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Sample records for headspace gas chromatography-mass

  1. Application of Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Detection of the Chemical Warfare Agent Sulfur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-16

    Title of Thesis: “Application of Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for Rapid...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Application of Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Detection of the Chemical...phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Five commercially available SPME fibers were investigated to determine the

  2. [Determination of 10 volatile organic compounds in toys by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lü, Qing; Zhang, Qing; Kang, Suyuan; Bai, Hua; Wang, Chao

    2010-08-01

    A headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method was developed for the determination of 10 residual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in toys. The experimental conditions such as headspace temperature, headspace time and the analytical conditions of GC-MS were optimized. Toy samples were treated at 140 degrees C for 45 min, and then the evolved products were separated on a DB-624 column, determined by MS and quantified by external standard method. The recoveries were from 79% to 106% and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were from 0.4% to 5.6%. The linear range was 0.001 - 2.0 microg with a good linear correlation coefficient (r > 0.994 0) and the limits of quantification (LOQ) were less than 0 66 mg/kg. The method is accurate, simple, rapid, and is suitable for the analysis of residual VOCs in various toys.

  3. Study on volatile components in salami by reverse carrier gas headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Procida, G; Conte, L S; Fiorasi, S; Comi, G; Favretto, L G

    1999-01-08

    Salami are a typical seasoned sausage of Italy; a number of types are produced, according to local traditional recipes. As industrial production has taken place, a number of problems rise in obtaining products similar to the traditional ones. The use of selected microbial starters is permitted by Italian law for some years and at present, microbiological research is engaged in selecting starters similar to the ones isolated from traditional products, with the aim of obtaining organoleptic characteristics close to the ones of traditional recipes. A study was carried out concerning the characterisation of volatile components of salami by headspace capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As during the sampling step, analytes could reach the analytical column, the carrier gas rate was back flushed in the latter, while a pre column was used as cold trap. Then GC-MS analysis follows. By these techniques, we were able to highlight typical profiles of different salami, as well as monitoring the ripening of a traditional and a starter added salami. Main peaks are of fermentative origin, while also peaks from spices were detected. Ethyl propionate was used as internal standard to be able to normalise the peaks amounts.

  4. Rapid quantification of dimethyl methylphosphonate from activated carbon particles by static headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Billingsley, Brit G; Logue, Brian A

    2013-06-07

    Activated carbon (AC) particles are utilized as an adsorbent for binding hazardous vapors in protective equipment. The binding affinity and utilization of these AC particles should be known to ensure effective and efficient use. Therefore, a simple and effective method was developed for the quantification of the chemical warfare agent simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), from AC particles. Static headspace gas chromatography mass-spectrometry with internal standard, DMMP-d6, was used to perform the analysis. The method produced a linear dynamic range of 2.48-620g DMMP/kg carbon and a detection limit of 1.24g DMMP/kg carbon. Furthermore, the method produced a coefficient of variation of less than 16% for all intra- and inter-assay analyses. The method provided a simple and effective procedure for quantifying DMMP from AC particles and was applied to the analysis of a DMMP-exposed AC protective respirator filter.

  5. Characterization of gamma irradiated petrolatum eye ointment base by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lan; Altorfer, Hans

    2002-06-20

    The effects of gamma irradiation on petrolatum eye ointment base (EOB) and its ingredients (white petrolatum, liquid paraffin, and wool fat) were studied at different irradiation doses. Forty-one volatile radiolysis products were detected and identified by a combined system of headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS). The characteristics of the radiolysis products and the degradation pathway were discussed in each case, respectively. GC method demonstrates that the component distribution patterns of eye ointment as well as its individual ingredients have no differences before and after gamma irradiation. The influence of gamma treatment on EOB was quantitatively determined at 15, 25 and 50 kGy. The concentrations of the radiolysis products increase linearly with increasing doses. Both qualitative and quantitative data show that irradiated eye ointment is safe for human use.

  6. Headspace Analysis of Philippine Civet Coffee Beans Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Electronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongo, E.; Sevilla, F.; Antonelli, A.; Sberveglieri, G.; Montevecchi, G.; Sberveglieri, V.; de Paola, E. L.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Civet coffee, the most expensive and best coffee in the world, is an economically important export product of the Philippines. With a growing threat of food adulteration and counterfeiting, a need for quality authentication is essential to protect the integrity and strong market value of Philippine civet coffee. At present, there is no internationally accepted method of verifying whether a bean is an authentic civet coffee. This study presented a practical and promising approach to identify and establish the headspace qualitative profile of Philippine civet coffee using electronic nose (E-nose) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). E-nose analysis revealed that aroma characteristic is one of the most important quality indicators of civet coffee. The findings were supported by GC-MS analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) exhibited a clearly separated civet coffees from their control beans. The chromatographic fingerprints indicated that civet coffees differed with their control beans in terms of composition and concentration of individual volatile constituents.

  7. Headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry characterization of propolis volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Federica; Prencipe, Francesco Pio; Benvenuti, Stefania

    2013-10-01

    In this study, a novel and efficient method based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was developed for the analysis of propolis volatile compounds. The HS-SPME procedure, whose experimental parameters were properly optimized, was carried out using a 100 μm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber. The GC-MS analyses were performed on a HP-5 MS cross-linked 5% diphenyl-95% dimethyl polysiloxane capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm I.D., 1.00 μm film thickness), under programmed-temperature elution. Ninety-nine constituents were identified using this technique in the samples of raw propolis collected from different Italian regions. The main compounds detected include benzoic acid (0.87-30.13%) and its esters, such as benzyl benzoate (0.16-13.05%), benzyl salicylate (0.34-1.90%) and benzyl cinnamate (0.34-3.20%). Vanillin was detected in most of the samples analyzed in this study (0.07-5.44%). Another relevant class of volatile constituents is represented by sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, such as δ-cadinene (1.29-13.31%), γ-cadinene (1.36-8.85%) and α-muurolene (0.78-6.59%), and oxygenated sesquiterpenes, such as β-eudesmol (2.33-12.83%), T-cadinol (2.73-9.95%) and α-cadinol (4.84-9.74%). Regarding monoterpene hydrocarbons, they were found to be present at low level in the samples analyzed in this study, with the exception of one sample from Southern Italy, where α-pinene was the most abundant constituent (13.19%). The results obtained by HS-SPME-GC-MS were also compared with those of hydrodistillation (HD) coupled with GC-MS. The HS-SPME-GC-MS method developed in this study allowed us to determine the chemical fingerprint of propolis volatile constituents, thus providing a new and reliable tool for the complete characterization of this biologically active apiary product.

  8. Detection of perfluorocarbons in blood by headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mathurin, J C; de Ceaurriz, J; Audran, M; Krafft, M P

    2001-11-01

    A new method of detection of perfluorocarbon molecules (PFCs) in blood sample has been established. After an extraction and pre-concentration step performed by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), the PFCs are detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with an ion trap mass spectrometer in MS and MS/MS modes. The influence of different parameters on the SPME process is discussed. The limit of detection and the linearity of the procedure have been determined for two PFCs.

  9. Rapid identification of pork for halal authentication using the electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nurjuliana, M; Che Man, Y B; Mat Hashim, D; Mohamed, A K S

    2011-08-01

    The volatile compounds of pork, other meats and meat products were studied using an electronic nose and gas chromatography mass spectrometer with headspace analyzer (GCMS-HS) for halal verification. The zNose™ was successfully employed for identification and differentiation of pork and pork sausages from beef, mutton and chicken meats and sausages which were achieved using a visual odor pattern called VaporPrint™, derived from the frequency of the surface acoustic wave (SAW) detector of the electronic nose. GCMS-HS was employed to separate and analyze the headspace gasses from samples into peaks corresponding to individual compounds for the purpose of identification. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for data interpretation. Analysis by PCA was able to cluster and discriminate pork from other types of meats and sausages. It was shown that PCA could provide a good separation of the samples with 67% of the total variance accounted by PC1.

  10. Analysis of ammonium nitrate headspace by on-fiber solid phase microextraction derivatization with gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Adam L; Andrews, Benjamin; Hammond, Mark; Collins, Greg E; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan

    2016-01-15

    A novel analytical method has been developed for the quantitation of trace levels of ammonia in the headspace of ammonium nitrate (AN) using derivatized solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Ammonia is difficult to detect via direct injection into a GC-MS because of its low molecular weight and extreme polarity. To circumvent this issue, ammonia was derivatized directly onto a SPME fiber by the reaction of butyl chloroformate coated fibers with the ammonia to form butyl carbamate. A derivatized externally sampled internal standard (dESIS) method based upon the reactivity of diethylamine with unreacted butyl chloroformate on the SPME fiber to form butyl diethylcarbamate was established for the reproducible quantification of ammonia concentration. Both of these compounds are easily detectable and separable via GC-MS. The optimized method was then used to quantitate the vapor concentration of ammonia in the headspace of two commonly used improvised explosive device (IED) materials, ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) and ammonium nitrate aluminum powder (Ammonal), as well as identify the presence of additional fuel components within the headspace.

  11. Determination of some volatile compounds in alcoholic beverage by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography - mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmutzer, G.; Avram, V.; Feher, I.; David, L.; Moldovan, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The volatile composition of alcoholic beverage was studied by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSSPME) method and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Some volatile compounds, such as alcohols, esters, terpenes and other are mainly responsible for the flavor of fortified wines and their amounts specify the quality of the alcoholic beverages. From this perspective it is interesting to develop a rapid, selective and sensitive analytical method suitable for simultaneous quantification of the main molecules being responsible for the organoleptic characteristic of alcoholic beverages. Vermouth fortified drink was analyzed in order to characterize the volatile profile. Using the HS-SPME/GC-MS a number of twenty-six volatile compounds from a commercial market alcoholic beverage were identified. The most abundant compounds were m-thymol, o-thymol and eugenol, alongside of the ethyl ester compounds.

  12. Determination of benzene in soft drinks and other beverages by isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu-Liang; Casey, Valerie; Seaman, Steve; Tague, Brett; Becalski, Adam

    2007-01-01

    An automated, simple, and reproducible method was developed for the determination of benzene in soft drinks, based on isotope dilution headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the selected-ion monitoring mode. The method was used to assess benzene levels in samples of 124 soft drinks and beverages. Benzene was not detected in 60% of the 124 products. The average benzene levels in 6 products exceeded the Canadian maximum acceptable concentration of 5 microg/L for benzene in drinking water, and 2 of the 6 products had benzene levels above the World Health Organization guideline of 10 microg/L. The highest level of benzene, 23 microg/L, was found in a soft drink product specifically marketed to children.

  13. Headspace solid-phase microextraction for characterization of fragrances of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam-Sun; Lee, Dong-Sun

    2004-01-01

    Natural fragrances from lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) were studied by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) techniques followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), with six different fibre coatings being tested to evaluate the extraction efficiencies of several selected compounds. A total of 14 compounds were identified in the fragrances of lemon verbena. Geranial and neral were detected as major components and alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, beta-caryophyllene, and curcumene as minor components. Enantiomeric analysis of chiral compounds from lemon verbena was carried out on a chiral column. alpha-Pinene, limonene, and camphor in the fragrances emitted from lemon verbena were found in the (+), (-), and (-) forms, respectively.

  14. Characterization of novel varietal floral hop aromas by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Van Opstaele, Filip; De Causmaecker, Brecht; Aerts, Guido; De Cooman, Luc

    2012-12-19

    In this study, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were optimized and implemented to investigate the volatile composition of novel floral hop essences prepared from four German aroma hop varieties. In total, 91 different constituents were assigned, which were further grouped into monoterpene hydrocarbons, esters, ketones, aldehydes, furans, and oxygenated and nonoxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most volatiles belong to the ester group, whereas the monoterpene hydrocarbon β-myrcene appears to be the predominant compound in all hop oil preparations investigated. Furthermore, as demonstrated by principal component analysis, varietal floral hop essences are clearly discriminated on the basis of their characteristic volatile composition. Via GC-olfactometry on the floral essence variety Spalter Select, β-myrcene and 2-undecanone were identified as the most potent odorants. Several hop oil constituents were reported for the first time as impact odorants of hop aroma.

  15. Volatile constituents of Murraya koenigii fresh leaves using headspace solid phase microextraction--gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sukkaew, Sayamol; Pripdeevech, Patcharee; Thongpoon, Chalermporn; Machan, Theeraphan; Wongchuphan, Rattana

    2014-12-01

    The volatile components of Murraya koenigii fresh leaves, collected from Surat Thani province, Thailand were studied by using headspace (HS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The four fibers employed to extract the volatiles were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB), carboxane-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene-carboxane (PDMS-DVB-CAR). The volatile constituents of M. koenigii fresh leaves were also extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. Fifty-one compounds were identified by these fibers. Five major compounds, γ-terpinene, β-caryophyllene, β-phellandrene, a-selinene and a-pinene, were detected in all fibers. The PDMS-DVB-CAR fiber was considered as the best for trapping key volatiles of M. koenigii fresh leaves.

  16. Determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in bituminous emulsion sealants using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Isacsson, Ulf

    2006-12-22

    The possibility of quantitative determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in bituminous emulsion sealants was investigated using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The target analytes studied were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-, m-, and o-xylene (BTEX) as well as 1,3,5- and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Experimental factors influencing HS-SPME efficiency were studied (sample-headspace equilibration time, extraction time and sample matrix effects). A HS-SPME method using surrogate matrix was developed. The detection limit was estimated as approximately 0.1 ppmw for the target analytes investigated. Good linearity was observed (R(2)>0.997) for all calibration curves obtained. The repeatability of the method (RSD, relative standard deviation) was found less than 10%. The accuracy of the method given by recovery of spiked samples was between 99 and 116%. The HS-SPME method developed was applied to two commercially available bituminous emulsion sealants. External calibration and standard addition approaches were investigated, and statistical paired t-test was performed. The contents of target aromatic hydrocarbons in the sealants studied varied from approximately 0.4 to 150 ppmw. The method developed shows potential as a tool for the determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in emulsified bituminous materials.

  17. Static headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids in canned vegetables.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes

    2016-07-08

    Canned vegetables appear to be a possible exposure pathway for hazardous disinfection by-products due to the use of sanitizers and treated water by the canning industry in the preparation of these foods. This work reports on two static headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for the simultaneous determination of 10 trihalomethanes (THMs) and 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs) in both solid and liquid phases of the canned vegetables. Both methods carry out the whole process (including the leaching of target analytes from the vegetable), derivatization of HAAs and volatilization of THMs and HAA esters, in a single step within a static headspace unit. The methods proposed provide an efficient and simple tool for the determination of regulated disinfection by-products in canned vegetables. Average limits of detection for THMs and HAAs were 0.19 and 0.45μg/kg, respectively, in the solid phase of canned vegetables, and 0.05 and 0.09μg/L, respectively, in the liquid phase. Satisfactory recoveries (90-99%) and precision, calculated as relative standard deviations (RSD≤10%), were obtained in both phases of canned vegetables. The methods proposed were applied for the analysis of frequently-used canned vegetables and confirmed the presence of up to 3 THMs and 5 HAAs at microgram per kilogram or liter levels in both phases of the samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Screening for petrochemical contamination in seafood by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bencsath, F Aladar; Benner, Ronald A; Abraham, Ann; Wang, Yuesong; El Said, Kathleen R; Jester, Edward L E; Plakas, Steven M

    2015-05-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS) method is described, to screen seafood for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with petrochemical taint. VOCs are extracted from the headspace of heated sample homogenates by adsorption onto a SPME fiber and desorbed for analysis by GC-MS. Targeted compounds are determined semi-quantitatively using representative calibration standards for the various classes (alkanes, alkylbenzenes, indanes/tetralins, and naphthalenes) of VOCs analyzed. Sample preparation is minimal, and the analyses are rapid and automated with a capacity of 50 samples per day. The method was optimized in terms of headspace temperature, sample heating time, extraction time, and desorption time using oyster samples fortified with target compounds. Calibrations for hydrocarbon components were linear in the range of 8.3-167 ng/g; the limit of detection ranged between 0.05 and 0.21 ng/g, and the limit of quantitation between 0.16 and 0.69 ng/g. Good precision (RSD < 10 % at 16.7 ng/g for individual VOCs) and accuracy (recovery range 89-118 % at 25 ng/g) were obtained in oyster, crab, shrimp, and finfish matrices. The trueness of the method was demonstrated by quantifying VOCs at 1-2-ppb levels in oyster fortified with certified reference material NIST SRM 1491a. Following single laboratory validation, the method was employed for the determination of VOCs in seafood exposed to oil contaminated seawater and for the determination of background VOC levels in seafood species from the Gulf of Mexico and local food stores. The method as described can be used to supplement human sensory testing for petrochemical taint in seafood.

  19. Determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt release agents using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Isacsson, Ulf

    2005-04-01

    The possibility of quantitative analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons in oil-based asphalt release agents was investigated using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The target analytes studied were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-, m-, and o-xylene (BTEX) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Experimental parameters influencing HS-SPME efficiency were studied (equilibration time between sample and headspace and between headspace and SPME fiber, sample amount and sample matrice effects). A HS-SPME method using hexadecane as a surrogate matrice was developed. The detection limit was estimated as 0.03-0.08 ppm (w/w) for the target analytes investigated. Good linearity was observed (R2 > 0.999) for all calibration curves at high, medium and low concentration level. The repeatability of the method (RSD, relative standard deviation) was found to be less than 10% (generally less than 5%) in triplicate samples and approximately 2% at eight consecutive tests on one and the same sample. The accuracy of the method given by recovery of spiked samples was between 85 and 106% (generally between 95 and 105%). The HS-SPME method developed was applied to four commercially available asphalt release agents. External calibration and standard addition approaches were investigated regarding accuracy. The results showed that standard addition generates higher accuracy than external calibration. The contents of target aromatic hydrocarbons in the asphalt release agents studied varied greatly from approximately 0.1-700 ppm. The method described looks promising, and could be a valuable tool for determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in different types of organic matrices.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Bioactive Compounds from Aromatic Plants by Means of Dynamic Headspace Extraction and Multiple Headspace Extraction-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Omar, Jone; Olivares, Maitane; Alonso, Ibone; Vallejo, Asier; Aizpurua-Olaizola, Oier; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2016-04-01

    Seven monoterpenes in 4 aromatic plants (sage, cardamom, lavender, and rosemary) were quantified in liquid extracts and directly in solid samples by means of dynamic headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DHS-GC-MS) and multiple headspace extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MHSE), respectively. The monoterpenes were 1st extracted by means of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and analyzed by an optimized DHS-GC-MS. The optimization of the dynamic extraction step and the desorption/cryo-focusing step were tackled independently by experimental design assays. The best working conditions were set at 30 °C for the incubation temperature, 5 min of incubation time, and 40 mL of purge volume for the dynamic extraction step of these bioactive molecules. The conditions of the desorption/cryo-trapping step from the Tenax TA trap were set at follows: the temperature was increased from 30 to 300 °C at 150 °C/min, although the cryo-trapping was maintained at -70 °C. In order to estimate the efficiency of the SFE process, the analysis of monoterpenes in the 4 aromatic plants was directly carried out by means of MHSE because it did not require any sample preparation. Good linearity (r2) > 0.99) and reproducibility (relative standard deviation % <12) was obtained for solid and liquid quantification approaches, in the ranges of 0.5 to 200 ng and 10 to 500 ng/mL, respectively. The developed methods were applied to analyze the concentration of 7 monoterpenes in aromatic plants obtaining concentrations in the range of 2 to 6000 ng/g and 0.25 to 110 μg/mg, respectively.

  1. Dynamic headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of volatiles produced in fish oil enriched mayonnaise during storage.

    PubMed

    Hartvigsen, K; Lund, P; Hansen, L F; Holmer, G

    2000-10-01

    Protection against lipid oxidation and formation of unpleasant fishy and rancid off-flavors in oil-in-water food emulsions, such as fish oil enriched mayonnaise, is difficult to achieve. Volatile profiles from stored mayonnaises with different oil phase compositions were collected using a developed dynamic headspace sampling technique, in which interfering acetic acid was removed in situ with potassium hydroxide, and subsequently 148 volatiles were characterized and monitored by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistics showed correlation between the concentration of 62 volatiles and the fish oil and storage parameters, indicating the formation of lipid oxidation products, which impose fishy off-flavors. Further verification was obtained by gas chromatography/olfactometry, by which, among 78 odors, cis-4-heptenal and trans,cis-2,4-heptadienal were detected as distinct fishy notes. In total, 27 volatiles, including 1-penten-3-one, cis-2-penten-1-ol, cis-3-hexenal, cis-4-heptenal, 1-octen-3-one, 1,cis-5-octadien-3-one, 1-octen-3-ol, trans,cis-2, 4-heptadienal, and trans,cis-2,6-nonadienal, were suggested to contribute to the developed unpleasant fishy and rancid off-flavors.

  2. Characterization of organic fouling in reverse osmosis membranes by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Gómez, V; Pocurull, E; Borrull, F

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption of organic substances on reverse osmosis (RO) membrane surfaces may form an organic film on the membrane, known as organic fouling, and cause flow-rate loss. This problem is mostly unavoidable as no pretreatment method exists for perfect removal of possible foulants, including organic compounds resulting from undesirable bioactivity. Understanding the characteristics of fouling layers is an essential step towards overall improvement of RO membrane operations. In this study, the organic fouling in RO membranes treating the effluent of a secondary treatment from an urban wastewater treatment plant was characterized. Headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been used for the first time, to provide valuable information of organic fouling. Different polarity SPME fibers were tested for this purpose. In addition, the characterization of the organic fouling obtained by HS-SPME was compared with the results obtained by extraction using several organic solvents. The results indicated that more compound families can be identified by HS-SPME than by organic solvent extraction. Moreover, complementary organic analyses were done for better understanding of the organic fouling in RO membranes, such as total organic carbon and loss on ignition.

  3. Novel ethyl-derivatization approach for the determination of fluoride by headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pagliano, Enea; Meija, Juris; Ding, Jianfu; Sturgeon, Ralph E; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Mester, Zoltán

    2013-01-15

    We report a novel derivatization chemistry for determination of fluoride based on the batch reaction of fluoride ions with triethyloxonium tetrachloroferrate(III) in a closed vessel to yield fluoroethane. Gaseous fluoroethane was readily separated from the matrix, sampled from the headspace, and determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method was validated using rainwater certified reference material (IRMM CA408) and subsequently applied to the determination of fluoride in various matrixes, including tap water, seawater, and urine. An instrumental limit of detection of 3.2 μg/L with a linear range up to 50 mg/L was achieved. The proposed derivatization is a one-step reaction, requires no organic solvents, and is safe, as the derivatizing agent is nonvolatile. Determination of fluoride is affected by common fluoride-complexing agents, such as Al(III) and Fe(III). The effect of large amounts of these interferences was studied, and the adverse effect of these ions was eliminated by use of the method of standard additions.

  4. Analysis of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in water by headspace-solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Companioni-Damas, E Y; Santos, F J; Galceran, M T

    2012-01-30

    This paper proposes a new method for the analysis of linear and cyclic methylsiloxanes in water samples based on headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The extraction efficiency of four commercially available SPME-fibres was evaluated and it was found that a 65 μm polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) coating was the most suitable for the extraction of siloxanes. The method provided good linearity (r>0.999) and precision (RSD % <17%), and low limits of quantification ranging from 0.01 to 0.74 ng L(-1) for linear siloxanes and between 18 and 34 ng L(-1) for cyclic siloxanes. The HS-SPME-GC-MS method was applied to the analysis of linear and cyclic siloxanes in river waters from Catalonia (NE, Spain) and the results showed concentrations of linear and cyclic siloxanes ranging from 0.09 to 3.94 ng L(-1) and 22.2 to 58.5 ng L(-1), respectively.

  5. Profile of volatile compounds in 11 brandies by headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Xu, Y; Li, J; Fan, W; Jiang, W

    2009-03-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied for the qualitative or semiquantitative characterization of brandy volatiles. SPME variables (SPME fiber, extraction temperature and time, and ethanol concentration) were optimized. A total of 144 compounds were from the brandies' volatiles, tentatively identified or identified by comparing mass spectra and retention indices of the standards or from literature. Of these, 57 are common to 11 brandies. They were mainly represented by esters and alcohols, such as 2-methyl propanol, 3-methyl butanol, 1-hexanol, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl decanoate, which were quantitatively determined. Chromatographic peaks were integrated using selective ion method (SIM) and the semiquantitative data analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) to study relationships between volatile composition and brandy. Eleven brandies were differentiated into 3 groups: 1 for Hennessy VSOP and XO samples, 1 for Changyu PEGASE VSOP and XO-1, 2, 3 samples, and the other for Changyu PEGASE brandy and VO, Taro brandy, Baiyang River brandy, and Wealth XO samples. The classification of groups is consistent with the brandy samples by variety and grade.

  6. Simultaneous determination of 76 micropollutants in water samples by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez, C; Ramírez, N; Gómez, V; Pocurull, E; Borrull, F

    2013-11-15

    This study focuses on the development of an analytical method based on headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the simultaneous determination of 76 micropollutants in water samples. The selected micropollutants include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (e.g. chlorobenzenes, chloroalkanes), endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) (e.g. bisphenol A and tributyl phosphate), odour compounds (e.g. limonene, phenol), fragrance allergens (e.g. geraniol, eugenol) and some pesticides (e.g. heptachlor, terbutryn). The experimental conditions affecting their extraction, such as the type of fibre, temperature and time of extraction, sample volume and ionic strength of the samples were optimized using HS-SPME. The method showed good linear range, reproducibility between days, repeatability and low detection limits (at ng L(-1) levels). The validated method has been applied to determine the target organic micropollutants in aqueous samples from different experimental research units of surface water, sea water, waste water and those effluents of advance membrane treatments. The optimized method showed good performance in the different types of samples studied. The analysis revealed the presence of several micropollutants at concentrations between 20 and 5000 μg L(-1), such as ethylbenzene, o-xylene, p-isopropilbenzene, D-limonene, citral and isoeugenol, due to the fact that these species are commonly used in domestic and industrial applications.

  7. Headspace-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for determination of sulphur mustard and related compounds in soil.

    PubMed

    Røen, Bent T; Unneberg, Erik; Tørnes, John Aa; Lundanes, Elsa

    2010-04-02

    Methods for trace determination of sulphur mustard (HD) and some related cyclic sulphur compounds in soil samples have been developed using headspace-trap in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Two quite different types of soil were employed in the method optimisation (sandy loam and silty clay loam). Prior to analysis, water saturated with sodium chloride was added to the samples, at a water to soil ratio of 1:1. A detection limit of 3 ng/g was achieved for HD, while the cyclic sulphur compounds 1,4-thioxane, 1,3-dithiolane and 1,4-dithiane could be detected at 0.2-0.7 ng/g. The methods were validated in the concentration range from the limit of quantification (LOQ) to hundred times LOQ. The within assay precision at fifty times LOQ was 6.9-7.3% relative standard deviation (RSD) for determination of the cyclic sulphur compounds, and 15% RSD for determination of HD. Recoveries were in the range of 43-60% from the two soil types. As the technique requires very little sample preparation, the total time for sample handling and analysis was less than 1h. The technique was successfully employed for the determination of cyclic sulphur compounds in a sediment sample from an old dumping site for chemical munitions, known to contain HD degradation products. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid monitoring of sulfur mustard degradation in solution by headspace solid-phase microextraction sampling and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Creek, Jo-Anne M; McAnoy, Andrew M; Brinkworth, Craig S

    2010-12-15

    A method using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis has been developed to gain insight into the degradation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard in solution. Specifically, the described approach simplifies the sample preparation for GC/MS analysis to provide a rapid determination of changes in sulfur mustard abundance. These results were found to be consistent with those obtained using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) GC/MS. The utility of the described approach was further demonstrated by the investigation of the degradation process in a complex matrix with surfactant added to assist solvation of sulfur mustard. A more rapid reduction in sulfur mustard abundance was observed using the HS-SPME approach with surfactant present and was similar to results from LLE experiments. Significantly, this study demonstrates that HS-SPME can simplify the sample preparation for GC/MS analysis to monitor changes in sulfur mustard abundance in solution more rapidly, and with less solvent and reagent usage than LLE.

  9. Volatile fingerprints of artemisinin-rich Artemisia annua cultivars by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reale, Samantha; Fasciani, Paolo; Pace, Loretta; De Angelis, Francesco; Marcozzi, Giordana

    2011-09-15

    The cultivar Anamed (A3) is a hybrid of Artemisia annua with a high content of the secondary metabolite artemisinin, a well-known antimalarial drug. Here we report for the first time the volatile profile of fresh leaves of this hybrid in comparison with that of Artemisia annua L. wild-type species. Evaluation and comparison of the volatile profiles of A. annua genotypes with different content in artemisinin were carried out by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) that was performed on fresh leaves of the plants under investigation using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber. The chromatograms obtained from hybrids with a high content of artemisinin (A. annua cv. Anamed A3 and A. annua cv. Artemis F2) reveal the total absence of artemisia ketone, one of the major and characteristic compounds of the wild-type A. annua L., along with a significantly lower variety of volatile compounds. In conclusion, HS-SPME coupled with GC/MS is a very useful, non-destructive and efficient method to describe the volatile pattern of Artemisia annua cultivars. It represents a rapid screening method for the evaluation of volatile biomarkers like artemisia ketone, whose absence is typical of artemisinin-rich A. annua cultivars. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Analysis of volatile compounds responsible for kiwifruit aroma by desiccated headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Yun; Zhang, Qiong; Zhong, Cai-Hong; Guo, Ming-Quan

    2016-04-01

    A new method for desiccated headspace (DHS) sampling of aqueous sample to GC-MS for the analysis of volatile compounds responsible for kiwifruit aroma in different kiwifruit cultivars has been developed based on the complete hydrate formation between the sample solvent (water) with anhydrous salt (calcium chloride) at an elevated temperature (above the boiling point of the aqueous sample) in a non-contact format, which overcame the water-effect challenge to directly introduce aqueous sample into GC-MS analysis. By means of DHS, the volatile compounds in three different kiwifruit cultivars were analyzed and compared under the optimized operating conditions, mainly time and temperature for headspace equilibration, column temperature program for GC-MS measurement. As a result, 20 peaks of volatile compounds responsible for kiwifruit aroma were detected and remarkable differences were found in the relative contents of three major volatile compounds among the three different kiwifruit cultivars, i.e., acetaldehyde, ethanol and furfural. The DHS sampling technique used in the present method can make the GC-MS analysis of volatile compounds in the aqueous sample within complex matrix possible without contaminating the GC-MS instrument. In terms of the analysis of volatile compounds in kiwifruit, the present method enabled a direct measurement on the filtrate of the aqueous kiwifruit pulp, without intermediate trap phase for the extraction of analytes, which will be more reliable and simpler as compared with any other headspace method in use. Thus, DHS coupled with GC-MS will be a new valuable tool available for the kiwifruit related research and organoleptic quality control.

  11. [Rapid determination of benzene series in seawater by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with static headspace extraction].

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongyan; Han, Bin; Chen, Junhui; Zheng, Li; Yang, Dongfang; Wang, Xiaoru

    2012-05-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of 13 benzene series (BTEX) in seawater using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with static headspace extraction (HS-GC/MS) was developed. To carefully characterize the performance of this method, several factors affecting parameters were studied in detail, such as the type of column, heating procedure, equilibrium temperature, equilibrium time and the volume ratio of gas phase to liquid phase. The optimized conditions were as follows: the polar column of DB-WAX; heating procedure, 40 degrees C kept for 4 min, then raised to 120 degrees C at 10 degrees C/min, to 180 degrees C at 25 degrees C/min; equilibrium temperature, 80 degrees C; equilibrium time, 10 min; and the volume ratio of gas phase to liquid phase, 1:1. Under the optimized conditions, the linear equations were obtained in the concentration range of 0.16-320 microg/L with correlation coefficients greater than 0.999. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) were 0.019-0.033 microg/L. The recoveries at the three spiked levels of 1.6, 16 and 160 microg/L ranged from 81. 25% to 103.73% with the relative standard deviations (RSD, n=6) from 0.3% to 4.4%. The analytical results of the practical seawater samples from Shanghai Huangpu District were satisfactory. The determination of the 13 benzene series can be finished in 12 min. The method is simple, accurate, reliable, efficient and environmental-friendly.

  12. Determination of haloacetic acids in human urine by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cardador, M J; Gallego, M

    2010-07-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed by the reaction of chlorine oxidizing compounds with natural organic matter in water containing bromine. HAAs are second to trihalomethanes as the most commonly detected DBPs in surface drinking water and swimming pools. After oral exposure (drinking, showering, bathing and swimming), HAAs are rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and excreted in urine. Typical methods used to determine these compounds in urine (mainly from rodents) only deal with one or two HAAs and their sensitivity is inadequate to determine HAA levels in human urine, even those manual sample preparation protocols which are complex, costly, and neither handy nor amenable to automation. In the present communication, we report on a sensitive and straightforward method to determine the nine HAAs in human urine using static headspace (HS) coupled with GC-MS. Important parameters controlling derivatisation and HS extraction were optimised to obtain the highest sensitivity: 120 microl of dimethylsulphate and 100 microl of tetrabutylammonium hydrogen sulphate (derivatisation regents) were selected, along with an excess of Na(2)SO(4) (6 g per 12 ml of urine), an oven temperature of 70 degrees C and an equilibration time of 20 min. The method developed renders an efficient tool for the precise and sensitive determination of the nine HAAs in human urine (RSDs ranging from 6 to 11%, whereas LODs ranged from 0.01 to 0.1 microg/l). The method was applied in the determination of HAAs in urine from swimmers in an indoor swimming pool, as well as in that of non-swimmers. HAAs were not detected in the urine samples from non-swimmers and those of volunteers before their swims; therefore, the concentrations found after exposure were directly related to the swimming activity. The amounts of MCAA, DCAA and TCAA excreted from all swimmers are related to the highest levels in the swimming pool water. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All

  13. Full evaporation dynamic headspace and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for uniform enrichment of odor compounds in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Hoffmann, Andreas; Okanoya, Kazunori

    2012-06-01

    A method for analysis of a wide range of odor compounds in aqueous samples at sub-ng mL⁻¹ to μg mL⁻¹ levels was developed by full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Compared to conventional DHS and headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), FEDHS provides more uniform enrichment over the entire polarity range for odor compounds in aqueous samples. FEDHS at 80°C using 3 L of purge gas allows complete vaporization of 100 μL of an aqueous sample, and trapping and drying it in an adsorbent packed tube, while providing high recoveries (85-103%) of the 18 model odor compounds (water solubility at 25°C: log0.54-5.65 mg L⁻¹, vapor pressure at 25°C: 0.011-3.2 mm Hg) and leaving most of the low volatile matrix behind. The FEDHS-GC-MS method showed good linearity (r²>0.9909) and high sensitivity (limit of detection: 0.21-5.2 ng mL⁻¹) for the model compounds even with the scan mode in the conventional MS. The feasibility and benefit of the method was demonstrated with analyses of key odor compounds including hydrophilic and less volatile characteristics in beverages (whiskey and green tea). In a single malt whiskey sample, phenolic compounds including vanillin could be determined in the range of 0.92-5.1 μg mL⁻¹ (RSD<7.4%, n=6). For a Japanese green tea sample, 48 compounds including 19 potent odorants were positively identified from only 100 μL of sample. Heat-induced artifact formation for potent odorants was also examined and the proposed method does not affect the additional formation of thermally generated compounds. Eighteen compounds including 12 potent odorants (e.g. coumarin, furaneol, indole, maltol, and pyrazine congeners) were determined in the range of 0.21-110 ng mL⁻¹ (RSD<10%, n=6).

  14. Accurate analysis of trace earthy-musty odorants in water by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kang; Zhang, Jin Na; Zhao, Min; He, Ya Juan

    2012-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method was developed for the simultaneous separation and determination of trace earthy-musty compounds including geosmin, 2-methylisoborneol, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2,3,4-trichloroanisole, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, and 2,3,6-trichloroanisole in water samples. This method combined headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and used naphthalene-d(8) as internal standard. A divinylbenzene/carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber exposing at 90°C for 30 min provided effective sample enrichment in HS-SPME. These compounds were separated by a DB-1701MS capillary column and detected in selected ion monitoring mode within 12 min. The method showed a good linearity from 1 to 100 ng L(-1) and detection limits within (0.25-0.61 ng L(-1)) for all compounds. Using naphthalene-d(8) as the internal standard, the intra-day relative standard deviation (RSD) was within (2.6-3.4%), while the inter-day RSD was (3.5-4.9%). Good recoveries were obtained for tap water (80.5-90.6%), river water (81.5-92.4%), and lake water (83.5-95.2%) spiked at 10 ng L(-1). Compared with other methods using HS-SPME for determination of odor compounds in water samples, this present method had more analytes, better precision, and recovery. This method was successfully applied for analysis of earthy-musty odors in water samples from different sources. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Non-invasive ethylene quantification in attached fruit headspace at 1 ppb by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Lara; Pujol, Marta; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Phillips, Michael A

    2017-03-28

    Ethylene is a gaseous plant hormone involved in defense, adaptations to environmental stress, and fruit ripening. Its relevance to the latter makes its detection highly useful to physiologists interested in ripening onset. Produced as a sharp peak during the respiratory burst, ethylene is biologically active at tens of nL·L(-1) . Reliable quantification at such concentrations generally requires specialized instrumentation. Here we present a rapid, high sensitivity method for detecting ethylene in attached fruit using a conventional gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system and in situ headspace collection chambers. We apply this method to melon (Cucumis melo L.), a unique species consisting of climacteric and non-climacteric varieties, with a high variation in the climacteric phenotype among climacteric types. Using a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from highly climacteric ("Védrantais", cantalupensis type) and non-climacteric ("Piel de sapo", inodorus type) parental lines, we observed a significant variation for the intensity, onset, and duration of the ethylene burst during fruit ripening. Our method does not require concentration, sampling times over 1 h, or fruit harvest. We achieved a limit of detection of 0.41 ± 0.04 nL·L(-1) and a limit of quantification of 1.37 ± 0.13 nL·L(-1) with an analysis time of 2.6 min per sample. Validation of the analytical method indicated that linearity (>98%), precision (CV ≤ 2%), and sensitivity compared favorably with dedicated optical sensors. This study adds to evidence of the characteristic climacteric ethylene burst as a complex trait whose intensity in our RIL population lies along a continuum in addition to two extremes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2010-09-17

    Sulfide and polysulfides are strong nucleophiles and reducing agents that participate in many environmentally significant processes such as the formation of sulfide minerals and volatile organic sulfur compounds. Their presence in drinking water distribution systems are of particular concern and need to be assessed, since these species consume disinfectants and dissolved oxygen, react with metal ions to produce insoluble metal sulfides, and cause taste and odour problems. The analysis of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems is challenging due to their low concentrations, thermal instability and their susceptibility to undergo oxidation and disproportionation reactions. This paper reports on the development and optimisation of a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for the determination of sulfide and polysulfides in drinking water distribution systems. The method uses methyl iodide to derivatize sulfide and polysulfides into their corresponding dimethyl(poly)sulfides, which are then extracted using solid-phase microextraction in the headspace mode and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Good sensitivity was achieved for the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides, with detection limits ranging from 50 to 240 ng L(-1). The method also demonstrated good precision (repeatability: 3-7%) and good linearity over two orders of magnitude. Matrix effects from raw drinking water containing organic carbon (3.8 mg L(-1)) and from sediment material from a drinking water distribution system were shown to have no interferences in the analysis of dimethyl(poly)sulfides. The method provides a rapid, robust, and reliable mean to analyse trace levels of sulfides and polysulfides in aqueous systems. The new method described here is more accessible and user-friendly than methods based on closed-loop stripping analysis, which have been traditionally used for the analysis of these compounds. The optimised method was used to analyse samples collected

  17. Microwave distillation followed by headspace single drop microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for fast analysis of volatile components of Echinophora platyloba DC.

    PubMed

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Abolghasemi, Mir Mahdi; Piryaei, Marzieh; Maassoumi, Sayed Mohammad; Papzan, Abdolhamid

    2013-05-01

    To avoid the traditional and time consuming hydrodistillation, the analyses of volatile components in aerial parts of Echinophora platyloba DC was carried out by a simple microwave distillation followed by headspace single drop microextraction (MD-HS-SDME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The headspace volatile compounds were collected after irradiation using a single drop of n-heptadecan. The extraction conditions were optimised using the relative peak areas as index. The chemical composition of the MD-HS-SDME extracts was confirmed according to their retention indexes and mass spectra. Fifty-three components were extracted and identified by using the MD-HS-SDME method. E-β-ocimene (53.81%), R-D-decalactone (12.75%), α-pinene (6.43%), n-heptanol (6.27%), β-phellanderne (2.70%) and linalool (1.89%) were the major constituents.

  18. Differentiation of the volatile profile of microbiologically contaminated canned tomatoes by dynamic headspace extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, F; Careri, M; Mangia, A; Mattarozzi, M; Musci, M; Concina, I; Falasconi, M; Gobbi, E; Pardo, M; Sberveglieri, G

    2009-01-15

    The aromatic profile of microbiologically contaminated canned tomatoes was analyzed by the dynamic headspace extraction technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Canned tomatoes contaminated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus carbonarius were analyzed after 2 and 7 days. About 100 volatiles were detected, among which alcohols, aldehydes and ketones were the most abundant compounds. Gas chromatographic peak areas were used for statistical purposes. First, principal component analysis was carried out in order to visualize data trends and clusters. Then, linear discriminant analysis was performed in order to detect the set of volatile compounds ables to differentiate groups of analyzed samples. Five volatile compounds, i.e. ethanol, beta-myrcene, o-methyl styrene, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol and 1-octanol, were found to be able to better discriminate between uncontaminated and contaminated samples. Prediction ability of the calculated model was estimated to be 100% by the "leave-one-out" cross-validation. An electronic nose device was then used to analyze the same contaminated and not contaminated canned tomato samples. Preliminary results were compared with those obtained by dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, showing a good agreement.

  19. Innovative method for carbon dioxide determination in human postmortem cardiac gas samples using headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and stable labeled isotope as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; de Froidmont, S; Dominguez, A; Rinaldi, A; Augsburger, M; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2013-06-19

    A novel approach to measure carbon dioxide (CO2) in gaseous samples, based on a precise and accurate quantification by (13)CO2 internal standard generated in situ is presented. The main goal of this study was to provide an innovative headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method applicable in the routine determination of CO2. The main drawback of the GC methods discussed in the literature for CO2 measurement is the lack of a specific internal standard necessary to perform quantification. CO2 measurement is still quantified by external calibration without taking into account analytical problems which can often occur considering gaseous samples. To avoid the manipulation of a stable isotope-labeled gas, we have chosen to generate in situ an internal labeled standard gas ((13)CO2) on the basis of the stoichiometric formation of CO2 by the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaH(13)CO3). This method allows a precise measurement of CO2 concentration and was validated on various human postmortem gas samples in order to study its efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Purge-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for determination of chlorophenols in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsin-Pin; Lee, Ren-Jye; Lee, Maw-Rong

    2008-12-12

    A simple, economical and very effective method is demonstrated for simultaneous determination of 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol and pentachlorophenol, in aqueous samples, by using purge-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (PA/HS-SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the new method, purging the sample enhances the removal of the trace chlorophenols without derivatization from the matrices to the headspace. Extraction parameters including extraction temperature, purge gas flow rate and extraction time were systematically investigated. Under optimal conditions, the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 4-11% at 50 pg/mL and 5-14% at 5 pg/mL, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 83-114%. Detection limits were determined at the fg level. These results indicate that PA/HS-SPME provides a significant contribution to highly efficient extraction of semi-volatile CPs, especially for pentachlorophenol, which has the smallest Henry's constant and large octanol-water partitioning coefficient. In addition, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of chlorophenols in landfill leachate. New perspectives are opened for headspace extraction of relatively low vapor pressure compounds in complex matrices.

  1. Differentiating organically and conventionally grown oregano using ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (headspace-GC-FID), and flow injection mass spectrum (FIMS) fingerprints combined with multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Boyan; Qin, Fang; Ding, Tingting; Chen, Yineng; Lu, Weiying; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2014-08-13

    Ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS), and headspace gas chromatography (headspace-GC) combined with multivariate data analysis techniques were examined and compared in differentiating organically grown oregano from that grown conventionally. It is the first time that headspace-GC fingerprinting technology is reported in differentiating organically and conventionally grown spice samples. The results also indicated that UPLC-MS, FIMS, and headspace-GC-FID fingerprints with OPLS-DA were able to effectively distinguish oreganos under different growing conditions, whereas with PCA, only FIMS fingerprint could differentiate the organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. UPLC fingerprinting provided detailed information about the chemical composition of oregano with a longer analysis time, whereas FIMS finished a sample analysis within 1 min. On the other hand, headspace GC-FID fingerprinting required no sample pretreatment, suggesting its potential as a high-throughput method in distinguishing organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. In addition, chemical components in oregano were identified by their molecular weight using QTOF-MS and headspace-GC-MS.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide measurement by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS): application to gaseous samples and gas dissolved in muscle.

    PubMed

    Varlet, Vincent; Giuliani, Nicole; Palmiere, Cristian; Maujean, Géraldine; Augsburger, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to present a new headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method applicable to the routine determination of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) concentrations in biological and gaseous samples. The primary analytical drawback of the GC/MS methods for H(2)S measurement discussed in the literature was the absence of a specific H(2)S internal standard required to perform quantification. Although a deuterated hydrogen sulfide (D(2)S) standard is currently available, this standard is not often used because this standard is expensive and is only available in the gas phase. As an alternative approach, D(2)S can be generated in situ by reacting deuterated chloride with sodium sulfide; however, this technique can lead to low recovery yield and potential isotopic fractionation. Therefore, N(2)O was chosen for use as an internal standard. This method allows precise measurements of H(2)S concentrations in biological and gaseous samples. Therefore, a full validation using accuracy profile based on the β-expectation tolerance interval is presented. Finally, this method was applied to quantify H(2)S in an actual case of H(2)S fatal intoxication.

  3. Determination of musty odorants, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, in environmental water by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography--mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Keita; Okamura, Kota; Kataoka, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-04

    A simple and sensitive method for the determination of musty odorants, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GSM), in environmental water was developed by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. MIB and GSM were separated within 10 min using a DB-1 capillary column and detected in the selective ion monitoring mode. HS-SPME using a polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fiber provided effective sample enrichment, and was carried out by fiber exposition at 70 degrees C for 30 min. Using this method, the calibration curves of MIB and GSM were linear in the range of 0-500 pg/mL, with a correlation coefficient above 0.9977 (n=24). The detection limits (S/N=3) of MIB and GSM were 0.9 and 0.6 pg/mL, respectively. This method was successfully applied to the analysis of environmental water samples without interference peaks.

  4. Determination of nonylphenol and octylphenol in paper by microwave-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Latorre, A; Lacorte, S; Barceló, D; Montury, M

    2005-02-18

    A novel and simple method for the determination of active endocrine disrupter compounds (octylphenol OP, and nonylphenol NP) in paper using microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and headspace solid-phase microextraction, coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed. Parameters affecting the efficiency in the MAE process such as exposure time and extraction solvent were studied in order to determine operating conditions. The optimised method was linear over the range studied (1.25-125 microg kg(-1) for OP and 9.50-950 microg kg(-1) for NP) and showed good level of precision, with a RSD lower than 10% and detection limits at 0.10 and 4.56 microg kg(-1) for OP and NP, respectively. The results obtained from six different types of paper revealed the presence of the target compounds in all samples analysed, at levels ranging between 3 and 211 microg kg(-1).

  5. Use of headspace sorptive extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in herbal infusions.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2014-08-22

    A solvent-free method is described for the determination of 10 volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), considered as priority pollutants by the EU, in different herbal infusions using headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The parameters affecting both the extraction and thermal desorption steps in the HSSE were optimized by means of Plackett-Burman designs. Ten millilitres of the herbal infusion was submitted to the HSSE preconcentration in the presence of salt for 4h at 88 °C. The use of d(10)-phenanthrene as internal standard not only improved the repeatability of the method but allowed quantification of the samples against external aqueous standards. Detection limits ranged between 11 and 26 ng L(-1).

  6. A headspace solid-phase microextraction procedure coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in milk samples.

    PubMed

    Aguinaga, N; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2008-06-01

    A sensitive and solvent-free method for the determination of ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, namely, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene and chrysene, with up to four aromatic rings, in milk samples using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection has been developed. A polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber was chosen and used at 75 degrees C for 60 min. Detection limits ranging from 0.2 to 5 ng L(-1) were attained at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, depending on the compound and the milk sample under analysis. The proposed method was applied to ten different milk samples and the presence of six of the analytes studied in a skimmed milk with vegetal fiber sample was confirmed. The reliability of the procedure was verified by analyzing two different certified reference materials and by recovery studies.

  7. [Analysis of the components of floral scent in Glochidion puberum using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with dynamic headspace adsorption].

    PubMed

    Huang, Daihong; Zhang, Zhenguo; Chen, Guoping; Li, Houhun; Shi, Fuchen

    2015-03-01

    The floral scent plays the important key role in maintaining the obligate pollination mutualism between Glochidion plants and Epicephala moths. In the study, the dynamic headspace adsorption technique was employed to collect the floral scent emitted by Glochidion puberum, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the detection and identification of volatile chemical components in headspace samples of flowers from G. puberum. The peak area normalization was used to determine the relative contents of each odour component. The results showed that 45 compounds mainly consisting of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were isolated from the floral scent produced by G. puberum. Especially, both linalool (38.06%) and β-elemene (23.84%) were considered as the major scent components of G. puberum. It was speculated that linalool and β-elemene may be the two potential compounds attracting female Epicephala moths. The study provided the basic data for further electroantennographic detection and bioassays to identify the compounds having the actual physiological activity to female Epicephala moths.

  8. Multi-Component Profiling of Trace Volatiles in Blood by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry with Dynamic Headspace Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Kakuta, Shoji; Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic headspace extraction method (DHS) with high-pressure injection is described. This dynamic extraction method has superior sensitivity to solid phase micro extraction, SPME and is capable of extracting the entire gas phase by purging the headspace of a vial. Optimization of the DHS parameters resulted in a highly sensitive volatile profiling system with the ability to detect various volatile components including alcohols at nanogram levels. The average LOD for a standard volatile mixture was 0.50 ng mL−1, and the average LOD for alcohols was 0.66 ng mL−1. This method was used for the analysis of volatile components from biological samples and compared with acute and chronic inflammation models. The method permitted the identification of volatiles with the same profile pattern as in vitro oxidized lipid-derived volatiles. In addition, the concentration of alcohols and aldehydes from the acute inflammation model samples were significantly higher than that for the chronic inflammation model samples. The different profiles between these samples could also be identified by this method. Finally, it was possible to analyze alcohols and low-molecular-weight volatiles that are difficult to analyze by SPME in high sensitivity and to show volatile profiling based on multi-volatile simultaneous analysis. PMID:26819905

  9. Multi-Component Profiling of Trace Volatiles in Blood by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry with Dynamic Headspace Extraction.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Shoji; Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Nishiumi, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    A dynamic headspace extraction method (DHS) with high-pressure injection is described. This dynamic extraction method has superior sensitivity to solid phase micro extraction, SPME and is capable of extracting the entire gas phase by purging the headspace of a vial. Optimization of the DHS parameters resulted in a highly sensitive volatile profiling system with the ability to detect various volatile components including alcohols at nanogram levels. The average LOD for a standard volatile mixture was 0.50 ng mL(-1), and the average LOD for alcohols was 0.66 ng mL(-1). This method was used for the analysis of volatile components from biological samples and compared with acute and chronic inflammation models. The method permitted the identification of volatiles with the same profile pattern as in vitro oxidized lipid-derived volatiles. In addition, the concentration of alcohols and aldehydes from the acute inflammation model samples were significantly higher than that for the chronic inflammation model samples. The different profiles between these samples could also be identified by this method. Finally, it was possible to analyze alcohols and low-molecular-weight volatiles that are difficult to analyze by SPME in high sensitivity and to show volatile profiling based on multi-volatile simultaneous analysis.

  10. Assessment of the degradation of polyurethane foams after artificial and natural ageing by using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lattuati-Derieux, A; Thao-Heu, S; Lavédrine, B

    2011-07-15

    Polyurethane foams are widely present in museum collections either as part of the artefacts, or as a material for their conservation. Unfortunately many of PU foam artefacts are in poor condition and often exhibit specific conservation issues. Their fast thermal and photochemical degradations have been the aim of previous researches. It is now accepted that hydrolysis predominates for polyester-based polyurethane PU(ES) whereas oxidation is the principal cause of degradation for polyether-based polyurethane PU(ET) variety. Only a few studies have been devoted to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by polyurethanes and, to our knowledge, none were performed on polyurethane foams by using headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME). The objective of the work described here is to assess the impact of some environmental factors (humidity, temperature and daylight) on the degradation of PU foams by evaluating their volatile fractions. We investigated morphological changes, polymerized fractions and volatile fractions of (i) one modern produced PU(ES) foam and one modern PU(ET) foam artificially aged in different conditions as well as (ii) four naturally aged foams collected from various daily life objects and selected for the representativeness of their analytical data. Characterization procedure used was based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) and non-invasive headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). In this paper, the formation of alcohol and acid raw products for PU(ES) and glycol derivatives for PU(ET) during natural and artificial ageing is confirmed. These main products can be considered as degradation markers for PU foams. Results show that artificial and natural ageing provide similar analytical results, and confirm that the dominant degradation paths for PU(ES) and for PU(ET) are

  11. Extraction and analysis of different Cannabis samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ilias, Yara; Rudaz, Serge; Mathieu, Patrick; Christen, Philippe; Veuthey, Jean-Luc

    2005-11-01

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with GC-MS method was developed for the extraction and analysis of cannabinoids from Cannabis samples. Different commercially available fibres were evaluated; polydimethylsiloxane 100 microm was selected as the most efficient one. In order to enhance sensitivity and reduce analysis time, the sampling temperature was studied and it showed that extraction should be performed at a high temperature (150 degrees C). In relation with the high lipophilicity of cannabinoids, a relatively long desorption time (3 min) was necessary to ensure a total transfer from the fibre into the injection port of the gas chromatograph. The method was finally applied to the extraction of Swiss marijuana samples from different regions. Data treatment by principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis allowed a discrimination of the different batches.

  12. Characterization of the volatile profiles of beer using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Serena; Sileoni, Valeria; Perretti, Giuseppe; Marconi, Ombretta

    2014-03-30

    The objective of this study was a multivariate characterization of the volatile profile of beers. Such a characterization is timely considering the increasing worldwide consumption of beer, the continuous growth of microbreweries and the importance of volatile compounds to beer flavour. A method employing solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) was optimized and then applied to a sample set of 36 industrial and craft beers of various styles and fermentation types. The volatile profiles of different beer styles is described, with particular attention paid to the volatile compounds characteristic of a spontaneously fermented lambic raspberry framboise beer. Furthermore, it was also possible to identify which specific volatile compounds are principally responsible for the differences in the volatile profiles of top- and bottom-fermented beers. Moreover, a volatile fingerprint of the craft top-fermented Italian beers was defined, as they show a very similar volatile profile. Finally, the volatile compounds that are characteristic of the bock-style beers are described. The SPME-GC-MS analytical method optimized in this study is suitable for characterizing the volatile fingerprint of different beers, especially on the basis of the kind of fermentation (top, bottom or spontaneous), the method of production and the style of the beer. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Different headspace solid phase microextraction--gas chromatography/mass spectrometry approaches to haloanisoles analysis in wine.

    PubMed

    Jeleń, Henryk H; Dziadas, Mariusz; Majcher, Małgorzata

    2013-10-25

    Three approaches in determination of six haloanisoles (2,4,6-trichloroanisole, 2,3,4-trichloroanisole, 2,3,6-trichloroanisole, tetrachloroanisole, pentachloroanisole and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole) in wine were compared. Comprehensive gas chromatography - time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-ToF-MS) was described for the first time for this application and compared to gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) using triple quadrupole instrument. These techniques were compared with "standard" analytical approach using GC-MS(SIM). SPME method was developed and used for all separation methods (DVB/PDMS fiber, 70 °C, 30%NaCl, 20 min extraction). Extraction dependence on matrix was discussed using model wines with different ethanol contents (8%, 12%, and 18%) as well as water and different wines (dry white, dry red and sweet liqueur), with the lowest sensitivities obtained for highest ethanol contents in model wine and for liqueur wine. Limits of detection for GC×GC-ToF-MS method were 0.09-2.92 ng/L depending on the examined compound and matrix (compared to 0.1-13.3 ng/L obtained using GC/MS(SIM)). For GC-MS/MS method lower detection limits were achieved than for the GC×GC method (0.01-0.1 ng/L), however comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry provides full spectral information on analyzed compounds. Both methods had limits of detection far below odor thresholds of haloanisoles in wine, good linearity up to 2000 ng/L tested and good precision, what makes them suitable for analysis of these compounds in low ppt levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fully automated determination of cannabinoids in hair samples using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, Frank; Junker, Heike P; Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kroener, Lars; Madea, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a fully automated procedure using alkaline hydrolysis and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by on-fiber derivatization and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) detection of cannabinoids in human hair samples. Ten milligrams of hair was washed with deionized water, petroleum ether, and dichloromethane. After the addition of deuterated internal standards the sample was hydrolyzed with sodium hydroxide and directly submitted to HS-SPME. After absorption of analytes for an on-fiber derivatization procedure the fiber was directly placed into the headspace of a second vial containing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) before GC-MS analysis. The limit of detection was 0.05 ng/mg for delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 0.08 ng/mg for cannabidiol (CBD), and 0.14 ng/mg for cannabinol (CBN). Absolute recoveries were in the range between 0.3 and 7.5%. Linearity was proved over a range from 0.1 to 20 ng/mg with coefficients of correlation from 0.998 to 0.999. Validation of the whole procedure revealed excellent results. In comparison with conventional methods of hair analysis this automated HS-SPME-GC-MS procedure is substantially faster. It is easy to perform without use of solvents and with minimal sample quantities, but with the same degree of sensitivity and reproducibility. The applicability was demonstrated by the analysis of 25 hair samples from several forensic cases. The following concentration ranges were determined: THC 0.29-2.20 (mean 1.7) ng/mg, CBN 0.55-4.54 (mean 1.2) ng/mg, and CBD 0.53-18.36 (mean 1.3) ng/mg. 11-nor-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid could not be detected with this method.

  15. Investigations on the emission of fragrance allergens from scented toys by means of headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masuck, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Luch, Andreas

    2010-04-30

    In the revised European toy safety directive 2009/48/EC the application of fragrance allergens in children's toys is restricted. The focus of the present work lies on the instrumental analytics of 13 banned fragrance allergens, as well as on 11 fragrance allergens that require declaration when concentrations surpass 100 microg per gram material. Applying a mixture of ethyl acetate and toluene solid/liquid extraction was performed prior to quantitative analysis of mass contents of fragrances in scented toys. In addition, an easy-to-perform method for the determination of emitted fragrances at 23 degrees C (handling conditions) or at 40 degrees C (worst case scenario) has been worked out to allow for the evaluation of potential risks originating from inhalation of these compounds during handling of or playing with toys. For this purpose a headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) technique was developed and coupled to subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Fragrance allergens were adsorbed (extracted) from the gas phase onto an 85 microm polyacrylate fiber while incubating pieces of the scented toys in sealed headspace vials at 23 degrees C and 40 degrees C. Quantification of compounds was performed via external calibration. The newly developed headspace method was subsequently applied to five perfumed toys. As expected, the emission of fragrance allergens from scented toys depends on the temperature and on the content of fragrance allergens present in those samples. In particular at conditions mimicking worst case (40 degrees C), fragrance allergens in toys may pose a risk to children since considerable amounts of compound might be absorbed by lung tissue via breathing of contaminated air. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Simple and automatic determination of aldehydes and acetone in water by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ji; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2011-03-01

    We describe a simple and automatic method to determine nine aldehydes and acetone simultaneously in water. This method is based on derivatization with 2,2,2-trifluoroethylhydrazine (TFEH) and consecutive headspace-solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Acetone-d(6) was used as the internal standard. Aldehydes and acetone in water reacted for 30 min at 40°C with TFEH in a headspace vial and the formed TFEH derivatives were simultaneously vaporized and adsorbed on polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene. Under the established condition, the method detection limit was 0.1-0.5 μg/L in 4 mL water and the relative standard deviation was less than 13% at concentrations of 0.25 and 0.05 mg/L. This method was applied to determine aldehydes and acetone in 5 mineral water and 114 surface water samples. All mineral water samples had detectable levels of methanal (24.0-61.8 μg/L), ethanal (57.7-110.9 μg/L), propanal (11.5-11.7 μg/L), butanal, pentanal (3.3-3.4 μg/L) and nonanal (0.3-0.4 μg/L). Methanal and ethanal were also detected in concentration range of 2.7-117.2 and 1.2-11.9 μg/L, respectively, in surface water of 114 monitoring sites in Korea.

  17. Components detected by means of solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the headspace of artisan fresh goat cheese smoked by traditional methods.

    PubMed

    Guillén, M D; Ibargoitia, M L; Sopelana, P; Palencia, G; Fresno, M

    2004-02-01

    The study of the headspace components of fresh smoked goat cheese, was carried out by means of solid-phase microextraction using a polyacrylate fiber followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The samples studied were six artisan Palmero cheeses manufactured following traditional methods and smoked using pine needles. The cheese regions studied were exterior, interior, and a cross section. In total, more than 320 components were detected, the exterior region being the richest in components, among which were acids, alcohols, esters, hydrocarbons, aldehydes, ketones, furan and pyran derivatives, terpenes and sesquiterpenes, nitrogen derivatives, phenol, guaiacol and syringol derivatives, ethers, and others. In addition to typical cheese components, typical smoke components were also detected; these latter were present especially in the headspace of the exterior region and only those in significant concentrations in the exterior region were also detected in the interior. The main components were acids and phenolic derivatives. These latter compounds play an important role in the flavor of this cheese, and their relative proportions together with the presence of specific smoke components derived from pine leaves may be considered of interest in order to distinguish this cheese from others smoked with different vegetable matter.

  18. Simple and sensitive analysis of nereistoxin and its metabolites in human serum using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Namera, A; Watanabe, T; Yashiki, M; Kojima, T; Urabe, T

    1999-03-01

    A simple method for the analysis of nereistoxin and its metabolites in human serum using headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is developed. A vial containing a serum sample, 5M sodium hydroxide, and benzylacetone (internal standard) is heated to 70 degrees C, and an SPME fiber is exposed for 30 min in the headspace of the vial. The compounds extracted by the fiber are desorbed by exposing the fiber in the injection port of the GC-MS. The calibration curves show linearity in the range of 0.05-5.0 micrograms/mL for nereistoxin and N-methyl-N-(2-methylthio-1-methylthiomethyl)ethylamine, 0.01-5.0 micrograms/mL for S,S'-dimethyl dihydronereistoxin, and 0.5-10 micrograms/mL for 2-methylthio-1-methylthiomethylethylamine in serum. No interferences are found, and the analysis time is 50 min for one sample. In addition, this proposed method is applied to a patient who attempted suicide by ingesting Padan 4R, a herbicide. Padan 4R contains 4% cartap hydrochloride, which is an analogue of nereistoxin. Nereistoxin and its metabolites are detected in the serum samples collected from the patient during hospitalization. The concentration ranges of nereistoxin in the serum are 0.09-2.69 micrograms/mL.

  19. Development of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following headspace single-drop microextraction and simultaneous derivatization for fast determination of short-chain aliphatic amines in water samples.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Li, Ning; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2006-10-27

    In this work, for the first time, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following headspace single-drop microextraction (HS-SDME) and simultaneous derivatization was developed for fast determination of short-chain aliphatic amines (SCAAs) in water samples. In the proposed method, SCAAs in water samples were headspace extracted and concentrated by suspending a microdrop of solvent, and SCAAs extracted in the microdrop of solvent were simultaneously and rapidly reacted with pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFBAY). The formed SCAA derivatives were analyzed by GC-MS. The HS-SDME parameters of solvent selection, solvent volume, sample temperature, extraction time and stirring rate were studied, and the method linearity, precision and detection limits, were also studied. The results show that the proposed method provided good linearity (R(2)>0.99, 5.0-500 ng/ml), low detection limit (0.6-1.1 ng/ml), and good precision (RSD value less than 10%). The proposed method was further tested by its application to quantitative analysis of SCAAs in four wastewater samples. The experiment results have demonstrated that GC-MS following HS-SDME and simultaneous derivatization is a simple, rapid and low-cost method for the determination of SCAAs in water samples.

  20. Highly sensitive analysis of methamphetamine and amphetamine in human whole blood using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Okajima, K; Namera, A; Yashiki, M; Tsukue, I; Kojima, T

    2001-02-01

    A simple and highly sensitive method for analysis of derivatized methamphetamine (MA) and amphetamine (AM) in whole blood was developed using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry electron impact ionization selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-EI-SIM). A whole blood sample, deuterated-MA (d(5)-MA), as an internal standard (IS), tri-n-propylamine and pentafluorobenzyl bromide were placed in a vial. The vial was heated and stirred at 90 degrees C for 30min. Then the extraction fiber of the SPME was exposed at 90 degrees C for 30min in the headspace of the vial while being stirred. The derivatives adsorbed on the fiber were desorbed by exposing the fiber in the injection port of a GC-MS. The calibration curves showed linearity in the range of 0.5-1000ng/g for both MA and AM. The time for analysis was about 80min per sample. In addition, this proposed method was applied to two autopsy cases where MA ingestion was suspected. In one case, MA and AM concentrations in the mixed left and right heart blood were 165 and 36.9ng/g, respectively. In the other case, MA and AM concentrations were 1.79 and 0.119 microg/g in the left heart blood, and 1.27 and 0.074 microg/g in the right heart blood, respectively.

  1. Analysis of volatile compounds in beef fat by dynamic-headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, A; Ueda, Y; Higuchi, M; Shiba, N

    2008-06-01

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) technique has been applied to the determination of the volatile compounds, including diterpenoids and lactones, in cooked beef fat. The ability of static-headspace SPME to extract lactones was disappointing, regardless of the type of SPME fiber or the temperature used. Dynamic-headspace SPME extraction with 50-/30-microm divinylbenzene-Carboxen on a polydimethylsiloxane fiber at 100 degrees C, by contrast, enabled the analysis of volatiles, including delta-lactones, gamma-lactones, and diterpenoids, with 50-/30-microm divinylbenzene-Carboxen on a polydimethylsiloxane fiber at 100 degrees C. Fifty-three compounds were identified from only 0.20 g of rendered beef fat, and 76% of these showed reliable peak size repeatability: the coefficient of variation was less than 10% on the total ion chromatograms obtained from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Some lactones showed higher CV values (>10%), but single-ion mode GC-MS analysis reduced them to 10% or less. In a study of beef samples available to the Japanese market, our analytical procedure revealed significantly higher levels of 1-hexanol, octadecane, ethyl tetradecanoate, gamma-nonalactone, but lower levels of delta-decalactone, delta-dodecalactone, and neophytadiene, in Japanese Black cattle than in beef imported from Australia.

  2. Determination of glutaraldehyde in water samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2,2,2-trifluoroethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye-In; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2016-05-27

    A simple and convenient headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was described for the determination of glutaraldehyde in water. Glutaraldehyde in water reacted with 2,2,2-trifluoroethylhydrazine (TFEH) in a headspace vial and the formed TFEH derivatives were vaporized and adsorbed onto a fiber. The optimal HS-SPME conditions were achieved with a 50/30μm-divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane fiber, 0.06% 2,2,2-TFEH, 25% salt, an extraction/derivatization temperature of 80°C, a heating time of 30min, and a pH of 6.5. The desorption was performed for 1min at 240°C. Under the established conditions, the lowest limits of detection were 0.3μg/L and 0.1μg/L in 6.0mL of surface water and drinking water, respectively, and the intra- and inter-day relative standard deviation was less than 9.1% at concentrations of 50, 100 and 500μg/L. The calibration curve showed good linearity with R=0.9995 and R=0.9993 in surface water and drinking water, respectively. This method is simple, amenable to automation and environmentally friendly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Headspace in-tube extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of hydroxylic methyl-derivatized and volatile organic compounds in blood and urine.

    PubMed

    Rasanen, Ilpo; Viinamäki, Jenni; Vuori, Erkki; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2010-04-01

    A novel headspace in-tube extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (ITEX-GC-MS) approach was developed for broad-scale analysis of low molecular weight organic compounds in blood and/or urine. One sample was analyzed following in-vial derivatization with dimethyl sulfate for ethylene glycol (EG), glycolic acid (GA), formic acid (FA), other hydroxylic compounds, and another sample for underivatized volatile organic compounds. Tenax adsorbent resin was used in the microtrap, and a porous layer, open tubular GC capillary column was used for separation. MS was operated in the full-scan mode, identification was based on the Automated Mass Spectral Deconvolution and Identification System, and quantification was based on extracted ions. The limits of quantification for EG, GA, and FA in blood were 10, 50, and 30 mg/L, respectively, and the expanded uncertainties of measurement were 20%, 16%, and 14%, respectively. The procedure allowed for the first time the inclusion of EG and GA as their methyl derivatives within a quantitative HS analysis. The ITEX method described here was more sensitive for analysis of volatile organic compounds than the corresponding static headspace analysis as demonstrated for 11 representative compounds.

  4. Improvement of a headspace solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the analysis of wheat bread volatile compounds.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; Carcea, Marina; Castagna, Claudia; Magrì, Andrea

    2015-08-07

    An improved method based on headspace solid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC-MS) was proposed for the semi-quantitative determination of wheat bread volatile compounds isolated from both whole slice and crust samples. A DVB/CAR/PDMS fibre was used to extract volatiles from the headspace of a bread powdered sample dispersed in a sodium chloride (20%) aqueous solution and kept for 60min at 50°C under controlled stirring. Thirty-nine out of all the extracted volatiles were fully identified, whereas for 95 other volatiles a tentative identification was proposed, to give a complete as possible profile of wheat bread volatile compounds. The use of an array of ten structurally and physicochemically similar internal standards allowed to markedly improve method precision with respect to previous HS-SPME/GC-MS methods for bread volatiles. Good linearity of the method was verified for a selection of volatiles from several chemical groups by calibration with matrix-matched extraction solutions. This simple, rapid, precise and sensitive method could represent a valuable tool to obtain semi-quantitative information when investigating the influence of technological factors on volatiles formation in wheat bread and other bakery products.

  5. Determination of chlorophenols in landfill leachate using headspace sampling with ionic liquid-coated solid-phase microextraction fibers combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tse-Tsung; Chen, Chung-Yu; Li, Zu-Guang; Yang, Thomas Ching-Cherng; Lee, Maw-Rong

    2012-01-27

    A new microextraction technique based on ionic liquid solid-phase microextraction (IL-SPME) was developed for determination of trace chlorophenols (CPs) in landfill leachate. The synthesized ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C(4)MIM][PF(6)]), was coated onto the spent fiber of SPME for extraction of trace CPs. After extraction, the absorbed analytes were desorbed and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The term of the proposed method is as ionic liquid-coated of solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (IL-SPME-GC/MS). No carryover effect was found, and every laboratory-made ionic liquids-coated-fiber could be used for extraction at least eighty times without degradation of efficiency. The chlorophenols studied were 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP). The best results of chlorophenols analysis were obtained with landfill leachate at pH 2, headspace extraction for 4 min, and thermal desorption with the gas chromatograph injector at 240°C for 4 min. Linearity was observed from 0.1 to 1000 μg L(-1) with relative standard deviations (RSD) less than 7% and recoveries were over 87%. The limit of detection (LOD) for pentachlorophenol was 0.008 μg L(-1). The proposed method was tested by analyzing landfill leachate from a sewage farm. The concentrations of chlorophenols were detected to range from 1.1 to 1.4 μg L(-1). The results demonstrate that the IL-SPME-GC/MS method is highly effective in analyzing trace chlorophenols in landfill leachate. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of halophenolic wood preservant traces in milk using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mardones, Claudia; von Baer, Dietrich; Silva, Jorge; Retamal, Maria José

    2008-12-26

    Extraction of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP), pentachlorophenol (PCP) and pentachloroanisole (PCA) from whole fat cow milk using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with polyacrylate (PA) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibers was evaluated and compared. The PA was studied to extract PCA, TBP and PCP, while PDMS was used to extract PCA and acetyl derivatives of PCP and TBP. The parameters: fiber position, matrix effect, temperature and extraction time were studied. The analysis was made by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The results show that the distance between fiber and milk had a significant effect on the extraction kinetics. Also, the fat content in milk was a critical parameter that clearly affected the extracted mass of each compound. By using a PA fiber, the sensitivity for PCA and TBP was higher than that obtained with PDMS fiber; however, PA fiber did not allow PCP determination. The recoveries from milk were 95+/-4%, 96+/-2% and 96+/-4% for PCP, TBP and PCA, respectively, with the PDMS fiber and 94+/-3% and 95+/-1% for TBP and PCA, respectively, with PA fiber. The method using PDMS fiber was applied to real whole milk samples.

  7. Magnetic solid phase extraction and static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; Wang, Lijia; NguyenVan, Manh; Cai, Qingyun

    2016-01-15

    A magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) protocol combining a static headspace gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method has been developed for extraction, and determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in drinking water samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were coated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and modified by cholesterol chloroformate. Transmission electron microscope, vibrating sample magnetometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the cholesterol-functionalized sorbents, and the main parameters affecting the extraction as well as HS sampling, such as sorbent amount, extraction time, oven temperature and equilibration time have been investigated and established. Combination with HS sampling, the MSPE procedure was simple, fast and environmentally friendly, without need of any organic solvent. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels obtaining the limit of detection (S/N=3) ranging from 0.20 to 7.8 ng/L. Good values for intra and inter-day precision were obtained (RSDs ≤ 9.9%). The proposed method was successfully applied to drinking water samples.

  8. Determination of Tuta absoluta pheromones in water and tomato samples by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    del Carmen Alcudia-León, María; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Tuta absoluta is a tomato pest which is originally from South America. This pest was detected in eastern Spain in 2006 and it rapidly invaded various European countries and spread throughout the Mediterranean basin. The usual detection of this pest is based on the physical evaluation of the crops and in the exhaustive count of potential insects in dedicated traps. The early detection of that pest on the basis of more objective or measurable indicators is desirable. In this case, the combination of headspace and gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection is proposed for the identification of Tuta absoluta pest using two of its pheromone components as markers. These components, namely: (3E,8Z,11Z)-tetradecatrien-1-yl acetate and (3E,8Z)-tetradecadien-1-yl acetate, are characteristic of Tuta absoluta and they are not present in other insect pheromones. The developed combination allows the determination of both components in water and tomato samples with limits of detection in the range from 25-32 ng/L to 89-111 ng/kg, respectively. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, was better than 4.6% for water samples and better than 7.1% when tomato samples were analyzed. The relative recovery values varied in the interval 94-100 and 83-99% for water and tomato samples.

  9. Characterization of novel single-variety oxygenated sesquiterpenoid hop oil fractions via headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Van Opstaele, Filip; Praet, Tatiana; Aerts, Guido; De Cooman, Luc

    2013-11-06

    The volatile composition of novel varietal oxygenated sesquiterpenoid hop oil fractions ("spicy essences") was characterized by headspace solid-phase microextraction in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Oxygenated sesquiterpenes represent the major chemical compound class, accounting for at least 65% of the total volatile fraction. In addition to oxygenated sesquiterpenes, spicy hop essences consist of several ketones, sesquiterpene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, and a relatively high number of unidentified compounds. On the basis of their relative composition, spicy hop essences can be fully differentiated according to their varietal origin. Multidimensional gas chromatography in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry on spicy hop essence cv. Spalter Select further demonstrated the enormous complexity of this particular hop oil fraction. The aromagram obtained via gas chromatography-olfactometry comprised nine odor-active regions described in terms of "citrus", "green", "haylike", "earthy", "woody", and "spicy". 2-Undecanone, 2-tridecanone, γ-cadinene, α-calacorene, calarene, humuladienone, caryolan-1-ol, caryophyllene oxide enantiomers, and humulene epoxide II are tentatively identified in the odor-active zones.

  10. Static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the one-step derivatisation and extraction of eleven aldehydes in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Serrano, María; Gallego, Mercedes; Silva, Manuel

    2013-09-13

    Low-molecular-mass aldehydes (LMMAs) are water disinfection by-products formed by the reaction of ozone and/or chlorine with natural organic matter in water. LMMAs are mutagenic and carcinogenic compounds, which are detected at ng/L levels in water. An analytical method that allows simultaneous derivatisation and extraction of LMMAs in water has been developed using the classical static headspace technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS). Important parameters controlling the derivatisation of LMMAs with o-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine, oxime-products extraction and headspace generation were optimised to obtain the highest sensitivity, completing the entire process in 20min. For the first time the derivatisation reaction was carried out at alkaline pH adjusted with sodium hydrogen carbonate which exerts a significant enhancement effect on the derivatisation efficiency of the aldehydes; up to 20-fold with respect to those obtained in weak acid media as recommended by EPA Method 556.1. The addition of 200μL of n-hexane, as a chemical modifier, favoured the volatilisation of oxime-products, increasing the sensitivity of the method. The proposed method allows the achieving of detection limits from 2 to 80ng/L and has excellent precision (RSD average value of 6.4%) and accuracy (recovery ranging from 97% to 99%) for LMMA quantifications in drinking water samples. Finally, the HS-GC-MS method was validated relative to EPA Method 556.1 for the analysis of drinking water samples subjected to several disinfection treatments.

  11. Determination of phthalates in wine by headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: fibre comparison and selection.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, J D; Salazar, C; Moreta, C; Tena, M T

    2007-09-14

    This paper describes the development of a headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) method for determining phthalates in wine. The HS-SPME conditions were thoroughly studied: first, the performance of six fibres at three temperature values and two sample volumes was surveyed by means of a 6 x 3 x 2 multi-factor categorical experimental design. From this study, three fibres - carbowax-divinylbenzene (CW-DVB), polyacrylate (PA) and polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) - were selected. Then, temperature, sample volume and sodium chloride concentration were optimised using a central composite design and the overall desirability function for each fibre. The optimal values were 70 degrees C, a NaCl concentration of 2.6, 3.6 and 5.5M for PA, CW-DVB and PDMS-DVB fibres, respectively, and sample volumes of 4.0, 3.5 and 3.0 mL. Next, the performance characteristics of the three fibres were obtained and compared. PDMS-DVB fibre showed the best repeatability values followed by CW-DVB. PA fibre was not suitable for diethylhexylphthalate extraction and showed poor repeatability for the heavier phthalates, and was therefore discarded. Finally, the performance of CW-DVB and PDMS-DVB fibres was checked for red, white and rosé wines.

  12. Headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of cosmetic ingredients causing delamination of packagings.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Gustavo; Tena, María Teresa

    2006-01-06

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) method using a 75 microm Carboxen polydimethylsiloxane fibre was used to identify volatile compounds of cosmetic formulations responsible for causing loss of adhesion between layers of multilayer packagings. To obtain the sample, the sachet with the product was kept in an oven at 40 degrees C in order to favour the migration of the aggressive compounds to the inner layers. Then the sachet was manually delaminated and the aluminium/polyester and polyethylene layers were analysed. The cosmetic product was also analysed by HS-SPME-GC-MS. Several compounds used in the cosmetic industry such as perfumes or fixing agents were detected in the inner layers of the laminated material, showing the migration of them through the layer in contact with the product (polyethylene). Phenoxy ethanol, beta-linalool, menthol and p-propenylanisole are suspected to be responsible for the loss of adhesion. In order to provide a complete overview of the cause of the aforementioned phenomenon, the packaging material was exposed to the cosmetic products in order to measure the decrease of the adhesion strength with time. It was observed that the product with a higher phenoxy ethanol concentration caused a higher loss of adhesion strength. The results obtained showed that this method is suitable for identifying aggressive compounds in cosmetic products, as well as for giving prior information about which products may be problematic for packaging in sachets.

  13. A preliminary identification and determination of characteristic volatile organic compounds from cotton, polyester and terry-towel by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Katherine; Dean, John R

    2013-06-21

    Analysis of fifteen volatile organic compounds previously associated with laundry malodour has been investigated using headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Limits of detection (all determined on a 25 cm(2) area of fabric) ranged from a low of 0.4 ng (for guaiacol) through to a high of 28 ng (for 3-methylindole) on cotton; values on polyester ranged from a low of 0.7 ng (for dimethyl trisulfide) through to a high of 37 ng (for 3-methylindole); and, values on terry-towel ranged from a low of 1.7 ng (for guaiacol) through to a high of 157 ng (for ethyl benzene). There was a lack of correlation between the level of malodour and the occurrence of any of the VOCs detected; it could be that other compounds not evaluated in this study are responsible for malodour or it could be a collaborative effect of the various compounds studied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following microwave distillation and headspace solid-phase microextraction for fast analysis of essential oil in dry traditional Chinese medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Deng, Chunhui; Li, Yan; Ye, Hao; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2006-11-10

    In this paper, a novel method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) following microwave distillation-headspace solid-phase microextraction (MD-HS-SPME) was developed for the determination of essential oil in dry traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). TCM is dried before being preserved and used, there is too little water to absorb microwave energy and heat the TCM samples. In the work, carbonyl iron powders (CIP) was added and mixed with the dried TCM sample, which was used as microwave absorption solid medium for dry distillation of the TCM. At the same time, SPME was used for the extraction and concentration of essential oil after MD. The dry rhizomes of Atractylodes lancea DC was used as the model TCM, and used in the study. The MD-HS-SPME parameters including fiber coating, microwave power, irradiation time, and the amount of added CIP, were studied. To demonstrate the method feasibility, the conventional HS-SPME method was also used for the analysis of essential oil in the TCM. Experimental results show that more compounds were isolated and identified by MD-HS-SPME than those by HS-SPME. Compared to conventional HS-SPME, the advantages of the proposed method are: short extraction time and high extraction efficiency. All experimental results show that the proposed method is an alternative tool for fast analysis of essential oils in dry TCMs.

  15. An accurate method for microanalysis of carbon monoxide in putrid postmortem blood by head-space gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS/GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Hao, Hongxia; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Xiaopei; Zhang, Zhong; Yu, Zhongshan

    2013-06-10

    Carbon monoxide (CO) may be the cause of more than half the fatal poisonings reported in many countries, with some of these cases under-reported or misdiagnosed by medical professionals. Therefore, an accurate and reliable analytical method to measure blood carboxyhemoglobin level (COHb%), in the 1% to lethal range, is essential for correct diagnosis. Herein a method was established, i.e. head-space gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS/GC/MS) that has numerous advantages over other techniques, such as UV spectrometry, for determination of COHb%. There was a linear relationship (R(2)=0. 9995) between the peak area for CO and the COHb% in blood. Using a molecular sieve-packed column, CO levels in the air down to 0.01% and COHb% levels in small blood samples down to 0.2% could be quantitated rapidly and accurately. Furthermore, this method showed good reproducibility with a relative standard deviation for COHb% of <1%. Therefore, this technique provides an accurate and reliable method for determining CO and COHb% levels and may prove useful for investigation of deaths potentially related to CO exposure.

  16. Determination of furan in jarred baby food purchased from the Spanish market by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Ruiz, E; Santillana, M I; Nieto, M T; Cirugeda, M E; Sanchez, J J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer a method based on headspace gas chromatography-mass (HS-GC-MS) spectrometry technique in-house validated and use to estimate furan concentrations in jarred baby-food samples purchased from the Spanish market. The validation was performed according to ISO 17025 and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) requirements and the results obtained (limit of detection (LOD) = 0.05 microg kg(-1); limit of quantification (LOQ) = 4 microg kg(-1), lowest validated level; relative standard deviation (RSD) = 3.1-10.5%; recoveries = 85.4-101.5%) confirm that this method is fit for the routine analysis of furan in jarred baby food control. Furan was analysed in 39 different baby-food samples and the mean levels varied between 64.6 microg kg(-1) (rice and chicken samples) and less than or equal to the LOQ (fruit-based samples). The mean concentrations found for the different matrices were 5.0, 37.8, 25.2, 33.8 and 30.5 microg kg(-1) for fruit, vegetables, meat/vegetables, fish/vegetables and dairy-containing baby foods, respectively. According to the statistical analyses, fruit-based baby-food samples had significantly lower concentrations of furan. Mean values for the other matrices were at least five times higher, and this is in accordance with the levels reported in other studies.

  17. Ultrasonic nebulization extraction coupled with headspace single drop microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for analysis of the essential oil in Cuminum cyminum L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Ziming; Zhang, Huihui; Li, Xueyuan; Zhang, Hanqi

    2009-08-04

    A novel method for analysis of essential oil in Cuminum cyminum L. using simultaneous ultrasonic nebulization extraction and headspace single drop microextraction (UNE-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed. Experimental parameters, including the kind of suspended solvent, microdrop volume, sample amount, extraction time, enrichment time and salt concentration were examined and optimized. Compared with hydrodistillation (HD), UNE-HS-SDME provides the advantages of a small amount of sample (50 mg), time-saving (20 min), simplicity, cheapness and low toxicity. In addition, UNE-HS-SDME also provided higher enrichment efficiency and sensitivity compared with stirring extraction (SE)-HS-SDME, ultrasonic assistant extraction (UAE) and UNE. Some constituents in the essential oil, were identified and the detection limits for beta-pinene, p-cymene and gamma-terpinene range from 6.67 pLL(-1) to 14.8 pLL(-1). The results indicated that the UNE-HS-SDME is simple and highly efficient extraction and enrichment technique.

  18. Optimization of a Dynamic Headspace-Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry procedure for the determination of furfurals in vinegars.

    PubMed

    Manzini, Simona; Durante, Caterina; Baschieri, Carlo; Cocchi, Marina; Sighinolfi, Simona; Totaro, Sara; Marchetti, Andrea

    2011-08-15

    The use of a Dynamic Headspace System (DHS) device combined with a Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) interfaced to a Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) system is proposed for the determination of furfurals in oenological products. An experimental design protocol has been employed for the optimization of the instrumental settings concerning DHS and TDU extraction and desorption steps. It has been possible to individuate the following optimized conditions: incubation temperature 40°C, purge volume 800 mL, dry volume 1500 mL, TDU hold time 5 min and incubation time 10 min. The performance of two different SPE sorbents, namely Tenax TA and Tenax GR used for the furfurals trapping, was investigated too. The developed DHS sampling procedure showed good reproducibility values with a RSD% lower than 10% for all the monitored species. The optimized experimental settings have been used to determine furfurals in several vinegar samples obtained by traditional procedure starting from cooked grape musts, i.e. in Aceto Balsamico Tradizionale di Modena (ABTM). In fact, the control of these species is extremely important for quality and safety issues.

  19. Determination of E,E-farnesol in Makgeolli (rice wine) using dynamic headspace sampling and stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jaeho; Wang, Yiru; Jang, Hyejin; Seog, Homoon; Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analysed the volatile and semi-volatile compounds, including E,E-farnesol in Makgeolli which is a traditional type of Korean fermented rice wines. Forty-one compounds including alcohols, 1-butanol-3-methyl acetate, E,E-farnesol, stearol, and phytane, were separated and quantified by dynamic headspace sampling (DHS) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. SBSE has been found to be an effective method for analysing E,E-farnesol levels in Makgeolli. The experimental parameters related to the extraction efficiency of the SBSE method, such as ethanol concentration and filtration, were studied and optimised. The linear dynamic range of the SBSE method for E,E-farnesol ranged from 0.02 to 200ngml(-1) with R(2)=0.9974. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of the SBSE method were 0.02 and 0.05ngml(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviation of intra- and inter-day reproducibility was less than 6.2% and 9.9%, respectively.

  20. Headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of volatile compounds in different varieties of African star apple fruit (Chrysophillum albidum).

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Ola; Khatib, Alfi; Juhari, Hanisah; Patiram, Parveen; Lasekan, Seye

    2013-12-01

    The volatile compounds in four selected African star apple fruit (Chrysophyllum albidum) varieties were isolated and identified using the headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 59 compounds were identified. Application of the aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) to the aroma distillates from the fruits revealed 45 odour-active compounds in the flavour dilution (FD) factor range of 4-128. Among them, the highest odour activities (FD factors) were determined for methylhexanoate, acetophenone and ethyl dodecanoate. Moreover, aroma lipophilicity appears to reflect molecular conformation. Further analysis of the similarities and differences between the fruit varieties in terms of the key odourants by the application of PLS-DA and PLS-regression coefficient showed strong positive correlation between the very sweet/sweet varieties and 10 key odourants. The odourants included ethyl acetate, acetyl methyl carbinol, methylhexanoate, sabinene, p-cymene, methylbenzoate, ethylbenzoate, geraniol, cis-α-bergomotene, acetophenone, and ethyl dodecanoate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. One-step microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction for the rapid determination of synthetic polycyclic musks in oyster by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shin-Fang; Liu, Li-Lian; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2012-07-15

    A rapid, simple and solvent-free procedure was developed for the determination of synthetic polycyclic musks in oyster samples by using one-step microwave-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction (MA-HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Two commonly used synthetic polycyclic musks, galaxolide (HHCB) and tonalide (AHTN), were selected in the method development and validation. The parameters (microwave irradiation power, extraction time, amount of water added, pH value and addition of NaCl) affecting the extraction efficiency of analytes from oyster slurry were systematically investigated and optimised. The best extraction conditions were achieved when the oyster tissue mixed with 10-mL deionised water (containing 3g of NaCl in a 40-mL sample-vial) was microwave irradiated at 80 W for 5 min. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.1 ng/g in 5-g of wet tissue. The good precision and accuracy of one-step MA-HS-SPME coupled with GC-MS for the determination of trace level of AHTN in oyster samples was also demonstrated.

  2. Simultaneous determination of 14 disinfection by-products in meat products using microwave-assisted extraction and static headspace coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes

    2017-08-04

    This paper described the first analytical method to simultaneously determine 14 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in meat products using microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and static headspace (SHS) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The DBPs included were 4 trihalomethanes, 7 haloacetic acids, 2 haloacetonitriles and trichloronitromethane, which are commonly formed as a consequence of the disinfection process of water. The combination of the MAE and SHS techniques allows meat samples to be analysed in two sequential steps into the same HS vial in spite of the sample's complexity. Detection limits were obtained within the range of 0.06-0.70ng/g, and the average relative standard deviation was 7.4%. Recoveries throughout the whole process were between 86 and 95%. The SHS-GC-MS method was applied to determine DBPs in meat products with different industrial processing which could be contaminated through contact with disinfectants and/or treated water employed in the factory either for washing or for the cooking of meat. Up to 5 DBPs were found at ng/g levels in about 36% of the samples analysed, cooked ham being the most contaminated meat product because of the brine solutions employed in its manufacturing process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Simultaneous determination of estrogenic odorant alkylphenols, chlorophenols, and their derivatives in water using online headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Su-Fen; Liu, Ze-Hua; Lian, Hai-Xian; Yang, Chuangtao; Lin, Qing; Yin, Hua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-10-01

    A simple online headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for simultaneous determination of trace amounts of nine estrogenic odorant alkylphenols and chlorophenols and their derivatives in water samples. The extraction conditions of HS-SPME were optimized including fiber selection, extraction temperature, extraction time, and salt concentration. Results showed that divinylbenzene/Carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (DVB/CAR/PDMS) fiber was the most appropriate one among the three selected commercial fibers, and the optimal extraction temperature, time, and salt concentration were 70 °C, 30 min, and 0.25 g/mL, respectively. The developed method was validated and showed good linearity (R (2) > 0.989), low limit of detection (LOD, 0.002-0.5 μg/L), and excellent recoveries (76-126 %) with low relative standard deviation (RSD, 0.7-12.9 %). The developed method was finally applied to two surface water samples and some of these target compounds were detected. All these detected compounds were below their odor thresholds, except for 2,4,6-TCAS and 2,4,6-TBAS wherein their concentrations were near their odor thresholds. However, in the two surface water samples, these detected compounds contributed to a certain amount of estrogenicity, which seemed to suggest that more attention should be paid to the issue of estrogenicity rather than to the odor problem.

  4. CODEX-compliant eleven organophosphorus pesticides screening in multiple commodities using headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sang, Zi-Ye; Wang, Yu-Ting; Tsoi, Yeuk-Ki; Leung, Kelvin Sze-Yin

    2013-01-15

    A headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (HS-SPME-GC-MS, hereafter abbreviated as "SPME") method was developed for dedicated organophosphorus (OP) pesticides assessment in multiple vegetable and fruit commodities. Specific extraction variables were optimised to achieve harmonised extraction performance of eleven OPs in a great span of seven characteristic commodities cataloged in Codex Alimentarius Commission. Comprehensive validation study confirmed analytical robustness of the SPME treatment in turnip, green cabbage, French beans, eggplant, apple, nectarine and grapes. Based on range-specific evaluation, extraction of individual OPs was characterised by sub-ppb level sensitivity and a wide 0.01-2.5 mg L(-1) dynamic range. Effective sample clean-up afforded precise quantification (0.5-10.9% R.S.D.) within a 70-120% recovery range at the MRL levels specified for individual commodities. Compared to conventional methods currently used, the SPME treatment developed here is quick, accurate, and relatively environmental friendly; it represents an attractive, practical way to deliver international standards in OP screening routines.

  5. Rapid determination of acetone in human blood by derivatization with pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine followed by headspace liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Li, Ning; Wang, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Xiangmin; Zeng, Jia

    2005-01-01

    In the current work, a simple, rapid, accurate and inexpensive method was developed for the determination of acetone in human blood. The proposed method is based on derivatization with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA), followed by headspace liquid-phase microextraction (HS-LPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In the present method, acetone in blood samples was derivatized with PFBHA and acetone oxime formed in several seconds. The formed oxime was enriched by HS-LPME using the organic solvent film (OSF) formed in a microsyringe barrel as extraction interface. Finally, the enriched oxime was analyzed by GC/MS in electron ionization (EI) mode. HS-LPME parameters including solvent, syringe plunger withdrawal rate, sampling volume, and extraction cycle were optimized and the method reproducibility, linearity, recovery and detection limit were studied. The proposed method was applied to determination of acetone in diabetes blood and normal blood. It has been shown that derivatization with HS-LPME and GC/MS is an alternative method for determination of the diabetes biomarker, acetone, in blood samples.

  6. Rapid analysis of Fructus forsythiae essential oil by ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Ma, Dan-Hui; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2013-12-04

    A rapid, green and effective miniaturized sample preparation and analytical technique, i.e. ionic liquids-assisted microwave distillation coupled with headspace single-drop microextraction (ILAMD-HS-SDME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil (EO) in Fructus forsythiae. In this work, ionic liquids (ILs) were not only used as the absorption medium of microwave irradiation but also as the destruction agent of plant cell walls. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc) was chosen as the optimal ILs. Moreover, n-heptadecane (2.0 μL) was selected as the appropriate suspended solvent for the extraction and concentration of EO. Extraction conditions of the proposed method were optimized using the relative peak area of EO constituents as the index, and the optimal operational parameters were obtained as follows: irradiation power (300 W), sample mass (0.7 g), mass ratio of ILs to sample (2.4), temperature (78°C) and time (3.4 min). In comparison to previous reports, the proposed method was faster and required smaller sample amount but could equally monitor all EO constituents with no significant differences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Simple and sensitive determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol in hair by combined silylation, headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nadulski, Thomas; Pragst, Fritz

    2007-02-01

    A new method for determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) in hair based on alkaline hair hydrolysis, extraction by iso-octane, combined derivatization with N,O-bis-(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide and headspace solid phase microextraction of the extract residue, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed and evaluated. The limits of detection of the three compounds were 0.01-0.02 ng/mg. The method was routinely applied to more than 250 hair samples. In 77 positive samples, the concentrations ranged from LOD to 4.2 ng/mg for THC (mean 0.49 ng/mg), to 12.1 ng/mg for CBD (mean 0.37 ng/mg) and to 0.85 ng/mg for CBN (mean 0.12 ng/mg) using a sample amount of 30 mg. The frequently observed increase of the segmental drug concentrations from proximal to distal is explained by progressive accumulation in the hair shaft from sebum or side stream smoke.

  8. [Determination of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole in wine by head-space solid phase micro-extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhong, Qiding; Li, Jingguang; Xing, Jiangtao; Huang, Feifei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2012-07-01

    To establish a method of combining gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with head-space solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) for the detection of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in wine. 2,4,6-TCA in wine were extracted by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS,100 microm) fiber for 15 min under 35 degrees C in a water bath. The fiber was then transferred into the injection port of the GC-MS and separated by a CP-SIL 8CB-MS capillary column (30m x 0.25mm x 0.25 microm), and detected by mass spectrometry using d5-2,4,6-TCA as an internal standard. The linear range for 2,4,6-TCA was 5 (60ng/L, the detection limit was 0.06ng/L. The recovery of standard addition (5, 10, 20ng/L) was in the range of 79.8% (101.6% with relative standard deviations (RSD, n=5) < or = 7%. Organic solvents were avoided and the selection was sensitive for the method, which is suitable for the determination of 2,4,6-TCA in wine.

  9. Determination of different recreational drugs in sweat by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME GC/MS): Application to drugged drivers.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Stefano; Mortali, Claudia; Mastrobattista, Luisa; Berretta, Paolo; Zaami, Simona

    2016-09-10

    A procedure based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been developed for the determination of most commonly used drugs of abuse in sweat of drivers stopped during roadside controls. DrugWipe 5A sweat screening device was used to collect sweat by a specific pad rubbed gently over forehead skin surface. The procedure involved an acid hydrolysis, a HS-SPME extraction for drugs of abuse but Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which was directly extracted in alkaline medium HS-SPME conditions, a GC separation of analytes by a capillary column and MS detection by electron impact ionisation. The method was linear from the limit of quantification (LOQ) to 50ng drug per pad (r(2)≥0.99), with an intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy always less than 15% and an analytical recovery between 95.1% and 102.8%, depending on the considered analyte. Using the validated method, sweat from 60 apparently intoxicated drivers were found positive to one or more drugs of abuse, showing sweat patches testing as a viable economic and simple alternative to conventional (blood and/or urine) and non conventional (oral fluid) testing of drugs of abuse in drugged drivers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of headspace-oxylipin-volatilomes of some Eastern Himalayan mosses extracted by sample enrichment probe and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Souvik; Burger, Barend V; Poddar-Sarkar, Mousumi

    2017-03-01

    Mosses have an inherent adaptability against different biotic and abiotic stresses. Oxylipins, the volatile metabolites derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), play a key role in the chemical defence strategy of mosses. In the present study, a comparative survey of these compounds, including an investigation into their precursor fatty acids (FAs), was carried out for the first time on the mosses Brachymenium capitulatum (Mitt.) Paris, Hydrogonium consanguineum (Thwaites & Mitt.) Hilp., Barbula hastata Mitt., and Octoblepharum albidum Hedw. collected from the Eastern Himalayan Biodiversity hotspot. Their headspace volatiles were sampled using a high-efficiency sample enrichment probe (SEP) and were characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis. FAs from neutral lipid (NL) and phospholipid (PL) fractions were also evaluated. Analysis of the oxylipin volatilome revealed the generation of diverse metabolites from C5 to C18, dominated by alkanes, alkenes, saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and cyclic compounds, with pronounced structural variations. The C6 and C8 compounds dominated the total volatilome of all the samples. Analyses of FAs from membrane PL and storage NL highlighted the involvement of C18 and C20 PUFAs in oxylipin generation. The volatilome of each moss is characterized by a 'signature oxylipin mixture'. Quantitative differences in the C6 and C8 metabolites indicate their phylogenetic significance.

  11. Optimization of headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for detecting methoxyphenolic compounds in pu-erh tea.

    PubMed

    Du, Liping; Wang, Chao; Li, Jianxun; Xiao, Dongguang; Li, Changwen; Xu, Yongquan

    2013-01-23

    A method based on headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the analysis of volatile methoxyphenolic compounds in pu-erh tea. Six fibers with different polarities were initially evaluated. The 75 μm carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane fiber exhibited the highest extraction efficiency and was selected for further optimization. A Plackett-Burman design was used to screen for the brewing proportion of tea and water, amount of pu-erh tea, ionic strength, extraction time, extraction temperature, desorption time, rate of agitation, and equilibrium time. A Box-Behnken design was then applied to optimize the significant factors. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method affords a wide range of linearity, high linear regression coefficients (0.996-0.999), less than 9.0% repeatability of relative standard deviation, and limits of detection ranging from 2.31 to 21.80 ng/g. The proposed method has satisfactory accuracy, with recoveries of 79.08-113.9%. This method was successfully applied for the analysis of pu-erh tea samples.

  12. Determination of 1,3-dichloropropanol in soy sauces by automated headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Crews, C; LeBrun, G; Brereton, P A

    2002-04-01

    There has been recent concern about the levels of carcinogenic chloropropanols in some soy sauces. We have devised and tested a new automated headspace GC-MS technique for the analysis of 1,3-dichloropropan-2-ol (1,3-DCP) in soy sauce and similar products. The method incorporates the use of cryogenic trapping and a deuterium-labelled internal standard. The limit of detection was 0.003 mg kg(-1). After in-house validation testing, the method was applied to soy sauce samples that had previously been analysed for the related contaminant 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD). 1,3-DCP was detected in 10 of 40 sauces, all of which also contained 3-MCPD. The highest level was just >1 mg kg(-1). There was no correlation between the levels of 1,3-DCP and 3-MCPD.

  13. Profiling of volatile compounds in APC(Min/+) mice blood by dynamic headspace extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, Shoji; Nishiumi, Shin; Yoshida, Masaru; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2015-10-15

    Various volatile compounds as well as hydrophilic compounds exist in the blood. For example, 2-alkenals, 4-hydroxy-2-alkenals, and ketoaldehydes have been reported as oxidized lipid-derived volatiles in blood. These specific volatiles have been associated with diseases; however, multi-volatile analyses have not been performed. In this study, volatile profiling of APC(Min/+) mouse plasma by dynamic headspace extraction was performed for multi-volatile analysis. In total, 19 volatiles were detected in the plasma of mice, based on information regarding oxidized lipid-derived volatile compounds, and eight of these compounds differed significantly between normal and diseased mice. 2-Methyl-2-butanol and benzyl alcohol were previously unreported in blood samples. Furthermore, 3,5,5-trimethyl-2(5H)-furanone was only detected in normal mice. 5-Methyl-3-hexanone and benzaldehyde have been detected in subjects with gastrointestinal diseases and lung cancer, respectively. Therefore, volatile profiling can be used to detect differences between samples and to identify compounds associated with diseases.

  14. Determination of urinary ortho- and meta-cresol in humans by headspace SPME gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Mercadante, Rosa; Campo, Laura; Scibetta, Licia; Valla, Carla; Foà, Vito

    2005-03-25

    ortho-Cresol (o-C) and meta-cresol (m-C) are minor urinary metabolites of toluene, a widely used chemical with neurotoxicological properties. A new assay for their determination in human urine is here proposed. Urinary cresol sulphates and glucuronates are submitted to acid hydrolysis, urine is neutralized, added with o-cresols-d8, and analytes are sampled in the headspace of urine by SPME using a polydimethylsiloxane fiber. Analysis is performed by GC/MS using, for separation, either a SupelcoWax10 (for o-C) or a chiral CP Cresol (for o-C and m-C) column. The method is very specific, with a range of linearity 0-5.0 mg/l, within- and between-run precision, as coefficient of variation, <15% and <19%, limit of detection of 0.006 mg/l for o-C and 0.007 mg/l for m-C. The procedure is applied to the quantification of cresols in urine from workers exposed to toluene and from subjects belonging to the general population.

  15. Simultaneous quantification of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids in cheese by on-line static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Fernández-Salguero, Jose; Gallego, Mercedes

    2015-08-21

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the two most prevalent classes of disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are present in treated water. Four THMs and six HAAs are regulated by several countries in drinking waters but no regulation for these DBPs has been established in foods. THMs are volatile species that can easily be determined by static headspace (SHS)-GC-MS, but HAAs require a derivatisation step to make them suitable for GC due to their polar and hydrophilic nature. This paper describes the first analytical method that performs the simultaneous determination of 10 THMs and 13 HAAs (chlorinated, brominated and iodinated) in cheeses by SHS in one unique GC-MS run. Parameters controlling leaching, centrifugation, derivatisation and volatilisation were optimised taking into account the high volatility of THMs and the thermal instability of HAAs. To increase sensitivity, 3g of cheese was extracted with 10mL of water at pH 4.5-7.7, and after centrifugation the supernatant (∼8mL) was introduced into an HS vial for the derivatisation (HAAs) and volatilisation (HAA esters and THMs) of the species in an automatic SHS unit coupled to GC-MS. Detection limits within the range of 0.05-0.50 and 0.15-0.85μg/kg for THMs and HAAs, respectively, were obtained, and the relative standard deviation was lower than 10% for all the target analytes. Recoveries throughout the whole method were between 85-90% and 92-97% for THMs and HAAs, respectively. The SHS-GC-MS method was applied for the determination of THMs and HAAs in 3 groups of Spanish cheeses, which can be contaminated through contact with treated water during the manufacturing steps. Up to 2 THMs and 4 HAAs were found at μg/kg levels in the samples analysed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of volatile organic compounds including alcohols in refill fluids and cartridges of electronic cigarettes by headspace solid-phase micro extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Hee; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2017-02-01

    An analytical method for the detection of 14 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was developed to investigate VOCs in refill fluids and cartridges of electronic cigarettes (EC) using headspace solid-phase micro extraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 14 VOCs were identified and quantified in 283 flavored liquids, 21 nicotine liquids, and 12 disposable cartridges. The detected concentration ranges of the VOCs are as follows: benzene (0.008-2.28 mg L(-1)), toluene (0.006-0.687 mg L(-1)), ethylbenzene (0.01-1.21 mg L(-1)), m-xylene (0.002-1.13 mg L(-1)), p-xylene (0.007-2.8 mg L(-1)), o-xylene (0.004-2.27 mg L(-1)), styrene (0.011-0.339 mg L(-1)), ethyl acetate (0.3-669.9 mg L(-1)), ethanol (16-38,742 mg L(-1)), methanol (66-3375 mg L(-1)), pyridine (0.077-99.7 mg L(-1)), acetylpyrazine (0.077-147 mg L(-1)), 2,3,5-trimethylpyrazine (0.008-96.8 mg L(-1)), and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (0.1-57.2 mg L(-1)). Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, p-xylene, and o-xylene coexisted in samples, which may have originated from the use of petrogenic hydrocarbons as an extraction solvent for flavor and nicotine from natural plants. The maximum detected concentrations of benzene, methanol, and ethanol in liquid samples were found in quantities higher than their authorized maximum limits as residual solvents in pharmaceutical products.

  17. Characteristics of volatile organic compounds produced from five pathogenic bacteria by headspace-solid phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Tang, Junni; Shi, Hui; Tang, Cheng; Zhang, Rong

    2017-03-01

    The characteristics of volatile compounds from five different bacterial species, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Enteritidis, Shigella flexneri, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes, growing, respectively, in trypticase soy broth were monitored by headspace solid-phase micro-extraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of five pathogens started to increase after the sixth to tenth hour. Methyl ketones and long chain alcohols were representative volatiles for three Gram-negative bacteria. The especially high production of indole was characterized to E. coli O157:H7. The production of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone was indicative of the presence of two Gram-positive bacteria. Both 3-methyl-butanoic acid and 3-methyl-butanal were unique biomarkers for S. aureus. The population dynamics of individual pathogen could be monitored using the accumulation of VOCs correlated with its growth. And these five pathogens could be distinguishable though principle component analysis of 18 volatile metabolites. Moreover, the mixed culture of S. aureus and E. coli O157:H7 was also investigated. The levels of 3-methyl-butanal and 3-methyl-butanoic acid were largely reduced; while the level of indole almost unchanged and correlated with E. coli O157:H7 growth very well. The characteristics of volatiles from the five foodborne pathogens could lay a fundamental basis for further research into pathogen contamination control by detecting volatile signatures of pathogens. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Study on seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage and its potential use for freshness evaluation by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke; Luo, Lin; Chen, Guonan

    2010-02-05

    Seafood volatile profile characteristics at different storage phases are various and can be used for freshness evaluation during storage. It is imperative to obtain the full volatile information prior to the further study of seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage. Also, the efficient data-processing method is another important factor for the interpretation of seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage and related potential volatile markers. In this work, a new analytical strategy, including the efficient sampling technique, sensitive detection and suitable data-processing method, for seafood freshness evaluation was developed based on the volatile profile characteristics during storage. First, the study of volatiles of seafood samples including razor clam, redspot swimming crab and prawn at different storage phases were conducted by headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) detection. Then, seafood volatile profile characteristics at different storage phases were statistically interpreted by a combination data-processing method including normalization, principle component analysis (PCA) and common model strategy. The different seafood volatile profile characteristics and potential volatile markers were attempted to be distilled. The results tentatively suggested that the different seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage could reflect the transitional changing seafood freshness and provide more precise warning information for seafood spoilage during storage than any single chemical markers. This work developed an analytical method for study of seafood volatile profile characteristics and tentatively proposed a new idea of using seafood volatile profile characteristics during storage for the freshness evaluation from the point of view of analytical chemistry.

  19. A simple headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the quantitative determination of the release of the antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene from chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Davoli, Enrico; Bastone, Antonio; Bianchi, Giancarlo; Salmona, Mario; Diomede, Luisa

    2017-05-30

    Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are widely used to prevent oxidation and rancidity in foodstuffs, pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetic formulations. Although their safety has been thoroughly investigated, possible endocrine side-effects have been suggested. A useful method for the determination of BHA and BHT in foods is needed to estimate their daily intake through the diet. We selected commercial chewing gums as a model of a complex food matrix and developed a new method based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. This allows the determination of 130 pg/gum of BHA and 9 pg/gum of BHT. Analysis of different chewing gums from the European market indicated that the two antioxidants were never used together and that the content of BHA was in the range of 220-348 μg/gum and BHT ranged from 278 up to 479 μg/gum. These amounts correspond to 86-157 mg/kg gum for BHA and 170-185 mg/kg gum for BHT, and are both within the maximum levels established by the European Food Safety Authority. Chewing a piece of gum for 15 min resulted in the release of up to 28% of BHA, but no release of BHT was detectable. A new, simple and rapid method for the determination of BHA and BHT in chewing gums was described. This analytical method, based on headspace sampling, did not require the extraction of antioxidants from chewing gum samples, assuring the absence of any gum material contaminants that might affect the instrumentation. It is also automatable, employing a sequential automatic sampler. This method could be of interest to academic researchers and to food industrialists looking for a new methodological approach for BHA and BHT determination in foodstuffs with complex matrices. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Emission pattern of semi-volatile organic compounds from recycled styrenic polymers using headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, Francisco; Martínez-Sanz, Marta; Ribes-Greus, Amparo; Karlsson, Sigbritt

    2010-01-15

    The emission of low molecular weight compounds from recycled high-impact polystyrene (HIPS) has been investigated using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Four released target analytes (styrene, benzaldehyde, acetophenone, and 2-phenylpropanal) were selected for the optimisation of the HS-SPME sampling procedure, by analysing operating parameters such as type of SPME fibre (polarity and operating mechanism), particle size, extraction temperature and time. 26 different compounds were identified to be released at different temperatures from recycled HIPS, including residues of polymerisation, oxidated derivates of styrene, and additives. The type of SPME fibre employed in the sampling procedure affected the detection of emitted components. An adsorptive fibre such as carbowax/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS fibre) offered good selectivity for both non-polar and polar volatile compounds at lower temperatures; higher temperatures result in interferences from less-volatile released compounds. An absorptive fibre as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibre is suitable for the detection of less-volatile non-polar molecules at higher temperatures. The nature and relative amount of the emitted compounds increased with higher exposure temperature and smaller polymeric particle size. HS-SPME proves to be a suitable technique for screening the emission of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from polymeric materials; reliable quantification of the content of target analytes in recycled HIPS is however difficult due to the complex mass-transfer processes involved, matrix effects, and the difficulties in equilibrating the analytical system. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of volatiles from oxidised phosphatidylcholine molecular species using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Zhao, Minjie; Khalil, Ali; Marcic, Christophe; Bindler, Françoise; Marchioni, Eric

    2013-11-01

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS) was used to investigate the volatile compounds from oxidised phosphatidylcholine molecular species. 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) and 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SLPC) were chosen as models. The influence of several parameters on the efficiency of volatile oxidised compounds (VOCs) microextraction, such as type of fibre, extraction duration and temperature were studied. The best results were obtained with a polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibre used at 50 °C during 25 min. The effect of oxidation temperature on the yield of VOCs from SOPC and SLPC was investigated. Oxidative kinetics of SOPC and SLPC were investigated by measuring both the production of VOCs and the degradation of starting materials. More than 30 VOCs were detected by means of the reference mass spectra of the National Institute of Standards and Technology mass spectral library, and most of them were further confirmed by comparing their mass spectra and retention time with those obtained from authentic reference compounds under the same analytical conditions. Moreover, the origins of VOCs from oxidised PLs were studied by comparing those obtained from their corresponding triacylglycerides under the same experimental conditions. The main VOCs identified from oxidised SOPC were (E)-2-decenal, nonanal and octanal and from oxidised SLPC were (E)-2-heptenal, (E)-2-octenal and (E, E)-2,4-decadienal. The proposed method was applied to a real food sample, soy lecithin.

  2. Development and validation of an automated static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SHS-GC-MS) method for monitoring the formation of ethyl methane sulfonate from ethanol and methane sulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Jacq, Karine; Delaney, Ed; Teasdale, Andrew; Eyley, Steve; Taylor-Worth, Karen; Lipczynski, Andrew; Reif, Van D; Elder, David P; Facchine, Kevin L; Golec, Simon; Oestrich, Rolf Schulte; Sandra, Pat; David, Frank

    2008-12-15

    An automated sample preparation and analysis procedure was developed to monitor the formation of ethyl methane sulfonate from reaction mixtures containing ethanol and methane sulfonic acid. The system is based on a liquid handling robot combined with a static headspace module. The formed ethyl methane sulfonate is analysed after derivatisation with pentafluorothiophenol using static headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SHS-GC-MS). Using the automated reaction-derivatisation-headspace GC-MS system, the formation of ethyl methane sulfonate can be monitored in different reaction mixtures under different reaction conditions, including temperature, water content and pH. Excellent linearity, repeatability and robustness were obtained, allowing the system to be used in kinetic studies.

  3. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in olive oil by a completely automated headspace technique coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arrebola, Francisco J; Frenich, A Garrido; González Rodríguez, Manuel J; Bolaños, Patricia Plaza; Martínez Vidal, José L

    2006-06-01

    A new and completely automated method for the determination of ten relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in olive oil is proposed using an extraction by the headspace (HS) technique. Quantification and confirmation steps are carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) combining simultaneously selected-ion monitoring (SIM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). This combination offers on one hand an increased sensitivity and on the other hand, selective and reliable qualitative information. Sample pretreatment or clean-up are not necessary because the olive oil sample is put directly into an HS vial, automatically processed by HS and introduced into the GC-MS instrument for analysis. Because of its high selectivity and sensitivity, a triple-quadrupole (QqQ) detector coupled with the gas chromatograph allows us to limit handling. Each sample is completely processed in approximately 63 min (45 min for HS isolation and 18 min for GC-MS determination), a reduced time compared with previously published methods. The chemical and instrumental variables were preliminarily optimized using uncontaminated olive oil samples spiked with 25 microg kg(-1) of each target compound. The final method was validated to ensure the quality of the results. The precision was satisfactory, with relative standard deviation (RSD) values in the range 3-9%. Recovery rates ranged from 96 to 99%. Limits of detection (LOD) were calculated as 0.02-0.06 microg kg(-1) and the limits of quantification (LOQ) were obtained as 0.07-0.26 microg kg(-1). It must be mentioned that the LOD and LOQ are much lower than the maximum levels established by the European Union (EU) in oils and fats intended for direct human consumption or for use as an ingredient in foods, which are set at 2 microg kg(-1). All the figures of merit are completely in accordance with the latest EU legislation. This fact makes it possible to consider the proposed method as a useful tool for the control of PAHs in

  4. Novel approach for the determination of volatile compounds in processed onion by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Colina-Coca, Clara; González-Peña, Diana; Vega, Estela; de Ancos, Begoña; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción

    2013-01-15

    A novel headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS GC-MS) method was developed for analysis of volatile compounds in onion (Allium cepa L. var. cepa, 'Recas'). MS was operated using full scan mode and selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode in order to quantify some specific compounds with increased sensitivity relative to full scan mode. The limits of detection and quantitation ranged from 0.01 to 0.10 μg/g and from 0.02 to 3.83 μg/g fresh weight, respectively, for studied compounds. The procedure allowed the identification of eighteen compounds and quantitation of nine compounds in the volatile fraction of onion, belonging mainly to di-, and trisulfides and aldehydes. These methods were applied to evaluate how high-pressure (HP) as a processing technology affects onion volatile compounds, responsible in part of the onion biological activity. Onion samples were treated at T1: 200 MPa/25°C/5 min, T2: 400 MPa/25°C/5 min and T3: 600 MPa/25°C/5 min (treatments). In addition, the difference among diced, freeze-dried and pulverized onions (groups) was studied, in order to select the process more adequate for better preserving volatile compounds. The results obtained in full scan mode showed that both main factors (group and treatment) had a significant effect (P<0.001). There were also significant differences between groups and treatments for all compounds, being the main effect of group more marked by HS GC-MS using selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. For 2-methyl 2-pentenal, dimethyl trisulfide, and methyl propyl trisulfide it has been observed an increase in freeze-dried and pulverized onion samples compared with diced samples regardless the HP treatment. However, freeze-drying and pulverization processes affected the stability of propionaldehyde, 1-propanethiol, hexanal, dipropyl disulfide, and dipropyl trisulfide, diminishing their content regardless the HP treatment. HP at 200 and 400 MPa/25°C/5 min were the least detrimental treatments to the total

  5. [Determination of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in drinking water using headspace solid phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass-spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianguo; Liu, Kaiying; Bai, Mindong; Cheng, Chao; Yu, Yixuan; Zhou, Xinying

    2015-12-01

    The odorous compounds of 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) and geosmin (GSM) heavily produced and released in water source are one of the most important factors leading to off-flavor emergencies and resident water consumption panic in drinking water. A headspace solid phase micro-extraction ( HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was established for the simultaneous determination of these two trace earthy and musty compounds in reservoir water, reservoir soil and tap water. The conditions of HS-SPME, such as salt amount, extraction time and extraction temperature, were optimized based on orthogonal analysis. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of 2-MIB and GSM were carried out in the electron impact (EI) -selective ion scanning mode. The results showed that the linear relationship between peak area and concentration of 2-MIB and GSM was good enough (r2 0.998) from 5 to 1 000 ng/L, the limits of detection were 0.72 ng/L for 2-MIB, 0.34 ng/L for GSM and the limits of quantification were 2.40 ng/L for 2-MIB, 1.13 ng/L for GSM. When the target samples spiked in the range of 10-600 ng/L, the average recoveries of the target compounds were 93.6% - 107.7% ( RSD ≤ 6.1%, n = 6). Based on the above method, the target compounds in reservoir water, reservoir soil and tap water in a certain region of Liaoning Province were analyzed. The results showed that the two target odors in reservoir water were 3.0 -3.6 ng/L. As for the extract of the soil around the reservoir, 2-MIB was 8.1 ng/L and GSM was 17.8 ng/L. The odorous substances were not detected in the tap water. This method is simple, accurate, reliable, highly sensitive and no need of organic solvents. And it is suitable for the detection of 2-MIB and GSM in drinking water.

  6. Quantification of aroma compounds in Parmigiano Reggiano cheese by a dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique and calculation of odor activity value.

    PubMed

    Qian, Michael; Reineccius, G A

    2003-03-01

    Potentially important aroma compounds in Parmigiano Reggiano cheese were quantified. Free fatty acids were isolated with ion-exchange chromatography and quantified by gas chromatography. Neutral aroma compounds were quantified with a purge-trap/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selective mass ion technique. Odor activity values were calculated based on sensory thresholds reported in literature. The calculated odor activity values suggest that 3-methylbutanal, 2-methylpropanal, 2-methylbutanal, dimethyl trisulfide, diacetyl, methional, phenylacetaldehyde, ethyl butanoate, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, acetic, butanoic, hexanoic, and octanoic acids are the most important aroma contributors to Parmigiano Reggiano cheese.

  7. Direct thermal desorption in the analysis of cheese volatiles by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: comparison with simultaneous distillation-extraction and dynamic headspace.

    PubMed

    Valero, E; Sanz, J; Martínez-Castro, I

    2001-06-01

    Direct thermal desorption (DTD) has been used as a technique for extracting volatile components of cheese as a preliminary step to their gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. In this study, it is applied to different cheese varieties: Camembert, blue, Chaumes, and La Serena. Volatiles are also extracted using other techniques such as simultaneous distillation-extraction and dynamic headspace. Separation and identification of the cheese components are carried out by GC-mass spectrometry. Approximately 100 compounds are detected in the examined cheeses. The described results show that DTD is fast, simple, and easy to automate; requires only a small amount of sample (approximately 50 mg); and affords quantitative information about the main groups of compounds present in cheeses.

  8. Impurity analysis of 1,4-dioxane in nonionic surfactants and cosmetics using headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fuh, C Bor; Lai, M; Tsai, H Y; Chang, C M

    2005-04-15

    1,4-Dioxane impurity in nonionic surfactants and cosmetics were analyzed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Experimental results show that there is no significant difference using SPME-GC and SPME-GC-MS for analysis of 1,4-dioxane in three types of nonionic surfactants at the 95% confidence level. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) values of each analytical method were smaller than 3%. The amount of 1,4-dioxane was found to vary from 11.6 +/- 0.3 ppm to 73.5 +/- 0.5 ppm in 30% of nonionic surfactants from manufacturers in Taiwan. These methods were linear over the studied range of 3-150 ppm with correlation coefficients higher than 0.995. The recoveries of 1,4-dioxane for these nonionic surfactants following SPME were all higher than 96 +/- 1% (n = 3). The detection limits of 1,4-dioxane for these nonionic surfactants following SPME were from 0.06 ppm to 0.51 ppm. The experimentally determined level of 1,4-dioxane in cosmetics from manufacturers in Taiwan varied from 4.2 +/- 0.1 ppm to 41.1 +/- 0.6 ppm in 22% of daily used cosmetics following SPME coupled with GC and GC-MS. Conventional solvent extraction takes around 1 h for extraction and reconcentration but SPME takes only around 10 min. SPME provides better analyses of 1,4-dioxane in nonionic surfactants and cosmetics than conventional solvent extraction and head space pretreatments in term of simplicity, speed, precision, detection limit, and solvent consumption.

  9. Quantitative fingerprinting by headspace--two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of solid matrices: some challenging aspects of the exhaustive assessment of food volatiles.

    PubMed

    Nicolotti, Luca; Cordero, Chiara; Cagliero, Cecilia; Liberto, Erica; Sgorbini, Barbara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Bicchi, Carlo

    2013-10-10

    The study proposes an investigation strategy that simultaneously provides detailed profiling and quantitative fingerprinting of food volatiles, through a "comprehensive" analytical platform that includes sample preparation by Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME), separation by two-dimensional comprehensive gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry detection (GC×GC-MS) and data processing using advanced fingerprinting approaches. Experiments were carried out on roasted hazelnuts and on Gianduja pastes (sugar, vegetable oil, hazelnuts, cocoa, nonfat dried milk, vanilla flavorings) and demonstrated that the information potential of each analysis can better be exploited if suitable quantitation methods are applied. Quantitation approaches through Multiple Headspace Extraction and Standard Addition were compared in terms of performance parameters (linearity, precision, accuracy, Limit of Detection and Limit of Quantitation) under headspace linearity conditions. The results on 19 key analytes, potent odorants, and technological markers, and more than 300 fingerprint components, were used for further processing to obtain information concerning the effect of the matrix on volatile release, and to produce an informative chemical blueprint for use in sensomics and flavoromics. The importance of quantitation approaches in headspace analysis of solid matrices of complex composition, and the advantages of MHE, are also critically discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification and Quantitation of Volatile Organic Compounds in Poly(methyl methacrylate) Kitchen Utensils by Headspace Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Mutsuga, Motoh; Kawamura, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    A headspace GC/MS method was developed for identification and quantitation of residual volatile organic compounds in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) kitchen utensils. A sample was cut into small pieces, then N,N-dimethylacetamide was added in a headspace vial and sealed. After storing for more than 1 day at room temperature, the vial was incubated for 1 h at 90°C, and the headspace gas was analyzed by GC/MS. In 24 PMMA kitchen utensils, 16 volatile organic compounds including methyl methacrylate, methyl acrylate, toluene, 2-methyl-1-butene, 2-methyl-2-butene, 2-methylpropanal, methyl propionate, methyl isobutyrate, trans-3-heptene, heptane, cis-3-heptene, trans-2-heptene, cis-2-heptene, 2,4,4-trimethyl-1-pentene, 2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentene, and 1-octene were identified and quantitated. These 15 volatile compounds except methyl methacrylate were found for the first time in PMMA kitchen utensils. Recovery rates from spiked samples were 97.4-104.0% with CV values of 2.8-9.6%. Samples contained 190-7900 μg/g of methyl methacrylate, 26-810 μg/g of methyl acrylate, and 2-1300 μg/g of toluene; other compounds were at levels less than 100 μg/g. Methyl methacrylate was the main monomer of PMMA and methyl acrylate was a comonomer; toluene should be used as a solvent.

  11. Multivariate analysis of the volatile components in tobacco based on infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqin; Pan, Yuanjiang; Zhou, Guojun; Chu, Guohai; Jiang, Jian; Yuan, Kailong; Xia, Qian; Cheng, Changhe

    2016-11-01

    A novel infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry method has been developed for the rapid determination of the volatile components in tobacco. The optimal extraction conditions for maximizing the extraction efficiency were as follows: 65 μm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene fiber, extraction time of 20 min, infrared power of 175 W, and distance between the infrared lamp and the headspace vial of 2 cm. Under the optimum conditions, 50 components were found to exist in all ten tobacco samples from different geographical origins. Compared with conventional water-bath heating and nonheating extraction methods, the extraction efficiency of infrared-assisted extraction was greatly improved. Furthermore, multivariate analysis including principal component analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, and similarity analysis were performed to evaluate the chemical information of these samples and divided them into three classifications, including rich, moderate, and fresh flavors. The above-mentioned classification results were consistent with the sensory evaluation, which was pivotal and meaningful for tobacco discrimination. As a simple, fast, cost-effective, and highly efficient method, the infrared-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction technique is powerful and promising for distinguishing the geographical origins of the tobacco samples coupled to suitable chemometrics.

  12. Determination of styrene content in Gorgonzola PDO cheese by headspace solid phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) and gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Chiesa, L M; Panseri, S; Soncin, S; Vallone, L; Dragoni, I

    2010-06-01

    Control of the composition of products that are intended for use as packaging material is essential, particularly when these products come into direct contact with food. It is well known that plastics are not inert and that their residual monomers, starting substances, and additives are able to migrate into the food they contact. Among plastics, styrene is a common compound found in many plastic containers that can also be produced by the oxidation of Penicillium roqueforti used in gorgonzola Protected Denomination of Origin cheese manufacturing. Therefore, solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was applied in the present work to determine the styrene content in packaged and unpackaged gorgonzola cheese samples to understand styrene migration phenomena from plastic containers.

  13. Simple and rapid analysis for quantitation of the most important volatile flavor compounds in yogurt by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alonso, L; Fraga, M J

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this experiment is to develop a rapid, simplified, direct gas chromatographic (GC) method for the analysis of volatile flavor compounds in yogurt combining a headspace with constant heating temperature and GC with a mass spectrometric detect ion. Repeatability of the method is assessed. The relative standard deviation for individual flavor compounds range from 3.5% for acetaldehyde to 8.4% for acetone, with a total mean value of 52.4 +/- 2.2 mg/kg for all of the studied aroma components. Recovery for individual flavor compounds range from 63.7% for acetone to 82.4% for acetic acid.

  14. Headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: a fast approach to the identification and determination of 2-alkyl-3- methoxypyrazine pheromones in ladybugs.

    PubMed

    Cudjoe, Erasmus; Wiederkehr, Tara B; Brindle, Ian D

    2005-02-01

    Static headspace sampling technique coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was used to investigate the presence of volatile 2-alkyl-3-methoxypyrazines in three different species of ladybugs of the Coccinellidae family. The species investigated were Coccinella septempunctata, Harmonia axyridis and Hippodemia convergens. 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP) was identified in all three species with detectable levels of 2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine (SBMP) and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazines (IBMP) in only Hippodemia convergens and Harmonia axyridis species. Relative amounts of 2-alkyl-3-methoxypyrazines based on body mass showed that Hippodemia convergens had the highest levels of all three methoxypyrazines and Coccinella septempunctata the least.

  15. Detection of the Previously Unobserved Stereoisomers of Thujone in the Essential Oil and Consumable Products of Sage (Salvia officinalis L.) Using Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jack D; Yazarians, Jessica A; Almeyda, Chelcie C; Anderson, Kristin A; Boyce, Gregory R

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the (+)-α-thujone and (-)-β-thujone stereoisomers in the essential oil of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) and dietary supplements is documented for the first time. The detection was accomplished using a chiral resolution protocol of racemic α-/β-thujone on headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Because the previously unreported stereoisomers, (+)-α-thujone and (-)-β-thujone, are not commercially available, a three-step synthesis of racemic thujone from commercially available starting materials was developed. Thermolysis studies demonstrated that no racemization at the cyclopropane stereocenters occurs, corroborating that the detection is not an artifact from the hydrodistillation process. The developed chiral resolution of thujone was also used to provide evidence for the absence of the (+)-α-thujone and (-)-β-thujone enantiomers in other common thujone-containing essential oils.

  16. Application of headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine short-chain alkane monocarboxylic acids in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Banel, Anna; Wasielewska, Marta; Zygmunt, Bogdan

    2011-03-01

    In this study, a procedure was developed to determine short-chain alkane monocarboxylic acids (SCMAs) in aqueous samples using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography (GC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). A Stabilwax-DA capillary column (30 m × 0.32-mm inner diameter, 0.50-μm film thickness) was used for GC separation and a 60-μm poly(ethylene glycol) fiber was used to isolate SCMAs from water and introduce them into the gas chromatograph. Parameters of HS-SPME, analyte desorption, and GC-MS analysis were selected and an analytical procedure was proposed. Limits of quantitation were on the order of about 0.2 mg L(-1). As an example of the application of the procedure, SCAMs were determined in municipal wastewater at different steps of treatment.

  17. Determination of cannabinoids in hemp food products by use of headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kroener, Lars; Musshoff, Frank; Madea, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    A fully automated procedure using alkaline hydrolysis and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), followed by on-fiber derivatization and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) detection has been developed for determination of cannabinoids in hemp food samples. After addition of a deuterated internal standard, the sample was hydrolyzed with sodium hydroxide and submitted to direct HS-SPME. After absorption of analytes for on-fiber derivatization, the fiber was placed directly into the headspace of a second vial containing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA), before GC-MS analysis. Linearity was good for Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol, and cannabinol; regression coefficients were greater than 0.99. Depending on the characteristics of the matrix the detection limits obtained ranged between 0.01 and 0.17 mg kg(-1) and the precision between 0.4 and 11.8%. In comparison with conventional liquid-liquid extraction this automated HS-SPME-GC-MS procedure is substantially faster. It is easy to perform, solvent-free, and sample quantities are minimal, yet it maintains the same sensitivity and reproducibility. The applicability was demonstrated by analysis of 30 hemp food samples. Cannabinoids were detected in all of the samples and it was possible to differentiate between drug-type and fiber-type Cannabis sativa L. In comparison with other studies relatively low THC concentrations between 0.01 and 15.53 mg kg(-1) were determined.

  18. Multivariate study of parameters in the determination of pesticide residues in apple by headspace solid phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using experimental factorial design.

    PubMed

    Abdulra'uf, Lukman Bola; Tan, Guan Huat

    2013-12-15

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is a solvent-less sample preparation method which combines sample preparation, isolation, concentration and enrichment into one step. In this study, multivariate strategy was used to determine the significance of the factors affecting the solid phase microextraction of pesticide residues (fenobucarb, diazinon, chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos) using a randomised factorial design. The interactions and effects of temperature, time and salt addition on the efficiency of the extraction of the pesticide residues were evaluated using 2(3) factorial designs. The analytes were extracted with 100 μm PDMS fibres according to the factorial design matrix and desorbed into a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detector. The developed method was applied for the analysis of apple samples and the limits of detection were between 0.01 and 0.2 μg kg(-)(1), which were lower than the MRLs for apples. The relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 0.1% and 13.37% with average recovery of 80-105%. The linearity ranges from 0.5-50 μg kg(-)(1) with correlation coefficient greater than 0.99. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Purge-assisted headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of trace nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Hung, Cheng-Han; Ho, Hsin-Pin; Lin, Mei-Tzu; Chen, Chung-Yu; Shu, Youn-Yuen; Lee, Maw-Rong

    2012-11-23

    This study describes a new procedure, namely, purge-assisted headspace solid phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (PA/HS-SPME-GC/NICI-MS), which is used to determine seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) in aqueous samples. High extraction efficiency was obtained with PA/HS-SPME with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber coating. A programmable temperature vaporizing (PTV) inlet was used in the desorption process. Selected ion monitoring (SIM) was used for quantitative and qualitative purposes. The linear range of detection of the proposed method was 5-5000 pg/mL with coefficients of determination between 0.995 and 0.999. Limits of detection (LODs) for seven NPAHs were 0.01-0.06 pg/mL. The relative standard deviation was below 12.7% at a concentration of 50 pg/mL. Compared with headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), the purge procedure enhanced the extraction efficiency for high boiling point analytes, such as 7-nitrobenz[a]anthracene (7-NBA) and 6-nitrochrysene (6-NC). The proposed method provides a sensitive method for NPAH analysis at the pg/mL level. The application of the proposed method for the determination of trace NPAHs in real samples was investigated by analyzing aqueous samples from rivers. The concentrations of NPAHs detected from the samples ranged from 5.2 to 7.5 pg/mL. This method was applied successfully in the analysis of trace NPAHs in river samples.

  20. Rapid determination of the volatile components in tobacco by ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanqin; Chu, Guohai; Zhou, Guojun; Jiang, Jian; Yuan, Kailong; Pan, Yuanjiang; Song, Zhiyu; Li, Zuguang; Xia, Qian; Lu, Xinbo; Xiao, Weiqiang

    2016-03-01

    An ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction was first employed to determine the volatile components in tobacco samples. The method combined the advantages of ultrasound, microwave, and headspace solid-phase microextraction. The extraction, separation, and enrichment were performed in a single step, which could greatly simplify the operation and reduce the whole pretreatment time. In the developed method, several experimental parameters, such as fiber type, ultrasound power, and irradiation time, were optimized to improve sampling efficiency. Under the optimal conditions, there were 37, 36, 34, and 36 components identified in tobacco from Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, and Zimbabwe, respectively, including esters, heterocycles, alkanes, ketones, terpenoids, acids, phenols, and alcohols. The compound types were roughly the same while the contents were varied from different origins due to the disparity of their growing conditions, such as soil, water, and climate. In addition, the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction method was compared with the microwave-assisted extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction and headspace solid-phase microextraction methods. More types of volatile components were obtained by using the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction method, moreover, the contents were high. The results indicated that the ultrasound-microwave synergistic extraction coupled to headspace solid-phase microextraction technique was a simple, time-saving and highly efficient approach, which was especially suitable for analysis of the volatile components in tobacco.

  1. Storage stability studies for tributyltin determination in human urine samples using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zachariadis, G A; Tzollas, N M; Nikolaou, M; Rosenberg, E

    2013-03-01

    A headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) method was employed in order to study the effect of storage conditions of human urine samples spiked with tributyltin (TBT) using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. To render the analyte more volatile, the derivatization (ethylation) was made in situ by sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt(4) ), which was added directly to dilute unpreserved urine samples and in buffers of similar acidity. The stability of TBT in human urine matrix was compared with the stability of TBT in buffer solutions of similar pH value. Critical parameters of storage conditions such as temperature and time, which affect the stability of TBT in this kind of matrix, were examined extensively. The tests showed that the stability of TBT remains practically satisfactory for a maximum of 2 days of storage either at +4 or 20°C. Greater variations were observed in the concentration of TBT in human urine samples at +4°C and lower ones at -20°C over a month's storage. The freeze-thaw cycles have negative effect on the stability and should be kept to a minimum. The results from spiked urine samples are also discussed in comparison to those acquired from buffer solutions of equal TBT concentration.

  2. Evaluation of three headspace sorptive extraction coatings for the determination of volatile terpenes in honey using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Campillo, N; Viñas, P; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2015-06-19

    Headspace sorptive extraction (HSSE) was used to preconcentrate seven monoterpenes (eucalyptol, linalool, menthol, geraniol, carvacrol, thymol and eugenol) for separation by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Three commercially available coatings for the stir bars, namely Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polyacrilate (PA) and Ethylene glycol-silicone (EG-Silicone), were tested, and the influential parameters both in the adsorption and the thermal desorption steps were optimized. PDMS provided the best sensitivity for linalool, geraniol, menthol and eucalyptol, whereas EG-Silicone was best for extracting the phenolic monoterpenes studied. Considering the average obtained slopes from all compounds, PDMS pointed as the best option, and the analytical characteristics for the HSSE-TD-GC-MS method using this coating were obtained. Quantification of the samples was carried out by matrix-matched calibration using a synthetic honey. Detection limits ranged between 0.007 and 0.032 ng g(-1), depending on the compound. Twelve honey samples of different floral origins were analyzed using the HSSE-GC-MS method, the analytes being detected at concentrations up to 64 ng g(-1).

  3. Monitoring the benzene contents in soft drinks using headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: a survey of the situation on the belgian market.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Christof; Detavernier, Christ'l; Van Bocxlaer, Jan F; Vermeylen, Rudi; Van Peteghem, Carlos

    2008-06-25

    Whenever benzoic acid is combined with ascorbic acid in acidic beverages such as soft drinks, benzene can be formed. To determine the current situation on the Belgian market, a headspace gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was developed, which needs little to no sample preparation. This method was then used to analyze 134 soft drinks sampled on the Belgian market by the Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain. Thirty-three percent of the samples contained no detectable benzene, whereas the majority of the samples (47%) contained trace amounts below the limit of quantification of the method (0.3 microg L (-1)). Ten samples were above the European limit for benzene in drinking water of 1 microg L (-1), and one sample had a concentration of 10.98 microg L (-1), thereby exceeding the action limit for benzene in soft drinks of 10 microg L (-1) discussed at the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health of the European Commission. Statistical analyses revealed that besides benzoic acid, ascorbic acid, and acidity regulators, the packing may also play an important role in benzene formation.

  4. Determination of volatile organic compounds in pen inks by a dynamic headspace needle trap device combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zang, Xiaohuan; Liang, Weiqian; Chang, Qingyun; Wu, Tong; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Some harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as methylbenzene, ethylbenzene, xylene, chlorobenzene and bromobenzene, are the commonly found chemicals in pen inks. In this work, a dynamic headspace needle-trap device (D-HS-NTD) with a ZIF-8-derived nanoporous carbon (ZIF-8-NPC) as the adsorbent was developed for the extraction of some VOCs in different pen inks prior to GC-MS detection. The main important influencing experimental parameters including the flow rate of the purge gas N2, extraction temperature, extraction time, desorption temperature and desorption time for the extraction were optimized to obtain a high extraction efficiency. Under the optimized conditions, a good linearity was obtained in the concentration range of 0.1-400μgkg(-1) with the correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.9911 to 0.9990 for the eleven VOCs. The LODs at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 (S/N=3) were measured to be 10-20ngkg(-1) for the VOCs. The developed method was applied to determine the VOCs from 20 pen inks. The recoveries of the VOCs for the method at the spiking levels of 0.5 and 20.0μgkg(-1) fell in the range from 80.0% to 108%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Direct determination of methyl parathion insecticide in rice samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Darlan Ferreira; Paiva Silva, Francisco Eduardo; Silva, Fernanda Gabrielle S; Nunes, Gilvanda Silva; Badea, Mihaela

    2015-11-01

    The organophosphorus insecticides, especially those based on methyl parathion as active principle, have been used extensively in the protection of rice in Maranhão State, in the north-east of Brazil. This paper describes the optimisation of a solid-phase microextraction (SPME) procedure in confined atmosphere (headspace, HS) for the determination of methyl parathion in rice organic samples by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (GC/MS). The proposed HS-SPME-GC/MS method has been shown to be appropriate for direct analysis of the insecticide in polished rice, with satisfactory results for the following parameters: linearity (correlation coefficient 0.9985), sensitivity (LOD and LOQ of 0.026 and 0.078 µg kg(-1) respectively), precision (coefficients of variation between 6.1 and 22.4%) and accuracy (recoveries varying from 73.2 to 90.0%). Although the efficiency of the proposed GC/MS does not differ statistically (P < 0.05) from the conventional GC/NPD method, given its low cost, speed and also the fact that a minimum volume of toxic effluent is generated, this method can be considered an on-line procedure based on green chemistry. Thus, the analytical methodology satisfies the minimum requirements for control of residues of such insecticides in rice samples destined for human consumption. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Rapid white truffle headspace analysis by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and comparison with solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aprea, Eugenio; Biasioli, Franco; Carlin, Silvia; Versini, Giuseppe; Märk, Tilmann D; Gasperi, Flavia

    2007-01-01

    The gastronomic relevance and high price of white truffle are related mainly to its unique aroma. Here we evaluate, for the first time, the possibility of characterizing in a rapid and non-destructive way the aroma of white truffles based on proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). We indicate that anonymous PTR-MS fingerprinting allows sample classification and we also compare qualitatively and quantitatively PTR-MS data with measurements made by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography (SPME-GC) of the same samples under the same conditions. PTR-MS fragmentation data of truffle-relevant compounds are also published here for the first time. Most of the sulfur-containing compounds detected by GC and relevant for white truffle aroma have a high positive correlation with single PTR-MS peaks. Our work indicates that, after preliminary comparison with GC data, PTR-MS is a new tool for the rapid, quantitative and non-invasive characterization of white truffle by direct headspace injection without any pre-concentration.

  7. First results on headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of volatile organic compounds emitted by wax objects in museums.

    PubMed

    Lattuati-Derieux, A; Thao, S; Langlois, J; Regert, M

    2008-04-11

    Sampling volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by a large variety of materials is nowadays a very useful technique for analytical purpose. In the field of cultural heritage, it can be applied to identify some constituents of museum artefacts off-gassing VOCs without sampling on the object itself. In this study, we focused on objects made of wax. First volatiles emitted by a reference beeswax were trapped and identified by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME)-gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This allowed to identify numerous volatile biomarkers, namely saturated n-alkanes from C(10) to C(21), saturated n-carboxylic acids containing 6-12 carbon atoms, benzene and cinnamic derivatives that may be considered as volatile biomarkers of beeswax. The SPME strategy was then performed at the Orsay museum (Paris) in a showcase containing a wax sculpture "Le Mineur de la Loire" by J.-J. Carriès. The use of beeswax in this sculpture was unequivocally confirmed by the VOCs concentrated in the showcase, together with a set of characteristic molecular compounds identified by HT-GC/MS. HS-SPME-GC/MS thus appears to be a powerful in situ and non-invasive analytical technique that allows to identify natural substances in the field of cultural heritage without any sampling of solid matter from the object. The results obtained are promising for orientating the strategy of preventive conservation related to works of art characterised by important emission of VOCs.

  8. Rapid analysis of halothane in biological samples using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry--a case of a double homicide.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, F; Junker, H; Madea, B

    2000-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive method for the analysis of halothane in biological samples was developed. The procedure describes the extraction of halothane from blood, liver, kidney, brain, urine, bile, and stomach contents by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by capillary gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The recovery in blood samples after addition of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid was 72% compared to a sample prepared in water (100%). Linearity was established over a concentration range of 0.1-100 mg/kg of spiked blood samples with an excellent coefficient of correlation (0.996) and a limit of detection of 0.004 mg/kg. The time for analysis was approximately 40 min per sample including the extraction step. The procedure was used for quantitation of halothane in various samples in a case of a double homicide. HS-SPME in combination with GC-MS was an effective method for the determination and quantitation of halothane in biological material.

  9. Optimization and application of headspace-solid-phase micro-extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of volatile compounds in cherry wines.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Zhou, Xuan; Niu, Yunwei; Yu, Dan; Zhu, Jiancai; Zhu, Guangyong

    2015-01-26

    A simple, rapid and solvent-free multi-residue method has been developed and applied to confirm and quantify a series of volatile compounds in five cherry wines by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Four parameters (e.g., coating material of fiber, temperature and time of extraction, and addition of sodium chloride in the solution) of headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) were optimized, resulting in the best extraction condition including 50/30 μm DVB/CAR/PDMS fiber, 45 min and 50 °C of SPME, and 2g of sodium chloride addition in the wine during the extraction. The SPME had LODs and LOQs ranging from 0.03 to 7.27 μg L(-1) and 0.10 to 24.24 μg L(-1) for analytic compounds, respectively. Repeatability and reproducibility values were all below 19.8%, with mean values of 12.7% and 10.5%, respectively. Regression coefficients (R(2)) of detective linearity of the standard curves was higher than 0.9852. Moreover, relative recoveries of analytical targets were achieved in a range of 60.7-125.6% with good relative standard deviation values (≤20.6%). In addition, a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the aroma profiles of the wines, which indicated that five samples were distinctly divided into two groups based on their different geographical origins and volatile compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Confirmation of natural gas explosion from methane quantification by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) in postmortem samples: a case report.

    PubMed

    Varlet, V; Augsburger, M

    2013-03-01

    A new analytical approach for measuring methane in tissues is presented. For the first time, the use of in situ-produced, stably labelled CDH(3) provides a reliable and precise methane quantification. This method was applied to postmortem samples obtained from two victims to help determine the explosion origin. There was evidence of methane in the adipose tissue (82 nmol/g) and cardiac blood (1.3 nmol/g) of one victim, which corresponded to a lethal methane outburst. These results are discussed in the context of the available literature to define an analysis protocol for application in the event of a gas explosion.

  11. Dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with one-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as a powerful tool to differentiate banana cultivars based on their volatile metabolite profile.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Marisela; Pereira, Jorge; Câmara, José S

    2012-10-15

    In this study the effect of the cultivar on the volatile profile of five different banana varieties was evaluated and determined by dynamic headspace solid-phase microextraction (dHS-SPME) combined with one-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (1D-GC-qMS). This approach allowed the definition of a volatile metabolite profile to each banana variety and can be used as pertinent criteria of differentiation. The investigated banana varieties (Dwarf Cavendish, Prata, Maçã, Ouro and Platano) have certified botanical origin and belong to the Musaceae family, the most common genomic group cultivated in Madeira Island (Portugal). The influence of dHS-SPME experimental factors, namely, fibre coating, extraction time and extraction temperature, on the equilibrium headspace analysis was investigated and optimised using univariate optimisation design. A total of 68 volatile organic metabolites (VOMs) were tentatively identified and used to profile the volatile composition in different banana cultivars, thus emphasising the sensitivity and applicability of SPME for establishment of the volatile metabolomic pattern of plant secondary metabolites. Ethyl esters were found to comprise the largest chemical class accounting 80.9%, 86.5%, 51.2%, 90.1% and 6.1% of total peak area for Dwarf Cavendish, Prata, Ouro, Maçã and Platano volatile fraction, respectively. Gas chromatographic peak areas were submitted to multivariate statistical analysis (principal component and stepwise linear discriminant analysis) in order to visualise clusters within samples and to detect the volatile metabolites able to differentiate banana cultivars. The application of the multivariate analysis on the VOMs data set resulted in predictive abilities of 90% as evaluated by the cross-validation procedure.

  12. Headspace stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of the diluted vapor phase of cigarette smoke delivered to an in vitro cell exposure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navneet; Cabral, Jean-Louis; Morin, André; Waldron, Karen C

    2011-01-14

    Advanced smoke generation systems, such as the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine used in combination with the BAT exposure chamber, allow for the generation, dilution and delivery of fresh cigarette smoke to cell or tissue cultures for in vitro cell culture analyses. Recently, our group confirmed that the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) is a reliable tool to generate and deliver repeatable and reproducible exposure concentrations of whole smoke to in vitro cultures. However, the relationship between dose and diluted smoke components found within the exposure chamber has not been characterized. The current study focused on the development of a headspace stir bar sorptive extraction (HSSE) method to chemically characterize some of the vapor phase components of cigarette smoke generated by the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) and collected within a cell culture exposure chamber. The method was based on passive sampling within the chamber by HSSE using a Twister™ stir bar. Following exposure, sorbed analytes were recovered using a thermal desorption unit and a cooled injection system coupled to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry for identification and quantification. Using the HSSE method, sixteen compounds were identified. The desorption parameters were assessed using ten reference compounds and the following conditions led to the maximal response: desorption temperature of 200°C for 2 min with cryofocussing temperature of -75°C. During transfer of the stir bars to the thermal desorption system, significant losses of analytes were observed as a function of time; therefore, the exposure-to-desorption time interval was kept at the minimum of 10±0.5 min. Repeatability of the HSSE method was assessed by monitoring five reference compounds present in the vapor phase (10.1-12.9% RSD) and n-butyl acetate, the internal standard (18.5% RSD). The smoke dilution precision was found to be 17.2, 6.2 and 11.7% RSD for exposure concentrations of 1, 2 and 5% (v/v) cigarette vapor phase in air

  13. Evaluation of dynamic headspace with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethanol, and trichloroacetic acid in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Johns, Douglas O; Dills, Russell L; Morgan, Michael S

    2005-03-25

    A sensitive and reproducible method is described for the analysis of trichloroacetic acid in urine and 1,1,1-trichloroethane in blood using dynamic headspace GC/MS. Samples were analyzed using the soil module of a modified purge and trap autosampler to facilitate the use of disposable purging vessels. Coefficients of variation were below 3.5% for both analytes, and response was linear in the range of 0.01-7.0 microg/ml for trichloroacetic acid and 0.9 ng/ml-2.2 microg/ml for 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Attempts at using dynamic headspace for the analysis of trichloroethanol in urine were unsuccessful.

  14. An Effective Method to Detect Volatile Intermediates Generated in the Bioconversion of Coal to Methane by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after In-Situ Extraction Using Headspace Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction under Strict Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Baoyu; Tai, Chao; Wu, Li; Zhao, Han; Guan, Jiadong; Chen, Linyong

    2016-01-01

    Bioconversion of coal to methane has gained increased attention in recent decades because of its economic and environmental advantages. However, the mechanism of this process is difficult to study in depth, partly because of difficulties associated with the analysis of intermediates generated in coal bioconversion. In this investigation, we report on an effective method to analyze volatile intermediates generated in the bioconversion of coal under strict anaerobic conditions. We conduct in-situ extraction of intermediates using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction followed by detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioconversion simulation equipment was modified and combined with a solid-phase micro-extraction device. In-situ extraction could be achieved by using the combined units, to avoid a breakdown in anaerobic conditions and to maintain the experiment continuity. More than 30 intermediates were identified qualitatively in the conversion process, and the variation in trends of some typical intermediates has been discussed. Volatile organic acids (C2-C7) were chosen for a quantitative study of the intermediates because of their importance during coal bioconversion to methane. Fiber coating, extraction time, and solution acidity were optimized in the solid-phase micro-extraction procedure. The pressure was enhanced during the bioconversion process to investigate the influence of headspace pressure on analyte extraction. The detection limits of the method ranged from 0.0006 to 0.02 mmol/L for the volatile organic acids and the relative standard deviations were between 4.6% and 11.5%. The volatile organic acids (C2-C7) generated in the bioconversion process were 0.01-1.15 mmol/L with a recovery range from 80% to 105%. The developed method is useful for further in-depth research on the bioconversion of coal to methane.

  15. An Effective Method to Detect Volatile Intermediates Generated in the Bioconversion of Coal to Methane by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after In-Situ Extraction Using Headspace Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction under Strict Anaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Baoyu; Tai, Chao; Wu, Li; Zhao, Han; Guan, Jiadong; Chen, Linyong

    2016-01-01

    Bioconversion of coal to methane has gained increased attention in recent decades because of its economic and environmental advantages. However, the mechanism of this process is difficult to study in depth, partly because of difficulties associated with the analysis of intermediates generated in coal bioconversion. In this investigation, we report on an effective method to analyze volatile intermediates generated in the bioconversion of coal under strict anaerobic conditions. We conduct in-situ extraction of intermediates using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction followed by detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioconversion simulation equipment was modified and combined with a solid-phase micro-extraction device. In-situ extraction could be achieved by using the combined units, to avoid a breakdown in anaerobic conditions and to maintain the experiment continuity. More than 30 intermediates were identified qualitatively in the conversion process, and the variation in trends of some typical intermediates has been discussed. Volatile organic acids (C2–C7) were chosen for a quantitative study of the intermediates because of their importance during coal bioconversion to methane. Fiber coating, extraction time, and solution acidity were optimized in the solid-phase micro-extraction procedure. The pressure was enhanced during the bioconversion process to investigate the influence of headspace pressure on analyte extraction. The detection limits of the method ranged from 0.0006 to 0.02 mmol/L for the volatile organic acids and the relative standard deviations were between 4.6% and 11.5%. The volatile organic acids (C2–C7) generated in the bioconversion process were 0.01–1.15 mmol/L with a recovery range from 80% to 105%. The developed method is useful for further in-depth research on the bioconversion of coal to methane. PMID:27695055

  16. Vanguard/rearguard strategy for the evaluation of the degradation of yoghurt samples based on the direct analysis of the volatiles profile through headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Carrión, C; Cárdenas, S; Valcárcel, M

    2007-02-02

    A vanguard/rearguard analytical strategy for the monitoring of the degradation of yoghurt samples is proposed. The method is based on the headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) instrumental coupling. In this combination, the chromatographic column is firstly used as an interface between the HS and the MS (vanguard mode) avoiding separation of the volatile components by maintaining the chromatographic oven at high, constant temperature. By changing the thermal conditions of the oven, the aldehydes can be properly separated for individual identification/quantification (rearguard mode). In the vanguard method, the quantification of the volatile aldehydes was calculated through partial least square and given as a total index. The rearguard method permits the detection of the aldehydes at concentrations between 12 and 35 ng/g. Both methods were applied to the study of the environmental factors favouring the presence of the volatile aldehydes (C(5)-C(9)) in the yoghurt samples. Principal component analysis of the total concentration of aldehydes with the time (from 0 to 30 days) demonstrates the capability of the HS-MS coupling for the estimation of the quality losses of the samples. The results were corroborated by the HS-GC-MS which also indicates that pentanal was present in the yoghurt from the beginning of the study and the combination of light/oxygen was the most negative influence for sample conservation.

  17. Analysis of Odorants in Marking Fluid of Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) Using Simultaneous Sensory and Chemical Analysis with Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction and Multidimensional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Soso, Simone B; Koziel, Jacek A

    2016-06-25

    Scent-marking is the most effective method of communication in the presence or absence of a signaler. These complex mixtures result in a multifaceted interaction triggered by the sense of smell. The objective was to identify volatile organic compound (VOC) composition and odors emitted by total marking fluid (MF) associated with Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica). Siberian tiger, an endangered species, was chosen because its MF had never been analyzed. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) for headspace volatile collection combined with multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry for simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses were used. Thirty-two VOCs emitted from MF were identified. 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, the sole previously identified compound responsible for the "characteristic" odor of P. tigris MF, was identified along with two additional compounds confirmed with standards (urea, furfural) and four tentatively identified compounds (3-methylbutanamine, (R)-3-methylcyclopentanone, propanedioic acid, and 3-hydroxybutanal) as being responsible for the characteristic aroma of Siberian tiger MF. Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses improved characterization of scent-markings and identified compounds not previously reported in MF of other tiger species. This research will assist animal ecologists, behaviorists, and zookeepers in understanding how scents from specific MF compounds impact tiger and wildlife communication and improve management practices related to animal behavior. Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses is applicable to unlocking scent-marking information for other species.

  18. Optimization of headspace solid phase microextraction based on nano-structured ZnO combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for preconcentration and determination of ultra-traces of chlorobenzenes in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Ensieh; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a simple, novel and efficient preconcentration method for the determination of some chlorobenzenes (monochlorobenzene (MCB), three isomeric forms of dichlorobenzene (diCB), 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (triCB) and hexachlorobenze (hexaCB)) has been developed using a headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) based on nano-structured ZnO combined with capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). ZnO nanorods have been grown on fused silica fibers using a hydrothermal process. The diameter of ZnO nanorods was in the range of 50-80 nm. The effect of different variables on the extraction efficiency was studied simultaneously using an experimental design. The variables of interest in the HS-SPME were stirring rate, desorption time and temperature, ionic strength, extraction time and temperature. For this purpose, a multivariate strategy was applied based on an experimental design using a Plackett-Burman design for screening and a Box-Behnken design for optimizing of the significant factors. The detection limit and relative standard deviation (RSD) (n=5) for the target analytes were in the range of 0.01-0.1 ng L(-1) and 4.3-7.6%, respectively. The developed technique was found to be successfully applicable to preconcentration and determination of the target analytes in environmental water and soil samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sensory screening for large-format natural corks by "dry soak" testing and its correlation to headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) releasable trichloroanisole (TCA) analysis.

    PubMed

    Macku, Carlos; Gonzalez, Lesa; Schleussner, Christiane; Mesquita, Ana Cristina; Herwatt, James W; Kirch, Leonard C; Schwartz, Rob J

    2009-09-09

    Large-format natural corks were individually screened for trichloroanisole (TCA) taint and other non-characteristic cork odors by smelling the high relative humidity headspace of the jarred closure during expert panel sensory sessions. The method was coined "dry soak sensory screening". Out of a population of 2296 corks, 138 specimens [6% of the total population (TP)] were retained because of unusual odors, ranging from mild to severe. All retained corks were analyzed for releasable TCA (RTCA) by the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique. Results indicated that 30 corks (1.3% TP) had concentrations between 1.0 and 5.0 ppt. Most of these corks had non-typical TCA odors described as ashtray, musty, moldy, dirty, and wet cardboard. A total of 13 retained corks (0.57% TP) had RTCA values higher than 5.0 ppt, mostly displaying the typical TCA odor. Dry soak screening has been determined to be a clean, fast, and most importantly, a nondestructive method ideal for screening large-format natural corks with off odors.

  20. Residual solvents in methylenedioxymethamphetamine tablets as a source of strategic information and as a tool for comparative analysis: the development and application of a static headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method.

    PubMed

    Visser, H A A H; Visser-van Leeuwen, M; Huizer, H

    2005-01-01

    Various solvents can be used in the synthesis of the illicit synthetic drug methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, commonly known as Ecstasy). In the crystallization process, traces of those solvents can be trapped inside crystals; during the following tabletting process, the solvent traces remain present in the tablets. The forensic investigation of tablets for solvents may increase knowledge of production methods and contribute to a possible choice of monitoring or regulating certain organic solvents. Further, the identification and quantification of solvents in MDMA tablets may contribute to the chemical characterization of illicit tablets for comparative examination. The methods of analysis of volatile components in illicit MDMA tablets described so far are often based on solid-phase micro extraction (SPME). To avoid several disadvantages of SPME, a quantitative static headspace method was developed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS); for quantification, the standard addition method appeared to be advantageous. The residual solvents in 155 MDMA tablets were analysed and 150 of them were quantified.

  1. Influence of harvest maturity and fruit logistics on pineapple (Ananas comosus [L.] Merr.) volatiles assessed by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS).

    PubMed

    Steingass, Christof B; Grauwet, Tara; Carle, Reinhold

    2014-05-01

    Profiling of volatiles from pineapple fruits was performed at four ripening stages using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). In total, 142 volatiles were detected, of which 132 were identified. Multivariate data analysis was carried out to assess the effect of post-harvest storage on volatiles composition of green-ripe sea-freighted pineapple in comparison to air-freighted fruits harvested at full maturity. The latter fruits were characterised by volatiles described as potent odorants in pineapples, such as δ-octalactone, γ-lactones, 1-(E,Z)-3,5-undecatriene and 1,3,5,8-undecatetraene, as well as various methyl esters. In contrast, post-harvest storage of green-ripe sea-freighted fruits resulted in an increased formation of ethyl esters, acetates, acetoxy esters and alcohols, thus allowing the authentication of sea- and air-freighted pineapples, respectively. Particularly, compounds presumably derived from methyl-branched amino acid catabolism were identified in the fruits at later post-harvest stages. In addition, physicochemical traits were determined to characterise the fruit maturity stages.

  2. Full evaporation dynamic headspace in combination with selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of suspected fragrance allergens in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Devos, Christophe; Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Sandra, Pat; David, Frank

    2012-09-14

    Suspected fragrance allergens were determined in cosmetic products using a combination of full evaporation-dynamic headspace (FEDHS) with selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional GC-MS. The full evaporation dynamic headspace approach allows the non-discriminating extraction and injection of both apolar and polar fragrance compounds, without contamination of the analytical system by high molecular weight non-volatile matrix compounds. The method can be applied to all classes of cosmetic samples, including water containing matrices such as shower gels or body creams. In combination with selectable (1)D/(2)D GC-MS, consisting of a dedicated heart-cutting GC-MS configuration using capillary flow technology (CFT) and low thermal mass GC (LTM-GC), a highly flexible and easy-to-use analytical solution is offered. Depending on the complexity of the perfume fraction, analyses can be performed in one-dimensional GC-MS mode or in heart-cutting two-dimensional GC-MS mode, without the need of hardware reconfiguration. The two-dimensional mode with independent temperature control of the first and second dimension column is especially useful to confirm the presence of detected allergen compounds when mass spectral deconvolution is not possible.

  3. Freeze-drying: an alternative method for the analysis of volatile organic compounds in the headspace of urine samples using solid phase micro-extraction coupled to gas chromatography - mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aggio, Raphael B M; Mayor, Arno; Coyle, Séamus; Reade, Sophie; Khalid, Tanzeela; Ratcliffe, Norman M; Probert, Chris S J

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be intermediates of metabolic pathways and their levels in biological samples may provide a better understanding about diseases in addition to potential methods for diagnosis. Headspace analysis of VOCs in urine samples using solid phase micro extraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is one of the most used techniques. However, it generally produces a limited profile of VOCs if applied to fresh urine. Sample preparation methods, such as addition of salt, base or acid, have been developed to improve the headspace-SPME-GC-MS analysis of VOCs in urine samples. These methods result in a richer profile of VOCs, however, they may also add potential contaminants to the urine samples, result in increased variability introduced by manually processing the samples and promote degradation of metabolites due to extreme pH levels. Here, we evaluated if freeze-drying can be considered an alternative sample preparation method for headspace-SPME-GC-MS analysis of urine samples. We collected urine from three volunteers and compared the performances of freeze-drying, addition of acid (HCl), addition of base (NaOH), addition of salt (NaCl), fresh urine and frozen urine when identifying and quantifying metabolites in 4 ml samples. Freeze-drying and addition of acid produced a significantly higher number of VOCs identified than any other method, with freeze-drying covering a slightly higher number of chemical classes, showing an improved repeatability and reducing siloxane impurities. In this work we compared the performance of sample preparation methods for the SPME-GC-MS analysis of urine samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the potential of freeze-dry as an alternative sample preparation method. Our results indicate that freeze-drying has potential to be used as an alternative method for the SPME-GC-MS analysis of urine samples. Additional studies using internal standard

  4. Development of a dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for on-site analysis of sulfur mustard degradation products in sediments.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, R; Nordlander, T; Östin, A

    2016-01-15

    Sampling teams performing work at sea in areas where chemical munitions may have been dumped require rapid and reliable analytical methods for verifying sulfur mustard leakage from suspected objects. Here we present such an on-site analysis method based on dynamic headspace GC-MS for analysis of five cyclic sulfur mustard degradation products that have previously been detected in sediments from chemical weapon dumping sites: 1,4-oxathiane, 1,3-dithiolane, 1,4-dithiane, 1,4,5-oxadithiephane, and 1,2,5-trithiephane. An experimental design involving authentic Baltic Sea sediments spiked with the target analytes was used to develop an optimized protocol for sample preparation, headspace extraction and analysis that afforded recoveries of up to 60-90%. The optimized method needs no organic solvents, uses only two grams of sediment on a dry weight basis and involves a unique sample presentation whereby sediment is spread uniformly as a thin layer inside the walls of a glass headspace vial. The method showed good linearity for analyte concentrations of 5-200 ng/g dw, good repeatability, and acceptable carry-over. The method's limits of detection for spiked sediment samples ranged from 2.5 to 11 μg/kg dw, with matrix interference being the main limiting factor. The instrumental detection limits were one to two orders of magnitude lower. Full-scan GC-MS analysis enabled the use of automated mass spectral deconvolution for rapid identification of target analytes. Using this approach, analytes could be identified in spiked sediment samples at concentrations down to 13-65 μg/kg dw. On-site validation experiments conducted aboard the research vessel R/V Oceania demonstrated the method's practical applicability, enabling the successful identification of four cyclic sulfur mustard degradation products at concentrations of 15-308μg/kg in sediments immediately after being collected near a wreck at the Bornholm Deep dumpsite in the Baltic Sea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  5. High-efficiency headspace sampling of volatile organic compounds in explosives using capillary microextraction of volatiles (CMV) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Fan, Wen; Almirall, José

    2014-03-01

    A novel geometry configuration based on sorbent-coated glass microfibers packed within a glass capillary is used to sample volatile organic compounds, dynamically, in the headspace of an open system or in a partially open system to achieve quantitative extraction of the available volatiles of explosives with negligible breakthrough. Air is sampled through the newly developed sorbent-packed 2 cm long, 2 mm diameter capillary microextraction of volatiles (CMV) and subsequently introduced into a commercially available thermal desorption probe fitted directly into a GC injection port. A sorbent coating surface area of ∼5 × 10(-2) m(2) or 5,000 times greater than that of a single solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber allows for fast (30 s), flow-through sampling of relatively large volumes using sampling flow rates of ∼1.5 L/min. A direct comparison of the new CMV extraction to a static (equilibrium) SPME extraction of the same headspace sample yields a 30 times improvement in sensitivity for the CMV when sampling nitroglycerine (NG), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), and diphenylamine (DPA) in a mixture containing a total mass of 500 ng of each analyte, when spiked into a liter-volume container. Calibration curves were established for all compounds studied, and the recovery was determined to be ∼1 % or better after only 1 min of sampling time. Quantitative analysis is also possible using this extraction technique when the sampling temperature, flow rate, and time are kept constant between calibration curves and the sample.

  6. A simple and automated method to determine macrocyclic musk fragrances in sewage sludge samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vallecillos, Laura; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) has shown to be a powerful technique to extract macrocyclic musk fragrances directly from sewage sludge. It avoids the need to use additional extraction/preconcentration techniques or clean-up procedure and facilitates the automation of the method. Thus, a simple and fully automated method based on HS-SPME and GC-MS has been developed which allows the determination of eight macrocyclic musk fragrances at ngg(-1) (d.w.) levels. The optimal HS-SPME conditions were achieved when a PDMS/DVB 65μm fibre was exposed for 45min in the headspace of 0.25g sewage sludge samples mixed with 0.5mL of water stirred at 750rpm at 80°C. Optimal desorption conditions were found to be 250°C for 3min. Method detection limits were found in the low pgg(-1) range between 10pgg(-1) (d.w.) and 25pgg(-1) (d.w.) depending on the target analytes. In addition, under optimized conditions, the method gave good levels of intra-day and inter-day repeatabilities in sewage sludge with relative standard deviations varying between 1% to 9% and 6% to 15% respectively (n=5, 1000pgg(-1) d.w.). The applicability of the method was tested with sewage sludge from three urban sewage treatment plants (STPs). The analysis revealed the presence of the macrocyclic musks studied in several samples, with concentrations ranging between below MQL (method quantification limit) and 0.89ngg(-1) (d.w.). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous determination of gasoline oxygenates and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene in water samples using headspace-programmed temperature vaporization-fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez Pavón, José Luis; del Nogal Sánchez, Miguel; Fernández Laespada, María Esther; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2007-12-14

    A sensitive method is presented for the fast analysis of seven fuel oxygenates (methanol, ethanol, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE)) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene (BTEX) in water samples. The applicability of a headspace (HS) autosampler in combination with a GC device equipped with a programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) and a MS detector is explored. The proposed method achieves a clear improvement in sensitivity with respect to conventional headspace methods due to the use of the PTV. Two different packed liners with materials of different trapping strengths (glass wool and Tenax-TA) were compared. The benefits of using Tenax-TA instead of glass wool as packed material for the measurement of the 11 compounds emerged as better signal-to-noise ratios and hence better detection limits. The proposed method is extremely sensitive. The limits of detection are of the order of ng/L for six of the compounds studied and of the order of microg/L for the rest, with the exception of the most polar and volatile compound: methanol. Precision (measured as the relative standard deviation for a level with an S/N ratio close to 3) was equal to or lower than 15% in all cases. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in natural matrixes (tap, river and sea water) and the results obtained can be considered highly satisfactory. The methodology has much lower detection limits than the concentration limits proposed in drinking water by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the European Union for compounds under regulation.

  8. Headspace solid-phase microextraction in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the rapid screening of organophosphorus insecticide residues in strawberries and cherries.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulou, Dimitra A; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2003-04-18

    A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) method in combination with GC-MS was used for the extraction and quantification of diazinon, fenitrothion, fenthion, parathion ethyl, bromophos methyl, bromophos ethyl and ethion. The method was developed using a 100-microm poly(dimethylsiloxane) fiber. The obtained results showed higher responses of the insecticides after addition of aliquots of water and solvent to the fruit samples. Calibration curves that were constructed for the analytes spiked into strawberry and cherry samples followed linear relationships with good correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.986). Linearity range was between 50 and 500 microg/kg and the precision was found to be lower than 15% when applying the optimized HS-SPME procedure to fruit samples. Limits of detection in both strawberry and cherry samples using GC-MS (selected ion monitoring mode) were below 13 microg/kg. Moreover, the HS-SPME method was applied to the analysis of fruit samples and compared with liquid-liquid extraction. Results obtained in this study were in good agreement with those obtained using liquid-liquid extraction demonstrating that the recommended procedure was a fast, accurate and stable sample pretreatment method obtaining good efficiency for the extraction of organophosporus insecticides from strawberries and cherries.

  9. A method to detect diphenylamine contamination of apple fruit and storages using headspace solid phase micro-extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Forney, Charles F; Jordan, Michael A

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of headspace concentrations of diphenylamine using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) was examined for its suitability to detect DPA contamination and off-gassing in apple (Malus domestica) fruit, storage rooms and storage materials. Four SPME fibre coatings including polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, 100 μm), PDMS/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB), Polyacrylate (PA) and PDMS 7 μm were evaluated. The average limits of detection and of quantification for head space DPA ranged from 0.13 to 0.72 μg L(-1) and 0.42 to 2.35 μg L(-1), respectively. Polyacrylate was identified to be the most suitable and compatible fibre for DPA analysis in apple samples, because of its high sensitivity to DPA and low fruit volatile interferences. SPME techniques were further applied to study contamination of DPA in apples, storage rooms and packaging materials. DPA was found in the air of storage rooms containing apples that were not treated with DPA. Wood and plastic bin material, bin liners, and foam insulation all adsorbed and off-gassed DPA and could be potential sources of contamination of untreated apples. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Miniscale Liquid-Liquid Extraction Coupled with Full Evaporation Dynamic Headspace Extraction for the Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with 4000-to-14 000-fold Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Liew, Christina Shu Min; Li, Xiao; Lee, Hian Kee

    2016-09-20

    A new sample preparation approach of combining a miniscale version of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), termed miniscale-LLE (msLLE), with automated full evaporation dynamic headspace extraction (FEDHS) was developed. Its applicability was demonstrated in the extraction of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene) from aqueous samples. In the first step, msLLE was conducted with 1.75 mL of n-hexane, and all of the extract was vaporized through a Tenax TA sorbent tube via a nitrogen gas flow, in the FEDHS step. Due to the stronger π-π interaction between the Tenax TA polymer and PAHs, only the latter, and not n-hexane, was adsorbed by the sorbent. This selectivity by the Tenax TA polymer allowed an effective concentration of PAHs while eliminating n-hexane by the FEDHS process. After that, thermal desorption was applied to the PAHs to channel them into a gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) system for analysis. Experimental parameters affecting msLLE (solvent volume and mixing duration) and FEDHS (temperature and duration) were optimized. The obtained results achieved low limits of detection (1.85-3.63 ng/L) with good linearity (r(2) > 0.9989) and high enrichment factors ranging from 4200 to 14 100. The optimized settings were applied to the analysis of canal water sampled from an industrial area and tap water, and this methodology was compared to stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE). This innovative combined extraction-concentration approach proved to be fast, effective, and efficient in determining low concentrations of PAHs in aqueous samples.

  11. Multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of 3-alkyl-2-methoxypyrazines in wine and must. A comparison of solid-phase extraction and headspace solid-phase extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Culleré, Laura; Escudero, Ana; Campo, Eva; Cacho, Juan; Ferreira, Vicente

    2009-05-01

    Two different strategies for the quantitative determination of 3-alkyl-2-methoxypyrazines in wine and must have been developed and validated. Comparison between both the techniques has been presented and the most adequate has been applied to the determination of these compounds in different samples of wine, made from several varieties of grapes, and also in different samples of must made from Cabernet Sauvignon grapes. Both the methods consisted of a dynamic headspace coupled with a solid-phase extraction (HS-SPE) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) directly from the sample, coupled with multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system (MDGC-MS). Both of them require resins LiChrolut EN, and analyte elution has been carried out with dichloromethane. The repeatability of both methodologies was evaluated at two concentration levels. The relative standard deviations (RSD%) were acceptable in every case, but smaller when working with HS-SPE. The recoveries obtained for the three analytes with the two methodologies were almost 100%, with the exception of IBMP, which had a recovery of only 70% with HS-SPE. The linearity was satisfactory with both methods for the range of occurrence of methoxypyrazines in wine and must. The limits of detection of the direct SPE technique were much lower than those of HS-SPE in every case. Direct SPE method detection limits ranged from 0.09 to 0.15 ng L(-1). The method based on direct SPE was chosen finally because it had better detection limits and was easier and quicker than the HS-SPE-based method. It has been applied to the determination of these components in 36 wine and 17 musts samples. The quantitative results suggest that the Spanish wines show meaningless amounts of these compounds. IBMP has been found just in between 1.9 and 15 ng L(-1).

  12. Integrated sampling and analysis unit for the determination of sexual pheromones in environmental air using fabric phase sorptive extraction and headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alcudia-León, M Carmen; Lucena, Rafael; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel; Kabir, Abuzar; Furton, Kenneth G

    2017-03-10

    This article presents a novel unit that integrates for the first time air sampling and preconcentration based on the use of fabric phase sorptive extraction principles. The determination of Tuta absoluta sexual pheromone traces in environmental air has been selected as analytical problem. For this aim, a novel laboratory-built unit made up of commercial brass elements as holder of the sol-gel coated fabric extracting phase has been designed and optimized. The performance of the integrated unit was evaluated analyzing environmental air sampled in tomato crops. The unit can work under sampling and analysis mode which eliminates any need for sorptive phase manipulation prior to instrumental analysis. In the sampling mode, the unit can be connected to a sampling pump to pass the air through the sorptive phase at a controlled flow-rate. In the analysis mode, it is placed in the gas chromatograph autosampler without any instrumental modification. It also diminishes the risk of cross contamination between sampling and analysis. The performance of the new unit has been evaluated using the main components of the sexual pheromone of Tuta absoluta [(3E,8Z,11Z)-tetradecatrien-1-yl acetate and (3E,8Z)-tetradecadien-1-yl acetate] as model analytes. The limits of detection for both compounds resulted to be 1.6μg and 0.8μg, respectively, while the precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) was better than 3.7%. Finally, the unit has been deployed in the field to analyze a number of real life samples, some of them were found positive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of volatile components in fresh, frozen, and freeze-dried Padrón-type peppers by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using dynamic headspace sampling and microwave desorption.

    PubMed

    Oruña-Concha, M J; López-Hernández, J; Simal-Lozano, J A; Simal-Gándara, J; González-Castro, M J; de la Cruz García, C

    1998-12-01

    "Padrón-type" peppers are a small variety of Capsicum annuum cultivated mainly in Galicia, Spain. To compare the effects of freezing and freeze-drying on the volatile components of Padrón-type peppers, preserved samples are analyzed by means of dynamic headspace sampling on an adsorbent followed by microwave desorption into a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometric detector. Sixty-five compounds are identified, including hydrocarbons, terpenes, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, esters, pyrroles, pyrazines, and sulfurous compounds. Fresh whole, homogenized, and freeze-dried peppers have characteristic volatile-component profiles, whereas frozen peppers have a highly variable volatile-component profile.

  14. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  15. Specialized Gas Chromatography--Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gochman, Nathan; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the basic design and characteristics of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry systems used in clinical chemistry. A comparison of three specific systems: the Vitek Olfax IIA, Hewlett-Packard HP5992, and Du Pont DP-102 are included. (BB)

  16. Screening of Brazilian fruit aromas using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Augusto, F; Valente, A L; dos Santos Tada, E; Rivellino, S R

    2000-03-17

    Manual headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for the qualitative analysis of the aromas of four native Brazilian fruits: cupuassu (Theobroma grandiflorum, Spreng.), cajá (Spondias lutea. L.), siriguela (Spondias purpurea, L.) and graviola (Anona reticulata, L). Industrialized pulps of these fruits were used as samples, and extractions with SPME fibers coated with polydimethylsiloxane, polyacrylate, Carbowax and Carboxen were carried out. The analytes identified included several alcohols, esters, carbonyl compounds and terpernoids. The highest amounts extracted, evaluated from the sum of peak areas, were achieved using the Carboxen fiber.

  17. Fast analysis of volatile components of Achillea tenuifolia Lam with microwave distillation followed by headspace single-drop microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Piryaei, Marzieh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of microwaves on the amount of volatile compounds Achillea tenuifolia Lam with two methods, headspace single-drop microextraction and microwave-assisted headspace single-drop microextraction (MA-SDME), for the analysis of essential oil. Solvent selection, solvent volume, microwave power, irradiation time and sample mass were optimised by the simplex method.

  18. Characterization of sulfur compounds in whisky by full evaporation dynamic headspace and selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with simultaneous element-specific detection.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; MacNamara, Kevin

    2012-12-28

    A method is described for characterization of sulfur compounds in unaged and aged whisky. The method is based on full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) of 100 μL of whisky samples followed by selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) retention-time-locked (RTL) gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) with simultaneous element-specific detection using a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD) and a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). Sequential heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to identify each individual sulfur compound in the unaged whisky. Twenty sulfur compounds were positively identified by a MS library search, linear retention indices (LRI), and formula identification using MS calibration software. Additionally eight formulas were also identified for unknown sulfur compounds. Simultaneous heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to produce the (2)D RTL GC-SCD chromatograms for principal component analysis. PCA of the (2)D RTL GC-SCD data clearly demonstrated the difference between unaged and aged whisky, as well as two different whisky samples. Fourteen sulfur compounds could be characterized as key sulfur compounds responsible for the changes in the aging step and/or the difference between two kinds of whisky samples. The determined values of the key sulfur compounds were in the range of 0.3-210 ng mL(-1) (RSD: 0.37-12%, n=3).

  19. Determination of volatile organic compounds in recycled polyethylene terephthalate and high-density polyethylene by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry to evaluate the efficiency of recycling processes.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Camila; Pezo, Davinson; Freire, Maria Teresa de Alvarenga; Nerín, Cristina; Reyes, Felix Guillermo Reyes

    2011-03-11

    A method for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in recycled polyethylene terephthalate and high-density polyethylene using headspace sampling by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry detection is presented. This method was used to evaluate the efficiency of cleaning processes for VOC removal from recycled PET. In addition, the method was also employed to evaluate the level of VOC contamination in multilayer packaging material containing recycled HDPE material. The optimisation of the extraction procedure for volatile compounds was performed and the best extraction conditions were found using a 75 μm carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fibre for 20 min at 60 °C. The validation parameters for the established method were linear range, linearity, sensitivity, precision (repeatability), accuracy (recovery) and detection and quantification limits. The results indicated that the method could easily be used in quality control for the production of recycled PET and HDPE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reliable characterization of coffee bean aroma profiles by automated headspace solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with the support of a dual-filter mass spectra library.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Luigi; Costa, Rosaria; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Dugo, Paola; Lo Presti, Maria; Festa, Saverio; Fazio, Alessia; Dugo, Giovanni

    2005-06-01

    This investigation is based on the automated solid phase microextraction GC-MS analysis of the volatile fraction of a variety of coffee bean matrices. Volatile analytes were extracted by headspace (HS)-SPME which was achieved with the support of automated instrumentation. The research was directed towards various important aspects relating to coffee aroma analysis: monitoring of the volatile fraction formation during roasting; chromatographic differentiation of the two main coffee species (Arabica and Robusta) and of a single species from different geographical origins; evaluation of the influence of specific industrial treatments prior to roasting. Reliable peak assignment was carried out through the use of a recently laboratory-constructed "flavour and fragrance" library and a dual-filter MS spectral search procedure. Further emphasis was placed on the automated SPME instrumentation and on its ability to supply highly repeatable chromatographic data.

  1. Rapid method for the simultaneous determination of DDTs and PCBs in hair of children by headspace solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HSSPME/GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Barbounis, Emmanouil G; Kavvalakis, Matthaios P; Vakonaki, Elena; Renieri, Elisavet; Vardavas, Alexander I; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a rapid and cost efficient hair extraction method, using the headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) technique for the simultaneous determination and biomonitoring of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane) (DDT) and its isomers/metabolites and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in hair samples. A total of 72 head hair samples were collected from children living in urban and rural regions of the island of Crete. Two hundred milligrams of hair were digested under alkaline conditions and thermostated for 30 min at 90°C while a 65 µm PDMS/DVB fibre was exposed into the headspace of the vial. Analytical parameters of the method (time of incubation, agitation speed, recovery, precision, accuracy, carry over, matrix effect, linearity, and selectivity) were examined. Recoveries of the DDTs in the spiked hair samples were calculated from 42.3% for opDDD to 87.1% for opDDE, while recoveries for PCB congeners were from 52.6% for PCB138 to 96.6 % for PCB28. The method was applied for the analysis of authentic hair samples. Significant differences (p=0.001) of the burden to total DDTs (sumDDTs) as well as of the frequencies of detection of positive samples (p=0.020) were observed between the examined regions. Moreover, significant differences in the detected concentrations of PCB congeners were observed for PCB52 (p<0.001) and PCB28 (p=0.017) as well for their prevalence between urban and rural regions. Application of HSSPME for the biomonitoring of DDTs and PCBs biomarkers in hair was tested and successfully applied to the analysis of spiked and authentic hair samples. HSSPME was found to be substantially simpler and faster procedure than previous reported sample treatment procedures.

  2. Automated headspace-solid-phase micro extraction-retention time locked-isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of organotin compounds in water and sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Devosa, Christophe; Vliegen, Maarten; Willaert, Bart; David, Frank; Moens, Luc; Sandra, Pat

    2005-06-24

    An automated method for the simultaneous determination of six important organotin compounds namely monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), monophenyltin (MPhT), diphenyltin (DPhT) and triphenyltin (TPhT) in water and sediment samples is described. The method is based on derivatization with sodium tetraethylborate followed by automated headspace-solid-phase micro extraction (SPME) combined with GC-MS under retention time locked (RTL) conditions. Home-synthesized deuterated organotin analogues were used as internal standards. Two high abundant fragment ions corresponding to the main tin isotopes Sn118 and Sn120 were chosen; one for quantification and one as qualifier ion. The method was validated and excellent figures of merit were obtained. Limits of quantification (LOQs) are from 1.3 to 15 ng l(-1) (ppt) for water samples and from 1.0 to 6.3 microg kg(-1) (ppb) for sediment samples. Accuracy for sediment samples was tested on spiked real-life sediment samples and on a reference PACS-2 marine harbor sediment. The developed method was used in a case-study at the harbor of Antwerp where sediment samples in different areas were taken and subsequently screened for TBT contamination. Concentrations ranged from 15 microg kg(-1) in the port of Antwerp up to 43 mg kg(-1) near a ship repair unit.

  3. [Analytical method and comparison for static and dynamic headspace gas chromatography of anisole in water].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Qian, Jie-feng; Liu, Lan-xia; Zhao, Hui-qin

    2013-01-01

    To establish and compare the method of static headspace gas chromatography hydrogen flame detector (static headspace method) and purge and trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (dynamic headspace method) of anisole in water. Nitrogen gas was used as carrier gas in the static headspace method, 5 g NaCl as matrix modifier was added into 10 ml water. The sample was balanced with high speed vibration at 75°C for 30 min, and anisole was detected by gas chromatography and quantified with external standard. Helium was used as carrier gas in dynamic headspace method, 5.0 ml water and 0.004 mg/L internal standard fluorobenzene was purged into the purge and trap apparatus. After purging, trapping and desorption, anisole was detected by the gas chromatography-mass spectrograph, confirmed by the retention time and comparison of mass-spectrogram in spectrum library and quantified with internal standard. The repeatability and sensitivity of assay were evaluated. A good linear range for anisole was observed in static headspace gas chromatography and dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, within the range of 10 - 500 µg/L and 0.5 - 60.0 µg/L respectively. The linear regression equation was Y = 782.150X + 1.3446 and Y = 0.0358X - 0.0209 respectively, both the correlation coefficient ≥ 0.999. The detection limit (LOD) were 0.002 µg/L and 0.110 µg/L, the lower limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.006 µg/L and 0.350 µg/L, the relative standard deviation (RSD) were 1.8% - 2.3% and 2.0% - 3.4%, and the spiking recovery were 93% - 101% and 96% - 101% respectively. The methods of static headspace gas chromatography and dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry are simple and can measure anisole in water quickly, sensitively and accurately.

  4. Field gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast analysis.

    PubMed

    Makas, Alexei L; Troshkov, Mikhail L

    2004-02-05

    The objective of this presentation is to demonstrate the original device and procedure for fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of gaseous and liquid samples and to discuss its features and capabilities. The concept was developed in order to expand the range of compounds suitable for GC separation and to reduce the time of analysis. Field GC-MS, consisting of original "concentrator-thermodesorber" (CTD) unit, multiple module GC system and compact magnetic mass spectrometer with powerful two-stage vacuum system and multicollector ion detector, is represented. The whole weight of the device is 90 kg. Power consumption is 250 W. The device and analytical procedures allow high speed screening of toxic substances in air and extracts within 100 s per sample. The examples of applications are described, including fast screening of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in air at low ppt level at the rate 1 sample/min.

  5. Estimation of brassylic acid by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed J. Nasrullah, Erica N. Pfarr, Pooja Thapliyal, Nicholas S. Dusek, Kristofer L. Schiele, Christy Gallagher-Lein, and James A. Bahr

    2010-10-29

    The main focus of this work is to estimate Brassylic Acid (BA) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). BA is a product obtained from the oxidative cleavage of Erucic Acid (EA). BA has various applications for making nylons and high performance polymers. BA is a 13 carbon compound with two carboxylic acid functional groups at the terminal end. BA has a long hydrocarbon chain that makes the molecule less sensitive to some of the characterization techniques. Although BA can be characterized by NMR, both the starting material (EA) and products BA and nonanoic acid (NA) have peaks at similar {delta}, ppm values. Hence it becomes difficult for the quick estimation of BA during its synthesis.

  6. Quantification of antidepressants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Winecker, Ruth E

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressants are of great interest to clinical and forensic toxicologists as they are frequently used in suicidal gestures; they can be the source of drug interactions and some have narrow therapeutic indices making the potential for toxicity more likely. There are five categories of antidepressants based on function and/or structure. These are monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), cyclic antidepressants including tricyclic and tetracyclic compounds (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI), and atypical compounds. This method is designed to detect the presence of antidepressant drugs in blood/serum, urine, and tissue specimens using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) following liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and identified by relative retention times and mass spectra.

  7. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reichel, W L; Prouty, R M; Gay, M L

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  8. Identification of polychlorinated styrene compounds in heron tissues by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Prouty, R.M.; Gay, M.L.

    1977-01-01

    Unknown compounds detected in Ardea herodias tissues are identified by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as residues of octachlorostyrene. Heptachlorostyrene and hexachlorostyrene were tentatively identified.

  9. Development of a candidate reference method for the simultaneous quantitation of the boar taint compounds androstenone, 3α-androstenol, 3β-androstenol, skatole, and indole in pig fat by means of stable isotope dilution analysis-headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jochen; Elsinghorst, Paul W; Bücking, Mark; Tholen, Ernst; Petersen, Brigitte; Wüst, Matthias

    2011-09-01

    The steroidal pig pheromones androstenone (5α-androst-16-en-3-one), 3α-androstenol (5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol), and 3β-androstenol (5α-androst-16-en-3β-ol) as well as the heterocyclic aromatic amines skatole and indole, originating from microbial degradation of tryptophan in the intestine of pigs, are frequently recognized as the major compounds responsible for boar taint. A new procedure, applying stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) and headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS) for the simultaneous quantitation of these boar taint compounds in pig fat was developed and validated. The deuterated compounds androstenone-d(3), 3β-androstenol-d(3), skatole-d(3), and indole-d(6) were synthesized and successfully employed as internal standards for SIDA. The new procedure is characterized by a fast, simple, and economic sample preparation: methanolic extraction of the melted fat followed by a freezing and an evaporation step allows for extraction and enrichment of all five analytes. Additional time-consuming cleanup steps were not necessary, as HS-SPME sampling overcomes fat-associated injector and column contamination. The method has been validated by determining intra- and interday precision and accuracy as well as the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ). Additionally, a cross-validation for androstenone, skatole, and indole was carried out comparing the results of 25 back fat samples obtained simultaneously by the new SIDA-HS-SPME-GC/MS procedure with those obtained in separate GC/MS and high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) measurements. The cross-validation revealed comparable results and confirms the feasibility of the new SIDA-HS-SPME-GC/MS procedure.

  10. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the determination of 5alpha-androst-2-en-17-one and -17beta-ol in the female Asian elephant: application for reproductive monitoring and prediction of parturition.

    PubMed

    Dehnhard, M; Hatt, J-M; Eulenberger, K; Ochs, A; Strauss, G

    2003-02-01

    Asian elephants are not self-sustaining in captivity. The main reasons for this phenomenon are a low birth rate, an aging population, and poor calf-rearing. Therefore, it is essential that reproductive rates had to be improved and there is need for rapid quantitative measures to monitor reproductive functions focussing on estrous detection and the prediction of the period of parturition. The objective of this study was to develop a method which combines headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for analyses of 5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-ol and -17-one to prognose estrous and to predict the period of parturition. SPME was carried out with a CTC Combi Pal system. The course of the luteal phase-specific substance 5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-ol and -17-one followed a cyclic pattern in which the follicular and luteal phases could be clearly distinguished (mean estrous cycle length, 15+/-1.4 weeks). Based on daily urine samples, estrous prognosis might be possibly based on the initial 5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-o1 increase at the end of the follicular phase. Parturition prognosis was performed in three elephant cows based on the 5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-o1 drop to baseline levels 5-4 days prior parturition. Experiments revealed that 5alpha-androst-3alpha-ol-17-one and probably 5alpha-androst-3alpha-ol-17beta-ol are generated from sulfate conjugates by a thermal process.

  11. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of biofluids and extracts.

    PubMed

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M; Al-Talla, Zeyad A; Yang, Yang; Kharbatia, Najeh M

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been widely used in metabonomics analyses of biofluid samples. Biofluids provide a wealth of information about the metabolism of the whole body and from multiple regions of the body that can be used to study general health status and organ function. Blood serum and blood plasma, for example, can provide a comprehensive picture of the whole body, while urine can be used to monitor the function of the kidneys, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) will provide information about the status of the brain and central nervous system (CNS). Different methods have been developed for the extraction of metabolites from biofluids, these ranging from solvent extracts, acids, heat denaturation, and filtration. These methods vary widely in terms of efficiency of protein removal and in the number of metabolites extracted. Consequently, for all biofluid-based metabonomics studies, it is vital to optimize and standardize all steps of sample preparation, including initial extraction of metabolites. In this chapter, recommendations are made of the optimum experimental conditions for biofluid samples for GC-MS, with a particular focus on blood serum and plasma samples.

  12. Glass bottle sampling solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry for breath analysis of drug metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Niu, Wenqi; Zou, Xue; Shen, Chengyin; Xia, Lei; Huang, Chaoqun; Wang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2017-05-05

    Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach which may be applied to disease diagnosis and pharmacokinetic study. In the case of offline analysis, the exhaled gas needs to be collected and the sampling bag is often used as the storage vessel. However, the sampling bag usually releases some extra compounds, which may interfere with the result of the breath test. In this study, a novel breath sampling glass bottle was developed with a syringe needle sampling port for solid phase microextraction (SPME). Such a glass bottle scarcely liberates compounds and can be used to collect exhaled gas for ensuing analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The glass bottle sampling SPME-GC-MS analysis was carried out to investigate the breath metabolites of myrtol, a multicompound drug normally used in the treatment of bronchitis and sinusitis. Four compounds, α-pinene, 2,3-dehydro-1,8-cineole, d-limonene and 1,8-cineole were found in the exhaled breath of all eight volunteers who had taken the myrtol. While for other ten subjects who had not used the myrtol, these compounds were undetectable. In the SPME-GC-MS analysis of the headspace of myrtol, three compounds were detected including α-pinene, d-limonene and 1,8-cineole. Comparing the results of breath and headspace analysis, it indicates that 2,3-dehydro-1,8-cineole in the breath is the metabolite of 1,8-cineole. It is the first time that this metabolite was identified in human breath. The study demonstrates that the glass bottle sampling SPME-GC-MS method is applicable to exhaled gas analysis including breath metabolites investigation of drugs like myrtol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of phosphine residues in stored products and processed foods.

    PubMed

    Norman, K N; Leonard, K

    2000-09-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was used for the quantitative confirmation of phosphine residues in stored products and processed foods. An established extraction technique was utilized for the preparation of headspace samples, which were analyzed by GC-MS and gas chromatography-nitrogen-phosphorus detection (GC-NPD). Wheat, oats, maize, white rice, brown rice, cornflakes, tortilla cornchips, groundnuts, and raisins were validated, showing excellent agreement between detectors when spiked at levels equivalent to 0.001 and 0.01 mg/kg phosphine and for samples containing incurred residues. The GC-MS method was reproducible and accurate when compared to the GC-NPD method and allowed five samples to be quantified in a working day. Subambient GC-MS oven temperatures were most suitable for phosphine residues ranging from 0.001 to 0.005 mg/kg, and a GC oven temperature of 100 degrees C was appropriate for residues >0.005 mg/kg. The method was sufficiently robust to be evaluated for other similar commodities as the need arises.

  14. Classification of natural resins by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using chemometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Rhourrhi-Frih, B; West, C; Pasquier, L; André, P; Chaimbault, P; Lafosse, M

    2012-09-21

    Twenty-six resins from six botanical sources belonging to the class Magnoliopsida were compared based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry data. The extracts were analysed by GC after silylation and by reversed phase LC combined with atmospheric pressure photoionisation (APPI) mass spectrometry. The chromatograms were re-organized in data matrices, where each sample was represented by a single column comprising 2755 observations (intensity, time, m/z) in GC-MS and 360 observations in LC-MS. A simple comparison of resin fingerprints was attempted by organizing data according to a three dimensional bubble chart (retention time against m/z where each point was a bubble which size represented the ion intensity) where it is possible to easily superimpose the fingerprints. Thus the common and different species can be easily observed enabling to classify the resins. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on characteristics of GC-MS and LC-MS profiles affords a complete description of the classes of the resins and shows that 26 resins are divided into five main clusters Commiphora mukul, Daniella oliveri, Gardenia gummifera, Canarium madagascariensis, Boswellia dalzielii and Boswellia serrata, respectively. In conclusion, the proposed method has been applied to three other resinous samples from the Burseraceae family to evaluate their alteration state.

  15. Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell-Baguley, Brittany; Hipp, Rachael E.; Morgan, Neal R.; Morgan, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment in which gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used for latent fingerprint extraction and analysis on glass beads or glass slides is conducted. The results determine that the fingerprint residues are gender dependent.

  16. Chemical Composition of Latent Fingerprints by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell-Baguley, Brittany; Hipp, Rachael E.; Morgan, Neal R.; Morgan, Stephen L.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment in which gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is used for latent fingerprint extraction and analysis on glass beads or glass slides is conducted. The results determine that the fingerprint residues are gender dependent.

  17. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  18. VACUUM DISTILLATION COUPLED WITH GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure is presented that uses a vacuum distillation/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system for analysis of problematic matrices of volatile organic compounds. The procedure compensates for matrix effects and provides both analytical results and confidence intervals from...

  19. Determination of terpenes in tequila by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peña-Alvarez, Araceli; Capella, Santiago; Juárez, Rocío; Labastida, Carmen

    2006-11-17

    Solid phase microextraction and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for the determination of seven terpenes in tequila. The method was selected based on the following parameters: coating selection (PA, PDMS, CW/DVB, and PDMS/DVB), extraction temperature, addition of salt, and extraction time profile. The extraction conditions were: PDMS/DVB fiber, Headspace, 100% NaCl, 25 degrees C extraction temperature, 30 min extraction time and stirring at 1200 rpm. The calibration curves (50-1000 ng/ml) for the terpenes followed linear relationships with correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.99, except for trans,trans-farnesol (r = 0.98). RSD values were smaller than 10% confirmed that the technique was precise. Samples from 18 different trade brands of "Aged" tequila analyzed with the developed method showed the same terpenes in different concentrations. The analytical procedure used is selective, robust (more than 100 analyses with the same fiber), fast and of low-cost.

  20. Solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of fragrance allergens in baby bathwater.

    PubMed

    Lamas, J Pablo; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Llompart, Maria

    2009-07-01

    A method based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized for the determination of fragrance allergens in water samples. This is the first study devoted to this family of cosmetic ingredients performed by SPME. The influence of parameters such as fibre coating, extraction and desorption temperatures, salting-out effect and sampling mode on the extraction efficiency has been studied by means of a mixed-level factorial design, which allowed the study of the main effects as well as two-factor interactions. Excluding desorption temperature, the other parameters were, in general, very important for the achievement of high response. The final procedure was based on headspace sampling at 100 degrees C, using polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene fibres. The method showed good linearity and precision for all compounds, with detection limits ranging from 0.001 to 0.3 ng mL(-1). Reliability was demonstrated through the evaluation of the recoveries in different real water samples, including baby bathwater and swimming pool water. The absence of matrix effects allowed the use of external standard calibration to quantify the target compounds in the samples. The proposed procedure was applied to the determination of allergens in several real samples. All the target compounds were found in the samples, and, in some cases, at quite high concentrations. The presence and the levels of these chemicals in baby bathwater should be a matter of concern.

  1. Determination of ink photoinitiators in packaged beverages by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sagratini, Gianni; Caprioli, Giovanni; Cristalli, Gloria; Giardiná, Dario; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Volpini, Rosaria; Zuo, Yanting; Vittori, Sauro

    2008-06-20

    A new analytical method, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) techniques, was developed for the determination in packaged food beverages of five ink photoinitiator residues: 2-isopropylthioxanthone (ITX), benzophenone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EHDAB), 1-hydroxycyclohexyl-1-phenyl ketone (IRGACURE 184) and ethyl-4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB). Samples were extracted from selected beverages (milk, fruit juices and wine) and relative packagings, using n-hexane and dichloromethane, respectively, purified on solid-phase extraction (SPE) silica gel cartridges, and then analyzed in GC/MS and LC/MS. The recovery percentages, obtained spiking the beverage samples at concentrations of 4 and 10 microgl(-1) with a standard mixture of photoinitiators, were in the range 42-108% (milk), 50-84% (wine), and 48-109% (fruit juices). The repeatability of the method was assessed in all cases by the % of correlation value, that was lower than 19%. The lowest limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs), obtained using GC/MS, were in the range 0.2-1 and 1-5 microgl(-1), respectively. The method was applied to the analysis of forty packaged food beverages (milk, fruit juices and wine samples). The most significant contamination was that of benzophenone, found in all samples in a concentration range of 5-217mugl(-1). Its presence was confirmed by an LC/Atmospheric-Pressure PhotoIonization (APPI)/MS/MS analysis. The photoinitiator (EHDAB) was found in eleven out of forty beverages in a concentration range of 0.13-0.8 microgl(-1). Less important was the ITX contamination, found in three out of forty samples in a range 0.2-0.24 microgl(-1). The work proposes a new method to analyze ink photoinitiator residues in polycoupled carton packaging and in contained food beverages.

  2. Steroid profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for adrenal diseases.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jeffrey G; Matthew, Susan; Auchus, Richard J

    2011-12-01

    The ability to measure steroid hormone concentrations in blood and urine specimens is central to the diagnosis and proper treatment of adrenal diseases. The traditional approach has been to assay each steroid hormone, precursor, or metabolite using individual aliquots of serum, each with a separate immunoassay. For complex diseases, such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia and adrenocortical cancer, in which the assay of several steroids is essential for management, this approach is time consuming and costly, in addition to using large amounts of serum. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry profiling of steroid metabolites in urine has been employed for many years but only in a small number of specialized laboratories and suffers from slow throughput. The advent of commercial high-performance liquid chromatography instruments coupled to tandem mass spectrometers offers the potential for medium- to high-throughput profiling of serum steroids using small quantities of sample. Here, we review the physical principles of mass spectrometry, the instrumentation used for these techniques, the terminology used in this field and applications to steroid analysis.

  3. A fatal case of trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11) poisoning. Tissue distribution study by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groppi, A; Polettini, A; Lunetta, P; Achille, G; Montagna, M

    1994-05-01

    A case of lethal poisoning due to trichlorofluoromethane (FC11) inhalation is described. The fluorocarbon was determined in biological tissues by headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. FC11 was detected in all the examined tissues, with decreasing levels in heart, lung, brain, liver, blood, kidney, and spleen. The highest concentration measured in heart could be related to the mode of toxic action of fluorocarbons postulated by many authors, characterized by the sensitization of the myocardium to the catecholamines producing arrhythmia and cardiac arrest. Nevertheless the aspecific picture of the anatomo-pathological and histological findings does not exclude that the described accidental fatality may have been caused by the combination of direct from toxicity with hypoxemic asphyxiation, due to the saturation of the atmosphere by FC11 in the closed environment in which the intoxication occurred.

  4. Analysis of acetylene in blood and urine using cryogenic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Hara, Kenji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Kageura, Mitsuyoshi; Takamoto, Mutsuo; Matsusue, Aya; Sugimura, Tomoko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2009-09-01

    A method for quantitative analysis of acetylene in blood and urine samples was investigated. Using cryogenic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), acetylene was measured with isobutane as the internal standard in the headspace method, which revealed a linear response over the entire composite range with an excellent correlation coefficient, both in blood (R = 0.9968, range = 5.39-43.1 microg/ml) and urine (R = 0.9972, range = 2.16-10.8 microg/ml). The coefficients of variation (CV) for blood ranged from 2.62 to 11.6% for intra-day and 4.55 to 10.4% for inter-day. The CV for urine ranged from 2.38 to 3.10% for intra-day and 4.83 to 11.0% for inter-day. The recovery rate as an index of accuracy ranged from 83 to 111%. The present method showed good reliability, and is also simple and rapid. In actual samples from a charred cadaver due to acetylene explosion, the measured concentrations of acetylene by this method were 21.5 microg/ml for femoral vein blood, 17.9 microg/ml for right atrial blood, 25.5 microg/ml for left atrial blood and 7.49 microg/ml for urine. Quantification of acetylene provides important information, because the acetylene concentration is a vital reaction or sign. For example, when acetylene is filled in a closed space and then explodes, in antemortem explosion, the blood acetylene concentration of the cadaver might be significant. On the other hand, in postmortem explosion, acetylene is not detected in blood. Furthermore, when several victims are involved in one explosion, comparison of the sample concentrations can also provide useful information to establish the conditions at the accident scene; therefore, the present method is useful in forensics.

  5. Some recent developments in headspace gas chromatography

    Treesearch

    J.Y. Zhu; X.-S. Chai

    2005-01-01

    In this study, recent developments in headspace gas chromatography (HSGC) are briefly reviewed. Several novel HSGC techniques developed recently are presented in detail. These techniques were developed using the unique characteristics of the headspace sampling process implemented in commercial HSGC systems and therefore can be easily applied in laboratory and...

  6. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

  7. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  8. DEVELOPMENTS IN DIRECT THERMAL EXTRACTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY OF FINE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This examines thermal extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE/GC/MS) applied to aerosols collected on filters. Several different TE/GC/MS systems as a group have speciated hundreds of individual organic constituents in ambient fine aerosols. Molecular marker source ap...

  9. Identification of Synthetic Polymers and Copolymers by Analytical Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An experiment for the identification of synthetic polymers and copolymers by analytical pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) was developed and performed in the polymer analysis courses for third-year undergraduate students of chemistry with material sciences, and for first-year postgraduate students of polymer sciences. In…

  10. Incorporation of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry into the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarikos, Dimitrios G.; Patel, Sagir; Lister, Andrew; Razeghifard, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical tool for detection, identification, and quantification of many volatile organic compounds. However, many colleges and universities have not fully incorporated this technique into undergraduate teaching laboratories despite its wide application and ease of use in organic…

  11. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of extractives of naturally durable wood

    Treesearch

    G.T. Kirker; A.B. Blodgett; S.T. Lebow; C.A. Clausen

    2011-01-01

    A preliminary study to evaluate naturally durable wood species in an above ground field trial using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) detected differences in fatty acid extractives between species and within the same species over time. Fatty acids were extracted with chloroform: methanol mixture then methylated with sodium methoxide and fractionated using...

  12. Examination of the enantiomeric distribution of certain monoterpene hydrocarbons in selected essential oils by automated solid-phase microextraction-chiral gas chromatography-mass selective detection.

    PubMed

    Coleman, W M; Lawrence, B M

    2000-03-01

    A viable approach for the determination of sources of essential oils based on automatic injection solid-phase microextraction-chiral-gas chromatography-mass selective detection is demonstrated. With no sample preparation, it is shown that the source of essential oils such as peppermint, spearmint, and rosemary can be easily distinguished. Short fiber exposure times of approximately 6 s to the headspace above submicroliter quantities of the selected oils are all that is required to obtain both the required sensitivity and resolution to afford analyses with excellent reproducibilities (relative standard deviation values consistently less than 5.0%).

  13. Chemical Discrimination in Turbulent Gas Mixtures with MOX Sensors Validated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance. PMID:25325339

  14. Chemical discrimination in turbulent gas mixtures with MOX sensors validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-10-16

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance.

  15. Determination of Dihydroqinghaosu in Blood by Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-15

    capillary the therapeutic range, our laboratory sought to develop new column gas chromatography/mass spectrometry ( GCMS ) specific and sensitive methodologies...paper, the results on the development and validation of packed for pharmacoklneUc an metabolism studies In animals. and capillary column gas...respectively. Petroleum ether washave been treated with QHS or its derivatives in China with purchased from Mallinckrodt, Inc. (Paris, KY), and ethyl acetate

  16. [Analysis of cracking gas compressor fouling by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yunfeng; Fang, Fei; Wei, Tao; Liu, Shuqing; Jiang, Guangshen; Cai, Jun

    2013-06-01

    The fouling from the different sections of the cracked gas compressor in Daqing Petrochemical Corporation was analyzed by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py/GC-MS). All the samples were cracked in RJ-1 tube furnace cracker at the cracking temperature of 500 degrees C, and separated with a 60 m DB-1 capillary column. An electron impact ionization (EI) source was used with the ionizing voltage of 70 eV. The results showed the formation of fouling was closely related with cyclopentadiene which accounted for about 50% of the cracking products. Other components detected were 1-butylene, propylene, methane and n-butane. This Py/GC-MS method can be used as an effective approach to analyze the causes of fouling in the petrochemical plants.

  17. Isotope Ratio Monitoring Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (IRM-GCMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, S. A.; Studley, A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    On Earth, the C-13 content of organic compounds is depleted by roughly 13 to 23 permil from atmospheric carbon dioxide. This difference is largely due to isotope effects associated with the fixation of inorganic carbon by photosynthetic organisms. If life once existed on Mars, then it is reasonable to expect to observe a similar fractionation. Although the strongly oxidizing conditions on the surface of Mars make preservation of ancient organic material unlikely, carbon-isotope evidence for the existence of life on Mars may still be preserved. Carbon depleted in C-13 could be preserved either in organic compounds within buried sediments, or in carbonate minerals produced by the oxidation of organic material. A technique is introduced for rapid and precise measurement of the C-13 contents of individual organic compounds. A gas chromatograph is coupled to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer through a combustion interface, enabling on-line isotopic analysis of isolated compounds. The isotope ratios are determined by integration of ion currents over the course of each chromatographic peak. Software incorporates automatic peak determination, corrections for background, and deconvolution of overlapped peaks. Overall performance of the instrument was evaluated by the analysis of a mixture of high purity n-alkanes of know isotopic composition. Isotopic values measured via IRM-GCMS averaged withing 0.55 permil of their conventionally measured values.

  18. Study of the microbiodegradation of terpenoid resin-based varnishes from easel painting using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Doménech-Carbó, María Teresa; Osete-Cortina, Laura; de la Cruz Cañizares, Juana; Bolívar-Galiano, Fernando; Romero-Noguera, Julio; Fernández-Vivas, María Antonia; Martín-Sánchez, Inés

    2006-08-01

    The alterations produced by microbiological attack on terpenoid resin-based varnishes from panel and canvas paintings have been evaluated using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The proposed methods include the on-line derivatisation of drying oils and diterpenoid resins using hexamethyldisilazane during pyrolysis and the application of methyl chloroformate as a derivatisation reagent for triterpenoid resins in GC-MS. Two types of specimens, consisting of model oil medium prepared from linseed oil and model spirit varnishes prepared from colophony and mastic resins dissolved in turpentine, have been used as reference materials. For a series of specimens upon which different genera of bacteria and fungi were inoculated and encouraged to grow, analyses indicated that no mechanisms that commonly occur during the attack of enzymes on drying oils and terpenoid biodegraders were observed to occur in the oil medium and varnishes studied. Thus, the degradation pathways observed in the performed trials usually occur as consequence of natural ageing. Specific trials consisting of the application of biocides to uninoculated colophony varnish resulted in the identification of processes that produce undesirable degradation of the varnish due to interactions between the biocide and the varnish components. Finally, the studied biocides--Biotin, New-Des and Nipagine--generally exhibited good inhibiting effects on the microorganisms studied, although some interesting differences were found between them regarding the application method and type of biocide.

  19. Quantification of carbonate by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine

    2010-10-01

    Carbon dioxide and carbonates are widely distributed in nature, are constituents of inorganic and organic matter, and are essential in vegetable and animal organisms. CO(2) is the principal greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. In human blood, CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) is an important buffering system. Quantification of bicarbonate and carbonate in inorganic and organic matter and in biological fluids such as blood or blood plasma by means of the GC-MS technology has been impossible so far, presumably because of the lack of suitable derivatization reactions to produce volatile and thermally stable derivatives. Here, a novel derivatization reaction is described for carbonate that allows for its quantification in aqueous alkaline solutions and alkalinized plasma and urine. Carbonate in acetonic solutions of these matrices (1:4 v/v) and added (13)C-labeled carbonate for use as the internal standard were heated in the presence of the derivatization agent pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) bromide for 60 min and 50 °C. Investigations with (12)CO(3)(2-), (13)CO(3)(2-), (CH(3))(2)CO, and (CD(3))(2)CO in alkaline solutions and GC-MS and GC-MS/MS analyses under negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) or electron ionization (EI) conditions of toluene extracts of the reactants revealed formation of two minor [i.e., PFB-OCOOH and O=CO(2)-(PFB)(2)] and two major [i.e., CH(3)COCH(2)-C(OH)(OPFB)(2) and CH(3)COCH=C(OPFB)(2)] carbonate derivatives. The latter have different retention times (7.9 and 7.5 min, respectively) but virtually identical EI and NICI mass spectra. It is assumed that CH(3)COCH(2)-C(OH)(OPFB)(2) is formed from the reaction of the carbonate dianion with two molecules of PFB bromide to form the diPFB ester of carbonic acid, which further reacts with one molecule of acetone. Subsequent loss of water finally generates the major derivative CH(3)COCH=C(OPFB)(2). This derivatization reaction was utilized to quantify total CO(2)/HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-) (tCO(2)) in human plasma and urine by GC

  20. Characterisation of beeswax in works of art by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedures.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2004-03-05

    Pyrolysis (Py) with in situ derivatisation with hexamethyldisilazane-gas chroma-break tography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure based on microwave-assisted saponification were used to identify the organic components in small sized beeswax samples. With the latter procedure quantitative recoveries can be made and hydrocarbons, alcohols and omega-1-diols in the neutral fraction, and fatty acids and omega-1-hydroxy acids in the acidic fraction can be efficiently separated and detected. Both procedures were used to characterise a wax anatomic sculpture "The Plague" (1691-1694) by Gaetano Zumbo, resulting in the identification of beeswax and a Pinaceae resin. The GC-MS analysis brought to light some essential differences in beeswax composition between the raw material and the old modelled wax thus giving some clear indications about the recipe used by the sculptor.

  1. Structural analysis of commercial ceramides by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bleton, J; Gaudin, K; Chaminade, P; Goursaud, S; Baillet, A; Tchapla, A

    2001-05-11

    A simple method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to analyse structures of ceramides. Identification of trimethylsilylated ceramides were obtained in short analysis times (derivatization of ceramides in 30 min at room temperature and 20 min gas chromatography mass spectrometry run) even for complex mixtures. For example in ceramide Type III, 18 peaks were observed which represent 27 various structures. The coeluted compounds were ceramides containing the same functional groups and the same carbon number but with a different distribution on the two alkyl chains of the molecule. They were accurately differentiated by mass spectrometry. Therefore, 83 structures of trimethylsilylated ceramides were identified in 11 different commercial mixtures. For 52 structures of these, mass spectral data were not described in the literature, neither full mass spectra nor characteristic fragments.

  2. Global urinary metabolic profiling procedures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2011-09-08

    The role of urinary metabolic profiling in systems biology research is expanding. This is because of the use of this technology for clinical diagnostic and mechanistic studies and for the development of new personalized health care and molecular epidemiology (population) studies. The methodologies commonly used for metabolic profiling are NMR spectroscopy, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In this protocol, we describe urine collection and storage, GC/MS and data preprocessing methods, chemometric data analysis and urinary marker metabolite identification. Results obtained using GC/MS are complementary to NMR and LC/MS. Sample preparation for GC/MS analysis involves the depletion of urea via treatment with urease, protein precipitation with methanol, and trimethylsilyl derivatization. The protocol described here facilitates the metabolic profiling of ∼400-600 metabolites in 120 urine samples per week.

  3. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of a series of bile acid sequestrants.

    PubMed

    Haskins, N J; Eckers, C; Mitchell, R

    1992-09-01

    Pyrolysis of a series of polymers based on polystyrene and used as bile acid sequestrants produced characteristic mixtures of compounds which were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The nature of the substituent groups was clearly apparent while the polymer backbone gave rise to representative styrenes. The reproducibility of the results was examined by experimenting with the temperature of pyrolysis. It was found that at low temperatures very little fragmentation of the polystyrene backbone occurred but the substituents were still released in high yield. The orientation of the various substituted styrenes generated by pyrolysis was confirmed by the use of gas chromatography with infrared and mass spectrometric detection.

  4. Simultaneous Determination of Cyanide and Thiocyanate in Plasma by Chemical Ionization Gas Chromatography Mass-Spectrometry (CI-GC-MS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-04

    ORIGINAL PAPER Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS...chemical ioniza- tion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocya- nate in plasma...Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide

  5. Determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cam, D; Gagni, S

    2001-11-01

    Manual solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is investigated as a possible alternative for the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils. Spiked onto an agricultural soil is a commercial diesel fuel (DF) with the following composition by weight: 12% linear alkanes, 52% saturated hydrocarbons (branched and cyclic), 21% alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons, 6% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 9% unidentified compounds. The spiked soil samples are aged three days at room temperature before analysis. The optimal conditions for the SPME of DF from soils are examined and maximum sensitivity is obtained using a 100-microm polydimethylsiloxane fiber at a sampling temperature of 47 degrees C by sonication both in the headspace and directly through a water medium. The reproducibility of the whole technique showed a relative standard deviation of 10%. The parameters that can influence the recovery of DF (such as the time of SPME extraction, the presence of organic solvent and water, and the matrix) are investigated. The linearity is verified in the range of 40 to 1200 mg/L for the direct injection of DF, 0.1 to 1 mg/L for the SPME of DF from water, and 1 to 50 mg/Kg of dry soil for the SPME of DF from soils. The detection limits are respectively 0.5 mg/L, 0.02 mg/L, and 0.1 mg/Kg of dry soil. The method is corroborated by comparing the results with those obtained by the traditional way.

  6. An improved method for cyanide determination in blood using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Frison, Giampietro; Zancanaro, Flavio; Favretto, Donata; Ferrara, Santo Davide

    2006-01-01

    A new method is described for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of cyanide, a very short-acting and powerful toxic agent, in human whole blood. It involves the conversion of cyanide into hydrogen cyanide and its subsequent headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and detection by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Optimizing the conditions for the GC/MS (type of column, injection conditions, temperature program) and SPME (choice of SPME fiber, effect of salts, adsorption and desorption times, adsorption temperature) led to the choice of a 75-microm carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane SPME fiber, with D3-acetonitrile as internal standard, and a capillary GC column with a polar stationary phase. Method validation was carried out in terms of linearity, precision and accuracy in both aqueous solutions and blood. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were determined only in aqueous solutions. The assay is linear over three orders of magnitude (water 0.01-10, blood 0.05-10 microg/mL); and the LOD and LOQ in water were 0.006 and 0.01 microg/mL, respectively. Good intra- and inter-assay precision was obtained, always <8%. The method is simple, fast and sensitive enough for the rapid diagnosis of cyanide intoxication in clinical and forensic toxicology.

  7. Solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for residual solvent assessment in seized cocaine and heroin.

    PubMed

    Cabarcos, Pamela; Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Álvarez-Freire, Iván; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2016-09-01

    A simple sample pre-treatment method based on solid phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been optimized and validated for the assessment of 15 residual solvents (2-propanol, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, acetone, ethyl acetate, benzene, hexane, methylcyclohexane, methylcyclopentane, m-xylene, propyl acetate, toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, dichloromethane, and ethylbenzene) in seized illicit cocaine and heroin. DMSO and DMF as sample diluents were found to offer the best residual solvent transference to the head space for further adsorption onto the SPME fiber, and the developed method therefore showed high sensitivity and analytical recovery. Variables affecting SPME were fully evaluated by applying an experimental design approach. Best conditions were found when using an equilibration time of 5 min at 70 °C and headspace sampling of residual solvents at the same temperature for 15 min. Method validation, performed within the requirements of international guidelines, showed excellent sensitivity, as well as intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy. The proposed methodology was applied to 96 cocaine samples and 14 heroin samples seized in Galicia (northwestern Spain) within 2013 and 2014.

  8. Analysis of radioactive mixed hazardous waste using derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Lerner, B.D.; Bean, R.M.; Grant, K.E.; Lucke, R.B.; Mong, G.M.; Clauss, S.A.

    1994-08-01

    Six samples of core segments from Tank 101-SY were analyzed for chelators, chelator fragments, and several carboxylic acids by derivatization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The major components detected were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitroso-iminodiacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and ethylenediaminetriacetic acid. The chelator of highest concentration was ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in all six samples analyzed. Liquid chromatography was used to quantitate low molecular weight acids including oxalic, formic, glycolic, and acetic acids, which are present in the waste as acid salts. From 23 to 61% of the total organic carbon in the samples analyzed was accounted for by these acids.

  9. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses Using Amines as Chemical Ionization Reagent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, James L.; Howard, Adam S.

    2013-12-01

    Ammonia is a very useful chemical ionization (CI) reagent gas for the qualitative analyses of compounds by positive ion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS). The gas is readily available, inexpensive, and leaves no carbon contamination in the MS source. Compounds of interest to our laboratory typically yield abundant protonated or ammoniated species, which are indicative of a compound's molecular weight. Nevertheless, some labile compounds fragment extensively by substitution and elimination reactions and yield no molecular weight information. In these cases, a CI reagent gas mixture of methylamine in methane prepared dynamically was found to be very useful in obtaining molecular weight data. Likewise, deuterated ammonia and deuterated methylamine are useful CI reagent gases for determining the exchangeable protons in organic compounds. Deuterated methylamine CI reagent gas is conveniently prepared by dynamically mixing small amounts of methylamine with excess deuterated ammonia.

  10. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of exhaled leukotrienes in asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Cap, P; Chladek, J; Pehal, F; Maly, M; Petru, V; Barnes, P; Montuschi, P

    2004-01-01

    Background: Leukotriene-like immunoreactivity has been detected in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), but definitive evidence for the presence of leukotrienes (LTs) in this biological fluid is not available. A study was undertaken to determine whether LTC4, LTD4, LTE4, and LTB4 are measurable in EBC by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and to quantify exhaled LTs in adults and children with asthma and in control subjects. Methods: Twenty eight adults and 33 children with mild to moderate persistent asthma treated with inhaled corticosteroids and age matched healthy controls (50 adults and 50 children) were studied. LTB4, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 in EBC were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results: LTD4, LTE4, and LTB4 were detectable in all samples. Concentrations of LTC4 in EBC were either close to or below the detection limit of 1 pg/ml. Median exhaled LTD4, LTE4, and LTB4 concentrations in asthmatic adults were increased 4.1-fold (p<0.001), 1.8-fold (p<0.01), and 2.6-fold (p<0.001), respectively, compared with values in healthy adults. Median exhaled LTD4, LTE4, and LTB4 concentrations in asthmatic children were increased 2.8-fold (p<0.001), 1.3-fold (p<0.001), and 1.6-fold (p<0.001), respectively, compared with those in healthy children. In patients with asthma there was a correlation between exhaled LTD4 and LTE4 in both adults (r = 0.87, p<0.0001) and children (r = 0.78, p<0.0001). Conclusions: Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used to accurately quantify exhaled LTs which are increased in asthmatic adults and children compared with controls. PMID:15170025

  11. Statistical Modeling Efforts for Headspace Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Brian Phillip

    2016-03-17

    The purpose of this document is to describe the statistical modeling effort for gas concentrations in WIPP storage containers. The concentration (in ppm) of CO2 in the headspace volume of standard waste box (SWB) 68685 is shown. A Bayesian approach and an adaptive Metropolis-Hastings algorithm were used.

  12. Analysis of the citric acid cycle intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kombu, Rajan S; Brunengraber, Henri; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2011-01-01

    Researchers view analysis of the citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates as a metabolomic approach to identifying unexpected correlations between apparently related and unrelated pathways of metabolism. Relationships of the CAC intermediates, as measured by their concentrations and relative ratios, offer useful information to understanding interrelationships between the CAC and metabolic pathways under various physiological and pathological conditions. This chapter presents a relatively simple method that is sensitive for simultaneously measuring concentrations of CAC intermediates (relative and absolute) and other related intermediates of energy metabolism using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  13. Analysis of the anthraquinones aloe-emodin and aloin by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Murphy, Timothy P

    2004-12-20

    A procedure was developed for the determination of low levels of the anthraquinones aloe-emodin and aloin A (barbalin) in aloe products based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) of the trimethyl silyl (TMS) derivatives of these analytes in the presence of Chrysophanol used as internal standard. The method was used to analyze several aloe based commercial products (liquids, gels and solids). Wide variation in the level of these anthraquinones was observed among the different products. The method had a sensitivity of 0.005 ppm of aloe-emodin and 0.05 ppm of aloin.

  14. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of historical varnishes of ancient Italian lutes and violin.

    PubMed

    Echard, J P; Benoit, C; Peris-Vicente, J; Malecki, V; Gimeno-Adelantado, J V; Vaiedelich, S

    2007-02-12

    The organic constituents of historical vanishes from two ancient Italian lutes and a Stradivari violin, kept in the Musée de la musique in Paris, have been characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results have been compared with the chromatograms and mass spectra of recent as well as old naturally aged reference materials. The three historical varnishes analyzed have been shown to be oil varnishes, probably mixtures of linseed oil with resins. Identification of diterpenoids and triterpenoids compounds, and of the resins that may have been ingredients of the varnishes, are discussed in this paper.

  15. Identification of cryptorchidism in horses by analysing urine samples with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leung, David K K; Tang, Francis P W; Wan, Terence S M; Wong, Jenny K Y

    2011-01-01

    Currently there are two common radioimmunoassay-based methods for the detection of equine cryptorchidism; one measures testosterone concentrations in peripheral blood samples taken before and after an intravenous injection of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) and the other measures plasma estrone sulfate. However, each of these invasive methods has its own shortfalls and neither gives unequivocal results. In this article a highly reliable gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method is described based on the analysis of urine samples for the identification of cryptorchidism in horses, some as young as 2 years old. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, J.

    1995-08-23

    The Savannah River Site contains approximately 1500 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are collected. Many of these samples are sent off-site for various analyses, including the determination of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs). This report describes accomplishments that have been made during the past year which will ultimately allow VOC analysis to be performed on-site using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Through the use of the on-site approach, it is expected that there will be a substantial cost savings. This approach will also provide split-sample analysis capability which can serve as a quality control measure for off-site analysis.

  17. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  18. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the chemical characterisation of modern and archaeological figs (Ficus carica).

    PubMed

    Ribechini, Erika; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2011-06-24

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethylsilylation, and analytical pyrolysis using hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) for in situ derivatisation followed by gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis (Pyrolysis-silylation-GC/MS) were used to investigate the hydrolysable and soluble constituents, and the polymerised macromolecules of an archaeological fig (Ficus carica) recovered in Zaragoza (Spain), as well as of modern figs. The main aim was to study the compositional alterations undergone by the fig tissues in a particular archaeological environment: the fig was in a vessel and covered by a layer of a mixture of orpiment and gypsum. A comparison between the GC/MS results from modern and archaeological figs revealed that degradative reactions took place, leading to the disappearance/depletion of reactive (unsaturated fatty acids) and sensitive compounds (phytosterols and triterpenes). Py-silylation-GC/MS data provided evidence of a significant degradation of the saccharide and lipid components of the fig tissue, which left a residue enriched in polyphenols and polyesters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolomics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: Combined Targeted and Untargeted Profiling.

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics is ideal for identifying and quantitating small-molecule metabolites (<650 Da), including small acids, alcohols, hydroxyl acids, amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, sterols, catecholamines, drugs, and toxins, often using chemical derivatization to make these compounds sufficiently volatile for gas chromatography. This unit shows how GC-MS-based metabolomics allows integration of targeted assays for absolute quantification of specific metabolites with untargeted metabolomics to discover novel compounds. Complemented by database annotations using large spectral libraries and validated standard operating procedures, GC-MS can identify and semiquantify over 200 compounds from human body fluids (e.g., plasma, urine, or stool) per study. Deconvolution software enables detection of more than 300 additional unidentified signals that can be annotated through accurate mass instruments with appropriate data processing workflows, similar to untargeted profiling using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. GC-MS is a mature technology that uses not only classic detectors (quadrupole) but also target mass spectrometers (triple quadrupole) and accurate mass instruments (quadrupole-time of flight). This unit covers sample preparation from mammalian samples, data acquisition, quality control, and data processing. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Comparison of the sensitivity of different aroma extraction techniques in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to detect minor aroma compounds in wine.

    PubMed

    Gamero, Amparo; Wesselink, Wilma; de Jong, Catrienus

    2013-01-11

    MicroVinification platforms are used for screening purposes to study aroma development in wine. These high-throughput methodologies require flavor analysis techniques that allow fast detection of a high number of aroma compounds which often appear in very low concentrations (μg/l). In this work, a selection of aroma extraction techniques in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were evaluated to detect minor wine aroma compounds in low sample volume. The techniques evaluated were headspace (HS), headspace solid-phase dynamic extraction (HS-SPDE), headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), direct immersion solid-phase microextraction (DI-SPME), stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and monolithic material sorptive extraction (MMSE). DI-SPME showed the highest sensitivity as expressed by detection of the highest percentage of total aroma compounds at concentrations around 0.1 μg/l. SBSE and MMSE followed DI-SPME in terms of sensitivity. HS-SPME was less sensitive but considered sensitive enough for detection of most of the volatile compounds present in highly aromatic wines. Matrix effect was shown to strongly affect aroma extraction and therefore the sensitivity of the different extraction methods.

  1. Characterization and Differentiation of Geometric Isomers of 3-methylfentanyl Analogs by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Segawa, Hiroki; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-26

    The cis and trans isomers of 3-methylfentanyl and its three analogs were chemically synthesized, and these compounds were characterized and differentiated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The cis and trans isomers of the 3-methylfentanyl analogs were completely separated by GC/MS. Although the high temperature of the GC injection port caused thermal degradation of β-hydroxy-3-methylfentanyl, the degradation was completely suppressed by trimethylsilyl derivatization. The isomers were also well separated by LC/MS on an octadecylsilyl column with 10 mM ammonium acetate and methanol as the mobile phase. The proton NMR signals were split when the hydrochloride salts of the 3-methylfentanyl analogs were dissolved in deuterated chloroform because stereoisomers were formed by the coordination of the hydrochloride proton to the nitrogen of the piperidine ring of the 3-methylfentanyl analogs. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Analysis of volatiles from stored wheat and Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) with solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yonghao; Hua, Lei; Hardy, Giles; Agarwal, Manjree; Ren, Yonglin

    2016-03-30

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) contribute significantly to food flavour and can be used as indicators of quality, age of storage, and hygiene condition of stored products. The VOCs in the headspace of three different samples - healthy wheat, Rhyzopertha dominica, and wheat with R. dominica - were analysed at 25°C by solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All the experimental conditions were kept consistent except a polar column and a non-polar column were used to assess the differences in volatile fingerprints. A total of 114 volatiles were identified by both the polar and non-polar columns, of which 48 were specific to one of the three samples tested. The volatiles were mainly carbonyl chemical compounds such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols. GC-MS results showed slightly more VOCs were identified from the polar column. The total number for the three samples was 43 from the polar column compared to 39 from the non-polar column. Conversely, 30 VOCs unique to a given sample were identified from the non-polar column compared to 18 from the polar column. The use of both polar and non-polar columns is essential to capture the full range of VOCs produced by the three specific sample types investigated. The data can form the basis of enquiry into the relationship between storage and grain quality, and insect infestation and grain quality by observing the impact that these circumstances have on the production of volatile organic compounds. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of synthetic ceramides containing phytosphingosine.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, S

    1970-05-01

    Ceramides containing phytosphingosine as base and one of the fatty acids 16:0, 18:0, 20:0, 22:0, 23:0, and 24:0, were prepared by direct coupling in the presence of a mixed carbodiimide. The ceramides were analyzed as the 1,3,4-tri-O-trimethylsilyl ether derivatives by gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Gas chromatographic data is presented, and structures of mass spectral ions are suggested. The structures are supported by mass spectra of the homologous ceramides, by deuterium-labeling experiments, and by high resolution mass spectrometry. Some ions, formed by cleavage between C-3 and C-4 in the long-chain base, indicate the phytosphingosine nature of the ceramide.

  4. Characterisation of volatile profiles in 50 native Peruvian chili pepper using solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS).

    PubMed

    Patel, Kirti; Ruiz, Candy; Calderon, Rosa; Marcelo, Mavel; Rojas, Rosario

    2016-11-01

    The volatiles were characterised by headspace solid phase micro extraction (HS-SPME), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-FID/MS). A total of 127 compounds were identified with terpenes (including mono terpenes and sesquiterpenes - a total of 45 compounds), esters (31 compounds) and hydrocarbons (20 compounds) were the predominant volatile compounds. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the volatile compounds yielded 2 significant PC's, which together accounted for 90.3% of the total variance in the data set and the scatter plot generated between PC1 and PC2 successfully segregated the 50 chili pepper samples into 7 groups. Clusters of hydrocarbons, esters, terpenes, aldehyde and ketones formed the major determinants of the difference. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole and guaiacol in cork stoppers by pressurised fluid extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ezquerro, Oscar; Garrido-López, Alvaro; Tena, María Teresa

    2006-01-13

    This paper describes the development of an analytical method consisting of pressurised fluid extraction (PFE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using experimental designs to determine two volatile compounds in naturally-tainted cork stoppers. The target analytes, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) and guaiacol, are involved in the cork taint of wine. First, a Plackett-Burman experimental design was carried out in order to determine the significant experimental parameters affecting the PFE process, and then a central composite design was used to optimise these significant parameters. Once the method had been optimised, the influence of the number of extraction cycles was studied. The method was applied to determine the concentration of 2,4,6-TCA and guaiacol in three cork samples, and the results were compared with the ones obtained by multiple headspace-solid-phase microextraction (MHS-SPME) and by Soxhlet extraction.

  6. Monoterpene composition of essential oil from peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) with regard to leaf position using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Rohloff, J

    1999-09-01

    Monoterpene compounds of leaf pairs and flowers of Mentha x piperita have been studied by direct headspace sampling using solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS). The content of peppermint-characteristic compounds such as menthol, menthyl acetate, and neomenthol increased in a basipetal direction (older plant parts), whereas menthone and isomenthone showed higher levels in the acropetal direction (younger plant parts). Higher levels of menthofuran were found in peppermint flowers in contrast to the leaves. SPME sampling resulted in relatively higher amounts of high-volatile monoterpenes and lower detection of less volatile compounds such as menthol and menthone, compared to solvent-based samples from essential oil distillation.

  7. Fungal infections of fresh-cut fruit can be detected by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometric identification of microbial volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Steven W; Grimm, Casey C; Klich, Maren A; Beltz, Shannon B

    2005-06-01

    There is a large and rapidly growing market for fresh-cut fruit. Microbial volatile organic compounds indicate the presence of fungal or bacterial contamination in fruit. In order to determine whether microbial volatile organic compounds can be used to detect contamination before fruit becomes unmarketable, pieces of cantaloupe, apple, pineapple, and orange were inoculated with a variety of fungal species, incubated at 25 degrees C, then sealed in glass vials. The volatiles were extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Forty-five compounds were identified that might serve as unique identifiers of fungal contamination. Fungal contamination can be detected as early as 24 h after inoculation.

  8. Analysis of halonitriles in drinking water using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kristiana, Ina; Joll, Cynthia; Heitz, Anna

    2012-02-17

    Halonitriles are a class of nitrogen-containing disinfection by-products (DBPs) that have been reported to be more toxic and carcinogenic than the regulated DBPs. While haloacetonitriles (HANs) are often measured in drinking waters, there is little information on the formation, characteristics, and occurrence of other, higher molecular weight halonitriles. Halopropionitriles and halobutyronitriles have been predicted to be highly toxic and carcinogenic, and may have sufficient potency and selectivity to account for epidemiological associations of chlorinated and chloraminated water with adverse health effects. This paper reports on the development, optimisation, and validation of a simple, robust, and sensitive analytical method for the determination of halonitriles in waters, as well as the application of the method to study the formation and characteristics of halonitriles. This is the first reported method development for analysis halopropionitriles and halobutyronitriles, and the first study on their formation and occurrence as DBPs in drinking waters. The new method uses headspace solid-phase microextraction to extract the halonitriles from water, which are then analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS SPME/GC-S). The method demonstrated good sensitivity (detection limits: 0.9-80 ng L⁻¹) and good precision (repeatability: 3.8-12%), and is linear over three orders of magnitude. Matrix effects from raw drinking water containing organic carbon (4.1 mg L⁻¹) were shown to be negligible in the analysis of halonitriles. The optimised method was used to study the stability and persistence of halonitriles in aqueous samples, and the formation and occurrence of halonitriles in waters. Results from laboratory-scale disinfection experiments showed that haloacetonitriles were formed in chlorinated and chloraminated samples, but 2,2-dichloropropionitrile was only measured in chloraminated samples. Results from surveys of several drinking water

  9. Quantitative solid phase microextraction--gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis of five megastigmatrienone isomers in aged wine.

    PubMed

    Slaghenaufi, Davide; Perello, Marie-Claire; Marchand-Marion, Stéphanie; Tempere, Sophie; de Revel, Gilles

    2014-02-27

    Megastigmatrienone is a key flavor compound in tobacco. It has also been detected in wine, where it may contribute to a tobacco/incense aroma, but its importance and concentration in wines had never previously been evaluated. A method was developed and validated for quantifying the five megastigmatrienone isomers in red and white wines. Megastigmatrienone isomers were extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), with a 65 μm film thickness polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB) fiber and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM). Several parameters affecting the length of the adsorption process (i.e., adding salt, extraction time and extraction temperature) were tested. The optimum analytical conditions were established. The LOQ were between 0.06 μg L(-1) and 0.49 μg L(-1) for white wine and 0.11 μg L(-1) and 0.98 μg L(-1) for red wine, repeatability in both types of wine was less than 10% and recovery ranged from 96% for white wine to 94% for red wine. The five isomers of megastigmatrienone were quantified in red and white wines for the first time. Concentrations ranged from 2 μg L(-1) to 41 μg L(-1) in both red and white wines. Initial results revealed a link between wine aging and megastigmatrienone levels, indicating that megastigmatrienone may be a component in wine "bouquet". Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Subsurface detection of fossil fuel pollutants by photoionization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robbat, Albert; Considine, Thomas; Antle, Patrick M

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes analysis of environmental pollutants at depth without bringing sample to the surface. It is based on an improved 3-stage Peltier freeze trap, which efficiently pre-concentrates volatile coal tar and petroleum hydrocarbons, and an integrated system for detecting pollutants on-line, in real-time by photoionization detection and quantitation by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) as the probe is advanced into the subsurface. Findings indicate measurement precision and accuracy for volatiles meet EPA criteria for hazardous waste site investigations. When a Teflon membrane inlet is used to detect contaminants in groundwater, its 140 degrees C temperature limit restricts analyte collection in soil to C(2)-phenanthrenes. Two case studies demonstrate the probe is well-suited to tracking petroleum and coal tar plumes from source to groundwater. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) in Nonscience Major Course Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecka, Keith S.; Lerman, Zafra M.; Angelos, Sanford A.

    1996-06-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been utilized with nonscience majors in the courses: "Modern Methods in Science: Discovering Molecular Secrets"; "The Extraordinary Chemistry of Ordinary Things"; "From Ozone to Oil Spills: Chemistry, the Environment and You"; and "Crime Lab Chemistry: Solving Crime through Analytical Chemistry". Our efforts have centered on introducing prospective science communicators (film, video, radio, television, and journalism majors) to science relative to their majors and personal interests. Quality lecture-discussion topics, "mystery"-based laboratory activities have assisted in introducing and/or explaining specific areas of chemistry that attempt to reduce fear of subject matter. Students have also used GC-MS, as a form of alternative assessment, in course projects that have been based on their majors, personal interests, and cultural backgrounds. Students have also conducted advanced independent work in different areas of chemistry, including the analysis of nail polishes and lacquers and eleven aromatic compounds present in three different brands of gasoline.

  12. Improvements in bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium purity as determined with gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    BARTRAM,MICHAEL E.

    2000-03-08

    Bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium (MgCp2) is used commonly as a source for doping nitride materials with magnesium. Increased oxygen incorporation known to accompany the use of MgCp2 makes the purity of this precursor an important consideration in nitride CVD. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS) methods have now been developed for the identification of volatile impurities in MgCp2. Diethylether, an oxygen containing organic compound (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}), and additional organic impurities were found in the MgCp2 supplied by three manufacturers. Subsequent refinements in the synthetic processes by these companies have resulted in the availability of MgCp2 free of ether and other organic impurities as determined by GCMS.

  13. Simultaneous determination of amphetamines and ketamines in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei Ru; Lua, Ahai Chang

    2006-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of amphetamines and ketamines (ketamine, norketamine and dehydronorketamine) in urine samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed and validated. Urine samples were extracted with organic solvent and derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA). The limits of detection and limits of quantification for each analyte were lower than 19 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Within-day and between-day precisions were within 0.5% and 10.6%, respectively. Biases for three levels of control samples were within -10.6% and +7.8%. The concentration of dehydronorketamine was greater than those of ketamine or norketamine in 19 of 35 ketamine-positive samples. A group of 110 human urine samples previously determined to contain at least one of the target analytes was analyzed using the new method, and excellent agreement was observed with previous results.

  14. High-speed, low-pressure gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for essential oil analysis.

    PubMed

    Poynter, Samuel D H; Shellie, Robert A

    2008-07-18

    Analysis of parsley and fennel essential oils was performed by using low-pressure gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The low-pressure instrument configuration was achieved by fitting a GC-MS instrument with a 530microm I.D. capillary column and an appropriate capillary restrictor at the inlet of the column. Comparison of the performance of the low-pressure GC-MS setup was made with fast GC-MS using a narrow-bore capillary column. By comparing the two approaches side-by-side the benefits of low-pressure GC-MS for characterisation of moderately complex essential oils comprising less than 50 detectable components can be fully appreciated. Although efficiency is sacrificed, the improved sample capacity of the 530microm I.D. column leads to higher peak intensities and in-turn better mass spectral library matching thus providing highly satisfactory results.

  15. [Differentiation of ballpoint pen inks by thermodesorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2004-01-01

    Differentiation and classification of ink entries with dated samples of a reference collection are important aspects in the examination of questioned documents. Classification of writing inks is presently achieved by analysis of dyes and colorants contained in the ink. This technique has its limitations in newly developed ink formulations with identical dye composition but differing in their solvents and binder resins. This paper introduces a method for the determination of solvents and binder resins of an ink sample directly from paper without sample preparation. This aim is accomplished by thermodesorption of the sample followed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The method was tested on numerous samples of ballpoint pen inks, which were subsequently grouped into several solvent and resin subgroups. A case study shows the applicability of the newly developed method.

  16. Confirmatory tests for drugs in the workplace by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, B A; Cone, E J

    1994-07-15

    The Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs require the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the confirmation of presumptive positive urine specimens. This review focuses upon GC-MS methods developed specifically for forensic confirmation of amphetamine, methamphetamine, 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-acid), benzoylecgonine, morphine, codeine and phencyclidine in urine for purposes of workplace drug testing. In addition, current laboratory issues pertaining to each drug class are reviewed. Generally, drug assays utilized either liquid-liquid or solid-phase extraction methods, derivatization if necessary, and GC-MS detection operating in the selected ion monitoring mode or by full scan acquisition.

  17. Characterization and quantification of fluoxymesterone metabolite in horse urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masayuki; Aramaki, Sugako; Hosoe, Tomoo; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Kijima-Suda, Isao; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-07-01

    Fluoxymesterone, an anabolic steroid with the 17alpha-methyl,17beta-hydroxy group, has been developed as an oral formulation for therapeutic purposes. However, it is also used illegally in racehorses to enhance racing performance. In this study, we detected 9alpha-fluoro-17,17-dimethyl-18-norandrostane-4,13-dien-11beta-ol-3-one by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), which has not been reported as a fluoxymesterone metabolite so far in horse. It was synthesized for use as a reference standard, and characterized on the basis of (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectra, as well as GC/MS EI mass spectra of TMS derivatives. It was excreted as the main metabolite in horse urine, and its reference standard could be synthesized easily. Therefore, this metabolite could be a useful target for a doping test of fluoxymesterone in racehorses.

  18. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid from epileptic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Sumita, Maho; Horitani, Yusuke; Tamai, Reo; Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Komori, Masayuki; Takenaka, Shigeo

    2014-04-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy.

  19. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolic Profiling of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Epileptic Dogs

    PubMed Central

    HASEGAWA, Tetsuya; SUMITA, Maho; HORITANI, Yusuke; TAMAI, Reo; TANAKA, Katsuhiro; KOMORI, Masayuki; TAKENAKA, Shigeo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder with seizures, but diagnostic approaches in veterinary clinics remain limited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a body fluid used for diagnosis in veterinary medicine. In this study, we explored canine epilepsy diagnostic biomarkers using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling of CSF and multivariate data analysis. Profiles for subjects with idiopathic epilepsy differed significantly from those of healthy controls and subjects with symptomatic epilepsy. Among 60 identified metabolites, the levels of 20 differed significantly among the three groups. Glutamic acid was significantly increased in idiopathic epilepsy, and some metabolites including ascorbic acid were changed in both forms of epilepsy. These findings show that metabolic profiles of CSF differ between idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsy and that metabolites including glutamic acid and ascorbic acid in CSF may be useful for diagnosis of canine epilepsy. PMID:24334864

  20. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy study of tert-butylarsine stability and purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartram, M. E.; Breiland, W. G.; Bruskas, L. A.; Killeen, K. P.

    2000-06-01

    We have used gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS) to study the decomposition of TBA ( tert-butylarsine, H 2AsC(CH 3) 3) in storage containers at room temperature. Over a four-week period, as much as 1% of the TBA decomposed to arsine and isobutane in a stainless-steel bottle. Several freeze-thaw purification schemes were tested. Use of a liquid-nitrogen bath left a substantial amount of arsine and isobutane in the bottle, while an ice water bath removed all of the arsine but left residual isobutane. Evacuation of the storage container at room temperature removed both arsine and isobutane to below the GCMS detection limits. However, this approach did lead to significant TBA loss. Storing TBA in a Teflon-lined bottle and in a high-surface-to-volume stainless-steel container did not change the decomposition rate measurably, suggesting that stainless-steel surfaces do not promote TBA decomposition.

  1. Analysis of beechwood creosote by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Baba, T

    1989-12-01

    Compounds in beechwood creosote were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 22 major constituents were identified. Of these, 19 were phenolic compounds, i. e., guaiacol, phenol, two cresol isomers, four methylguaiacol (creosol) isomers, six xylenol isomers, two trimethylphenol isomers, 4-ethylguaiacol, 4-ethyl-5-methylguaiacol, and 4-propylguaiacol. The remaining three were hitherto unpredicted five-membered ring compounds, i. e., 3-methyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one, 3,5-dimethyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one, and 3-ethyl-2-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one. The relative quantities of these compounds were also compared with those obtained by high-resolution high-performance liquid chromatography. This report probably represents the first extensive analysis of beechwood creosote.

  2. Quantitative Analysis and Fingerprint Profiles for Quality Control of Fructus Schisandrae by Gas Chromatography: Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yong-Gang; Yang, Bing-You; Liang, Jun; Yang, Qi; Wang, Di; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, rapid, and effective quality assessment method for Fructus Schisandrae by gas chromatography-mass spectrum (GC-MS). The method was established by using specific lignan fingerprint profiles and quantitation of characteristic compounds in this herbal medicine. The GC-MS fingerprints of 15 batches of Schisandra samples from different regions of China showed similar lignan profiles. Five peaks were selected as characteristic peaks, and all of these were identified by using GC-MS techniques. The relative retention times of these characteristic peaks in the GC-MS fingerprint were established as an important parameter for identification of Schisandra samples. Meanwhile, relative peak areas may be a feasible approach to discriminate the S. chinensis and S. sphenanthera. Finally, these pharmacologically active constituents in the titled plant, schisandrins A–C and schizandrols A and B, were quantitatively determined using a validated GC-MS method. PMID:24574919

  3. Determination of glyphosate, glyphosate metabolites, and glufosinate in human serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Motojyuku, Megumi; Saito, Takeshi; Akieda, Kazuki; Otsuka, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Isotoshi; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2008-11-15

    This paper describes an assay for the determination of glyphosate (GLYP), glyphosate metabolites [(aminomethyl) phosphonic acid] (AMPA), and glufosinate (GLUF) in human serum. After protein precipitation using acetonitrile and solid-phase extraction, serum samples were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The assay was linear over a concentration range of 3-100.0 microg/ml for GLYP, AMPA, and GLUF. The overall recoveries for the three compounds were >73%. The intra- and inter-day variations were <15%. Precision and accuracy were 6.4-10.6% and 88.2-103.7%, respectively. The validated method was applied to quantify the GLYP and AMPA content in the serum of a GLYP-poisoned patient. In conclusion, the method was successfully applied for the determination of GLYP and its metabolite AMPA in serum obtained from patient of GLYP-poisoning.

  4. Analysis of Iranian rosemary essential oil: application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Moazeni, Rudabeh Sadat; Sereshti, Hassan

    2011-05-06

    This paper focuses on characterization of the components of Iranian rosemary essential oil using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) approach was used to overcome the problem of background, baseline offset and overlapping/embedded peaks in GC-MS. The analysis of GC-MS data revealed that sixty eight components exist in the rosemary essential oil. However, with the help of MCR this number was extended to ninety nine components with concentrations higher than 0.01%, which accounts for 98.23% of the total relative content of the rosemary essential oil. The most important constituents of the Iranian rosemary are 1,8-cineole (23.47%), α-pinene (21.74%), berbonone (7.57%), camphor (7.21%) and eucalyptol (4.49%).

  5. Preparative monohydroxyflavanone syntheses and a protocol for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of monohydroxyflavanones.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Hitoshi; Shigematsu, Asako; Ohta, Shigeru; Harigaya, Yoshihiro

    2005-05-01

    We describe a facile efficient, and preparative approach for monohydroxyflavanone syntheses. Using this protocol, a hydroxyl is regio-selectively introduced at one carbon of a flavanone A- or B-ring per synthesis. The seven possible isomers were each synthesized from the corresponding monomethoxymethoxylated 2'-hydroxychalcones in acidic solution. These monohydroxyflavanones were characterized using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) system that incorporated a DB-5 capillary column. Ours is the first report of a preparative synthetic method during which a single hydroxyl can be selectively added to a flavanone A- or B-ring at any position. We are also the first to develop a procedure that separates the seven isomers by GC and characterizes the mass spectra of the isomers. Both the synthetic method and the GC-MS conditions may become important tools during future flavanone metabolism and oxidation studies.

  6. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of nitrosamines in red wine.

    PubMed

    Lona-Ramirez, Fernando J; Gonzalez-Alatorre, Guillermo; Rico-Ramírez, Vicente; Perez-Perez, Ma Cristina I; Castrejón-González, Edgar O

    2016-04-01

    N-nitrosamines (NAms) are highly active carcinogens that have been detected in food and beverages. Currently certain studies report their presence in red wine, while others fail to detect their presence. In this study the head space solid phase micro-extraction technique coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) was applied to quantify four NAms in different types of red wine. The technique was found to be a simple, precise, fast and environmentally friendly alternative for the quantification of volatile NAms. A factorial analysis was carried out to evaluate the influence of the parameters on the HS-SPME technique. This is the first study that such analysis has been reported and where NAms in red wine have been quantified using HS-SPME-GC-MS. The method was validated by calculating the linearity, limit of detection and quantification. Two of the four NAms analyzed were found to be present in red wine samples.

  7. Verification of chemical composition of commercially available propolis extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Czyżewska, Urszula; Konończuk, Joanna; Teul, Joanna; Drągowski, Paweł; Pawlak-Morka, Renata; Surażyński, Arkadiusz; Miltyk, Wojciech

    2015-05-01

    Propolis is a resin that is collected by honeybees from various plant sources. Due to its pharmacological properties, it is used in commercial production of nutritional supplements in pharmaceutical industry. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied for quality control analysis of the three commercial specimens containing aqueous-alcoholic extracts of bee propolis. More than 230 constituents were detected in analyzed products, including flavonoids, chalcones, cinnamic acids and their esters, phenylpropenoid glycerides, and phenylpropenoid sesquiterpenoids. An allergenic benzyl cinnamate ester was also identified in all tested samples. This analytical method allows to evaluate biological activity and potential allergenic components of bee glue simultaneously. Studies on chemical composition of propolis samples may provide new approach to quality and safety control analysis in production of propolis supplementary specimens.

  8. [Determination of primary aromatic amines in crayons gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Kang, Suyuan; Zhang, Qing; Bai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Lü, Qing

    2011-05-01

    A method for the determination of nine primary aromatic amines in crayon by solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed. The alkanes in the sample were removed with n-hexane. Then the sample was extracted twice with ultrasonic extraction by methanol. The extract was evaporated, then the concentrated solution reacted with the reducing agent (sodium hydrosulfite) for 30 min at 70 degrees C. After the extraction with a diatomite SPE column, the aromatic amines were collected and separated on an HP-5M column, determined by MS. The nine primary aromatic amines can be separated and determined successfully. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits were 5 mg/kg and the spiked recoveries of the samples were in the range of 86.02%-102.43%. The method is accurate and stable. It can be applied in the analysis of the primary aromatic amine of real crayon samples.

  9. Analysis of the venom of the Sydney funnel-web spider, Atrax robustus using gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duffield, P H; Duffield, A M; Carroll, P R; Morgans, D

    1979-03-01

    Thirteen compounds have been identified using gas chromatography mass spectrometry in the venom of the Sydney funnel-web spider, Atrax robustus. The compounds were identified as their trimethylsilyl or pentafluoropropionate derivatives and were citric acid, lactic acid, phosphoric acid, glycerol, urea, glucose, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glycine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and octopamine. Female venom contained trace quantities of 5-methyoxytryptamine which was not detected in male venom. Quantitative determination of tyramine and octopamine was achieved using chemical ionization (CH4) gas chromatography mass spectrometry and deuterated internal standards.

  10. Determination of chemical components derived from 2% chlorhexidine gel degradation using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Câmara De Bem, Samuel Henrique; Estrela, Carlos; Guedes, Débora Fernandes Costa; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2014-11-01

    This study determined the chemical components derived from degradation of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel and solution by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Three 2% CHX gels were used to identify the products of CHX gel degradation using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A solution of CHX was also evaluated to compare the degradation between gel and solution. Degradation was evaluated in four storage situations (on the worktable with light: on the worktable without light; in the Pasteur oven at 36.5°C without light; and in the refrigerator at 8°C without light). Measurements were made at four time points: initial analysis and 1, 3 and 6 months after. The conversion of CHX into para-chloroaniline in storage situations and in different periods was analyzed statistically using chi-square test (α = 5%). The 2% CHX gel or solution had already degraded vial found within the period of validity, at all time points and for all storage conditions. The amount of para-chloroaniline (pCA) was directly proportional to time in the case of CHX solution, but not in CHX gel due to lack of homogeneity. CHX homogeneity in hydroxyethylcellulose gel was directly dependent on compounding mode. Degradation products, such as para-chloroaniline (pCA), orto- chloroaniline (oCA), meta-chloroaniline (mCA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and organochlorines (ortho-chlorophenyl isocyanate and 2-amino-5-clorobenzonitrila) were found in 2% CHX gel and solution, regardless of storage conditions or time. In relationship to gel homogenization an alternative to produce 2% CHX gel and a new homogenization method have been developed.

  11. Metabonomics investigation of human urine after ingestion of green tea with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Law, Wai Siang; Huang, Pei Yun; Ong, Eng Shi; Ong, Choon Nam; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Chan, Eric Chun Yong

    2008-08-01

    A method using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and (1)H NMR with pattern recognition tools such as principle components analysis (PCA) was used to study the human urinary metabolic profiles after the intake of green tea. From the normalized peak areas obtained from GC/MS and LC/MS and peak heights from (1)H NMR, statistical analyses were used in the identification of potential biomarkers. Metabolic profiling by GC/MS provided a different set of quantitative signatures of metabolites that can be used to characterize the molecular changes in human urine samples. A comparison of normalized metabonomics data for selected metabolites in human urine samples in the presence of potential overlapping peaks after tea ingestion from LC/MS and (1)H NMR showed the reliability of the current approach and method of normalization. The close agreements of LC/MS with (1)H NMR data showed that the effects of ion suppression in LC/MS for early eluting metabolites were not significant. Concurrently, the specificity of detecting the stated metabolites by (1)H NMR and LC/MS was demonstrated. Our data showed that a number of metabolites involved in glucose metabolism, citric acid cycle and amino acid metabolism were affected immediately after the intake of green tea. The proposed approach provided a more comprehensive picture of the metabolic changes after intake of green tea in human urine. The multiple analytical approach together with pattern recognition tools is a useful platform to study metabolic profiles after ingestion of botanicals and medicinal plants.

  12. Identification of volatiles from pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) pulp by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Marcio P; Ferreira, Ernesto C; Hantao, Leandro W; Bogusz, Stanislau; Augusto, Fabio

    2011-07-01

    Combining qualitative data from the chromatographic structure of 2-D gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC×GC-FID) and that from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) should result in a more accurate assignment of the peak identities than the simple analysis by GC/MS, where coelution of analytes is unavoidable in highly complex samples (rendering spectra unsuitable for qualitative purposes) or for compounds in very low concentrations. Using data from GC×GC-FID combined with GC/MS can reveal coelutions that were not detected by mass spectra deconvolution software. In addition, some compounds can be identified according to the structure of the GC×GC-FID chromatogram. In this article, the volatile fractions of fresh and dehydrated pineapple pulp were evaluated. The extraction of the volatiles was performed by dynamic headspace extraction coupled to solid-phase microextraction (DHS-SPME), a technique appropriate for slurries or solid matrices. Extracted analytes were then analyzed by GC×GC-FID and GC/MS. The results obtained using both techniques were combined to improve compound identifications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Identification of Volatile Organic Compounds in Water by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Using Purge-and-Trap Sample Concentration and Introduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    block nwnber) Dynamic headspace analysis Water analysis Operating parameters Hewlett-Packard model 7675A...must be shifted toward the gas. One way of shifting the eauilibrium is to utilize the technique known as dynamic headspace analysis. Dynamic headspace analysis...of solvent interference during chromatography. i Bellar and Lichtenberg-^ have utilized the dynamic headspace technique, while avoiding

  14. ANALYSIS OF TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMBUSTION PROCESS EMISSIONS USING NOVEL MULTIDIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the analysis of trace-level organic combustion process emissions using novel multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (MDGC-MS) procedures. It outlines the application of the technique through the analyses of various incinerator effluent and produ...

  15. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  16. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  17. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining…

  18. Quantitation of Phenol Levels in Oil of Wintergreen Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with Selected Ion Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, Robert M.; Ballantine, David S.; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Industrial application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is a powerful technique that could be used to elucidate components of a complex mixture while offering the benefits of high-precision quantitative analysis. The natural wintergreen oil is examined for its phenol concentration to determine the level of refining…

  19. An Advanced Analytical Chemistry Experiment Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, MATLAB, and Chemometrics to Predict Biodiesel Blend Percent Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Schale, Stephen P.; Le, Trang M.; Larson, Joel C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a laboratory experiment for an advanced analytical chemistry course where we first focus on the chemometric technique partial least-squares (PLS) analysis applied to one-dimensional (1D) total-ion-current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-TIC) separations of biodiesel blends. Then, we focus on n-way PLS (n-PLS) applied to…

  20. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  1. Gas flow headspace liquid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cui; Qiu, Jinxue; Ren, Chunyan; Piao, Xiangfan; Li, Xifeng; Wu, Xue; Li, Donghao

    2009-11-06

    There is a trend towards the use of enrichment techniques such as microextraction in the analysis of trace chemicals. Based on the theory of ideal gases, theory of gas chromatography and the original headspace liquid phase microextraction (HS-LPME) technique, a simple gas flow headspace liquid phase microextraction (GF-HS-LPME) technique has been developed, where the extracting gas phase volume is increased using a gas flow. The system is an open system, where an inert gas containing the target compounds flows continuously through a special gas outlet channel (D=1.8mm), and the target compounds are trapped on a solvent microdrop (2.4 microL) hanging on the microsyringe tip, as a result, a high enrichment factor is obtained. The parameters affecting the enrichment factor, such as the gas flow rate, the position of the microdrop, the diameter of the gas outlet channel, the temperatures of the extracting solvent and of the sample, and the extraction time, were systematically optimized for four types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The results were compared with results obtained from HS-LPME. Under the optimized conditions (where the extraction time and the volume of the extracting sample vial were fixed at 20min and 10mL, respectively), detection limits (S/N=3) were approximately a factor of 4 lower than those for the original HS-LPME technique. The method was validated by comparison of the GF-HS-LPME and HS-LPME techniques using data for PAHs from environmental sediment samples.

  2. Isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for determination of pyrethroids in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Siu-kay; Yu, Kwok-chiu; Lam, Chi-ho

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the development of a highly precise and accurate analytical method for the determination of three matrix-bound pyrethroids, namely, cypermethrin, permethrin, and bifenthrin, using an isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. Identification of the analytes was confirmed under selective ion monitoring mode by the presence of two dominant ion fragments within specific time windows and matching of relative ion intensities of the ions concerned in samples and calibration standards. Quantitation was based on the measurement of concentration ratios of the natural and isotope analogues in the sample and calibration blends. Intraday and interday repeatabilities of replicate analyses of the pyethroids in an apple juice sample were below 0.5%. The expanded relative uncertainty ranged from 3 to 6%, which was significantly lower than the range obtained using internal or external calibration methods. As a labeled analogue is not available for bifenthrin, bifenthrin was determined using labeled cis-permethrin as the internal standard. The results were counterchecked by a gas chromatography-electron capture detection technique using PCB 209 as the internal standard. The method developed was applied to a recent pilot study organized by CCQM and the results were consistent with those of other participants.

  3. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Study of tert-Butylarsine Stability and Purification

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, M.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Bruskas, L.A.; Killeen, K.P.

    1999-07-20

    TBA (tert-butylarsine, H{sub 2}AsC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) has been demonstrated to be an effective arsenic precursor for the deposition of compound semiconductors such as GaAs by MOCVD (metal organic chemical vapor deposition). TBA is used as a liquid (bubbler) source in MOCVD and is a less toxic alternative to the more commonly used gaseous arsine (AsH{sub 3}). Materials and device performance using TBA have in many cases equaled or surpassed those using arsine. This includes the first observation of fractional quantum Hall behavior in a two dimensional electron gas structure grown by MOCVD. Despite the beneficial characteristics, the use of TBA in our laboratories has revealed some inconsistent behavior. Small pressure rises have been observed in the TBA bubbler sources when left unused over a period of many days. Measurements of the TBA partial pressure using UV absorption revealed that new absorption peaks could be observed after storage. The features of the absorption profile were insufficient to ascribe to a specific chemical species. Attempts to remove the gaseous impurities with liquid nitrogen freeze-pump-thaw techniques had limited success. Unfortunately, there is no published information on the room temperature decomposition of TBA. In this paper, we present a series of GCMS (gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy) analyses designed to determine the stability of TBA and identify its decomposition products in storage containers. The GCMS is also used to evaluate several methods for in-situ purification of TBA.

  4. Metabolomics by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: the combination of targeted and untargeted profiling

    PubMed Central

    Fiehn, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics is ideal for identifying and quantitating small molecular metabolites (<650 daltons), including small acids, alcohols, hydroxyl acids, amino acids, sugars, fatty acids, sterols, catecholamines, drugs, and toxins, often using chemical derivatization to make these compounds volatile enough for gas chromatography. This unit shows that on GC-MS- based metabolomics easily allows integrating targeted assays for absolute quantification of specific metabolites with untargeted metabolomics to discover novel compounds. Complemented by database annotations using large spectral libraries and validated, standardized standard operating procedures, GC-MS can identify and semi-quantify over 200 compounds per study in human body fluids (e.g., plasma, urine or stool) samples. Deconvolution software enables detection of more than 300 additional unidentified signals that can be annotated through accurate mass instruments with appropriate data processing workflows, similar to liquid chromatography-MS untargeted profiling (LC-MS). Hence, GC-MS is a mature technology that not only uses classic detectors (‘quadrupole’) but also target mass spectrometers (‘triple quadrupole’) and accurate mass instruments (‘quadrupole-time of flight’). This unit covers the following aspects of GC-MS-based metabolomics: (i) sample preparation from mammalian samples, (ii) acquisition of data, (iii) quality control, and (iv) data processing. PMID:27038389

  5. [Analysis of volatile oil of garlic by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaofei; Du, Ailing; Guan, Congsheng; Pan, Guangmin; Du, Aiqin; Wang, Weiqiang

    2005-09-01

    The volatile oil of garlic was extracted by hydrodistillation method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to analyse the compounds in the oil. The best extraction conditions for high-content, effective components were obtained through optimization. The capillary column was an HP-5MS column (25 mm x 0.25 mm i.d. x 0.25 microm); oven temperature increased with a rate of 5 degrees C /min from 80 to 300 degrees C, and then maintained for 20 min; sample size of 1 microL; split ratio of 100:1; carrier gas of helium (1 mL/min). Mass spectra were obtained at 70 eV. The temperatures of injector base, ionization source were maintained at 270 degrees C, 230 degrees C respectively. Under these conditions, twenty compounds in the volatile oil of garlic were isolated and identified, and the content of each was determined. Sulfur-containing compounds were found to be the principal components, of which the major compound was diallyl trisulfide with the content of more than 30%, which is higher than the others in the literature. The experimental results also indicated that hydrodistillation method is an effective method for officinal component extraction. In addition, it was also demonstrated that the garlic volatile oil was stable when stored at 0 degrees C for 6 months.

  6. [Simultaneous determination of three organic fluorides in workplace air by portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Xin, Chaoyi; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-06-01

    To establish a method for rapid determination of organic fluorides in the air of a fluorine chemical plant using portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Standard samples of monochlorodifluoromethane, tetrafluoroethylene, and hexafluoropropylene of different concentrations were prepared by static volumetric method with high-purity nitrogen as the diluent gas. The samples were injected into the GC-MS by a hand-held probe. Retention time and characteristic ion were used for qualitative analysis, and the area of selected ion peak was used for quantitative analysis. The standard curves were then created for quantitative determination of the three organic fluorides. The linear ranges for monochlorodifluoromethane, tetrafluoroethylene, and hexafluoropropylene by the method were 0.39-7.72, 0.45-8.84, and 0.61-12.20 mg/m3, respectively, the average recovery rates for the three concentrations were 102.8%, 96.0%, and 106.5%, respectively, and the average deviations were 2.1%, 5.1%, and 2.4%, respectively. The portable GC-MS can be used for the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative analysis of monochlorodifluoromethane, tetrafluoroethylene, and hexafluoropropylene in the workplace air, and the method is simple, fast, and accurate.

  7. Determination of ortho-phenylphenol in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M J; Brzak, K A; Bormett, G A

    1997-12-05

    A sensitive gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was developed to quantitate total o-phenylphenol (OPP) (free plus conjugates) in human urine. Conjugates of OPP were acid-hydrolyzed to free OPP, derivatized to the pentafluorobenzoyl ester derivative and analyzed via negative-ion chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two stable isotope analogs of OPP were shown to be suitable as internal standards for this method (D2-phenol ring, 13C6-phenyl ring). A synthetic method is presented for the preparation of the D2-OPP internal standard. The 13C6-OPP analog was also shown to be useful as an alternate test material for laboratory-based exposure studies. The limit of quantitation for this method was 1 ng OPP/ml urine. Calibration curves were linear for the analyte over the concentration range of 0.5-1117 ng OPP/ml urine. Relative recovery of OPP from urine ranged from 97.0 to 104.7%. Low levels of OPP (mean=6+/-7 ng/ml; n=22) were found in control human urine samples. The method was validated with urine samples obtained from human volunteers undergoing a dermal exposure study with 12C-/13C6-/14C-OPP. This method was developed to aid in assessments of human exposure to OPP during a variety of uses of the compound.

  8. Optimizing 2D gas chromatography mass spectrometry for robust tissue, serum and urine metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhanru; Huang, Honglei; Reim, Alexander; Charles, Philip D; Northage, Alan; Jackson, Dianne; Parry, Ian; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2017-04-01

    Two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) is utilized to an increasing extent in biomedical metabolomics. Here, we established and adapted metabolite extraction and derivatization protocols for cell/tissue biopsy, serum and urine samples according to their individual properties. GCxGC-MS analysis revealed detection of ~600 molecular features from which 165 were characterized representing different classes such as amino acids, fatty acids, lipids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and small polar components of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle using electron impact (EI) spectrum matching and validation using external standard compounds. Advantages of two-dimensional gas chromatography based resolution were demonstrated by optimizing gradient length and separation through modulation between the first and second column, leading to a marked increase in metabolite identification due to improved separation as exemplified for lactate versus pyruvate, talopyranose versus methyl palmitate and inosine versus docosahexaenoic acid. Our results demonstrate that GCxGC-MS represents a robust metabolomics platform for discovery and targeted studies that can be used with samples derived from the clinic. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxysterols in cosmetics-Determination by planar solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schrack, S; Hohl, C; Schwack, W

    2016-11-18

    Sterol oxidation products (SOPs) are linked to several toxicological effects. Therefore, investigation of potential dietary uptake sources particularly food of animal origin has been a key issue for these compounds. For the simultaneous determination of oxysterols from cholesterol, phytosterols, dihydrolanosterol and lanosterol in complex cosmetic matrices, planar solid phase extraction (pSPE) was applied as clean-up tool. SOPs were first separated from more non-polar and polar matrix constituents by normal phase thin-layer chromatography and then focussed into one target zone. Zone extraction was performed with the TLC-MS interface, followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. pSPE showed to be effective for cleaning up cosmetic samples as sample extracts were free of interferences, and gas chromatographic columns did not show any signs of overloading. Recoveries were between 86 and 113% with relative standard deviations of below 10% (n=6). Results of our market survey in 2016 showed that some cosmetics with ingredients of plant origin contained phytosterol oxidation products (POPs) in the low ppm range and therefore in line with levels reported for food. In lanolin containing products, total SOPs levels (cholesterol oxidation products (COPs), lanosterol oxidation products (LOPs), dihydrolanosterol oxidation products (DOPs)) being in the low percent range exceeded reported levels for food by several orders of magnitudes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of Morphine and Codeine in Human Urine by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Cao, Gaozhong; Hu, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of morphine and codeine in human urine. The GC-MS conditions were developed. The analysis was carried out on a HP-1MS column (30 m × 0.25 mm, 0.25 μm) with temperature programming, and Helium was used as the carrier gas with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode was used to quantify morphine and codeine. The derivation solvent, temperature, and time were optimized. A mixed solvent of propionic anhydride and pyridine (5 : 2) was finally used for the derivation at 80°C for 3 min. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration range of 25–2000.0 ng/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 25 ng/mL. The intra- and interday precision (RSD) values were below 13%, and the accuracy was in the range 87.2–108.5%. This developed method was successfully used for the determination of morphine and codeine in human urine for forensic identification study. PMID:24222889

  11. Determination of methomyl in the stomach contents of baited wildlife by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, John P; Bokhart, Mark; Johnson, Margaret; Lehner, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The poisoning of wildlife with fly-bait containing the active ingredient methomyl is an intentional and illegal act in many jurisdictions. A case of 2 animals poisoned by methomyl through consumption of tainted bait at multiple stations is described. Although thermally and ultraviolet-labile, methomyl can be identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and is detected in abundance in bait samples; however, it is not readily observed in tissues, owing to its rapid metabolism and elimination. The application of derivatizing functionalities, such as trimethylsilyl groups, stabilizes the methomyl-oxime metabolite to facilitate its detectability during exposure to the relatively harsh conditions of gas chromatography. This brief communication reports on the analytical detection of methomyl in baits and biological samples from poisoned wildlife. Essential to the case were the added determination of a fly-bait coactive ingredient, (Z)-9-tricosene, and identification of a chemical indicator, caffeine, to confirm both the type of pesticide product involved in the poisoning incident and the vehicle used to perpetrate its delivery.

  12. Analysis of 62 synthetic cannabinoids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with photoionization.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Mamoru; Sugie, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in electron ionization (EI) mode is one of the most commonly used techniques for analysis of synthetic cannabinoids, because the GC-EI-MS spectra contain characteristic fragment ions for identification of a compound; however, the information on its molecular ions is frequently lacking. To obtain such molecular ion information, GC-MS in chemical ionization (CI) mode is frequently used. However, GC-CI-MS requires a relatively tedious process using reagent gas such as methane or isobutane. In this study, we show that GC-MS in photoionization (PI) mode provided molecular ions in all spectra of 62 synthetic cannabinoids, and 35 of the 62 compounds showed only the molecular radical cations. Except for the 35 compounds, the PI spectra showed very simple patterns with the molecular peak plus only a few fragment peak(s). An advantage is that the ion source for GC-PI-MS can easily be used for GC-EI-MS as well. Therefore, GC-EI/PI-MS will be a useful tool for the identification of synthetic cannabinoids contained in a dubious product. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to use GC-PI-MS for analysis of synthetic cannabinoids.

  13. Identification and Quantification of Pesticides in Environmental Waters With Solid Phase Microextraction and Analysis Using Field-Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-10

    Microextraction and Analysis using Field-Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Name of Candidate: CPT Michael J. Nack...in the thesis manuscript entitled: Identification and Quantification of Pesticides in Environmental Waters with Solid Phase Microextraction ...Pesticides in Environmental Waters with Solid Phase Microextraction and Analysis using Field-Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

  14. Multivariate analysis of progressive thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-09-01

    Thermal decomposition of poly dimethyl siloxane compounds, Sylgard{reg_sign} 184 and 186, were examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. The technique involves sequentially heating a sample of the material of interest with subsequent analysis in a commercial GC/MS system. The decomposition chromatograms were analyzed using multivariate analysis tools including principal component analysis (PCA), factor rotation employing the varimax criterion, and multivariate curve resolution. The results of the analysis show seven components related to offgassing of various fractions of siloxanes that vary as a function of temperature. Thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique for analyzing chemical mixtures. It has great potential in numerous analytic areas including materials analysis, sports medicine, in the detection of designer drugs; and biological research for metabolomics. Data analysis is complicated, far from automated and can result in high false positive or false negative rates. We have demonstrated a step-wise TD/GC-MS technique that removes more volatile compounds from a sample before extracting the less volatile compounds. This creates an additional dimension of separation before the GC column, while simultaneously generating three-way data. Sandia's proven multivariate analysis methods, when applied to these data, have several advantages over current commercial options. It also has demonstrated potential for success in finding and enabling identification of trace compounds. Several challenges remain, however, including understanding the sources of noise in the data, outlier detection, improving the data pretreatment and analysis methods, developing a software tool for ease of use by the chemist, and demonstrating our belief that

  15. Morphological and Chemoprofile (Liquid Chromatography-mass Spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-mass Spectroscopy) Comparisons of Cyperus scariosus R. Br and Cyperus rotundus L.

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Lavanya; Katragadda, Suresh Babu; Botlagunta, Mahendran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cyperus scariosus (CS) R.Br and Cyperus rotundus (CR) L. belongs to Cyperaceae family which is well-reputed in the traditional systems of medicine. Although they grow in different agro-climatic conditions, they are often considered to be synonymous with each other. Objective: The present study was aimed to systematically classify both the species CS and CR through their morphological features and chemical profiling using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS), gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and thin layer chromatography patterns of the rhizome extracts. Materials and Methods: A method (LC-MS analysis) has been developed on Agilent LC-MSD Trap SL mass spectrometer equipped with Waters HR C18 column (3.9 mm × 300 mm, 6 μm) using isocratic elution with acetonitrile and water (70:30% v/v ratio). GC-MS analysis was performed on a Shimadzu GC-MS-QP 2010 equipped with DB-5 capillary column (30 m × 0.25 mm × 0.25 μm). Results: Chemoprofiling of CS and CR using LC-MS and GC-MS suggested that these two are different based on their deferential spectral pattern, however, some of the common peaks were found in both the species. In addition, we also performed the preliminary phytochemical investigation of hexane and chloroform extracts of these species, which led to the isolation of stigmasterol, β-sitosterol and lupeol as major constituents in CS. Conclusion: In summary, we have developed optimal chromatographic conditions (LC-MS and GC-MS) and morphological profiles to classify both the species, that is, CS and CR. Collectively, our analytical results coupled with the morphological data clearly suggested that CS and CR are morphologically different. SUMMARY The huge demand for herbal medicine has put pressure on the supply of natural resources which ultimately results in use of substandard materials or substitution and adulteration. The medicinal plants, Cyperus rotundus L and Cyperus scariosus R.Br which belongs to cyperaceae family

  16. Study on the photostability of guaiazulene by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Jessica; Gotti, Roberto; Albini, Angelo; Cavrini, Vanni

    2008-09-01

    The photostability of guaiazulene (1,4-dimethyl-7-isopropylazulene; GA), a natural azulenic compound used in cosmetic and health-care products, as well as in pharmaceutical preparations, was investigated in solution (methanol, ethanol, acetonitrile), by different techniques: gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and high-performance liquid chromatography combined with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and UV detection (LC/APCI-MS and HPLC/UV). A solar simulator (xenon-arc lamp) was used as UV-A radiation source. The study involved: monitoring compound decomposition, identifying products of photodegradation (PPs), assessing the role of oxygen and evaluating the kinetics of the process. Minor PPs are volatile compounds and were characterized by GC/MS, while oligomeric polyoxygenated compounds, tentatively characterized on the basis of MS and MS/MS spectra, were found to be the main photoproducts. The photodegradation was found to be enhanced by the presence of oxygen; nevertheless, determination of the singlet oxygen quantum yield for GA gave a lower value than that for the reference standard Rose Bengal. The obtained results and the developed stability-indicating methods (GC/MS and LC/MS) are of interest for stability studies and/or quality control purposes of GA as raw material or cosmetic products.

  17. Determination of hormonal growth promoters in bovine hair: comparison of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods for estradiol benzoate and nortestosterone decanoate.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Eleanor; Rambaud, Lauriane; Le Bizec, Bruno; O'Keeffe, Michael

    2009-04-01

    The detection of steroid residues in hair is a powerful strategy to demonstrate long-term administration of these growth promoters in meat production animals. Analysis of the ester form of administered steroids is an unambiguous approach to prove the illegal use of natural hormones. For detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) was generally used. However, recent advances in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technology have improved the robustness and potential sensitivity of this method. This paper describes development and validation, according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, of LC-MS/MS and GC-MS/MS methods, in two separate laboratories, for determination of steroid esters in bovine hair. Bovine hair samples taken from animals treated with estradiol-3-benzoate and nortestosterone decanoate, as well as from an untreated animal, were used to evaluate the comparability of the results of the two validated methods. The results of the inter-comparison demonstrate that both the LC-MS/MS and the GC-MS/MS methods are fit for purpose and capable of determining steroid esters in hair samples from treated bovine animals.

  18. Laser desorption fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Shahar, T; Dagan, S; Amirav, A

    1998-06-01

    A novel method for fast analysis is presented. It is based on laser desorption injection followed by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in supersonic molecular beams. The sample was placed in an open air or purged laser desorption compartment, held at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature conditions. Desorption was performed with a XeCl Excimer pulsed laser with pulse energy of typically 3 mJ on the surface. About 20 pulses at 50 Hz were applied for sample injection, resulting in about 0.4 s injection time and one or a few micrograms sample vapor or small particles. The laser desorbed sample was further thermally vaporized at a heated frit glass filter located at the fast GC inlet. Ultrafast GC separation and quantification was achieved with a 50-cm-long megabore column operated with a high carrier gas flow rate of up to 240 mL/min. The high carrier gas flow rate provided effective and efficient entrainment of the laser desorbed species in the sweeping gas. Following the fast GC separation, the sample was analyzed by mass spectrometry in supersonic molecular beams. Both electron ionization and hyperthermal surface ionization were employed for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity. Typical laser desorption analysis time was under 10 s. The laser desorption fast GC-MS was studied and demonstrated with the following sample/matrices combinations, all without sample preparation or extraction: (a) traces of dioctylphthalate plasticizer oil on stainless steel surface and the efficiency of its cleaning; (b) the detection of methylparathion and aldicarb pesticides on orange leaves; (c) water surface analysis for the presence of methylparathion pesticide; (d) caffeine analysis in regular and decaffeinated coffee powder; (e) paracetamol and codeine drug analysis in pain relieving drug tablets; (f) caffeine trace analysis in raw urine; (g) blood analysis for the presence of 1 ppm lidocaine drug. The features and advantages of the laser desorption fast GC

  19. Determination of residual styrene monomer in polystyrene granules by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garrigós, M C; Marín, M L; Cantó, A; Sánchez, A

    2004-12-24

    Polystyrene is widely used in formulations intended for children use. The main problem with this plastic is the residual styrene, which can migrate from the product, and therefore, be in contact with children. The acute toxicity of styrene is well known, raising the need of an efficient and fast method of analysis for this compound. Several extraction methods have been evaluated and compared for the determination of residual styrene monomer in polystyrene granules used in toys: supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), Soxhlet extraction, headspace emission and dissolution-precipitation. The analyte was subsequently detected by gas chromatography (GC) with MS detection. The results indicated that the most efficient method was dissolution-precipitation giving even higher extraction efficiency than SFE. For validating the method, PS samples spiked with known quantities of styrene at three concentration levels were prepared to calculate the extraction recovery. The founded validation data proved the suitability of the proposed method.

  20. Determination of cyclamate in urine by derivatized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Idris, Mohd; Middha, Deepak; Rasool, Shaik N; Shukla, Sudhir K; Baggi, Tulsidas R

    2013-01-01

    It is important in toxicological/drug screening work to rule out the possible interfering analytes, to eliminate the false positive or negative results. In this paper, we describe a simple, selective, and sensitive derivatized GC-MS method for the determination of cyclohexylsulfamic acid (cyclamate) in urine. Elite- 5MS capillary column was used for the separation of analytes and detection using GC-MS. The analysis was carried out in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM) in the range of 26 to 200 using m/z values of 57, 30, 55, 41, 44, 67, 82, 98, and 39. The method is based on the conversion of cyclamate into nitroso derivative of cyclamate followed by its gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. The limit of detection, limit of quantitation, and linearity range of the proposed method were found to be 0.2 μg/ ml, 0.7 μg/ml, and 1-15 μg/ml, respectively. The recovery of the present method is in the range of 88-94%. The proposed method can be applied for detection and quantification of cyclamate in urine.

  1. Determination of cyclamate in urine by derivatized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Mohd; Middha, Deepak; Rasool, Shaik N.; Shukla, Sudhir K.; Baggi, Tulsidas R.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: It is important in toxicological/drug screening work to rule out the possible interfering analytes, to eliminate the false positive or negative results. In this paper, we describe a simple, selective, and sensitive derivatized GC-MS method for the determination of cyclohexylsulfamic acid (cyclamate) in urine. Materials and Methods: Elite- 5MS capillary column was used for the separation of analytes and detection using GC-MS. The analysis was carried out in selected ion monitoring mode (SIM) in the range of 26 to 200 using m/z values of 57, 30, 55, 41, 44, 67, 82, 98, and 39. Results and Discussion: The method is based on the conversion of cyclamate into nitroso derivative of cyclamate followed by its gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. The limit of detection, limit of quantitation, and linearity range of the proposed method were found to be 0.2 μg/ ml, 0.7 μg/ml, and 1-15 μg/ml, respectively. The recovery of the present method is in the range of 88-94%. Conclusion: The proposed method can be applied for detection and quantification of cyclamate in urine. PMID:23559823

  2. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  3. [Determination of organotin compounds in textile auxiliaries by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Yanming; Hu, Yongjie; Liu, Jinhua; Guo, Yuliang; Wang, Guiqin

    2011-04-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method has been developed for the determination of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPhT) in textile auxiliaries. The sample was first extracted with n-hexane in acetate buffer solution (pH 4.0) under ultrasonication (for hydrophobic sample) or oscillation extraction (for hydrophilic sample) and then derivatized with sodium tetraethylborate in tetrahydrofuran. The derivative was determined by GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The separation and quantification were achieved using a Rxi-5 ms silica capillary column (30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm). The linear ranges were 0.1-8.0 mg/L for both DBT and TBT, and 0.1-4.0 mg/L for TPhT. There were good linear relationships between the peak area and concentration in the linear ranges and the correlation coefficients (r2) were 0.9994-0.9998. The detection limits (LOD) were from 0.003 mg/L to 0.005 mg/L. The average recoveries of these organotin compounds at the three spiked levels of 4.0, 10.0 and 40.0 mg/kg were 92.6%-108.0% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 2.5%-10.2%. The method is simple and accurate for simultaneous analysis of the DBT, TBT and TPhT in textile auxiliaries.

  4. Identification and differentiation of dragon's blood in works of art using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baumer, Ursula; Dietemann, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Dragon's blood is a common but non-specific name for red-coloured resins that are produced by various plants, particularly exudations from plant species belonging to the genera Dracaena and Daemonorops. Although dragon's blood is mentioned in historic sources as a colourant, it has hardly ever been identified in real artworks. This paper reports the identification and discrimination of dragon's blood produced by Dracaena cinnabari, Dracaena draco as well as Daemonorops draco and Daemonorops micracantha by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) within the context of a routine analysis of binding media used in works of art. The detection of specific flavonoid marker compounds in both underivatised and methylated methanol extracts provided the first evidence for the use of dragon's blood from all four species in various works of art from the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries. Dragon's blood was mainly used as a red colourant in gold lacquers as well as translucent glazes and paints, e.g. in reverse-glass paintings (Hinterglasmalerei).

  5. Evaluation of the quality of sandalwood essential oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Simmonds, Monique S J; Kite, Geoffrey C

    2004-03-05

    Trade and historic oils from 'sandalwoods', labelled as Amyris balsamifera, Eremophila mitchelli, Fusanus acuminatus (= Santalum acuminatum), Santalum album, S. austrocaledonicum, S. latifolium, S. spicatum and S. yasi, were assessed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using GC-MS, none of the oils assessed complied with the internationally recognised standard of a 90% santalol content, and only about half of the trade sandalwood oils met with recent International Organisation for Standardisation standards. The majority of trade oils, reportedly from S. album, contained approximately 50-70% santalols (Z-alpha and Z-beta). Thus, the internationally recognised specification (90% santalols) for S. album requires re-evaluation by more efficient analysis methods. In view of the issues associated with the quality of sandalwood oils being traded, specifications of > or = 43% Z-alpha-santalol and > or = 18% Z-beta-santalol for S. album oil estimated by GC-MS are suggested. GC-MS are recommended as it assists with authentication and quality control issues associated with sandalwood oils.

  6. Multi-class method for biomonitoring of hair samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martín, Julia; Möder, Monika; Gaudl, Alexander; Alonso, Esteban; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    Currently, non-invasive biomonitoring of human exposure to organic pollutants bases upon the analysis mainly of urine and human breast milk. While mostly persistent organic pollutants are the center of interest, the aim of our study was to develop a method for the determination of different chemical classes of emerging pollutants (organophosphorus flame retardants, plastic additives such as phthalates, bisphenol A, insecticides, antimicrobials, preservatives and musk fragrances) in hair by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The preferred sample preparation included hydrolysis of the hair with trifluoroacetic acid in methanol followed by a liquid-liquid extraction using hexane/ethyl acetate. The validated method is characterized by recoveries higher than 77 % for most analytes, relative standard deviations below 16 % and limits of detection between 2 pg mg(-1) (HHCB) and 292 pg mg(-1) (propylparaben) using 50 mg of dry hair. After respective blank corrections, bis-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and the musk fragrance HHCB were the predominant compounds determined in all hair samples at concentrations between 32 and 59 ng mg(-1) and 0.8-13 ng mg(-1), respectively. The bactericide triclosan and the insect repellent N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) were detected in selected hair samples at 2 and 0.8 ng mg(-1), respectively.

  7. Analysis of isothiazolinones in environmental waters by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rafoth, Astrid; Gabriel, Sabine; Sacher, Frank; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen

    2007-09-14

    This paper describes an analytical method for the determination of five biocides of isothiazolinone type (2-methyl-3-isothiazolinone (MI), 5-chloro-2-methyl-3-isothiazolinone (CMI), 1,2-benzisothiazolinone (BIT), 2-octyl-3-isothiazolinone (OI), 4,5-dichloro-2-octyl-3-isothiazolinone (DCOI)) in environmental waters. The method is based on pre-concentration of the analytes by solid-phase extraction onto a mixture of a polymeric material and RP-C18 material and subsequent determination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). One of the target compounds (BIT) is derivatised with diazomethane after pre-concentration to improve its chromatographic performance. The method was optimised with respect to pre-concentration conditions (liquid-liquid extraction versus solid-phase extraction, solid-phase material, elution solvent and volume) and extensively validated. Applying the method to surface waters, groundwaters, and drinking waters, limits of detection between 0.01 and 0.1 microg/l could be achieved and the repeatability was below 10% for all compounds except for MI. Additional investigations showed that the stability of the isothiazolinones in environmental waters is limited and sample storage at 4 degrees C is mandatory to preserve the target biocides. First investigations of influents and effluents of a wastewater treatment plant showed that conventional wastewater treatment exhibits a high efficiency for removal of the isothiazolinones. In river waters, the target isothiazolinones could not be detected.

  8. Determination of emulsion explosives with Span-80 as emulsifier by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei-Fei; Yu, Jing; Hu, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Meng-Xia; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Hai-Ling; Han, Jie

    2011-06-03

    A novel approach for identification and determination of emulsion explosives with Span-80 (sorbitol mono-oleate) as the emulsifier and their postblast residues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been developed. 24 kinds of emulsion explosives collected have been processed by transesterification reaction with metholic KOH solution and the emulsifier has turned into methyl esters of fatty acids. From the peak area ratios of their methyl esters, most of these emulsion explosives can be differentiated. In order to detect the postblast residues of emulsion explosives, the sorbitols in the emulsifier Span-80 obtained after transesterification reaction have been further derivatized by silylation reaction with N,O-bis-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS) as the derivatizing reagent. The derivatization conditions were optimized and the derivatives were determined by GC-MS. The results showed that the silylation derivatives of sorbitol and it isomers, combined with hydrocarbon compounds and methyl esters of fatty acids, were the characteristic components for identification of the emulsion explosives. The established approach was applied to analyze the postblast residues of emulsion explosives. It has been found that the method was sensitive and specific, especially when detecting the derivatives of sorbitol and its isomers by GC-MS in selecting ion mode. The information of the characteristic components can help probe the origin of the emulsion explosives and providing scientific evidences and clues for solving the crimes of the emulsion explosive explosion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of beta-hydroxybutyrate in blood and urine using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Huda M A; Cooper, Gail A A

    2009-10-01

    Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is considered a potential biomarker for alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA). A robust and sensitive method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of BHB in postmortem blood and urine using deuterated gamma-hydroxybutyrate as an internal standard. Samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following liquid-liquid extraction and silyl derivatization. The limits of detection and lower limits of quantification in blood and urine were 2 and 7 mg/L and 2 and 6 mg/L, respectively. The interday and intraday precision was measured by coefficients of variation for blood and urine and ranged from 1.0 to 12.4% for quality control samples spiked at 50 and 300 mg/L. The linear range of 50-500 mg/L resulted in an average correlation of R(2) > 0.99, and the average extraction recoveries in blood and urine were >or= 82% and >or= 59%, respectively. BHB remains stable in blood spiked at a concentration of 300 mg/L for 15 days when stored within a refrigerator (2-5 degrees C). Postmortem blood and urine samples were analyzed using the validated method for cases where the deceased had a history of chronic alcohol abuse to establish the use of BHB as a potential marker of AKA.

  10. EIder: A compound identification tool for gas chromatography mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Koo, Imhoi; Kim, Seongho; Shi, Biyun; Lorkiewicz, Pawel; Song, Ming; McClain, Craig; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-05-27

    We report software entitled EIder (EI mass spectrum identifier) that provides users with eight literature reported spectrum matching algorithms for compound identification from gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data. EIder calculates retention index according to experimental conditions categorized by column class, column type and data type, where 9 empirical distribution functions of the absolute retention index deviation to its mean value were constructed using the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 2011 retention index database to improve the accuracy of compound identification. EIder filters compound candidates based on elementary composition and derivatization reagent, and automatically adds the molecular information of the native compound to each derivatized compound using a manually created database. When multiple samples are analyzed together, EIder performs cross-sample alignment and provides an option of using an average mass spectrum for compound identification. Furthermore, a suite of graphical user interfaces are implemented in EIder to allow users to both manually and automatically modify the identification results using experimental information at various analysis stages. Analysis of three types of GC-MS datasets indicates that the developed EIder software can improve the accuracy of compound identification.

  11. Mixture model normalization for non-targeted gas chromatography/mass spectrometry metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Reisetter, Anna C; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Bain, James R; Nodzenski, Michael; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga; Metzger, Boyd E; Newgard, Christopher B; Lowe, William L; Scholtens, Denise M

    2017-02-02

    Metabolomics offers a unique integrative perspective for health research, reflecting genetic and environmental contributions to disease-related phenotypes. Identifying robust associations in population-based or large-scale clinical studies demands large numbers of subjects and therefore sample batching for gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) non-targeted assays. When run over weeks or months, technical noise due to batch and run-order threatens data interpretability. Application of existing normalization methods to metabolomics is challenged by unsatisfied modeling assumptions and, notably, failure to address batch-specific truncation of low abundance compounds. To curtail technical noise and make GC/MS metabolomics data amenable to analyses describing biologically relevant variability, we propose mixture model normalization (mixnorm) that accommodates truncated data and estimates per-metabolite batch and run-order effects using quality control samples. Mixnorm outperforms other approaches across many metrics, including improved correlation of non-targeted and targeted measurements and superior performance when metabolite detectability varies according to batch. For some metrics, particularly when truncation is less frequent for a metabolite, mean centering and median scaling demonstrate comparable performance to mixnorm. When quality control samples are systematically included in batches, mixnorm is uniquely suited to normalizing non-targeted GC/MS metabolomics data due to explicit accommodation of batch effects, run order and varying thresholds of detectability. Especially in large-scale studies, normalization is crucial for drawing accurate conclusions from non-targeted GC/MS metabolomics data.

  12. Determination of pesticides in soil by liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Lee, Hian Kee

    2004-06-04

    Trace amounts of pesticides in soil were determined by liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The technique involved the use of a small amount (3 microl) of organic solvent impregnated in a hollow fiber membrane, which was attached to the needle of a conventional GC syringe. The organic solvent was repeatedly discharged into and withdrawn from the porous polypropylene hollow fiber by a syringe pump, with the pesticides being extracted from a 4 ml aqueous soil sample into the organic solvent within the hollow fiber. Aspects of the developed procedure such as organic solvent selection, extraction time, movement pattern of plunger, concentrations of humic acid and salt, and the proportion of organic solvent in the soil sample, were optimized. Limits of detection (LOD) were between 0.05 and 0.1 microg/g with GC-MS analysis under selected-ion monitoring (SIM). Also, this method provided good precision ranging from 6 to 13%; the relative standard deviations were lower than 10% for most target pesticides (at spiked levels of 0.5 microg/g in aqueous soil sample). Finally, the results were compared to those achieved using solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The results demonstrated that LPME was a fast (within 4 min) and accurate method to determine trace amounts of pesticides in soil.

  13. Postmortem interval estimation: a novel approach utilizing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry-based biochemical profiling.

    PubMed

    Kaszynski, Richard H; Nishiumi, Shin; Azuma, Takeshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Kondo, Takeshi; Takahashi, Motonori; Asano, Migiwa; Ueno, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-01

    While the molecular mechanisms underlying postmortem change have been exhaustively investigated, the establishment of an objective and reliable means for estimating postmortem interval (PMI) remains an elusive feat. In the present study, we exploit low molecular weight metabolites to estimate postmortem interval in mice. After sacrifice, serum and muscle samples were procured from C57BL/6J mice (n = 52) at seven predetermined postmortem intervals (0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h). After extraction and isolation, low molecular weight metabolites were measured via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and examined via semi-quantification studies. Then, PMI prediction models were generated for each of the 175 and 163 metabolites identified in muscle and serum, respectively, using a non-linear least squares curve fitting program. A PMI estimation panel for muscle and serum was then erected which consisted of 17 (9.7%) and 14 (8.5%) of the best PMI biomarkers identified in muscle and serum profiles demonstrating statistically significant correlations between metabolite quantity and PMI. Using a single-blinded assessment, we carried out validation studies on the PMI estimation panels. Mean ± standard deviation for accuracy of muscle and serum PMI prediction panels was -0.27 ± 2.88 and -0.89 ± 2.31 h, respectively. Ultimately, these studies elucidate the utility of metabolomic profiling in PMI estimation and pave the path toward biochemical profiling studies involving human samples.

  14. Determination of Synthetic Cathinones in Urine Using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Techniques.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei-Yin; Ko, Ya-Chun; Lin, Mei-Chih; Wang, Po-Yu; Chen, Yu-Pen; Chiueh, Lih-Ching; Shih, Daniel Yang-Chih; Chou, Hsiu-Kuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the abuse of synthetic cathinones has increased considerably. This study proposes a method, based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), to analyze and quantify six synthetic cathinones in urine samples: mephedrone (4-MMC), methylone (bk-MDMA), butylone, ethylone, pentylone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In our procedure, the urine samples undergo solid-phase extraction (SPE) and derivatization prior to injection into the GC-MS device. Separation is performed using a HP-5MS capillary column. The use of selective ion monitoring (SIM mode) makes it is good sensitivity in this method, and the entire analysis process is within 18 min. In addition, the proposed method maintains linearity in the calibration curve from 50 to 2,000 ng/mL (r(2) > 0.995). The limit of detection of this method is 5 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (20 ng/mL); the limit of quantification is 20 ng/mL, with the exception of MDPV (50 ng/mL). In testing, the extraction performance of SPE was between 82.34 and 104.46%. Precision and accuracy results were satisfactory <15%. The proposed method was applied to six real urine samples, one of which was found to contain 4-MMC and bk-MDMA. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method in the identification of synthetic cathinones in urine, with regard to the limits of detection and quantification. This method is highly repeatable and accurate.

  15. Characterization by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of sterols in saccharomyces cerevisiae during autolysis.

    PubMed

    Le Fur, Y; Maume, G; Feuillat, M; Maume, B F

    1999-07-01

    Yeast autolysis affects membrane stability and induces a release of vacuolar enzymes into the cell cytoplasm. Consecutively, it was important to study the evolution of sterol content in Saccharomycescerevisiae for a fourteen day period of accelerated autolysis. Unesterified and esterified sterols were analyzed both in the biomass and in the autolysis medium. Ten sterols were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A second group of six sterols was separated and partially characterized. Among the first group of 10 sterols, a dehydroergosterol was identified as ergosta-5, 7,9(11),22-tetraen-3beta-ol, not yet charaterized in S. cerevisiae. Yeast autolysis induced a decrease of esterified sterol content, especially first intermediates in the sequence of the ergosterol biosynthesis, as zymosterol. In contrast, the yeast autolysis resulted in the release of a low quantity of sterols into the medium. At the end of the fourteenth day of autolysis, 0.015% of the total sterol content of the initial biomass was found in the medium.

  16. A novel method for the determination of guanfacine in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Haglock, Carrie; Wolf, Carl; Poklis, Alphonse

    2008-10-01

    Guanfacine (Tenex), an antihypertensive available since 1975, has recently been indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children (Intuniv). Because of this new usage, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the determination of guanfacine in urine. Guanfacine and 100 ng of protriptyline (internal standard) were extracted from 1.0 mL urine with 0.5 mL of saturated carbonate/bicarbonate buffer and 2 mL of ethyl acetate. The solvent extract was evaporated and derivatized with heptaflurobutyric anhydride in n-butyl chloride. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a DB-5 capillary column (30 m x 0.32 mm, 0.25 microm). Ions monitored for guanfacine were m/z 86.1, 272.1, and 274.1, and ions monitored for protriptyline were m/z 191.1 and 189.1. Concentrations were determined using calibrators over the range of 0.1-2.0 mg/L. The linear regression for all calibration curves had r2 values > or = 0.99. The limit of detection was 0.05 mg/L; limit of quantitation was 0.1 mg/L; and upper limit of linearity was 10.0 mg/L. Percent recovery of guanfacine at 0.1 and 2.0 mg/L was 93% and 71%, respectively. The method was found acceptable for routine quantitative analysis of guanfacine in urine.

  17. Isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine for stable isotope analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, C.S.; Klein, P.D.

    1980-09-01

    A method for the isolation and derivatization of plasma taurine is described that allows stable isotope determinations of taurine to be made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The isolation procedure can be applied to 0.1 ml of plasma; the recovery of plasma taurine was 70 to 80%. For gc separation, taurine was converted to its dimethylaminomethylene methyl ester derivative which could not be detected by hydrogen flame ionization, but could be monitored readily by NH/sub 3/ chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The derivatization reaction occurred partially on-column and required optimization of injection conditions. Using stable isotope ratiometry multiple ion detection, (M + 2 + H)/sup +//(M + H)/sup +/ ion ratio of natural abundance taurine was determined with a standard deviation of less than +-0.07% of the ratio. The (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine/taurine mole ratios of standard mixtures could be accurately determined to 0.001. This stable isotope gc-ms method is suitable for studying the plasma kinetics of (1,2-/sup 13/C)taurine in infants who are at risk with respect to taurine depletion.

  18. Determination of phthalate esters in teas and tea infusions by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Liping; Ma, Lijuan; Qiao, Yang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Dongguang

    2016-04-15

    Phthalate esters (PAEs), a group of environmental pollutants which are carcinogenic to human body, have been detected in teas. In this work, five PAEs in teas and tea infusions were quantitatively determined by a modified simultaneous distillation extraction (SDE) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. After the optimization of SDE, the proposed method afforded a wide range of linearity and high linear regression coefficients with the limits of detection range of 0.24-3.72 μg/kg. The average recoveries were 79.83-116.67% for tea samples and 78.22-101.64% for tea infusions with all the relative standard deviations below 20%. The total content of five PAEs in teas was 1.135-3.734 mg/kg and the total dissolving ratio of five PAEs from tea to infusion was 19.05-28.07% for the selected tea samples. The risk assessment result of all the selected tea samples demonstrated that the population with the habit of drinking tea won't cause risk to human health.

  19. Quantification of busulfan in plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following derivatization with tetrafluorothiophenol.

    PubMed

    Quernin, M H; Poonkuzhali, B; Montes, C; Krishnamoorthy, R; Dennison, D; Srivastava, A; Vilmer, E; Chandy, M; Jacqz-Aigrain, E

    1998-05-08

    A specific and highly sensitive method has been developed for the determination of busulfan in plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using a deuterium-labeled busulfan (busulfan-d8) as internal standard. Plasma containing busulfan and busulfan-d8 were extracted with ethyl acetate and derivatized with 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorothiophenol prior to the monitoring of specific ions. The limit of quantification of the assay was 20 ng/ml and the calibration curve was linear over the range of 10 to 2000 ng/ml of derivatized busulfan. This method was in good agreement with the GC-MS assay using derivatization with sodium iodide and measuring diiodobutane. In addition, a pharmacokinetic study of busulfan was conducted in six children. The apparent oral clearance was 5.7+/-1.9 ml/kg/min and the volume of distribution was 1.0+/-0.4 l/kg and were similar to those previously reported in pediatric patients.

  20. Discriminating Hodgdon Pyrodex(®) and Triple Seven(®) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Routon, Benjamin J; Kocher, Brandon B; Goodpaster, John V

    2011-01-01

    Pyrodex(®) and Triple Seven(®) are black powder substitutes that often find use as fillers in improvised explosive devices, such as pipe bombs. These propellants have essentially the same overall appearance and oxidizers, but different fuels. For example, Pyrodex(®) contains sulfur, sodium benzoate, and dicyandiamide (DCDA), whereas Triple Seven(®) lacks sulfur but also contains 3-nitrobenzoic acid. In this method, intact particles and postblast solid residues were reacted with bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide + 1% trimethylchlorosilane in acetonitrile for 30 min at 60°C. The resultant trimethylsilyl derivatives of the organic fuels were then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Each derivative was clearly resolved from other components, and high-quality mass spectra were obtained. In addition, characteristic fragments resulting from loss of a methyl radical from the molecular ion (m/z 163 for sulfur, m/z 171 for DCDA, m/z 179 for benzoic acid, and m/z 224 for nitrobenzoic acid) were able to be monitored.

  1. Magnetic solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometrical analysis of sixteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ying; Yan, Zhihong; NguyenVan, Manh; Wang, Lijia; Cai, Qingyun

    2015-08-07

    Fluorenyl functionalized superparamagnetic core/shell magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, Fe3O4@SiO2@Flu) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The MNPs having an average diameter of 200nm were then used as solid-phase extraction sorbent for the determination of 16 priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water samples designated by United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The main influencing parameters, including sorbent amount, desorption solvent, sample volume and extraction time were optimized. Analyses were performed on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Method validation proved the feasibility of the developed sorbents for the quantitation of the investigated analytes at trace levels. Limit of detection ranging from 0.5 to 4.0ng/L were obtained. The repeatability was investigated by evaluating the intra- and inter-day precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 13.1%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PAHs in water samples with the recoveries in the range of 96.0-106.7%.

  2. Flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with a supersonic molecular beam.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Maya; Gordin, Alexander; Alon, Tal; Amirav, Aviv

    2006-09-29

    A new approach of flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC x GC-MS) with supersonic molecular beam (SMB) and a quadrupole mass analyzer is presented. Flow modulation uniquely enables GC x GC-MS to be achieved even with the limited scan speed of quadrupole MS, and its 20 ml/min column flow rate is handled, splitless, by the SMB interface. Flow modulation GC x GC-SMB-MS shares all the major benefits of GC x GC and combines them with GC-MS including: (a) increased GC separation capability; (b) improved sensitivity via narrower GC peaks; (c) improved sensitivity through reduced matrix interference and chemical noise; (d) polarity and functional group sample information via the order of elution from the second polar column. In addition, GC x GC-SMB-MS is uniquely characterized by the features of GC-MS with SMB of enhanced and trustworthy molecular ion plus isotope abundance analysis (IAA) for improved sample identification and fast fly-through ion source response time. The combination of flow modulation GC x GC with GC-MS with SMB (supersonic GC-MS) was explored with complex matrices such as diesel fuel analysis and pesticide analysis in agricultural products.

  3. Characterization of ballpoint pen inks by thermal and desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2005-09-01

    The characterization of ink on paper is of importance for dating and comparing questioned ink entries in forensic document examination. Inks are commonly characterized by their colorant profile that is identified by well-established analytical methods. Numerous ink formulations show identical colorant profiles, though. In order to differentiate inks that are not distinguishable by colorant analysis, a method for the characterization of colorless ink ingredients, namely binders, solvents and additives is necessary. In this paper, we propose a technique for the analysis of colorless compounds in ballpoint inks using direct thermal desorption of the ink on paper followed by chemical analysis of the desorbed volatile compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As compared to liquid extraction and subsequent analysis of the extracts, the technique avoids possible contamination risks. Sensitivity is very high due to the enrichment of volatile components by thermal desorption. Even from old samples, the chromatograms obtained by the method enable the determination of binder polymers, solvents and additives. Pure binders as used by ink manufacturers were analyzed for unambiguous assignment of analytical results to specific polymers. To prove the practical applicability, we analyzed 121 ballpoint pens, not all having the same colorant profile, and grouped the pens into resin and solvent categories.

  4. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry can be used for dose estimation in irradiated pork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oca, M. C.; Bartolotta, A.; Cammilleri, M. C.; Giuffrida, S. A.; Parlato, A.; Di Noto, A. M.; Caracappa, S.

    2009-07-01

    Food safety can be improved using ionizing radiation to reduce food spoilage and to extend its shelf life. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) has been validated by the European Community as a powerful method to identify irradiated food containing fat. The preliminary goals of our research were: (i) to set up this method, based on the detection of radiation induced 2-dodecylcyclobutanones (2-DCB) in pork muscle samples and (ii) to check the microbiological efficacy of the treatment. The main objective was to render the GC/MS a quantitative technique for dose estimation, through the measurement of the 2-DCB concentration in the irradiated sample. Our results show that the reduction of the microbial population is substantially reduced even at 2 kGy, and that a clear identification of irradiated samples can be achieved also one month after irradiation at 2 kGy in frozen-stored samples. The 2-DCB concentration showed a linear dependence on dose in the range 1-10 kGy, no matter the origin of the sample; a unique calibration function was obtained, that allowed dose estimation in irradiated pork samples. A retrospective evaluation on the quality of the treatment could be carried out this way.

  5. Serum total testosterone: immunoassay compared with negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R L; Herold, D A

    1996-05-01

    We have developed an electron capture negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure to quantify serum testosterone in the clinically relevant range 0.69-69.3 nmol/L and used this procedure to assess Ciba Corning Diagnostics ACS:180 testosterone immunoassay. The GC-MS method involves liquid-liquid extraction of serum samples and synthesis of a pentafluorobenzyloxime/silyl ether derivative of testosterone with excellent chromatographic and electron capturing properties. The ACS testosterone assay is the first fully automated nonradioactive testosterone immunoassay approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients' specimens (101, 57 males, 44 females) were analyzed by both techniques. A plot of the GC-MS (x) vs ACS (y) testosterone concentrations for men was linear (y = 1.07x + 0.19 nmol/L), showing excellent correlation (r2 = 0.98) between the two assays. Agreement of the two assays for female specimens was poor (y = 0.72x + 1.2 nmol/L), with a poor correlation (r2 = 0.31).

  6. Identification of tartary buckwheat tea aroma compounds with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peiyou; Ma, Tingjun; Wu, Li; Shan, Fang; Ren, Guixing

    2011-08-01

    Tartary buckwheat tea, which is an important and healthy product, has a distinct malty aroma. However, its characteristic aroma compounds have not been elucidated. The aims of present study were identification and quantification of its aroma compounds. The analyses were performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after 3 different isolation techniques. Seventy-seven compounds were identified. Among these compounds, 35 were quantified by available standards. The compounds with a high probability of contribution to the tartary buckwheat tea aroma (OAV ≥ 10) were as follows: 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone, nonanal, 2,3-diethyl-5-methylpyrazine, benzeneacetaldehyde, maltol, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-ethyl-5-methylpyrazine, trimethylpyrazine. Some nutritional and bioactive compounds were also identified in this study, such as linoleic acid, niacin, vanillic acid, 7-hydroxycoumarin, butylated hydroxytoluene. Practical Application: Tartary buckwheat, one type of buckwheat, has gained much attention from nutritionists and medical doctors in recent years. It is rich in rutin, quercetin, and other nutrients that are good for health. Tartary buckwheat-based product such as tartary buckwheat tea is an important and popular healthy product in China, Japan,South Korea, European countries as well as in American countries. It has a distinct malty aroma. The present study first identified and quantified of its aroma compounds. The results will draw attention to other researchers in food flavor and buckwheat filed.

  7. Integration of gas chromatography mass spectrometry methods for differentiating ricin preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Wunschel, David S; Melville, Angela M; Ehrhardt, Christopher J; Colburn, Heather A; Victry, Kristin D; Antolick, Kathryn C; Wahl, Jon H; Wahl, Karen L

    2012-05-07

    The investigation of crimes involving chemical or biological agents is infrequent, but presents unique analytical challenges. The protein toxin ricin is encountered more frequently than other agents and is found in the seeds of Ricinus communis, commonly known as the castor plant. Typically, the toxin is extracted from castor seeds utilizing a variety of different recipes that result in varying purity of the toxin. Moreover, these various purification steps can also leave or differentially remove a variety of exogenous and endogenous residual components with the toxin that may indicate the type and number of purification steps involved. We have applied three gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) based analytical methods to measure the variation in seed carbohydrates and castor oil ricinoleic acid, as well as the presence of solvents used for purification. These methods were applied to the same samples prepared using four previously identified toxin preparation methods, starting from four varieties of castor seeds. The individual data sets for seed carbohydrate profiles, ricinoleic acid, or acetone amount each provided information capable of differentiating different types of toxin preparations across seed types. However, the integration of the data sets using multivariate factor analysis provided a clear distinction of all samples based on the preparation method, independent of the seed source. In particular, the abundance of mannose, arabinose, fucose, ricinoleic acid, and acetone were shown to be important differentiating factors. These complementary tools provide a more confident determination of the method of toxin preparation than would be possible using a single analytical method.

  8. [Determination of two mouldy compounds in cork by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xi; Liang, Ming; Li, Xiaojing; Xiong, Wenming; Tang, Hong; Jiang, Xiaoli; Chen, Jiamin

    2012-07-01

    A simple and fast method for the simultaneous determination of two mouldy compounds, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) and 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA), in cork by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was established. The analytes were extracted by ultrasonic extraction with methanol, and purified then by solid phase extraction using primary secondary amine (PSA) as solid phase. After concentrating, the sample was analyzed by GC-MS and quantified by the external standard method. The linear ranges were from 10 microg/L to 10 000 microg/L for TCA and TBA, the correlation coefficients (r2) of the calibration curves were above 0.99. The recoveries and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of TCA and TBA in different kinds of corks were investigated. The recoveries ranged from 88.4% to 97.6% with the RSDs between 1.02% and 4.58% (n = 6). The limits of detection (LODs) were 12 microg/L for TCA and 18 microg/L for TBA, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 40 microg/L for TCA and 50 microg/L for TBA. The method is suitable to the determination of TCA and TBA in corks.

  9. Thermal degradation of α-pyrrolidinopentiophenone during injection in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Kenji; Kuwayama, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2013-09-10

    α-Pyrrolidinopentiophenone (α-PVP) is a popular recreational drug in Japan. This drug easily undergoes thermal decomposition during gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. We evaluated three factors involved in the decomposition, namely the injection method (splitless or split, split ratio), injector temperature, and surface activity on the inlet liner. Splitless injection of α-PVP using a used deactivated split/splitless liner at an injector temperature of 250 °C caused thermal decomposition. This decomposition was inhibited by split injection. A higher split ratio resulted in greater prevention. Based on the mass spectrum of deuterated α-PVP, the decomposition product was presumed to be an enamine whose double bond was located in the alkyl chain. Lowering the injection temperature from 250 °C to 200 °C did not prevent decomposition. New glass liners, both deactivated and non-deactivated, were compared. The use of a new deactivated liner minimized thermal decomposition, even for splitless injection, while the non-deactivated liner generated an increase in the amount of the decomposition product. These results showed that the injection method and the surface activity on the inlet liner were involved in the thermal decomposition of α-PVP.

  10. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to monitor detergents removal from a membrane protein sample.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaowei; Han, Fang; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2009-12-01

    In membrane protein biochemical and structural studies, detergents are used to mimic membrane environment and maintain functional, stable conformation of membrane proteins in the absence of lipid bilayers. However, detergent concentration, esp. molar ratio of membrane protein to detergent is usually unknown. Here, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM) method was developed to quantify four detergents which are frequently used in membrane protein structural studies. To remove excessive detergents, a filtered centrifugation using Centricon tubes was applied. A membrane protein Ig-Beta fragment in four different detergent micelles was exemplified. Detergent concentrations in the upper and lower fraction of the Centricon tube were measured after each round of centrifugation. The results were very consistent to basic properties of detergent micelles in aqueous solvents. Therefore, coupling of GC-MS-SIM and detergent removal by Centricon tubes, detergents concentration, esp. molar ratio of membrane protein to detergent could be controlled, which will expedite membrane protein structural and biochemical studies.

  11. Urinary Succinylacetone Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongjie; Yu, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    Succinylacetone (SA) is used for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with tyrosinemia type I (Tyr I). SA is exclusively elevated in blood and urine of patients with Tyr I. As urinary SA concentration is much higher than blood, SA is usually tested in urine samples. Urinary SA quantitation by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described in this chapter. The urine sample in the amount of 1 μmol creatinine is used for testing. 3,4,5,6,7-(13)C5-succinylacetone ((13)C5-SA) is used as an internal standard (IS). SA and (13)C5-SA are oximated and extracted from urine with organic solvents, and then derivatized to form trimethylsilane (TMS) derivatives. TMS derivatives of SA and (13)C5-SA are detected and quantified by GC-MS using selective ion monitoring (SIM). The assay is linear from 0.05 to 450 mmol/mol creatinine to cover the broad range of urinary SA concentrations.

  12. Fingerprint developing of coffee flavor by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and combined chemometrics methods.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan-Fang; Wu, Ming-Jian; Zhong, Ke-Jun; Sun, Xian-Jun; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Dai, Yun-Hui; Huang, Ke-Long; Guo, Fang-Qiu

    2007-04-11

    In this paper, chromatographic fingerprint was firstly used for quality control of tobacco flavors. Based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and combined chemometrics methods, a simple, reliable and reproducible method for developing chromatographic fingerprint of coffee flavor, one of tobacco flavors, was described. Six coffee flavor samples obtained from different locations were used to establish the fingerprint. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of coffee flavor sample from Shenzhen was completed with the help of subwindow factor analysis (SFA). Fifty-two components of 68 separated constituents in coffee flavor sample from Shenzhen, accounting for 88.42% of the total content, were identified and quantified. Then, spectral correlative chromatography (SCC) was used to extract the common peaks from other five studied coffee flavor samples. Thirty-eight components were found to exist in all six samples. Finally, the method validation of fingerprint analysis was performed based on the relative retention time and the relative peak area of common peaks, sample stability and similarity analysis. The similarities of six coffee flavor samples were more than 0.9104 and showed that samples from different locations were consistent to some extent. The developed chromatographic fingerprint was successfully used to differentiate coffee flavor from cocoa flavor and some little difference sample prepared with coffee flavor and cocoa flavor by both similarity comparison and principal component projection analysis. The developed method can be used for quality control of coffee flavor.

  13. Valid internal standard technique for arson detection based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, Pedro A S; Borges, Carlos M F; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N

    2012-09-28

    The most popular procedures for the detection of residues of accelerants in fire debris are the ones published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM E1412-07 and E1618-10). The most critical stages of these tests are the conservation of fire debris from the sampling to the laboratory, the extraction of residues of accelerants from the debris to the activated charcoal strips (ACS) and from those to the final solvent, as well as the analysis of sample extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and the interpretation of the instrumental signal. This work proposes a strategy for checking the quality of the sample conservation, the accelerant residues transference to final solvent and GC-MS analysis, using internal standard additions. It is used internal standards ranging from a highly volatile compound for checking debris conservation to low volatile compound for checking GC-MS repeatability. The developed quality control (QC) parameters are not affected by GC-MS sensitivity variation and, specifically, the GC-MS performance control is not affected by ACS adsorption saturation that may mask test performance deviations. The proposed QC procedure proved to be adequate to check GC-MS repeatability, ACS extraction and sample conservation since: (1) standard additions are affected by negligible uncertainty and (2) observed dispersion of QC parameters are fit for its intended use.

  14. Issues pertaining to the analysis of buprenorphine and its metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Shan; Lin, Dong-Liang; Yang, Shu-Ching; Wu, Meng-Yan; Liu, Ray H; Su, Lien-Wen; Cheng, Pai-Sheng; Liu, Chiareiy; Fuh, Ming-Ren

    2010-03-05

    "Substitution therapy" and the use of buprenorphine (B) as an agent for treating heroin addiction continue to gain acceptance and have recently been implemented in Taiwan. Mature and widely utilized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology can complement the low cost and highly sensitive immunoassay (IA) approach to facilitate the implementation of analytical tasks supporting compliance monitoring and pharmacokinetic/pharmacogenetic studies. Issues critical to GC-MS analysis of B and norbuprenorphine (NB) (free and as glucuronides), including extraction, hydrolysis, derivatization, and quantitation approaches were studied, followed by comparing the resulting data against those derived from IA and two types of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. Commercial solid-phase extraction devices, highly effective for recovering all metabolites, may not be suitable for the analysis of free B and NB; acetyl-derivatization products exhibit the most favorable chromatographic, ion intensity, and cross-contribution characteristics for GC-MS analysis. Evaluation of IA, GC-MS, and LC-MS/MS data obtained in three laboratories has proven the 2-aliquot GC-MS protocol effective for the determination of free B and NB and their glucuronides.

  15. Metabolic Profiling and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Mouse Brain by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buttini, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Metabolites are key mediators of cellular functions, and have emerged as important modulators in a variety of diseases. Recent developments in translational biomedicine have highlighted the importance of not looking at just one disease marker or disease inducing molecule, but at populations thereof to gain a global understanding of cellular function in health and disease. The goal of metabolomics is the systematic identification and quantification of metabolite populations. One of the most pressing issues of our times is the understanding of normal and diseased nervous tissue functions. To ensure high quality data, proper sample processing is crucial. Here, we present a method for the extraction of metabolites from brain tissue, their subsequent preparation for non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement, as well as giving some guidelines for processing of raw data. In addition, we present a sensitive screening method for neurotransmitters based on GC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The precise multi-analyte detection and quantification of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters can be used for further studies such as metabolic modeling. Our protocol can be applied to shed light on nervous tissue function in health, as well as neurodegenerative disease mechanisms and the effect of experimental therapeutics at the metabolic level. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Microwave-assisted derivatization: application to steroid profiling by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Casals, Gregori; Marcos, Josep; Pozo, Oscar J; Alcaraz, José; Martínez de Osaba, María Jesús; Jiménez, Wladimiro

    2014-06-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) remains as the gold-standard technique for the study of the steroid metabolome. A main limitation is the need of performing a derivatization step since incubation with strong silylations agents for long periods of time (usually 16 h) is required for the derivatization of hindered hydroxyls present in some steroids of interest. In the present work, a rapid, simple and reproducible microwave-assisted derivatization method was developed. In the method, 36 steroids already treated with methoxyamine (2% in pyridine) were silylated with 50 μl of N-trimethylsilylimidazole by using microwave irradiation, and the formed methyloxime-trimethylsilyl derivatives were analyzed by GC-MS. Microwave power and derivatization time silylation conditions were optimized being the optimum conditions 600 W and 3 min respectively. In order to evaluate the usefulness of this technique, the urine steroid profiles for 20 healthy individuals were analyzed. The results of a comparison of microwave irradiation with the classical heating protocol showed similar derivatization yields, thus suggesting that microwave-assisted silylation is a valid tool for the rapid steroid metabolome study.

  17. Measurement of F2- isoprostanes and isofurans using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Milne, Ginger L; Gao, Benlian; Terry, Erin S; Zackert, William E; Sanchez, Stephanie C

    2013-06-01

    F2-Isoprostanes (IsoPs) are isomers of prostaglandin F2α formed from the nonenzymatic free radical-catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid. Since discovery of these molecules by Morrow and Roberts in 1990, F2-IsoPs have been shown to be excellent biomarkers as well as potent mediators of oxidative stress in vivo in humans. Isofurans (IsoFs) are also oxidation products generated from the nonenzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid. IsoFs are preferentially formed instead of F2-IsoPs in settings of increased oxygen tension. The protocol presented herein is the current methodology that our laboratory uses to quantify F2-IsoPs and IsoFs in biological tissues and fluids using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A variety of analytical procedures to measure F2-IsoPs, including other GC/MS methods and liquid chromatography/MS and immunological approaches, are reported in the literature. This method provides a very low limit of quantitation and is suitable for analysis of both F2-IsoPs and IsoFs from a variety of biological sources including urine, plasma, tissues, cerebral spinal fluid, exhaled breath condensate, and amniotic fluid, among others.

  18. Determination of free and ethoxylated alkylphenols in leather with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, He-Wei; Cheng, Ya

    2010-12-10

    An analytical approach was developed to determine nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP), nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEO(n)) and octylphenol ethoxylates (OPEO(n)) in leather samples involving the conversion of NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) into the corresponding NP and OP. The four targets were extracted from samples using ultrasonic-assisted acetonitrile extraction. NP and OP in the extracts were directly isolated with hexane and quantitatively determined with 4-n-nonylphenol as internal standard by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) in the extracts, they were first converted into NP and OP with aluminum triiodide as cleavage agent, and the yielded NP and OP were determined by GC-MS. The contents of NPEO(n) and OPEO(n) were calculated by normalizing to NPEO(9) and OPEO(9), respectively. This method was properly validated and the real sample tests revealed the pollution significance of leather by NPEO(n) and OPEO(n).

  19. Analysis of extractable organic compounds in water by gas chromatography mass spectrometry: applications to surface water.

    PubMed

    Deroux, J M; Gonzalez, C; Le Cloirec, P; Kovacsik, G

    1996-03-01

    Contamination of water by organic pollutants is a common environmental problem. Over a period of 1 year, the surface water of a canal network (Languedoc-Roussillon area, France) was analysed in order to identify organic compounds and to monitor its quality. Pollutants were extracted from 19 l of raw water using methylene chloride in a continuous countercurrent liquid-liquid extractor with a pulsed column. The extraction was performed at a pH above 11 and again at a pH below 2 according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 625. The extract was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, using two ionization techniques, namely electron ionization and chemical ionization. Mass spectra obtained by electron ionization were compared with those in a database (NIST). Some natural compounds and micropollutants were identified. Their structures were confirmed by chemical ionization (methane). One hundred and ten substances, making up the broad spectrum of extractable compounds in the surface water studied, were found by this method at a nanogram per litre concentration level. Among them, 13 are priority pollutants. These specific pollutants were qualified.

  20. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method for metabolic profiling of tobacco leaves.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Pang, Tao; Li, Yanli; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Qinghua; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2011-06-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method was developed for profiling of tobacco leaves. The differentiation among tobacco leaves planted in two different regions was investigated. Prior to analysis, the extraction solvent formulation was optimized and a combination of water, methanol and acetonitrile with a volume ratio of 3:1:1 was found to be optimal. The reproducibility of the method was satisfactory. Kendall tau-b rank correlation coefficients were equal to 1 (p<0.05) for 82% of the resolved peaks (up to 95% of the overall peak areas), indicating the good response correlation. Forty-four compounds including 9 saccharides, 9 alcohols, 9 amino acids, 16 organic acids and phosphoric acid were identified based on standard compounds. The method was successfully applied for profiling of tobacco leaves from Zimbabwe and Yunnan of China. Our result revealed that levels of saccharides and their derivatives including xylose, ribose, fructose, glucose, turanose, xylitol and glyceric acid were more abundant while sucrose, glucitol and D-gluconic acid were less abundant in tobacco leaves from Yunnan as compared to those from Zimbabwe. Amino acids such as L-alanine, L-tyrosine and L-threonine were found to be richer in Zimbabwe tobacco than in Yunnan tobacco.

  1. [Determination of five representative ultraviolet filters in water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ding, Yiran; Huang, Yun; Zhao, Tingting; Cai, Qian; Luo, Yu; Huang, Bin; Zhang, Yuxia; Pan, Xuejun

    2014-06-01

    A method for the determination of five representative organic UV filters: ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC), benzophenone-3 (BP-3), 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC), octocrylene (OC), homosalate (HMS) in water was investigated. The method was ased on derivatization, solid phase extraction (SPE), followed by determination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The variables involved in the derivatization of BP-3 and HMS were optimized, and SPE conditions were studied. For derivatization, 100 microL N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) was used as derivatization reagent and reacted with BP-3 and HMS at 100 degrees C for 100 min. For SPE, the pH value of water sample was adjusted to 3-5. The Oasis HLB cartridges were employed and the solution of ethyl acetate and dichloromethane (1 : 1, v/v) was used as the eluting solvent, and good recoveries of the target compounds were obtained. The limits of detection (LODs) and the limits of quantification (LOQs) for the five target compounds in water samples were 0.5-1.2 ng/L and 1.4-4.0 ng/L, respectively. The recoveries of spiked water samples were 87.85%-102.34% with good repeatability and reproducibility (RSD < 5%, n = 3) for all the target compounds. Finally, the validated method was applied to analysis the representative UV filters in water samples collected from a wastewater treatment plant in Kunming city of Yunnan province.

  2. Measurement of nitrite in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Suchy, Maria-Theresia; Mitschke, Anja; Beckmann, Bibiana; Gutzki, Frank-Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is enzymatically produced from L-arginine and has a variety of biological functions. Autoxidation of NO in aqueous media yields nitrite (O = N-O(-)). NO and nitrite are oxidized in erythrocytes by oxyhemoglobin to nitrate (NO(3)(-)). Nitrate reductases from bacteria reduce nitrate to nitrite. Nitrite and nitrate are ubiquitous in nature, they are present throughout the body and they are excreted in the urine. Nitrite in urine has been used for several decades as an indicator and measure of bacteriuria. Since the identification of nitrite as a metabolite of NO, circulating nitrite is also used as an indicator of NO synthesis and is considered an NO storage form. In contrast to plasma nitrite, the significance of nitrite in the urine beyond bacteriuria is poorly investigated and understood. This chapter describes a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) protocol for the quantitative determination of nitrite in urine of humans. Although the method is useful for detection and quantification of bacteriuria, the procedures described herein are optimum for urinary nitrite in conditions other than urinary tract infection. The method uses [(15)N]nitrite as internal standard and pentafluorobenzyl bromide as the derivatization agent. Derivatization is -performed on 100-μL aliquots and quantification of toluene extracts by selected-ion monitoring of m/z 46 for urinary nitrite and m/z 47 for the internal standard in the electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mode.

  3. Optimization of focused ultrasonic extraction of propellant components determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fryš, Ondřej; Česla, Petr; Bajerová, Petra; Adam, Martin; Ventura, Karel

    2012-09-15

    A method for focused ultrasonic extraction of nitroglycerin, triphenyl amine and acetyl tributyl citrate presented in double-base propellant samples following by the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis was developed. A face-centered central composite design of the experiments and response surface modeling was used for optimization of the time, amplitude and sample amount. The dichloromethane was used as the extractant solvent. The optimal extraction conditions with respect to the maximum yield of the lowest abundant compound triphenyl amine were found at the 20 min extraction time, 35% amplitude of ultrasonic waves and 2.5 g of the propellant sample. The results obtained under optimal conditions were compared with the results achieved with validated Soxhlet extraction method, which is typically used for isolation and pre-concentration of compounds from the samples of explosives. The extraction yields for acetyl tributyl citrate using both extraction methods were comparable; however, the yield of ultrasonic extraction of nitroglycerin and triphenyl amine was lower than using Soxhlet extraction. The possible sources of different extraction yields are estimated and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitation of ibuprofen in blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerry; Garg, Uttam

    2010-01-01

    Ibuprofen is a non-narcotic, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug used for the treatment of pain, fever, and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. It is also used for induction of closure of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in neonates. Although the exact mechanism of action of ibuprofen is not known, it is believed to mediate its therapeutic effects through the inhibition of cyclooxygenase and subsequently by the inhibition of prostacyclin production. As the drug has a number of side effects, which correlate to its circulating concentration, monitoring of ibuprofen in plasma or serum is desired for patients receiving high-dose therapy. Chromatographic methods are frequently used for the assay of ibuprofen, as no immunoassays are currently available.In the method described, the drug is extracted from the serum or plasma using methylene chloride and phosphate buffer (pH 6). Meclofenamic acid is used as an internal standard. The organic phase containing the drug is separated and dried under stream of nitrogen. After trimethylsilyl derivatization, analysis is done using gas-chromatography/ mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Quantification of the drug in a sample is achieved by comparing responses of the unknown sample to the responses of the calibrators using selected ion monitoring.

  5. Derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for quantification of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuejiao; Gao, Yihan; Cao, Xiujun; Wang, Xiang; Song, Guoxin; Zhao, Jianfeng; Hu, Yaoming

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive and rapid analytical methodology based on derivatization followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the quantitative determination of the toxic contaminant ethyl carbamate (EC, urethane, C(2)H(5)OCONH(2)) in alcoholic samples. EC was extracted using liquid-liquid extraction technique, and then silylated with bis-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide, analysed finally by GC-MS. The isopropyl carbamate was used as the internal standard for quantitative analysis of EC in alcoholic samples. In this work, the sample extraction and derivatization reaction conditions were investigated, and the optimal extraction conditions obtained were: pH 9 and solvent of ethyl acetate, and the derivatization conditions were: derivatization reaction temperature of 80°C and time duration of 30 min. With the optimal conditions, the method validations were also studied. In the validation studies, EC exhibited good linearity with a regression coefficient of 0.9999. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.30 and 5.0 μg/kg, respectively. The precision was less than 8.4%. Finally, the proposed technique was successfully applied to the analysis of EC in 35 kinds of alcoholic samples. The experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed technique is a fast, reliable and low-cost method for determination of EC in alcoholic samples. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Metabolic products in urine of preterm infants characterized via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Hu; Li, Sitao; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Hong; Liu, Mengxian; Shi, Congcong; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the metabolic products of urine associated with preterm birth, thus providing clinical guidelines for intestinal and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants. Methods: Urine samples of 47 preterm infants and 45 full-term infants were collected and prepared for trimethylsilylation by treatment with urease. The levels of lysine, phenylalanine, histidine, ornithine, fumaric acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactose, stearic acid, and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), and statistically analyzed. Results: The normalized concentrations of the following metabolites in preterm infant urine samples were significantly lower than that of full-term infant urine samples: lysine (P = 0.003), phenylalanine (P = 0.001), histidine (P = 0.006), ornithine (P = 0.000), fumaric acid (P = 0.002), malic acid (P = 0.006), succinic acid (P = 0.000), lactose (P = 0.000), stearic acid (P = 0.000) and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (P = 0.000). Conclusions: The results of the GC/MS analysis indicated that amino acid, carbohydrate, and fatty acid metabolism defects exist in preterm infants. The use of GC/MS to determine metabolic products in urine samples could be helpful for prospectively evaluating the nutritional status of preterm infants, and therefore providing clinical guidelines on reasonable nutritional support. PMID:26629171

  7. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiles of urinary organic acids in healthy captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Tordiffe, Adrian Stephen Wolferstan; van Reenen, Mari; Reyers, Fred; Mienie, Lodewyk Jacobus

    2017-04-01

    In captivity, cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) frequently suffer from several unusual chronic diseases that rarely occur in their free-ranging counterparts. In order to develop a better understanding of their metabolism and health we documented the urine organic acids of 41 apparently healthy captive cheetahs, in an untargeted metabolomic study, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 339 organic acids were detected and annotated. Phenolic compounds, thought to be produced by the anaerobic fermentation of aromatic amino acids in the distal colon, as well as their corresponding glycine conjugates, were present in high concentrations. The most abundant organic acids in the cheetahs' urine were an as yet unidentified compound and a novel cadaverine metabolite, tentatively identified as N(1),N(5)-dimethylpentane-1,5-diamine. Pantothenic acid and citramalic acid concentrations correlated negatively with age, while glutaric acid concentrations correlated positively with age, suggesting possible dysregulation of coenzyme A metabolism in older cheetahs. This study provides a baseline of urine organic acid reference values in captive cheetahs and suggests important avenues for future research in this species.

  8. Enhanced analysis of steroids by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using microwave-accelerated derivatization.

    PubMed

    Bowden, John A; Colosi, Dominic M; Stutts, Whitney L; Mora-Montero, Diana C; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A

    2009-08-15

    Derivatization of steroids is typically required before analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS); nevertheless, the derivatization process can often be time-consuming and irreproducible. Although several strategies have been employed to enhance this process, few have the potential of microwave-accelerated derivatization (MAD) to be more efficient than traditional thermal derivatization methods. MAD using a synthesis microwave system was evaluated and compared to traditional thermal derivatization methods in terms of yield, reproducibility, and overall analysis time. Parameters affecting MAD, including reaction temperature, time, and power, were systematically optimized for several silyl reagents (BSTFA with TMCS, MSTFA, and BSA) and other derivatization procedures (MOX reagent and MTBSTFA). MSTFA was found to derivatize best with the microwave, as demonstrated by the enhanced relative response factors (RRFs). BSTFA with TMCS, on the other hand, did not couple as well, but RRF values improved significantly upon addition of polar solvents. The rapid (1 min) derivatization reactions associated with MAD had comparable RRFs for all reagents with those obtained with thermal heating (>30 min). This study highlights the best methods for analyzing a comprehensive variety of steroids and also provides ideal strategies for MAD of steroids on an individual or class level.

  9. Aromatic resin characterisation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Raw and archaeological materials.

    PubMed

    Modugno, Francesca; Ribechini, Erika; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2006-11-17

    An analytical procedure based on alkaline hydrolysis, solvent extraction and trimethyl-silylation followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was used to study the chemical composition of benzoe and storax resins, water-insoluble exudates of trees of the Styrax and Liquidambar genus. They are chemically characterised by having aromatic acids, alcohols and esters as their main components and are thus known as aromatic and/or balsamic resins. This analytical procedure allowed us to characterise the main components of the two resins and, even though cinnamic acid is the main component of both the resins, the presence of other characteristic aromatic compounds and triterpenes permitted us to distinguish between the two materials. All the compounds identified in benzoe resin were detected in an archaeological organic residue from an Egyptian ceramic censer (fifth to seventh centuries a.d.), thus proving that this resin was used as one of the components of the mixture of organic materials burned as incense. These results provide the first chemical evidence of the presence of benzoe resin in an archaeological material from Mediterranean area.

  10. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of nitrite in biological fluids without derivatization.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke; Mitschke, Anja

    2010-06-15

    We report on a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the quantification of nitrite in biological fluids without preceding derivatization. This method is based on the solvent extraction with ethyl acetate of nitrous acid (HONO, pK(a) = 3.29), i.e., HO(14)NO and (15)N-labeled nitrous acid (HO(15)NO) which was supplied as the sodium salt of (15)N-labeled nitrite and served as the internal standard. HO(14)NO and HO(15)NO react within the injector (at 300 degrees C) of the gas chromatograph with the solvent ethyl acetate to form presumably unlabeled and (15)N-labeled acetyl nitrite, respectively. Under negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) conditions with methane as the reagent gas, these species ionize to form O(14)NO(-) (m/z 46) and O(15)NO(-) (m/z 47), respectively. Quantification is performed by selected ion monitoring of m/z 46 for nitrite and m/z 47 for the internal standard. Nitrate at concentrations up to 20 mM does not interfere with nitrite analysis in this method. The GC-MS method was validated for the quantification of nitrite in aqueous buffer, human urine (1 mL, acidification) and saliva (0.1-1 mL, acidification), and hemolysates. The method was applied in studying reactions of nitrite (0-10 mM) with oxyhemoglobin ( approximately 6 mM) in lysed human erythrocytes (100 microL aliquots, no acidification).

  11. Characterization of oil shale waters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, D.C.; Baughman, K.J.; Jones, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    Characterization work has begun on organic compounds and compound classes to establish a baseline for the evaluation and development of alternative instrumental characterization techniques. For this purpose raw water from two oil shale processes has been subjected to an extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Samples from the R-17 and Rio Blanco processes were chosen for comparison with previous characterization work reported by Poulson et al. (1984, 1985), who used low-cost gas and reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques. In addition, various inorganic and physical parameters were re-evaluated. The preliminary comparison of GC/MS data with the GC and reverse phase LC data previously reported by Poulson et al., indicates a number of positive correlations for both the process waters. Aliphatic carboxylic acids, cresols, xylenols, methyl pyridines, dimethyl pyridines, and trimethyl pyridines were found both in present GC/MS analysis and in earlier GC and LC analyses of the samples. In addition, trimethylphenols were observed in both the present GC/MS analysis and in the previous GC and LC analyses of the Rio Blanco sample. A number of tentatively identified compounds and compound classes were observed in the GC/MS analysis but were unreported in either the GC or LC analyses for both samples. Similarly, several compounds and compound classes previously reported by GC and LC techniques were absent in the GC/MS analysis. These discrepancies may be attributed to either the original GC and LC research design or to a fundamental chemical change in the samples used for the GC/MS characterization. Additional research is necessary in the areas of extraction design, use of comparable GC and GC/MS marker compounds for identification, standardization of chromatographic columns and GC conditions, and the validity of computer library identifications. 3 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Identifying and quantifying contaminants contributing to endogenous analytes in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2010-09-15

    Contaminants from various sources including medical devices, laboratory materials and the environment, and analytical apparatus may contribute to their endogenous congeners at different stages of the analytical process. Here, an approach is reported for the identification and quantification of contaminating analytes in biological fluids by stable-isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) methods. This approach is based on the analysis of different sample volumes and determination of the peak area ratio (PAR) of the endogenous analyte to the stable-isotope labeled analogue serving as the internal standard. The PAR is obtained by selected-ion monitoring or selected-reaction monitoring of appropriate ions. Generation of PAR values that correlate inversely with the sample volume subjected to analysis reveals the existence of contamination. The extent of contamination is obtained by plotting the PAR of endogenous analyte to internal standard versus the reciprocal of the sample volume analyzed. Examples are given for uncontaminated and contaminated endogenous analytes in biological samples, including nitrite and nitrate analyzed by GC/MS, and the fatty acid metabolites oleic acid oxide, oleic acid ethanol amide, and arachidonic acid ethanol amide analyzed by GC/MS/MS. Dependence of the PAR of endogenous analyte to its internal standard upon derivatization time reveals a unique kind of contamination that was identified in the GC/MS analysis of nitrate in plasma as pentafluorobenzyl ester. This kind of contamination occurs at the latest stage of GC/MS analysis and cannot be controlled by reference to the internal standard.

  13. TRU Drum Headspace Gas Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S.

    1998-10-27

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has approximately 10,000 Transuranic (TRU) waste drums whose final disposition is the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. Each drum, prior to shipment to WIPP, must be inspected and tested to certify that is meets the WIPP requirements for acceptance. One, of many requirements, is the analysis of the TRU drum vapor space for hydrogen, methane, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DOE Carlsbad Area Office has published two documents specifying the analytical methodologies and the quality assurance requirements for analyzing TRU drum vapor space.The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was contracted by the Solid Waste Division of SRS to specify, assemble, and test a system that would satisfy the WIPP requirements for drum headspace gas analysis. Since no single vendor supplies a complete system, analytical instrumentation and supporting components were integrated into a configuration that performed that required analyses. This required both software and hardware design and modifications. The major goal of the design team was to integrate commercially available instrumentation and equipment into a seamless production process. The final output of the process is an analytical report formatted to the specifications outlined in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). SRTC has assembled the necessary analytical instrumentation and installed it in a mobile trailer to perform the TRU drum vapor space analyses. This mobile trailer had previously housed instrumentation for reactor tank inspections. As a cost savings it was decided to renovate and install the instrumentation in this trailer to eliminate the need of building or modifying permanent structures. This also allows for portability to meet future analytical needs on or off site.This task was divided into three sub tasks: headspace gas sampling, gas analysis and system component integration, and sample canister cleaning. The following sections

  14. Characterisation of odorants in roasted stem tea using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tetsuya; Koshi, Erina; Take, Harumi; Michihata, Toshihide; Maruya, Masachika; Enomoto, Toshiki

    2017-04-01

    Roasted stem tea has a characteristic flavour, which is obtained by roasting tea stems, by-product of green tea production. This research aims to understand the characteristic odorants in roasted stem tea by comparing it to roasted leaf tea. We revealed potent odorants in commercial roasted stem tea using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-olfactometry with aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). The difference between roasted stem and leaf tea derived from the same tea plants were investigated using GC-MS. Pyrazine compounds exhibited a roasted odour and high flavour dilution (FD) factors, as determined via AEDA. Roasted stem tea was richer in these pyrazines than roasted leaf tea. Geraniol and linalool exhibited high FD factors and a floral odour, and roasted stem tea was richer in these compounds than roasted leaf tea. These results may have a positive impact on the development of tea products.

  15. Pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of kerogens and kerogen precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Meent, D.; Brown, S. C.; Philp, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of kerogens and kerogen precursors isolated from DSDP samples, oil shales and recent algal mats have been examined by Curie point pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study has shown that the three main types of kerogens (marine, terrestrial and mixtures of both) can be characterized using these techniques. The marine (algal) kerogens yield principally aliphatic products and the terrestrial kerogens yield more aromatic and phenolic products with some n-alkanes and n-alkenes. The yields of n-alkanes and n-alkenes increase and phenols decrease with increasing geologic age, however, pyrolysis-GC cannot be used to characterize the influence of short term diagenesis on the kerogen structure.

  16. Pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of kerogens and kerogen precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van De Meent, D.; Brown, S. C.; Philp, R. P.; Simoneit, B. R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A series of kerogens and kerogen precursors isolated from DSDP samples, oil shales and recent algal mats have been examined by Curie point pyrolysis-high resolution gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This study has shown that the three main types of kerogens (marine, terrestrial and mixtures of both) can be characterized using these techniques. The marine (algal) kerogens yield principally aliphatic products and the terrestrial kerogens yield more aromatic and phenolic products with some n-alkanes and n-alkenes. The yields of n-alkanes and n-alkenes increase and phenols decrease with increasing geologic age, however, pyrolysis-GC cannot be used to characterize the influence of short term diagenesis on the kerogen structure.

  17. Whole Microorganisms Studied by Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: Significance for Extraterrestrial Life Detection Experiments 1

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, Peter G.

    1970-01-01

    Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric studies of two microorganisms, Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus subtilis var. niger, indicate that the majority of thermal fragments originate from the principal classes of bio-organic matter found in living systems such as protein and carbohydrate. Furthermore, there is a close qualitative similarity between the type of pyrolysis products found in microorganisms and the pyrolysates of other biological materials. Conversely, there is very little correlation between microbial pyrolysates and comparable pyrolysis studies of meteoritic and fossil organic matter. These observations will aid in the interpretation of a soil organic analysis experiment to be performed on the surface of Mars in 1975. The science payload of this landed mission will include a combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrument as well as several “direct biology experiments” which are designed to search for extraterrestrial life. PMID:16349890

  18. Identification of organic acids as potential biomarkers in the urine of autistic children using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kałużna-Czaplińska, Joanna; Żurawicz, Ewa; Struck, Wiktoria; Markuszewski, Michał

    2014-09-01

    There is a need to identify metabolic phenotypes in autism as they might each require unique approaches to prevention. Biological markers can help define autism subtypes and reveal potential therapeutic targets. The aim of the study was to identify alterations of small molecular weight compounds and to find potential biomarkers. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was employed to evaluate major metabolic changes in low molecular weight urine metabolites of 14 children with autism spectrum disorders vs. 10 non-autistic subjects. The results prove the usefulness of an identified set of 21 endogenous compounds (including 14 organic acids), whose levels are changed in diseased children. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method combined with multivariate statistical analysis techniques provide an efficient way of depicting metabolic perturbations of diseases, and may potentially be applicable as a novel strategy for the noninvasive diagnosis and treatment of autism.

  19. GNS Castor V/21 Headspace Gas Sampling 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, Philip Lon

    2016-01-01

    Prior to performing an internal visual inspection, samples of the headspace gas of the GNS Castor V/21 cask were taken on June 12, 2014. These samples were taken in support of the CREIPI/Japanese nuclear industry effort to validate fuel integrity without visual inspection by measuring the 85Kr content of the cask headspace

  20. Quantitation of opioids in whole blood by electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Shan, Xiaoqin; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate

    2011-03-01

    Opioids are frequently encountered in Forensic Toxicology casework. A PubMed literature search was conducted to find a method using electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine whole blood specimens. A previously published method was identified, and an updated version was provided by the State of North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. This procedure was used as a starting point for development and validation of a refined procedure to be used in the Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office Forensic Toxicology laboratory for routine analysis of antemortem forensic toxicology case samples. Materials and instrumentation common to most forensic toxicology laboratories were utilized while obtaining detection limits from 1 to 10 ng/mL and quantitation limits of 2.5 to 10 ng/mL using 1 mL of whole blood. Target compounds were chosen based on applicability to the method as well as availability and common use in the United States and include dihydrocodeine, codeine, morphine, hydrocodone, 6-monoacetylmorphine, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and oxymorphone. Each analyte demonstrated two zero-order linear ranges (r(2) > 0.990) over the concentrations evaluated (from 2.5 to 500 ng/mL). The coefficient of variation of replicate analyses was less than 12%. Quantitative accuracy was within ± 27% at 2.5 ng/mL, ± 11% at 10 ng/mL, and ± 8% at 50 ng/mL. The validated method provides a more sensitive procedure for the quantitation of common opioids in blood using standard laboratory equipment and a small amount of sample.

  1. Quantitation of benzodiazepines in whole blood by electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tiscione, Nicholas B; Shan, Xiaoqin; Alford, Ilene; Yeatman, Dustin Tate

    2008-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are frequently encountered in forensic toxicology. A literature search was conducted to find a simple method using electron impact-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (EI-GC-MS) to examine whole blood specimens for the most commonly encountered benzodiazepines in the United States. A recently published method was identified in the literature search and used as a starting point for development of a new procedure to be used for routine analysis of forensic toxicology case samples. The procedure was then developed and validated as a rapid and efficient method for the screening and quantitation of benzodiazepines in blood using liquid-liquid extraction and EI-GC-MS in selective ion monitoring mode. Materials and instrumentation common to most forensic toxicology laboratories were utilized while obtaining LODs from 5 to 50 ng/mL and LOQs of 50 ng/mL or less using 1 mL of sample. Target compounds were chosen based on availability and common use in the United States and include diazepam, desalkylflurazepam, nordiazepam, midazolam, oxazepam, temazepam, lorazepam, clonazepam, and alprazolam (relative elution order). The linear range (r2 > 0.990) was validated from 50 to 1000 ng/mL for all analytes. The CV of replicate analyses at both 50 and 200 ng/mL was less than 4%. Quantitative accuracy was within +/- 16% at 50 ng/mL and within +/- 7% at 200 ng/mL. The validated method provides an efficient procedure for the quantitation of a broad range of the most common benzodiazepines in blood at meaningful limits of detection and quantitation using standard laboratory equipment and a small amount of sample.

  2. [Simultaneous determination of five hypertoxic rodenticides in serum by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Huang, Huiqiu; Huang, Xun; Yu, Jingsun

    2015-03-01

    A fast analytical method based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was established for the simultaneous determination of tetramine, fluoroacetamide, sodium fluoroacetate, gliftor I and gliftor II in serum. At pH 2.0, sodium fluoroacetate was derivatizated at room temperature for 5 min by using N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine as the derivatization reagent and N, N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as the catalyst. The derivative and other rodenticides were extracted with ethyl acetate and concentrated with nitrogen at 50 °C, then determined by GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, and quantified with matrix-match standard solutions. The analysis was carried out on an ionic liquid chromatographic capillary column (SLB-IL59, 30 m x 0.25 mm x 0.20 µm, maximum temperature 300 °C) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and the five rodenticides were successfully separated in 15 min when temperature programming was used. The results showed that the calibration curves were linear in the range of 0.01-1.0 mg/L, except for fluoroacetamide (0.02-2.0 mg/L) and tetramine (0.02-10 mg/L), with correlation coefficients (R2) greater than 0.995, and the limits of detection (LODs) were 0.001-0.002 mg/L (S/N = 3). The recoveries were 84.0%-110.0% at three different spiked levels, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 2.9%-7.5% (n = 6). The method is simple, accurate, highly sensitive and suitable for the detection of the five hypertoxic rodenticides in serum for toxicological purposes.

  3. Rapid analysis of benzoylecgonine in urine by fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Romberg, Robert W; Jamerson, Matthew H; Klette, Kevin L

    2006-10-01

    A novel fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (FGC-MS) analytical method for benzoylecgonine (BZE) has been developed to improve the efficiency of specimen analysis without diminishing the reliability of metabolite identification and quantification. Urine specimens were spiked with deuterated internal standard (BZE-d8), subjected to solid-phase extraction, and derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride (PFPA) and pentafluoropropanol (PFPOH). The pentafluoropropyl ester derivative of BZE was identified and quantified using both a standard GC-MS method and the newly developed FGC-MS method. Shorter GC analyte retention times were made possible in the FGC-MS method by employing a 220-volt GC oven controller, which allowed an increased temperature ramp rate. The FGC-MS method was linear between 25 and 10,000 ng/mL of BZE yielding a correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The intra-assay precision of a 100 ng/mL BZE standard (n=15) yielded an average concentration of 99.7 ng/mL and a coefficient of variation of 1.2%. The interassay precision of 21 sets of 50, 100, and 125 ng/mL BZE controls was found to be acceptable, with coefficients of variation less than 2.4%. No interference was observed when the FGC-MS method was challenged with cocaine, ecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, and nine other drugs of abuse. Analysis of presumptively positive specimens (n=146) by both analytical methods yielded comparable results with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. The FGC-MS method, when compared with a standard GC-MS method, reduces total assay time by approximately 50% while demonstrating comparable reliability.

  4. Urine Mescaline Screening With a Biochip Array Immunoassay and Quantification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Battal, Dilek; Barnes, Allan J; Castaneto, Marisol S; Martin, Thomas M; Klette, Kevin L; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-12-01

    Mescaline, the primary psychoactive chemical in peyote cactus, has been consumed for thousands of years in ancient religious ceremonies. The US military wanted to determine if mescaline intake was a problem for personnel readiness. Twenty thousand seventeen urine specimens negative for cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates, and amphetamines were tested for mescaline with the Randox Drugs of Abuse V (DOA-V) biochip array immunoassay at the manufacturer's recommended cutoff of 6 mcg/L. A sensitive and specific method for mescaline quantification in urine was developed and fully validated. Extracted analytes were derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol and quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with electron impact ionization. Standard curves, using linear least squares regression with 1/x weighting, were linear from 1 to 250 mcg/L with coefficients of determination >0.994. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision was <4.4 coefficient of variation (%CV), with accuracies >90.4%. Mean extraction efficiencies were >92.0% across the linear range. This fully validated method was applied for the confirmation of urinary mescaline in 526 presumptive-positive specimens and 198 randomly selected presumptive-negative specimens at the manufacturer's 6 mcg/L cutoff. No specimen confirmed positive at the GC/MS limit of quantification of 1 mcg/L. Results indicated that during this time frame, there was insufficient mescaline drug use in the military to warrant routine screening in the drug testing program. However, mescaline stability, although assessed, could have contributed to lower prevalence. We also present a validated GC/MS method for mescaline quantification in urine for reliable confirmation of suspected mescaline intake.

  5. Analysis of 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smokeless tobacco by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Irina; Villalta, Peter W; Knezevich, Aleksandar; Jensen, Joni; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Hecht, Stephen S

    2010-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco contains 28 known carcinogens and causes precancerous oral lesions and oral and pancreatic cancer. A recent study conducted by our research team identified eight different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in U.S. moist snuff, encouraging further investigations of this group of toxicants and carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products. In this study, we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method that allows simultaneous analysis of 23 various PAHs in smokeless tobacco after a simple two-step extraction and purification procedure. The method produced coefficients of variation under 10% for most PAHs. The limits of quantitation for different PAHs varied between 0.3 and 11 ng/g tobacco, starting with a 300 mg sample. The recovery of the stable isotope-labeled internal standards averaged 87%. The method was applied to analysis of 23 moist snuff samples that included various flavors of the most popular U.S. moist snuff brands, as well as 17 samples representing the currently marketed brands of spit-free tobacco pouches, a relatively new type of smokeless tobacco. The sum of all detected PAHs in conventional moist snuff averaged 11.6 (+/-3.7) microg/g dry weight; 20% of this amount was comprised of carcinogenic PAHs. The levels of PAHs in new spit-free tobacco products were much lower than those in moist snuff; the sum of all detected PAHs averaged 1.3 (+/-0.28) microg/g dry weight. Our findings render PAHs one of the most prevalent groups of carcinogens in smokeless tobacco. Urgent measures are required from the U.S. tobacco industry to modify manufacturing processes so that the levels of these toxicants and carcinogens in U.S. moist snuff are greatly reduced.

  6. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of clobenzorex.

    PubMed

    Cody, J T; Valtier, S

    1999-01-01

    Drugs metabolized to amphetamine or methamphetamine are potentially significant concerns in the interpretation of amphetamine-positive urine drug-testing results. One of these compounds, clobenzorex, is an anorectic drug that is available in many countries. Clobenzorex (2-chlorobenzylamphetamine) is metabolized to amphetamine by the body and excreted in the urine. Following administration, the parent compound was detectable for a shorter time than the metabolite amphetamine, which could be detected for days. Because of the potential complication posed to the interpretation of amphetamin-positive drug tests following administration of this drug, the viability of a current amphetamine procedure using liquid-liquid extraction and conversion to the heptafluorobutyryl derivative followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was evaluated for identification and quantitation of clobenzorex. Qualitative identification of the drug was relatively straightforward. Quantitative analysis proved to be a far more challenging process. Several compounds were evaluated for use as the internal standard in this method, including methamphetamine-d11, fenfluramine, benzphetamine, and diphenylamine. Results using these compounds proved to be less than satisfactory because of poor reproducibility of the quantitative values. Because of its similar chromatographic properties to the parent drug, the compound 3-chlorobenzylamphetamine (3-Cl-clobenzorex) was evaluated in this study as the internal standard for the quantitation of clobenzorex. Precision studies showed 3-Cl-clobenzorex to produce accurate and reliable quantitative results (within-run relative standard deviations [RSDs] < 6.1%, between-run RSDs < 6.0%). The limits of detection and quantitation for this assay were determined to be 1 ng/mL for clobenzorex.

  7. Age determination of ballpoint pen ink by thermal desorption and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bügler, Jürgen H; Buchner, Hans; Dallmayer, Anton

    2008-07-01

    Two main approaches can be used for determining the age of an ink: indirect dating and direct dating. Indirect dating is based on the chemical analysis of an ink followed by comparison with known samples in a reference collection. The collection should contain information about the inks including the market introduction dates. This approach may allow for an anachronism to be detected. The second concept is based on measuring ink components that change with age. The analysis of solvents in ballpoint inks may be a useful parameter for determining the age of ink on paper. In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that thermal desorption of ink directly from paper, followed by chemical analysis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), is a promising procedure for characterizing ink-binder resins and solvents. Preliminary tests showed that monitoring the evaporation of ink solvent from ink on paper is not a suitable method for ink dating. Thermal analysis of ink on paper in two steps revealed that fresh ink releases a relative amount of solvent at a certain low temperature in a defined period of time, which decreases as the ink ages. As a consequence, this relative amount of solvent released at a certain low temperature, and its decrease with time, can be used to estimate ink age. This age-dependent parameter was studied in 85 different inks ranging in age from 1 week to 1.5 years. It was found that some inks showed a significant decrease of this parameter up to an age of several months, and that the aging process can be monitored within this period. For other inks, however, the age-dependent parameter decreases relatively fast, e.g., within a few days, to a constant level, which can be too fast for casework. Based on these results, a general procedure for assessing the age of ballpoint pen inks on paper was developed.

  8. Triple sorbent thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry determination of vapor phase organic contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C.Y.; Skeen, J.T.; Dindal, A.B.; Higgins, C.E.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    A thermal desorption/ps chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) has been evaluated for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vapor phase samples using Carbosieve S-III/Carbotrap/Carotrap C triple sorbent traps (TST) similar to those available from a commercial source. The analysis was carried out with a Hewlett-Packard 5985A or 5995 GC/MS system with a modified injector to adapt an inhouse manufactured short-path desorber for transferring desorbate directly onto a cryofocusing loop for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Vapor phase standards generated from twenty six compounds were used for method validation, including alkanes, alkyl alcohols, alkyl ketones, and alkyl nitrites, a group of representative compounds that have previously been identified in a target airborne matrix. The method was validated based on the satisfactory results in terms of reproducibility, recovery rate, stability, and linearity. A relative, standard deviation of 0.55 to 24.3 % was obtained for the entire TD process (generation of gas phase standards, spiking the standards on and desorbing from TST) over a concentration range of 20 to 500 ng/trap. Linear correlation coefficients for the calibration curves as determined ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 and limits of detection ranged from 3 to 76 ng. For a majority of standards, recoveries of greater than 90% were observed. For three selected standards spiked on TSTS, minimal loss (10 to 22%) was observed after storing the spiked in, a 4{degree}C refrigerator for 29 days. The only chromatographable artifact observed was a 5% conversion of isopropanol to acetone. The validated method been successfully applied, to the determination of VOCs collected from various emission sources in a diversified concentration range.

  9. Supervised pattern recognition procedures for discrimination of whiskeys from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry congener analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Arjona, Domingo; López-Pérez, Germán; González-Gallero, Víctor; González, A Gustavo

    2006-03-22

    The volatile congener analysis of 52 commercialized whiskeys (24 samples of single malt Scotch whiskey, 18 samples of bourbon whiskey, and 10 samples of Irish whiskey) was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. Pattern recognition procedures were applied for discrimination of different whiskey categories. Multivariate data analysis includes linear discriminant analysis (LDA), k nearest neighbors (KNN), soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), procrustes discriminant analysis (PDA), and artificial neural networks techniques involving multilayer perceptrons (MLP) and probabilistic neural networks (PNN). Classification rules were validated by considering the number of false positives (FPs) and false negatives (FNs) of each class associated to the prediction set. Artificial neural networks led to the best results because of their intrinsic nonlinear features. Both techniques, MLP and PNN, gave zero FPs and zero FNs for all of the categories. KNN is a nonparametric method that also provides zero FPs and FNs for every class but only when selecting K = 3 neighbors. PDA produced good results also (zero FPs and FNs always) but only by selecting nine principal components for class modeling. LDA shows a lesser classification performance, because of the building of linear frontiers between classes that does not apply in many real situations. LDA led to one FP for bourbons and one FN for scotches. The worse results were obtained with SIMCA, which gave a higher number of FPs (five for both scotches and bourbons) and FNs (six for scotchs and two for bourbons). The possible cause of these findings is the strong influence of class inhomogeneities on the SIMCA performance. It is remarkable that in any case, all of the methodologies lead to zero FPs and FNs for the Irish whiskeys.

  10. Analysis of 23 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in smokeless tobacco by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Irina; Villalta, Peter W.; Knezevich, Aleksandar; Jensen, Joni; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2009-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco contains 28 known carcinogens and causes precancerous oral lesions and oral and pancreatic cancer. A recent study conducted by our research team identified 8 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in U.S. moist snuff, encouraging further investigations of this group of toxicants and carcinogens in smokeless tobacco products. In this study, we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method that allows simultaneous analysis of 23 various PAH in smokeless tobacco after a simple two-step extraction and purification procedure. The method produced coefficients of variation under 10% for most PAH. The limits of quantitation for different PAH varied between 0.3 ng/g tobacco and 11 ng/g tobacco, starting with a 300-mg sample. The recovery of the stable isotope-labeled internal standards averaged 87%. The method was applied to analysis of 23 moist snuff samples that include various flavors of the most popular U.S. moist snuff brands, as well as 17 samples representing the currently marketed brands of spit-free tobacco pouches, a relatively new type of smokeless tobacco. The sum of all detected PAH in conventional moist snuff averaged 11.6 (± 3.7) µg/g dry weight, 20% of this amount being comprised by carcinogenic PAH. The levels of PAH in new spit-free tobacco products were much lower than those in moist snuff, the sum of all detected PAH averaging 1.3 (±0.28) µg/g dry weight. Our findings render PAH one of the most prevalent groups of carcinogens in smokeless tobacco, along with tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Urgent measures are required from the U.S. tobacco industry to modify manufacturing processes so that the levels of these toxicants and carcinogens in the U.S. moist snuff are greatly reduced. PMID:19860436

  11. Nitrate Reduction in a Groundwater Microcosm Determined by 15N Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Göran; Annadotter, Heléne

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO3−-N liter−1. Traces of 15NO3− were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day−1. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of 15N2, 15N2O, 15NH4+, and 15N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N2 and N2O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO3− and NH4+ were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g−1 day−1. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N2, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO3− was reduced to NH4+. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month. PMID:16348048

  12. Unconjugated morphine in blood by radioimmunoassay and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Spiehler, V; Brown, R

    1987-07-01

    Morphine, the active metabolite of heroin, is rapidly inactivated by glucuronidation at the 3 carbon. Unconjugated (pharmacologically active) morphine was measured in postmortem blood by radioimmunoassay using an antibody-coated tube kit. The kit shows less than 0.2% cross-reactivity with codeine and morphine-glucuronide. Unconjugated morphine concentrations were confirmed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using deuterated morphine as the internal standard. The blood was precipitated with 10% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl), centrifuged, and decanted. The supernatant was then either diluted (unhydrolyzed) or heated to 100 degrees C, 30 min (hydrolyzed), followed by a wash with 4:1 chloroform:isopropranol. The upper aqueous layer was then saturated with sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and extracted with 4:1 chloroform:isopropranol. The organic layer was evaporated, derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFA), and analyzed by selected ion monitoring (SIM) GC/MS. Comparison of the results for unconjugated morphine by radioimmunoassay and unhydrolyzed morphine by GC/MS gave a correlation coefficient of r = 0.98, n = 100. Unconjugated morphine ranged from 0 to 100% of total morphine with a mean of 42%, n = 200, for heroin or morphine involved deaths. Review of 56 putative rapid deaths gave a mean of 68% unconjugated morphine with a range of 26 to 100%. The ratio of unconjugated to total morphine was found to be stable in postmortem blood after more than a year of storage at room temperature, within the precision of the method.

  13. Systematic analysis of glycerol: colourimetric screening and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric confirmation.

    PubMed

    Sardela, Vinícius F; Scalco, Fernanda B; Cavalcante, Karina M; Simoni, Ruth E; Silva, Deyvison R; Pereira, Henrique Marcelo G; de Oliveira, Maria Lúcia L Costa; Aquino Neto, Francisco R

    2015-10-01

    Glycerol is a naturally occurring polyol in the human body, essential for several metabolic processes. It is widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and medical industries and in clinical practice as a plasma volume expander (PVE). Athletes, however, may use glycerol to mask the presence of forbidden substances or to enhance performance, inclusively through hyperhydration achieved by glycerol ingestion with added fluid. These practices are considered doping, and are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Therefore, glycerol was introduced in the prohibited list. Doping through glycerol ingestion can readily be identified by detection of elevated glycerol concentrations in urine. In this paper, a protocol for the fast detection of glycerol in urine is proposed. It consists of a previous visual colourimetric screening, followed by a quantitative/qualitative confirmation analysis by mass spectrometry. The screening procedure involves a reaction in which polyhydric alcohols are oxidized by periodate to formic acid and formaldehyde, which is detected by the addition of a fuchsin solution. For the subsequent qualitative/quantitative confirmation analysis, a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based approach with a non-deuterated internal standard and a drying step of only 10 min is proposed. The linear correlation was demonstrated within WADA´s threshold range. The calculated RSD were 2.1% for within-day precision and 2.8% for between-day precision. The uncertainty estimation was calculated, and a value of 2.7% was obtained. The procedure may also be used for the analysis of other polyols in urine, as for example the PVE mannitol.

  14. Improved method for rapid detection of phthalates in bottled water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otero, Paz; Saha, Sushanta Kumar; Moane, Siobhan; Barron, John; Clancy, Gerard; Murray, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    An improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for simple, rapid and precise quantification of phthalates in drinking water is presented. This method was validated for bis (2-n-butoxyethyl) phthalate (DBEP), bis (2-n-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-butyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dihexyl phthalate (DHP), dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP) and dinonyl phthalate (DINP). Linearity of 0.9984>r(2)>0.9975 in the range of 0.075-4.8μg/mL for the selected phthalates was obtained. Accuracy values were in the range of 93-114% and RSD% for the analysis of 1.2μg/mL of each phthalate was below 2.3% (n=9). This new method design has significantly improved the detection in terms of rapidity, specificity, repeatability and accuracy compared to available methods. The procedure has been applied to the analyses of three different brands of commercially available bottled mineral water and the corresponding plastic bottles. Phthalates were extracted with dichloromethane and re-constituted in cyclohexane prior to GC-MS analysis. When the validated GC-MS method was applied to the quantification of the selected phthalates in the samples, only DBP (up to 0.0675±0.0018μg/mL) and DEHP (up to 1.6848±0.1631μg/mL) were found. Furthermore, we provide specific data about the concentration of DBP and DEHP in bottled water attributable to migration of phthalates from respective plastic bottles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry computer analysis of volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in man and his environment--A multimedia environmental study.

    PubMed

    Barkley, J; Bunch, J; Bursey, J T; Castillo, N; Cooper, S D; Davis, J M; Erickson, M D; Harris, B S; Kirkpatrick, M; Michael, L C; Parks, S P; Pellizzari, E D; Ray, M; Smith, D; Tomer, K B; Wagner, R; Zweidinger, R A

    1980-04-01

    As part of a study to make a comparative analysis of selected halogenated compounds in man and the environmental media, a quantitative gas chromatography mass spectrometric analysis of the levels of the halogenated compounds found in the breath, blood and urine of an exposed population (Old Love Canal area, Niagara, New York) and their immediate environment (air and water) was undertaken. In addition, levels of halogenated hydrocarbons in air samples taken in the general Buffalo, Niagara Falls area were determined.

  16. Identification of New Metabolites of Bacterial Transformation of Indole by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SPG transformed indole completely in the presence of an additional carbon source. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde as biotransformation products. This is the first report of the formation of indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde from indole by any bacterium. PMID:25548566

  17. A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method for the Detection and Quantitation of Monofluoroacetate in Plants Toxic to Livestock.

    PubMed

    Santos-Barbosa, Joyce M; Lee, Stephen T; Cook, Daniel; Gardner, Dale R; Viana, Luis Henrique; Ré, Nilva

    2017-02-22

    Monofluoroacetate (MFA) is a potent toxin that occurs in over 50 plant species in Africa, Australia, and South America and is responsible for significant livestock deaths in these regions. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants based on the derivatization of MFA with n-propanol in the presence of sulfuric acid to form propyl fluoroacetate was developed. This method compared favorably to a currently employed high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method for the analysis of MFA in plants. The GC-MS method was applied to the analysis of MFA in herbarium specimens of Fridericia elegans, Niedenzuella stannea, N. multiglandulosa, N. acutifolia, and Aenigmatanthera lasiandra. This is the first report of MFA being detected in F. elegans, N. multiglandulosa, N. acutifolia, and A. lasiandra, some of which have been reported to cause sudden death or that are toxic to livestock.

  18. Sweat testing for cocaine, codeine and metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huestis, M A; Oyler, J M; Cone, E J; Wstadik, A T; Schoendorfer, D; Joseph, R E

    1999-10-15

    Sweat testing for drugs of abuse provides a convenient and considerably less invasive method for monitoring drug exposure than blood or urine. Numerous devices have been developed for collection of sweat specimens. The most common device in current use is the PharmChek Sweat Patch, which usually is worn by an individual for five to ten days. This device has been utilized in several field trials comparing sweat test results to conventional urinalysis and the results have been favorable. Two new Fast Patch devices have been developed and tested that allow rapid collection of sweat specimens. The Hand-held Fast Patch was applied to the palm of the hand and the Torso Fast Patch was applied to the abdomen or the sides of the trunk (flanks) of volunteer subjects participating in a research study. Both patches employed heat-induced sweat stimulation and a larger cellulose pad for increased drug collection. Sweat specimens were collected for 30 min at various times following administration of cocaine or codeine in controlled dosing studies. After patch removal, the cellulose pad was extracted with sodium acetate buffer, followed by solid-phase extraction. Extracts were derivatized and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) simultaneously for cocaine, codeine and metabolites. Cocaine and codeine were the primary analytes detected in sweat. Peak cocaine and codeine concentrations ranged from 33 to 3579 ng/patch and 11 to 1123 ng/patch, respectively, across all doses for the Hand-held Patch compared to 22-1463 ng/patch and 12-360 ng/patch, respectively, for the Torso Fast Patch. Peak concentrations generally occurred 4.5-24 h after dosing. Both drugs could be detected for at least 48 h after dosing. Considerably smaller concentrations of metabolites of cocaine and codeine were also present in some patches. Generally, concentrations of cocaine and codeine were higher in sweat specimens collected with the Hand-held Fast Patch than for the Torso Fast Patch

  19. Detecting Organic Compounds in Martian Soil Analogues Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2004-01-01

    One of the primary objectives of the 1976 Viking missions was to determine whether organic compounds, possibly of biological origin, were present in the Martian surface soils. The Viking gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) instruments found no evidence for any organic compounds of Martian origin above a few parts per billion in the upper 10 cm of surface soil [l], suggesting the absence of a widely distributed Martian biota. However, Benner et d. have suggested that significant amounts of non-volatile organic compounds, possibly including oxidation products of bioorganic molecules (e.g. carboxylic acids) would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS [2]. Moreover, other key organic compounds important to biology, such as amino acids and nucleobases, would also likely have been missed by the Viking GCMS as these compounds require chemical derivatization to be stable in a GC column [3]. Recent pyrolysis experiments with a Mars soil analogue that had been innoculated with Escherichia coli bacteria have shown that amino acid decomposition products (amines) and nucleobases are among the most abundant products generated after pyrolysis of the bacterial cells [4,5]. At the part per billion level (Viking GCMS detection limit), these pyrolysis products generated from several million bacterial cells per gram of Martian soil would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments [4]. Analytical protocols are under development for upcoming in situ lander opportunities to target several important biological compounds including amino acids and nucleobases. For example, extraction and chemical derivatization techniques [3] are being adapted for space flight use to transform reactive or fragile molecules that would not have been detected by the Viking GCMS instruments, into species that are sufficiently volatile to be detected by GCMS. Recent experiments carried out at NASA Goddard have shown that using this derivatization technique all of the targeted compounds

  20. [Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based urinary metabolomics in very low birth weight premature infants].

    PubMed

    Li, S T; Huang, X L; Wu, S G; Ma, Y M; Shi, C C; Xiao, X; Hao, H

    2017-06-02

    Objective: To investigate the urinary metabolic spectrum and pathways in very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants. Method: A prospective case-control study was conducted to collect and compare the data of VLBW premature infants and full term infants from the Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yet-Sen University in 2014. Within 24 hours after birth, urine specimens in each group were collected. Metabolites of urine samples including amino acid, fatty acid and organic acid were detected using the urease pre-processing and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology. Using the orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), the biomarkers and differences between the two groups were found. The online metabolic pathway website was explored and multivariable analysis was conducted to investigate the valuable pathways and biomarkers related to the prematurity. Result: A total of 20 VLBW premature infants were enrolled, among whom 11 were male, 9 were female; and 20 full term infants were enrolled, among whom 9 were male, 11 were female. The urinary metabolites were established and compared between the VLBW premature and term infants. The investigation showed that the following nine pathways were enriched: amino-acyl-tRNA biosynthesis(P=0.000), lysine degradation(P=0.007), fatty acid biosynthesis(P=0.008), pyrimidine metabolism(P=0.014), pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis(P=0.022), valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis(P=0.022), lysine biosynthesis(P=0.031), glycerolipid metabolism(P=0.046), and valine, leucine and isoleucine degradation(P=0.031). Almost all the metabolites decreased except for the glyceric acid exhibiting a higher content in the VLBW premature infant. 12 potential biomarkers were explored with the most significant covariance and correlation, within which stearic acid, palmiticacid, myristic acid, β-amino-isobutyric acid, and uric acid were lower, while myo-inositol, mannitol, glycine, glucose1, glucose2, glyceric

  1. Nitrate reduction in a groundwater microcosm determined by sup 15 N gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson, G.; Annadotter, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Aerobic and anaerobic groundwater continuous-flow microcosms were designed to study nitrate reduction by the indigenous bacteria in intact saturated soil cores from a sandy aquifer with a concentration of 3.8 mg of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N liter{sup {minus}1}. Traces of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} were added to filter-sterilized groundwater by using a Darcy flux of 4 cm day{sup {minus}1}. Both assimilatory and dissimilatory reduction rates were estimated from analyses of {sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}O, {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +}, and {sup 15}N-labeled protein amino acids by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O were separated on a megabore fused-silica column and quantified by electron impact-selected ion monitoring. NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and NH{sub 4}{sup +} were analyzed as pentafluorobenzoyl amides by multiple-ion monitoring and protein amino acids as their N-heptafluorobutyryl isobutyl ester derivatives by negative ion-chemical ionization. The numbers of bacteria and their (methyl-{sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation rates were simultaneously measured. Nitrate was completely reduced in the microcosms at a rate of about 250 ng g{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1}. Of this nitrate, 80 to 90% was converted by aerobic denitrification to N{sub 2}, whereas only 35% was denitrified in the anaerobic microcosm, where more than 50% of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was reduced to NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Assimilatory reduction was recorded only in the aerobic microcosm, where N appeared in alanine in the cells. The nitrate reduction rates estimated for the aquifer material were low in comparison with rates in eutrophic lakes and coastal sediments but sufficiently high to remove nitrate from an uncontaminated aquifer of the kind examined in less than 1 month.

  2. Simultaneous determination of urinary dialkylphosphate metabolites of organophosphorus pesticides using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Jun; Saito, Isao; Kamijima, Michihiro; Nakajima, Tamie; Gotoh, Masahiro; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Shibata, Eiji; Kondo, Takaaki; Takagi, Kenji; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takamatsu, Junki; Hasegawa, Takaaki; Takagi, Kenzo

    2006-02-17

    In this study, we developed a safe and sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of urinary dialkylphosphates (DAPs), metabolites of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs), including dimethylphosphate (DMP), diethylphosphate (DEP), dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP), and diethylthiophosphate (DETP), using a pentafluorobenzylbromide (PFBBr) derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Several parameters were investigated: pH on evaporation, reaction temperature and time for the derivatization, the use of an antioxidant for preventing oxidation, and a clean-up step. The pH was set at 6, adjusted with K2CO3, and the reaction temperature and time of derivatization were 80 degrees C and 30 min, respectively. Sodium disulfite was chosen as an antioxidant. The clean-up step was performed with a Florisil/PSE mini-column to remove the unreacted PFBBr and sample matrix. This established procedure markedly shortened the sample preparation time to only about 3 h, and completely inhibited the unwanted oxidization of dialkylthiophosphates. The limits of determination (LOD) were approximately 0.3 microg/L for DMP, and 0.1 microg/L for DEP, DMTP, and DETP in 5 mL of human urine. Within-series and between-day imprecision for the present method using pooled urine spiked with DAPs was less than 20.6% in the calibration range of 1-300 microg/L, and the mean recovery was 56.7-60.5% for DMP, 78.5-82.7% for DEP, 88.3-103.9% for DMTP, and 84.2-92.4% for DETP. This method detected geometric mean values of the urinary DAPs in Japanese with and without occupational exposure to OPs, 16.6 or 27.4 for DMP, 1.0 or 0.7 for DEP, 1.3 or 2.3 for DMTP, and 1.0 or 1.1 microg/L for DETP, respectively. The present method, which does not require special equipment except for GC-MS, is quick, safe, and sensitive enough to be adopted in routine biological monitoring of non-occupational as well as occupational exposure to OPs.

  3. Authentication of Organically and Conventionally Grown Basils by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Chemical Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengfang; Chen, Pei; Yu, Liangli; Harrington, Peter de B.

    2013-01-01

    Basil plants cultivated by organic and conventional farming practices were accurately classified by pattern recognition of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) data. A novel extraction procedure was devised to extract characteristic compounds from ground basil powders. Two in-house fuzzy classifiers, i.e., the fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) and the fuzzy optimal associative memory (FOAM) for the first time, were used to build classification models. Two crisp classifiers, i.e., soft independent modeling by class analogy (SIMCA) and the partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used as control methods. Prior to data processing, baseline correction and retention time alignment were performed. Classifiers were built with the two-way data sets, the total ion chromatogram representation of data sets, and the total mass spectrum representation of data sets, separately. Bootstrapped Latin partition (BLP) was used as an unbiased evaluation of the classifiers. By using two-way data sets, average classification rates with FuRES, FOAM, SIMCA, and PLS-DA were 100 ± 0%, 94.4 ± 0.4%, 93.3 ± 0.4%, and 100 ± 0%, respectively, for 100 independent evaluations. The established classifiers were used to classify a new validation set collected 2.5 months later with no parametric changes except that the training set and validation set were individually mean-centered. For the new two-way validation set, classification rates with FuRES, FOAM, SIMCA, and PLS-DA were 100%, 83%, 97%, and 100%, respectively. Thereby, the GC/MS analysis was demonstrated as a viable approach for organic basil authentication. It is the first time that a FOAM has been applied to classification. A novel baseline correction method was used also for the first time. The FuRES and the FOAM are demonstrated as powerful tools for modeling and classifying GC/MS data of complex samples and the data pretreatments are demonstrated to be useful to improve the performance of classifiers

  4. Correlation of Drug-Testing Results - Immunoassay versus Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, M H; Liu, R H; Chen, Y L; Rhodes, S L

    2006-01-01

    The need for and prevalence of workplace drug-testing programs mandate the development of an effective and efficient two-step test strategy. Successful implementation of the two-step test strategy relies on the establishment of a reasonable correlation between the preliminary and the confirmatory test data and the selection of an appropriate cutoff for each test step. Correlations of test data derived form these two test steps were most commonly studied qualitatively by comparing the positive/negative test result concluded by these two test steps; however, when instrument-based immunoassays (IA) are used in the preliminary test step, the resulting "semiquantitative" and "apparent" concentration of the targeted analyte can be quantitatively correlated to the analyte concentration as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Specimens selected for quantitative correlation studies should be clinical specimens with the distributions of metabolites similar to that present in test specimens; if the resulting correlation data are to be used for selecting appropriate/corresponding cutoffs for these two test steps, the concentrations of the targeted analyte in these specimens should also be within a narrow range centering on the proposed GC-MS cutoff concentration. Among the very significant number of reports correlating IA and GC-MS test data, cannabis and urine are the most common drug category and test specimen studied. The degree of correlation between IA and the GC-MS test data varies with the IA reagent manufacturers, and even with manufacture dates/lots of those supplied by the same manufacturer. The most important factors underlying the observed degree of correlation are undoubtedly the cross-reacting characteristics of the antibody and the metabolite distribution pattern of the drug of concern. Over time, specificities of IA reagents have been optimized so that the two-step test strategy can be most effectively and efficiently applied using the

  5. Plasma metabolomic profiling of dairy cows affected with ketosis using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ketosis is an important problem for dairy cows` production performance. However, it is still little known about plasma metabolomics details of dairy ketosis. Results A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique was used to investigate plasma metabolic differences in cows that had clinical ketosis (CK, n=22), subclinical ketosis (SK, n=32), or were clinically normal controls (NC, n=22). The endogenous plasma metabolome was measured by chemical derivatization followed by GC/MS, which led to the detection of 267 variables. A two-sample t-test of 30, 32, and 13 metabolites showed statistically significant differences between SK and NC, CK and NC, and CK and SK, respectively. Orthogonal signal correction-partial least-square discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) revealed that the metabolic patterns of both CK and SK were mostly similar, with the exception of a few differences. The development of CK and SK involved disturbances in many metabolic pathways, mainly including fatty acid metabolism, amino acid metabolism, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the pentose phosphate pathway. A diagnostic model arbitrary two groups was constructed using OPLS-DA and receiver–operator characteristic curves (ROC). Multivariate statistical diagnostics yielded the 19 potential biomarkers for SK and NC, 31 for CK and NC, and 8 for CK and SK with area under the curve (AUC) values. Our results showed the potential biomarkers from CK, SK, and NC, including carbohydrates, fatty acids, amino acids, even sitosterol and vitamin E isomers, etc. 2-piperidinecarboxylic acid and cis-9-hexadecenoic acid were closely associated with metabolic perturbations in ketosis as Glc, BHBA and NEFA for dealing with metabolic disturbances of ketosis in clinical practice. However, further research is needed to explain changes of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid, α-aminobutyric acid, methylmalonic acid, sitosterol and α-tocopherol in CK and SK, and to reveal differences

  6. Analytical strategies for characterizing organic paint media using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Maria Perla; Andreotti, Alessia; Bonaduce, Ilaria; Modugno, Francesca; Ribechini, Erika

    2010-06-15

    Throughout history, artists have experimented with a variety of organic-based natural materials, using them as paint binders, varnishes, and ingredients for mordants in gildings. Artists often use many layers of paint to produce particular effects. How we see a painting is thus the final result of how this complex, highly heterogeneous, multimaterial, and multilayered structure interacts with light. The chemical characterization of the organic substances in paint materials is of great importance for artwork conservation because the organic components of the paint layers are particularly subject to degradation. In addition, understanding the organic content and makeup of paint materials allows us to differentiate between the painting techniques that have been used over history. Applying gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis to microsamples of paint layers is widely recognized as the best approach for identifying organic materials, such as proteins, drying oils, waxes, terpenic resins, and polysaccharide gums. The method provides essential information for reconstructing artistic techniques, assessing the best conditions for long-term preservation, and planning restoration. In this Account, we summarize the more common approaches adopted in the study of the organic components of paint materials. Our progress in developing GC/MS analytical procedures in the field of cultural heritage is presented, focusing on problems that arise from (i) the presence of mixtures of many chemically complex and degraded materials, (ii) the interference of inorganic species, (iii) the small size of the samples, and (iv) the risk of contamination. We outline some critical aspects of the analytical strategy, such as the need to optimize specific wet-chemical sample pretreatments in order to separate the various components, hydrolyze macromolecular analytes, clean-up inorganic ions, and derivatize polar molecules for subsequent GC/MS separation and identification. We also

  7. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  8. EPA Method 525.3 - Determination of Semivolatile Organic Chemicals in Drinking Water by Solid Phase Extraction and Capillary Column Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Method 525.3 is an analytical method that uses solid phase extraction (SPE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the identification and quantitation of 125 selected semi-volatile organic chemicals in drinking water.

  9. Determination of characteristic odorants from Harmonia axyridis beetles using in vivo solid-phase microextraction and multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lingshuang; Koziel, Jacek A; O'Neal, Matthew E

    2007-04-13

    Homeowners, small fruit growers, and wine makers are concerned with noxious compounds released by multicolored Asian ladybird beetles (Harmonia axyridis, Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). A new method based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (MDGC-MS-O) system was developed for extraction, isolation and simultaneous identification of compounds responsible for the characteristic odor of live H. axyridis. Four methoxypyrazines (MPs) were identified in headspace volatiles of live H. axyridis as those responsible for the characteristic odor: 2,5-dimethyl-3-methoxypyrazine (DMMP), 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP), 2-sec-butyl-3-methoxypyrazine (SBMP), and 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP). To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of H. axyridis releasing DMMP and the first report of this compound being a component of the H. axyridis characteristic odor. Besides the MPs, 34 additional compounds were also identified. Quantification of three MPs (IPMP, SBMP and IBMP) emitted from live H. axyridis were performed using external calibration with HS-SPME and direct injections. A linear relationship (R(2)>0.9951 for all 3 MPs) between MS response and concentration of a standard was observed over a concentration range from 0.1 ng L(-1) to 0.05 microg L(-1) for HS-SPME-GC-MS. The method detection limits (MDL) based on multidimensional GC-MS with narrow heart-cut approach for three MPs were estimated to be between 0.020 and 0.022 ng L(-1). This represents a 38.9-52.4% improvement in sensitivity compared to GC-MS with full heart-cut method. This methodology is applicable for in vivo determination of odor-causing chemicals associated with emissions of volatiles from insects.

  10. Identification of Gibberellins in Norway Spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) by Combined Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Odén, Per Christer; Schwenen, Ludger; Graebe, Jan E.

    1987-01-01

    Gibberellins A1 (GA1), A3 and A9 were identified from extracts of shoots of 6-month old Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings by the use of sequential reverse and normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), bioassay, radioimmunoassay (RIA) and combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The bioassay and RIA were used after fractionation by HPLC to detect the GA-containing fractions, which were then examined by GC-MS. The GAs identified are considered to be endogenous. PMID:16665471

  11. Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

    2013-02-01

    Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 ÀC. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (#6 and #10), one commercially available formulation (#21), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl #10 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl #10 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

  12. [Applications of multi-micro-volume pressure-assisted derivatization reaction device for analysis of polar heterocyclic aromatic amines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiru; Chen, Fangxiang; Shi, Yamei; Tan, Connieal; Chen, Xi

    2013-01-01

    A multi-micro-volume pressure-assisted derivatization reaction device has been designed and made for the silylation derivatization of polar heterocyclic aromatic amines by N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl )-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) with 1% catalyst tert-butyldimethylchlorosilane (TBDMCS) at a high temperature. The tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives then could be automatically analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Using the pressure-assisted device, the silylation reaction may occur at a temperature higher than the boiling points of the reagents, and several micro-volume samples can be simultaneously pretreated in the same device to shorten the sample-preparation time and to improve the repeatability. The derivatization conditions including the headspace volume of the vial, the evaporative surface area of the reagent, derivatization temperature and time have been discussed for the use of the pressure-assisted device. The experimental results proved that the device is an effective way for the simultaneous derivatization of several micro-volume samples at a high temperature. Compared with a common device, the derivative amounts were obviously increased when using the pressure-assisted device at 90 degrees C. Quantitative derivatization can be achieved even at 150 degrees C while there was no common device could be applied at such a high temperature due to the heavy losses of reagents by evaporation. However, no obviously higher reaction speed has been observed in such a circumstance with a higher temperature and a higher pressure using the pressure-assisted device.

  13. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method optimized using response surface modeling for the quantitation of fungal off-flavors in grapes and wine.

    PubMed

    Sadoughi, Navideh; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Antalick, Guillaume; Blackman, John W; Steel, Christopher C

    2015-03-25

    An optimized method for the quantitation of volatile compounds responsible for off-aromas, such as earthy odors, found in wine and grapes was developed. The method involved a fast and simple headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) for simultaneous determination of 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, 3-octanone, fenchone, 1-octen-3-one, trans-2-octen-1-ol, fenchol, 1-octen-3-ol, 2-methylisoborneol, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, geosmin, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole, and pentachloroanisole. The extraction of the temperature and time were optimized using response surface methodology in both wine base (WB) and grape base (GB). Low limits of detection (0.1-5 ng/L in WB and 0.05-1.6 in GB) and quantitation (0.3-17 in WB and 0.2-6.2 in GB) with good recoveries (83-131%) and repeatability [4.3-9.8% coefficient of variation (CV) in WB and 5.1-11.1% CV in GB] and reproducibility (3.6-10.2 in WB and 1.9-10.9 in GB) indicate that the method has excellent sensitivity and is suitable for the analysis of these off-flavor compounds in wine and grape juice samples.

  14. Comparitive study on volatile aroma compounds of two different garlic types (Kastamonu and Chinese) using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS) technique.

    PubMed

    Keleş, Davut; Taşkin, Hatira; Baktemur, Gökhan; Kafkas, Ebru; Büyükalaca, Saadet

    2014-01-01

    The medicinal use of garlic is much older than its usage as a food. The medical importance of garlic comes forward for its sulfur-containing components. In this study, it was aimed to compare Kastamonu garlic type with Chinese garlic type based on their aroma profiles. Fresh Kastamonu garlic samples harvested from Kastamonu region of Turkey and Chinese garlic samples obtained from Turkish market were used as plant material. Volatile aroma compounds were determined using Headspace Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (HS-GC/MS). Sixteen and twenty aroma components were identified in Kastamonu and Chinese garlic types, respectively. Kastamonu garlic type was found to be richer than Chinese garlic types in terms of sulfur-containing compounds. Diallyl disulphide, which is one of these components, was detected at level of 41.87% and 34.95% in the Kastamonu and Chinese garlic types, respectively. Also di-2-propenyl trisulfide was found only in Kastamonu garlic types. Disulfide, methyl 2-propenyl was determined at similar levels in both garlic types. The majority of garlic grown in Kastamonu region of Turkey is assessed by medical companies. The results of the current study showed that Kastamonu garlic type has important medical properties. Therefore, this garlic can also be used in the medical field, as well as the consumption as food.

  15. Simultaneous quantification of Aroclor mixtures in soil samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with solid phase microextraction using partial least-squares regression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengliang; Harrington, Peter de B

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate partial least-squares (PLS) method was applied to the quantification of two complex polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) commercial mixtures, Aroclor 1254 and 1260, in a soil matrix. PCBs in soil samples were extracted by headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) and determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Decachlorinated biphenyl (deca-CB) was used as internal standard. After the baseline correction was applied, four data representations including extracted ion chromatograms (EIC) for Aroclor 1254, EIC for Aroclor 1260, EIC for both Aroclors and two-way data sets were constructed for PLS-1 and PLS-2 calibrations and evaluated with respect to quantitative prediction accuracy. The PLS model was optimized with respect to the number of latent variables using cross validation of the calibration data set. The validation of the method was performed with certified soil samples and real field soil samples and the predicted concentrations for both Aroclors using EIC data sets agreed with the certified values. The linear range of the method was from 10μgkg(-1) to 1000μgkg(-1) for both Aroclor 1254 and 1260 in soil matrices and the detection limit was 4μgkg(-1) for Aroclor 1254 and 6μgkg(-1) for Aroclor 1260. This holistic approach for the determination of mixtures of complex samples has broad application to environmental forensics and modeling.

  16. Solid phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: a very rapid method for identification of volatile organic compounds emitted by Carum copticum.

    PubMed

    Dehghan Abkenar, Shiva; Yamini, Yadollah; Shemirani, Farzaneh; Assadi, Yaghoub

    2006-07-20

    The investigation of flower scent represents an important field of modern biological research which is directed towards special theories of biological recognition. The headspace solid phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify the volatile components of Carum copticum (C. copticum) cultivated in Iran. The compounds were identified according to their retention indices and mass spectra (EI, 70 eV). The effects of different parameters, such as the desorption time, the extraction temperature, the sample mass, the addition of salt, the pre-equilibration time and the extraction time, on the extraction efficiency were investigated. The optimized conditions were: the desorption time, 2 min; the extraction temperature, 58 degrees Celsius; the sample mass, 1.000 g in 4.0 mL 2.0 M NaCl solution; the pre-equilibration time, 25 min; the extraction time, 20 min. Finally, ten components were identified in the volatile components of C. copticum. The major components of C. copticum were thymol (68.2%), gamma-terpinene (13.9%), p-cymene (11.6%), myrcene (1.0%) and beta-pinene (0.6%). Precision of the proposed method is good and %RSD less than 14 was obtained.

  17. Ion and gas chromatography mass spectrometry investigations of organophosphates in lithium ion battery electrolytes by electrochemical aging at elevated cathode potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Waldemar; Wagner, Ralf; Streipert, Benjamin; Kraft, Vadim; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2016-02-01

    The electrochemical aging of commercial non-aqueous lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6)/organic carbonate solvent based lithium ion battery electrolyte has been investigated in view of the formation of ionic and non-ionic alkylated phosphates. Subject was a solvent mixture of ethylene carbonate/ethyl methyl carbonate EC:EMC (1:1, by wt.) with 1 M LiPF6 (LP50 Selectilyte™, BASF). The analysis was carried out by ion chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) for ionic compounds and (headspace) gas chromatography mass spectrometry ((HS)-GC-MS) for non-ionic compounds. The electrochemical aging was performed by galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling and potentiostatic experiments with LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LMNO) as cathode material at increased cut-off potentials (>4.5 V vs. Li/Li+). A strong dependence of the formation of organophosphates on the applied electrode potential was observed and investigated by quantitative analysis of the formed phosphates. In addition, new possible "fingerprint" compounds for describing the electrolyte status were investigated and compared to existing compounds.

  18. Multi-residue off-flavour profiling in wine using stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Franc, Céline; David, Frank; de Revel, Gilles

    2009-04-10

    A multi-residue method (MRM) for the detection and quantification of eight compounds responsible for off-flavours in wine using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis is presented. The extraction and desorption conditions were optimised in order to get the best compromise for the simultaneous analysis of the eight target solutes, belonging to different chemical classes. The analytical conditions enable the quantification of the solutes below their respective organoleptic perception thresholds in wine. The method displayed good linearity over the concentration ranges explored in wine as well as excellent repeatability (RSD below 6%) and good reproducibility (RSD below 24%). The developed methodology was applied to the analysis of several wines and showed good agreement with the results collected with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) or liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by GC-MS or electron capture detection (ECD). Good correlation was also found between the analytical and sensory results.

  19. Contribution of oxidized tallow to aroma characteristics of beeflike process flavour assessed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and partial least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Song, Shiqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xiao, Zuobing; Niu, Yunwei; Hayat, Khizar; Eric, Karangwa

    2012-09-07

    Flavour profiles of seven beeflike process flavours (BFs) including non-oxidized or oxidized tallow were comparatively analysed by electronic nose, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and descriptive sensory analysis to characterize the headspace of BFs. Analysis of volatiles by GC-MS indicated that the effect of oxidized tallow with moderate oxidization level on Maillard reaction was more prominent than that of others, which potentially could result in an optimal meat flavour with strong, harmony and species-specific characteristics detected by sensory analysis. In addition, electronic nose data confirmed the accuracy of the GC-MS and sensory analysis results. Correlation analysis of the electronic nose measurements, sensory evaluation and characteristic compounds through Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR) further explained that moderate oxidized tallow with peroxide value (PV) of 87.67-160 mequiv./kg, the p-anisidine value (p-AV) of 30.57-50, and the acid value (AV) of 1.8-2.2 mg KOH/g tallow was a desirable precursor for imparting aroma characteristics of beef flavour.

  20. Rapid analysis of essential oil from Fructus Amomi by pressurized hot water extraction followed by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Wang, Aiqin; Shen, Shun; Fu, Daxi; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2005-06-15

    In this paper, a simple, rapid, solvent-free and low-cost method of pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) followed by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the analysis of essential oil in a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) of the dried ripe fruit of Fructus Amomi (Sha Ren). The essential oil in the TCM (0.050 g) was extracted by water at 50 bar and 150 degrees C, followed by extraction and concentration by SPME fibers at 80 degrees C for 15min and analysis by GC-MS. The PHWE and HS-SPME parameters were optimized. Thirty-five compounds in the TCM were identified by PHWE-HS-SPME. Among them, camphor, an active compound, in the TCM samples was quantitatively analyzed. The proposed method required little time to prepare the sample. Moreover, little sample mass and no organic solvent was needed. The precision of the present method was found to be good (R.S.D. <10.0%). It is shown that PHWE-SPME-GC-MS is an alternative method for the determination of volatile components in TCMs and can be used as a powerful tool for TCM quality assessment.

  1. Determination of volatile organic compounds in the dried leaves of Salvia species by solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, Rosaria; Ramezani, Sadrollah; Martignetti, Antonella; Mari, Angela; Piacente, Sonia; De Giulio, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Salvia spp. are used throughout the world both for food and pharmaceutical purposes. In this study, a method involving headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed, to establish the volatiles profile of dried leaves of four Iranian Salvia spp.: Salvia officinalis L., Salvia leriifolia Benth, Salvia macrosiphon Boiss. and two ecotypes of Salvia reuterana Boiss. A total of 95 volatiles were identified from the dried leaves of the five selected samples. Specifically, α-thujone was the main component of S. officinalis L. and S. macrosiphon Boiss. (34.40 and 17.84%, respectively) dried leaves, S. leriifolia Benth was dominated by β-pinene (27.03%), whereas α-terpinene was the major constituent of the two ecotypes of S. reuterana Boiss. (21.67 and 13.84%, respectively). These results suggested that the proposed method can be considered as a reliable technique for isolating volatiles from aromatic plants, and for plant differentiation based on the volatile metabolomic profile.

  2. Measurement of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: comparison with measurement by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, M; Jaruga, P; Rodriguez, H

    2001-02-01

    Measurement of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dGuo) in DNA by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was studied. A methodology was developed for separation by LC of 8-OH-dGuo from intact and modified nucleosides in DNA hydrolyzed by a combination of four enzymes: DNase I, phosphodiesterases I and II and alkaline phosphatase. The atmospheric pressure ionization-electrospray process was used for mass spectral measurements. A stable isotope-labeled analog of 8-OH-dGuo was used as an internal standard for quantification by isotope-dilution MS (IDMS). Results showed that LC/IDMS with selected ion-monitoring (SIM) is well suited for identification and quantification of 8-OH-dGuo in DNA at background levels and in damaged DNA. The sensitivity level of LC/IDMS-SIM was found to be comparable to that reported previously using LC-tandem MS (LC/MS/MS). It was found that approximately five lesions per 10(6) DNA bases can be detected using amounts of DNA as low as 2 microgram. The results also suggest that this lesion may be quantified in DNA at levels of one lesion per 10(6) DNA bases, or even lower, when more DNA is used. Up to 50 microgram of DNA per injection were used without adversely affecting the measurements. Gas chromatography/isotope-dilution MS with selected-ion monitoring (GC/IDMS-SIM) was also used to measure this compound in DNA following its removal from DNA by acidic hydrolysis or by hydrolysis with Escherichia coli Fpg protein. The background levels obtained by LC/IDMS-SIM and GC/IDMS-SIM were almost identical. Calf thymus DNA and DNA isolated from cultured HeLa cells were used for this purpose. This indicates that these two techniques can provide similar results in terms of the measurement of 8-OH-dGuo in DNA. In addition, DNA in buffered aqueous solution was damaged by ionizing radiation at different radiation doses and analyzed by LC/IDMS-SIM and GC/IDMS-SIM. Again, similar results were obtained by the two techniques. The

  3. Thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to determine phthalate and organophosphate esters from air samples.

    PubMed

    Aragón, M; Borrull, F; Marcé, R M

    2013-08-16

    A method based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed to determine four organophosphate esters, seven phthalate esters, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate in the gas phase from harbour and urban air samples. The method involves the sampling of 1.5L of air in a Tenax TA sorbent tube followed by thermal desorption (using a Tenax TA cryogenic trap) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The repeatability of the method expressed as %RSD (n=3) is less than 15% and the MQLs are between 0.007μgm(-3) (DMP, TBP, BBP, TPP and DnOP) and 6.7μgm(-3) (DEHP). The method was successfully applied in two areas (urban and harbour) testing two and three points in each one, respectively. Some of these compounds were found in both urban and harbour samples. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was the most abundant compound found in both areas at concentration levels between 6.7μgm(-3) and 136.4μgm(-3). This study demonstrates that thermal desorption is an efficient method for the determination of these semi-volatile compounds in the gas phase fraction of air samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of stable isotopes and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in the identification of steroid metabolites in the equine

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, E.; Dumasia, M.C.; Teale, P.; Smith, S.J.; Cox, J.; Marshall, D.; Gower, D.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry has been used successfully in the elucidation of structures of urinary steroid metabolites in the horse and in the identification of metabolites isolated from in vivo perfusion and in vitro incubation studies using equine tissue preparations. Deuterium-labeled steroids, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and 5-androstene-3 beta,17 beta-diol have been synthesized by base-catalyzed isotope exchange methods and the products characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. (16,16(-2)H2)Dehydroepiandrosterone (plus radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone) was perfused into a testicular artery of a pony stallion and was shown to be metabolized into 2H2-labeled testosterone, 4-androstenedione, isomers of 5-androstene-3,17-diol, 19-hydroxytestosterone, and 19-hydroxy-4-androstenedione. In further studies, equine testicular minces have been incubated with 2H2-labeled and radiolabeled dehydroepiandrosterone and 5-androstene-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. The metabolites, whose identity was confirmed by stable isotope gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proved the interconversion of the two substrates, as well as formation of testosterone and 4-androstenedione. The aromatization of dehydroepiandrosterone was also confirmed, together with the formation of an isomer of 5(10)-estrene-3,17-diol from both substrates showing 19-demethylation without concomitant aromatization. In studies of the feto-placental unit, the allantochorion was shown to aromatize (2H5)testosterone to (2H4)estradiol, the loss of one 2H from the substrate being consistent with aromatization of the A ring. The formation of 6-hydroxyestradiol was also confirmed in this study. The same technique has been valuable in determining the structure of two metabolites of nandrolone isolated from horse urine.

  5. Determination of residual epichlorohydrin in sevelamer hydrochloride by static headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Kaliaperumal; Arularasu, Govindasamy T; Devaraj, Perumalsamy; Pillai, Karnam Chandrasekara

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive static headspace gas chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of residual epichlorohydrin (ECH) in sevelamer hydrochloride (SVH) drug substance. This method utilized a Phenomenex Zebron ZB-WAX GC column, helium as carrier gas with flame ionization detection. The critical experimental parameters, such as, headspace vial incubation time and incubation temperature were studied and optimized. The method was validated as per United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in terms of detection limit (DL), quantitation limit (QL), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity and robustness. A linear range from 0.30 to 10 Îg/mL was obtained with the coefficient of determination (r(2)) 0.999. The DL and QL of ECH were 0.09 Îg/mL and 0.30 Îg/mL, respectively. The recovery obtained for ECH was between 91.7 and 96.6%. Also, the specificity of the method was proved through gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method was applied successfully to determine the content of residual ECH in SVH bulk drug.

  6. Determination of Residual Epichlorohydrin in Sevelamer Hydrochloride by Static Headspace Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detection

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Kaliaperumal; Arularasu, Govindasamy T.; Devaraj, Perumalsamy; Pillai, Karnam Chandrasekara

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive static headspace gas chromatographic method was developed and validated for the determination of residual epichlorohydrin (ECH) in sevelamer hydrochloride (SVH) drug substance. This method utilized a Phenomenex Zebron ZB-WAX GC column, helium as carrier gas with flame ionization detection. The critical experimental parameters, such as, headspace vial incubation time and incubation temperature were studied and optimized. The method was validated as per United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines in terms of detection limit (DL), quantitation limit (QL), linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity and robustness. A linear range from 0.30 to 10 μg/mL was obtained with the coefficient of determination (r2) 0.999. The DL and QL of ECH were 0.09 μg/mL and 0.30 μg/mL, respectively. The recovery obtained for ECH was between 91.7 and 96.6%. Also, the specificity of the method was proved through gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). This method was applied successfully to determine the content of residual ECH in SVH bulk drug. PMID:21179319

  7. The composition of volatile components in olivines from Yakutian kimberlites of various ages: Evidence from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomilenko, A. A.; Bul'bak, T. A.; Khomenko, M. O.; Kuzmin, D. V.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2016-06-01

    The composition of volatiles from fluid and melt inclusions in olivine phenocrysts from Yakutian kimberlite pipes of various ages (Olivinovaya, Malokuonapskaya, and Udachnaya-East) were studied for the first time by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. It was shown that hydrocarbons and their derivatives, as well as nitrogen-, halogen-, and sulfur-bearing compounds, played a significant role in the mineral formation. The proportion of hydrocarbons and their derivatives in the composition of mantle fluids could reach 99%, including up to 4.9% of chlorineand fluorine-bearing compounds.

  8. Application of capillary gas chromatography mass spectrometry/computer techniques to synoptic survey of organic material in bed sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinheimer, T.R.; Pereira, W.E.; Johnson, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A bed sediment sample taken from an area impacted by heavy industrial activity was analyzed for organic compounds of environmental significance. Extraction was effected on a Soxhlet apparatus using a freeze-dried sample. The Soxhlet extract was fractionated by silica gel micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic compounds was accomplished by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry techniques. More than 50 compounds were identified; these include saturated hydrocarbons, olefins, aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and oxygenated compounds such as aldehydes and ketones. The role of bed sediments as a source or sink for organic pollutants is discussed. ?? 1981.

  9. Chemical analysis of surface hydrocarbons in fireflies by direct contact extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shibue, Keiko; Goto, Yoshimasa; Kawashima, Itsuro; Shibue, Toshimichi

    2004-12-01

    We characterized three Japanese firefly species (Luciola lateralis, Luciola cruciata, and Lucidina biplagiata) and three North American firefly species (Lucidota atra, Photuris lucicrescens, and Photuris cinctipennis) based on their surface hydrocarbons. The analysis of firefly extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed clear differences in the chromatographic profiles and mass spectra. Each firefly could be distinguished by its GC-MS profile. A major difference was observed between Japanese fireflies and North American fireflies. Among the North American fireflies, non-luminous fireflies, Lucidota atra, showed much more complicated GC-MS profile than those of luminous fireflies, Photuris lucicrescens and Photuris cinctipennis.

  10. Determination of cocaine and cocaethylene in plasma by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Iván; Bermejo, Ana María; Tabernero, María Jesús; Fernández, Purificación; López, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a method for the simultaneous determination of cocaine and cocaethylene in plasma. It was based in the extraction of the analytes by solid-phase microextraction (SPME), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify and quantify the analytes in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The method showed to be very simple, rapid and sensitive. The method was validated for the two compounds, including linearity (range 25-1000 ng/mL) and the main precision parameters. It was applied to ten plasma samples from cocaine and alcohol users, obtaining positive results in all cases.

  11. Interference of 3-hydroxyisobutyrate with measurements of ketone body concentration and isotopic enrichment by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Des Rosiers, C; Montgomery, J A; Desrochers, S; Garneau, M; David, F; Mamer, O A; Brunengraber, H

    1988-08-15

    Concentrations and 13C2 molar percentage enrichments of blood R-3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate are measured by selected ion monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Samples are treated with NaB2H4 to reduce unlabeled and labeled acetoacetate to corresponding deuterium-labeled RS-3-hydroxybutyrate species. Only the gas chromatographic peak for the tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivative of 3-hydroxybutyrate needs to be monitored. The various compounds are quantitated using an internal standard of RS-3-hydroxy-[2,2,3,4,4,4-2H6]-butyrate. Concentrations of ketone bodies are obtained by monitoring the m/z 159 to 163 fragments of tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives of labeled and unlabeled 3-hydroxybutyrate species. High correlations were obtained between ketone body concentrations assayed (i) enzymatically with R-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase and (ii) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The limit of detection is about 10 nmol of substrate in blood samples. The current practice of monitoring the m/z 275 to 281 fragments overestimates the concentration of endogenous R-3-hydroxybutyrate, due to co-elution of 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, a valine metabolite. The method presented is used to measure ketone body turnover in vivo in 24-h-fasted dogs.

  12. Chromatographic fingerprint analysis of metabolites in natural and artificial agarwood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoxia; Xie, Mingrong; Liu, Shaofeng; Guo, Xiaoling; Chen, Xiaoying; Zhong, Zhaojian; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin

    2014-09-15

    Agarwood is a resinous material formed in wounded Aquilaria sinensis in China, which is widely used as an effective traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This study is aimed to use gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometric methods to create reliable criteria for accurate identification of natural agarwood and artificial agarwood, as well as for quality evaluation of artificial agarwood. Natural agarwood and artificial agarwood (stimulated by formic acid or formic acid plus fungal inoculation) were used as standards and controls for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. The identification criteria developed were applied to commercial agarwood. A reliable criteria including correlation coefficient of GC-MS fingerprint of natural agarwood and 22 markers of metabolism in natural and artificial agarwood was constructed. Compared with chemically stimulated agarwood (formic acid) and in terms of the 22 markers, artificial agarwood obtained by formic acid stimulation and fungal inoculation were much closer to natural agarwood. The study demonstrates that the chemical components of artificial agarwood obtained by comprehensive stimulated method (formic acid plus fungal inoculation) are much closer to the natural agarwood than those obtained by chemically stimulated method (formic acid), as times goes by. A reliable criteria containing correlation coefficient of GC-MS fingerprint of natural agarwood and 22 metabolism markers can be used to evaluate the quality of the agarwood. As an application case, three samples were identified as natural agarwood from the 25 commercial agarwood by using the evaluation method.

  13. Sensitive determination of fluoride in biological samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Myung; Shin, Ho-Sang

    2014-12-10

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometric method was developed in this study in order to determine fluoride in plasma and urine after derivatization with 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene. 2-Fluoronaphthalene was chosen as the internal standard. The derivatization of fluoride was performed in the biological sample and the best reaction conditions (10.0 mg mL(-1) of 2-(bromomethyl)naphthalene, 1.0 mg mL(-1) of 15-crown-5-ether as a phase transfer catalyst, pH of 7.0, reaction temperature of 70°C, and heating time of 70 min) were established. The organic derivative was extracted with dichloromethane and then measured by a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Under the established condition, the detection limits were 11 μg L(-1) and 7 μg L(-1) by using 0.2 mL of plasma or urine, respectively. The accuracy was in a range of 100.8-107.6%, and the precision of the assay was less than 4.3% in plasma or urine. Fluoride was detected in a concentration range of 0.12-0.53 mg L(-1) in six urine samples after intake of natural mineral water containing 0.7 mg L(-1) of fluoride. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential of needle trap microextraction-portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for measurement of atmospheric volatile compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feijó Barreira, Luís Miguel; Xue, Yu; Duporté, Geoffroy; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Hartonen, Kari; Jussila, Matti; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a key role in atmospheric chemistry and physics. They participate in photochemical reactions in the atmosphere, which have direct implications on climate through, e.g. aerosol particle formation. Forests are important sources of VOCs, and the limited resources and infrastructures often found in many remote environments call for the development of portable devices. In this research, the potential of needle trap microextraction and portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the study of VOCs at forest site was evaluated. Measurements were performed in summer and autumn 2014 at the Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations (SMEAR II) in Hyytiälä, Finland. During the first part of the campaign (summer) the applicability of the developed method was tested for the determination of monoterpenes, pinonaldehyde, aldehydes, amines and anthropogenic compounds. The temporal variation of aerosol precursors was determined, and evaluated against temperature and aerosol number concentration data. The most abundant monoterpenes, pinonaldehyde and aldehydes were successfully measured, their relative amounts being lower during days when particle number concentration was higher. Ethylbenzene, p- and m-xylene were also found when wind direction was from cities with substantial anthropogenic activity. An accumulation of VOCs in the snow cover was observed in the autumn campaign. Results demonstrated the successful applicability of needle trap microextraction and portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the rapid in situ determination of organic gaseous compounds in the atmosphere.

  15. Sensitive determination of methomyl in blood using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as its oxime tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivative.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Kudo, K; Imamura, T; Suzuki, T; Ikeda, N

    1998-08-25

    A sensitive, selective and reliable method was developed to determine methomyl ¿methyl-N-[(methylcarbamoyl)oxy]-thioacetimidate¿, a carbamate insecticide in human blood, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dimethylglyoxime served as an internal standard (I.S.). Methomyl in the blood was converted to its oxime form by sodium hydroxide. The solution made acidic with hydrochloric acid was poured into a column packed with Extrelut. Methomyloxime and I.S. were eluted from the column with a mixture of dichloromethane-ethyl acetate-chloroform (65:25:10), transformed to tert.-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the electron impact mode. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range from 1 ng/g to 100 ng/g and 100 ng/g to at least 5000 ng/g. The lower limit of detection was 0.5 ng/g. The absolute recoveries were 72-93% and within-day coefficients of variation were 3.1-5.6% at blood concentrations of 10 and 1000 ng/g. Two practical forensic applications are described.

  16. Direct analysis of oligomeric tackifying resins in rubber compounds by automatic thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Kim

    1999-01-01

    Two analytical methods, automatic thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (ATD-GC/MS) and pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS), were applied as direct methods for the analysis of oligomeric tackifying resins in a vulcanized rubber. The ATD-GC/MS method, based on discontinuous volatile extraction, was found to be an effective means for direct analysis of the oligomeric tackifying resins contained in a vulcanized rubber. The oligomeric tackifying resins, such as t-octylphenolformaldehyde (TOPF) resin, rosin-modified terpene resin, and cashew resin, could be directly analyzed in vulcanized rubber by ATD-GC/MS. Much simpler total ion chromatograms were obtained by ATD-GC/MS than by flash pyrolysis with a Curie-point pyrolyzer, permitting much easier interpretation. Ions at m/z 206, 135, and 107 were fingerprints in the characteristic mass spectra obtained by ATD-GC/MS for TOPF resin in the vulcanized rubber. 1H-Indene, styrene, and isolongifolene were observed as their characteristic mass spectra in the pyrolyzate of the rosin-modified terpene resin. From the cashew resin, phenol, 3-methylphenol, and 4-(1,1,3, 3-tetramethylbutyl)phenol were obtained as the characteristic pyrolyzates by discontinuous thermal extraction via ATD-GC/MS. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Predicting percent composition of blends of biodiesel and conventional diesel using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and partial least squares analysis.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Karisa M; Schale, Stephen P

    2011-01-30

    The percent composition of blends of biodiesel and conventional diesel from a variety of retail sources were modeled and predicted using partial least squares (PLS) analysis applied to gas chromatography-total-ion-current mass spectrometry (GC-TIC), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-total-ion-current mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TIC) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS) separations of the blends. In all four cases, the PLS predictions for a test set of chromatograms were plotted versus the actual blend percent composition. The GC-TIC plot produced a best-fit line with slope=0.773 and y-intercept=2.89, and the average percent error of prediction was 12.0%. The GC-MS plot produced a best-fit line with slope=0.864 and y-intercept=1.72, and the average percent error of prediction was improved to 6.89%. The GCxGC-TIC plot produced a best-fit line with slope=0.983 and y-intercept=0.680, and the average percent error was slightly improved to 6.16%. The GCxGC-MS plot produced a best-fit line with slope=0.980 and y-intercept=0.620, and the average percent error was 6.12%. The GCxGC models performed best presumably due to the multidimensional advantage of higher dimensional instrumentation providing more chemical selectivity. All the PLS models used 3 latent variables. The chemical components that differentiate the blend percent compositions are reported. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of odour compounds from scented consumer products using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Jennifer; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga

    2016-01-21

    Scented consumer products are being bought in increasing amounts and gaining more popularity. There is, however, relatively little information available about their ingredients, emissions and allergenic potential. Frequently, a mixture of different fragrance substances and not solely an individual substance contributes to the overall desired smell. The aim of this study was to investigate the odorous volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in consumer products containing fragrances. Over 44 products were selected: various scented candles, printing products with different scent types and other products types particularly meant to be used indoors. Measurements were carried out in a desiccator. Air samples were collected on thermal desorption tubes to determine the released fragrance substances by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) was used to obtain sensory data and to ensure no important odorant was overlooked. Using both methods it was possible to distinguish between odour active and inactive compounds and subsequently to identify almost 300 different odorants across all scented products. Besides the advantage of differentiation, as the human nose is a very sensitive detector, GC-O was found to be a useful tool for detecting traces and chosen target compounds. One focus in this study lay on the 26 EU-regulated fragrance allergens to prove their relevance in scented consumer goods. In total, 18 of them were identified, with at least one substance being present in almost every product. Benzyl alcohol, cinnamaldehyde, citronellol, eugenol, linalool and limonene were the prevalently detected allergens. Particularly linalool and limonene were observed in over 50% of the products. In addition, eugenol appeared to be one of the most frequently detected compounds in trace-level concentrations in the candle emissions.

  19. Solid-phase microcolumn extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identification of volatile organic compounds emitted by paper.

    PubMed

    Hrivnák, Ján; Tölgyessy, Peter; Figedyová, Sona; Katuscák, Svetozár

    2009-11-15

    A rapid non-destructive sampling technique for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by paper sheets is described. A capillary, which is connected to a microcolumn packed with Tenax TA, is inserted between two sheets at the centre of a paper stack encapsulated inside a PET/Al/PE composite foil. The other end of the microcolumn is connected to a gas-tight syringe and an appropriate volume of gaseous phase is aspirated. The microcolumn is then thermally desorbed in a modified GC inlet (modification is presented) and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the chromatogram from the analysis of artificially aged paper sample 21 compounds were identified. Advantages of the method including the short sampling time (1 min), simplicity and economic aspect are discussed.

  20. Protocol: A simple protocol for quantitative analysis of bio-oils through gas- chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Mattia; Rosi, Luca; Frediani, Marco; Frediani, Piero

    2016-01-01

    A new and simple protocol for quantitative analysis of bio-oils using gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry is suggested. Compounds were identified via their mass spectra, and then unavailable response factors were calculated with respect to diphenyl as the internal standard using a modified method previously suggested for gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. This new protocol was applied to the characterization of bio-oils obtained from the pyrolysis of woods of different sources or using different pyrolysis procedures. This protocol allowed evaluation of the yields of products from poplar pyrolysis (among 50% and 99%), while a reduced amounts of products were identified from the pyrolysis of cellulose (between 46% and 58%). The main product was always acetic acid, but it was formed in very large yields from poplar while lower yields were obtained from cellulose.

  1. Identification of wild collected mosquito vectors of diseases using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in Jazan Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Ahmed, Azzam M; Badjah-Hadj-Ahmed, Ahmed-Yacine; Al Othman, Zeid A; Sallam, Mohamed F

    2013-11-01

    Thirty-three species of mosquitoes have been reported from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Several of these mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae Giles s.l., Anopheles stephensi Liston, Culex pipiens Linnaeus, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles, Stegomyia aegypti (Linnaeus) and Aedimorphus vexans arabiensis (Patton) are known vectors of human and animal diseases. In this study, the cuticular hydrocarbon profiles of eight mosquito species using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were analyzed. Wild collected fourth-instar larvae were reared, and single, newly emerged, unfed adult females were used for the analysis. A total of 146-160 peaks were detected from the cuticular extracts by gas chromatography. Repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD Post Hoc test was used to test for quantitative differences in relative hydrocarbon quantity. In addition, a linear regression model was applied using Enter method to determine the diagnostic peaks for the eight mosquito specimens. The ANOVA test indicated that relative peaks were significant (P < 0.05) when selected pairs of peaks were compared. Also, seven compounds showed qualitative differences among the five mosquito vectors tested. The classes of constituents present were n-alkanes, monomethylalkanes, dimethylalkanes, trimethylalkanes, alkenes, branched aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes and esters. These compounds have a carbon chain length ranging from 8 to 18 carbons. The most abundant compound in all adult mosquito specimens was n-hexylacrylate [retention time (RT) 6.73 min], which was not detected in Cx. pipiens. In Cx. pipiens, the most abundant peak was benzaldehyde (RT 2.98 min). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is a suitable method to identify adult mosquitoes, especially from focal areas of public health concern such as Jazan Province, Saudi Arabia. This method allows a wide range of adult collected material to be identified with high accuracy.

  2. Quantitative determination of some volatile suspected allergens in cosmetic creams spread on skin by direct contact sorptive tape extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sgorbini, B; Ruosi, M R; Cordero, C; Liberto, E; Rubiolo, P; Bicchi, C

    2010-04-16

    This study describes a method based on direct contact sorptive tape extraction followed by on-line thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DC-STE-GC-MS) to detect and quantify a group of suspected volatile allergens on the European Union (E.U.) list and a related compound on the skin (the stratum corneum) of volunteers treated with a cream of known composition fortified with the reference allergens. The following compounds were tested: citronellol, Z-citral (neral), geraniol, cinnamaldehyde, anisyl alcohol, cinnamyl alcohol, eugenol, methyleugenol, coumarin, isoeugenol, alpha-isomethylionone, 2-(4-tert-butylbenzyl)propionaldehyde (lilial), alpha-amylcinnamaldehyde, alpha-hexylcinnamaldehyde. Sorptive tape extraction (STE) is a sorption-based sampling technique in which a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) tape is used to recover analytes by direct contact with the surface of a solid matrix or from the headspace in equilibrium with it. The reliability of the method was confirmed by: (i) allergen recoveries varying from 52.3% for lilial to 95.7% for neral, (ii) linearity in the range 10-150ppm, with regression coefficient R(2) always above 0.97, (iii) repeatability of each analyte, RSD% never exceeding 10%, (iv) intermediate precision, always below 15%, and (v) LOD and LOQ in the ppb range, therefore fully compatible with E.U. prescriptions (ppm). Other parameters such as substantivity analyte, approximate permeation through skin and influence of different nature of stratum corneum on recovery were also investigated. The method was also successfully applied to five commercially available creams declared to contain some of the allergens in question spread on the skin of the same volunteers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Simultaneous determination of ten taste and odor compounds in drinking water by solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xichao; Luo, Qian; Yuan, Shengguang; Wei, Zi; Song, Hanwen; Wang, Donghong; Wang, Zijian

    2013-11-01

    Taste and odor (T&O) problems in drinking water frequently occur because of many compounds present in the water, of which trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol (geosmin) and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) are well-known. In this study, a fast and effective method was established for simultaneous determination of 10 T&O compounds, including geosmin, MIB, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), 2-methylbenzofuran, 2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IPMP), 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine (IBMP), cis-3-hexenyl acetate, trans,trans-2,4-heptadienal, trans, cis-2,6-nonadienal, and trans-2-decenal in water samples by headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. An orthogonal array experimental design was used to optimize the effects of SPME fiber, extraction temperature, stirring rate, NaCI content, extraction time, and desorption time. The limits of detection ranged from 0.1 to 73 ng/L were lower than or close to the odor threshold concentrations (OTCs). All the 10 T&O compounds were detected in the 14 water samples including surface water, treatment process water and tap water, taken from a waterworks in Lianyungang City, China. MB and geosmin were detected in most samples at low concentration. Six T&O compounds (IPMP, IBMP, trans,cis-2,6-nonadienal, 2-methylbenzofuran, trans-2-decenal, and TCA) were effectively decreased in water treatment process (sedimentation and filtration) that is different from cis-3-hexenyl acetate, MIB and geosmin. It is noted that the TCA concentrations at 15.9-122.3 ng/L and the trans,cis-2,6-nonadienal concentrations at 79.9-190.1 ng/L were over 10 times higher than their OTCs in tap water. The variation of the analytes in the all water samples, especially distribution system indicated that distribution system cannot be ignored as a T&O compounds source.

  4. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with solid-phase microextraction method for determination of methyl salicylate and other volatile compounds in leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin; Zhu, Weimin; Qian, Ji

    2004-01-01

    Methyl salicylate (MeSA) in many plants is a important signaling compound, which plays an important role in a pathogen-induced defense response. In this paper, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was developed for determination of MeSA and other volatile compounds in leaves of a tomato plant (Lycopersicon esculentum). Tomato leaves were ground under liquid nitrogen and sampled by HS-SPME, with a 100 microm polydimethylsiloxane fiber, and finally analyzed by GC-MS. Eighteen compounds in the leaves of tomato plant infested by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were separated and identified, among them MeSA, which was quantitatively analyzed by the standard addition method. MeSA concentrations higher than 2.0 microg g(-1) fresh weight accumulated in leaves of TMV-infested tomato plant as the defense response to TMV. A similar concentration of MeSA in the leaves of MeSA-treated tomato plant was also found. No MeSA in leaves of control tomato plant was detected. These findings suggest that MeSA might be a signaling compound in the tomato plant response to TMV. The present method for determination of MeSA required only simple sample preparation and no organic solvent, and provided an excellent relative standard deviation of less than 5.0% and a low detection limit of 10 ng g(-1) fresh weight for MeSA. These results show that GC-MS-HS-SPME is a simple, rapid and sensitive method for determination of MeSA and other plant-signaling compounds in plant tissues.

  5. Investigation of volatile organic metabolites in lung cancer pleural effusions by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huijun; Wang, Hong; Li, Caixia; Wang, Lichao; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili

    2014-01-15

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method was applied for the investigation of low molecular weight volatile organic metabolites (VOMs) in pleural effusion samples. Three important HS-SPME experimental parameters that influence extraction efficiency (fiber coating, extraction time and temperature of sampling) were optimized by a univariate optimization design. The highest extraction efficiency was obtained when sampling was performed at 50°C for 10min under agitation using a carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (CAR/PDMS) fiber. A total of 36 volatile metabolites belonging to nine distinct chemical classes were identified in 40 pleural effusion samples (20 malignant effusions from lung cancer patients and 20 benign effusions from inflammatory patients). Ketones, alcohols, and benzene derivatives were the main chemical classes for the metabolomic profile of malignant effusions. The average peak areas of ketones and alcohols were much higher in malignant group compared to benign group. Together with phenols, they exhibit significant differences (P<0.05) between the two groups. Particularly, the average peak areas of cyclohexanone and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol in malignant effusions were significantly higher than those in benign ones. Furthermore, of the 36 identified metabolites, 5 compounds including cyclohexanone and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were found to be statistically different (Student's t-test, P<0.05) between the two groups by statistical analysis based on the peak areas of all identified metabolites. Among them, cyclohexanone and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol might be considered as candidate biomarkers of lung cancer to differentiate malignant from benign effusions. The results show that HS-SPME-GC/MS is a simple, rapid, sensitive and solvent-free method for the determination of VOMs in pleural effusion samples. Pleural effusion is a valuable sample source for observation of changes in VOMs for differentiation between

  6. Field Analysis of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Soil Using Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) and a Portable Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengliang; Kruse, Natalie A; Bowman, Jennifer R; Jackson, Glen P

    2016-05-01

    An expedited field analysis method was developed for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil matrices using a portable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) instrument. Soil samples of approximately 0.5 g were measured with a portable scale and PCBs were extracted by headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a 100 µm polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber. Two milliliters of 0.2 M potassium permanganate and 0.5 mL of 6 M sulfuric acid solution were added to the soil matrices to facilitate the extraction of PCBs. The extraction was performed for 30 min at 100 ℃ in a portable heating block that was powered by a portable generator. The portable GC-MS instrument took less than 6 min per analysis and ran off an internal battery and helium cylinder. Six commercial PCB mixtures, Aroclor 1016, 1221, 1232, 1242, 1248, 1254, and 1260, could be classified based on the GC chromatograms and mass spectra. The detection limit of this method for Aroclor 1260 in soil matrices is approximately 10 ppm, which is sufficient for guiding remediation efforts in contaminated sites. This method was applicable to the on-site analysis of PCBs with a total analysis time of 37 min per sample. However, the total analysis time could be improved to less than 7 min per sample by conducting the rate-limiting extraction step for different samples in parallel.

  7. Development of stir-bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of musks in vegetables and amended soils.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Josu; Bizkarguenaga, Ekhiñe; Iparraguirre, Arantza; Fernández, Luis Ángel; Zuloaga, Olatz; Prieto, Ailette

    2014-02-17

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive and environment-friendly method based on stir-bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) followed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) to determine 8 synthetic musks (musk ambrette, musk ketone, celestolide, tonalide, galaxolide, phantolide, traseolide, and cashmeran) in vegetables (lettuce, carrot, and pepper) and amended soil samples. In a first step sorptive extraction was studied both in the headspace (HSSE) and in the immerse mode (SBSE). The best results were obtained in the immersion mode which was further studied. The influence of the main factors: methanol (20%) and NaCl addition (0%), extraction temperature (40°C) and time (180 min), extraction solvent volume (9 mL) and stirring rate (600 rpm) on the efficiency of SBSE was evaluated by means of experimental designs. In the case of TD, desorption time (10 min), desorption temperature (300°C), cryo-focusing temperature (-30°C), vent flow (75 mL/min) and vent pressure (7.2 psi) were studied using both a fractioned factorial design and a central composite design (CCD). The method was validated in terms of apparent recoveries (AR%), method detection limits (MDLs) and precision at two different concentration levels. Although quantification using instrumental calibration rendered odd results in most of the cases, satisfactory recoveries (74-126%) were obtained in the case of matrix-matched calibration approach for all of the analytes and matrices studied at the two concentration levels evaluated. MDLs in the range of 0.01-0.8 ng/g and 0.01-1.1 ng/g were obtained for vegetables and amended soil samples, respectively. RSD values within 1-23% were obtained for all the analytes and matrices. Finally, the method was applied to the determination of musks in vegetable and amended soil samples.

  8. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of biological particulates collected during recent space shuttle missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matney, M. L.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    Biological particulates collected on air filters during shuttle missions (STS-40 and STS-42) were identified using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). A method was developed for identifying the atmospheric particles and their sources through the analysis of standard materials and the selection of "marker" compounds specific to the particle type. Pyrolysis spectra of biological standards were compared with those of airborne particles collected during two space shuttle missions; marker compounds present in the shuttle particle spectra were matched with those of the standards to identify the source of particles. Particles of 0,5--1-mm diameter and weighing as little as 40 micrograms could be identified using this technique. The Py-GC/MS method identified rat food and soilless plant-growth media as two sources of particles collected from the shuttle atmosphere during flight.

  9. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy: Reliable techniques for analysis of Parthenium mediated vermicompost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajiv, P.; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Venckatesh, Rajendran

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy have been carried out to investigate the chemical composition of Parthenium mediated vermicompost. Four different concentrations of Parthenium and cow dung mixtures were vermicomposted using the earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae). FT-IR spectra reveal the absence of Parthenin toxin (sesquiterpene lactone) and phenols in vermicompost which was obtained from high concentration of cow dung mixed treatments. GC-MS analysis shows no phenolic compounds and predominant level of intermediate metabolites such as 4,8,12,16-Tetramethylheptadecan-4-olide (7.61%), 2-Pentadecanone, 6,10,14-trimethyl- (5.29%) and Methyl 16-methyl-heptadecanoate (4.69%) during the vermicomposting process. Spectral results indicated that Parthenin toxin and phenols can be eradicated via vermicomposting if mixed with appropriate quantity of cow dung.

  10. Comparative study on pyrolysis of lignocellulosic and algal biomass using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Liqiang; Zhu, Liang; Zhu, Xifeng

    2017-06-01

    The cornstalk and chlorella were selected as the representative of lignocelulosic and algal biomass, and the pyrolysis experiments of them were carried out using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The physicochemical properties of samples and the pyrolytic product distribution were presented. And then the compositional differences between the two kinds of pyrolytic products were studied, the relevant pyrolysis mechanisms were analyzed systematically. Pyrolytic vapor from lignocellulosic biomass contained more phenolic and carbonyl compounds while that from algal biomass contained more long-chain fatty acids, nitrogen-containing compounds and fewer carbonyl compounds. Maillard reaction is conducive to the conversion of carbonyl compounds to nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds with better thermal stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of Jatropha curcas leaf extracts prepared by supercritical fluid CO2 extraction].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-yu; Chen, Fei-long; Lin, Jing-ming; Huang, Shu-lin

    2009-05-01

    To analyze the bioactive components in Jatropha curcas leaves using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The bioactive components were extracted from J. curcas leaves by supercritical fluid CO2 extraction and analyzed by using GC-MS. Seventy peaks were detected by GC-MS, and 43 compounds were identified (61.43%). Among the identified compounds, 16 had a content of more than 1%, and the total contents of these 16 compounds reached 81.36%. The four most abundant components were 22,23-dihydro-stigmasterol (16.14%), alpha-tocopherol (15.18%), beta-amylin (7.73%) and dotriacontanol (7.02%). The content of gamma-tocopherol reached 2.88% and vitamin E reached 18.06% in the extract. J. curcas leaves contain multiple compounds with anti-tumor, anti-virus and antimicrobial activities.

  12. Measurement uncertainty for the determination of amphetamines in urine by liquid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Franco de Oliveira, Sarah Carobini Werner de Souza Eller; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the determination of amphetamines in urine samples by means of liquid-phase microextraction was validated, including calculation of measurement uncertainty. After extraction in the three-phase mode, acceptor phase was withdrawn from the fiber and the residue was derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride. The method showed to be very simple, rapid and it required a significantly low amount of organic solvent for extraction. The limits of detection were 10 and 20μg/L for amphetamine and methamphetamine, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the specified range (20μg/L to 1400μg/L; r(2)>0.99). The method showed to be both precise and accurate and a relative combined uncertainty of 2% was calculated. In order of importance, the factors which were more determinant for the calculation of method uncertainty were: analyte concentration, sample volume, trueness and method precision.

  13. Multiresidue determination of pesticides in agricultural products by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with large volume injection.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yukio; Kodama, Shuji; Matsunaga, Akinobu; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2004-01-01

    A method is described for the rapid determination of pesticide residues in agricultural products. Pesticides were extracted from samples with acetonitrile. To remove pigments and fatty acids, an aliquot of the extract was cleaned up by a minicolumn that was packed both with graphitized carbon black and primary secondary amine. Analysis was performed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry with programmable temperature vaporizer-based large volume injection using a liner packed with phenylmethylsilicone chemically bonded silica. The method was evaluated for 114 pesticides by spiking into tomato, spinach, Japanese pear, grape, and brown rice at various concentrations of each pesticide (0.02-0.4 microg/g). The method, which gave good recovery (>60%) for 108 pesticides, is characterized by high cleanup efficiency and short cleanup time, and is useful as a rapid screening analysis.

  14. Pyrolysis-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of polyvinyl chloride traces in solid environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Tienpont, B; David, F; Vanwalleghem, F; Sandra, P

    2001-03-16

    A novel method based on pyrolysis-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CGC-MS) was developed for the quantitative analysis of polyvinylchloride (PVC) in solid environmental samples like sludge and dust. The samples are extracted and the extract is fractionated by solid-phase extraction (SPE). Possibly interfering biological and frequently occuring synthetic polymers are removed by this clean-up. The final extract is analyzed by pyrolysis-CGC-MS. Selective detection of PVC is performed by using specific markers in the pyrogram. Quantitation is done on naphthalene. Good linearity was obtained in a range from 0.5 to 100 microg applied to the pyrolyser. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) in sludge and dust samples is 10 mg/kg dry mass. A correlation between PVC and phthalates was made for sewage sludge samples.

  15. Improved peak selection strategy for automatically determining minute compositional changes in fuels by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Jeffrey A; Begue, Nathan J; Morris, Robert E

    2011-02-11

    During the development of automated computational methods to detect minute compositional changes in fuels, it became apparent that peak selection through the spectral deconvolution of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data is limited by the complexity and noise levels inherent in the data. Specifically, current techniques are not capable of detecting minute, chemically relevant compositional differences with sufficient sensitivity. Therefore, an alternative peak selection strategy was developed based on spectral interpretation through interval-oriented parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). It will be shown that this strategy outperforms the deconvolution-based peak selection strategy as well as two control strategies. Successful application of the PARAFAC-based method to detect minute chemical changes produced during microbiological growth in four different inoculated diesel fuels will be discussed.

  16. Analyzing salvia divinorum and its active ingredient salvinorin a utilizing thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jermain, John D; Evans, Hiram K

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, Salvia divinorum has become a major focus by state legislatures throughout the United States looking to prohibit the sale of the psychoactive plant. After researching testing procedures presented in the literature and those employed by crime laboratories throughout the country, it was decided that thin layer chromatography (TLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were the methods to use to analyze plant material for salvinorin A. With TLC, salvinorin A was detected from extracted plant material and was easily distinguishable from 13 other Salvia species as well as Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). When using GC/MS, salvinorin A was best extracted from plant material with chloroform at ambient temperature when using a nonpolar solvent and acetone at ambient temperature when using a polar solvent. By utilizing these techniques, criminalists are now able to confirm the presence of salvinorin A in a submitted plant material suspected to be Salvia divinorum.

  17. Characterization by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of diterpenoid resinous materials in Roman-age amphorae from northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakoudi, Evagelia A; Mitkidou, Sofia A; Urem-Kotsou, Dushka; Kotsakis, Kostas; Stephanidou-Stephanatou, Julia; Stratis, John A

    2011-01-01

    A combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry approach has been used for the characterization of two lumps of resin and 17 adsorbed residues on Roman-age vessels, mainly amphorae, from northern Greece. The data show that a diterpenic resin from plants of the Pinacae family is the main component of the tarry material associated with the analyzed archaeological samples. The identification and mass spectrometric fragmentation of several characteristic diterpenoid biomarkers is discussed. The abundance of secondary products identified in the archaeological samples suggests that the oxidative degradation of abietic acid and dehydroabietic acid to aromatic products was the main pathway. Of particular interest is the presence of characteristic saturated abietane hydrocarbons in one sample, which indicate that a reductive process also occurred on a small scale. The overall similarity in the composition of the residues suggests the common use of pine tar as a waterproofing and sealing agent at different sites in northern Greece during the Roman period.

  18. Fatty acid composition of wild mushroom species of order Agaricales--examination by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Marekov, Ilko; Momchilova, Svetlana; Grung, Bjørn; Nikolova-Damyanova, Boryana

    2012-12-01

    Applying gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of 4,4-dimethyloxazoline fatty acid derivatives, the fatty acid composition of 15 mushroom species belonging to 9 genera and 5 families of order Agaricales growing in Bulgaria is determined. The structure of 31 fatty acids (not all present in each species) is unambiguously elucidated, with linoleic, oleic and palmitic acids being the main components (ranging between 70.9% (Marasmius oreades) and 91.2% (Endoptychum agaricoides)). A group of three hexadecenoic positionally isomeric fatty acids, 6-, 9- and 11-16:1, appeared to be characteristic components of the examined species. By applying chemometrics it was possible to show that the fatty acid composition closely reflects the classification of the species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The analysis of tire rubber traces collected after braking incidents using Pyrolysis-GasChromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, Garry

    2007-09-01

    Automobile tire marks can routinely be found at the scenes of crime, particularly hit-and-run accidents and are left on road surfaces because of sudden braking or the wheels spinning. The tire marks are left due to the friction between the tire rubber and the solid road surface, and do not always demonstrate the tire tread pattern. However, the tire mark will contain traces of the tire. In this study, Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry was used to analyze 12 tires from different manufacturer's and their traces collected after braking incidents. Tire marks were left on a conglomerate road surface with sudden braking. The samples were pyrolysed without removal of contaminant in a micro-furnace type pyrolyser. Quantitative and qualitative analysis were performed on all the samples. All 12 samples were distinguished from each other. Each of the tire traces were identified as coming from there original source.

  20. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy: reliable techniques for analysis of Parthenium mediated vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Rajiv, P; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Venckatesh, Rajendran

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy have been carried out to investigate the chemical composition of Parthenium mediated vermicompost. Four different concentrations of Parthenium and cow dung mixtures were vermicomposted using the earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae). FT-IR spectra reveal the absence of Parthenin toxin (sesquiterpene lactone) and phenols in vermicompost which was obtained from high concentration of cow dung mixed treatments. GC-MS analysis shows no phenolic compounds and predominant level of intermediate metabolites such as 4,8,12,16-Tetramethylheptadecan-4-olide (7.61%), 2-Pentadecanone, 6,10,14-trimethyl- (5.29%) and Methyl 16-methyl-heptadecanoate (4.69%) during the vermicomposting process. Spectral results indicated that Parthenin toxin and phenols can be eradicated via vermicomposting if mixed with appropriate quantity of cow dung.

  1. Determination of testosterone:epitestosterone ratio after pentafluorophenyldimethylsilyl-trimethylsilyl derivatisation using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in equine urine.

    PubMed

    Choi, M H; Kim, J Y; Chung, B C

    1999-05-01

    A highly specific method is described for measuring the testosterone:epitestosterone ratio in equine urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with stable isotope internal standards. The procedure was based on Serdolit Pad-1 resin extraction, enzymatic hydrolysis, and chemical derivatisation prior to instrumental analysis. The mixed derivatives, 3-trimethylsilyl-17-pentafluorophenyldimethylsilyl ether (3-TMS-17-flophemesyl) testosterone and epitestosterone, were found to have excellent analytical properties. The specificity of the derivatisation method exploits a unique feature of steroids: the selective exchange of the alcoholic flophemesyl ether for the trimethylsilyl ether. The sensitivity and specificity of the mixed 3-TMS-17-flophemesyl derivatives allow adequate determinations of testosterone and epitestosterone, even in urine from mares, in 5 ml samples. The repeatability of testosterone and epitestosterone was 6.2 and 5.7%, respectively, and their reproducibility was in the range of 6.4-8.7%.

  2. Simultaneous determination of alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.Q.

    1989-03-01

    A multiresidue method was developed for the simultaneous determination of low parts per billion (ppb) concentrations of the herbicides alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, and simazine in water and soil using isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Known amounts of /sup 15/N,/sup 13/C-alachlor and /sup 2/H/sub 5/-atrazine were added to each sample as internal standards. The samples were then prepared by a solid phase extraction with no further cleanup. A high resolution GC/low resolution MS system with data acquisition in selected ion monitoring mode was used to quantitate herbicides in the extract. The limit of detection was 0.05 ppb for water and 0.5 ppb for soil. Accuracy greater than 80% and precision better than 4% was demonstrated with spiked samples.

  3. Ultra trace determination of fluorobenzoic acids in reservoir and ground water using isotope dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Müller, Karsten; Seubert, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    The accurate ultra-trace analysis of six fluorobenzoic acids (FBAs) via isotope dilution gas chromatography mass spectrometry through their deuterated analogues is described. North Sea reservoir and ground water samples were spiked with six deuterated FBAs (dFBAs), enriched using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and analysed using GC/MS after derivatisation with BF 3· MeOH. All FBAs were enriched and determined simultaneously. SPE allowed a 250-fold enrichment of the acids if 100 mL of sample volume was used. The method enables the determination of FBAs down to the range of 8-37 ng L (-1) with recoveries between 66 % and 85 %. It uses low amounts of chemicals and is adaptable to larger and smaller sample volumes.

  4. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric study of 19-oxygenation of the aromatase inhibitor 19-methylandrostenedione with human placental microsomes.

    PubMed

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Nagaoka, Masao; Handa, Wakako; Yamada, Akane

    2006-06-01

    To gain insight into the catalytic function of aromatase, we studied 19-oxygenation of 19-methyl-substituted derivative of the natural substrate androstenedione (AD), compound 1, with human placental aromatase by use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Incubation of the 19-methyl derivative 1 with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under an aerobic condition did not yield a detectable amount of [19S]19-hydroxy product 2 or its [19R]-isomer 3 when the product was analyzed as the bis-methoxime-trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative by GC-MS; moreover, the production of estrogen was not detected as the bis-TMS derivative of estradiol (detection limit: about 3 ng and 10 pg per injection for the 19-ol and estradiol, respectively). The results reveal that the 19-methyl steroid 1 does not serve as a substrate of aromatase, although it does serve as a powerful inhibitor of the enzyme.

  5. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Constituent Oil from Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (Agaricomycetes), from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ohiri, Reginald Chibueze; Bassey, Essien Eka

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of constituent oil from dried Ganoderma lucidum was carried out. Fresh G. lucidum obtained from its natural environment was thoroughly washed with distilled water and air-dried for 2 weeks and the component oils were extracted and analyzed. Four predominant components identified were pentadecanoic acid, 14-methyl-ester (retention time [RT] = 19.752 minutes; percentage total = 25.489), 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (Z,Z)- (RT = 21.629 minutes and 21.663 minutes; percentage total = 25.054), n-hexadecanoic acid (RT = 20.153 minutes; percentage total = 24.275), and 9-octadecenoic acid (Z)-, methyl ester (RT = 21.297 minutes; percentage total = 13.027). The two minor oils identified were 9,12-octadecadienoic acid, methyl ester, (E,E)- and octadecanoic acid, methyl ester (RT = 21.246 minutes and 21.503 minutes; percentage total = 7.057 and 5.097, respectively).

  6. Ink dating using thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry: comparison of results obtained in two laboratories.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Agnès; Bügler, Jürgen; Kirsch, Dieter; Köhler, Fritz; Weyermann, Céline

    2015-01-01

    An ink dating method based on solvent analysis was recently developed using thermal desorption followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and is currently implemented in several forensic laboratories. The main aims of this work were to implement this method in a new laboratory to evaluate whether results were comparable at three levels: (i) validation criteria, (ii) aging curves, and (iii) results interpretation. While the results were indeed comparable in terms of validation, the method proved to be very sensitive to maintenances. Moreover, the aging curves were influenced by ink composition, as well as storage conditions (particularly when the samples were not stored in "normal" room conditions). Finally, as current interpretation models showed limitations, an alternative model based on slope calculation was proposed. However, in the future, a probabilistic approach may represent a better solution to deal with ink sample inhomogeneity. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Science.

  7. Dissimilarity analysis and automatic identification of monomethylalkanes from gas chromatography mass spectrometry data 1. Principle and protocols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Liang, Yizeng

    2009-07-03

    Monomethylalkanes are common but important components in many naturally occurring and synthetic organic materials. Generally, this kind of compounds is routinely analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and identified by the retention pattern or similarity matching to the reference mass spectral library. However, these identification approaches rely on the limited standard database or costly standard compounds. When unknown monomethylalkane is absent from the reference library, these approaches might be less useful. In this study, based on the fragmentation rules and empirical observation, many interesting mass spectral characteristics of monomethylalkanes were discovered and employed to infer the number of carbon atoms and methylated position. Combined with the retention pattern, a protocol was described for the identification of monomethylalkane analyzed by GC-MS. After tested by simulated data and GC-MS data of the gasoline sample, it was demonstrated that the developing approach could automatically and correctly identify monomethylalkanes in complicated GC-MS data.

  8. Determination of chlorpromazine and its major metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry: application to biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Gruenke, L D; Craig, J C; Klein, F D; Nguyen, T L; Hitzemann, B A; Holaday, J W; Loh, H H; Braff, L; Fischer, A; Glick, I D

    1985-12-01

    A method for the quantitative determination of chlorpromazine and five of its major metabolites in a single sample of biological fluid in the ng/ml range has been developed utilizing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected ion recording. The assay is highly specific and quantification is accomplished by an inverse stable isotope dilution technique, using deuterium-labeled variants of the compounds as internal standards. In this way the concentrations of chlorpromazine and five of its major metabolites (the sulfoxide, the N-oxide, the monodemethylated, the didemethylated, and the 7-hydroxylated compounds) can be determined in biological fluids. Levels in humans have been measured both in plasma and in red blood cells and are compared to those found in related in vitro studies.

  9. Identification of wood between Phoebe zhennan and Machilus pingii using the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry direct injection technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhu, Tao; Li, Jingya; Liu, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the technique of direct injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) was employed to discriminate between two batches of wood (Phoebe zhennan and Machilus pingii) with characteristic smells. Based on the GC-MS fingerprints obtained, similarities between samples were evaluated via correlation coefficient, hierarchical clustering and characteristic constituents analysis. The results showed that distinct differences in total ion chromatograms existed between the two species of wood and their correlation coefficients were low; however, the relationship between the same species of different batches showed the opposite; meanwhile, the analysis of hierarchical clustering and characteristic constituents also demonstrated an interrelationship. All the analytical methods achieved the goal of identification between the two species of wood, which verified that the technique can be used to identify different species of wood with characteristic smells.

  10. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the characterization of organic materials in frescoes of the Monumental Cemetery of Pisa (Italy).

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2003-01-01

    The paper deals with the application of two analytical procedures, based respectively on on-line pyrolysis in the presence of hexamethyldisilazane followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis (Py/GC/MS) and on selective extractions and microwave-assisted hydrolysis followed by GC/MS determination. These procedures give reliable data on the organic composition of micro-samples; moreover, when applied to the same micro-sample, they give comparable data on natural substances, and complementary information on synthetic compounds and degradation products. The two methods were used to characterise the organic matter present in several samples taken from scenes of the frescoes 'Giudizio Universale' and the 'Ascensione' by Bonamico Buffalmacco in the Monumental Cemetery of Pisa. The observed hydrophobicity of their surfaces, which hampers traditional means of restoration, is explained by the formation of a polymeric network due to reactions between a synthetic polymer used as adhesive, the proteinaceous material (animal glue and casein), and formaldehyde.

  11. Dual low thermal mass gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for fast dual-column separation of pesticides in complex sample.

    PubMed

    Sasamoto, Kikuo; Ochiai, Nobuo; Kanda, Hirooki

    2007-07-31

    A method is described for fast dual-column separation of pesticides by use of dual low thermal mass gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (dual LTM-GC-MS) with different temperature programming. The method can provide two total ion chromatograms with different separation on DB-5 and DB-17 in a single run, which allows improved identification capability, even with short analysis time (<17 min). Also simultaneous detection with MS and elemental selective detector, e.g. pulsed flame photometric detection (PFPD) was evaluated for fast dual-column separation of 82 pesticide mixtures including 27 phosphorus pesticides. Dual LTM-GC-MS/PFPD was applied to analysis of pesticides in a brewed green tea sample with dual stir bar sorptive extraction method (dual SBSE).

  12. Analysis of volatile components in a Chinese fish sauce, Fuzhou Yulu, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuan-fan; Chen, Shen-ru; Ni, Hui; Ye, Xing-qian

    2008-01-01

    Volatile components of Fuzhou Yulu, a Chinese fish sauce, were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and two pretreatment methods, i.e., purge and trap (P&T) GC-MS and ethyl acetate extraction followed by GC-MS, were compared. P&T-GC-MS method determined 12 components, including sulfur-containing constituents (such as dimethyl disulfide), nitrogen-containing constituents (such as pyrazine derivatives), aldehydes and ketones. Ethyl acetate extraction followed by GC-MS method detected 10 components, which were mainly volatile organic acids (such as benzenepropanoic acid) and esters. Neither of the two methods detected alcohols or trimethylamine. This study offers an important reference to determine volatile flavor components of traditional fish sauce through modern analysis methods. PMID:19067466

  13. Analysis of volatile components in a Chinese fish sauce, Fuzhou Yulu, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan-fan; Chen, Shen-ru; Ni, Hui; Ye, Xing-qian

    2008-12-01

    Volatile components of Fuzhou Yulu, a Chinese fish sauce, were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and two pretreatment methods, i.e., purge and trap (P&T) GC-MS and ethyl acetate extraction followed by GC-MS, were compared. P&T-GC-MS method determined 12 components, including sulfur-containing constituents (such as dimethyl disulfide), nitrogen-containing constituents (such as pyrazine derivatives), aldehydes and ketones. Ethyl acetate extraction followed by GC-MS method detected 10 components, which were mainly volatile organic acids (such as benzenepropanoic acid) and esters. Neither of the two methods detected alcohols or trimethylamine. This study offers an important reference to determine volatile flavor components of traditional fish sauce through modern analysis methods.

  14. The identification of synthetic organic pigments in modern paints and modern paintings using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Russell, Joanna; Singer, Brian W; Perry, Justin J; Bacon, Anne

    2011-05-01

    A collection of more than 70 synthetic organic pigments were analysed using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). We report on the analysis of diketo-pyrrolo-pyrrole, isoindolinone and perylene pigments which are classes not previously reported as being analysed by this technique. We also report on a number of azo pigments (2-naphthol, naphthol AS, arylide, diarylide, benzimidazolone and disazo condensation pigments) and phthalocyanine pigments, the Py-GC-MS analysis of which has not been previously reported. The members of each class were found to fragment in a consistent way and the pyrolysis products are reported. The technique was successfully applied to the analysis of paints used by the artist Francis Bacon (1909-1992), to simultaneously identify synthetic organic pigments and synthetic binding media in two samples of paint taken from Bacon's studio and micro-samples taken from three of his paintings and one painting attributed to him.

  15. Biocatalytic Lactone Generation in Genetically Engineered Escherichia coli and Identification of Products by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slawson, Chad; Stewart, Jon; Potter, Robert

    2001-11-01

    Genetically altered Escherichia coli are used as biocatalysts to produce optically pure lactones from a variety of cyclic ketones as a biotechnology experiment for a biochemistry laboratory. The genetically engineered E. coli bacteria express large amounts of the enzyme cyclohexanone monooxygenase and are therefor capable of converting a variety of ketones into optically pure lactones. Separation by organic extraction and analysis by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy allows for the direct identification of products. Yield calculations and evaluation of the cost effectiveness of various substrates give students an opportunity to make recommendations and model industrial decision-making. Evaluation of the synthetic process for its environmental impact allows students to consider problems of cost versus environmental concerns. Use of bacterial biocatalysts offers chemistry students an opportunity to work with microorganisms and directly see the utility of genetically altered bacteria for synthetic chemistry.

  16. Use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/solid phase microextraction for the identification of MVOCs from moldy building materials.

    PubMed

    Wady, Loay; Bunte, Annicka; Pehrson, Christina; Larsson, Lennart

    2003-03-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/solid phase microextraction (GC-MS/SPME) was applied to identify microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) in water-damaged, mold-infested building materials (gypsum board papers (n=2), mineral wool, and masonite) and in cultivated molds (Aspergillus penicillioides, Stachybotrys chartarum, and Chaetomium globosum). Three SPME fibers (65-microm PDMS-DVB, 75-microm Carboxen-PDMS, and 70-microm Carbowax-stableflex) designed for automated injection were used of which the latter showed best performance. A number of previously reported MVOCs were detected both in the building materials and the cultivated molds. In addition, methyl benzoate was identified both in the S. chartarum and A. penicillioides cultures and in the building materials. SPME combined with GC-MS may be a useful method for the determination of MVOCs emitted from mold-infested building materials.

  17. A low thermal mass fast gas chromatograph and its implementation in fast gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Moragn, Mati; Amirav, Aviv

    2011-12-30

    A new type of low thermal mass (LTM) fast gas chromatograph (GC) was designed and operated in combination with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), including GC-MS-MS with SMB, thereby providing a novel combination with unique capabilities. The LTM fast GC is based on a short capillary column inserted inside a stainless steel tube that is resistively heated. It is located and mounted outside the standard GC oven on its available top detector port, while the capillary column is connected as usual to the standard GC injector and supersonic molecular beam interface transfer line. This new type of fast GC-MS with SMB enables less than 1 min full range temperature programming and cooling down analysis cycle time. The operation of the fast GC-MS with SMB was explored and 1 min full analysis cycle time of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons in the C(10)H(22) up to C(44)H(90) range was achieved. The use of 35 mL/min high column flow rate enabled the elution of C(44)H(90) in less than 45 s while the SMB interface enabled splitless acceptance of this high flow rate and the provision of dominant molecular ions. A novel compound 9-benzylazidanthracene was analyzed for its purity and a synthetic chemistry process was monitored for the optimization of the chemical reaction yield. Biodiesel was analyzed in jet fuel (by both GC-MS and GC-MS-MS) in under 1 min as 5 ppm fatty acid methyl esters. Authentic iprodion and cypermethrin pesticides were analyzed in grapes extract in both full scan mode and fast GC-MS-MS mode in under 1 min cycle time and explosive mixture including TATP, TNT and RDX was analyzed in under 1 min combined with exhibiting dominant molecular ion for TATP. Fast GC-MS with SMB is based on trading GC separation for speed of analysis while enhancing the separation power of the MS via the enhancement of the molecular ion in the electron ionization of cold molecules in the SMB. This paper further discusses several features of

  18. Environmental and biological determination of acrolein using new cold fiber solid phase microextraction with gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cláudia M; Menezes, Helvécio C; Cardeal, Zenilda L

    2017-04-01

    Acrolein is a pollutant released daily to the indoor environment from different sources. The present study reports the development of a simple and sensitive cold fiber solid phase microextraction sampling method for the determination of acrolein in exhaled air and indoor air by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine was used as derivatizing agent supported on a 65-μm polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene SPME fiber. An acrolein permeation tube at 326.25 ng min(-1) rate was used to generate gaseous standards. The method shows good results for main validation parameters. The limits of detection and quantification were 2.88 and 5.08 μg m(-3), respectively, for indoor analysis; and 2.40 and 3.79 μg m(-3), respectively, for exhaled air analysis. The precision showed standard deviation ranges from 6.00 to 8.00% for intra-assay analyses and from 8.00 to 10.00% for inter-assay analyses. After optimizing the conditions, analyses of real samples were performed on indoor environments contaminated by cigarette smoke, or heated oil, including pastry shops, restaurants, churros stands, and closed parking cars located in the city of Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Acrolein breaths of exposed people were also determined. A good Pearson correlation coefficient (r = 0.901) was observed between the concentration of acrolein in indoor air and exhaled air, allowing to propose acrolein breath as environmental exposure biomarker. Graphical Abstract Cold fiber solid phase microextraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  19. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach for the characterization of goat milk compared with cow milk.

    PubMed

    Scano, Paola; Murgia, Antonio; Pirisi, Filippo M; Caboni, Pierluigi

    2014-10-01

    In this work, the polar metabolite pool of commercial caprine milk was studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical data analysis. Experimental data were compared with those of cow milk and the discriminant analysis correctly classified milk. By the same means, differences due to heat treatments (UHT or pasteurization) on milk samples were also investigated. Results of the 2 discriminant analyses were combined, with the aim of finding the discriminant metabolites unique for each class and shared by 2 classes. Valine and glycine were specific to goat milk, talose and malic acid to cow milk, and hydroxyglutaric acid to pasteurized samples. Glucose and fructose were shared by cow milk and UHT-treated samples, whereas ribose was shared by pasteurized and goat milk. Other discriminant variables were not attributed to specific metabolites. Furthermore, with the aim to reduce food fraud, the issue of adulteration of caprine milk by addition of cheaper bovine milk has been also addressed. To this goal, mixtures of goat and cow milk were prepared by adding the latter in a range from 0 to 100% (vol/vol) and studied by multivariate regression analysis. The error in the level of cow milk detectable was approximately 5%. These overall results demonstrated that, through the combined approach of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical data analysis, we were able to discriminate between milk typologies on the basis of their polar metabolite profiles and to propose a new analytical method to easily discover food fraud and to protect goat milk uniqueness. The use of appropriate visualization tools improved the interpretation of multivariate model results. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal…

  1. Using Single Drop Microextraction for Headspace Analysis with Gas Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, Daniel; Wood, Derrick C.; Miller, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Headspace (HS) gas chromatography (GC) is commonly used to analyze samples that contain non-volatiles. In 1996, a new sampling technique called single drop microextraction, SDME, was introduced, and in 2001 it was applied to HS analysis. It is a simple technique that uses equipment normally found in the undergraduate laboratory, making it ideal…

  2. Determination of microstickies in recycled whitewater by headspace gas chromatography

    Treesearch

    X.-S. Chai; J.C. Samp; Q.F. Yang; H.N. Song; J.Y. Zhu

    2007-01-01

    This study proposed a novel headspace gas chromatographic (HS-GC) method for determination of adhesive contaminants (microstickies) in recycled whitewater, a fiber containing process stream, in the paper mill. It is based on the adsorption behavior of toluene (as a tracer) on the hydrophobic surface of microstickies, which affects the apparent vapor-liquid...

  3. Evidence of lipid degradation during overnight contact lens wear: gas chromatography mass spectrometry as the diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Panaser, Amandeep; Tighe, Brian J

    2014-03-20

    We investigated structural differences in the fatty acid profiles of lipids extracted from ex vivo contact lenses by using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Two lens materials (balafilcon A or lotrafilcon A) were worn on a daily or continuous wear schedule for 30 and 7 days. Lipids from subject-worn lenses were extracted using 1:1 chloroform: methanol and transmethylated using 5% sulfuric acid in methanol. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were collected using hexane and water, and analyzed by GCMS (Varian 3800 GC, Saturn 2000 MS). The gas chromatograms of lens extracts that were worn on a continuous wear schedule showed two predominant peaks, C16:0 and C18:0, both of which are saturated fatty acids. This was the case for balafilcon A and lotrafilcon A lenses. However, the gas chromatograms of lens extracts that were worn on a daily wear schedule showed saturated (C16:0, C18:0) and unsaturated (C16:1 and C18:1) fatty acids. Unsaturated fatty acids are degraded during sleep in contact lenses. Degradation occurred independently of lens material or subject-to-subject variability in lipid deposition. The consequences of lipid degradation are the production of oxidative products, which may be linked to contact lens discomfort.

  4. An improved, automated whole air sampler and gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis system for volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Brian M.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Aikin, Kenneth C.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Goldan, Paul D.; Graus, Martin; Hendershot, Roger; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel A.; Koss, Abigail; Kuster, William C.; Lueb, Richard A.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Peischl, Jeff; Sueper, Donna; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Tokarek, Travis W.; Warneke, Carsten; Yuan, Bin; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were quantified during two aircraft-based field campaigns using highly automated, whole air samplers with expedited post-flight analysis via a new custom-built, field-deployable gas chromatography-mass spectrometry instrument. During flight, air samples were pressurized with a stainless steel bellows compressor into electropolished stainless steel canisters. The air samples were analyzed using a novel gas chromatograph system designed specifically for field use which eliminates the need for liquid nitrogen. Instead, a Stirling cooler is used for cryogenic sample pre-concentration at temperatures as low as -165 °C. The analysis system was fully automated on a 20 min cycle to allow for unattended processing of an entire flight of 72 sample canisters within 30 h, thereby reducing typical sample residence times in the canisters to less than 3 days. The new analytical system is capable of quantifying a wide suite of C2 to C10 organic compounds at part-per-trillion sensitivity. This paper describes the sampling and analysis systems, along with the data analysis procedures which include a new peak-fitting software package for rapid chromatographic data reduction. Instrument sensitivities, uncertainties and system artifacts are presented for 35 trace gas species in canister samples. Comparisons of reported mixing ratios from each field campaign with measurements from other instruments are also presented.

  5. DETERMINATION OF A BOUND MUSK XYLENE METABOLITE IN CARP HEMOGLOBIN AS A BIOMARKER OF EXPOSURE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY USING SELECTED ION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Musk xylene (MX) is widely used as a fragrance ingredient in commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (AMX) metabolite was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Detection of AMX occur...

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Bisphenol A Leached from Household Plastics by Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bettie Obi; Burke, Fernanda M.; Harrison, Rebecca; Burdette, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of trace levels of bisphenol A (BPA) leached out of household plastics using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is reported here. BPA is an endocrine-disrupting compound used in the industrial manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles and epoxy resin can liners. This experiment…

  7. METHOD 530 DETERMINATION OF SELECT SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ MASS SPECTROMETRY (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1.1. This is a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the determination of selected semivolatile organic compounds in drinking waters. Accuracy and precision data have been generated in reagent water, and in finished ground and surface waters for the compounds li...

  8. DETERMINATION OF A BOUND MUSK XYLENE METABOLITE IN CARP HEMOGLOBIN AS A BIOMARKER OF EXPOSURE BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY USING SELECTED ION MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Musk xylene (MX) is widely used as a fragrance ingredient in commercial toiletries. Identification and quantification of a bound 4-amino-MX (AMX) metabolite was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS), with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Detection of AMX occur...

  9. Lipid fatty acid profile analyses in liver and serum in rats with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis using improved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methodology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fatty acids (FA) are essential components of lipids and exhibit important biological functions. The analyses of FAs are routinely carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, after multi-step sample preparation. In this study, several key experimental factors were carefully examined, validat...

  10. Odor and odorous chemical emissions from dairy and swine facilities: Part 5-Simultaneous chemical and sensory analysis with Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry - Olfactometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Simultaneous chemical and sensory analyses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-olfactometry (GC-MS-O) for air samples collected at barn exhaust fans were used for quantification and ranking of odor impact of target odorous gases. Fifteen target odorous VOCs (odorants) were selected. Air sampl...

  11. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and…

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Bisphenol A Leached from Household Plastics by Solid-Phase Microextraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Bettie Obi; Burke, Fernanda M.; Harrison, Rebecca; Burdette, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of trace levels of bisphenol A (BPA) leached out of household plastics using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is reported here. BPA is an endocrine-disrupting compound used in the industrial manufacture of polycarbonate plastic bottles and epoxy resin can liners. This experiment…

  13. Analysis of Whiskey by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Upper Division Analytical Chemistry Experiment Guided by Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janel E.; Zimmerman, Laura B.; Gardner, Michael A.; Lowe, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of whiskey samples prepared by a green microextraction technique, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), before analysis by a qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, is described as a laboratory experiment for an upper division instrumental methods of analysis laboratory course. Here, aroma compounds in…

  14. Analysis of Whiskey by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Upper Division Analytical Chemistry Experiment Guided by Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janel E.; Zimmerman, Laura B.; Gardner, Michael A.; Lowe, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of whiskey samples prepared by a green microextraction technique, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), before analysis by a qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, is described as a laboratory experiment for an upper division instrumental methods of analysis laboratory course. Here, aroma compounds in…

  15. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and…

  16. METHOD 530 DETERMINATION OF SELECT SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN DRINKING WATER BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ MASS SPECTROMETRY (GC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    1.1. This is a gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the determination of selected semivolatile organic compounds in drinking waters. Accuracy and precision data have been generated in reagent water, and in finished ground and surface waters for the compounds li...

  17. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sensitive determination of bromate in ozonated and chlorinated water, and sea water by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after derivatization.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ho-Sang

    2012-02-03

    A sensitive gas chromatographic method has been established for the determination of bromate in ozonated and chlorinated water, and in sea water. With acidic conditions, bromate reacts with chloride to form bromine, which reacts with 2,6-dialkylphenol to form 4-bromo-2,6-dialkylphenol. The organic derivative was extracted with ethyl acetate after quenching remaining oxidants with ascorbic acid, and then measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The lowest detection limit and limit of quantification of bromate in drinking water were 0.02 and 0.07 μg/L, respectively, and the calibration curve showed good linearity with r²=0.998. The 32 common ions did not interfere even when present in 100-fold excess over the bromated ion. The accuracy was in a range of 102-106% and the precision of the assay was less than 6% in chlorinated and ozonated tap water, ozonated mineral water, and sea water. The method was sensitive, reproducible and simple enough to permit reliable analysis of bromate to the ng/L level in water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High Sensitivity Quantitative Lipidomics Analysis of Fatty Acids in Biological Samples by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Oswald; Armando, Aaron M.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically considered to be simple membrane components serving as structural elements and energy storing entities, fatty acids are now increasingly recognized as potent signaling molecules involved in many metabolic processes. Quantitative determination of fatty acids and exploration of fatty acid profiles have become common place in lipid analysis. We present here a reliable and sensitive method for comprehensive analysis of free fatty acids and fatty acid composition of complex lipids in biological material. The separation and quantitation of fatty acids is achieved by capillary gas chromatography. The analytical method uses pentafluorobenzyl bromide derivatization and negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chromatographic procedure provides base line separation between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of different chain lengths as well as between most positional isomers. Fatty acids are extracted in the presence of isotope-labeled internal standards for high quantitation accuracy. Mass spectrometer conditions are optimized for broad detection capacity and sensitivity capable of measuring trace amounts of fatty acids in complex biological samples. PMID:21787881

  20. Fluoroacetylation/fluoroethylesterification as a derivatization approach for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in metabolomics: preliminary study of lymphohyperplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Karamani, Anna A; Fiamegos, Yiannis Ch; Vartholomatos, George; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2013-08-09

    Metabolic fingerprinting in combination with gas chromatography and multivariate analysis is being extensively employed for the improved understanding of biological changes induced by endogenous or exogenous factors. Chemical derivatization increases the sensitivity and specificity of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for polar or thermally labile biological compounds, which bear derivatizable groups. Thus, there is a constant demand for simple methods of derivatization and separation that satisfy the need for metabolite analysis, identifying as many chemical classes of compounds as possible. In this study, an optimized protocol of extraction and derivatization is established as a generally applicable method for the analysis of a wide range of classes of metabolites in urine, whole blood and saliva. Compounds of biological relevance bearing hydroxyl- carboxyl- and amino-groups are derivatized using single-step fluoroacetylation/fluoroethylesterification after proper optimization of the protocol. Subsequently, the developed derivatization procedure is engaged in finding blood metabolic biomarkers, induced by lymphohyperplastic disease, through the metabolomic fingerprinting approach, the multivariate modeling (hierarchical cluster analysis) and GC-MS. Our preliminary, GC-MS-based metabolomic fingerprinting study underlines the contribution of certain metabolites to the discrimination of patients with lymphohyperplastic diseases.

  1. [Determination of acetanilide herbicide residues in tea by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques].

    PubMed

    Shen, Weijian; Xu, Jinzhong; Yang, Wenquan; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Ding, Tao; Wu, Bin

    2007-09-01

    An analytical method of solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with two different ionization techniques was established for simultaneous determination of 12 acetanilide herbicide residues in tea-leaves. Herbicides were extracted from tea-leaf samples with ethyl acetate. The extract was cleaned-up on an active carbon SPE column connected to a Florisil SPE column. Analytical screening was determined by the technique of gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode with either electron impact ionization (EI) or negative chemical ionization (NCI). It is reliable and stable that the recoveries of all herbicides were in the range from 50% to 110% at three spiked levels, 10 microg/kg, 20 microg/kg and 40 microg/kg, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were no more than 10.9%. The two different ionization techniques are complementary as more ion fragmentation information can be obtained from the EI mode while more molecular ion information from the NCI mode. By comparison of the two techniques, the selectivity of NCI-SIM was much better than that of EI-SIM method. The sensitivities of the both techniques were high, the limit of quantitative (LOQ) for each herbicide was no more than 2.0 microg/kg, and the limit of detection (LOD) with NCI-SIM technique was much lower than that of EI-SIM when analyzing herbicides with several halogen atoms in the molecule.

  2. Direct sample introduction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of haloanisole compounds in cork stoppers.

    PubMed

    Cacho, J I; Nicolás, J; Viñas, P; Campillo, N; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2016-12-02

    A solventless analytical method is proposed for analyzing the compounds responsible for cork taint in cork stoppers. Direct sample introduction (DSI) is evaluated as a sample introduction system for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) determination of four haloanisoles (HAs) in cork samples. Several parameters affecting the DSI step, including desorption temperature and time, gas flow rate and other focusing parameters, were optimized using univariate and multivariate approaches. The proposed method shows high sensitivity and minimises sample handling, with detection limits of 1.6-2.6ngg(-1), depending on the compound. The suitability of the optimized procedure as a screening method was evaluated by obtaining decision limits (CCα) and detection capabilities (CCβ) for each analyte, which were found to be in 6.9-11.8 and 8.7-14.8ngg(-1), respectively, depending on the compound. Twenty-four cork samples were analysed, and 2,4,6-trichloroanisole was found in four of them at levels between 12.6 and 53ngg(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of Levetiracetam in Human Plasma by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Followed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is an antiepileptic drug that is clinically effective in generalized and partial epilepsy syndromes. The use of this drug has been increasing in clinical practice and intra- or -interindividual variability has been exhibited for special population. For this reason, bioanalytical methods are required for drug monitoring in biological matrices. So this work presents a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (DLLME-GC-MS) for LEV quantification in human plasma. However, due to the matrix complexity a previous purification step is required. Unlike other pretreatment techniques presented in the literature, for the first time, a procedure employing ultrafiltration tubes Amicon® (10 kDa porous size) without organic solvent consumption was developed. GC-MS analyses were carried out using a linear temperature program, capillary fused silica column, and helium as the carrier gas. DLLME optimized parameters were type and volume of extraction and dispersing solvents, salt addition, and vortex agitation time. Under chosen parameters (extraction solvent: chloroform, 130 μL; dispersing solvent: isopropyl alcohol, 400 μL; no salt addition and no vortex agitation time), the method was completely validated and all parameters were in agreement with the literature recommendations. LEV was quantified in patient's plasma sample using less than 550 μL of organic solvent. PMID:27830105

  4. Isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/Mass spectrometry of D/H by high temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hilkert; Douthitt; Schlüter; Brand

    1999-07-01

    Of all the elements, hydrogen has the largest naturally occurring variations in the ratio of its stable isotopes (D/H). It is for this reason that there has been a strong desire to add hydrogen to the list of elements amenable to isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (irm-GC/MS). In irm-GC/MS the sample is entrained in helium as the carrier gas, which is also ionized and separated in the isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Because of the low abundance of deuterium in nature, precise and accurate on-line monitoring of D/H ratios with an IRMS requires that low energy helium ions be kept out of the m/z 3 collector, which requires the use of an energy filter. A clean mass 3 (HD(+.)) signal which is independent of a large helium load in the electron impact ion source is essential in order to reach the sensitivity required for D/H analysis of capillary GC peaks. A new IRMS system, the DELTA(plus)XL(trade mark), has been designed for high precision, high accuracy measurements of transient signals of hydrogen gas. It incorporates a retardation lens integrated into the m/z 3 Faraday cup collector. Following GC separation, the hydrogen bound in organic compounds must be quantitatively converted into H(2) gas prior to analysis in the IRMS. Quantitative conversion is achieved by high temperature conversion (TC) at temperatures >1400 degrees C. Measurements of D/H ratios of individual organic compounds in complicated natural mixtures can now be made to a precision of 2 per thousand (delta notation) or, better, with typical sample amounts of approximately 200 ng per compound. Initial applications have focused on compounds of interest to petroleum research (biomarkers and natural gas components), food and flavor control (vanillin and ethanol), and metabolic studies (fatty acids and steroids). Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Identification of terpenes and essential oils by means of static headspace gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Maecker, Roman; Vyhmeister, Eduardo; Meisen, Stefan; Rosales Martinez, Antonio; Kuklya, Andriy; Telgheder, Ursula

    2017-09-20

    Static headspace gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (SHS GC-IMS) is a relatively new analytical technique that has considerable potential for analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, SHS GC-IMS was used for the identification of the major terpene components of various essential oils (EOs). Based on the data obtained from 25 terpene standards and 50 EOs, a database for fingerprint identification of characteristic terpenes and EOs was generated utilizing SHS GC-IMS for authenticity testing of fragrances in foods, cosmetics, and personal care products. This database contains specific normalized IMS drift times and GC retention indices for 50 terpene components of EOs. Initially, the SHS GC-IMS parameters, e.g., drift gas and carrier gas flow rates, drift tube, and column temperatures, were evaluated to determine suitable operating conditions for terpene separation and identification. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used as a reference method for the identification of terpenes in EOs. The fingerprint pattern based on the normalized IMS drift times and retention indices of 50 terpenes is presented for 50 EOs. The applicability of the method was proven on examples of ten commercially available food, cosmetic, and personal care product samples. The results confirm the suitability of SHS GC-IMS as a powerful analytical technique for direct identification of terpene components in solid and liquid samples without any pretreatment. Graphical abstract Fingerprint pattern identification of terpenes and essential oils using static headspace gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry.

  6. Development of thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as a rapid method for ambient particulate characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheya, Sue Anne N.

    A direct thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD GC/MS) method for air particulate matter (PM) analysis of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds was investigated. This technique uses a specially designed microdesorption GC inlet utilizing an inductively heated ferromagnetic foil with a Curie point temperature suitable for desorption, which can accommodate microgram amounts of material deposited on a thin strip of quartz fiber filter. Liquid or solid samples can be rapidly desorbed within 10 s at 315°C, followed by 30--40 min of chromatography time. The results obtained by this technique were found to be statistically equivalent to those obtained by the conventional solvent extraction gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SX GC/MS) method for analysis of aromatic and n alkane standards, single source soot particles, and PM 10 filter samples. Correlations between injecting an extract, desorbing an extract, and desorbing particles averaged R = 0.94, with a three way correlation averaging R = 0.97. High volume sampling conducted at 12 spatially distributed sites located along the US/Mexican border of the El Paso/Juarez metroplex supplied 24h PM 10 filters for an investigation combining thermal desorption with a rapid online chemical derivatization procedure, and multivariate methods of source attribution using principal component and canonical correlation analysis of the resultant chemical markers. Four major combustion related PM emission sources were revealed at these sites: automotive, waste burning, biomass burning and meat cooking. A second investigation conducted in the same area used mediumvolume sampling to collect 2 h timeresolved PM 10 receptor samples for TD GC/MS analysis. Additionally, 2 h samples for inorganic analysis, multichannel particle size distribution measurements, and meteorological data were collected enabling generation of circadian PM multicharacterization profiles. Factor analysis based receptor modeling using

  7. Method Development for the Determination of Fluorotelomer Alcohols in Soils by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) have been widely studied as precursors to perfluorocarboxylates, e.g. 8:2 FTOH degrades to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). This presentation describes an analytical method for the extraction and analysis of 6:2, 8:2, and 10:2 FTOHs. Gas chromatograph...

  8. SPECIATION OF SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANTS BY CONE PENETROMETRY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY. (R826184)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction cone penetrometry gas chroma tography/mass spectrometry system (TECP GC/MS) has been developed to detect subsurface contaminants in situ. The TECP can collect soil-bound organics up to depths of 30 m. In contrast to traditional cone penetrometer sample collec...

  9. Performance and optimization of a combustion interface for isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Ricci, M. P.; Studley, S. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Conditions and systems for on-line combustion of effluents from capillary gas chromatographic columns and for removal of water vapor from product streams were tested. Organic carbon in gas chromatographic peaks 15 s wide and containing up to 30 nanomoles of carbon was quantitatively converted to CO2 by tubular combustion reactors, 200 x 0.5 mm, packed with CuO or NiO. No auxiliary source of O2 was required because oxygen was supplied by metal oxides. Spontaneous degradation of CuO limited the life of CuO reactors at T > 850 degrees C. Since NiO does not spontaneously degrade, its use might be favored, but Ni-bound carbon phases form and lead to inaccurate isotopic results at T < 1050 degrees C if gas-phase O2 is not added. For all compounds tested except CH4, equivalent isotopic results are provided by CuO at 850 degrees C, NiO + O2 (gas-phase mole fraction, 10(-3)) at 1050 degrees C and NiO at 1150 degrees C. The combustion interface did not contribute additional analytical uncertainty, thus observed standard deviations of 13C/12C ratios were within a factor of 2 of shot-noise limits. For combustion and isotopic analyses of CH4, in which quantitative combustion required T approximately 950 degrees C, NiO-based systems are preferred, and precision is approximately 2 times lower than that observed for other analytes. Water must be removed from the gas stream transmitted to the mass spectrometer or else protonation of CO2 will lead to inaccuracy in isotopic analyses. Although thresholds for this effect vary between mass spectrometers, differential permeation of H2O through Nafion tubing was effective in both cases tested, but the required length of the Nafion membrane was 4 times greater for the more sensitive mass spectrometer.

  10. Performance and optimization of a combustion interface for isotope ratio monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Merritt, D A; Freeman, K H; Ricci, M P; Studley, S A; Hayes, J M

    1995-07-15

    Conditions and systems for on-line combustion of effluents from capillary gas chromatographic columns and for removal of water vapor from product streams were tested. Organic carbon in gas chromatographic peaks 15 s wide and containing up to 30 nanomoles of carbon was quantitatively converted to CO2 by tubular combustion reactors, 200 x 0.5 mm, packed with CuO or NiO. No auxiliary source of O2 was required because oxygen was supplied by metal oxides. Spontaneous degradation of CuO limited the life of CuO reactors at T > 850 degrees C. Since NiO does not spontaneously degrade, its use might be favored, but Ni-bound carbon phases form and lead to inaccurate isotopic results at T < 1050 degrees C if gas-phase O2 is not added. For all compounds tested except CH4, equivalent isotopic results are provided by CuO at 850 degrees C, NiO + O2 (gas-phase mole fraction, 10(-3)) at 1050 degrees C and NiO at 1150 degrees C. The combustion interface did not contribute additional analytical uncertainty, thus observed standard deviations of 13C/12C ratios were within a factor of 2 of shot-noise limits. For combustion and isotopic analyses of CH4, in which quantitative combustion required T approximately 950 degrees C, NiO-based systems are preferred, and precision is approximately 2 times lower than that observed for other analytes. Water must be removed from the gas stream transmitted to the mass spectrometer or else protonation of CO2 will lead to inaccuracy in isotopic analyses. Although thresholds for this effect vary between mass spectrometers, differential permeation of H2O through Nafion tubing was effective in both cases tested, but the required length of the Nafion membrane was 4 times greater for the more sensitive mass spectrometer.

  11. Analysis of Phenolic Antioxidants in Navy Mobility Fuels by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-19

    degradation involves chemical changes that lead to oxidation of fuel molecules to form a variety of oxygenated species, often resulting in the accumulation...D5304, 2006, “Standard Test Method for Assessing Middle Distillate Fuel Storage Stability by Oxygen Overpressure,” ASTM International, West Conshohocken...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6180--13-9471 Analysis of Phenolic Antioxidants in Navy Mobility Fuels by Gas

  12. Simultaneous determination of melatonin and pyridoxine in tablets by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nùñez-Vergara, L J; Squella, J A; Sturm, J C; Baez, H; Camargo, C

    2001-12-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of melatonin plus pyridoxine commercial tablets is described. Melatonin and pyridoxine were simultaneously determined by GC-MS after extraction from ground tablets with methanol and derivatization with N-methyl-N-N-trimethlylsilyltrifluoroacetamide (MSTFA). The mass chromatograms were generated using 232 m/z ion for melatonin and 280 m/z ion for pyridoxine, respectively. Splitless injection offers good reproducibility with a standard deviation of 2%. The developed method was applied to analyze the melatonin and pyridoxine content from two different tablet formulations. Also, recovery, detection and quantification limits are reported.

  13. Nitrogen isotopic analyses by isotope-ratio-monitoring gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, D. A.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Amino acids containing natural-abundance levels of 15N were derivatized and analyzed isotopically using a technique in which individual compounds are separated by gas chromatography, combusted on-line, and the product stream sent directly to an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. For samples of N2 gas, standard deviations of ratio measurement were better than 0.1% (Units for delta are parts per thousand or per million (%).) for samples larger than 400 pmol and better than 0.5% for samples larger than 25 pmol (0.1% 15N is equivalent to 0.00004 atom % 15N). Results duplicated those of conventional, batchwise analyses to within 0.05%. For combustion of organic compounds yielding CO2/N2 ratios between 14 and 28, in particular for N-acetyl n-propyl derivatives of amino acids, delta values were within 0.25% of results obtained using conventional techniques and standard deviations were better than 0.35%. Pooled data for measurements of all amino acids produced an accuracy and precision of 0.04 and 0.23%, respectively, when 2 nmol of each amino acid was injected on column and 20% of the stream of combustion products was delivered to the mass spectrometer.

  14. An experimental design approach for optimizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analysis in contaminated soil by pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buco, S; Moragues, M; Sergent, M; Doumenq, P; Mille, G

    2007-06-01

    Pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil without preliminary extraction. Experimental research methodology was used to obtain optimal performance of the system. After determination of the main factors (desorption time, Curie point temperature, carrier gas flow), modeling was done using a Box-Behnken matrix. Study of the response surface led to factor values that optimize the experimental response and achieve better chromatographic results.

  15. Simultaneous Determination of 10 Photoinitiators in Milk by Solid-Phase Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyan; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Yajing; Chen, Yanjie

    2016-05-01

    Photoinitiators (PIs) are widely used in food packaging materials, can migrate easily from packaging materials to food, and cause food contamination. It is essential to establish a method of determining PIs residues in food. A new method for simultaneously determining 10 kinds of PIs in milk has been established by using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) combined with a simple method of protein precipitation as the pretreatment approach and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry as the detecting technique. The limits of detection for 10 PIs in different milks were between 0.05 and 1.4 μg/L (skimmed milk), between 0.07 and 2.2 μg/L (semi-skimmed milk), between 0.11 and 4.4 μg/L (whole milk), respectively. The recoveries were from 71.5% to 133.5%, and the relative standard deviations were less than 15%. Twelve kinds of packed milk with different brands and fat contents were determined using this method.

  16. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of effects of dietary fish oil on total fatty acid composition in mouse skin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peiru; Sun, Min; Ren, Jianwei; Djuric, Zora; Fisher, Gary J.; Wang, Xiuli; Li, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Altering the fatty acid (FA) composition in the skin by dietary fish oil could provide therapeutic benefits. Although it has been shown that fish oil supplementation enhances EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) abundance in the skin, comprehensive skin FA profiling is needed. We established a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method, which allows precise quantification of FA profile using small (<24 mm2 for mice and <12 mm2 for humans) skin specimens that can be readily obtained from live mice and humans. We determined mouse skin FA composition after 2, 4 and 8 weeks of consuming a control diet or a diet supplemented with fish oil. Fish oil markedly enhanced EPA and DHA in mouse skin within 2 weeks, and this increase plateaued after 4 weeks. The FA composition in mouse skin was different from that of serum, indicating that skin has homeostatic control of FA metabolism. Mice fed the control diet designed to simulate Western human diet displayed similar skin FA composition as that of humans. The present study presents a validated method for FA quantification that is needed to investigate the mechanisms of actions of dietary treatments in both mouse and human skin. PMID:28195161

  17. [Determination of volatile N-nitrosamine compounds in salted aquatic products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Wang, Xiuyuan; Wang, Pingya; Zhou, Yong; Xue, Chaobo; Jiang, Lingbo

    2013-03-01

    An analytical method was developed for the determination of the extraction of volatile N-nitrosamine compounds including N-nitrosodimethylamine ( NDMA) , N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosodipropylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosodibutylamine (NDBA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), and N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) from salted aquatic products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In this experiment, the separation and detection conditions were optimized for different extraction methods, solid-phase extraction columns, and chromatographic columns. The results showed that the linear correlation coefficients (R2) were higher than 0. 999 8 within 10 - 1 000 micro g/L, and the reproducibilities were good with the - relative standard deviations (RSD) less than 8%. The recoveries were 79% - 105%. It is noted that this method for the determination of volatile N-nitrosamine compounds in salted aquatic products was much more sensitivity and with a lower detection limits (0. 05 micro g/kg except NDPA) than the previously reported methods. This proposed method is rapid and convenient for the determination, and easy for the operation. It is appropriate for the determination of volatile N-nitrosamine compounds in various salted aquatic products.

  18. Microextraction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for improved analysis of geosmin and other fungal "off" volatiles in grape juice.

    PubMed

    Morales-Valle, H; Silva, L C; Paterson, R R M; Oliveira, J M; Venâncio, A; Lima, N

    2010-10-01

    Geosmin is a volatile fungal metabolite with an earthy aroma produced in grape products from rotten grapes. The accumulation of geosmin in grapes is caused by the interaction of Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum. Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) has great utility for collecting volatile compounds in wine. However, contamination with earthy odours may have occurred previously in the must and novel methods are required for this commodity. In the present report, several parameters of the SPME were evaluated to optimize geosmin extraction. The method permitted quantification of geosmin and other fungal volatiles by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) at very low concentrations. Limits of detection and quantification (L(D) and L(Q)) for geosmin were 4.7 ng L(-1) and 15.6 ng L(-1) respectively. The RSD was 4.1% and the recovery rates ranged from 115% to 134%. Uniquely, haloanisoles were analyzed by using only one internal standard (2,3,6-trichloroanisole) thus avoiding the synthesis of deuterated anisole analogues that are used as internal standard in other methods. The method was used for the analysis of grape juice samples inoculated with B. cinerea and P. expansum. Geosmin and methylisoborneol were the compounds that appeared to contribute most to earthy odours, although other fungal compounds which are claimed to cause earthy or mouldy off-odours were detected (e.g. 1-octen-3-ol and fenchol).

  19. Application of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in analyzing pharmacokinetics and distribution of deltamethrin in miniature pig tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pan; Fan, Sai; Zou, Jian Hong; Miao, Hong; Li, Jing Guang; Zhang, Guo Wen; Wu, Yong Ning

    2014-06-01

    To characterize the pharmacokinetics and distribution profiles of deltamethrin in miniature pig tissues by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Pharmacokinetics and distribution of deltamethrin in blood and tissues of 30 miniature pigs were studied by GC-MS after oral administration of deltamethrin (5 mg/kg bw). Data were processed by 3P97 software. The serum deltamethrin level was significantly lower in tissues than in blood of miniature pigs. The AUC0-72 h, Cmax, of deltamethrin were 555.330 ± 316.987 ng h/mL and 17.861 ± 11.129 ng/mL, respectively. The Tmax, of deltamethrin was 6.004 ± 3.131 h. The metabolism of deltamethrin in miniature pigs is fit for a one-compartment model with a weighting function of 1/C2. Deltamethrin is rapidly hydrolyzed and accumulated in miniature pig tissues. Copyright © 2014 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  20. Analytical Approaches Based on Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to Study Organic Materials in Artworks and Archaeological Objects.

    PubMed

    Bonaduce, Ilaria; Ribechini, Erika; Modugno, Francesca; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2016-02-01

    Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), after appropriate wet chemical sample pre-treatments or pyrolysis, is one of the most commonly adopted analytical techniques in the study of organic materials from cultural heritage objects. Organic materials in archaeological contexts, in classical art objects, or in modern and contemporary works of art may be the same or belong to the same classes, but can also vary considerably, often presenting different ageing pathways and chemical environments. This paper provides an overview of the literature published in the last 10 years on the research based on the use of GC/MS for the analysis of organic materials in artworks and archaeological objects. The latest progresses in advancing analytical approaches, characterising materials and understanding their degradation, and developing methods for monitoring their stability are discussed. Case studies from the literature are presented to examine how the choice of the working conditions and the analytical approaches is driven by the analytical and technical question to be answered, as well as the nature of the object from which the samples are collected.

  1. Analysis of isotope ratios in vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) from human plasma by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kerry S; Bluck, Leslie J C; Coward, W Andy

    2006-01-01

    Vitamin K(1) is a fat-soluble vitamin required for the gamma-carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Recent work has suggested an important role for vitamin K(1) in bone health beyond its more established function in the control and regulation of blood coagulation. However, current UK recommended intakes do not reflect this recent evidence. The use of stable isotopes provides a powerful tool to investigate vitamin K kinetics, turnover and absorption in man, although published methods have reported difficulties in the extraction and analysis of isotope ratios of vitamin K in human plasma. In this paper, we report a new methodology for the extraction and measurement of isotope ratios in vitamin K(1). Sample clean-up is achieved with liquid-liquid extraction, enzyme hydrolysis with lipase and cholesterol esterase, and solid-phase extraction. Isotopic analysis of the pentafluoropropionyl derivative of vitamin K(1) is performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The limit of quantitation is equivalent to at least 0.3 nmol/L and the method is demonstrated to be linear over a range of enrichments. This method provides a robust alternative to previous work requiring the use of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based study on urine metabolomics in rats chronically poisoned with hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingjie; Zhang, Meiling; Sun, Fa; Ma, Jianshe; Hu, Lufeng; Yang, Xuezhi; Lin, Guanyang; Wang, Xianqin

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GS-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was applied to explore the metabolic variability in urine of chronically hydrogen sulfide- (H2S-) poisoned rats relative to control ones. The changes in endogenous metabolites were studied by partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) and independent-samples t-test. The metabolic patterns of H2S-poisoned group are separated from the control, suggesting that the metabolic profiles of H2S-poisoned rats were markedly different from the controls. Moreover, compared to the control group, the level of alanine, d-ribose, tetradecanoic acid, L-aspartic acid, pentanedioic acid, cholesterol, acetate, and oleic acid in rat urine of the poisoning group decreased, while the level of glycine, d-mannose, arabinofuranose, and propanoic acid increased. These metabolites are related to amino acid metabolism as well as energy and lipid metabolism in vivo. Studying metabolomics using GC-MS allows for a comprehensive overview of the metabolism of the living body. This technique can be employed to decipher the mechanism of chronic H2S poisoning, thus promoting the use of metabolomics in clinical toxicology.

  3. Validation of biomarkers for distinguishing Mycobacterium tuberculosis from non-tuberculous mycobacteria using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ngoc A; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Walters, Elisabetta; Claassens, Mareli; van Soolingen, Dick; Vivo-Truyols, Gabriel; Janssen, Hans-Gerd; Kolk, Arend H J

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major international health problem. Rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) from non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is critical for decisions regarding patient management and choice of therapeutic regimen. Recently we developed a 20-compound model to distinguish between MTB and NTM. It is based on thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and partial least square discriminant analysis. Here we report the validation of this model with two independent sample sets, one consisting of 39 MTB and 17 NTM isolates from the Netherlands, the other comprising 103 isolates (91 MTB and 12 NTM) from Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa. All the MTB strains in the 56 Dutch samples were correctly identified and the model had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 94%. For the South African samples the model had a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 100%. Based on our model, we have developed a new decision-tree that allows the differentiation of MTB from NTM with 100% accuracy. Encouraged by these findings we will proceed with the development of a simple, rapid, affordable, high-throughput test to identify MTB directly in sputum.

  4. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Raman imaging measurement of squalene content and distribution in human hair.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Chen, Guoqiang; Ji, Chengdong; Hoptroff, Michael; Jones, Andrew; Collins, Luisa Z; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and validated for the measurement of the squalene content from root to tip, in both Chinese black virgin and bleached hair. Deuterated squalene was used as the internal standard. For quantification, selective ion monitoring (SIM) at m/z 410.0 and 347.0 were monitored for squalene and deuterated squalene, respectively. Different methods for the extraction of squalene from ex vivo human hair were compared including organic solvent extraction and acid/alkali hydrolysis. The best extraction efficiency was obtained by using a mixed solvent consisting of chloroform:methanol = 2:1 (v:v). The linear range of squalene ran from 1.0 to 50.0 μg mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.10 μg mL(-1) (corresponding to 0.005 mg g(-1) in human hair), which enabled quantification of squalene in human hair at very low level. The recovery of squalene was 96.4 ± 1.46% (n = 3). Using the above-mentioned mixed solvent extraction, squalene content in human hair was successfully quantified from root to tip. Meanwhile, a Raman imaging method was developed to visualize the squalene distribution in Chinese white virgin hair from cuticle to medulla.

  5. Determination of alkylphenolic residues in fresh fruits and vegetables by extractive steam distillation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deng-Kai; Ding, Wang-Hsien

    2005-09-23

    This study describes a simple and sensitive method for determining the alkylphenolic compounds, 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), 4-nonylphenol isomers (4-NPs), and their monoethoxylates (4-t-OP1EO and 4-NP1EOs), in fresh fruits and vegetables. The method involves extracting a sample by a modified Nielson-Kryger steam distillation extraction using n-hexane for 1 h. The alkylphenolic compounds were identified and quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Various pH values and amounts of NaCl added to the sample solution were evaluated as extraction conditions. The quantitation limit of this method was less than 0.2 ng/g in 10 g (fresh weight) of sample. Recovery of alkylphenolic compounds in spiked samples exceeded 64% while R.S.D. ranged from 1.0 to 9.8%. Alkylphenolic residues were detected in fresh fruits and vegetables at concentrations of 4-NPs and 4-t-OP from n.d. to 16 ng/g and from n.d. to 4.8 ng/g (fresh weight), respectively. NP1EO and OP1EO were always below the quantitation limit.

  6. A simple gas chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure for the simultaneous determination of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine in human urine.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Dwain C

    2008-10-01

    With the increasing use of buprenorphine in treatment of opiate addiction and pain management, it is important that laboratories be able to assess patient compliance. The presented procedure is simple, efficient, and employs gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) technology available to most laboratories. The specimen is hydrolyzed with beta-glucuronidase prior to liquid-liquid extraction at a basic pH. The evaporated extract is derivatized to form the tertiary-butyl-dimethyl-silyl derivatives of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine prior to analysis by GC-MS in the electron impact mode. Confirmation of the analytes is based on comparing the ion abundance ratios of the analytes to those of a contemporaneously analyzed standard. The qualitative ion abundance ratios are required to be within 20% of those of the standard for acceptance. Quantification is based on the ion ratios of the analytes to those of their corresponding deuterated analogues. Linearity was obtained for buprenorphine in the range of 1 to 2000 microg/L with a correlation coefficient (R) exceeding 0.999 and for norbuprenorphine from 1 to 1000 microg/L with R exceeding 0.997. Percent recoveries for the buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine were 71% and 75%, respectively. It was found that the recovery of norbuprenorphine could be enhanced to 100% by a simple "salting-out" modification to the procedure.

  7. Determination of microcontaminants in sediments by on-line solid-phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Slobodník, J; Ramalho, S; van Baar, B L; Louter, A J; Brinkman, U A

    2000-11-01

    Two simple and straightforward analytical procedures for the screening of sediment samples are reported. They involve extraction with ethyl acetate or methanol and subsequent analysis by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) using large-volume injection (LVI) or solid-phase extraction (SPE). The latter, which was originally developed for the analysis of aqueous samples, can be used without any modification. In general, 10 ml of organic solvent were added to 2 g of sediment, and the mixture was shaken and allowed to stand overnight. The methanolic extracts were then diluted in water and subjected to preconcentration and analysis using on-line SPE-GC-MS. The ethyl acetate extracts were injected directly into the GC using LVI. Both methods were used for the detection and identification of microcontaminants during a monitoring study of the river Nitra (Slovak Republic). They included polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), chlorofluorohydrocarbons, alkoxylated and alkylated phenols and benzothiazole derivatives. Semi-quantitative profiles of the contaminants were constructed and provisionally interpreted. The results indicate that SPE-GC-MS, and also LVI-GC-MS, have good potential for a rapid screening of sediment samples and the identification of microcontaminants. The analytical procedures pose no problems, and the on-line set-up is user-friendly.

  8. Evaluation of beer deterioration by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/multivariate analysis: a rapid tool for assessing beer composition.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João A; Barros, António S; Carvalho, Beatriz; Brandão, Tiago; Gil, Ana M; Ferreira, António C Silva

    2011-02-18

    Beer stability is a major concern for the brewing industry, as beer characteristics may be subject to significant changes during storage. This paper describes a novel non-targeted methodology for monitoring the chemical changes occurring in a lager beer exposed to accelerated aging (induced by thermal treatment: 18 days at 45 °C), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in tandem with multivariate analysis (GC-MS/MVA). Optimization of the chromatographic run was performed, achieving a threefold reduction of the chromatographic time. Although losing optimum resolution, rapid GC runs showed similar chromatographic profiles and semi-quantitative ability to characterize volatile compounds. To evaluate the variations on the global volatile signature (chromatographic profile and m/z pattern of fragmentation in each scan) of beer during thermal deterioration, a non-supervised multivariate analysis method, Principal Component Analysis (PCA), was applied to the GC-MS data. This methodology allowed not only the rapid identification of the degree of deterioration affecting beer, but also the identification of specific compounds of relevance to the thermal deterioration process of beer, both well established markers such as 5-hydroxymethylfufural (5-HMF), furfural and diethyl succinate, as well as other compounds, to our knowledge, newly correlated to beer aging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of different organic crude extracts from the local medicinal plant of Thymus vulgaris L

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Laila Salim Al; Hossain, Mohammad Amzad; Weli, Afaf Mohammed; Al-Riyami, Qasim; Al-Sabahi, Jamal Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Objective To isolate and analyze the chemical composition in different crude extracts of from the leaves of locally grown of Thymus vulgaris L (T. vulgaris) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods The shade dried leaves powder was extracted with methanol by using Soxhlet extractor. Methanol crude extracts of T. vulgaris and the derived fractions of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol were obtained. Results Qualitative analyses of various organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris by using GC-MS showed that there were different types of high and low molecular weight compounds. Most of the isolated and identified compounds by GC-MS in the crude extracts are basically biologically important. Further, the T. vulgaris leaf possessed certain characteristics that can be ascribed to cultivation on a domestic plantation. The crude extracts were prepared from the powder leaves of T. vulgaris for respective compounds can be chosen on the basis of above GC-MS analysis. Conclusions All the major compounds were identified and characterized by spectroscopic method in different organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris are biologically active molecules. Thus the identification of a good number of compounds in various crude extracts of T. vulgaris might have some ecological role. PMID:23570020

  10. Identification and quantitation of urinary dicarboxylic acids as their dicyclohexyl esters in disease states by gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Norman, E J; Berry, H K; Denton, M D

    1979-12-01

    Clinical studies were conducted by gas chromatography mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring of urinary dicarboxylic acids as dicyclohexyl esters. The dicyclohexyl esters of the dicarboxylic acids give characteristic electron impact mass spectra suitable for selected ion monitoring. The mass spectra exhibit a prominent acid + 1H ion and an (acid + 1H)-H2O ion for use as quantitating and confirming ions. The cyclohexyl esters are stable for days at room temperature and have excellent chromatographic properties. Dicarboxylic acid quantitation is performed within one hour using only 50 microliter of unpurified urine. A rapid method specifically for methylmalonic acid quantitation is described which has assisted physicians in the diagnosis of pernicious anemia and methylmalonic aciduria. This procedure is applicable for screening urinary organic acids for detection of inborn errors of metabolism. The detection of a child with elevated medium length dicarboxylic acids in the terminal urine specimen is reported. This condition, previously described as an inborn error, is attributed to a terminal event. Finally, an increase in urinary succinic acid paralleling putrescine levels is described during a response to cancer chemotherapy.

  11. Determination of Drugs of Abuse in a Single Sample of Human Teeth by a Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Method.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Giovanni; Cameriere, Roberto; Cippitelli, Marta; Froldi, Rino; Tassoni, Giovanna; Zampi, Massimiliano; Cingolani, Mariano

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method to detect drugs of abuse in a single sample of tooth. Pulverized samples of dental materials were subjected to acid hydrolysis to detect opiates, cocaine and their metabolites. The residual dental materials from these analyses were subjected to basic extraction to detect cannabis products (Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol). The method showed a good linearity between 0.05 and 2 ng/mg for all substances. The limit of detection ranged from 0.02 to 0.03 ng/mg, and the limit of quantification was 0.05 ng/mg. The application of the method to samples of teeth obtained from drug addicts was successful. It can be applied in post-mortem cases, especially when limited amounts of sample are available. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Recent trends in application of multivariate curve resolution approaches for improving gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of essential oils.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Parastar, Hadi

    2011-08-15

    Essential oils (EOs) are valuable natural products that are popular nowadays in the world due to their effects on the health conditions of human beings and their role in preventing and curing diseases. In addition, EOs have a broad range of applications in foods, perfumes, cosmetics and human nutrition. Among different techniques for analysis of EOs, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is the most important one in recent years. However, there are some fundamental problems in GC-MS analysis including baseline drift, spectral background, noise, low S/N (signal to noise) ratio, changes in the peak shapes and co-elution. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) approaches cope with ongoing challenges and are able to handle these problems. This review focuses on the application of MCR techniques for improving GC-MS analysis of EOs published between January 2000 and December 2010. In the first part, the importance of EOs in human life and their relevance in analytical chemistry is discussed. In the second part, an insight into some basics needed to understand prospects and limitations of the MCR techniques are given. In the third part, the significance of the combination of the MCR approaches with GC-MS analysis of EOs is highlighted. Furthermore, the commonly used algorithms for preprocessing, chemical rank determination, local rank analysis and multivariate resolution in the field of EOs analysis are reviewed.

  13. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry screening for phytochemical 4-desmethylsterols accumulated during development of Tunisian peanut kernels (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Cherif, Aicha O; Trabelsi, Hajer; Ben Messaouda, Mhamed; Kâabi, Belhassen; Pellerin, Isabelle; Boukhchina, Sadok; Kallel, Habib; Pepe, Claude

    2010-08-11

    4-Desmethylsterols, the main component of the phytosterol fraction, have been analyzed during the development of Tunisian peanut kernels ( Arachis hypogaea L.), Trabelsia (AraT) and Chounfakhi (AraC), which are monocultivar species, and Arbi (AraA), which is a wild species, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Immature wild peanut (AraA) showed the highest contents of beta-sitosterol (554.8 mg/100 g of oil), campesterol (228.6 mg/100 g of oil), and Delta(5)-avenasterol (39.0 mg/100 g of oil) followed by peanut cultivar AraC with beta-sitosterol, campesterol, and Delta(5)-avenasterol averages of 267.7, 92.1, and 28.6 mg/100 g of oil, respectively, and similarly for AraT 309.1, 108.4, and 27.4 mg/100 g of oil, respectively, were found. These results suggest that, in immature stages, phytosterol contents can be important regulator factors for the functional quality of peanut oil for the agro-industry chain from plant to nutraceuticals.

  14. Determination of carbon number distributions of complex phthalates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with ammonia chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Di Sanzo, Frank P; Lim, Peniel J; Han, Wenning W

    2015-01-01

    An assay method for phthalate esters with a complex mixture of isomer of varying carbon numbers, such as di-isononyl phthalate (DINP) and di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP), using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) positive chemical ionization (PCI) with 5% ammonia in methane is described. GC-MS-PCI-NH3, unlike GC-MS electron ionization (EI) (GC-MS-EI) that produces generally m/z 149 ion as the main base peak and low intensity M(+) peaks, produces higher intensity (M + 1) ions that allow the determination of total (R + R') carbon number distributions based on the various R and R' alkyl groups of the di-esters moiety. The technique allows distinguishing among the various commercial DINP and DIDP plasticizers. The carbon number distributions are determined in the acceptable range of <0.1 mole percent to >85 mole percent (m/m). Several examples of analysis made on commercial DINP and DIDP are presented. The use of only 5% instead of 100% ammonia simplifies use of GC-MS-PCI-NH3 but still produces sufficient M + 1 ion intensities that are appropriate for the assay. In addition, use of low concentrations of ammonia mitigates potential safety aspects related to use of ammonia and provides less corrosion for the instrument hardware.

  15. Determination of cocaine and heroin with their respective metabolites in meconium by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López, P; Bermejo, A M; Tabernero, M J; Fernández, P; Alvarez, I

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of meconium specimens is a relatively accurate method for the detection of fetal exposure to drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a method for meconium sample preparation for a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmation of meconium extracts for cocaine, benzoylecgonine, codeine, morphine and 6-monoacetylmorphine. The analytes were initially extracted from the matrix by methanol. Subsequently a solid-phase extraction with Waters Oasis HLB cartridges was applied. Analytes were determined in GC-MS single monitoring mode. The method was validated in the range 40-2000 ng g(-1) using 0.5 g of meconium per assay. The detector response was linear over the studied range, and limits of quantitation and detection were found to be acceptable. Intra- and inter-batch coefficients of variation oscillated between 2.54% and 20.5%, and mean relative errors were in the range 0.79%-19.9%. The recoveries were higher than 42.1% in all cases. Finally the method was applied to analysis of meconium in newborns to assess fetal exposure to cocaine and opiates.

  16. Simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma by chemical ionization gas chromatography mass-spectrometry (CI-GC-MS).

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Raj K; Oda, Robert P; Youso, Stephanie L; Petrikovics, Ilona; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2012-11-01

    An analytical method utilizing chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was developed for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in plasma. Sample preparation for this analysis required essentially one-step by combining the reaction of cyanide and thiocyanate with pentafluorobenzyl bromide and simultaneous extraction of the product into ethyl acetate facilitated by a phase-transfer catalyst, tetrabutylammonium sulfate. The limits of detection for cyanide and thiocyanate were 1 μM and 50 nM, respectively. The linear dynamic range was from 10 μM to 20 mM for cyanide and from 500 nM to 200 μM for thiocyanate with correlation coefficients higher than 0.999 for both cyanide and thiocyanate. The precision, as measured by %RSD, was below 9 %, and the accuracy was within 15 % of the nominal concentration for all quality control standards analyzed. The gross recoveries of cyanide and thiocyanate from plasma were over 90 %. Using this method, the toxicokinetic behavior of cyanide and thiocyanate in swine plasma was assessed following cyanide exposure.

  17. Identification the Key Odorants in Different Parts of Hyla Rabbit Meat via Solid Phase Microextraction Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jingzhi; Zhang, En

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the volatile compounds of hind leg, foreleg, abdomen and Longissimus dorsi in both male and female Hyla rabbit meat by solid phase microextraction tandem with gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and to seek out the key odorants via calculating the odor activity value and principal component analysis. Cluster analysis is used to study the flavor pattern differences in four edible parts. Sixty three volatile compounds were detected, including 23 aldehydes, 4 alcohols, 5 ketones, 11 esters, 5 aromatics, 8 acids and 7 hydrocarbons. Among them, 6 aldehydes and 3 acids were identified as the potential key odorants according to the ratio of concentration and threshold. The contents of volatile compounds in male Hyla rabbit meat were significantly higher than those in female one (p<0.05). The results of p