on the Turnbull Lecture given by Eugene E. Haller at the 2005 Materials Research Society Fall Meeting in Boston on November 29, 2005. The David Turnbull Lectureship is awarded to recognize the career of a scientist who has made outstanding contributions to understanding materials phenomena and properties through research, writing, and lecturing, as exemplified by the life work of David Turnbull. Haller was named the 2005 David Turnbull Lecturer for his 'pioneering achievements and leadership in establishing the field of isotopically engineered semiconductors; for outstanding contributions to materials growth, doping and diffusion; and for excellence in lecturing, writing, and fostering international collaborations'. The scientific interest, increased availability, and technological promise of highly enriched isotopes have led to a sharp rise in the number of experimental and theoretical studies with isotopically controlled semiconductor crystals. This article reviews results obtained with isotopically controlled semiconductor bulk and thin-film heterostructures. Isotopic composition affects several properties such as phonon energies, band structure, and lattice constant in subtle, but, for their physical understanding, significant ways. Large isotope-related effects are observed for thermal conductivity in local vibrational modes of impurities and after neutron transmutation doping. Spectacularly sharp photoluminescence lines have been observed in ultrapure, isotopically enriched silicon crystals. Isotope multilayer structures are especially well suited for simultaneous self- and dopant-diffusion studies. The absence of any chemical, mechanical, or electrical driving forces makes possible the study of an ideal random-walk problem. Isotopically controlled semiconductors may find applications in quantum computing, nanoscience, and spintronics.

  9. Semiconductor Properties Near Interfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-31

    electron multi- plication with a scintillation counter. This detECtor , described in the appendix, provides very low background without sacrifice of...k ADA095 858 UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES F/G 20/12I SEMICONDUCTOR PROPERTIES NEAR INTERFACES.(U) JUL GO0 DB WITTRY. S Y YIN, F GUO...improvements in the Ion Microprobe Mass Analyzer; in the course of the investioations in improved inn detector was developed and a microcomrnu*e

  10. Semiconductor Diamond Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-31

    hidrogen at the maximum pressure showed only very faint -second order spots. Annealing of thee samples to 1000*C restored the (2x0) configura.-tion...semiconductor contact also provides a suitable vehicle for electrical characterization of the device material. However, it has been observed that the...nature of the plasma activated diamond deposition processes provides a very useful and flexible vehicle for device fabrication sequences. Other workers

  11. Electron Trajectory Reconstruction for Advanced Compton Imaging of Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimley, Brian Christopher

    Gamma-ray imaging is useful for detecting, characterizing, and localizing sources in a variety of fields, including nuclear physics, security, nuclear accident response, nuclear medicine, and astronomy. Compton imaging in particular provides sensitivity to weak sources and good angular resolution in a large field of view. However, the photon origin in a single event sequence is normally only limited to the surface of a cone. If the initial direction of the Compton-scattered electron can be measured, the cone can be reduced to a cone segment with width depending on the uncertainty in the direction measurement, providing a corresponding increase in imaging sensitivity. Measurement of the electron's initial direction in an efficient detection material requires very fine position resolution due to the electron's short range and tortuous path. A thick (650 mum), fully-depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) developed for infrared astronomy has 10.5-mum position resolution in two dimensions, enabling the initial trajectory measurement of electrons of energy as low as 100 keV. This is the first time the initial trajectories of electrons of such low energies have been measured in a solid material. In this work, the CCD's efficacy as a gamma-ray detector is demonstrated experimentally, using a reconstruction algorithm to measure the initial electron direction from the CCD track image. In addition, models of fast electron interaction physics, charge transport and readout were used to generate modeled tracks with known initial direction. These modeled tracks allowed the development and refinement of the reconstruction algorithm. The angular sensitivity of the reconstruction algorithm is evaluated extensively with models for tracks below 480 keV, showing a FWHM as low as 20° in the pixel plane, and 30° RMS sensitivity to the magnitude of the out-of-plane angle. The measurement of the trajectories of electrons with energies as low as 100 keV have the potential to make electron

  12. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  13. New Semiconductor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestra, F.

    2008-11-01

    A review of recently emerging semiconductor devices for nanoelectronic applications is given. For the end of the international technology roadmap for semiconductors, very innovative materials, technologies and nanodevice architectures will be needed. Silicon on insulator-based devices seem to be the best candidates for the ultimate integration of integrated circuits on silicon. The flexibility of the silicon on insulator-based structure and the possibility to realize new device architectures allow to obtain optimum electrical properties for low power and high performance circuits. These transistors are also very interesting for high frequency and memory applications. The performance and physical mechanisms are addressed in single- and multi-gate thin film Si, SiGe and Ge metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors. The impact of tensile or compressive uniaxial and biaxial strains in the channel, of high k materials and metal gates as well as metallic Schottky source-drain architectures are discussed. Finally, the interest of advanced beyond-CMOS (complementary MOS) nanodevices for long term applications, based on nanowires, carbon electronics or small slope switch structures are presented.

  14. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  15. Design of a Paraxial Inverse Compton Scattering Diagnostic for an Intense Relativistic Electron Beam

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    DESIGN OF A PARAXIAL INVERSE COMPTON SCATTERING DIAGNOSTIC FOR AN INTENSE RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON BEAM ∗ J.E. Colemanξ, J.A. Oertel, C.A. Ekdahl...supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy under ξ email: jecoleman@lanl.gov Abstract An inverse Compton ...ray range by the relativistic electrons. The diverging, scattered photons are diffracted onto an X-ray framing camera by an X-ray crystal

  16. The low Q$^2$ chicane and Compton polarimeter at the JLab EIC

    SciTech Connect

    Camsonne, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    The JLAB EIC (JLEIC) design includes a chicane after the interaction point to detect electron associated with production of quasi-real photon at the interaction. This chicane layout can also be used for Compton polarimetry to measure the electron beam polarization. This proceeding will present the layout of the low Q^2 chicane and the implementation and current R&D; of a Compton polarimeter which would be located in the middle of this chicane.

  17. Calculating electron momentum densities and Compton profiles using the linear tetrahedron method.

    PubMed

    Ernsting, D; Billington, D; Haynes, T D; Millichamp, T E; Taylor, J W; Duffy, J A; Giblin, S R; Dewhurst, J K; Dugdale, S B

    2014-12-10

    A method for computing electron momentum densities and Compton profiles from ab initio calculations is presented. Reciprocal space is divided into optimally-shaped tetrahedra for interpolation, and the linear tetrahedron method is used to obtain the momentum density and its projections such as Compton profiles. Results are presented and evaluated against experimental data for Be, Cu, Ni, Fe3Pt, and YBa2Cu4O8, demonstrating the accuracy of our method in a wide variety of crystal structures.

  18. IS COMPTON COOLING SUFFICIENT TO EXPLAIN EVOLUTION OF OBSERVED QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS IN OUTBURST SOURCES?

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Santanu; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Debnath, Dipak E-mail: chakraba@bose.res.in

    2015-01-01

    In outburst sources, quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequency is known to evolve in a certain way: in the rising phase, it monotonically goes up until a soft intermediate state is achieved. In the propagating oscillatory shock model, oscillation of the Compton cloud is thought to cause QPOs. Thus, in order to increase QPO frequency, the Compton cloud must collapse steadily in the rising phase. In decline phases, the exact opposite should be true. We investigate cause of this evolution of the Compton cloud. The same viscosity parameter that increases the Keplerian disk rate also moves the inner edge of the Keplerian component, thereby reducing the size of the Compton cloud and reducing the cooling timescale. We show that cooling of the Compton cloud by inverse Comptonization is enough for it to collapse sufficiently so as to explain the QPO evolution. In the two-component advective flow configuration of Chakrabarti-Titarchuk, centrifugal force-induced shock represents the boundary of the Compton cloud. We take the rising phase of 2010 outburst of Galactic black hole candidate H 1743-322 and find an estimation of variation of the α parameter of the sub-Keplerian flow to be monotonically rising from 0.0001 to 0.02, well within the range suggested by magnetorotational instability. We also estimate the inward velocity of the Compton cloud to be a few meters per second, which is comparable to what is found in several earlier studies of our group by empirically fitting the shock locations with the time of observations.

  19. Least-Squares Deconvolution of Compton Telescope Data with the Positivity Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheaton, William A.; Dixon, David D.; Tumer, O. Tumay; Zych, Allen D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a Direct Linear Algebraic Deconvolution (DLAD) approach to imaging of data from Compton gamma-ray telescopes. Imposition of the additional physical constraint, that all components of the model be non-negative, has been found to have a powerful effect in stabilizing the results, giving spatial resolution at or near the instrumental limit. A companion paper (Dixon et al. 1993) presents preliminary images of the Crab Nebula region using data from COMPTEL on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory.

  20. Resonant Compton Scattering in Highly-Magnetized Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadiasingh, Zorawar

    Soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars are subset of slow-rotating neutron stars, known as magnetars, that have extremely high inferred surface magnetic fields, of the order 100-1000 TeraGauss. Hard, non-thermal and pulsed persistent X-ray emission extending between 10 keV and 230 keV has been seen in a number of magnetars by RXTE, INTEGRAL, and Suzaku. In this thesis, the author considers inner magnetospheric models of such persistent hard X-ray emission where resonant Compton upscattering of soft thermal photons is anticipated to be the most efficient radiative process. This high efficiency is due to the relative proximity of the surface thermal photons, and also because the scattering becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency. At the cyclotron resonance, the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson one by over two orders of magnitude, thereby enhancing the efficiency of continuum production and cooling of relativistic electrons. In this thesis, a new Sokolov and Ternov formulation of the QED Compton scattering cross section for strong magnetic fields is employed in electron cooling and emission spectra calculations. This formalism is formally correct for treating spin-dependent effects and decay rates that are important at the cyclotron resonance. The author presents electron cooling rates at arbitrary interaction points in a magnetosphere using the QED cross sections. The QED effects reduce the rates below high-field extrapolations of older magnetic Thomson results. The author also computes angle-dependent upscattering model spectra, formed using collisional integrals, for uncooled monoenergetic relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of pulsar magnetospheres. These spectra are integrated over closed field lines and obtained for different observing perspectives. The spectral cut-off energies are critically dependent on the observer viewing angles and electron Lorentz factor. It is found that electrons with energies less than

  1. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-01

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing 22Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3-5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy.

  2. DETECTION AND IMAGING OF THE CRAB NEBULA WITH THE NUCLEAR COMPTON TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bandstra, M. S.; Bellm, E. C.; Boggs, S. E.; Perez-Becker, D.; Zoglauer, A.; Chang, H.-K.; Chiu, J.-L.; Liang, J.-S.; Chang, Y.-H.; Liu, Z.-K.; Hung, W.-C.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Chiang, S. J.; Run, R.-S.; Lin, C.-H.; Amman, M.; Luke, P. N.; Jean, P.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Wunderer, C. B.

    2011-09-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne Compton telescope designed for the study of astrophysical sources in the soft gamma-ray regime (200 keV-20 MeV). NCT's 10 high-purity germanium crossed-strip detectors measure the deposited energies and three-dimensional positions of gamma-ray interactions in the sensitive volume, and this information is used to restrict the initial photon to a circle on the sky using the Compton scatter technique. Thus NCT is able to perform spectroscopy, imaging, and polarization analysis on soft gamma-ray sources. NCT is one of the next generation of Compton telescopes-the so-called compact Compton telescopes (CCTs)-which can achieve effective areas comparable to the Imaging Compton Telescope's with an instrument that is a fraction of the size. The Crab Nebula was the primary target for the second flight of the NCT instrument, which occurred on 2009 May 17 and 18 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. Analysis of 29.3 ks of data from the flight reveals an image of the Crab at a significance of 4{sigma}. This is the first reported detection of an astrophysical source by a CCT.

  3. Development of electron-tracking Compton imaging system with 30-μm SOI pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Mizumachi, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Kamada, K.; Takeda, A.; Tsuru, T.; Arai, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Compton imaging is a useful method to localize gamma sources without using mechanical collimators. In conventional Compton imaging, the incident directions of gamma rays are estimated in a cone for each event by analyzing the sequence of interactions of each gamma ray followed by Compton kinematics. Since the information of the ejection directions of the recoil electrons is lost, many artifacts in the shape of cone traces are generated, which reduces signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and angular resolution. We have developed an advanced Compton imaging system with the capability of tracking recoil electrons by using a combination of a trigger-mode silicon-on-insulator (SOI) pixel detector and a GAGG detector. This system covers the 660-1330 keV energy range for localization of contamination nuclides such as 137Cs and 134Cs inside the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan. The ejection directions of recoil electrons caused by Compton scattering are detected on the micro-pixelated SOI detector, which can theoretically be used to determine the incident directions of the gamma rays in a line for each event and can reduce the appearance of artifacts. We obtained 2-D reconstructed images from the first iteration of the proposed system for 137Cs, and the SNR and angular resolution were enhanced compared with those of conventional Compton imaging systems.

  4. Double Compton and Cyclo-Synchrotron in Super-Eddington Discs, Magnetized Coronae, and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Chluba, Jens; Wielgus, Maciek; Narayan, Ramesh; Sadowski, Aleksander

    2017-01-01

    Black hole accretion discs accreting near the Eddington rate are dominated by bremsstrahlung cooling, but above the Eddington rate the double Compton process can dominate in radiation-dominated regions while the cyclo-synchrotron can dominate in strongly-magnetized regions like in a corona or jet. We present an extension to the general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamic code HARMRAD to account for emission and absorption by thermal cyclo-synchrotron, double Compton, bremsstrahlung, low-temperature OPAL opacities as well as Thomson and Compton scattering. We approximate the radiation field as a Bose-Einstein distribution and evolve it using the radiation number-energy-momentum conservation equations in order to track photon hardening. We perform various simulations to study how these extensions affect the radiative properties of magnetically-arrested discs accreting at Eddington to super-Eddington rates. We find that double Compton dominates bremsstrahlung in the disc within a radius of r ˜ 15rg (gravitational radii) at a hundred times the Eddington accretion rate, and within smaller radii at lower accretion rates. Double Compton and cyclo-synchrotron regulate radiation and gas temperatures in the corona, while cyclo-synchrotron regulates temperatures in the jet. Interestingly, as the accretion rate drops to Eddington, an optically thin corona develops whose gas temperature of T ˜ 109K is ˜100 times higher than the disc's black body temperature. Our results show the importance of double Compton and synchrotron in super-Eddington discs, magnetized coronae, and jets.

  5. Performance of MACACO Compton telescope for ion-beam therapy monitoring: first test with proton beams.

    PubMed

    Solevi, Paola; Muñoz, Enrique; Solaz, Carles; Trovato, Marco; Dendooven, Peter; Gillam, John E; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F; Rafecas, Magdalena; Torres-Espallardo, Irene; Llosá, Gabriela

    2016-07-21

    In order to exploit the advantages of ion-beam therapy in a clinical setting, delivery verification techniques are necessary to detect deviations from the planned treatment. Efforts are currently oriented towards the development of devices for real-time range monitoring. Among the different detector concepts proposed, Compton cameras are employed to detect prompt gammas and represent a valid candidate for real-time range verification. We present the first on-beam test of MACACO, a Compton telescope (multi-layer Compton camera) based on lanthanum bromide crystals and silicon photo-multipliers. The Compton telescope was first characterized through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The detector linearity was measured employing (22)Na and Am-Be sources, obtaining about 10% deviation from linearity at 3.44 MeV. A spectral image reconstruction algorithm was tested on synthetic data. Point-like sources emitting gamma rays with energy between 2 and 7 MeV were reconstructed with 3-5 mm resolution. The two-layer Compton telescope was employed to measure radiation emitted from a beam of 150 MeV protons impinging on a cylindrical PMMA target. Bragg-peak shifts were achieved via adjustment of the PMMA target location and the resulting measurements used during image reconstruction. Reconstructed Bragg peak profiles proved sufficient to observe peak-location differences within 10 mm demonstrating the potential of the MACACO Compton Telescope as a monitoring device for ion-beam therapy.

  6. Collective Evidence for Inverse Compton Emission from External Photons in High-Power Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first collective evidence that Fermi-detected jets of high kinetic power (L(sub kin)) are dominated by inverse Compton emission from upscattered external photons. Using a sample with a broad range in orientation angle, including radio galaxies and blazars, we find that very high power sources (L(sub kin) > 10(exp 45.5) erg/s) show a significant increase in the ratio of inverse Compton to synchrotron power (Compton dominance) with decreasing orientation angle, as measured by the radio core dominance and confirmed by the distribution of superluminal speeds. This increase is consistent with beaming expectations for external Compton (EC) emission, but not for synchrotron self Compton (SSC) emission. For the lowest power jets (L(sub kin) < 10(exp 43.5) erg /s), no trend between Compton and radio core dominance is found, consistent with SSC. Importantly, the EC trend is not seen for moderately high power flat spectrum radio quasars with strong external photon fields. Coupled with the evidence that jet power is linked to the jet speed, this finding suggests that external photon fields become the dominant source of seed photons in the jet comoving frame only for the faster and therefore more powerful jets.

  7. Searching for Compton-thick AGNs with XMM-Newton observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, R.; Guainazzi, M.; Ibrahim, A.

    2017-06-01

    Most Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are obscured by large column densities of cold and neutral gas. If the X-ray obscuring matter has a column density equal to or larger than the inverse of the Thomson cross-section (N H ≥ σ T ≈ 1.5×1024 cm-2), then the source is identified as a Compton-thick AGN. One of the characteristics of Compton-thick AGN is the presence of Fe K⍺ emission line in their spectra with a large equivalent width. Using this criterion with XMM-Newton observations we identified Compton-thick AGNs by following a selection method, the FLEX algorithm, developed by Maccacaro et al [1] to search for X-ray line emitting objects (XLEOs). This technique detects the sources having significant excess of photons resulting from the iron emission line. Here we present the results from applying this method on the 28 highly absorbed AGNs recently detected by Corral et al [2]. Of these 28 AGN, 15 are candidate Compton-thick AGN. We applied the detection algorithm on a pilot sample of 40 XMM-Newton observations. Our results confirm the Compton-thick nature of 14 of Compton-thick AGN, based on the observed properties of the Fe Kα emission line. We use the characteristics of the observed lines to diagnose the AGNs and their environments.

  8. The contribution of bulk Comptonization to the soft X-ray excess in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.; Hirose, S.

    2017-01-01

    Bulk velocities exceed thermal velocities for sufficiently radiation pressure dominated accretion flows. We model the contribution of bulk Comptonization to the soft X-ray excess in AGN. Bulk Comptonization is due to both turbulence and the background shear. We calculate spectra both taking into account and not taking into account bulk velocities using scaled data from radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shearing box simulations. We characterize our results with temperatures and optical depths to make contact with other warm Comptonization models of the soft excess. We chose our fiducial mass, M = 2 × 106M⊙, and accretion rate, L/LEdd = 2.5, to correspond to those fit to the super-Eddington narrow line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) RE1034+396. The temperatures, optical depths, and Compton y parameters we find broadly agree with those fit to RE1034+396. The effect of bulk Comptonization is to shift the Wien tail to higher energy and lower the gas temperature, broadening the spectrum. Observations of the soft excess in NLS1s can constrain the properties of disc turbulence if the bulk Comptonization contribution can be separated out from contributions from other physical effects, such as reflection and absorption.

  9. Collective Evidence for Inverse Compton Emission from External Photons in High-power Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Fossati, Giovanni; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.

    2012-06-01

    We present the first collective evidence that Fermi-detected jets of high kinetic power (L kin) are dominated by inverse Compton emission from upscattered external photons. Using a sample with a broad range in orientation angle, including radio galaxies and blazars, we find that very high power sources (L kin > 1045.5 erg s-1) show a significant increase in the ratio of inverse Compton to synchrotron power (Compton dominance) with decreasing orientation angle, as measured by the radio core dominance and confirmed by the distribution of superluminal speeds. This increase is consistent with beaming expectations for external Compton (EC) emission, but not for synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. For the lowest power jets (L kin < 1043.5 erg s-1), no trend between Compton and radio core dominance is found, consistent with SSC. Importantly, the EC trend is not seen for moderately high power flat spectrum radio quasars with strong external photon fields. Coupled with the evidence that jet power is linked to the jet speed, this finding suggests that external photon fields become the dominant source of seed photons in the jet comoving frame only for the faster and therefore more powerful jets.

  10. Detection and Imaging of the Crab Nebula with the Nuclear Compton Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandstra, M. S.; Bellm, E. C.; Boggs, S. E.; Perez-Becker, D.; Zoglauer, A.; Chang, H.-K.; Chiu, J.-L.; Liang, J.-S.; Chang, Y.-H.; Liu, Z.-K.; Hung, W.-C.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Chiang, S. J.; Run, R.-S.; Lin, C.-H.; Amman, M.; Luke, P. N.; Jean, P.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wunderer, C. B.

    2011-09-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a balloon-borne Compton telescope designed for the study of astrophysical sources in the soft gamma-ray regime (200 keV-20 MeV). NCT's 10 high-purity germanium crossed-strip detectors measure the deposited energies and three-dimensional positions of gamma-ray interactions in the sensitive volume, and this information is used to restrict the initial photon to a circle on the sky using the Compton scatter technique. Thus NCT is able to perform spectroscopy, imaging, and polarization analysis on soft gamma-ray sources. NCT is one of the next generation of Compton telescopes—the so-called compact Compton telescopes (CCTs)—which can achieve effective areas comparable to the Imaging Compton Telescope's with an instrument that is a fraction of the size. The Crab Nebula was the primary target for the second flight of the NCT instrument, which occurred on 2009 May 17 and 18 in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. Analysis of 29.3 ks of data from the flight reveals an image of the Crab at a significance of 4σ. This is the first reported detection of an astrophysical source by a CCT.

  11. Measurement and simulation of a Compton suppression system for safeguards application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Kyu; Seo, Hee; Won, Byung-Hee; Lee, Chaehun; Shin, Hee-Sung; Na, Sang-Ho; Song, Dae-Yong; Kim, Ho-Dong; Park, Geun-Il; Park, Se-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Plutonium (Pu) contents in spent nuclear fuels, recovered uranium (U) or uranium/transuranium (U/TRU) products must be measured in order to secure the safeguardability of a pyroprocessing facility. Self-induced X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and gamma-ray spectroscopy are useful techniques for determining Pu-to-U ratios and Pu isotope ratios of spent fuel. Photon measurements of spent nuclear fuel by using high-resolution spectrometers such as high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors show a large continuum background in the low-energy region, which is due in large part to Compton scattering of energetic gamma rays. This paper proposes a Compton suppression system for reducing of the Compton continuum background. In the present study, the system was configured by using an HPGe main detector and a BGO (bismuth germanate: Bi4Ge3O12) guard detector. The system performances for gamma-ray measurement and XRF were evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of the radiation source. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) simulations were performed using the same geometry as for the experiments, and considered, for exact results, the production of secondary electrons and photons. As a performance test of the Compton suppression system, the peak-to-Compton ratio, which is a figure of merit to evaluate the gamma-ray detection, was enhanced by a factor of three or more when the Compton suppression system was used.

  12. Compton scattering cross section for inner-shell electrons in the relativistic impulse approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, G. E.

    2014-01-01

    Total Compton scattering cross sections and inelastic scattering factors for bound electron states of several elements have been evaluated in the framework of the relativistic impulse approximation (RIA). The accuracy of different approximate expressions for the singly differential cross section within the RIA is discussed. Accurate evaluations of bound state scattering factors require the use of the full RIA expression. Compton scattering from K-shell electrons dominates over the photoelectric absorption at higher energies. Energy values at which the Compton interaction become the main process of creation of K-shell vacancies are assessed. The role of binding effects in Compton processes at lower energies are clearly evidenced by the computed total cross sections. Calculated K-shell ionization total cross sections, defined as the sum of the photoelectric absorption and the Compton scattering cross sections, are in good agreement with available experimental data. The total Compton cross section for the 2s atomic orbital exhibits a shoulder-like structure, which can be traced back to the node structure of the 2s wave function.

  13. Photon-conserving Comptonization in simulations of accretion discs around black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sądowski, Aleksander; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a new method for treating Comptonization in computational fluid dynamics. By construction, this method conserves the number of photons. Whereas the traditional `blackbody Comptonization' approach assumes that the radiation is locally a perfect blackbody and therefore uses a single parameter, the radiation temperature, to describe the radiation, the new `photon-conserving Comptonization' approach treats the photon gas as a Bose-Einstein fluid and keeps track of both the radiation temperature and the photon number density. We have implemented photon-conserving Comptonization in the general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamical code KORAL and we describe its impact on simulations of mildly supercritical black hole accretion discs. We find that blackbody Comptonization underestimates the gas and radiation temperature by up to a factor of 2 compared to photon-conserving Comptonization. This discrepancy could be serious when computing spectra. The photon-conserving simulation indicates that the spectral colour correction factor of the escaping radiation in the funnel region of the disc could be as large as 5.

  14. Nonlinear Compton scattering in a strong rotating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raicher, Erez; Eliezer, Shalom; Zigler, Arie

    2016-12-01

    The nonlinear Compton scattering rate in a rotating electric field is explicitly calculated. For this purpose, an approximate solution to the Klein-Gordon equation in the presence of a rotating electric field is applied. An analytical expression for the emission rate is obtained, as well as a simplified approximation adequate for implementation in kinetic codes. The spectrum is numerically calculated for present-day optical and x-ray laser parameters. The results are compared to the standard Volkov-Ritus rate for a particle in a plane wave, which is commonly assumed to be valid for a rotating electric field under certain conditions. Substantial deviations between the two models, in both the radiated power and the spectral shape, are demonstrated. First, the typical number of photons participating in the scattering process is much smaller compared to the Volkov-Ritus rate, resulting in up to an order of magnitude lower emitted power. Furthermore, our model predicts a discrete harmonic spectrum for electrons with low asymptotic momentum compared to the field amplitude. This discrete structure is a clear imprint of the electric field frequency, as opposed to the Volkov-Ritus rate, which reduces to the constant crossed field rate for the physical conditions under consideration. Our model predictions can be tested with present-day laser facilities.

  15. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jixie; Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Rondon, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    The applicability of pQCD to exclusive reactions at medium energies is a subject of considerable interest. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. In pQCD, three active quarks and two hard gluons are involved when describing RCS. But the cross sections do not agree with the pQCD predictions. In contrast, a handbag dominance model, involving only one single quark coupling to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs) does a good job of matching the cross section data. A measurement of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL was found inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the hand-bag mechanism. Further Miller's handbag approach, which including quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD and others which demands that KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL has been proposed to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. This experiment will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  16. Photon flux and spectrum of γ-rays Compton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Ben Alì Zinati, R.; Chaikovska, I.; Curatolo, C.; Ferrario, M.; Maroli, C.; Ronsivalle, C.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.; Variola, A.

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the characteristics of the γ radiation produced by Compton back-scattering of a high brightness electron beam produced by a photoinjector and accelerated in a linac up to energies of 360-720 MeV and a laser operated at about 500 nm, by comparing classical and quantum models and codes. The interaction produces γ rays in the range 4.9-18.8 MeV. In view of the application to nuclear resonance fluorescence a relative bandwidth of few 10-3 is needed. The bandwidth is reduced by taking advantage of the frequency-angular correlation typical of the phenomenon and selecting the radiation in an angle of tens of μrads. The foreseen spectral density is 20-6 photons per eV in a single shot, a number that can be increased by developing multi-bunch techniques and laser recirculation. In this way a final value of 104 photon per eV per second can be achieved.

  17. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    DOE PAGES

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; ...

    2016-12-22

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this article reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5-more » and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. Lastly, with the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.« less

  18. Compton-backscattering x-ray source for coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-12-01

    An X-ray source utilizing Compton-backscattered (CB) photons in a 75-MeV electron storage ring containing an infrared FEL is proposed for producing 33.17-keV X-rays (Iodine K-edge) for coronary angiography. The X-ray intensity into a 4-mrad cone is computed as 7.21 {times} 10{sup 14}/sec for a 500-mA electron beam colliding with 0.2-J/bunch, 3.22-{mu}m photons from an in-ring IR-FEL at the 353.21-MHz rate of a SLAC-PEP 500-kW RF system. The resultant average flux at the patient is 6.4 {times} 10{sup 7} photons/pixel/4-msec aver a 12-cm diameter circle at 3-m from the interaction point for the 0.5 {times}0.5-mm{sup 2} pixel size of the present Si(Li) array of the BNL-SMERF Angiography Facility. This flux is 2.1 times larger than obtains at SMERF at a comparable source-to-patient distance and over an area sufficient to encompass the entire coronary region. However, the X-Ray energy spread due to kinematics alone is 2.63-keV, a factor of 35 larger then SMERF, and presents the major difficulty for the digital subtraction angiography method (DSA) envisioned.

  19. Observation of enhanced Compton scattering in a supercavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, M.; Asakawa, M.; Chen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The enhanced Compton scattering in a supercavity has been observed experimentally. The supercavity with {approximately}99.99% reflectivity mirrors was used to confine the LD-pumped Nd:YAG laser light ({lambda} {approximately} 1.06 {mu} m, CW power {approximately} 500 mW, bandwidth <5kHz). The confined photons were scattered by 100kV electron beams generated from the laser-heated CW electrostatic accelerator. In this experiment, the scattered photon wavelength was in a visible range (<380nm). In order to increase the beam current and the system efficiency, the design of a beam recovery system is also in progress. As an alternative way to confine the laser power, a novel multi-pass optical resonator is being designed. 9MeV electron bunch from the rf linac with photoinjector will be used to interact with MW {approximately} TW high peak power laser pulse in the resonator. In this experiment, the scattered photon energy is in a x-ray regime. These experimental data is used to design the monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources for annihilation of the radioactive nuclear waste.

  20. High-Power Picosecond Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Igor; Shverdin, Miro; Gibson, David; Brown, Curtis; Gronberg, Jeff

    2008-11-01

    In the next generation of linear colliders, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) of intense laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches will enable a mode of operation based on energetic γe and γγ collisions, with a significant complementary scientific potential. The efficiency of γ-ray generation via ICS is constrained by the Thomson scattering cross section, resulting in typical laser photon-to- γ efficiencies of <10 -9. Furthermore, repetition rates of the state-of-art high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. We propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative, non-interferometric method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J [ I. Jovanovic, M. Shverdin, D. Gibson, and C. Brown, Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 578 160 (2007)]. ICS of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses is compatible with the proposed pulse structure for ILC and has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average γ-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  1. Novel design of a parallax free Compton enhanced PET scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braem, A.; Chamizo, M.; Chesi, E.; Colonna, N.; Cusanno, F.; De Leo, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Joram, C.; Marrone, S.; Mathot, S.; Nappi, E.; Schoenahl, F.; Seguinot, J.; Weilhammer, P.; Zaidi, H.

    2004-06-01

    Molecular imaging by PET is a powerful tool in modern clinical practice for cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, improvements are needed with respect to the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the technique for its application to specific human organs (breast, prostate, brain, etc.), and to small animals. Presently, commercial PET scanners do not detect the depth of interaction of photons in scintillators, which results in a not negligible parallax error. We describe here a novel concept of PET scanner design that provides full three-dimensional (3D) gamma reconstruction with high spatial resolution over the total detector volume, free of parallax errors. It uses matrices of long scintillators read at both ends by hybrid photon detectors. This so-called 3D axial concept also enhances the gamma detection efficiency since it allows one to reconstruct a significant fraction of Compton scattered events. In this note, we describe the concept, a possible design and the expected performance of this new PET device. We also report about first characterization measurements of 10 cm long YAP:Ce scintillation crystals.

  2. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  3. Preliminary observation of nonlinear effects in Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C.; McDonald, K.T.; Prebys, E.J.; E-144 Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC a low- emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collision with terawatt pulses from a 1.06 {mu} wavelength Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = {ital eE/mw{sub 0}c}, and to a value of 0.3 for the parameter {Upsilon} = {ital E{sup *}/E{sub crit}} = 2{gamma}{ital ehE}/{ital m}{sup 2}{ital c}{sup 3} in the case of frequency doubled laser pulses. In these circumstances an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near unit interaction probability. Signals are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which up to 4 laser photons interact with an electron. High energy backscattered photons of GeV energy can interact within the laser focus to create electron- positron pairs; an excess of 15 positrons above a background of 14 was observed in a run of 6,000 laser shots.

  4. Neutron polarizabilities from Compton scattering on the deuteron?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakowski, Jonathan J.; Miller, Gerald A.

    1999-07-01

    A calculation of deuteron Compton scattering using nonrelativistic perturbation theory is presented, with the primary motivation of investigating the feasibility of determining the neutron polarizabilities from this type of experiment. This calculation is expected to be valid for energies below 100 MeV. Pion-exchange, relativistic, and recoil corrections are also included. The low-energy theorem for gauge invariance is shown to be satisfied. The relative effects of the different terms and their effects on the determinations of the polarizabilities are discussed at energies of 49, 69, and 95 MeV. The cross section is dominated by the seagull, polarizability, and electromagnetic multipole interactions. Relativistic and pion-exchange terms are also important, while recoil corrections and multipoles of L=2 and greater are negligible. The calculation provides a reasonable description of the experimental data points at 49 and 69 MeV. The polarizabilities are difficult to determine at these energies. A more accurate determination of the polarizabilities may be possible at 95 MeV.

  5. Realistic simulation of the Space-borne Compton Polarimeter POLAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hualin

    2016-07-01

    POLAR is a compact wide field space-borne detector dedicated for precise measurements of the linear polarization of hard x-rays emitted by transient sources. Its energy range sensitivity is optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). POLAR is developed by an international collaboration of China, Switzerland and Poland. It is planned to be launched into space in 2016 onboard the Chinese space laboratory TG2. The energy range of POLAR spans between 50 keV and 500 keV. POLAR detects gamma rays with an array of 1600 plastic scintillator bars read out by 25 muti-anode PMTs (MAPMTs). Polarization measurements use Compton scattering process and are based on detection of energy depositions in the scintillator bars. Reconstruction of the polarization degree and polarization angle of GRBs requires comparison of experimental modulation curves with realistic simulations of the full instrument response. In this paper we present a method to model and parameterize the detector response including efficiency of the light collection, contributions from crosstalk and non-uniformity of MAPMTs as well as dependency on low energy detection thresholds and noise from readout electronics. The performance of POLAR for determination of polarization is predicted with such realistic simulations and carefully cross-checked with dedicated laboratory tests.

  6. FRONT-END ASIC FOR A SILICON COMPTON TELESCOPE.

    SciTech Connect

    DE GERONIMO,G.; FRIED, J.; FROST, E.; PHLIPS, B.; VERNON, E.; WULF, E.A.

    2007-10-27

    We describe a front-end application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) developed for a silicon Compton telescope. Composed of 32 channels, it reads out signals in both polarities from each side of a Silicon strip sensor, 2 mm thick 27 cm long, characterized by a strip capacitance of 30 pF. Each front-end channel provides low-noise charge amplification, shaping with a stabilized baseline, discrimination, and peak detection with an analog memory. The channels can process events simultaneously, and the read out is sparsified. The charge amplifier makes uses a dual-cascode configuration and dual-polarity adaptive reset, The low-hysteresis discriminator and the multi-phase peak detector process signals with a dynamic range in excess of four hundred. An equivalent noise charge (ENC) below 200 electrons was measured at 30 pF, with a slope of about 4.5 electrons/pF at a peaking time of 4 {micro}s. With a total dissipated power of 5 mW the channel covers an energy range up to 3.2 MeV.

  7. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2016-03-01

    Wide-angle Compton scattering (WACS) belongs to the family of exclusive processes, with large values of s, - t , and - u , that can reveal nucleon structure. In the pQCD version of WACS, three active quarks and two hard gluons are required to share the momentum. pQCD predictions for the WACS disagree with the cross sections currently available. In contrast, handbag mechanism calculations involving a single quark coupled to the spectator through GPDs, are compatible with the cross sections. Measurements of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL have been found to be inconsistent with the predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations within the handbag mechanism, at least at very large angles. There are handbag calculations, including quark and hadron helicity flip, which contradicts pQCD by finding that KLL ≠ALL . A measurement of ALL has been approved to run at Jefferson Lab and which has the potential to clarify the nature of the reaction mechanism in WACS and illuminate the role of quark orbital angular momentum. It will utilize a pure untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and a longitudinally polarized proton target. After an introduction, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  8. Initial State Helicity Correlation in Wide Angle Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Donal; Keller, Dustin; Zhang, Jixie

    2015-04-01

    Whether pQCD can describe exclusive reactions at medium energies remains an area of active study. Real Compton scattering (RCS) has the potential to provide insight to this unsettled issue. A pQCD description of RCS requires the participation of three quarks and two hard gluons. However its predictions for the RCS cross sections disagree with data while calculations based on the handbag mechanism, involving a single quark coupled to the spectator through generalized parton distributions (GPDs), match the data well. The measured longitudinal polarization transfer parameter KLL is inconsistent with predictions of pQCD yet consistent with calculations of the handbag mechanism. Furthermore, Miller's approach, which includes quark and hadron helicity flip, contradicts pQCD where KLL =ALL , the initial state helicity correlation asymmetry, by finding that KLL ≠ALL . The first ever measurement of ALL (E12-14-006) has been approved to run in Jefferson Lab's Hall C and will be able to discriminate between the various models. E12-14-006 will utilize an untagged bremsstrahlung photon beam and the longitudinally polarized UVA/JLAB proton target. After a brief introduction to the physics, the experiment will be described and the expected results presented.

  9. Comptonization of thermal photons by relativistic electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, Joseph K.; Harding, Alice K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical calculation of gamma-ray emission produced by Compton scattering of relativistic electron beams on background thermal radiation, which includes spatial dependence of electron energy losses and cyclotron resonance scattering in a strong magnetic field. In the first version, the scattering is described by the fully relativistic Klein-Nishina cross section, but the magnetic field is neglected. In the second version, the scattering is described by the magnetic resonant cross section in the Thomson limit. It is found that when the magnetic field is not included, electron energy losses are important only at higher neutron star surface temperatures (T about 3,000,000 K). In the presence of a strong magnetic field, (10 to the 12th G), resonant scattering greatly increases electron energy losses, making scattering very efficient even at lower surface temperatures. Resulting photon and electron spectra for both cases ae discussed in relation to models for pulsar X-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  10. Polarized Compton Scattering Experiments at the Mainz Microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between an electromagnetic wave and a proton are described at the basic level by the mass, charge, and anomalous magnetic moment of the proton. Such a description, however, assumes a point-like particle, something the proton is certainly not. The internal structure of the proton leads to higher order terms, such as the scalar and vector polarizabilities, in the interaction. To study these polarizabilities, a multi-experiment program has been undertaken at the Mainz Microtron to measure observables in Compton scattering that exhibit dependence on these parameters. This program has made use of the A2 tagged photon beam, with either a linear or circular polarization, proton targets of either unpolarized LH2 or frozen-spin butanol with transverse or longitudinal polarization, as well as the nearly 4 π detection capability of the Crystal Ball and TAPS detectors. The first of these measurements, the double-polarization asymmetry Σ2 x, also the first of its kind, has already been published. Measurements of the beam asymmetry Σ3 and another double-polarization asymmetry Σ2 z have also been performed and are in various stages of analysis and publication. This talk will discuss the status of these measurements, as well as various fitting studies that are being performed with the data in hand, and plans for future measurements. on behalf of the A2 collaboration at MAMI.

  11. Calculation of Theoretical Isotropic Compton Profile for Many Particle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alzubadi, Ali A.; Albayati, Khalil H.

    Theoretical isotropic (spherically symmetric) Compton profiles (ICP) have been calculated for many particle systems' He, Li, Be and B atoms in their ground states. Our calculations were performed using Roothan-Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave function, HF wave function of Thakkar and re-optimized HF wave function of Clementi-Roetti, taking into account the impulse approximation. The theoretical analysis included a decomposition of the various intra and inter shells and their contributions in the total ICP. A high momentum region of up to 4 a.u. was investigated and a non-negligible tail was observed in all ICP curves. The existence of a high momentum tail was mainly due to the electron-electron interaction. The ICP for the He atom has been compared with the available experimental data and it is found that the ICP values agree very well with them. A few low order radial momentum expectation values and the total energy for these atomic systems have also been calculated and compared with their counterparts' wave functions.

  12. Compton Backscattering Concept for the Production of Molybdenum-99

    SciTech Connect

    L. Merminga, G.A. Krafft

    2009-05-01

    The medical isotope Molybdenum-99 is presently used for 80-85% of all nuclear medicine procedures and is produced by irradiating highly enriched uranium U-235 targets in NRU reactors. It was recently proposed that an electron linac be used for the production of 99Mo via photo-fission of a natural uranium target coming from the excitation of the giant dipole resonance around 15 MeV. The photons can be produced using the braking radiation (“bremsstrahlung”) spectrum of an electron beam impinged on a high Z material. In this paper we present an alternate concept for the production of 99Mo which is also based on photo-fission of U-238, but where the ~15 MeV gamma-rays are produced by Compton backscattering of laser photons from relativistic electrons. We assume a laser wavelength of 330 nm, resulting in 485 MeV electron beam energy, and 10 mA of average current. Because the induced energy spread on the electron beam is a few percent, one may recover most of the electron beam energy, which substantially increases the efficiency of the system. The accelerator concept, based on a three-pass recirculation system with energy recovery, is described and efficiency estimates are presented.

  13. Extracting the Proton Backward Spin Polarizability using Compton Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefcochilos-Fogelquist, Heraclitos

    2016-09-01

    The proton spin-polarizabilities (SPs) are properties that quantify the response of the proton spin to electromagnetic waves. The SPs can be expressed in a linear combination called the backward spin polarizability (γπ) which arises in the cross-section of a Compton scattering event in which the incident photon is scattered at 180 degrees. As the cross-section at this angle cannot be experimentally determined, measurements of γπ are fitted using data with scattering angles close to 180 degrees. However, as the scattering angle is reduced the cross-section rapidly becomes determined by the values of the individual SPs, not γπ . This project investigated the viability of using cross-section data from different energy and angle bins to extract the γπ in order to optimize future experiments for γπ extraction. A Dispersion Relation was used to generate theory points based on randomly specified values of γπ and SPs for data sets of different energy and scattering angle. This was repeated 2000 times and the χ2 of each iteration was measured to determine if fits to a data set were dependent on the individual SPs values or γπ . This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. IIA-1358175.

  14. Compton thick AGN in the NuSTAR era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Stefano; Ajello, Marco; Marcotulli, Lea; Comastri, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    The recent launch of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), the first telescope with focusing optics at >10 keV, represented a major breakthrough in the study of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGN). In this talk, I present the results of the 0.3-100 keV spectral analysis of the 30 Compton thick (CT-; i.e., those sources having column density NH>1E24 cm-2) AGN detected within z~0.1 in the BAT 100-month survey with available NuSTAR data. Particularly, I will focus on how adding NuSTAR data to the 0.3-10 keV information helps to characterize the CT-AGN population, significantly improving the measurements of important X-ray spectral parameters such as the photon index, the intrinsic absorption, the intensity of the Iron K alpha line at 6.4 keV and the obscuring torus opening angle. Finally, I will discuss the role of these objects in the context of obscured AGN accretion physics, and their contribution to the cosmic X-ray background.

  15. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Ovodenko, A.; Agustsson, R.; Babzien, M.; Campese, T.; Fedurin, M.; Murokh, A.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Rosenzweig, J.; Sakai, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Swinson, C.

    2016-12-22

    Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this article reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. Lastly, with the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.

  16. Optimization of Compton Source Performance through Electron Beam Shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2016-09-26

    We investigate a novel scheme for significantly increasing the brightness of x-ray light sources based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) - scattering laser pulses off relativistic electron beams. The brightness of ICS sources is limited by the electron beam quality since electrons traveling at different angles, and/or having different energies, produce photons with different energies. Therefore, the spectral brightness of the source is defined by the 6d electron phase space shape and size, as well as laser beam parameters. The peak brightness of the ICS source can be maximized then if the electron phase space is transformed in a way so that all electrons scatter off the x-ray photons of same frequency in the same direction, arriving to the observer at the same time. We describe the x-ray photon beam quality through the Wigner function (6d photon phase space distribution) and derive it for the ICS source when the electron and laser rms matrices are arbitrary.

  17. Compton-backscattering x-ray source for coronary angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    An X-ray source utilizing Compton-backscattered (CB) photons in a 75-MeV electron storage ring containing an infrared FEL is proposed for producing 33.17-keV X-rays (Iodine K-edge) for coronary angiography. The X-ray intensity into a 4-mrad cone is computed as 7.21 [times] 10[sup 14]/sec for a 500-mA electron beam colliding with 0.2-J/bunch, 3.22-[mu]m photons from an in-ring IR-FEL at the 353.21-MHz rate of a SLAC-PEP 500-kW RF system. The resultant average flux at the patient is 6.4 [times] 10[sup 7] photons/pixel/4-msec aver a 12-cm diameter circle at 3-m from the interaction point for the 0.5 [times]0.5-mm[sup 2] pixel size of the present Si(Li) array of the BNL-SMERF Angiography Facility. This flux is 2.1 times larger than obtains at SMERF at a comparable source-to-patient distance and over an area sufficient to encompass the entire coronary region. However, the X-Ray energy spread due to kinematics alone is 2.63-keV, a factor of 35 larger then SMERF, and presents the major difficulty for the digital subtraction angiography method (DSA) envisioned.

  18. Proton Spin Polarizabilities with Polarized Compton Scattering at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudyal, Dilli; A2 Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The nucleon polarizabilities are fundamental structure observables, which describe its response to an applied electric or magnetic field. While the electric and magnetic scalar polarizabilities of the nucleon have been measured, little effort has been made to extract the spin dependent polarizabilities. These leading order spin dependent terms of the nucleon polarizabilities, γE1E1 ,γM1M1 ,γM1E2 and γE1M2 describe the spin response of a proton to electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole interactions. We plan to extract these spin polarizabilities of the proton using real polarised Compton scattering off the proton at the MAMI tagged photon facility in Mainz, Germany. This requires precise measurement of the single and double polarization observables which are sensitive to these polarizabilities. The double polarization observables ∑2 x, ∑2 z are measured via a circulary polarized photon beam and a transversely and a linearly polarized butanol target in the resonance region (E = 250 - 310 MeV). This presentation will be focused on the status and analyis of an experiment completed at MAMI in 2014 and 2015 for the measurement of ∑2 z at different energies and angles. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  19. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering Cross-Sections with CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, Francois-Xavier; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of a photon off a nucleon provides three-dimensional information on the nucleon structure. This reaction proceeds via the Bethe-Heitler (BH) process (photon emitted by electron), and the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process (photon emitted by proton). BH and DVCS interfere at the amplitude level. In the Bjorken regime of large Q2 at fixed xB, and for - t /Q2 < 1 , the amplitude factorizes, the non-perturbative part described by Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). GPDs are the Fourier transform of the spatial distributions of partons in the transverse plane at fixed longitudinal momentum fraction xB. The BH and DVCS contributions create harmonic dependencies of observables as functions of the angle between the leptonic and hadronic planes, which are then used to extract GPDs. The BH/DVCS cross-sections on unpolarized hydrogen target have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) in a dedicated experiment, at a polarized beam of energy 5.75 GeV, in the valence region 0 . 1

  20. Optimization of compton source performance through electron beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyzhenkov, Alexander; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2017-03-01

    We investigate a novel scheme for significantly increasing the brightness of x-ray light sources based on inverse Compton scattering (ICS) - scattering laser pulses off relativistic electron beams. The brightness of ICS sources is limited by the electron beam quality, since electrons traveling at different angles, and/or having different energies, produce photons with different energies. Therefore, the spectral brightness of the source is defined by the 6D electron phase space shape and size, as well as laser beam parameters. The peak brightness of the ICS source can be maximized, then, if the electron phase space is transformed in a way such that all electrons scatter off the x-ray photons of same frequency in the same direction, arriving to the observer at the same time. We describe the x-ray photon beam quality through the Wigner function (6D photon phase space distribution), and derive it for the ICS source when the electron and laser rms matrices are arbitrary.

  1. New developments in power semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper represents an overview of some recent power semiconductor developments and spotlights new technologies that may have significant impact for aircraft electric secondary power. Primary emphasis will be on NASA-Lewis-supported developments in transistors, diodes, a new family of semiconductors, and solid-state remote power controllers. Several semiconductor companies that are moving into the power arena with devices rated at 400 V and 50 A and above are listed, with a brief look at a few devices.

  2. Head circumference (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area (above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head). During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  3. Electrodes for Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2017-01-01

    The electrodes of semiconductor gas sensors are important in characterizing sensors based on their sensitivity, selectivity, reversibility, response time, and long-term stability. The types and materials of electrodes used for semiconductor gas sensors are analyzed. In addition, the effect of interfacial zones and surface states of electrode–semiconductor interfaces on their characteristics is studied. This study describes that the gas interaction mechanism of the electrode–semiconductor interfaces should take into account the interfacial zone, surface states, image force, and tunneling effect. PMID:28346349

  4. Electrodes for Semiconductor Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2017-03-25

    The electrodes of semiconductor gas sensors are important in characterizing sensors based on their sensitivity, selectivity, reversibility, response time, and long-term stability. The types and materials of electrodes used for semiconductor gas sensors are analyzed. In addition, the effect of interfacial zones and surface states of electrode-semiconductor interfaces on their characteristics is studied. This study describes that the gas interaction mechanism of the electrode-semiconductor interfaces should take into account the interfacial zone, surface states, image force, and tunneling effect.

  5. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1990-01-01

    A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  6. Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A method is described for passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

  7. Semiconductor cooling apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Gaier, James R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Gas derived graphite fibers generated by the decomposition of an organic gas are joined with a suitable binder. This produces a high thermal conductivity composite material which passively conducts heat from a source, such as a semiconductor, to a heat sink. The fibers may be intercalated. The intercalate can be halogen or halide salt, alkaline metal, or any other species which contributes to the electrical conductivity improvement of the graphite fiber. The fibers are bundled and joined with a suitable binder to form a high thermal conductivity composite material device. The heat transfer device may also be made of intercalated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and machined, rather than made of fibers.

  8. Power semiconductor controlled drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Gopal K.

    This book presents power semiconductor controlled drives employing dc motors, induction motors, and synchronous motors. The dynamics of motor and load systems are covered. Open-loop and closed-loop drives are considered, and thyristor, power transistor, and GTO converters are discussed. In-depth coverage is given to ac drives, particularly those fed by voltage and current source inverters and cycloconverters. Full coverage is given to brushless and commutatorless dc drives, including load-commuted synchronous motor drives. Rectifier-controlled dc drives are presented in detail.

  9. Chemically Derivatized Semiconductor Photoelectrodes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-04

    as Si, Ge, and GaAs derivatized with reagents based on ferrocene such as those represented by I and II. Work with p-type semiconductor photoelectrode...Concerning n-type Si it was found that EtOH/0.1 M En-Bu4N)C104 solutions containing A = ferrocene and A+ = ferri-- cinium result in a constant output of...electrical energy from an illuminated photoelectrochemical device configured as in Scheme II.(20) The ferrocene captures the photogenerated h+ at a rate -4

  10. Semiconductor Eutectic Solar Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    InSb - NiSb Es an... InSb - NiSb , InSb -FeSb, InSb -MnSb und InSb -CrSb", J. Phys. Chem. Solids, 26, 2021 (1965). 11. A. Muller and M. Wilhelm, "Das Eutektikum InSb -Mg 3 Sb’" Z...infant stages for use. In semiconducting eutectics, efforts were paid to eutectic systems which consist of III-V semiconductor phases, such as GaAs, InSb

  11. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  12. Semiconductor Terahertz Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-15

    COVERED (From - To) 15-June-2009 Final Report 12 Apr 07 - 15 Apr 09 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8718-07-C-0030 Semiconductor Terahertz ...and the other for the phononic waveguides. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Quantum cascade laser, gennanium, gennanium-tin, terahertz 16. SECURITY CLASStFICATION OF...7 Figure 7 lllustration of a GaAs-based active region waveguide with either Ga or Au as cladding operating in the Restrahlen band of GaN . 10 Figure 8

  13. Electrowetting on semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palma, Cesar; Deegan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Applying a voltage difference between a conductor and a sessile droplet sitting on a thin dielectric film separating it from the conductor will cause the drop to spread. When the conductor is a good metal, the change of the drop's contact angle due to the voltage is given by the Young-Lippmann (YL) equation. Here, we report experiments with lightly doped, single crystal silicon as the conductive electrode. We derive a modified YL equation that includes effects due to the semiconductor and contact line pinning. We show that light induces a non-reversible wetting transition, and that our model agrees well with our experimental results.

  14. Microwave semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitch, J. E.

    1985-03-01

    The state of the art of microwave semiconductor design is reviewed, with emphasis on developments of the past 10-12 years. Consideration is given to: varistor diodes; varactor diodes; and transit time negative diodes. The design principles of bipolar and unipolar transistors are discussed, with reference to power FETs, traveling-wave FETs, and camel or planar-doped barrier transistors. Recent innovations in the field of fabrication technology are also considered, including: crystal growth; doping; and packaging. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the different devices are provided.

  15. Semiconductor superlattice photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, S. L.; Hess, K.; Coleman, J. J.; Leburton, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    A superlattice photomultiplier and a photodetector based on the real space transfer mechanism were studied. The wavelength for the first device is of the order of a micron or flexible corresponding to the bandgap absorption in a semiconductor. The wavelength for the second device is in the micron range (about 2 to 12 microns) corresponding to the energy of the conduction band edge discontinuity between an Al/(sub x)Ga(sub 1-x)As and GaAs interface. Both devices are described.

  16. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s−1 mm−2 mrad−2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection. PMID:27405540

  17. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s‑1 mm‑2 mrad‑2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  18. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-13

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 10(22) photons s(-1) mm(-2) mrad(-2) 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  19. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  20. Semiconductor devices incorporating multilayer interference regions

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, R.M.; Drummond, T.J.; Gourley, P.L.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-08-31

    A semiconductor high reflector comprising a number of thin alternating layers of semiconductor materials is electrically tunable and may be used as a temperature insensitive semiconductor laser in a Fabry-Perot configuration. 8 figs.

  1. Semiconductor devices incorporating multilayer interference regions

    DOEpatents

    Biefeld, Robert M.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Gourley, Paul L.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    A semiconductor high reflector comprising a number of thin alternating layers of semiconductor materials is electrically tunable and may be used as a temperature insensitive semiconductor laser in a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  2. Contribution of inner shell Compton ionization to the X-ray fluorescence line intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Jorge E.; Scot, Viviana; Di Giulio, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    The Compton effect is a potential ionization mechanism of atoms. It produces vacancies in inner shells that are filled with the same mechanism of atomic relaxation as the one following photo-absorption. This contribution to X-ray fluorescence emission is frequently neglected because the total Compton cross-section is apparently much lower than the photoelectric one at useful X-ray energies. However, a more careful analysis suggests that is necessary to consider single shell cross sections (instead of total cross sections) as a function of energy. In this article these Compton cross sections are computed for the shells K, L1-L3 and M1-M5 in the framework of the impulse approximation. By comparing the Compton and the photoelectric cross-section for each shell it is then possible to determine the extent of the Compton correction to the intensity of the corresponding characteristic lines. It is shown that for the K shell the correction becomes relevant for excitation energies which are too high to be influent in X-ray spectrometry. In contrast, for L and M shells the Compton contribution is relevant for medium-Z elements and medium energies. To illustrate the different grades of relevance of the correction, for each ionized shell, the energies for which the Compton contribution reaches the extent levels of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100% of the photoelectric one are determined for all the elements with Z = 11-92. For practical applications it is provided a simple formula and fitting coefficients to compute average correction levels for the shells considered.

  3. Coded-aperture Compton camera for gamma-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farber, Aaron M.

    This dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.

  4. The COMPTON Observatory: Reflections on its origins and history

    SciTech Connect

    Kniffen, D. A.; Gehrels, N.

    1997-05-10

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) was planned as a mission to make the first comprehensive study of the gamma-ray sky over the full gamma-ray spectrum. It followed on the heels of two successful small astronomy satellites with high energy gamma-ray telescopes, SAS-2 and COS-B, and the High Energy Astronomical Observatory (HEAO) with low-energy gamma-ray detectors. The guideline was to cover the spectrum from the high energy limit of the x-ray domain to the highest energies for which a detectable flux might be reasonably observed. The objective was to include transients as well as persistent sources. The efforts to get such a mission approved stands as a model for developing a consensus of the scientific community for a mission involving a relatively small community of observers. A broad and vigorous guest investigator program was a key element in this effort. The results of the guest investigator program are testimony to the wisdom of this plan. The great success of GRO (now the Compton Observatory) was a result of the dedicated efforts of a few individuals and a project management team that understood how to work with scientists. In spite of increasing budgetary pressure and long delays beyond their control, the project management brought GRO to its successful launch with a minimum of cost growth resulting from the delays. This development period set the stage for what has been one of the most successful scientific programs in NASA's history. The very exciting results presented at this conference by a very broad community of scientists is a testimony to the dedicated efforts of a small group of visionaries with the foresight to see the potential of such a mission.

  5. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, M. S.; Band, D. L.; Kippen, R. M.; Preece, R. D.; Kouveliotou, C.; vanParadijs, J.; Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; Matz, S. M.; Connors, A.

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical, and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations and that the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fitted by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared with this function is observed below approx. 15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the vf (sub v), spectrum, E (sub p), reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 plus or minus 110 keV, and then falls to approx. 300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above approx. 1 MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment), clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power law. Using the redshift value of greater than or equal to 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray energy exceeds 10 (exp 54) ergs.

  6. X-Rays Compton Detectors For Biomedical Application

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Paolo; Fontana, Cristiano Lino; Moschini, Giuliano; Baldazzi, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Battistella, Andrea; Bello, Michele; Bollini, Dante; Bonvicini, Valter; Rashevsky, Alexander; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Vacchi, Andrea; Gennaro, Gisella; Uzunov, Nikolay

    2011-06-01

    Collimators are usually needed to image sources emitting X-rays that cannot be focused. Alternately, one may employ a Compton Camera (CC) and measure the direction of the incident X-ray by letting it interact with a thin solid, liquid or gaseous material (Tracker) and determine the scattering angle. With respect to collimated cameras, CCs allow higher gamma-ray efficiency in spite of lighter geometry, and may feature comparable spatial resolution. CCs are better when the X-ray energy is high and small setups are required. We review current applications of CCs to Gamma Ray Astronomy and Biomedical systems stressing advantages and drawbacks. As an example, we focus on a particular CC we are developing, which is designed to image small animals administered with marked pharmaceuticals, and assess the bio-distribution and targeting capability of these latter. This camera has to address some requirements: relatively high activity of the imaged objects; detection of gamma-rays of different energies that may range from 140 keV (Tc99m) to 511 keV; presence of gamma and beta radiation with energies up to 2 MeV in case of 188Re. The camera consists of a thin position-sensitive Silicon Drift Detector as Tracker, and a further downstream position-sensitive system employing scintillating crystals and a multi-anode photo-multiplier (Calorimeter). The choice of crystal, pixel size, and detector geometry has been driven by measurements and simulations with the tracking code GEANT4. Spatial resolution, efficiency and scope are discussed.

  7. GAMMA-RAY COMPTON LIGHT SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AT LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Hagmann, C A; Johnson, M S; Jovanovic, I; Messerly, M J; Pruet, J A; Shverdin, M Y; Tremaine, A M; McNabb, D P; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2007-08-15

    A new class of tunable, monochromatic {gamma}-ray sources capable of operating at high peak and average brightness is currently being developed at LLNL for nuclear photoscience and applications. These novel systems are based on Compton scattering of laser photons by a high brightness relativistic electron beam produced by an rf photoinjector. A prototype, capable of producing > 10{sup 8} 0.7 MeV photons in a single shot, with a fractional bandwidth of 1%, and a repetition rate of 10 Hz, is currently under construction at LLNL; this system will be used to perform nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments. A new symmetrized S-band rf gun, using a Mg photocathode, will produce up to 1 nC of charge in an 8 ps bunch, with a normalized emittance modeled at 0.8 mm.mrad; electrons are subsequently accelerated up to 120 MeV to interact with a 500 mJ, 10 ps, 355 nm laser pulse and generate {gamma}-rays. The laser front end is a fiber-based system, using corrugated-fiber Bragg gratings for stretching, and drives both the frequency-quadrupled photocathode illumination laser and the Nd:YAG interaction laser. Two new technologies are used in the laser: a hyper-Michelson temporal pulse stacker capable of producing 8 ps square UV pulses, and a hyper-dispersion compressor for the interaction laser. Other key technologies, basic scaling laws, and recent experimental results will also be presented, along with an overview of future research and development directions.

  8. Progress in semiconductor drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Walton, J.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sanpietro, M.; Kemmer, J.; Dietl, H.; Holl, P.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.

    1985-01-01

    Progress in testing semiconductor drift detectors is reported. Generally better position and energy resolutions were obtained than resolutions published previously. The improvement is mostly due to new electronics better matched to different detectors. It is shown that semiconductor drift detectors are becoming versatile and reliable detectors for position and energy measurements.

  9. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  10. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  11. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  12. Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

    1985-04-30

    A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

  13. Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Noufi, Rommel; Chen, Yih-Wen

    1987-01-01

    A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

  14. Physics with isotopically controlled semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E. E.

    2010-07-15

    This paper is based on a tutorial presentation at the International Conference on Defects in Semiconductors (ICDS-25) held in Saint Petersburg, Russia in July 2009. The tutorial focused on a review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, is the most prominent effect for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples.

  15. Study of Compton suppression for use in spent nuclear fuel assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Sarah

    The focus of this study has been to assess Compton suppressed gamma-ray detection systems for the multivariate analysis of spent nuclear fuel. This objective has been achieved using direct measurement of samples of irradiated fuel elements in two geometrical configurations with Compton suppression systems. In order to address the objective to quantify the number of additionally resolvable photopeaks, direct Compton suppressed spectroscopic measurements of spent nuclear fuel in two configurations were performed: as intact fuel elements and as dissolved feed solutions. These measurements directly assessed and quantified the differences in measured gamma-ray spectrum from the application of Compton suppression. Several irradiated fuel elements of varying cooling time from the Penn State Breazeale Reactor spent fuel inventory were measured using three Compton suppression systems that utilized different primary detectors: HPGe, LaBr3, and NaI(Tl). The application of Compton suppression using a LaBr3 primary detector to the measurement of the current core fuel element, which presented the highest count rate, allowed four additional spectral features to be resolved. In comparison, the HPGe-CSS was able to resolve eight additional photopeaks as compared to the standalone HPGe measurement. Measurements with the NaI(Tl) primary detector were unable to resolve any additional peaks, due to its relatively low resolution. Samples of Approved Test Material (ATM) commercial fuel elements were obtained from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The samples had been processed using the beginning stages of the PUREX method and represented the unseparated feed solution from a reprocessing facility. Compton suppressed measurements of the ATM fuel samples were recorded inside the guard detector annulus, to simulate the siphoning of small quantities from the main process stream for long dwell measurement periods. Photopeak losses were observed in the measurements of the dissolved ATM

  16. Measuring the Spin-Polarizabilities of the Proton in Polarized Compton scattering at MAMI-Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskimen, Rory; A2 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    At O (ω3) four new structure constants are present in the nucleon Compton scattering amplitude; these are the spin-polarizabilities γE 1 E 1, γM 1 M 1, γE 1 M 2, and γM 1 E 2. The most model independent way to determine the spin-polarizabilities is by measuring a double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetry with polarized target and circularly polarized photons, and by measuring an in-plane/transverse-plane Compton scattering asymmetry with linearly polarized photons (Σ3) . This talk will present new Compton scattering asymmetry data taken in the Δ region by the A2 Collaboration using the Crystal Ball at Mainz, with transverse polarized proton target and circularly polarized photons, the Σ2 x asymmetry (1). A dispersion model and an EFT calculation of Compton scattering are used to fit the four spin-polarizabilities to the new experimental data on Σ2 x, earlier results (2) on Σ3, and previous determinations of γ0 and γπ. The results of the fits are compared with theoretical calculations.

  17. On the possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to study magnetoelectrical properties of crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S. P. Laundy, D.; Connolley, T.; Laan, G. van der; Fabrizi, F.; Janssen, O.; Cooper, M. J.; Ebert, H.; Mankovsky, S.

    2016-02-16

    The possibility of using X-ray Compton scattering to reveal antisymmetric components of the electron momentum density, as a fingerprint of magnetoelectric sample properties, is investigated experimentally and theoretically by studying the polar ferromagnet GaFeO{sub 3}. This paper discusses the possibility of using Compton scattering – an inelastic X-ray scattering process that yields a projection of the electron momentum density – to probe magnetoelectrical properties. It is shown that an antisymmetric component of the momentum density is a unique fingerprint of such time- and parity-odd physics. It is argued that polar ferromagnets are ideal candidates to demonstrate this phenomenon and the first experimental results are shown, on a single-domain crystal of GaFeO{sub 3}. The measured antisymmetric Compton profile is very small (≃ 10{sup −5} of the symmetric part) and of the same order of magnitude as the statistical errors. Relativistic first-principles simulations of the antisymmetric Compton profile are presented and it is shown that, while the effect is indeed predicted by theory, and scales with the size of the valence spin–orbit interaction, its magnitude is significantly overestimated. The paper outlines some important constraints on the properties of the antisymmetric Compton profile arising from the underlying crystallographic symmetry of the sample.

  18. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, S W; Robertson, D; Polf, J

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ~10−6 to 10−3 prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy. PMID:21048295

  19. Development of a compact scintillator-based high-resolution Compton camera for molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, A.; Kataoka, J.; Koide, A.; Sueoka, K.; Iwamoto, Y.; Taya, T.; Ohsuka, S.

    2017-02-01

    The Compton camera, which shows gamma-ray distribution utilizing the kinematics of Compton scattering, is a promising detector capable of imaging across a wide range of energy. In this study, we aim to construct a small-animal molecular imaging system in a wide energy range by using the Compton camera. We developed a compact medical Compton camera based on a Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (Ce:GAGG) scintillator and multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC). A basic performance confirmed that for 662 keV, the typical energy resolution was 7.4 % (FWHM) and the angular resolution was 4.5° (FWHM). We then used the medical Compton camera to conduct imaging experiments based on a 3-D imaging reconstruction algorithm using the multi-angle data acquisition method. The result confirmed that for a 137Cs point source at a distance of 4 cm, the image had a spatial resolution of 3.1 mm (FWHM). Furthermore, we succeeded in producing 3-D multi-color image of different simultaneous energy sources (22Na [511 keV], 137Cs [662 keV], and 54Mn [834 keV]).

  20. Direct Comparison of Møller and Compton Polarimeters in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, Dave

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the electron beam polarization is one of the most important systematic uncertainties in precision, parity-violating electron scattering experiments with next generation experiments aiming to measure the electron beam polarization to better than 0.5%. At high energies, the most typical polarimetry techniques are Møller (polarized electron-electron) and Compton (polarized electron-photon) scattering. The use of two techniques with different systematic uncertainties provides confidence in the extracted beam polarization. Direct comparisons of the two polarimetry techniques are challenging in that Compton polarimeters typically desire maximum beam flux (high beam currents) while Møller polarimeters need to limit the beam current to avoid depolarization effects in the target. We have performed a direct comparison of the Møller and Compton polarimeters in experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab. This test is unique in that the data were taken sequentially under identical beam conditions at 4.5 μA. We found excellent agreement between the Hall C Møller and Compton polarimeters. Combined with high-current Compton data, we were also able to limit the beam current dependence of the beam polarization to 1% or less up to a beam current of 180 μA. Supported in part by the U.S. Deparment of Energy, contract number AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC operates Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  1. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, S. W.; Robertson, D.; Polf, J.

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ~10-6 to 10-3 prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy.

  2. Technical Note: Influence of Compton currents on profile measurements in small-volume ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, Sean; Sperling, Nicholas; Parsai, E. Ishmael; Holmes, Shannon

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This work is to evaluate the effects of Compton current generation in three small-volume ionization chambers on measured beam characteristics for electron fields. Methods: Beam scans were performed using Exradin A16, A26, and PTW 31014 microchambers. Scans with varying chamber components shielded were performed. Static point measurements, output factors, and cable only irradiations were performed to determine the contribution of Compton currents to various components of the chamber. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate why one microchamber showed a significant reduction in Compton current generation. Results: Beam profiles demonstrated significant distortion for two of the three chambers when scanned parallel to the chamber axis, produced by electron deposition within the wire. Measurements of ionization produced within the cable identified Compton current generation as the cause of these distortions. The size of the central collecting wire was found to have the greatest influence on the magnitude of Compton current generation. Conclusions: Microchambers can demonstrate significant (>5%) deviations from properties as measured with larger volume chambers (0.125 cm{sup 3} and above). These deviations can be substantially reduced by averaging measurements conducted at opposite polarities.

  3. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S W; Robertson, D; Polf, J

    2010-11-21

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ∼ 10(-6) to 10(-3) prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy.

  4. Nonmagnetic semiconductor spin transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, K. C.; Lau, Wayne H.; Gündoǧdu, K.; Flatté, Michael E.; Boggess, Thomas F.

    2003-10-01

    We propose a spin transistor using only nonmagnetic materials that exploits the characteristics of bulk inversion asymmetry (BIA) in (110) symmetric quantum wells. We show that extremely large spin splittings due to BIA are possible in (110) InAs/GaSb/AlSb heterostructures, which together with the enhanced spin decay times in (110) quantum wells demonstrates the potential for exploitation of BIA effects in semiconductor spintronics devices. Spin injection and detection is achieved using spin-dependent resonant interband tunneling and spin transistor action is realized through control of the electron spin lifetime in an InAs lateral transport channel using an applied electric field (Rashba effect). This device may also be used as a spin valve, or a magnetic field sensor.

  5. Semiconductor adiabatic qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Malcolm S.; Witzel, Wayne; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Ganti, Anand; Landahl, Andrew J.; Lilly, Michael; Nguyen, Khoi Thi; Bishop, Nathaniel; Carr, Stephen M.; Bussmann, Ezra; Nielsen, Erik; Levy, James Ewers; Blume-Kohout, Robin J.; Rahman, Rajib

    2016-12-27

    A quantum computing device that includes a plurality of semiconductor adiabatic qubits is described herein. The qubits are programmed with local biases and coupling terms between qubits that represent a problem of interest. The qubits are initialized by way of a tuneable parameter, a local tunnel coupling within each qubit, such that the qubits remain in a ground energy state, and that initial state is represented by the qubits being in a superposition of |0> and |1> states. The parameter is altered over time adiabatically or such that relaxation mechanisms maintain a large fraction of ground state occupation through decreasing the tunnel coupling barrier within each qubit with the appropriate schedule. The final state when tunnel coupling is effectively zero represents the solution state to the problem represented in the |0> and |1> basis, which can be accurately read at each qubit location.

  6. Photocatalysis Using Semiconductor Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, T.R.; Wilcoxon,J.P.

    1999-01-21

    We report on experiments using nanosize MoS{sub 2} to photo-oxidize organic pollutants in water using visible light as the energy source. We have demonstrated that we can vary the redox potentials and absorbance characteristics of these small semiconductors by adjusting their size, and our studies of the photooxidation of organic molecules have revealed that the rate of oxidation increases with increasing bandgap (i.e. more positive valence band and more negative conduction band potentials). Because these photocatalysis reactions can be performed with the nanoclusters fully dispersed and stable in solution, liquid chromatography can be used to determine both the intermediate reaction products and the state of the nanoclusters during the reaction. We have demonstrated that the MoS{sub 2} nanoclusters remain unchanged during the photooxidation process by this technique. We also report on studies of MoS{sub 2} nanoclusters deposited on TiO{sub 2} powder.

  7. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  8. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane W.; Burger, Arnold

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  9. Electronic properties of Laves phase ZrFe{sub 2} using Compton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Samir Kumar, Kishor; Ahuja, B. L.; Dashora, Alpa

    2016-05-06

    First-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe{sub 2}, using indigenous 20 Ci {sup 137}Cs Compton spectrometer, is presented. To analyze the experimental electron momentum density, we have deduced the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock scheme within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The energy bands and density of states are also calculated using LCAO prescription. The theoretical profile based on local density approximation gives a better agreement with the experimental profile than other reported schemes. The present investigations validate the inclusion of correlation potential of Perdew-Zunger in predicting the electronic properties of ZrFe{sub 2}.

  10. Compton sources for the observation of elastic photon-photon scattering events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micieli, D.; Drebot, I.; Bacci, A.; Milotti, E.; Petrillo, V.; Conti, M. Rossetti; Rossi, A. R.; Tassi, E.; Serafini, L.

    2016-09-01

    We present the design of a photon-photon collider based on conventional Compton gamma sources for the observation of elastic γ γ scattering. Two symmetric electron beams, generated by photocathodes and accelerated in linacs, produce two primary gamma rays through Compton backscattering with two high energy lasers. The elastic photon-photon scattering is analyzed by start-to-end simulations from the photocathodes to the detector. A new Monte Carlo code has been developed ad hoc for the counting of the QED events. Realistic numbers of the secondary gamma yield, obtained by using the parameters of existing or approved Compton devices, a discussion of the feasibility of the experiment and of the nature of the background are presented.

  11. First Results in the Development of a Compton Probe Prototype for Prostate Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llosá, G.

    2004-07-01

    Compton imaging offers the possibility to improve significantly prostate imaging. Current radiotracer techniques, such as PET, SPECT or planar scintigraphy, suffer from photon attenuation in the tissue, poor resolution or low efficiency. The development of a Compton probe employing silicon as scatter detector makes possible to obtain a considerable benefit over present instrumentation. Electronic collimation overcomes the resolution-efficiency tradeoff imposed by mechanical collimators, and due to its near field operation, both high resolution and high counting efficiency can be achieved. Silicon pad sensors and low noise electronics are being optimized for this application. A Compton probe prototype has been developed, proving its viability and enabling further steps towards the construction of a clinical prototype.

  12. Resonant Compton Scattering of Photons by Helium Atoms in Lorentzian Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Wang, Yang; Ho, Y. K.; Jiang, Zishi

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effects of Lorentzian astrophysical plasmas on resonant Compton scattering of photons by the helium ground and excited states. The bound-excited states energies in the plasma environments are obtained by using highly correlated exponential wave functions in the framework of Ritz variational method. The resonance Compton scattering cross sections in Lorentzian plasmas between the 1s2{ }1S and 1s2p 1P, 1s2s 1S and 1s3p 1P, 1s3s 1S and 1s3d 1D states are reported as a function of the spectral index and plasma parameter. The nonthermal character of the Lorentzian plasmas shows interesting features on the resonant Compton scattering cross sections.

  13. Arthur Compton's 1941 Report on explosive fission of U-235: A look at the physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2007-12-01

    In November 1941, the third of three reports on atomic fission commissioned by Vannevar Bush through the National Academy of Sciences examined the prospects for explosive fission in U-235. This report, prepared by Arthur Compton, developed a model for estimating the critical mass and efficiency of an atomic bomb. I examine Compton's physics, attempt to discern the provenance of the numbers he adopted for various parameters, and compare his results with those yielded by a full diffusion-theory approach with contemporary values for the fission parameters. I conclude that Compton's physics is sound. A combination of somewhat optimistic parameter values and a conservative model for critical mass lead him to a numerical value for the bare critical radius of U-235 that is in fairly good accord with that yielded by diffusion theory. His estimated efficiency proved to be quite accurate for the Little Boy bomb.

  14. Compton imaging tomography for nondestructive evaluation of spacecraft thermal protection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Volodymyr; Burke, Eric; Grubsky, Victor

    2017-02-01

    Here we present new results of in situ nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of spacecraft thermal protection system materials obtained with POC-developed NDE tool based on a novel Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) technique recently pioneered and patented by Physical Optics Corporation (POC). In general, CIT provides high-resolution three-dimensional Compton scattered X-ray imaging of the internal structure of evaluated objects, using a set of acquired two-dimensional Compton scattered X-ray images of consecutive cross sections of these objects. Unlike conventional computed tomography, CIT requires only one-sided access to objects, has no limitation on the dimensions and geometry of the objects, and can be applied to large multilayer non-uniform objects with complicated geometries. Also, CIT does not require any contact with the objects being imaged during its application.

  15. Measurement of an inverse Compton scattering source local spectrum using k-edge filters

    SciTech Connect

    Golosio, Bruno; Oliva, Piernicola; Carpinelli, Massimo; Endrizzi, Marco; Delogu, Pasquale; Pogorelsky, Igor; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2012-04-16

    X-ray sources based on the inverse Compton scattering process are attracting a growing interest among scientists, due to their extremely fast pulse, quasi-monochromatic spectrum, and relatively high intensity. The energy spectrum of the x-ray beam produced by inverse Compton scattering sources in a fixed observation direction is a quasi-monochromatic approximately Gaussian distribution. The mean value of this distribution varies with the scattering polar angle between the electron beam direction and the x-ray beam observation direction. Previous works reported experimental measurements of the mean energy as a function of the polar angle. This work introduces a method for the measurement of the whole local energy spectrum (i.e., the spectrum in a fixed observation direction) of the x-ray beam yielded by inverse Compton scattering sources, based on a k-edge filtering technique.

  16. High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

    2007-04-17

    Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

  17. A Compton-suppression detection system for use in manganese bath measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Doostizadeh, H.; Hazami, Z.; Doust-Mohammadi, V.

    2015-07-01

    The manganese sulfate bath technique is a standard tool for neutron source strength measurement (Park et al., 2005). However, the dominate Compton continuum of most sodium iodide scintillators used in manganese bath systems (MBSs) does not allow the precise identification of induced gamma rays required for such measurements. In this research, to resolve this problem, a Compton-suppression system has been proposed which consists of a 2 in. by 2 in. NaI(Tl) right cylindrical scintillator as the main and a set of eight rectangular NE102 plastic scintillators of 12×12×15 cm3 dimensions as suppression detectors. Both detectors operate in anti-coincidence circuit to suppress the Compton continuum. The proposed system has been simulated with the MCNPX code with two different approaches and the corresponding measurements with 137Cs gamma-ray source and neutron-activated MnSO4 solution have been undertaken that give rise to a promising agreement.

  18. On Compton reflection in the sources of the cosmic X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Zycki, Piotr T.; Svensson, Roland; Boldt, Elihu

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to recent models for the cosmic X-ray background that assume that it originates from unresolved AGN emitting spectra due to enhanced Compton reflection of a power-law photon spectrum incident on cold matter. The parameter space of the Compton reflection model is studied, and the allowed parameter space is found to be severely constrained by physical and cosmological effects. For an incident power-law energy index alpha is greater than about 1, the X-ray peak in the observed spectrum from a population of AGN is necessarily at an energy less than that of the observed peak. Two examples of improved fits to the X-ray background are shown. It is concluded that the Compton reflection models proposed to date do not provide a straightforward explanation of the X-ray background spectrum.

  19. Compton profiles and electronic structure of HgBr(2) and HgI(2).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, G; Dashora, Alpa; Sharma, M; Ahuja, B L

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we present the first-ever experimental Compton line shapes of HgBr(2) and HgI(2) using (137)Cs Compton spectrometer. To compare our experimental momentum densities, we have computed the Compton profiles using Hartree-Fock and density functional theory within linear combination of atomic orbitals. We have also computed the energy bands and density of states using the linear combination of atomic orbitals and full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. On the basis of equal-valence-electron-density profiles, it is seen that HgI(2) is more covalent than HgBr(2) which is in agreement with the valence charge densities. The experimental isotropic profiles are found to be relatively in better agreement with the Hartree-Fock data. We have also discussed the photoluminescence and detection properties of both the halides.

  20. High energy Compton spectroscopy and electronic structure of Laves phase ZrFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Samir; Kumar, Kishor; Arora, Gunjan; Bapna, Komal; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe2 using indigenous 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer. To annotate the experimental electron momentum density, we have calculated the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of Hartree-Fock and DFT within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The spin-polarized energy bands and density of states are computed using LCAO and full potential-linearized augmented plane wave methods. The revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional (for solids) based theoretical profile gives a marginally better agreement with the experimental profile as compared to other approximations considered in the present work. The Fermi surface topology of ZrFe2 is explained in terms of majority- and minority-spin energy bands.

  1. Impact of Compton scatter on material decomposition using a photon counting spectral detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Cale; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.; Das, Mini

    2017-03-01

    Photon counting spectral detectors are being investigated to allow better discrimination of multiple materials by collecting spectral data for every detector pixel. The process of material decomposition or discrimination starts with an accurate estimation of energy dependent attenuation of the composite object. Photoelectric effect and Compton scattering are two important constituents of the attenuation. Compton scattering while results in a loss of primary photon, also results in an increase in photon counts in the lower ene1rgy bins via multiple orders of scatter. This contribution to each energy bin may change with material properties, thickness and x-ray energies. There has been little investigation into the effect of this increase in counts at lower energies due to presence of these Compton scattered photons using photon counting detectors. Our investigations show that it is important to account for this effect in spectral decomposition problems.

  2. Image Artifacts Resulting from Gamma-Ray Tracking Algorithms Used with Compton Imagers

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; He, Zhong

    2005-10-01

    For Compton imaging it is necessary to determine the sequence of gamma-ray interactions in a single detector or array of detectors. This can be done by time-of-flight measurements if the interactions are sufficiently far apart. However, in small detectors the time between interactions can be too small to measure, and other means of gamma-ray sequencing must be used. In this work, several popular sequencing algorithms are reviewed for sequences with two observed events and three or more observed events in the detector. These algorithms can result in poor imaging resolution and introduce artifacts in the backprojection images. The effects of gamma-ray tracking algorithms on Compton imaging are explored in the context of the 4π Compton imager built by the University of Michigan.

  3. A simple algorithm for estimation of source-to-detector distance in Compton imaging.

    PubMed

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W; Sullivan, John P; Tornga, Shawn R; Brumby, Steven P

    2008-12-01

    Compton imaging is used to predict the location of gamma-emitting radiation sources. The X and Y coordinates of the source can be obtained using a back-projected image and a two-dimensional peak-finding algorithm. The emphasis of this work is to estimate the source-to-detector distance (Z). The algorithm presented uses the solid angle subtended by the reconstructed image at various source-to-detector distances. This algorithm was validated using both measured data from the prototype Compton imager (PCI) constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and simulated data of the same imager. Results show this method can be applied successfully to estimate Z, and it provides a way of determining Z without prior knowledge of the source location. This method is faster than the methods that employ maximum likelihood method because it is based on simple back projections of Compton scatter data.

  4. Electronic properties of Laves phase ZrFe2 using Compton spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Samir; Kumar, Kishor; Dashora, Alpa; Ahuja, B. L.

    2016-05-01

    First-ever experimental Compton profile of Laves phase ZrFe2, using indigenous 20 Ci 137Cs Compton spectrometer, is presented. To analyze the experimental electron momentum density, we have deduced the theoretical Compton profiles using density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of DFT and Hartree-Fock scheme within linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method. The energy bands and density of states are also calculated using LCAO prescription. The theoretical profile based on local density approximation gives a better agreement with the experimental profile than other reported schemes. The present investigations validate the inclusion of correlation potential of Perdew-Zunger in predicting the electronic properties of ZrFe2.

  5. A method for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays by Compton scattering.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A

    2014-12-01

    A method was proposed for determination mass absorption coefficient of gamma rays for compounds, alloys and mixtures. It is based on simulating interaction processes of gamma rays with target elements having atomic numbers from Z=1 to Z=92 using the MCSHAPE software. Intensities of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturation thicknesses and at a scattering angle of 90° were calculated for incident gamma rays of different energies. The obtained results showed that the intensity of Compton scattered gamma rays at saturations and mass absorption coefficients can be described by mathematical formulas. These were used to determine mass absorption coefficients for compound, alloys and mixtures with the knowledge of their Compton scattered intensities. The method was tested by calculating mass absorption coefficients for some compounds, alloys and mixtures. There is a good agreement between obtained results and calculated ones using WinXom software. The advantages and limitations of the method were discussed.

  6. Resonant Compton cooling and annihilation line production in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Harding, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a synchrotron self-Compton emission model for gamma-ray bursts which produces narrow annihilation features for a variety of field strengths, primary electron injection energies, and injection rates. In this model, primary electrons are injected and cooled by synchrotron emission in a strong, homogeneous magnetic field, resulting in a pair cascade. Multiple resonant scattering with cyclotron photons efficiently traps and cools pairs in the ground state to an average energy where the Compton energy loss rate is zero, which is in agreement with previous estimates of a Compton temperature. The particle distributions in the ground state are determined by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the steady state. In the case of isotropic injection of primary electrons, a significant narrow-line feature appears in the overall emission. In the case of beamed injection, the annihilation line is broadened to the extent that it would not be observable.

  7. A Compton scattering technique to determine wood density and locating defects in it

    SciTech Connect

    Tondon, Akash Sandhu, B. S.; Singh, Bhajan; Singh, Mohinder

    2015-08-28

    A Compton scattering technique is presented to determine density and void location in the given wooden samples. The technique uses a well collimated gamma ray beam from {sup 137}Cs along with the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. First, a linear relationship is established between Compton scattered intensity and known density of chemical compounds, and then density of the wood is determined from this linear relation. In another experiment, the ability of penetration of gamma rays is explored to detect voids in wooden (low Z) sample. The sudden reduction in the Compton scattered intensities agrees well with the position and size of voids in the wooden sample. It is concluded that wood density and the voids of size ∼ 4 mm and more can be detected easily by this method.

  8. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S.

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  9. Hadronic weak charges and parity-violating forward Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Spiesberger, Hubert

    2016-11-01

    Background: Parity-violating elastic electron-nucleon scattering at low momentum transfer allows one to access the nucleon's weak charge, the vector coupling of the Z -boson to the nucleon. In the Standard Model and at tree level, the weak charge of the proton is related to the weak mixing angle and accidentally suppressed, QWp ,tree=1 -4 sin2θW≈0.07 . Modern experiments aim at extracting QWp at ˜1 % accuracy. Similarly, parity nonconservation in atoms allows to access the weak charge of atomic nuclei. Purpose: We consider a novel class of radiative corrections due to the exchange of two photons, with parity violation in the hadronic/nuclear system. These corrections are prone to long-range interactions and may affect the extraction of sin2θW from the experimental data at the relevant level of precision. Methods: The two-photon exchange contribution to the parity-violating electron-proton scattering amplitude is studied in the framework of forward dispersion relations. We address the general properties of the parity-violating forward Compton scattering amplitude and use relativistic chiral perturbation theory to provide the first field-theoretical proof that it obeys a superconvergence relation. Results: We show that the significance of this new correction increases with the beam energy in parity-violating electron scattering, but the superconvergence relation protects the formal definition of the weak charge as a limit at zero-momentum transfer and zero energy. We evaluate the new correction in a hadronic model with pion loops and the Δ (1232 ) resonance, supplemented with a high-energy contribution. For the kinematic conditions of existing and upcoming experiments we show that two-photon exchange corrections with hadronic or nuclear parity violation do not pose a problem for the interpretation of the data in terms of the weak mixing angle at the present level of accuracy. Conclusions: Two-photon exchange in presence of hadronic or nuclear parity violation

  10. Inverse Compton Light Source: A Compact Design Proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitrick, Kirsten Elizabeth

    In the last decade, there has been an increasing demand for a compact Inverse Compton Light Source (ICLS) which is capable of producing high-quality X-rays by colliding an electron beam and a high-quality laser. It is only in recent years when both SRF and laser technology have advanced enough that compact sources can approach the quality found at large installations such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Previously, X-ray sources were either high flux and brilliance at a large facility or many orders of magnitude lesser when produced by a bremsstrahlung source. A recent compact source was constructed by Lyncean Technologies using a storage ring to produce the electron beam used to scatter the incident laser beam. By instead using a linear accelerator system for the electron beam, a significant increase in X-ray beam quality is possible, though even subsequent designs also featuring a storage ring offer improvement. Preceding the linear accelerator with an SRF reentrant gun allows for an extremely small transverse emittance, increasing the brilliance of the resulting X-ray source. In order to achieve sufficiently small emittances, optimization was done regarding both the geometry of the gun and the initial electron bunch distribution produced off the cathode. Using double-spoke SRF cavities to comprise the linear accelerator allows for an electron beam of reasonable size to be focused at the interaction point, while preserving the low emittance that was generated by the gun. An aggressive final focusing section following the electron beam's exit from the accelerator produces the small spot size at the interaction point which results in an X-ray beam of high flux and brilliance. Taking all of these advancements together, a world class compact X-ray source has been designed. It is anticipated that this source would far outperform the conventional bremsstrahlung and many other compact ICLSs, while coming closer to performing at the levels

  11. Double Compton and Cyclo-Synchrotron in Super-Eddington Discs, Magnetized Coronae, and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Chluba, Jens; Wielgus, Maciek; Narayan, Ramesh; Sadowski, Aleksander

    2017-05-01

    Black hole accretion discs accreting near the Eddington rate are dominated by bremsstrahlung cooling, but above the Eddington rate, the double Compton process can dominate in radiation-dominated regions, while the cyclo-synchrotron can dominate in strongly magnetized regions like a corona or a jet. We present an extension to the general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamic code harmrad to account for emission and absorption by thermal cyclo-synchrotron, double Compton, bremsstrahlung, low-temperature opal opacities, as well as Thomson and Compton scattering. The harmrad code and associated analysis and visualization codes have been made open-source and are publicly available at the github repository website. We approximate the radiation field as a Bose-Einstein distribution and evolve it using the radiation number-energy-momentum conservation equations in order to track photon hardening. We perform various simulations to study how these extensions affect the radiative properties of magnetically arrested discs accreting at Eddington to super-Eddington rates. We find that double Compton dominates bremsstrahlung in the disc within a radius of r ˜ 15rg (gravitational radii) at hundred times the Eddington accretion rate, and within smaller radii at lower accretion rates. Double Compton and cyclo-synchrotron regulate radiation and gas temperatures in the corona, while cyclo-synchrotron regulates temperatures in the jet. Interestingly, as the accretion rate drops to Eddington, an optically thin corona develops whose gas temperature of T ˜ 109K is ˜100 times higher than the disc's blackbody temperature. Our results show the importance of double Compton and synchrotron in super-Eddington discs, magnetized coronae and jets.

  12. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  13. Low-Dimensional Semiconductor Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnham, Keith; Vvedensky, Dimitri

    2001-08-01

    Low-Dimensional Semiconductor Structures offers a seamless, atoms-to-devices introduction to the latest quantum heterostructures. It covers their fabrication; electronic, optical, and transport properties; role in exploring new physical phenomena; and utilization in devices. The authors describe the epitaxial growth of semiconductors and the physical behavior of electrons and phonons in low-dimensional structures. They then go on to discuss nonlinear optics in quantum heterostructures. The final chapters deal with semiconductor lasers, mesoscopic devices, and high-speed heterostructure devices. The book contains many exercises and comprehensive references.

  14. Modulated method for efficient, narrow-bandwidth, laser Compton X-ray and gamma-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2017-07-11

    A method of x-ray and gamma-ray generation via laser Compton scattering uses the interaction of a specially-formatted, highly modulated, long duration, laser pulse with a high-frequency train of high-brightness electron bunches to both create narrow bandwidth x-ray and gamma-ray sources and significantly increase the laser to Compton photon conversion efficiency.

  15. Tomographic images of breast tissues obtained by Compton scattering: An analytical computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M. E.; Brunetti, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we studied by analytical simulation the potential of a Compton scatter technique for breast imaging application. A Compton scattering tomography system was computationally simulated in order to provide the projection data (scattering signal) for the image reconstructions. The simulated projections generated by the analytical proposed method were validated through comparison with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. Electron density images were obtained from the scattering signal using a reconstruction algorithm implemented for the system geometry. Finally, the quality of the reconstructed images was evaluated for different sample sizes, beam energies, and tissue compositions (glandularities).

  16. FITS Data Conversion Efforts at the Compton Observatory Science Support Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D. G.; Jordan, J. M.; McGlynn, T. A.; Ruggiero, N. G.; Serlemitsos, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) is an active satellite consisting of four gamma ray telescopes. Each telescope is maintained by an independent team of investigators, and each team has devised separate data formats to handle the needs of their particular instrument. As mandated by NASA, the Compton Observatory Science Support Center (COSSC) intends to archive and distribute data from all four CGRO instruments in FITS. This paper describes the problems encountered in transcribing large amounts of data into a standard FITS form, the capabilities of the COSSC-built conversion software designed to perform the transformations and the ToFU conversion tools on which this software is based.

  17. Quality Control of Pavements and Tarmacs Using ({sup 137}Cs){gamma} Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pino, F.; Barros, H.; Bernal, M.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Palacios, D.; Greaves, E. D.; Viesti, G.

    2010-08-04

    The {gamma} Compton scattering over a volume of concrete has been studied in order to design an instrument for density measurements. It will be used for the quality control in road construction, where large surfaces must be monitored. The experimental results and Monte Carlo simulations of the {gamma} Compton scattering over homogeneous and inhomogeneous volumes of concrete are shown. MC simulations have been useful to optimize the values of several parameters to improve the experimental set up and to estimate the extension of the explored volume.

  18. First electron beam polarization measurements with a Compton polarimeter at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Maud Baylac; E. Burtin; C. Cavata; S. Escoffier; B. Frois; D. Lhuillier; F. Marie; J. Martino; D. Neyret; T. Pussieux; P.Y. Bertin; Kees de Jager; J. Mitchell

    2002-03-01

    A Compton polarimeter has been installed in Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory. This letter reports on the first electron beam polarization measurements performed during the HAPPEX experiment at an electron energy of 3.3 GeV and an average current of 40 muA. The heart of this device is a Fabry-Perot cavity which increased the luminosity for Compton scattering in the interaction region so much that a 1.4% statistical accuracy could be obtained within one hour, with a 3.3% total error.

  19. Gravitation and Special Relativity from Compton Wave Interactions at the Planck Scale: An Algorithmic Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper space is modeled as a lattice of Compton wave oscillators (CWOs) of near- Planck size. It is shown that gravitation and special relativity emerge from the interaction between particles Compton waves. To develop this CWO model an algorithmic approach was taken, incorporating simple rules of interaction at the Planck-scale developed using well known physical laws. This technique naturally leads to Newton s law of gravitation and a new form of doubly special relativity. The model is in apparent agreement with the holographic principle, and it predicts a cutoff energy for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that is consistent with observational data.

  20. Arthur Compton's 1941 Analysis of Explosive Fission in U-235: The Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Cameron

    2008-04-01

    In November 1941 Arthur Compton prepared a report for Vannevar Bush regarding the possibility of explosive fission of U-235. This remarkable report, arguably the parent document of the Los Alamos Primer, presented detailed estimates for the critical mass, expected energy release, efficiency, destructive effects and probable cost of such a weapon. This paper will examine the physics behind Compton's estimates for the critical mass and efficiency of a fission weapon and compare his results to those derived from present-day cross-sections and secondary-neutron numbers. His approach to the efficiency calculation is found to be particularly interesting in that it utilizes some very basic undergraduate physics.