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Sample records for headwater basin subject

  1. Ecological restoration of Xingu Basin headwaters: motivations, engagement, challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Durigan, Giselda; Guerin, Natalia; da Costa, José Nicola Martorano Neves

    2013-06-01

    Over the past two decades, the headwaters of the Xingu Basin in the Amazon have been subjected to one of the highest deforestation rates in Brazil, with negative effects on both terrestrial and aquatic systems. The environmental consequences of forest land conversion have concerned the indigenous people living downstream, and this was the first motivation for the Y Ikatu Xingu campaign--'save the good water of the Xingu'. Among the objectives of the initiative was to restore riparian forests on private land across the basin. For a region where the rivers, rainstorms, forest remnants, distances and farms are huge, the challenges were equally large: crossing the biotic and abiotic thresholds of degradation, as well as addressing the lack of technology, know-how, seeds, forest nurseries, trained personnel and roads, and the lack of motivation for restoration. After 6 years, despite the remarkable advances in terms of technical innovation coupled with a broad and effective social involvement, the restored areas represent only a small portion of those aimed for. The still high costs of restoration, the uncertainties of legislation and also the global economy have been strong forces constraining the expansion of restored forests. Additional efforts and strategies are necessary to overcome these barriers.

  2. Ecological restoration of Xingu Basin headwaters: motivations, engagement, challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Durigan, Giselda; Guerin, Natalia; da Costa, José Nicola Martorano Neves

    2013-06-01

    Over the past two decades, the headwaters of the Xingu Basin in the Amazon have been subjected to one of the highest deforestation rates in Brazil, with negative effects on both terrestrial and aquatic systems. The environmental consequences of forest land conversion have concerned the indigenous people living downstream, and this was the first motivation for the Y Ikatu Xingu campaign--'save the good water of the Xingu'. Among the objectives of the initiative was to restore riparian forests on private land across the basin. For a region where the rivers, rainstorms, forest remnants, distances and farms are huge, the challenges were equally large: crossing the biotic and abiotic thresholds of degradation, as well as addressing the lack of technology, know-how, seeds, forest nurseries, trained personnel and roads, and the lack of motivation for restoration. After 6 years, despite the remarkable advances in terms of technical innovation coupled with a broad and effective social involvement, the restored areas represent only a small portion of those aimed for. The still high costs of restoration, the uncertainties of legislation and also the global economy have been strong forces constraining the expansion of restored forests. Additional efforts and strategies are necessary to overcome these barriers. PMID:23610171

  3. Ecological restoration of Xingu Basin headwaters: motivations, engagement, challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Durigan, Giselda; Guerin, Natalia; da Costa, José Nicola Martorano Neves

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the headwaters of the Xingu Basin in the Amazon have been subjected to one of the highest deforestation rates in Brazil, with negative effects on both terrestrial and aquatic systems. The environmental consequences of forest land conversion have concerned the indigenous people living downstream, and this was the first motivation for the Y Ikatu Xingu campaign—‘save the good water of the Xingu’. Among the objectives of the initiative was to restore riparian forests on private land across the basin. For a region where the rivers, rainstorms, forest remnants, distances and farms are huge, the challenges were equally large: crossing the biotic and abiotic thresholds of degradation, as well as addressing the lack of technology, know-how, seeds, forest nurseries, trained personnel and roads, and the lack of motivation for restoration. After 6 years, despite the remarkable advances in terms of technical innovation coupled with a broad and effective social involvement, the restored areas represent only a small portion of those aimed for. The still high costs of restoration, the uncertainties of legislation and also the global economy have been strong forces constraining the expansion of restored forests. Additional efforts and strategies are necessary to overcome these barriers. PMID:23610171

  4. The size distribution of organic carbon in headwater streams in the Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Joana D'Arc; Luizão, Flávio Jesus; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez

    2016-06-01

    Despite the strong representativeness of streams in the Amazon basin, their role in the accumulation of coarse particulate organic carbon (CPOC), fine particulate organic carbon (FPOC), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in transport, an important energy source in these environments, is poorly known. It is known that the arboreal vegetation in the Amazon basin is influenced by soil fertility and rainfall gradients, but would these gradients promote local differences in organic matter in headwater streams? To answer this question, 14 low-order streams were selected within these gradients along the Amazon basin, with extensions that varied between 4 and 8 km. The efficiency of the transformation of particulate into dissolved carbon fractions was assessed for each stream. The mean monthly benthic organic matter storage ranged between 1.58 and 9.40 t ha(-1) month(-1). In all locations, CPOC was the most abundant fraction in biomass, followed by FPOC and DOC. Rainfall and soil fertility influenced the distribution of the C fraction (p = 0.01), showing differentiated particulate organic carbon (POC) storage and DOC transportation along the basin. Furthermore, the results revealed that carbon quantification at the basin level could be underestimated, ultimately influencing the global carbon calculations for the region. This is especially due to the fact that the majority of studies consider only fine particulate organic matter and dissolved organic matter, which represent less than 50 % of the stored and transported carbon in streambeds.

  5. The size distribution of organic carbon in headwater streams in the Amazon basin.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Joana D'Arc; Luizão, Flávio Jesus; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez

    2016-06-01

    Despite the strong representativeness of streams in the Amazon basin, their role in the accumulation of coarse particulate organic carbon (CPOC), fine particulate organic carbon (FPOC), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in transport, an important energy source in these environments, is poorly known. It is known that the arboreal vegetation in the Amazon basin is influenced by soil fertility and rainfall gradients, but would these gradients promote local differences in organic matter in headwater streams? To answer this question, 14 low-order streams were selected within these gradients along the Amazon basin, with extensions that varied between 4 and 8 km. The efficiency of the transformation of particulate into dissolved carbon fractions was assessed for each stream. The mean monthly benthic organic matter storage ranged between 1.58 and 9.40 t ha(-1) month(-1). In all locations, CPOC was the most abundant fraction in biomass, followed by FPOC and DOC. Rainfall and soil fertility influenced the distribution of the C fraction (p = 0.01), showing differentiated particulate organic carbon (POC) storage and DOC transportation along the basin. Furthermore, the results revealed that carbon quantification at the basin level could be underestimated, ultimately influencing the global carbon calculations for the region. This is especially due to the fact that the majority of studies consider only fine particulate organic matter and dissolved organic matter, which represent less than 50 % of the stored and transported carbon in streambeds. PMID:26762938

  6. Towards Mapping the Provision of Ecosystem Services from Headwater Wetlands in the Susquehanna River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater wetlands provide a range of ecosystem services including habitat provisioning and flood retention. Following the River Ecosystem Synthesis framework we identified and assessed not only headwater wetlands, but unconstrained reaches with the potential to support diverse s...

  7. Assessment of climate change impacts on streamflow dynamics in the headwaters of the Amazon River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Y.; Beighley, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Amazon River basin is the largest watershed in the world containing thousands of tributaries. Although the mainstream and its larger tributaries have been the focus on much research, there has been few studies focused on the hydrodynamics of smaller rivers in the foothills of the Andes Mountains. These smaller rivers are of particular importance for the fishery industry because fish migrate up these headwater rivers to spawn. During the rainy season, fish wait for storm event to increase water depths to a sufficient level for their passage. Understanding how streamflow dynamics will change in response to future conditions is vital for the sustainable management of the fishery industry. In this paper, we focus on improving the accuracy of river discharge estimates on relatively small-scale sub-catchments (100 ~ 40,000 km2) in the headwaters of the Amazon River basin. The Hillslope River Routing (HRR) hydrologic model and remotely sensed datasets are used. We provide annual runoff, seasonal patterns, and daily discharge characteristics for 81 known migration reaches. The model is calibrated for the period 2000-2014 and climate forecasts for the period 2070-2100 are used to assess future changes in streamflow dynamics. The forecasts for the 2070 to 2100 period were obtained by selecting 5 climate models from IPCC's Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) based on their ability to represent the main aspects of recent (1970 to 2000) Amazon climate. The river network for the HRR model is developing using surface topography based on the SRTM digital elevation model. Key model forcings include precipitation (TRMM 3B42) and evapotranspiration (MODIS ET, MOD16). Model parameters for soil depth, hydraulic conductivity, runoff coefficients and lateral routing were initially approximated based on literature values and adjusted during calibration. Measurements from stream gauges located near the reaches of interest were used for

  8. Impact of Placer Mining on Sediment Transport in Headwaters of the Lake Baikal Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietron, J.; Jarsjo, J.; Chalov, S.

    2015-12-01

    Adverse practices in alluvial surface mining (placer mining) can lead to shifts in sediment transport regimes of rivers. However, some placer mines are located in remote parts of river basins, which constrain data availability in mining impact assessments. One such mining area is the Zaamar Goldfield (Northern Mongolia) which stretches 60 km along the Tuul River. The area is located in the headwaters of the Lake Baikal Basin, and may impact the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Lake Baikal. Previous studies indicate that the mining industry in the Zaamar Goldfield loads the river system with considerable amount of contaminated sediments (heavy metals). Still, transport processes and possible changes in local to regional sediment transport need to be better understood. In this work, we use snapshot field measurements and various flow and transport modelling techniques to analyze (1) the impact of placer mining in the sediment delivery to the river system and (2) the dynamics of further sediment transport to downstream Tuul River. Our results indicate that surface mining operations and waste management have considerable impact on the sediment input from the landscape. Furthermore, dynamic in-channel storage of sediments can act as intermittent sources of mining sediments. These effects occur in addition to impacts of on-going changes in hydro-climatic conditions of the area. We hope that our methodology and results will aid in studying similar unmonitored and mining-affected river basins.

  9. Hydrological response to forest disturbance under a changing climate in experimental headwater basins, Central Sumava Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ye; Gao, Hongkai; Langhammer, Jakub; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2014-05-01

    In forested basins, forest disturbance and climatic variability are commonly recognized as two major drivers of hydrological regimes changes. Vydra's mountainous headwater basin in the Czech Republic, which is selected as study area, has undergone simultaneously an increase in temperature and extensive forest disturbance mainly resulting from bark beetle outbreak. The study area consists of 8 small experimental sub-basins of size around 3-5 km2. Water stages have been monitored in 10-min interval since 2005. Data on precipitation, air temperature, radiation, air humidity, wind speed and direction exist at 10-minute interval, in 4 stations since 2009. Different sub-basins are covered by different types of physiographic conditions, land cover and varying intensity and nature of forest disturbance. A paired basin methodology was used to study the effect of land cover change on the runoff regime. In the studied basins, the cumulative effects of the changing climate and the extensive forest decay are reflected in the observed discharge data in terms of the seasonal shift in peak flow and low flow magnitude, frequency, and duration by statistical methods. From the basin comparison, we could identify which factors determine the differences in hydrological regimes adjustment. Two main conclusions can be drawn: 1) forest disturbance largely changes the interception and transpiration, and 2) paired basins method is able to trade time for space in understanding the process of forest degradation and regeneration, especially in the growing season. In winter the hydrological regime shifts were mainly driven by climate variability. Subsequently, we used this knowledge in hydrological models and tested our hypothesis by stepwise modelling. We assume that the topography and land cover have great influence on the hydrological regime under different climate conditions. Thus, we test the split-sample validation as well as model transferability within the framework of the FLEX

  10. Alternative sources of large seasonal ground-water supplies in the headwaters of the Susquehanna River basin, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randall, A.D.; Snavely, D.S.; Holecek, T.P.; Waller, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The northern divide of the Susquehanna River basin crosses 29 broad valleys that contain thick glacial deposits but are drained only by small headwater streams. Much groundwater could be withdrawn from sand and gravel deposits in these valleys with little immediate effect on streamflow. A digital model of the headwater reach of one typical valley suggests that pumping 10.8 million gal/day for 2 months every summer would lower the water table as much as 33 ft, cause the upper 1,900 ft of the stream draining the valley to go dry, and reduce streamflow downvalley by 1.2 million gal/day by the time pumping ceased. Saturated thickness of surficial sand and gravel exceeds 40 ft in about half the headwater valley reaches; the valley floor areas range from 0.2 to 9 sq mi. Seepage losses from small streams that carry runoff from adjacent till-covered uplands are a major source of recharge to aquifers in these valleys under natural conditions and would increase if the water table were lowered by seasonal withdrawals. Some aquifers beneath extensive clay layers in these and other valleys of the Susquehanna River basin may be partially independent of streams but not easily evaluated. (USGS)

  11. Pareiorhaphis vetula, a new armored catfish from the headwaters of the Rio Doce basin, Brazil (Siluriformes: Loricariidae).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Edson H L; Lehmann, Pablo A; Reis, Roberto E

    2016-07-28

    A new species of Pareiorhaphis is described from the upper Rio Doce basin. The description is based on a series of specimens recently collected in small headwater tributaries to the Rio Guanhães, a tributary of the Rio Santo Antonio, left bank of the Rio Doce in Minas Gerais State, eastern Brazil. Pareiorhaphis vetula, new species, is a small loricariid catfish with dark brown spots irregularly scattered over a brown background on the dorsal surface of body and along flanks. The new species differs from all other Pareiorhaphis species by having the maxillary barbel completely adnate to the lower lip and by adult males possessing a particularly elongate, sharply pointed, conical urogenital papilla. In addition, Pareiorhaphis vetula is further distinguished from most congeners by having a shorter pelvic-fin spine, or by possessing more numerous premaxillary teeth, and by lacking a dorsal-fin spinelet. A comparison with congeners P. nasuta, P. scutula and P. proskynita, which also occur in headwater streams of the Rio Doce basin is also presented.

  12. Pareiorhaphis vetula, a new armored catfish from the headwaters of the Rio Doce basin, Brazil (Siluriformes: Loricariidae).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Edson H L; Lehmann, Pablo A; Reis, Roberto E

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Pareiorhaphis is described from the upper Rio Doce basin. The description is based on a series of specimens recently collected in small headwater tributaries to the Rio Guanhães, a tributary of the Rio Santo Antonio, left bank of the Rio Doce in Minas Gerais State, eastern Brazil. Pareiorhaphis vetula, new species, is a small loricariid catfish with dark brown spots irregularly scattered over a brown background on the dorsal surface of body and along flanks. The new species differs from all other Pareiorhaphis species by having the maxillary barbel completely adnate to the lower lip and by adult males possessing a particularly elongate, sharply pointed, conical urogenital papilla. In addition, Pareiorhaphis vetula is further distinguished from most congeners by having a shorter pelvic-fin spine, or by possessing more numerous premaxillary teeth, and by lacking a dorsal-fin spinelet. A comparison with congeners P. nasuta, P. scutula and P. proskynita, which also occur in headwater streams of the Rio Doce basin is also presented. PMID:27470867

  13. Headwater locations of U.S. streams tributary to St. Lawrence River basin between western Ohio and eastern New York, excluding Lake Champlain basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eissler, Benjamin B.

    1979-01-01

    The headwater locations of several thousand U.S. streams tributary to Lakes Ontario and Erie and the St. Lawrence and Niagara Rivers, from the Maumee River in Ohio to the western border of the Lake Champlain basin in New York, including parts of Pennsylvania, are listed by quadrangle. The location of the headwater of each is given with reference to cultural and topographic features. ' Headwater ' in this report is defined as the first site downstream from which the average streamflow is 5 cubic feet per second. The site locations were determined from drainage areas as indicated on topographic maps. The size of the drainage area required to produce an average flow of 5 cubic feet per second was determined from equations, developed separately for each State by regression techniques, that define the relation between streamflow and hydrologic factors of the region. Drainage area and precipitation were factors in the equations for all three States: forest cover was found to be significant in Ohio. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Assessment of climate impacts on hydrology and geomorphology of semiarid headwater basins using a physically-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francipane, A.; Fatichi, S.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Noto, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    The response of watershed erosion rates to changes in climate is expected to be highly non-linear and thus demands for mechanistic approaches to improve our understanding of the underlying causes. In this study, the integrated geomorphic component tRIBS-Erosion of the physically-based, spatially distributed hydrological model, tRIBS, the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator, is used to analyze the sensitivity of small semi-arid headwater basins to projected climate conditions. Observed historic climate and downscaled realizations of general circulation models from CMIP3 inform the stochastic weather generator AWE-GEN (Advanced WEather GENerator), which is used to produce two climate ensembles representative of the past historic and future climate conditions for the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) area in the Southwest U.S. The former ensemble incorporates the stochastic variability of the observed climate, while the latter includes the stochastic variability and the uncertainty of CMIP3 multi-model climate change projections. The climate ensembles are used as forcing input to the hydrogeomorphic model that is applied to seven headwater basins of WGEW. The basin response in terms of runoff and sediment yield for climate ensembles representative of the historic past and future is simulated and probabilistic inferences on future changes in catchment runoff and sediment transport are drawn. The application of the model to multiple catchments also identifies the scaling relationship between specific sediment yield/runoff and drainage basin area. The study reveals that geomorphic differences among catchments influence the variability of sediment yield, as affected by possible future climates, much more as compared to runoff, which is instead strongly dominated by the climate forcing. Despite a large uncertainty inherent to climate change projections and imposed by the stochastic climate variability, the basin sediment yield is predicted to decrease

  15. Spatial and temporal patterns of stream burial and its effect on habitat connectivity across headwater stream communities of the Potomac River Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzell, R.; Guinn, S. M.; Elmore, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The process of directing streams into culverts, pipes, or concrete-lined ditches during urbanization, known as stream burial, alters the primary physical, chemical, and biological processes of streams. Knowledge of the cumulative impacts of reduced structure and ecological function within buried stream networks is crucial for informing management of stream ecosystems, in light of continued growth in urban areas, and the uncertain response of freshwater ecosystems to the stresses of global climate change. To address this need, we utilized recently improved stream maps for the Potomac River Basin (PRB) to describe the extent and severity of stream burial across the basin. Observations of stream burial made from high resolution aerial photographs (>1% of total basin area) and a decision tree using spatial statistics from impervious cover data were used to predict stream burial at 4 time-steps (1975, 1990, 2001, 2006). Of the roughly 95,500 kilometers (km) of stream in the PRB, approximately 4551 km (4.76%) were buried by urban development as of 2001. Analysis of county-level burial trends shows differential patterns in the timing and rates of headwater stream burial, which may be due to local development policies, topographical constraints, and/or time since development. Consistently higher rates of stream burial were observed for small streams, decreasing with stream order. Headwater streams (1st-2nd order) are disproportionately affected, with burial rates continuing to increase over time in relation to larger stream orders. Beyond simple habitat loss, headwater burial decreases connectivity among headwater populations and habitats, with potential to affect a wide range of important ecological processes. To quantify changes to regional headwater connectivity we applied a connectivity model based on electrical circuit theory. Circuit-theoretical models function by treating the landscape as a resistance surface, representing hypothesized relationships between

  16. Hydrological Impacts of Land Use Change and Climate Variability in the Headwater Region of the Heihe River Basin, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Nan, Zhuotong; Xu, Yi; Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Land use change and climate variability are two key factors impacting watershed hydrology, which is strongly related to the availability of water resources and the sustainability of local ecosystems. This study assessed separate and combined hydrological impacts of land use change and climate variability in the headwater region of a typical arid inland river basin, known as the Heihe River Basin, northwest China, in the recent past (1995-2014) and near future (2015-2024), by combining two land use models (i.e., Markov chain model and Dyna-CLUE) with a hydrological model (i.e., SWAT). The potential impacts in the near future were explored using projected land use patterns and hypothetical climate scenarios established on the basis of analyzing long-term climatic observations. Land use changes in the recent past are dominated by the expansion of grassland and a decrease in farmland; meanwhile the climate develops with a wetting and warming trend. Land use changes in this period induce slight reductions in surface runoff, groundwater discharge and streamflow whereas climate changes produce pronounced increases in them. The joint hydrological impacts are similar to those solely induced by climate changes. Spatially, both the effects of land use change and climate variability vary with the sub-basin. The influences of land use changes are more identifiable in some sub-basins, compared with the basin-wide impacts. In the near future, climate changes tend to affect the hydrological regimes much more prominently than land use changes, leading to significant increases in all hydrological components. Nevertheless, the role of land use change should not be overlooked, especially if the climate becomes drier in the future, as in this case it may magnify the hydrological responses. PMID:27348224

  17. Hydrological Impacts of Land Use Change and Climate Variability in the Headwater Region of the Heihe River Basin, Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Nan, Zhuotong; Xu, Yi; Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Land use change and climate variability are two key factors impacting watershed hydrology, which is strongly related to the availability of water resources and the sustainability of local ecosystems. This study assessed separate and combined hydrological impacts of land use change and climate variability in the headwater region of a typical arid inland river basin, known as the Heihe River Basin, northwest China, in the recent past (1995–2014) and near future (2015–2024), by combining two land use models (i.e., Markov chain model and Dyna-CLUE) with a hydrological model (i.e., SWAT). The potential impacts in the near future were explored using projected land use patterns and hypothetical climate scenarios established on the basis of analyzing long-term climatic observations. Land use changes in the recent past are dominated by the expansion of grassland and a decrease in farmland; meanwhile the climate develops with a wetting and warming trend. Land use changes in this period induce slight reductions in surface runoff, groundwater discharge and streamflow whereas climate changes produce pronounced increases in them. The joint hydrological impacts are similar to those solely induced by climate changes. Spatially, both the effects of land use change and climate variability vary with the sub-basin. The influences of land use changes are more identifiable in some sub-basins, compared with the basin-wide impacts. In the near future, climate changes tend to affect the hydrological regimes much more prominently than land use changes, leading to significant increases in all hydrological components. Nevertheless, the role of land use change should not be overlooked, especially if the climate becomes drier in the future, as in this case it may magnify the hydrological responses. PMID:27348224

  18. Hydrological Impacts of Land Use Change and Climate Variability in the Headwater Region of the Heihe River Basin, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Nan, Zhuotong; Xu, Yi; Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Land use change and climate variability are two key factors impacting watershed hydrology, which is strongly related to the availability of water resources and the sustainability of local ecosystems. This study assessed separate and combined hydrological impacts of land use change and climate variability in the headwater region of a typical arid inland river basin, known as the Heihe River Basin, northwest China, in the recent past (1995-2014) and near future (2015-2024), by combining two land use models (i.e., Markov chain model and Dyna-CLUE) with a hydrological model (i.e., SWAT). The potential impacts in the near future were explored using projected land use patterns and hypothetical climate scenarios established on the basis of analyzing long-term climatic observations. Land use changes in the recent past are dominated by the expansion of grassland and a decrease in farmland; meanwhile the climate develops with a wetting and warming trend. Land use changes in this period induce slight reductions in surface runoff, groundwater discharge and streamflow whereas climate changes produce pronounced increases in them. The joint hydrological impacts are similar to those solely induced by climate changes. Spatially, both the effects of land use change and climate variability vary with the sub-basin. The influences of land use changes are more identifiable in some sub-basins, compared with the basin-wide impacts. In the near future, climate changes tend to affect the hydrological regimes much more prominently than land use changes, leading to significant increases in all hydrological components. Nevertheless, the role of land use change should not be overlooked, especially if the climate becomes drier in the future, as in this case it may magnify the hydrological responses.

  19. Stochastic assessment of climate impacts on hydrology and geomorphology of semiarid headwater basins using a physically based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francipane, A.; Fatichi, S.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Noto, L. V.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrologic and geomorphic responses of watersheds to changes in climate are difficult to assess due to projection uncertainties and nonlinearity of the processes that are involved. Yet such assessments are increasingly needed and call for mechanistic approaches within a probabilistic framework. This study employs an integrated hydrology-geomorphology model, the Triangulated Irregular Network-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS)-Erosion, to analyze runoff and erosion sensitivity of seven semiarid headwater basins to projected climate conditions. The Advanced Weather Generator is used to produce two climate ensembles representative of the historic and future climate conditions for the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed located in the southwest U.S. The former ensemble incorporates the stochastic variability of the observed climate, while the latter includes the stochastic variability and the uncertainty of multimodel climate change projections. The ensembles are used as forcing for tRIBS-Erosion that simulates runoff and sediment basin responses leading to probabilistic inferences of future changes. The results show that annual precipitation for the area is generally expected to decrease in the future, with lower hourly intensities and similar daily rates. The smaller hourly rainfall generally results in lower mean annual runoff. However, a non-negligible probability of runoff increase in the future is identified, resulting from stochastic combinations of years with low and high runoff. On average, the magnitudes of mean and extreme events of sediment yield are expected to decrease with a very high probability. Importantly, the projected variability of annual sediment transport for the future conditions is comparable to that for the historic conditions, despite the fact that the former account for a much wider range of possible climate "alternatives." This result demonstrates that the historic natural climate variability of sediment yield is already so

  20. Daily anomalous high flow (DAHF) of a headwater catchment over the East River basin in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ji; Niu, Jun; Sivakumar, Bellie

    2014-11-01

    This study develops a new method for analyzing the terrestrial hydrologic responses to precipitation through using level-based daily anomalous high flow (DAHF) occurrence in a catchment. The objectives of this study are twofold: (1) to explore the DAHF features over a headwater catchment; and (2) to evaluate the performance of a hydrologic model for DAHF simulation. In this study, DAHF is defined as the daily streamflow on a given day, whose deseasonalised daily streamflow is larger than a given multiplier of the standard deviation (STD) of the long-term deseasonalised streamflow series. Streamflow observations of a headwater catchment over the period of 1952-1972 (i.e., before reservoir operation) at the Longchuan station in the East River basin in South China are studied. The macro-scale Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model is used for streamflow simulation in the catchment, and wavelet analysis is performed to explore the DAHF variability. The study reveals that the percentages of the number of days with the first and second levels of DAHFs are 4.2% and 1%, respectively, for the observed streamflows, while the corresponding percentages for the VIC model-simulated streamflow are 5% and 1.3%, respectively. Application of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test indicates that these two levels of DAHFs can be described by two probability distribution functions, namely the Lognormal distribution and Generalized Extreme Value Type II distribution, respectively. The variability spectrum of the first level DAHF is basically consistent with that of antecedent precipitation, but not for the second level DAHF, as revealed by the wavelet analysis. The VIC model has better performance on the variability simulation of the first level of DAHF.

  1. Significance of trends toward earlier snowmelt runoff, Columbia and Missouri Basin headwaters, western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Johnnie N.; Harper, Joel T.; Greenwood, Mark C.

    2007-08-01

    We assess changes in runoff timing over the last 55 years at 21 gages unaffected by human influences, in the headwaters of the Columbia-Missouri Rivers. Linear regression models and tests for significance that control for ``false discoveries'' of many tests, combined with a conceptual runoff response model, were used to examine the detailed structure of spring runoff timing. We conclude that only about one third of the gages exhibit significant trends with time but over half of the gages tested show significant relationships with discharge. Therefore, runoff timing is more significantly correlated with annual discharge than with time. This result differs from previous studies of runoff in the western USA that equate linear time trends to a response to global warming. Our results imply that predicting future snowmelt runoff in the northern Rockies will require linking climate mechanisms controlling precipitation, rather than projecting response to simple linear increases in temperature.

  2. Relationship Between Storm Hydrograph Components and Subsurface Flow Processes in a Hilly Headwater Basin, Toyota, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimura, M.; Asai, K.; Takei, R.

    2001-05-01

    Temporal and spatial distribution of tracer elements and subsurface flow processes were investigated to study relationship between storm hydrograph components and behavior of subsurface water in a headwater catchment of Toyota Hill, Aichi prefecture, central Japan. The catchment has an area of 0.857 ha with an altitude of 60 to 100 m, and is underlain by granite. The soil depth revealed by sounding test ranges from 0.5 to 4.0 m. Rain, stream, soil and ground waters were sampled once in a week, and the stream water was sampled at 5 to 60 minute intervals during rainstorms. The pressure head of subsurface water was monitored using tensiometers and piezometers nests, and the stream flow was monitored using V-notch weir. The stable isotopic ratios of deuterium and oxygen 18 and inorganic ion concentrations were determined on all water samples. The oxygen 18 isotopic ratio in stream water decreased with rainfall during the rainstorms. The ratio of event water component to the total runoff water at the peak discharge ranged from 16 to 92 %, and the event water ratio correlated with the peak discharge rate and rainfall intensity. The tesiometric data showed that the shallow subsurface water with low isotopic ratios at the lower slope discharged directly to the stream during the heavy rainstorms. The shallow subsurface flow at the lower slope and overland flow on the raiparian zone contributed much to the stream water chemistry during heavy rainstorms.

  3. The Quantification and Identification of Land Use Change Impacts to Hydrology in Brazil from Headwater to Large Basin Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. C.; Lopes, A. V.; Cohn, A.; Thompson, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid agricultural expansion and intensification has characterized the land use/cover change (LUCC) dynamics of a large region spanning the southern rainforest and savanna biomes of Brazil. Despite a plethora of modeling analyses and small-scale investigations, the cumulative effects of this transformation on hydrological processes at multiple scales remain unclear. Yet quantifying the links between LUCC and hydrological response is essential to support evidence-based sustainable development of industry, society, and environment, particularly in this region, which includes the headwaters of Brazil's major rivers, the climatically-crucial Amazon transition region, and Brazil's agricultural breadbasket. Empirical analyses that can inform land use policy in this region and are sensitive to climate, agriculture and hydrological outcomes are critically needed. This study leverages the increased availability of remotely-sensed data products and a spatially dispersed gauging network to investigate the effects of a decade of LUCC on streamflow in over 150 river basins. Using a collection of statistical techniques to identify causal relationships and isolate LUCC effects from confounding variables such as climate, we quantify the sensitivity of hydrological dynamics to LUCC from small watersheds to regional scales.

  4. Influences of fragmentation on three species of native warmwater fishes in a Colorado River Basin headwater stream system, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Compton, R.I.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.; Quist, M.C.; Bower, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of constructed instream structures on movements and demographics of bluehead suckers Catostomus discobolus, flannelmouth suckers C. latipinnis, and roundtail chub Gila robusta in the upstream portion of Muddy Creek, an isolated headwater stream system in the upper Colorado River basin of Wyoming. Our objectives were to (1) evaluate upstream and downstream movements of these three native species past a small dam built to divert irrigation water from the stream and a barrier constructed to prevent upstream movements of nonnative salmonids and (2) describe population characteristics in stream segments created by these structures. Our results indicated that upstream and downstream movements of the three target fishes were common. Fish of all three species moved frequently downstream over both structures, displayed some upstream movements over the irrigation diversion dam, and did not move upstream over the fish barrier. Spawning migrations by some fish into an intermittent tributary, which was not separated from Muddy Creek by a barrier, were observed for all three species. Both the irrigation diversion dam and the fish barrier contributed to fragmentation of the native fish populations, and considerable differences in population features were observed among segments. The instream structures may eventually cause extirpation of some native species in one or more of the segments created by the structures. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  5. Land use effects on quality and quantity aspects of water resources in headwater areas of the Jaguari River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, R. D. O.; Camargo, P. B. D.; Piccolo, M. C.; Zuccari, M. L.; Ferracini, V. L.; Cruz, P. P. N. D.; Green, T. R.; Costa, C. F. G. D.; Reis, L. D. C.

    2015-12-01

    In the context of the recent drought conditions in southeastern Brazil, EMBRAPA (Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation) in partnership with two Brazilian universities (USP/CENA and UNIFAL) planned a research project, called BaCaJa, to understand the hydrobiogeochemistry processes that occur in small catchments (<1,000 ha) at the upper portions of the Jaguari River Basin situated on both states of Sao Paulo and Minas Gerais. The approach of this study is based on the fact that the evaluation of stream water quality and quantity is an efficient tool to characterize the sustainability of the agriculture production at a catchment level. Its goal is, therefore, to survey the land use effects on the hydrobiogeochemistry in headwaters areas of the Jaguari River Basin to support sustainable management of water resources in this region. Sampling stations were established on rivers and streams ranging from one to five order channels as well as selected small catchments to conduct studies on overland flow, soil solution, soil quality, aquatic biota and pesticide dynamic. The research team is huge and their goals are specific, diverse and complementary, being summed up as: characterize land use, topography and soils; evaluate erosive potential in agriculture areas; measure soil carbon and nitrogen contents; characterize hydrogeochemistry fluxes; apply hydrological modeling and simulate different land use and management scenarios; monitor possible pesticides contamination; and survey macro invertebrates as indicators of water quality. Based on a synthesis of the results, the project team intends to point out the environmental impacts and contribute recommendations of management for the focused region to conserve water resources in terms of quality and quantity.

  6. Effects of groundwater levels and headwater wetlands on streamflow in the Charlie Creek basin, Peace River watershed, west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, T.M.; Sacks, L.A.; Hughes, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    The Charlie Creek basin was studied from April 2004 to December 2005 to better understand how groundwater levels in the underlying aquifers and storage and overflow of water from headwater wetlands preserve the streamflows exiting this least-developed tributary basin of the Peace River watershed. The hydrogeologic framework, physical characteristics, and streamflow were described and quantified for five subbasins of the 330-square mile Charlie Creek basin, allowing the contribution of its headwaters area and tributary subbasins to be separately quantified. A MIKE SHE model simulation of the integrated surface-water and groundwater flow processes in the basin was used to simulate daily streamflow observed over 21 months in 2004 and 2005 at five streamflow stations, and to quantify the monthly and annual water budgets for the five subbasins including the changing amount of water stored in wetlands. Groundwater heads were mapped in Zone 2 of the intermediate aquifer system and in the Upper Floridan aquifer, and were used to interpret the location of artesian head conditions in the Charlie Creek basin and its relation to streamflow. Artesian conditions in the intermediate aquifer system induce upward groundwater flow into the surficial aquifer and help sustain base flow which supplies about two-thirds of the streamflow from the Charlie Creek basin. Seepage measurements confirmed seepage inflow to Charlie Creek during the study period. The upper half of the basin, comprised largely of the Upper Charlie Creek subbasin, has lower runoff potential than the lower basin, more storage of runoff in wetlands, and periodically generates no streamflow. Artesian head conditions in the intermediate aquifer system were widespread in the upper half of the Charlie Creek basin, preventing downward leakage from expansive areas of wetlands and enabling them to act as headwaters to Charlie Creek once their storage requirements were met. Currently, the dynamic balance between wetland

  7. Using a physically-based model, tRIBS-Erosion, for investigating the effects of climate change in semi-arid headwater basins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francipane, Antonio; Fatichi, Simone; Ivanov, Valeriy Y.; Noto, Leonardo V.

    2013-04-01

    Soil erosion due to rainfall detachment and flow entrainment of soil particles is a physical process responsible for a continuous evolution of landscapes. The rate and spatial distribution of this phenomenon depend on several factors such as climate, hydrologic regime, geomorphic characteristics, and vegetation of a basin. Many studies have demonstrated that climate-erosion linkage in particular influences basin sediment yield and landscape morphology. Although soil erosion rates are expected to change in response to climate, these changes can be highly non-linear and thus require mechanistic understanding of underlying causes. In this study, an integrated geomorphic component of the physically-based, spatially distributed hydrological model, tRIBS, the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator, is used to analyze the sensitivity of semi-arid headwater basins to climate change. Downscaled outputs of global circulation models are used to inform a stochastic weather generator that produces an ensemble of climate scenarios for an area in the Southwest U.S. The ensemble is used as input to the integrated model that is applied to different headwater basins of the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed to understand basin response to climate change in terms of runoff and sediment yield. Through a model application to multiple catchments, a scaling relationship between specific sediment yield and drainage basin area is also addressed and probabilistic inferences on future changes in catchment runoff and yield are drawn. Geomorphological differences among catchments do not influence specific changes in runoff and sediment transport that are mostly determined by precipitation changes. Despite a large uncertainty dictated by climate change projections and stochastic variability, sediment transport is predicted to decrease despite a non-negligible possibility of larger runoff rates.

  8. Sediment delivery ratio of single flood events and the influencing factors in a headwater basin of the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Mingguo; Liao, Yishan; He, Jijun

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the sediment delivery of single flood events although it has been well known that the sediment delivery ratio at the inter-annual time scale is close to 1 in the Chinese Loess Plateau. This study examined the sediment delivery of single flood events and the influencing factors in a headwater basin of the Loess Plateau, where hyperconcentrated flows are dominant. Data observed from plot to subwatershed over the period from 1959 to 1969 were presented. Sediment delivery ratio of a single event (SDRe) was calculated as the ratio of sediment output from the subwatershed to sediment input into the channel. It was found that SDRe varies greatly for small events (runoff depth <5 mm or rainfall depth <30 mm) and remains fairly constant (approximately between 1.1 and 1.3) for large events (runoff depth >5 mm or rainfall depth >30 mm). We examined 11 factors of rainfall (rainfall amount, rainfall intensity, rainfall kinetic energy, rainfall erosivity and rainfall duration), flood (area-specific sediment yield, runoff depth, peak flow discharge, peak sediment concentration and flood duration) and antecedent land surface (antecedent precipitation) in relation to SDRe. Only the peak sediment concentration significantly correlates with SDRe. Contrary to popular belief, channel scour tends to occur in cases of higher peak sediment concentrations. Because small events also have chances to attain a high sediment concentration, many small events (rainfall depth <20 mm) are characterized by channel scour with an SDRe larger than 1. Such observations can be related to hyperconcentrated flows, which behave quite differently from normal stream flows. Our finding that large events have a nearly constant SDRe is useful for sediment yield predictions in the Loess Plateau and other regions where hyperconcentrated flows are well developed.

  9. Long-term trends in stream water and precipitation chemistry at five headwater basins in the northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Mast, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Stream water data from five headwater basins in the northeastern United States covering water years 1968-1996 and precipitation data from eight nearby precipitation monitoring sites covering water years 1984-1996 were analyzed for temporal trends in chemistry using the nonparametric seasonal Kendall test. Concentrations of SO4 declined at three of five streams during 1968,1996 (p < 0.1), and all of the streams exhibited downward trends in SO4 over the second half of the period (1984-1996). Concentrations of SO4 in precipitation declined at seven of eight sites from 1984 to 1996, and the magnitudes of the declines (-0.7 to -2.0 ??eq L-1 yr-1) generally were similar to those of stream water SO4. These results indicate that changes in precipitation SO4 were of sufficient magnitude to account for changes in stream water SO4. Concentrations of Ca + Mg declined at three of five streams and five of eight precipitation sites from 1984 to 1996. Precipitation acidity decreased at five of eight sites during the same period, but alkalinity increased in only one stream. In most cases the decreases in stream water SO4 were similar in magnitude to declines in stream water Ca + Mg, which is consistent with the theory of leaching by mobile acid anions in soils. In precipitation the magnitudes of SO4 declines were similar to those of hydrogen, and declines in Ca + Mg were much smaller. This indicates that recent decreases in SO4 deposition are now being reflected in reduced precipitation acidity. The lack of widespread increases in stream water alkalinity, despite the prevalence of downward trends in Stream water SO4, suggests that at most sites, increases in stream water pH and acid-neutralizing capacity may be delayed until higher soil base-saturation levels are achieved.

  10. Hydrologic analysis of two headwater lake basins of differing lake pH in the west-central Adirondack Mountains of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdoch, Peter S.; Peters, N.E.; Newton, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrologic analysis of two headwater lake basins in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, during 1980-81 indicates that the degree of neutralization of acid precipitation is controlled by the groundwater contribution to the lake. According to flow-duration analyses, daily mean outflow/unit area from the neutral lake (Panther Lake, pH 5-7) was more sustained and contained a higher percentage of groundwater than that of the acidic lake (Woods Lake, pH 4-5). Outflow recession rates and maximum base-flow rates, derived from individual recession curves, were 3.9 times and 1.5 times greater, respectively, in the neutral-lake basin than in the acidic-lake basin. Groundwater contribution to lake outflow was also calculated from a lake-water budget; the groundwater contribution to the neutral lake was about 10 times greater than that to the acidic lake. Thick sandy till forms the groundwater reservoir and the major recharge area in both basins but covers 8.5 times more area in the neutral-lake basin than in the acidic-lake basin. More groundwater storage within the neutral basin provides longer contact time with neutralizing minerals and more groundwater discharge. As a result, the neutral lake has relatively high pH and alkalinity, and more net cation transport. (USGS)

  11. Quantification of surface water and groundwater flows to open- and closed-basin lakes in a headwaters watershed using a descriptive oxygen stable isotope model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, Edward G.; Winter, T. C.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Striegl, Rob

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of hydrologic fluxes in lakes is important to resource management and for placing hydrologic solute flux in an appropriate biogeochemical context. Water stable isotopes can be used to describe water movements, but they are typically only effective in lakes with long water residence times. We developed a descriptive time series model of lake surface water oxygen-18 stable isotope signature (δL) that was equally useful in open- and closed-basin lakes with very different hydrologic residence times. The model was applied to six lakes, including two closed-basin lakes and four lakes arranged in a chain connected by a river, located in a headwaters watershed. Groundwater discharge was calculated by manual optimization, and other hydrologic flows were constrained by measured values including precipitation, evaporation, and streamflow at several stream gages. Modeled and observed δL were highly correlated in all lakes (r = 0.84–0.98), suggesting that the model adequately described δL in these lakes. Average modeled stream discharge at two points along the river, 16,000 and 11,800 m3 d−1, compares favorably with synoptic measurement of stream discharge at these sites, 17,600 and 13,700 m3 d−1, respectively. Water yields in this watershed were much higher, 0.23–0.45 m, than water yields calculated from gaged streamflow in regional rivers, approximately 0.10 m, suggesting that regional groundwater discharge supports water flux through these headwaters lakes. Sensitivity and robustness analyses also emphasized the importance of considering hydrologic residence time when designing a sampling protocol for stable isotope use in lake hydrology studies.

  12. Quantification of surface water and groundwater flows to open - and closed-basin lakes in a headwaters watershed using a descriptive oxygen stable isotope model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, E.G.; Winter, T.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Striegl, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate quantification of hydrologic fluxes in lakes is important to resource management and for placing hydrologic solute flux in an appropriate biogeochemical context. Water stable isotopes can be used to describe water movements, but they are typically only effective in lakes with long water residence times. We developed a descriptive time series model of lake surface water oxygen-18 stable isotope signature (??L) that was equally useful in open- and closed-basin lakes with very different hydrologic residence times. The model was applied to six lakes, including two closed-basin lakes and four lakes arranged in a chain connected by a river, located in a headwaters watershed. Groundwater discharge was calculated by manual optimization, and other hydrologic flows were constrained by measured values including precipitation, evaporation, and streamflow at several stream gages. Modeled and observed ??L were highly correlated in all lakes (r = 0.84-0.98), suggesting that the model adequately described ??L in these lakes. Average modeled stream discharge at two points along the river, 16,000 and 11,800 m3 d -1, compares favorably with synoptic measurement of stream discharge at these sites, 17,600 and 13,700 m3 d-1, respectively. Water yields in this watershed were much higher, 0.23-0.45 m, than water yields calculated from gaged streamflow in regional rivers, approximately 0.10 m, suggesting that regional groundwater discharge supports water flux through these headwaters lakes. Sensitivity and robustness analyses also emphasized the importance of considering hydrologic residence time when designing a sampling protocol for stable isotope use in lake hydrology studies. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Random versus fixed-site sampling when monitoring relative abundance of fishes in headwater streams of the upper Colorado River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, M.C.; Gerow, K.G.; Bower, M.R.; Hubert, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Native fishes of the upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) have declined in distribution and abundance due to habitat degradation and interactions with normative fishes. Consequently, monitoring populations of both native and nonnative fishes is important for conservation of native species. We used data collected from Muddy Creek, Wyoming (2003-2004), to compare sample size estimates using a random and a fixed-site sampling design to monitor changes in catch per unit effort (CPUE) of native bluehead suckers Catostomus discobolus, flannelmouth suckers C. latipinnis, roundtail chub Gila robusta, and speckled dace Rhinichthys osculus, as well as nonnative creek chub Semotilus atromaculatus and white suckers C. commersonii. When one-pass backpack electrofishing was used, detection of 10% or 25% changes in CPUE (fish/100 m) at 60% statistical power required 50-1,000 randomly sampled reaches among species regardless of sampling design. However, use of a fixed-site sampling design with 25-50 reaches greatly enhanced the ability to detect changes in CPUE. The addition of seining did not appreciably reduce required effort. When detection of 25-50% changes in CPUE of native and nonnative fishes is acceptable, we recommend establishment of 25-50 fixed reaches sampled by one-pass electrofishing in Muddy Creek. Because Muddy Creek has habitat and fish assemblages characteristic of other headwater streams in the UCRB, our results are likely to apply to many other streams in the basin. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  14. Two new species of Hyphessobrycon (Characiformes: Characidae) from the headwaters of the Tapajós and Xingu River basins, Pará, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, T F; Netto-Ferreira, A L; Birindelli, J L O; Sousa, L M

    2016-02-01

    Two new species of Hyphessobrycon are described from the headwaters of the Tapajós and Xingu River basins, Pará, Brazil. Both new species can be distinguished from congeners by the presence of a vertically elongate humeral blotch, a conspicuous round to vertically oblong caudal-peduncle blotch not extending onto the distal portions of the middle caudal-fin rays, a conspicuous blotch on the central portion of the third infraorbital immediately ventral to the eye, the lack of a conspicuous longitudinal stripe and the lack of sexual dimorphism in the extension of the caudal-peduncle blotch. Hyphessobrycon delimai n. sp. can be distinguished from Hyphessobrycon krenakore n. sp. by the extent of the caudal-peduncle blotch which extends across most of the caudal-peduncle depth (v. restricted to the middle portion of the caudal peduncle), the presence of dark chromatophores uniformly scattered along the length of the interradial membranes of the dorsal, anal and caudal fins (v. concentrated on the distal one-half or one-fourth of the interradial membranes) and the absence of small bony processes on the pelvic and anal fins of mature males (v. small bony processes present). PMID:26660534

  15. Occurrence and distribution of dissolved solids, selenium, and uranium in groundwater and surface water in the Arkansas River Basin from the headwaters to Coolidge, Kansas, 1970-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Lisa D.; Watts, Kenneth R.; Ortiz, Roderick F.; ,

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with City of Aurora, Colorado Springs Utilities, Colorado Water Conservation Board, Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District, Pueblo Board of Water Works, Southeastern Colorado Water Activity Enterprise, Southeastern Colorado Water Conservancy District, and Upper Arkansas Water Conservancy District began a retrospective evaluation to characterize the occurrence and distribution of dissolved-solids (DS), selenium, and uranium concentrations in groundwater and surface water in the Arkansas River Basin based on available water-quality data collected by several agencies. This report summarizes and characterizes available DS, dissolved-selenium, and dissolved-uranium concentrations in groundwater and surface water for 1970-2009 and describes DS, dissolved-selenium, and dissolved-uranium loads in surface water along the main-stem Arkansas River and selected tributary and diversion sites from the headwaters near Leadville, Colorado, to the USGS 07137500 Arkansas River near Coolidge, Kansas (Ark Coolidge), streamgage, a drainage area of 25,410 square miles. Dissolved-solids concentrations varied spatially in groundwater and surface water in the Arkansas River Basin. Dissolved-solids concentrations in groundwater from Quaternary alluvial, glacial drift, and wind-laid deposits (HSU 1) increased downgradient with median values of about 220 mg/L in the Upper Arkansas subbasin (Arkansas River Basin from the headwaters to Pueblo Reservoir) to about 3,400 mg/L in the Lower Arkansas subbasin (Arkansas River Basin from John Martin Reservoir to Ark Coolidge). Dissolved-solids concentrations in the Arkansas River also increased substantially in the downstream direction between the USGS 07086000 Arkansas River at Granite, Colorado (Ark Granite), and Ark Coolidge streamgages. Based on periodic data collected from 1976-2007, median DS concentrations in the Arkansas River ranged from about 64 mg/L at Ark Granite to about

  16. Multi-variable evaluation of hydrological model predictions for a headwater basin in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Ellis, C. R.; MacDonald, M. K.; DeBeer, C. M.; Brown, T.

    2013-04-01

    One of the purposes of the Cold Regions Hydrological Modelling platform (CRHM) is to diagnose inadequacies in the understanding of the hydrological cycle and its simulation. A physically based hydrological model including a full suite of snow and cold regions hydrology processes as well as warm season, hillslope and groundwater hydrology was developed in CRHM for application in the Marmot Creek Research Basin (~ 9.4 km2), located in the Front Ranges of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. Parameters were selected from digital elevation model, forest, soil, and geological maps, and from the results of many cold regions hydrology studies in the region and elsewhere. Non-calibrated simulations were conducted for six hydrological years during the period 2005-2011 and were compared with detailed field observations of several hydrological cycle components. The results showed good model performance for snow accumulation and snowmelt compared to the field observations for four seasons during the period 2007-2011, with a small bias and normalised root mean square difference (NRMSD) ranging from 40 to 42% for the subalpine conifer forests and from 31 to 67% for the alpine tundra and treeline larch forest environments. Overestimation or underestimation of the peak SWE ranged from 1.6 to 29%. Simulations matched well with the observed unfrozen moisture fluctuation in the top soil layer at a lodgepole pine site during the period 2006-2011, with a NRMSD ranging from 17 to 39%, but with consistent overestimation of 7 to 34%. Evaluations of seasonal streamflow during the period 2006-2011 revealed that the model generally predicted well compared to observations at the basin scale, with a NRMSD of 60% and small model bias (1%), while at the sub-basin scale NRMSDs were larger, ranging from 72 to 76%, though overestimation or underestimation for the cumulative seasonal discharge was within 29%. Timing of discharge was better predicted at the Marmot Creek basin outlet, having a Nash

  17. Multi-variable evaluation of hydrological model predictions for a headwater basin in the Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Ellis, C. R.; MacDonald, M. K.; DeBeer, C. M.; Brown, T.

    2012-11-01

    One of the purposes of the Cold Regions Hydrological Modelling platform (CRHM) is to diagnose inadequacies in the understanding of the hydrological cycle and its simulation. A physically based hydrological model including a full suite of snow and cold regions hydrology processes as well as warm season, hillslope and groundwater hydrology was developed in CRHM for application in the Marmot Creek Research Basin (~ 9.4km2), located in the Front Ranges of Canadian Rocky Mountains. Parameters were selected from digital elevation model, forest, soil and geological maps, and from the results of many cold regions hydrology studies in the region and elsewhere. Non-calibrated simulations were conducted for six hydrological years during 2005-2011 and were compared with detailed field observations of several hydrological cycle components. Results showed good model performance for snow accumulation and snowmelt compared to the field observations for four seasons during 2007-2011, with a small bias and normalized root mean square difference (NRMSD) ranging from 40 to 42% for the subalpine conifer forests and from 31 to 67% for the alpine tundra and tree-line larch forest environments. Overestimation or underestimation of the peak SWE ranged from 1.6 to 29%. Simulations matched well with the observed unfrozen moisture fluctuation in the top soil layer at a lodgepole pine site during 2006-2011, with a NRMSD ranging from 17% to 39%, but with consistent overestimation of 7 to 34%. Evaluations of seasonal streamflow during 2006-2011 revealed the model generally predicted well compared to observations at the basin scale, with a NRMSD of 77% and small model bias (6%), but at the sub-basin scale NRMSD were larger, ranging from 86 to 106%; though overestimation or underestimation for the cumulative seasonal discharge was within 24%. Timing of discharge was better predicted at the Marmot Creek basin outlet having a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) of 0.31 compared to the outlets of the sub-basins

  18. Precipitation and temperature variations affecting glacierised Himalayan headwaters and water resources in the upper Indus and Sutlej basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. N.; Eaton, D.; Entwistle, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    Both the main stem upper Indus and Sutlej rivers feed major reservoirs for hydropower plants and supply water for irrigated agriculture in the Punjab plains. Flows in both rivers have shown significant decreases since the mid-20th century. Monsoon precipitation, which dominates flow in lower Himalayan section of the Sutlej as the upper basin on the Tibetan plateau is fairly dry, has declined by about 30% since the 1950s maximum. Air temperatures decreased from the 1960s to 1980s before recovering in the early 2000s to previous levels. Any enhanced glacier melt in the late twentieth century failed to offset declining precipitation and river flow continued to fall. In the upper Indus basin, precipitation derived in winter from the westerlies was enhanced but temperatures remained flat at stations in valleys at which measurements were undertaken. Runoff from tributary basins of the Indus, which have variable percentages of ice-cover, appears to be subdued as precipitation gently increased. Temperature was more stable than in mountain basins farther east. Valley bottoms in the Karakoram are arid, so that precipitation on glaciers reduces flow but there is little seasonal slow to melt to contribute to runoff in the ice-free areas. Changes in glacierised area seem to have limited impact on flow in these two significant rivers. Precipitation in Himalayan sub-catchments dominates flow, but has contrasting effects on runoff downstream. Temporal variations in both winter and summer precipitation along the Himalayan arc therefore have strong influences on the sustainability of water resources in the adjacent plains.

  19. Measured and Modeled Rainfall-Runoff Responses as Predictive Tools for Construction of Flood Mitigation Wetlands in Headwaters of the Upper Susquehanna River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsinger, G. B.; Salvage, K. M.; Graney, J. R.; Hubbard, K. A.

    2004-05-01

    Flooding and associated streambank erosion are major concerns in numerous watersheds within the Upper Susquehanna River Basin (USRB). Construction of wetlands is one technique that has been proposed to help mitigate flooding within this basin. As a pre-cursor to construction, this study utilized hydrogeochemical and numerical methods to examine the behavior of 8 headwater catchments (total area 110.4 km2) feeding flood-prone Catatonk Creek in south-central NY. Sulphur Springs watershed is particularly susceptible to flooding and has been selected for initial creation and demonstration of ~0.1 km2 mitigation wetlands. Miller Creek, an adjacent watershed that contains several natural wetlands was studied for comparison. The objectives of this project were two-fold; 1) to compare event-based hydrogeochemical responses in these watersheds, and 2) to assimilate these data into a HEC-1 model to predict the flood mitigation capacity of constructed wetlands within Sulphur Springs. We anticipate that the detailed analysis of hydrologic response in these watersheds could provide insight applicable to other flood impacted catchments in the USRB. Hydrologic measurements and stream sampling have occurred since June 2003, with more intensive monitoring in Miller Creek (28.4 km2) and Sulphur Springs (22.7 km2) watersheds. Manual measurements of discharge were used to develop stage-discharge rating curves, which combined with automated stage measurements, yield continuous hydrographs at the outlet of each watershed. In addition, changes in discharge were monitored within sub-watersheds of Miller Creek and Sulphur Springs. Rainfall measurements from a network of 9 tipping bucket rain gauges indicate a small-scale orographic effect over the catchment headwaters. Most of the watersheds exhibit flashy responses to rainfall with relatively short lag times (<12 hrs) to peak discharge. In-stream YSI Sondes measured temperature, conductivity/TDS, and pH and indicated greater contribution

  20. El-Niño southern oscillation and rainfall erosivity in the headwater region of the Grande River Basin, Southeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mello, C. R.; Norton, L. D.; Curi, N.; Yanagi, S. N. M.; Silva, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Relationships between regional climate and oceanic and atmospheric anomalies are important tools in order to promote the development of models for predicting rainfall erosivity, especially in regions with substantial intra-annual variability in the rainfall regime. In this context, this work aimed to analyze the rainfall erosivity in headwaters of Grande River Basin, Southern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. This study considered the two most representative environments, the Mantiqueira Range (MR) and Plateau of Southern Minas Gerais (PSM). These areas are affected by the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) indicators Sea Surface Temperature (SST) for Niño 3.4 Region and Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI). Rainfall erosivity was calculated for individual rainfall events from January 2006 to December 2010. The analyses were conducted using the monthly data of ENSO indicators and the following rainfall variables: rainfall erosivity (EI30), rainfall depth (P), erosive rainfall depth (E), number of rainfall events (NRE), number of erosive rainfall events (NEE), frequency of occurrence of an early rainfall pattern (EP), occurrence of late rainfall pattern (LP) and occurrence of intermediate rainfall patter (IP). Pearson's coefficient of correlation was used to evaluate the relationships between the rainfall variables and SST and MEI. The coefficients of correlation were significant for SST in the PSM sub-region. Correlations between the rainfall variables and negative oscillations of SST were also significant, especially in the MR sub-region, however, the Person's coefficients were lesser than those obtained for the SST positive oscillations. The correlations between the rainfall variables and MEI were also significant but lesser than the SST correlations. These results demonstrate that SST positive oscillations play a more important role in rainfall erosivity, meaning they were more influenced by El-Niño episodes. Also, these results have shown that the ENSO variables have

  1. Potential compensation of hydrological extremes in headwaters: case study of upper Vltava River basin, Šumava Mts., Czechia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocum, Jan; Janský, Bohumír.; Česák, Julius

    2010-05-01

    Increasing frequency of catastrophic flash floods and extreme droughts in recent years results in an urgent need of solving of flood protection questions and measures leading to discharge increase in dry periods. Flattening of discharge call for the use of untraditional practices as a suitable complement to classical engineering methods. These measures could be represented by gradual increase of river catchment retention capacity in headstream areas. Very favorable conditions for this research solution are concentrated to the upper part of Otava River basin (Vltava River left tributary, Šumava Mts., southwestern Czechia) representing the core zone of a number of extreme floods in Central Europe and the area with high peat land proportion. A number of automatic ultrasound and hydrostatic pressure water level gauges, climatic stations and precipitation gauges and utilization of modern equipment and methods were used in chosen experimental catchments to assess the landscape retention potential and to find out rainfall-runoff relations in this area. Successively, the detailed analysis of peat land hydrological function was carried out. The peat bogs influence on runoff conditions were assessed by thorough comparison of runoff regimes in subcatchments with different peat land proportion. The peat bog influence on hydrological process can be considered also with respect to its affecting of water quality. Therefore, hydrological monitoring was completed by ion, carbon (TOC) and oxygen isotopes balance observing within periods of high or low discharges in order to precise runoff phases separation by means of anion deficiency. Pedological survey of different soil types and textures was carried out to precise the estimation of its water capacity. Detailed analyses of extreme runoff ascending and descending phases and minimum discharges in profiles closing several subcatchments with different physical-geographic conditions show higher peak flow frequency and their shorter

  2. Characterizing the primary material sources and dominant erosional processes for post-fire debris-flow initiation in a headwater basin using multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staley, Dennis M.; Wasklewicz, Thad A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2014-06-01

    Wildfire dramatically alters the hydrologic response of a watershed such that even modest rainstorms can produce hazardous debris flows. Relative to shallow landslides, the primary sources of material and dominant erosional processes that contribute to post-fire debris-flow initiation are poorly constrained. Improving our understanding of how and where material is eroded from a watershed during a post-fire debris-flow requires (1) precise measurements of topographic change to calculate volumetric measurements of erosion and deposition, and (2) the identification of relevant morphometrically defined process domains to spatially constrain these measurements of erosion and deposition. In this study, we combine the morphometric analysis of a steep, small (0.01 km2) headwater drainage basin with measurements of topographic change using high-resolution (2.5 cm) multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning data made before and after a post-fire debris flow. The results of the morphometric analysis are used to define four process domains: hillslope-divergent, hillslope-convergent, transitional, and channelized incision. We determine that hillslope-divergent and hillslope-convergent process domains represent the primary sources of material over the period of analysis in the study basin. From these results we conclude that raindrop-impact induced erosion, ravel, surface wash, and rilling are the primary erosional processes contributing to post-fire debris-flow initiation in the small, steep headwater basin. Further work is needed to determine (1) how these results vary with increasing drainage basin size, (2) how these data might scale upward for use with coarser resolution measurements of topography, and (3) how these results change with evolving sediment supply conditions and vegetation recovery.

  3. Characterizing the primary material sources and dominant erosional processes for post-fire debris-flow initiation in a headwater basin using multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis M.; Waslewicz, Thad A.; Kean, Jason W.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire dramatically alters the hydrologic response of a watershed such that even modest rainstorms can produce hazardous debris flows. Relative to shallow landslides, the primary sources of material and dominant erosional processes that contribute to post-fire debris-flow initiation are poorly constrained. Improving our understanding of how and where material is eroded from a watershed during a post-fire debris-flow requires (1) precise measurements of topographic change to calculate volumetric measurements of erosion and deposition, and (2) the identification of relevant morphometrically defined process domains to spatially constrain these measurements of erosion and deposition. In this study, we combine the morphometric analysis of a steep, small (0.01 km2) headwater drainage basin with measurements of topographic change using high-resolution (2.5 cm) multi-temporal terrestrial laser scanning data made before and after a post-fire debris flow. The results of the morphometric analysis are used to define four process domains: hillslope-divergent, hillslope-convergent, transitional, and channelized incision. We determine that hillslope-divergent and hillslope-convergent process domains represent the primary sources of material over the period of analysis in the study basin. From these results we conclude that raindrop-impact induced erosion, ravel, surface wash, and rilling are the primary erosional processes contributing to post-fire debris-flow initiation in the small, steep headwater basin. Further work is needed to determine (1) how these results vary with increasing drainage basin size, (2) how these data might scale upward for use with coarser resolution measurements of topography, and (3) how these results change with evolving sediment supply conditions and vegetation recovery.

  4. Alternative methods to determine headwater benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.S.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.

    1997-11-10

    In 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) began using a Flow Duration Analysis (FDA) methodology to assess headwater benefits in river basins where use of the Headwater Benefits Energy Gains (HWBEG) model may not result in significant improvements in modeling accuracy. The purpose of this study is to validate the accuracy and appropriateness of the FDA method for determining energy gains in less complex basins. This report presents the results of Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) validation of the FDA method. The validation is based on a comparison of energy gains using the FDA method with energy gains calculated using the MWBEG model. Comparisons of energy gains are made on a daily and monthly basis for a complex river basin (the Alabama River Basin) and a basin that is considered relatively simple hydrologically (the Stanislaus River Basin). In addition to validating the FDA method, ORNL was asked to suggest refinements and improvements to the FDA method. Refinements and improvements to the FDA method were carried out using the James River Basin as a test case.

  5. Runoff Responses to Forest Thinning at Plot and Catchment Scales in a Headwater Catchment Draining Japanese Cypress Forest

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the effect of forest thinning on runoff generation at plot and catchment scales in headwater basins draining a Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) forest. We removed 58.3% of the stems (corresponding to 43.2% of the basal area) in the treated headwater basin (catc...

  6. Validation of a numerical modeling method for simulating rainfall-runoff relations for headwater basins in western King and Snohomish Counties, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinicola, Richard S.

    2001-01-01

    The validity of a previously determined numerical modeling method was assessed. Numerical models for 11 drainage basins were constructed with the Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) with parameter values that were generalized for the physiographic region. Large and recurrent simulation errors were initially identified, but three systematic modifications of the models corrected those errors for 10 out of the 11 basins. The validity of the numerical modeling method for simulating rainfall-runoff relations in the study area, as modified during this investigation, was not rejected, but observed streamflow data were needed to apply the method.

  7. Two new species of Cyphocharax (Teleostei: Characiformes: Curimatidae) from headwaters of the Jequitinhonha and São Francisco river basins, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Guilherme Moreira; Penido, Iago De Souza; Mello, Gabriel Caetano Guimarães De; Pessali, Tiago Casarim

    2016-04-12

    Two new species of Cyphocharax from southeastern Brazil are described. Both new species share with C. punctatus, and C. vanderi the presence of a midlateral series of irregular patches of dark pigmentation along the lateral line. Cyphocharax jagunco, new species, from Rio Jequitinhonha basin, is distinguished from C. lundi, C. punctatus, and C. vanderi by the number of patches of dark pigmentation along lateral line; the number of pored scales posterior to the hypural joint; the number of scales in the lateral line; and the number of scales rows above lateral line. Cyphocharax lundi, new species, from Rio São Francisco basin, is distinguished from C. jagunco, C. punctatus, and C. vanderi by the presence of dark spots above the lateral line; and the number of scales in the lateral line. Comments on the relationships of the new species within Cyphocharax are presented.

  8. Two new species of Cyphocharax (Teleostei: Characiformes: Curimatidae) from headwaters of the Jequitinhonha and São Francisco river basins, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Guilherme Moreira; Penido, Iago De Souza; Mello, Gabriel Caetano Guimarães De; Pessali, Tiago Casarim

    2016-01-01

    Two new species of Cyphocharax from southeastern Brazil are described. Both new species share with C. punctatus, and C. vanderi the presence of a midlateral series of irregular patches of dark pigmentation along the lateral line. Cyphocharax jagunco, new species, from Rio Jequitinhonha basin, is distinguished from C. lundi, C. punctatus, and C. vanderi by the number of patches of dark pigmentation along lateral line; the number of pored scales posterior to the hypural joint; the number of scales in the lateral line; and the number of scales rows above lateral line. Cyphocharax lundi, new species, from Rio São Francisco basin, is distinguished from C. jagunco, C. punctatus, and C. vanderi by the presence of dark spots above the lateral line; and the number of scales in the lateral line. Comments on the relationships of the new species within Cyphocharax are presented. PMID:27394625

  9. From Headwater Streams to Rivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Kenneth W.

    1977-01-01

    Presents generalizations regarding how running water systems change physically, chemically and biologically with stream order, i. e., from the tiny headwater streams (order 1) to those receiving first order headwater tributaries (order 2) and so on. Food chain diagrams respective of stream order are explained. Stream study projects are suggested.…

  10. Evaluating the present annual water budget of a Himalayan headwater river basin using a high-resolution atmosphere-hydrology model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu; Gochis, David J.; Sobolowski, Stefan; Mesquita, Michel d. S.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the present water budget in Himalayan basins is a challenge due to poor in-situ coverage, incomplete or unreliable records and the limitations of coarse resolution gridded dataset. In the study, a two-way coupled implementation of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (v3.5.1) and the WRF-Hydro hydrological modeling extension package (WRF/WRF-Hydro) was employed in its offline configuration, over a 10-year simulation period for a mountainous and topographically complex Beas river basin (up to Pandoh) in North India. A triple nest is employed, in which the innermost nest domain had an atmospheric model grid spacing of 3 km and a grid spacing of 300 meters for the hydrological routing components. Two microphysical parameterization schemes are quantitatively evaluated in the study to reveal how sensitively and differently microphysical parameterization (MP) influence orographic-related precipitation, and in turn, how it impacts hydrological responses. Two sensitivity experiments of the surface-flow parameter and glacier wastage were also tested for uncertainty analysis in the study. The WRF-Hydro modeling system shows reasonable skill in capturing the spatial and temporal structure of high-resolution precipitation and the resulting stream flow hydrographs exhibit a good correspondence with observed streamflow at monthly timescales, although the model tends to generally underestimate streamflow amounts. The Thompson scheme fits better to the observations than the WSM3 schemes in the study. More importantly, WRF showed that for high altitude precipitation, the Beas River exhibits a high 'bias' in winter precipitation from both MPs, which is about double to triple that as estimated from valley-sited rain gauges, and remotely sensed precipitation estimates from both TRMM and APHRODITE. While the distribution of simulated daily discharge values agrees well with the gamma distribution from observed discharge. This correspondence suggests that the major

  11. A new species of Characidium Reinhardt (Ostariophysi: Characiformes: Crenuchidae) from headwaters of Rio Pacaás Novos, Rio Madeira basin, Rondônia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zanata, Angela M; Ohara, Willian M

    2015-01-01

    Characidium summus, new species, is described from rio Pacaás Novos, rio Madeira basin, Rondônia, Brazil. The new species is the unique among congeners for completely lacking an adipose fin and having a complete lateral line. Characidium summus can be further distinguished from congeners, including C. vestigipinne that also has a complete lateral line and adipose fin absent, vestigial or reduced by the absence of dark bars or spots on head, body or fins, except for a dark blotch on the rear of the opercle, a narrow midlateral dark stripe, and a dark basicaudal spot. In addition, C. summus possess a vestigial supraorbital and a remarkably small pseutotympanum. The possible mimetic relationship between the new species with Erythrinus erythrinus is discussed. PMID:26624134

  12. Effects of land use and land cover on selected soil quality indicators in the headwater area of the Blue Nile basin of Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Teferi, Ermias; Bewket, Woldeamlak; Simane, Belay

    2016-02-01

    Understanding changes in soil quality resulting from land use and land management changes is important to design sustainable land management plans or interventions. This study evaluated the influence of land use and land cover (LULC) on key soil quality indicators (SQIs) within a small watershed (Jedeb) in the Blue Nile Basin of Ethiopia. Factor analysis based on principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine different SQIs. Surface (0-15 cm) soil samples with four replications were collected from five main LULC types in the watershed (i.e., natural woody vegetation, plantation forest, grassland, cultivated land, and barren land) and at two elevation classes (upland and midland), and 13 soil properties were measured for each replicate. A factorial (2 × 5) multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that LULC and altitude together significantly affected organic matter (OM) levels. However, LULC alone significantly affected bulk density and altitude alone significantly affected bulk density, soil acidity, and silt content. Afforestation of barren land with eucalypt trees can significantly increase the soil OM in the midland part but not in the upland part. Soils under grassland had a significantly higher bulk density than did soils under natural woody vegetation indicating that de-vegetation and conversion to grassland could lead to soil compaction. Thus, the historical LULC change in the Jedeb watershed has resulted in the loss of soil OM and increased soil compaction. The study shows that a land use and management system can be monitored if it degrades or maintains or improves the soil using key soil quality indicators.

  13. Effects of land use and land cover on selected soil quality indicators in the headwater area of the Blue Nile basin of Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Teferi, Ermias; Bewket, Woldeamlak; Simane, Belay

    2016-02-01

    Understanding changes in soil quality resulting from land use and land management changes is important to design sustainable land management plans or interventions. This study evaluated the influence of land use and land cover (LULC) on key soil quality indicators (SQIs) within a small watershed (Jedeb) in the Blue Nile Basin of Ethiopia. Factor analysis based on principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine different SQIs. Surface (0-15 cm) soil samples with four replications were collected from five main LULC types in the watershed (i.e., natural woody vegetation, plantation forest, grassland, cultivated land, and barren land) and at two elevation classes (upland and midland), and 13 soil properties were measured for each replicate. A factorial (2 × 5) multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) showed that LULC and altitude together significantly affected organic matter (OM) levels. However, LULC alone significantly affected bulk density and altitude alone significantly affected bulk density, soil acidity, and silt content. Afforestation of barren land with eucalypt trees can significantly increase the soil OM in the midland part but not in the upland part. Soils under grassland had a significantly higher bulk density than did soils under natural woody vegetation indicating that de-vegetation and conversion to grassland could lead to soil compaction. Thus, the historical LULC change in the Jedeb watershed has resulted in the loss of soil OM and increased soil compaction. The study shows that a land use and management system can be monitored if it degrades or maintains or improves the soil using key soil quality indicators. PMID:26744135

  14. Aquatic insect assemblages associated with subalpine stream segment types in relict glaciated headwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kubo, Joshua S.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Bolton, Susan M.; Weekes, Anne A.; Gara, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    1. Aquatic habitats and biotic assemblages in subalpine headwaters are sensitive to climate and human impacts. Understanding biotic responses to such perturbations and the contribution of high-elevation headwaters to riverine biodiversity requires the assessment of assemblage composition among habitat types. We compared aquatic insect assemblages among headwater stream segment types in relict glaciated subalpine basins in Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington, USA. 2. Aquatic insects were collected during summer and autumn in three headwater basins. In each basin, three different stream segment types were sampled: colluvial groundwater sources, alluvial lake inlets, and cascade-bedrock lake outlets. Ward's hierarchical cluster analysis revealed high β diversity in aquatic insect assemblages, and non-metric multidimensional scaling indicated that spatial and temporal patterns in assemblage composition differed among headwater stream segment types. Aquatic insect assemblages showed more fidelity to stream segment types than to individual basins, and the principal environmental variables associated with assemblage structure were temperature and substrate. 3. Indicator species analyses identified specific aquatic insects associated with each stream segment type. Several rare and potentially endemic aquatic insect taxa were present, including the recently described species, Lednia borealis (Baumann and Kondratieff). 4. Our results indicate that aquatic insect assemblages in relict glaciated subalpine headwaters were strongly differentiated among stream segment types. These results illustrate the contribution of headwaters to riverine biodiversity and emphasise the importance of these habitats for monitoring biotic responses to climate change. Monitoring biotic assemblages in high-elevation headwaters is needed to prevent the potential loss of unique and sensitive biota.

  15. Bifurcation characteristics and safe basin of MSMA microgripper subjected to stochastic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z. W. Li, X. M.; Xu, J.

    2015-02-15

    A kind of magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) microgripper is proposed in this paper, and its nonlinear dynamic characteristics are studied when the stochastic perturbation is considered. Nonlinear differential items are introduced to explain the hysteretic phenomena of MSMA, and the constructive relationships among strain, stress, and magnetic field intensity are obtained by the partial least-square regression method. The nonlinear dynamic model of a MSMA microgripper subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation is developed. The stationary probability density function of the system’s response is obtained, the transition sets of the system are determined, and the conditions of stochastic bifurcation are obtained. The homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits of the system are given, and the boundary of the system’s safe basin is obtained by stochastic Melnikov integral method. The numerical and experimental results show that the system’s motion depends on its parameters, and stochastic Hopf bifurcation appears in the variation of the parameters; the area of the safe basin decreases with the increase of the stochastic excitation, and the boundary of the safe basin becomes fractal. The results of this paper are helpful for the application of MSMA microgripper in engineering fields.

  16. Are postglacial sediment yields of mountain headwaters out of pace?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Many high mountains have been sculpted by strong glacial erosion during the Pleistocene that resulted in valley widening and overdeepening and the formation of glacial cirques, U-shaped valleys, and widespread glacial deposits. The retreat of glacial ice exposes oversteepened hillslopes that are susceptible to rockfalls, deep-seated landsliding, gully erosion, and debris flows, and can also result in valley aggradation and reworking of valley deposits through debris flow activity and fluvial processes. It has been argued that sediment fluxes caused by these processes remain elevated even several thousand years after the retreat of valley glaciers. Yet, our knowledge on the response times of postglacial mountain systems to Pleistocene glacial erosion remains insufficient. Here I represent an approach to calculate the response times of postglacial geomorphic systems to Pleistocene glacial erosion based on reservoir theory and the compilation of postglacial sediment budgets in alpine systems. The study is conducted in the Kananaskis Country in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, in which sediment budgets of 5 headwater basins have been complied. The sediment budgets show that sediment delivery from formerly glaciated headwaters is limited indicated by average postglacial sediment delivery ratios (SDR) ranging between 0 and 0.3. The low SDRs are controlled by the glacial history of the headwater and suggest that the response times of sediment flux in alpine headwater basins is in the order of 100-500 kyr. Thus postglacial adjustment of alpine sediment flux exceeds the recurrence interval of the large ice ages during the Pleistocene suggesting that mountain headwaters in the Canadian Rockies are out of pace with respect to glacially-induced changes.

  17. Toxins in transgenic crop byproducts may affect headwater stream ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rosi-Marshall, E J; Tank, J L; Royer, T V; Whiles, M R; Evans-White, M; Chambers, C; Griffiths, N A; Pokelsek, J; Stephen, M L

    2007-10-01

    Corn (Zea mays L.) that has been genetically engineered to produce the Cry1Ab protein (Bt corn) is resistant to lepidopteran pests. Bt corn is widely planted in the midwestern United States, often adjacent to headwater streams. We show that corn byproducts, such as pollen and detritus, enter headwater streams and are subject to storage, consumption, and transport to downstream water bodies. Laboratory feeding trials showed that consumption of Bt corn byproducts reduced growth and increased mortality of nontarget stream insects. Stream insects are important prey for aquatic and riparian predators, and widespread planting of Bt crops has unexpected ecosystem-scale consequences. PMID:17923672

  18. Runoff changes in Czech headwater regions after deforestation induced by acid rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchtele, J.; Buchtelova, M.; Hrkal, Z.; Koskova, R.

    2003-04-01

    Tendencies in water regime resulting from land-use change represent an important subject for research and in the region of so called Black Triangle at the borders of Czech Republic, Germany and Poland urgent practical problem. Namely extensive deforestation in Czech hilly basins induced by acid rains, which appeared in seventies and eighties, requires attention. Discussions among professionals and public, sometimes having emotional character, took place after large floods on the rivers Odra and Morava in 1997 and in Vltava and Elbe river basins in August 2002. The influence of deforestation induced by acid rains in the Central Europe has been considered as important contribution to disastrous character of floods. Simulations of rainfall-runoff process in several catchments and experimental basins in two distinct headwater regions along German borders, with different extent of deforestation have been carried out using daily time series up to 40 years long. The outputs of two hydrological models of different structure have been compared in these investigations: - the conceptual model SAC-SMA - Sacramento soil moisture accounting - physically based 1- D model BROOK´90 The differences between observed and simulated discharge, which could show the tendencies in the runoff have been followed. They indicate increase of runoff after deforestation.

  19. Resonance properties of a closed rotating rectangular basin subject to space- and time-dependent wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen L.; Roos, Pieter C.; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Hulscher, Suzanne J. M. H.

    2015-03-01

    We present an idealised process-based model to study the possibly resonant response of closed basins subject to periodic wind forcing. Two solution methods are adopted: a collocation technique (valid for arbitrary rotation) and an analytical expansion (assuming weak rotation). The spectral response, as obtained from our model, displays resonance peaks, which we explain by linking them to the spatial pattern of the wind forcing, the along-wind and cross-wind basin dimensions as well as the influence of rotation. Increasing bottom friction lowers the peaks. Finally, we illustrate how the spectral response is reflected in the time-dependent set-up due to a single wind event.

  20. Nitrate removal and denitrification in headwater agricultural streams of the Pacific Northwest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams can serve as important sites for nitrogen (N) removal in watersheds. Here we examine the influence of agricultural streams on watershed N export in the Willamette River Basin of western Oregon, USA, a region with mixed agricultural, urban and forestry land uses...

  1. Burial affects the biogeochemistry of headwater streams in a midwestern US metropolitan area - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban basins. Urban stream burial has only recently been recognized by ecologists as a regional environmental impact and little resea...

  2. Burial affects the biogeochemistry of headwater streams in a midwestern US metropolitan area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban basins. Urban stream burial has only recently been recognized by ecologists and little research has addressed the extent to whi...

  3. Comparison of peak discharges among sites with and without valley fills for the July 8-9, 2001 flood in the headwaters of Clear Fork, Coal River basin, mountaintop coal-mining region, southern West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, Jeffrey B.; Brogan, Freddie D.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of mountaintop-removal mining practices on the peak discharges of streams were investigated in six small drainage basins within a 7-square-mile area in southern West Virginia. Two of the small basins had reclaimed valley fills, one basin had reclaimed and unreclaimed valley fills, and three basins did not have valley fills. Indirect measurements of peak discharge for the flood of July 8-9, 2001, were made at six sites on streams draining the small basins. The sites without valley fills had peak discharges with 10- to 25-year recurrence intervals, indicating that rainfall intensities and totals varied among the study basins. The flood-recurrence intervals for the three basins with valley fills were determined as though the peak discharges were those from rural streams without the influence of valley fills, and ranged from less than 2 years to more than 100 years.

  4. A New User-Friendly Model to Reduce Cost for Headwater Benefits Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.S.; Cover, C.K.; Perlack, R.D.; Sale, M.J.; Sarma, V.

    1999-07-07

    Headwater benefits at a downstream hydropower project are energy gains that are derived from the installation of upstream reservoirs. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is required by law to assess charges of such energy gains to downstream owners of non-federal hydropower projects. The high costs of determining headwater benefits prohibit the use of a complicated model in basins where the magnitude of the benefits is expected to be small. This paper presents a new user-friendly computer model, EFDAM (Enhanced Flow Duration Analysis Method), that not only improves the accuracy of the standard flow duration method but also reduces costs for determining headwater benefits. The EFDAM model includes a MS Windows-based interface module to provide tools for automating input data file preparation, linking and executing of a generic program, editing/viewing of input/output files, and application guidance. The EDFAM was applied to various river basins. An example was given to illustrate the main features of EFDAM application for creating input files and assessing headwater benefits at the Tulloch Hydropower Plant on the Stanislaus River Basin, California.

  5. Hydrogeomorphic paradigm of stormflow generation in headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidle, Roy C.

    2015-04-01

    Over the past century, different paradigms have emerged to explain the processes of stormflow generation in steep, vegetated headwater catchments. These headwaters are important source areas of flood waters, sediments, nutrients, and biota that affect larger basins and coastal waters. Headwater systems exhibit unique and complex hydrogeomorphic processes from hillslopes to stream channels as well as linkages to downstream reaches. Through the 1960's, stormflow generation was largely attributed to Hortonian overland flow mechanisms. While numerous studies indicated the significance of saturated and unsaturated subsurface flow, it was not until the mid-1960's that the variable source area concept of streamflow generation emerged invoking a dynamic riparian source area that shrinks and expands in response to precipitation and fluctuating water tables. However, this concept does not specify flow mechanisms or pathways functioning at different spatial scales within the catchment. Based on extensive studies in nested, headwater catchment components in Japan, a conceptual hydrogeomorphic model has been developed to more explicitly explain stormflow pathways and response. The conceptual model recognizes the close coupling of hillslope and channel hydrological processes and the unique contributions of geomorphic features such as riparian corridors, geomorphic hollows, and linear hillslopes. During the driest conditions, catchment water yield is very low and runoff occurs as saturated overland flow from the narrow riparian corridors and via direct channel interception. For slightly wetter conditions, subsurface flow from the soil matrix augments stormflow. As wetness increases, two significant non-linear hydrologic responses occur: (1) response from geomorphic hollows (zero-order basins) after a threshold of shallow groundwater accumulates; and (2) self-organization and expansion of preferential flow pathways that facilitate significant amounts of subsurface drainage. The

  6. Characterizing hydrologic permanence in headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will be an overview of research to inform jurisdictional determinations for the Clean Water Act, in particular research that hydrographic comparisons of the extent and hydrologic permanence of headwater streams, indicator development, and an evaluation of a rapid...

  7. Headwater Streams in Porous Landscapes - What's the contributing area?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C. R.; Bitew, M. M.; Du, E.; Griffiths, N.; Hopp, L.; Klaus, J.; McDonnell, J.; Vache, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    Building on a long legacy of hydrogeological investigations at the Savannah River Site in the Sandhills of the Upper Coastal Plain in South Carolina, we began in 2005 a headwater-scale investigation of hillslope flow pathways, streamflow sources, and water quality responses to intensive woody biomass production. The landscape is characterized by blackwater streams flowing slowly through wide flat stream valleys, deep unconsolidated layers of sands and clays, a regional clay layer beneath Fourmile Creek that defines the lower boundary of the surficial aquifer, rolling topography with steeper slopes on the valley margins and gentle slopes elsewhere, and a sandy clay loam argillic layer within 0.2 to 1.5m from the surface. Most water leaves headwater basins by groundwater flow, appearing as streamflow far downstream. Only at scales larger than 50 km2 does average streamflow match expectations from water balances. This raises the question, what constitutes the contributing area for headwater streams in porous landscapes? Perching and interflow generation over the argillic horizon is common, but leakage through clay is rapid relative to interflow travel times, so interflow serves to shift the point of percolation downslope from the point of infiltration. Only interflow from the valley-adjacent slopes can contribute to stormflow responses. Our interflow interception trenches and maximum rise piezometer networks reveal high heterogeneity in subsurface flow paths at multiple spatial scales. Streamwater has isotopic and chemical characteristics similar to deep groundwater, but we cannot easily determine the source area for groundwater reaching the first order streams. Our observations suggest that one's view of hillslope and catchment flow processes depends on the scale, number, and frequency of observations of state variables and outputs. In some cases, less frequent or less numerous observations of fewer tracers would have yielded different inferences. The data also

  8. Herbicide mitigation in microcosms simulating stormwater basins subject to polluted water inputs.

    PubMed

    Bois, P; Huguenot, D; Jézéquel, K; Lollier, M; Cornu, J Y; Lebeau, T

    2013-03-01

    Non-point source pollution as a result of wine-growing activity is of high concern. Stormwater basins (SWB) found downstream of vineyard watersheds could show a potential for the mitigation of runoff water containing herbicides. In this study, mitigation of vinery-used herbicides was studied in microcosms with a very similar functioning to that recorded in SWB. Mitigation efficiency of glyphosate, diuron and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) was investigated by taking into account hydraulic flow rate, mitigation duration, bioaugmentation and plant addition. Mitigation efficiency measured in water ranged from 63.0% for diuron to 84.2% for 3,4-DCA and to 99.8% for glyphosate. Water-storage duration in the SWB and time between water supplies were shown to be the most influential factors on the mitigation efficiency. Six hours water-storage duration allowed an efficient sorption of herbicides and their degradation by indigenous microorganisms in 5 weeks. Neither bioaugmentation nor plant addition had a significant effect on herbicide mitigation. Our results show that this type of SWB are potentially relevant for the mitigation of these herbicides stemming from wine-growing activity, providing a long enough hydraulic retention time.

  9. ARE SALAMANDERS USEFUL INDICATORS OF HYDROLOGIC PERMANENCE IN HEADWATER STREAMS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulatory agencies need appropriate indicators of stream permanence to aid in jurisdictional determinations for headwater streams. We evaluated salamanders as permanence indicators because they are often abundant in fishless headwaters. Salamander and habitat data were collect...

  10. Hydrochemical water evolution in the Aral Sea Basin. Part II: Confined groundwater of the Amu Darya Delta - Evolution from the headwaters to the delta and SiO2 geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettler, Georg; Oberhänsli, Hedi; Stulina, Galina; Djumanov, Jamoljon H.

    2013-07-01

    We studied 40 artesian wells (AWs) in the Amu Darya Delta. These wells include high-salinity (∼52 g/l) and saline (5-24 g/l) waters but are mostly low-salinity waters (1.3-2.9 g/l). The low-salinity AWs cluster into three types, reflecting the variable mixing of different end member solutes: (residual) brines and solutes deriving from silicate alteration, dissolution of limestone and dissolution of gypsum. The solutes are all undersaturated in calcite and gypsum, contain a substantial cation excess against dissolved inorganic carbon and are characterised by low Ca/SO4 ratios. On the basis of the hydrochemical mass budgets of model cases, we demonstrate that Na-rich Cl-brines (45-48%) and a Na2SO4-brine (30-47%) are the dominant solute components. The solutes derived from aluminium silicate alteration are minor components (7.3-19.4%). Even less important are solutes from limestone or gypsum dissolution (0.05-3.7%). These waters are unlikely to have originated from sediments hosting gypsum. The low-salinity AWs must have acquired their dominant hydrochemical signatures under non-equilibrium conditions between their remote (unknown) seepage areas and their discharge locations. This acquisition may have begun during the early hydrochemical groundwater evolution when meteoric or surface water passed the critical zone under an arid climate regime. Warmer saline AWs (∼40 °C) hosted in deeper Cretaceous formations contain a high portion of NaCl-rich brine (85%) and some are saturated in gypsum. These waters were derived from fluids rising along faults from pre-Cretaceous strata. The high-salinity and relatively cold AWs discharge close to the retreating Aral Sea south of its western basin. These AWs are suboxic, and Si concentrations are very low. The AW hydrochemical signatures reflect the dissolution of halite and gypsum. We observed positive correlations between temperature, Br, B and Si. The temperature correlation with bromide likely documents the transformation

  11. Ecosystem Services Derived from Headwater Catchments

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used data from the USEPA’s wadeable streams assessment (WSA), US Forest Service’s forest inventory and analysis (FIA), and select USFS experimental forests (EF) to investigate potential ecosystems services derived from headwater catchments. C, N, and P inputs to these catchmen...

  12. INDICATORS OF HYDROLOGIC PERMANENCE IN HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater intermittent streams lie at the aquatic-terrestrial interface and represent much of our nation's stream miles. Recent court cases concerning the definition of jurisdictional waters under the Clean Water Act have illuminated a need to better understand the characteristi...

  13. Influence of catchment characteristics on the spatio-temporal dynamics of streamwater temperatures in montane headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Jonathan; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Streamwater temperature is an important physical parameter in riverine ecosystems. It governs many processes; from water quality to biogeochemical dynamics, and is thus essential to consider when producing river basin management plans. The thermal regimes of streams are determined by a complex series of inter-linkages which can be categorised in one of the three groups: atmospheric conditions, terrestrial controls and stream geomorphology. The climatic conditions are the most important factors as they are the drivers of the processes of heat fluxes at the air-surface interface, however terrestrial and aquatic factors such as elevation, aspect and vegetation are the main modulators of the atmospheric processes. Here we will couple spatially distributed streamwater, groundwater and riparian wetland surface water temperatures to provide insight into dynamics and controls of thermal dynamics at different spatial and temporal scales. The study is located in a 3.2 km2 upland watershed in the North East Scottish Highlands, and covers an 18 month period of measurements. The objectives are to characterise the streamwater thermal fingerprints of the three different headwaters with contrasting landscape description units (fen dominated, steep valley and a wetland dominated corrie), and infer the controls on the spatial and temporal patterns of water temperature throughout the catchment stream network. Results indicate that the temperature of the stream represents the energy balance of the source areas when the riparian zone is connected with the stream network and not just the energy balance of the stream network alone. There are significant differences between the characteristically different headwaters with a significant reduction in the diurnal temperature variability in the largest headwater catchment. The headwater catchment also contains the greatest percentage of wetland soils suggesting groundwater contributions act in the dampening of streamwater temperatures

  14. Rapid hydrologic shifts and prolonged droughts in Rocky Mountain headwaters during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Bryan; Pribyl, Paul; Minckley, Thomas A.; Shinker, Jacqueline J.

    2010-03-01

    Rapid hydroclimatic shifts repeatedly generated centuries to millennia of extensive aridity across the headwaters of three of North America's largest river systems during the Holocene. Evidence of past lake-level changes at the headwaters of the Snake-Columbia, Missouri-Mississippi, and Green-Colorado Rivers in the Rocky Mountains shows that aridity as extensive and likely as severe as the CE 1930s Dust Bowl developed within centuries or less at ca. 9 ka (thousand years before CE 1950), and persisted across large areas of the watersheds until ca. 3 ka. Regional water levels also shifted abruptly at >11.3 and 1.8-1.2 ka. The record of low water levels during the mid-Holocene on the Continental Divide links similar evidence from the Great Basin and the Midwestern U.S., and shows that extensive aridity was the Holocene norm even though few GCMs have simulated such a pattern.

  15. Hydroecological monitoring in the headwaters of the Volga River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovlev, Viacheslav V.; Zhenikov, Yuri N.; Zhenikov, Kyrill Y.; Shaporenko, Sergey I.; Haun, Stefan; Füreder, Leopold; Schletterer, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Europe's largest river, the Volga (3551 km), has experienced multiple stressors from human activities (i.e. the Volga Basin comprises about 40 % of the Russian population, 45 % of the country's industry and more than 50 % of its agriculture). During the research expedition "Upper Volga 2005" an assessment of hydrological, limnochemical and biological parameters was carried out by scientists from the Russian Federation and from Austria. The extensive sampling in 2005 showed that the free-flowing section of the Volga River, located upstream of Tver, represents conditions which are either reference or least disturbed - thus it can be considered as a refugial system for freshwater biota of the European lowlands. Subsequently three stretches in the headwaters of the Volga River (Rzhev, Staritsa, Tver) were selected for the monitoring programme "REFCOND_VOLGA", which is in operation since 2006. These locations correspond also with the sampling sites of ROSHYDROMET, i.e. at Tver physic-chemical samples are taken monthly and at Rzhev samples are taken in the main hydrological periods. The laboratory ship "ROSHYDROMET 11" conducted monthly cruises between Tver and Kalyazin (Ivankovskoye and Uglichskoye reservoirs on Volga) in the headwaters during the navigation period (May - October). This also includes measurements with ADCP, which further allow the analyses of the spatial distribution of the suspended solids within cross sections. In addition sediment fluxes were derived by using the acoustic backscatter signal strength from the acoustic current Doppler profiler (ADCP). We exemplify at the monitoring sites the spatial distribution of different sediments, i.e. choriotope types, according the longitudinal profile of the river. We show that it is highly influenced by morphodynamics in the different river sections and this corresponds with the zoobenthos fauna accordingly. This interdisciplinary approach, including sediment conditions, limnochemistry, hydrology and

  16. Work Element B: 157. Sampling in Fish-Bearing Reaches [Variation in Productivity in Headwater Reaches of the Wenatchee Subbasin], Final Report for PNW Research Station.

    SciTech Connect

    Polivka, Karl; Bennett, Rita L.

    2009-03-31

    within a major sub-basin of the Columbia River and associations of density with ecoregion and individuals drainages within the sub-basin. We further examined habitat metrics that show positive associations with fish abundance to see if these relationships varied at larger spatial scales. We examined the extent to which headwater fish density and temporal variation in density were correlated between the headwaters and the main tributaries of the sub-basin, and the influence of ecoregion influence on density differences, particularly at wider temporal scales. Finally, we examined demographic parameters such as growth and emigration to determine whether density-dependence differs among ecoregions or whether responses were more strongly influenced by the demography of the local fish population.

  17. Public Health Perspectives of Channelized and Unchannelized Headwater Streams in Central Ohio: A Case Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Headwater streams constitute the majority of watersheds in the United States and many headwater streams in the midwest have been channelized for agricultural drainage. Public health implications of water chemistry and aquatic macroinvertebrates within channelized and unchannelized headwater streams ...

  18. Habitat selection by juvenile Swainson’s thrushes (Catharus ustulatus) in headwater riparian areas, northwestern Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Stephanie R.; Betts, Matthew G.; Huso, Manuela M.; Hagar, Joan C.

    2013-01-01

    Lower order, non-fish-bearing streams, often termed “headwater streams”, have received minimal research effort and protection priority, especially in mesic forests where distinction between riparian and upland vegetation can be subtle. Though it is generally thought that breeding bird abundance is higher in riparian zones, little is known about species distributions when birds are in their juvenile stage – a critical period in terms of population viability. Using radio telemetry, we examined factors affecting habitat selection by juvenile Swainson’s thrushes during the post-breeding period in headwater basins in the Coast Range of Oregon, USA. We tested models containing variables expected to influence the amount of food and cover (i.e., deciduous cover, coarse wood volume, and proximity to stream) as well as models containing variables that are frequently measured and manipulated in forest management (i.e., deciduous and coniferous trees separated into size classes). Juvenile Swainson’s thrushes were more likely to select locations with at least 25% cover of deciduous, mid-story vegetation and more than 2.0 m3/ha of coarse wood within 40 m of headwater streams. We conclude that despite their small and intermittent nature, headwater streams and adjacent riparian areas are selected over upland areas by Swainson’s thrush during the postfledging period in the Oregon Coast Range.

  19. HEADWATER INTERMITTENT STREAMS STUDY: COLLABORATION ACROSS THE NATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams are the most abundant and widespread of our nation's surface waters, yet little guidance is available specific to these resources. Headwater streams lie at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, both spatially because of their narrow channels and landscape position ...

  20. Geology, Streamflow, and Water Chemistry of the Talufofo Stream Basin, Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scot K.; Ewart, Charles J.

    1995-01-01

    ions in water samples from Talufofo Stream are characteristic of water draining a heavily vegetated basin near the ocean. The streamflow and water-chemistry data indicate that discharge from springs is in hydraulic connection with the limestone aquifer near the headwaters of the basin. The base flow therefore is subject to stresses placed on the nearby limestone ground-water system. Pumping from wells in the limestones at the headwaters of Talufofo Stream Basin may decrease spring flow in Talufofo Stream.

  1. The impact of droughts and water management on various hydrological systems in the headwaters of the Tagus River (central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Lacruz, J.; Vicente-Serrano, S. M.; López-Moreno, J. I.; Beguería, S.; García-Ruiz, J. M.; Cuadrat, J. M.

    2010-05-01

    SummaryThe influence of climate variation on the availability of water resources was analyzed in the headwaters of the Tagus River basin using two drought indices, the standardized precipitation index (SPI) and the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI). This basin is highly regulated and strategic, and contains two hyperannual reservoirs that are the origin of the water supply system for Mediterranean areas of southeast Spain. The indices confirmed that drought conditions have prevailed in the headwaters of the Tagus River since the 1970s. The responses in river discharge and reservoir storage were slightly higher when based on the SPEI rather than the SPI, which indicates that although precipitation had a major role in explaining temporal variability in the analyzed parameters, the influence of temperature was not negligible. Moreover, the greatest response in hydrological variables was evident over longer timescales of the climatic drought indices. Although the effect of climate variability on water resources was substantial during the analyzed period, we also showed a major change in hydrological-climatic relationships in regulated systems including reservoir storage and outflow. These were closely related to changes in external demand following commencement of the water transfer system to the Júcar and Segura basins after the 1980s. The marked reduction in water availability in the basin, which is related to more frequent droughts, contrasts with the amount of water transferred, which shows a clear upward trend associated with increasing water demand in the Mediterranean basin.

  2. Model‐based analysis of the influence of catchment properties on hydrologic partitioning across five mountain headwater subcatchments

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Thorsten; McGlynn, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ungauged headwater basins are an abundant part of the river network, but dominant influences on headwater hydrologic response remain difficult to predict. To address this gap, we investigated the ability of a physically based watershed model (the Distributed Hydrology‐Soil‐Vegetation Model) to represent controls on metrics of hydrologic partitioning across five adjacent headwater subcatchments. The five study subcatchments, located in Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest in central Montana, have similar climate but variable topography and vegetation distribution. This facilitated a comparative hydrology approach to interpret how parameters that influence partitioning, detected via global sensitivity analysis, differ across catchments. Model parameters were constrained a priori using existing regional information and expert knowledge. Influential parameters were compared to perceptions of catchment functioning and its variability across subcatchments. Despite between‐catchment differences in topography and vegetation, hydrologic partitioning across all metrics and all subcatchments was sensitive to a similar subset of snow, vegetation, and soil parameters. Results also highlighted one subcatchment with low certainty in parameter sensitivity, indicating that the model poorly represented some complexities in this subcatchment likely because an important process is missing or poorly characterized in the mechanistic model. For use in other basins, this method can assess parameter sensitivities as a function of the specific ungauged system to which it is applied. Overall, this approach can be employed to identify dominant modeled controls on catchment response and their agreement with system understanding. PMID:27642197

  3. The Carbon Cycle at the Nile Headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael; Saunders, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    The carbon cycle at the Nile headwaters M B Jones, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College, University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland M Saunders, Environmental and Biochemical Sciences Group, The James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, Scotland River systems play an integral role in the global carbon cycle by connecting the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the oceans. Extensive wetland systems, such as those found in the Amazon region, have been shown to export significant amounts of carbon to river waters as dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) that can be transported and emitted hundreds of km downstream. The assessment of both regional and global carbon budgets could therefore be improved by quantifying these lateral carbon fluxes, especially from highly productive temporarily or permanently flooded areas where substantial CO2 evasion from inland waters can occur. The Nile is the longest river in the world and the headwaters are located in the extensive Papyrus dominated wetlands in central Africa that are associated with Lake Victoria. From its source the White Nile flows northwards through wetlands in Uganda and Sudan before it joins the Blue Nile. Papyrus wetlands have been shown to be some of the most productive global ecosystems, with recorded rates of aerial net primary productivity of up to 3.09 kg C m-2 yr-1. In addition, where anaerobic conditions occur they also accumulate large amounts of carbon in the form of peat, and under these circumstances they represent a significant carbon sink. However, as water moves through these wetlands and is exchanged with surrounding rivers and lakes significant quantities of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon as well as suspended particulate organic matter are exported, which are either released further downstream by degassing, decomposition or deposition. Information on such losses from these wetland ecosystems is extremely sparse but in order to better constrain ecosystem scale carbon dynamics more accurate

  4. Preliminary report on geophysics of the Verde River headwaters region, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Duval, J.S.; Wirt, Laurie; DeWitt, Ed

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the acquisition, data processing, and preliminary interpretation of a high-resolution aeromagnetic and radiometric survey near the confluence of the Big and Little Chino basins in the headwaters of the Verde River, Arizona. The goal of the aeromagnetic study is to improve understanding of the geologic framework as it affects groundwater flow, particularly in relation to the occurrence of springs in the upper Verde River headwaters region. Radiometric data were also collected to map surficial rocks and soils, thus aiding geologic mapping of the basin fill. Additional gravity data were collected to enhance existing coverage. Both aeromagnetic and gravity data indicate a large gradient along the Big Chino fault, a fault with Quaternary movement. Filtered aeromagnetic data show other possible faults within the basin fill and areas where volcanic rocks are shallowly buried. Gravity lows associated with Big Chino and Williamson Valleys indicate potentially significant accumulations of low-density basin fill. The absence of a gravity low associated with Little Chino Valley indicates that high-density rocks are shallow. The radiometric maps show higher radioactivity associated with the Tertiary latites and with the sediments derived from them. The surficial materials on the eastern side of the Big Chino Valley are significantly lower in radioactivity and reflect the materials derived from the limestone and basalt east of the valley. The dividing line between the low radioactivity materials to the east and the higher radioactiviy materials to the west coincides approximately with the major drainage system of the valley, locally known as Big Chino Wash. This feature is remarkably straight and is approximately parallel to the Big Chino Fault. The uranium map shows large areas with concentrations greater than 5 ppm eU, and we expect that these areas will have a significantly higher risk potential for indoor radon.

  5. Incision rates of headwater streams: Determination by paleomagnetic dating of clastic cave sediments in valley walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sasowsky, I.D.; White, W.B. . Dept. of Geosciences); Schmidt, V.A. . Dept. of Geology and Planetary Science)

    1992-01-01

    Incision rates of headwater streams which downcut through carbonate rocks can be inferred by correlating surface channels to associated subsurface drainage and the conduit fragments that remain as the channel deepens. Stream-deposited sediments from caves in the valley walls can be sampled for paleomagnetic polarity. Using these data, a local paleomagnetic column is constructed and matched with the global paleomagnetic record which then provides time markers for the sediments. The morphological characteristics of the caves are used to relate paleo-drainage in the karst to previous elevations of the surface channel. A test case was made in a headwater basin in the Western Cumberland Plateau Escarpment, the East Fork of the Obey River in northcentral Tennessee. The basin has a relief of 300m and an area of 523 km[sup 2]. Four extensive caves in the valley walls provided 118 paleomagnetic samples. Samples were step-demagnetized in an alternating field from 10 to 100 mT, and gave well-clustered normal and reversed field directions. NRM intensities were between 8 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] and 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] kA/m. Construction of a local paleomagnetic polarity column revealed that two normal and one reversed sedimentary sequences were present in the caves. The age of the uppermost (oldest) cave level was placed at 0.91 Ma, yielding an incision rate for the basin of 0.06 m/ka. This rate is consistent with rates of incision determined for other basins in the eastern US using different methods.

  6. Investigation of Biogeochemical Functional Proxies in Headwater Streams Across a Range of Channel and Catchment Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkowitz, Jacob F.; Summers, Elizabeth A.; Noble, Chris V.; White, John R.; DeLaune, Ronald D.

    2014-03-01

    Historically, headwater streams received limited protection and were subjected to extensive alteration from logging, farming, mining, and development activities. Despite these alterations, headwater streams provide essential ecological functions. This study examines proxy measures of biogeochemical function across a range of catchment alterations by tracking nutrient cycling (i.e., inputs, processing, and stream loading) with leaf litter fall, leaf litter decomposition, and water quality parameters. Nutrient input and processing remained highest in second growth forests (the least altered areas within the region), while recently altered locations transported higher loads of nutrients, sediments, and conductivity. Biogeochemical functional proxies of C and N input and processing significantly, positively correlated with rapid assessment results (Pearson coefficient = 0.67-0.81; P = 0.002-0.016). Additionally, stream loading equations demonstrate that N and P transport, sediment, and specific conductivity negatively correlated with rapid assessment scores (Pearson coefficient = 0.56-0.81; P = 0.002-0.048). The observed increase in stream loading with lower rapid assessment scores indicates that catchment alterations impact stream chemistry and that rapid assessments provide useful proxy measures of function in headwater ecosystems. Significant differences in nutrient processing, stream loading, water quality, and rapid assessment results were also observed between recently altered (e.g., mined) headwater streams and older forested catchments (Mann-Whitney U = 24; P = 0.01-0.024). Findings demonstrate that biogeochemical function is reduced in altered catchments, and rapid assessment scores respond to a combination of alteration type and recovery time. An analysis examining time and economic requirements of proxy measurements highlights the benefits of rapid assessment methods in evaluating biogeochemical functions.

  7. BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY IN MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAINS HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to assess the applicability of landscape metrics, in conjunction with stream water quality to estimate the biological integrity of headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plains using multivariate techniques.

  8. Physical indicators of hydrologic permanence in forested headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent court cases have brought headwater streams and their hydrologic permanence into the forefront for regulatory agencies, so rapid field-based indicators of hydrologic permanence in streams are critically needed. Our study objectives were to 1) identify environmental charact...

  9. SCIENCE TO INFORM POLICY ON PROTECTION OF HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent court cases concerning the definition of jurisdictional waters under the Clean Water Act have illuminated a need to better understand characteristics and functions of headwater streams (and associated riparian and wetland habitats). Research is needed to better quantify 1...

  10. Analysis of groundwater flow in mountainous, headwater catchments with permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Sarah G.; Ge, Shemin; Liang, Sihai

    2015-12-01

    Headwater catchments have a direct impact on the water resources of downstream lowland regions as they supply freshwater in the form of surface runoff and discharging groundwater. Often, these mountainous catchments contain expansive permafrost that may alter the natural topographically controlled groundwater flow system. As permafrost could degrade with climate change, it is imperative to understand the effect of permafrost on groundwater flow in headwater catchments. This study characterizes groundwater flow in mountainous headwater catchments and evaluates the effect of permafrost in the context of climate change on groundwater movement using a three-dimensional, finite element, hydrogeologic model. The model is applied to a representative headwater catchment on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China. Results from the model simulations indicate that groundwater contributes significantly to streams in the form of baseflow and the majority of groundwater flow is from the shallow aquifer above the permafrost, disrupting the typical topographically controlled flow pattern observed in most permafrost-free headwater catchments. Under a warming scenario where mean annual surface temperature is increased by 2°C, reducing the areal extent of permafrost in the catchment, groundwater contribution to streamflow may increase three-fold. These findings suggest that, in headwater catchments, permafrost has a large influence on groundwater flow and stream discharge. Increased annual air temperatures may increase groundwater discharge to streams, which has implications for ecosystem health and the long-term availability of water resources to downstream regions.

  11. A new species of Pareiorhaphis (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) from the headwaters of the Arroio Garapiá, coastal drainage of Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Edson H L; Lehmann, Pablo A; Schvambach, Lucas J; Reis, Roberto E

    2015-01-01

    Pareiorhaphis garapia, new species, is described based on specimens collected in the headwaters of the Arroio Garapiá, Rio Maquiné basin, a coastal drainage of Rio Grande do Sul State, southern Brazil. The new species is distinguished from all other Pareiorhaphis species in having the nuchal plate covered by thick skin, the exposed posterior process of the cleithrum comparatively narrow, and the last segment of the preopercular ramus of the latero-sensory canal reduced to an ossified tubule. The absence of a dorsal-fin spinelet, the reduced number of plates in the dorsal and mid-dorsal series of lateral plates, and morphometric traits also distinguish the new species from its congeners. The restricted geographic distribution of P. garapia, endemic to a headwater stream of the Rio Maquiné basin, and the syntopic occurrence of P. nudulus are discussed. PMID:26624457

  12. Recovery of sediment characteristics in moraine, headwater streams of Northern Minnesota after forest harvest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merten, Eric C.; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Kolka, Randall K.; Newman, Raymond M.; Verry, Elon S.; Vondracek, Bruce C.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the recovery of sediment characteristics in four moraine, headwater streams in north-central Minnesota after forest harvest. We examined changes in fine sediment levels from 1997 (preharvest) to 2007 (10 years postharvest) at study plots with upland clear felling and riparian thinning, using canopy cover, proportion of unstable banks, surficial fine substrates, residual pool depth, and streambed depth of refusal as response variables. Basin-scale year effects were significant (p < 0.001) for all responses when evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVAs. Throughout the study area, unstable banks increased for several years postharvest, coinciding with an increase in windthrow and fine sediment. Increased unstable banks may have been caused by forest harvest equipment, increased windthrow and exposure of rootwads, or increased discharge and bank scour. Fine sediment in the channels did not recover by summer 2007, even though canopy cover and unstable banks had returned to 1997 levels. After several storm events in fall 2007, 10 years after the initial sediment input, fine sediment was flushed from the channels and returned to 1997 levels. Although our study design did not discern the source of the initial sediment inputs (e.g., forest harvest, road crossings, other natural causes), we have shown that moraine, headwater streams can require an extended period (up to 10 years) and enabling event (e.g., high storm flows) to recover from large inputs of fine sediment.

  13. Recovery of sediment characteristics in moraine, headwater streams of northern Minnesota after forest harvest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vondracek, Bruce C.; Merten, Eric C.; Hemstad, Nathaniel A.; Kolka, Randall K.; Newman, Raymond M.; Verry, Elon S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the recovery of sediment characteristics in four moraine, headwater streams in north-central Minnesota after forest harvest. We examined changes in fine sediment levels from 1997 (preharvest) to 2007 (10 years postharvest) at study plots with upland clear felling and riparian thinning, using canopy cover, proportion of unstable banks, surficial fine substrates, residual pool depth, and streambed depth of refusal as response variables. Basin-scale year effects were significant (p < 0.001) for all responses when evaluated by repeated-measures ANOVAs. Throughout the study area, unstable banks increased for several years postharvest, coinciding with an increase in windthrow and fine sediment. Increased unstable banks may have been caused by forest harvest equipment, increased windthrow and exposure of rootwads, or increased discharge and bank scour. Fine sediment in the channels did not recover by summer 2007, even though canopy cover and unstable banks had returned to 1997 levels. After several storm events in fall 2007, 10 years after the initial sediment input, fine sediment was flushed from the channels and returned to 1997 levels. Although our study design did not discern the source of the initial sediment inputs (e.g., forest harvest, road crossings, other natural causes), we have shown that moraine, headwater streams can require an extended period (up to 10 years) and enabling event (e.g., high storm flows) to recover from large inputs of fine sediment.

  14. Feeding and reproductive patterns of Astyanax intermedius in a headwater stream of Atlantic Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ursulla P; Ferreira, Fabio C; Carmo, Michele A F; Braga, Francisco M S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we determined diet composition, reproductive periodicity and fecundity of Astyanax intermedius in a headwater stream of a State Park of an Atlantic rainforest. We also evaluated the influence of rainfall, water temperature and fish size on niche width and niche overlap. Sampling was conducted monthly throughout one year in the Ribeirão Grande stream, southeastern Brazil. Diet consisted of 31 food items with equal contribution of allochthonous and autochthonous items. Females were larger than males, and the mean sizes at first maturation were 4.44 cm and 3.92 cm, respectively. Based on 212 pairs of mature ovaries, the number of oocytes per female ranged from 538 to 6,727 (mean = 2,688.7). Niche width and niche overlap were not related to rainfall nor water temperature and only niche width increased with fish size, suggesting that as fish grow, more items are included in diet. Our results suggested that A. intermedius fit as a typical opportunistic strategist which may explain the prevalence of this species in several isolated headwater basins of vegetated Atlantic forested streams where food resources are abundant and distributed throughout the year. PMID:26628029

  15. Feeding and reproductive patterns of Astyanax intermedius in a headwater stream of Atlantic Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ursulla P; Ferreira, Fabio C; Carmo, Michele A F; Braga, Francisco M S

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we determined diet composition, reproductive periodicity and fecundity of Astyanax intermedius in a headwater stream of a State Park of an Atlantic rainforest. We also evaluated the influence of rainfall, water temperature and fish size on niche width and niche overlap. Sampling was conducted monthly throughout one year in the Ribeirão Grande stream, southeastern Brazil. Diet consisted of 31 food items with equal contribution of allochthonous and autochthonous items. Females were larger than males, and the mean sizes at first maturation were 4.44 cm and 3.92 cm, respectively. Based on 212 pairs of mature ovaries, the number of oocytes per female ranged from 538 to 6,727 (mean = 2,688.7). Niche width and niche overlap were not related to rainfall nor water temperature and only niche width increased with fish size, suggesting that as fish grow, more items are included in diet. Our results suggested that A. intermedius fit as a typical opportunistic strategist which may explain the prevalence of this species in several isolated headwater basins of vegetated Atlantic forested streams where food resources are abundant and distributed throughout the year.

  16. Exploring groundwater processes in Rocky Mountain headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, D.; Ireson, A. M.; Yassin, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    More than one-sixth of the Earth's human population relies on freshwater originating in mountain headwaters, which is understood to be generated largely from snowpacks that melt throughout the spring and summer. Annual hydrographs in these regions are characterized by large peaks occurring in the spring, followed by slow recession towards winter baseflow conditions. However, atmospheric warming trends are found to coincide with earlier periods of snowmelt, leading to increased flows in spring and decreased flows in summer. This decreased ability of our 'water towers' to store snow late into the summer suggests that other mechanisms of storage and release may become more important in sustaining baseflows. In particular, subsurface processes leading to late summer and winter flow will become increasingly important earlier on, but are as yet poorly understood. By utilising historical data to inform a better understanding of late-season subsurface processes, we will be better prepared to predict how these mountains will temporarily store and release groundwater in a warmer climate. Here, we analyse long-term data sets from a small (Marmot Creek, Alberta ~10 km2) and a large (Bow River at Banff, Alberta ~1000 km2) basinwithin the Canadian Rocky Mountains, comparing observations with model outputs, to investigate late-season hydrological responses, and particularly the role of groundwater as a temporary storage mechanism.

  17. Headwater Influences on Downstream Water Quality

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the influence of riparian and whole watershed land use as a function of stream size on surface water chemistry and assessed regional variation in these relationships. Sixty-eight watersheds in four level III U.S. EPA ecoregions in eastern Kansas were selected as study sites. Riparian land cover and watershed land use were quantified for the entire watershed, and by Strahler order. Multiple regression analyses using riparian land cover classifications as independent variables explained among-site variation in water chemistry parameters, particularly total nitrogen (41%), nitrate (61%), and total phosphorus (63%) concentrations. Whole watershed land use explained slightly less variance, but riparian and whole watershed land use were so tightly correlated that it was difficult to separate their effects. Water chemistry parameters sampled in downstream reaches were most closely correlated with riparian land cover adjacent to the smallest (first-order) streams of watersheds or land use in the entire watershed, with riparian zones immediately upstream of sampling sites offering less explanatory power as stream size increased. Interestingly, headwater effects were evident even at times when these small streams were unlikely to be flowing. Relationships were similar among ecoregions, indicating that land use characteristics were most responsible for water quality variation among watersheds. These findings suggest that nonpoint pollution control strategies should consider the influence of small upland streams and protection of downstream riparian zones alone is not sufficient to protect water quality. PMID:17999108

  18. Salamander occupancy in headwater stream networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, E.H.C.; Green, L.E.; Lowe, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    1. Stream ecosystems exhibit a highly consistent dendritic geometry in which linear habitat units intersect to create a hierarchical network of connected branches. 2. Ecological and life history traits of species living in streams, such as the potential for overland movement, may interact with this architecture to shape patterns of occupancy and response to disturbance. Specifically, large-scale habitat alteration that fragments stream networks and reduces connectivity may reduce the probability a stream is occupied by sensitive species, such as stream salamanders. 3. We collected habitat occupancy data on four species of stream salamanders in first-order (i.e. headwater) streams in undeveloped and urbanised regions of the eastern U.S.A. We then used an information-theoretic approach to test alternative models of salamander occupancy based on a priori predictions of the effects of network configuration, region and salamander life history. 4. Across all four species, we found that streams connected to other first-order streams had higher occupancy than those flowing directly into larger streams and rivers. For three of the four species, occupancy was lower in the urbanised region than in the undeveloped region. 5. These results demonstrate that the spatial configuration of stream networks within protected areas affects the occurrences of stream salamander species. We strongly encourage preservation of network connections between first-order streams in conservation planning and management decisions that may affect stream species.

  19. Contaminated sediment dynamics in peatland headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Clay, Gareth; Evans, Martin; Hutchinson, Simon; Rothwell, James

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an important store of soil carbon, provide multiple ecosystem services, and when located in close proximity to urban and industrial areas, can also act as sinks of atmospherically deposited heavy metals. The near-surface layer of the blanket peats of the Peak District National Park, UK, is severely contaminated with high concentrations of anthropogenically derived, atmospherically deposited lead (Pb). These peats are severely degraded, and there is increasing concern that erosion is releasing considerable quantities of this legacy pollution into surface waters. Despite substantial research into Pb dynamics in peatlands formal description of the possible mechanisms of contaminated sediment mobilisation is limited. However, there is evidence to suggest that a substantial proportion of contaminated surface sediment may be redistributed elsewhere in the catchment. This study uses the Pb contamination stored near the peat's surface as a fingerprint to trace contaminated sediment dynamics and storage in three severely degraded headwater catchments. Erosion is exposing high concentrations of Pb on interfluve surfaces, and substantial amounts of reworked contaminated material are stored on other catchment surfaces (gully walls and floors). We propose a variety of mechanisms as controls of Pb release and storage on the different surfaces, including: (i) wind action on interfluves; (ii) the aspect of gully walls, and (iii) gully depth. Vegetation also plays an important role in retaining contaminated sediment on all surfaces.

  20. Investigation of the Relative Effects of Insolation, Groundwater, and Spatial Variability in Temperature Dynamics of Two Headwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belica, L.; Caldwell, P. V.; Mitasova, H.; McCarter, J. B.; Smith, J.; Nelson, S. A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Forested headwater streams account for much of the aquatic species diversity and contribute valuable recreational fisheries in the mountains of the Southeastern United States. Stream temperature is key regulator of headwater ecosystems and thermal regime is such a critical factor that it limits where many species can survive, grow, and successfully reproduce. Forested headwater streams are dynamic systems located in complex terrain. The variability of heat exchange between a stream and its surroundings results in thermal variations along its course. Understanding the spatial variability of heat fluxes along headwater streams is important to understanding the thermal dynamics and their effects on the biota. Solar radiation and groundwater inflow are two primary components of the heat budget of headwater streams and are spatially variable over short distances. A comparative analysis of north-facing and south-facing watersheds the Coweeta Basin of the Southern Appalachian Mountains found that temperatures of north-facing streams were cooler than south-facing streams for most of the year, but were warmer in summer. A north-south watershed pair with similar discharge, drainage areas, elevation, slope, and landcover characteristics was selected for further study. Water temperature was monitored longitudinally from the stream origins to the outlets beginning in late 2014. Preliminary data suggested variation in solar radiation resulting from the spatial heterogeneity of evergreen and deciduous trees and seasonal changes in leaf density could explain temperature patterns. We used the Subcanopy Solar Radiation Model, which accounts for topographic and vegetative shading by using a light penetration index derived from LIDAR data, to produce spatially explicit estimates of solar radiation and elucidate spatial and temporal variations in solar radiation along the two streams. Groundwater influence on stream temperature dynamics was investigated using salt-dilution gaging

  1. Influence of thermal regime and land use on benthic invertebrate communities inhabiting headwater streams exposed to contrasted shading.

    PubMed

    Dohet, Alain; Hlúbiková, Daša; Wetzel, Carlos E; L'Hoste, Lionel; Iffly, Jean François; Hoffmann, Lucien; Ector, Luc

    2015-02-01

    Headwaters account for a high proportion of total freshwater stream-channel length in a drainage basin and are critical habitats for rare, endangered, and specialized species. In the context of climate warming, increasing water temperatures may be an ultimate threat to cold-adapted species even in temperate ecosystems. Climate change effects on streams may interact with other pressures such as pollution or habitat fragmentation, confounding their real impact on biological communities. Three headwater streams exposed to contrasted shading and land use conditions were sampled over a three-year period in spring and autumn (2010-2012). Five stations distributed along the longitudinal continuum were chosen in the upstream part of each stream. In addition to benthic invertebrate sampling, water temperature was recorded continuously using data loggers. Results showed that the riparian woodland associated with forested land use throughout the catchment clearly moderated winter temperature minima, summer temperature maxima and thermal variability compared to open river channels with narrow or absent riparian tree cover. Although, the variability in macroinvertebrate species distribution was mainly attributed to anthropogenic land use in the catchment, a significant part of the variability was explained by temperature descriptors such as the number of cumulative degree-days in summer and extremes in winter temperature. Trichoptera species preferring headwaters and cold water temperatures were found exclusively in the forested unimpacted stream. Conservation issues are discussed in relation to the predicted loss of the potential future distributions of these Trichoptera cold-adapted species.

  2. Influence of thermal regime and land use on benthic invertebrate communities inhabiting headwater streams exposed to contrasted shading.

    PubMed

    Dohet, Alain; Hlúbiková, Daša; Wetzel, Carlos E; L'Hoste, Lionel; Iffly, Jean François; Hoffmann, Lucien; Ector, Luc

    2015-02-01

    Headwaters account for a high proportion of total freshwater stream-channel length in a drainage basin and are critical habitats for rare, endangered, and specialized species. In the context of climate warming, increasing water temperatures may be an ultimate threat to cold-adapted species even in temperate ecosystems. Climate change effects on streams may interact with other pressures such as pollution or habitat fragmentation, confounding their real impact on biological communities. Three headwater streams exposed to contrasted shading and land use conditions were sampled over a three-year period in spring and autumn (2010-2012). Five stations distributed along the longitudinal continuum were chosen in the upstream part of each stream. In addition to benthic invertebrate sampling, water temperature was recorded continuously using data loggers. Results showed that the riparian woodland associated with forested land use throughout the catchment clearly moderated winter temperature minima, summer temperature maxima and thermal variability compared to open river channels with narrow or absent riparian tree cover. Although, the variability in macroinvertebrate species distribution was mainly attributed to anthropogenic land use in the catchment, a significant part of the variability was explained by temperature descriptors such as the number of cumulative degree-days in summer and extremes in winter temperature. Trichoptera species preferring headwaters and cold water temperatures were found exclusively in the forested unimpacted stream. Conservation issues are discussed in relation to the predicted loss of the potential future distributions of these Trichoptera cold-adapted species. PMID:25461112

  3. Dam removal increases American eel abundance in distant headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Eyler, Sheila; Wofford, John E.B.

    2012-01-01

    American eel Anguilla rostrata abundances have undergone significant declines over the last 50 years, and migration barriers have been recognized as a contributing cause. We evaluated eel abundances in headwater streams of Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, to compare sites before and after the removal of a large downstream dam in 2004 (Embrey Dam, Rappahannock River). Eel abundances in headwater streams increased significantly after the removal of Embrey Dam. Observed eel abundances after dam removal exceeded predictions derived from autoregressive models parameterized with data prior to dam removal. Mann–Kendall analyses also revealed consistent increases in eel abundances from 2004 to 2010 but inconsistent temporal trends before dam removal. Increasing eel numbers could not be attributed to changes in local physical habitat (i.e., mean stream depth or substrate size) or regional population dynamics (i.e., abundances in Maryland streams or Virginia estuaries). Dam removal was associated with decreasing minimum eel lengths in headwater streams, suggesting that the dam previously impeded migration of many small-bodied individuals (<300 mm TL). We hypothesize that restoring connectivity to headwater streams could increase eel population growth rates by increasing female eel numbers and fecundity. This study demonstrated that dams may influence eel abundances in headwater streams up to 150 river kilometers distant, and that dam removal may provide benefits for eel management and conservation at the landscape scale.

  4. Dissolved organic carbon export and internal cycling in small, headwater lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stets, Edward G.; Striegl, Rob; Aiken, George R.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon (C) cycling in freshwater lakes is intense but poorly integrated into our current understanding of overall C transport from the land to the oceans. We quantified dissolved organic carbon export (DOCX) and compared it with modeled gross DOC mineralization (DOCR) to determine whether hydrologic or within-lake processes dominated DOC cycling in a small headwaters watershed in Minnesota, USA. We also used DOC optical properties to gather information about DOC sources. We then compared our results to a data set of approximately 1500 lakes in the Eastern USA (Eastern Lake Survey, ELS, data set) to place our results in context of lakes more broadly. In the open-basin lakes in our watershed (n = 5), DOCX ranged from 60 to 183 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, whereas DOCR ranged from 15 to 21 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, emphasizing that lateral DOC fluxes dominated. DOCX calculated in our study watershed clustered near the 75th percentile of open-basin lakes in the ELS data set, suggesting that these results were not unusual. In contrast, DOCX in closed-basin lakes (n = 2) was approximately 5 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, whereas DOCR was 37 to 42 g C m−2 lake area yr−1, suggesting that internal C cycling dominated. In the ELS data set, median DOCX was 32 and 12 g C m−2 yr−1 in open-basin and closed-basin lakes, respectively. Although not as high as what was observed in our study watershed, DOCX is an important component of lake C flux more generally, particularly in open-basin lakes.

  5. Conservation implications of amphibian habitat relationships within channelized agricultural headwater streams in the midwestern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widespread use of stream channelization and subsurface tile drainage for removing water from agricultural fields has led to the development of numerous channelized agricultural headwater streams within agricultural watersheds of the Midwestern United States. Channelized agricultural headwater s...

  6. Implications of fish-habitat relationships for designing restoration projects within channelized agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channelized headwater streams are common throughout agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern United States. Management of these streams focuses on drainage without consideration of the other ecosystem services they are capable of providing. Restoration of channelized agricultural headwater stream...

  7. Relationship Between Watershed Land Use and Denitrification Enzyme Activity in Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams are the dominant land-water interface across much of the landscape. Denitrification is an important ecological service provided by headwater streams. Anthropogenic inputs of N to terrestrial ecosystems largely result from agricultural practices. Animal agricultu...

  8. Boulder distribution in a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golly, Antonius; Turowski, Jens; Badoux, Alexandre; Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Headwater catchments are usually transport limited fluvial systems meaning that large amounts of sediments are stored in the channel over long time periods until transport capacity rises during flood events. Available sediment fractions include small, frequently mobile grains and large, rarely mobile clasts or boulders that have a number of functions in the fluvial system. Often, large clasts build channel-spanning forms, bear most of the shear stress and contribute to the channel's resistance and stability. Boulders often induce steps (key-stone hypothesis) where grain diameters determine the step height. Although the effects of single boulders are well studied in various lab and field experiments, extensive analysis of boulder distributions along channel reaches are rare due to the lack of observational data. Here, we analyze a large dataset of boulders in the Erlenbach, Switzerland, a mountain stream with a mean slope of 17%. Data on size, orientation and location have been collected for more than 350 boulders with a grain diameter greater 50cm (b-axis) along a 550m channel reach. In addition, channel geometry - long-profile and channel width - has been surveyed precisely with a total station. From the long-profile steps are identified with an automated algorithm. We find that the spatial distribution of the boulders along the study reach is not uniform but follows a clustered pattern. We compare the location of the boulders to various channel measures (local slope, average gradient, channel width) to find valuable proxies. Furthermore, we determine the appearance of the boulders with respect to the identified steps.

  9. Effects of evapotranspiration on baseflow in a tropical headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadol, Daniel; Kampf, Stephanie; Wohl, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    SummaryDiel cycles in stream discharge during baseflow periods in a headwater stream in La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica, a tropical wet forest site, appear to be associated with groundwater withdrawal by the forest for evapotranspiration (ET). Analysis of the cycles indicates a strong correlation of stage change with ET demand, similar to the variation found in riparian water table elevation by previous researchers. Links between daily forest ET demand cycles and stream discharge cycles have been reported in temperate humid and semi-arid regions, but the frequent flood hydrographs of the wet tropics tend to obscure this daily signal. This study modifies and combines two established empirical methods for analyzing the diel ET signal in streamflow which lead to estimates of riparian ET derived from groundwater (ETG) at hourly time scales and spatial extent of the riparian area. The model has a direct dependence on the estimate of specific yield, a difficult to constrain parameter, which we estimate from previously published soil analyses. For the six baseflow periods analyzed, the model estimates groundwater ET losses ranging from 1.8 to 3.9 mm/day within the riparian area. These estimates are 52-81% of the total ET estimated with the Penman-Monteith equation (ETPM). The signal of ETG in the stream lags ETPM by 1.5-3 h, with apparent peak decay and signal duration lengthening during propagation. Model results indicate that the area of the riparian zone that influences streamflow by means of ET withdrawal increases with stream stage and ranges from 2.5% to 6.6% of the total basin area. Variations in the rate of change of nightly stream stage recovery suggest possible variations in the relative importance of subsurface hydraulic properties. At high stages, the rate of stream stage recovery from ET losses decreases throughout the night, whereas at low stages the rate of stream stage recovery increases throughout the night. Future work with numerical models could

  10. The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Richard B; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Moore, Richard B

    2007-02-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  11. The Role of Headwater Streams in Downstream Water Quality1

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Richard B; Boyer, Elizabeth W; Smith, Richard A; Schwarz, Gregory E; Moore, Richard B

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  12. The role of headwater streams in downstream water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Boyer, E.W.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.; Moore, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of headwater influences on the water-quality and flow conditions of downstream waters is essential to water-resource management at all governmental levels; this includes recent court decisions on the jurisdiction of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) over upland areas that contribute to larger downstream water bodies. We review current watershed research and use a water-quality model to investigate headwater influences on downstream receiving waters. Our evaluations demonstrate the intrinsic connections of headwaters to landscape processes and downstream waters through their influence on the supply, transport, and fate of water and solutes in watersheds. Hydrological processes in headwater catchments control the recharge of subsurface water stores, flow paths, and residence times of water throughout landscapes. The dynamic coupling of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in upland streams further controls the chemical form, timing, and longitudinal distances of solute transport to downstream waters. We apply the spatially explicit, mass-balance watershed model SPARROW to consider transport and transformations of water and nutrients throughout stream networks in the northeastern United States. We simulate fluxes of nitrogen, a primary nutrient that is a water-quality concern for acidification of streams and lakes and eutrophication of coastal waters, and refine the model structure to include literature observations of nitrogen removal in streams and lakes. We quantify nitrogen transport from headwaters to downstream navigable waters, where headwaters are defined within the model as first-order, perennial streams that include flow and nitrogen contributions from smaller, intermittent and ephemeral streams. We find that first-order headwaters contribute approximately 70% of the mean-annual water volume and 65% of the nitrogen flux in second-order streams. Their contributions to mean water volume and nitrogen flux decline only marginally to about 55% and

  13. Postglacial adjustment of steep, low-order drainage basins, Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T.; Müller, T.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2013-12-01

    is generally argued that Pleistocene glaciation results in increased sediment flux in mountain systems. An important, but not well constrained, aspect of Pleistocene glacial erosion is the geomorphic decoupling of cirque basins from main river systems. This study provides a quantitative link between glacier-induced basin morphology, postglacial erosion, and sediment delivery for mountain headwaters (with basin area <10 km2). We analyze the morphology of 57 headwater basins in the Canadian Rockies and establish postglacial sediment budgets for select basins. Notable differences in headwater morphology suggest different degrees of erosion by cirque glaciers, which we classify into headwater basins with either cirque or noncirque morphology. Despite steeper slope gradients in cirque basins, higher-mean postglacial erosion rates in basins with noncirque morphology (0.43-0.6 mm a-1) compared to those in cirques (0.19-0.39 mm a-1) suggest a more complex relationship between hillslope erosion and slope gradient in calcareous mountain environments than implied by the threshold hillslope concept. Higher values of channel profile concavity and lower channel gradients in cirques imply lower transport capacities and, thus, lower sediment delivery ratios (SDR). These results are supported by (i) postglacial SDR values for cirques and noncirque basins of <15% and >28%, respectively, and (ii) larger fan sizes at outlets of noncirque basins compared to cirques. Although small headwater basins represent the steepest part of mountain environments and erode significant postglacial sediment, the majority of sediment remains in storage under interglacial climatic conditions and does not affect large-scale mountain river systems.

  14. Headwaters: The Next Stage in High School Integrated Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrick, Mike

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, the grade 12 program "Headwaters" was initiated and offered the following four courses: (1) Environment and Resource Management; (2) Canadian Literature; (3) Outdoor Activities; and (4) Interdisciplinary Studies. The author has always described the program as simply "school." The teachers teach curriculum courses outlined by the Ministry…

  15. Localized bedrock aquifer distribution explains discharge from a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Ken'ichirou; Fujimoto, Masamitsu; Katsura, Shin'ya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Sando, Yoshiki; Mizuyama, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    Understanding a discharge hydrograph is one of the leading interests in catchment hydrology. Recent research has provided credible information on the importance of bedrock groundwater on discharge hydrographs from headwater catchments. However, intensive monitoring of bedrock groundwater is rare in mountains with steep topography. Hence, how bedrock groundwater controls discharge from a steep headwater catchment is in dispute. In this study, we conducted long-term hydrological observations using densely located bedrock wells in a headwater catchment underlain by granitic bedrock. The catchment has steep topography affected by diastrophic activities. Results showed a fairly regionalized distribution of bedrock aquifers within a scale of tens of meters, consisting of upper, middle, and lower aquifers, instead of a gradual and continuous decline in water level from ridge to valley bottom. This was presumably attributable to the unique bedrock structure; fault lines developed in the watershed worked to form divides between the bedrock aquifers. Spatial expanse of each aquifer and the interaction among aquifers were key factors to explain gentle and considerable variations in the base flow discharge and triple-peak discharge responses of the observed hydrograph. A simple model was developed to simulate the discharge hydrograph, which computed each of the contributions from the soil mantle groundwater, from the lower aquifer, and from the middle aquifer to the discharge. The modeling results generally succeeded in reproducing the observed hydrograph. Thus, this study demonstrated that understanding regionalized bedrock aquifer distribution is pivotal for explaining discharge hydrograph from headwater catchments that have been affected by diastrophic activities.

  16. Following Mike's Blazes: Thoughts from the CELP and Headwaters Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalziel, Janet; Gad, Katie

    2010-01-01

    In Mike's 14 years teaching the Community Environmental Leadership Program (CELP) and Headwaters, over 500 students have passed through these programs. Mike wove together outdoor education, environmental education, place-based education, and praxis, amongst other pedagogies. Mike had a keen, intuitive sense of the educational potential that lay at…

  17. Runoff generation mechanism at two distinct headwater catchments - isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnal, Michal; Votrubová, Jana; Šanda, Martin; Tesař, Miroslav; Vogel, Tomáš; Dušek, Jaromír

    2016-04-01

    Data from two headwater catchments indicate considerably different runoff formation mechanisms. The contributions of different surface and subsurface runoff mechanisms to the catchment discharge formation at these two small forested headwater catchments are studied with help of the natural isotopic signatures of the observed fluxes. The Uhlirska catchment (1.78 sq. km, Jizera Mts., Czech Republic) is situated in headwater area of Cerna Nisa stream. Deluviofluvial granitic sediments in the valley bottom areas (riparian zones/wetlands) are surrounded by gentle hillslopes with shallow soils developed on crystalline bedrock. The Liz catchment (0.99 sq. km, Bohemian Forest, Czech Republic) belongs to hillslope-type catchments without riparian zones situated in headwater area of Volynka River. The soil at Liz is developed on biotite paragneiss bedrock. Autocorrelation analysis of the measured catchment discharge rates reveals different hydrograph characteristics for each of the two catchments. Estimated autocorrelation lengths differ by an order of magnitude. Variations of oxygen-18 isotope concentrations in precipitation, groundwater and streamflow were analyzed. Several significant rainfall-runoff events at each of the two catchments were analyzed in detail. These events exhibit substantial difference in isotopic compositions of event and pre-event water, which facilitates hydrograph separation. Clockwise and counterclockwise hysteretic relationships between the stream discharge and its isotope concentration were identified. Results were confronted with the previously published concepts of the runoff formation at the catchments under study. The research was funded by the Czech Science Foundation, project No. 14-15201J.

  18. BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY IN MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAINS HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to assess the applicability of using landscape variables in conjunction with water quality and benthic data to efficiently estimate stream condition of select headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plains. Eighty-two streams with riffle sit...

  19. An ecosystem services framework for multidisciplinary research in the Colorado River headwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Semmens, D.J.; Briggs, J.S.; Martin, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A rapidly spreading Mountain Pine Beetle epidemic is killing lodgepole pine forest in the Rocky Mountains, causing landscape change on a massive scale. Approximately 1.5 million acres of lodgepoledominated forest is already dead or dying in Colorado, the infestation is still spreading rapidly, and it is expected that in excess of 90 percent of all lodgepole forest will ultimately be killed. Drought conditions combined with dramatically reduced foliar moisture content due to stress or mortality from Mountain Pine Beetle have combined to elevate the probability of large fires throughout the Colorado River headwaters. Large numbers of homes in the wildland-urban interface, an extensive water supply infrastructure, and a local economy driven largely by recreational tourism make the potential costs associated with such a fire very large. Any assessment of fire risk for strategic planning of pre-fire management actions must consider these and a host of other important socioeconomic benefits derived from the Rocky Mountain Lodgepole Pine Forest ecosystem. This paper presents a plan to focus U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) multidisciplinary fire/beetle-related research in the Colorado River headwaters within a framework that integrates a wide variety of discipline-specific research to assess and value the full range of ecosystem services provided by the Rocky Mountain Lodgepole Pine Forest ecosystem. Baseline, unburned conditions will be compared with a hypothetical, fully burned scenario to (a) identify where services would be most severely impacted, and (b) quantify potential economic losses. Collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service will further yield a distributed model of fire probability that can be used in combination with the ecosystem service valuation to develop comprehensive, distributed maps of fire risk in the Upper Colorado River Basin. These maps will be intended for use by stakeholders as a strategic planning tool for pre-fire management activities and can

  20. A process-based hierarchical framework for monitoring glaciated alpine headwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weekes, Anne A.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Montgomery, David R.; Woodward, Andrea; Bolton, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the geomorphic complexity and wide range of hydrologic regimes found in alpine headwater channels that provide complex habitats for aquatic taxa. These geohydrologic elements are fundamental to better understand patterns in species assemblages and indicator taxa and are necessary to aquatic monitoring protocols that aim to track changes in physical conditions. Complex physical variables shape many biological and ecological traits, including life history strategies, but these mechanisms can only be understood if critical physical variables are adequately represented within the sampling framework. To better align sampling design protocols with current geohydrologic knowledge, we present a conceptual framework that incorporates regional-scale conditions, basin-scale longitudinal profiles, valley-scale glacial macroform structure, valley segment-scale (i.e., colluvial, alluvial, and bedrock), and reach-scale channel types. At the valley segment- and reach-scales, these hierarchical levels are associated with differences in streamflow and sediment regime, water source contribution and water temperature. Examples of linked physical-ecological hypotheses placed in a landscape context and a case study using the proposed framework are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of this approach for monitoring complex temporal and spatial patterns and processes in glaciated basins. This approach is meant to aid in comparisons between mountain regions on a global scale and to improve management of potentially endangered alpine species affected by climate change and other stressors.

  1. Fish communities of the Buffalo River Basin and nearby basins of Arkansas and their relation to selected environmental factors, 2001-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, James C.

    2004-01-01

    The Buffalo River lies in north-central Arkansas and is a tributary of the White River. Most of the length of the Buffalo River lies within the boundaries of Buffalo National River, a unit of the National Park Service; the upper 24 river kilometers lie within the boundary of the Ozark National Forest. Much of the upper and extreme lower parts of the basin on the south side of the Buffalo River is within the Ozark National Forest. During the summers of 2001 and 2002, fish communities were sampled at 52 sites in the study area that included the Buffalo River Basin and selected smaller nearby basins within the White River Basin in north-central Arkansas. Water quality (including nutrient and bacteria concentrations) and several other environmental factors (such as stream size, land use, substrate size, and riparian shading) also were measured. A total of 56 species of fish were collected from sites within the Buffalo River Basin in 2001 and 2002. All 56 species also were collected from within the boundaries of Buffalo National River. Twenty-two species were collected from headwater sites on tributaries of the Buffalo River; 27 species were collected from sites within or immediately adjacent to the Ozark National Forest. The list of species collected from Buffalo National River is similar to the list of species reported by previous investigators. Species richness at sites on the mainstem of the Buffalo River generally increased in a downstream direction. The number of species collected (both years combined) increased from 17 at the most upstream site to 38 near the mouth of the Buffalo River. In 2001 and 2002, a total of 53 species of fish were collected from sites outside the Buffalo River Basin. Several fish community metrics varied among sites in different site categories (mainstem, large tributary, small tributary, headwater, and developed out-of-basin sites). Median relative abundances of stonerollers ranged from about 25 to 55 percent and were highest at

  2. The role of groundwater in streamflow in a headwater catchment with sub-humid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaping; Tian, Fuqiang; Hu, Hongchang; Tie, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that bedrock groundwater can exert considerable influence on streamflow in headwater catchments under humid climate. However, study of the role of bedrock groundwater is still challenged due to limited direct observation data. In this study, by utilizing observed hydrometric and hydrochemical data, we aimed at characterize the bedrock groundwater's response to rainfall at hillslope and catchment scales in a small headwater catchment with sub-humid climate. We selected Xitaizi catchment with area of 6.7 km in the earth-rock mountain region, which located in the north of Beijing, China, as study area. The catchment bedrock is mainly consist of fractured granite. Four weather stations were installed to observe the weather condition and soil volumetric water content (VWC) at depth of 10-60 cm with 10-minute interval. Five wells with depth of 10 m were drilled in two slopes to monitor the bedrock water table by pneumatic water gauge. At slope 1, the soil VWC at depth of 10-80 cm were also observed by soil moisture sensors, and surface/subsurface hillslope runoff at three different layers (0-20cm, 20-80cm, 80-300cm) was observed by three recording buckets. Field works were conducted from July 2013 to November 2014. During the period, precipitation, river, spring and groundwater were sampled nearly monthly. Water temperature, electrical conductivity (EC) and pH were measured in site with portable instruments. In addition, the precipitation, river and groundwater were also sampled intensively during two storm events. All the samples were subjected to stable isotope analysis, the samples taken monthly during the period from July 2013 to July 2014 were subjected to hydrochemistry analysis. Our results show that: (1) the bedrock groundwater is the dominant component of streamflow in the headwater catchment with sub-humid climate; (2) stream is recharged by groundwater sourcing from different mountains with different hydrochemistry characteristics

  3. Effect of ecological restoration and climate change on ecosystems: a case study in the Three-Rivers Headwater Region, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chong; Zhang, Linbo

    2016-06-01

    The Three-Rivers Headwater Region (TRHR) is the headwater of the Yangtze River Basin (YARB), Yellow River Basin (YRB), and Lancang River Basin (LRB); it is known as China's 'Water Tower' owing to its important supply of freshwater. In order to assess ecosystem changes in the TRHR during 2000-2012, we systematically and comprehensively evaluated a combination of model simulation results and actual observational data. The results showed the following: (1) Ecosystem pattern was relatively stable during 2000-2010, with a slight decrease in farmland and desert areas, and a slight increase in grassland and wetland/water-body areas. (2) A warmer and wetter climate, and ecological engineering, caused the vegetation cover and productivity to significantly improve. (3) Precipitation was the main controlling factor for streamflow. A significant increase in precipitation during 2000-2012 resulted in an obvious increase in annual and seasonal streamflow. Glacier melting also contributed to the streamflow increase. (4) The total amount of soil conservation increased slightly from 2000 to 2012. The increase in precipitation caused rainfall erosivity to increase, which enhanced the intensity of soil erosion. The decrease in wind speed decreased wind erosion and the frequency of sandstorms. (5) The overall habitat quality in the TRHR was stable between 2000 and 2010, and the spatial pattern exhibited obvious heterogeneity. In some counties that included nature reserves, habitat quality was slightly higher in 2010 than in 2000, which reflected the effectiveness of the ecological restoration. Overall, the aforementioned ecosystem changes are the combined results of ecological restoration and climate change, and they are likely a local and temporary improvement, rather than a comprehensive and fundamental change. Therefore, more investments and efforts are needed to preserve natural ecosystems.

  4. Effect of ecological restoration and climate change on ecosystems: a case study in the Three-Rivers Headwater Region, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chong; Zhang, Linbo

    2016-06-01

    The Three-Rivers Headwater Region (TRHR) is the headwater of the Yangtze River Basin (YARB), Yellow River Basin (YRB), and Lancang River Basin (LRB); it is known as China's 'Water Tower' owing to its important supply of freshwater. In order to assess ecosystem changes in the TRHR during 2000-2012, we systematically and comprehensively evaluated a combination of model simulation results and actual observational data. The results showed the following: (1) Ecosystem pattern was relatively stable during 2000-2010, with a slight decrease in farmland and desert areas, and a slight increase in grassland and wetland/water-body areas. (2) A warmer and wetter climate, and ecological engineering, caused the vegetation cover and productivity to significantly improve. (3) Precipitation was the main controlling factor for streamflow. A significant increase in precipitation during 2000-2012 resulted in an obvious increase in annual and seasonal streamflow. Glacier melting also contributed to the streamflow increase. (4) The total amount of soil conservation increased slightly from 2000 to 2012. The increase in precipitation caused rainfall erosivity to increase, which enhanced the intensity of soil erosion. The decrease in wind speed decreased wind erosion and the frequency of sandstorms. (5) The overall habitat quality in the TRHR was stable between 2000 and 2010, and the spatial pattern exhibited obvious heterogeneity. In some counties that included nature reserves, habitat quality was slightly higher in 2010 than in 2000, which reflected the effectiveness of the ecological restoration. Overall, the aforementioned ecosystem changes are the combined results of ecological restoration and climate change, and they are likely a local and temporary improvement, rather than a comprehensive and fundamental change. Therefore, more investments and efforts are needed to preserve natural ecosystems. PMID:27240853

  5. Linking brownification to carbon cycling in headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasching, C.; Behounek, B.; Singer, G. A.; Battin, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Brownification of inland waters is becoming a global phenomenon with major implications for aquatic ecology and drinking water supply. The unprecedented export of humic substances from the terrestrial environment causes this notable change in colour of stream and lake waters. Given the net heterotrophy of most inland waters, altered carbon fluxes may impact microbial metabolism and ultimately carbon dioxide emissions from these inland waters. Yet the implications for carbon cycling remain elusive. Here, we investigate the coupling of microbial metabolism, organic carbon characteristics and streamwater CO2 concntration along a brownification gradient in 20 headwater streams draining catchments covered with coniferous forest and peatland in the Bohemian Massive, Austria. We break down brownification into its components of concentration and quality, and relate each to carbon cycling in headwater streams. Brownification did not only increase streamwater dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration but also induced changes in DOM quality. Humic-like and aromatic compounds of terrigenous origin -- conferring the brown colour to the water -- were metabolised by microbial heterotrophs in the streamwater yet at the cost of low carbon use efficiency (CUE). Potential CO2 evasion from headwaters was controlled by the quantity of bioavailable carbon as well as by the coupling of carbon qulity and microbial metabolism. This implies brownification to contribute to CO2 evasion from streams as a large fraction of terrigenous organic carbon is respired by microbial heterotrophs along the flow path. Our results illuminate the impact of brownification on carbon cycling which may gain relevance as global change progresses.

  6. Hydrology and Geomorphology of Tallgrass Prairie Intermittent Headwater Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. D.; Grudzinski, B.

    2011-12-01

    The arid to semi-arid Great Plains region of the United States covers more than 1 million km2, yet virtually nothing is known about the geomorphology of its intermittent headwater streams. These streams and the perennial rivers they feed support a unique and increasingly endangered assemblage of endemic fish species. While human impacts in the region are not at first glace significant, the reality is that the Great Plains are an intensively managed landscape, with pervasive cattle grazing, channelization, and groundwater over-pumping affecting these systems. These stresses will only increase with potential climate and related land use changes. Few natural remnants of native grassland remain today, limiting opportunities to study the natural dynamics of these systems in contrast to the anthropogenically modified systems. This paper presents a review of the existing geomorphological and hydrological knowledge of Great Plains headwater streams and presents the initial analysis of an 18 year intermittent headwater stream record from the tallgrass Konza Prairie LTER, Kansas. Results suggest that fire frequency and grazing and the resultant riparian vegetation composition strongly influence stream flow dynamics as well as stream geomorphology.

  7. Hydrologic connectivity and the contribution of stream headwaters to ecological integrity at regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeman, Mary C.; Pringle, C.M.; Jackson, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    Cumulatively, headwater streams contribute to maintaining hydrologic connectivity and ecosystem integrity at regional scales. Hydrologic connectivity is the water-mediated transport of matter, energy and organisms within or between elements of the hydrologic cycle. Headwater streams compose over two-thirds of total stream length in a typical river drainage and directly connect the upland and riparian landscape to the rest of the stream ecosystem. Altering headwater streams, e.g., by channelization, diversion through pipes, impoundment and burial, modifies fluxes between uplands and downstream river segments and eliminates distinctive habitats. The large-scale ecological effects of altering headwaters are amplified by land uses that alter runoff and nutrient loads to streams, and by widespread dam construction on larger rivers (which frequently leaves free-flowing upstream portions of river systems essential to sustaining aquatic biodiversity). We discuss three examples of large-scale consequences of cumulative headwater alteration. Downstream eutrophication and coastal hypoxia result, in part, from agricultural practices that alter headwaters and wetlands while increasing nutrient runoff. Extensive headwater alteration is also expected to lower secondary productivity of river systems by reducing stream-system length and trophic subsidies to downstream river segments, affecting aquatic communities and terrestrial wildlife that utilize aquatic resources. Reduced viability of freshwater biota may occur with cumulative headwater alteration, including for species that occupy a range of stream sizes but for which headwater streams diversify the network of interconnected populations or enhance survival for particular life stages. Developing a more predictive understanding of ecological patterns that may emerge on regional scales as a result of headwater alterations will require studies focused on components and pathways that connect headwaters to river, coastal and

  8. Ecological linkages between headwaters and downstream ecosystems: Transport of organic matter, invertebrates, and wood down headwater channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wipfli, M.S.; Richardson, J.S.; Naiman, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Headwater streams make up a large proportion of the total length and watershed area of fluvial networks, and are partially characterized by the large volume of organic matter (large wood, detritus, and dissolved organic matter) and invertebrate inputs from the riparian forest, relative to stream size. Much of those inputs are exported to downstream reaches through time where they potentially subsidize river communities. The relative rates, timing, and conversion processes that carry inputs from small streams to downstream reaches are reasonably well quantified. For example, larger particles are converted to smaller particles, which are more easily exported. Also, dissolved organic matter and surface biofilms are converted to larger particles which can be more easily intercepted by consumers. However, the quality of these materials as it affects biological activity downstream is not well known, nor is the extent to which timing permits biological use of those particles. These ecological unknowns need to be resolved. Further, land uses may disrupt and diminish material transport to downstream reaches by removing sources (e.g., forest harvest), by affecting transport and decomposition processes (e.g., flow regulation, irrigation, changes in biotic communities), and by altering mechanisms of storage within headwaters (e.g., channelization). We present conceptual models of energy and nutrient fluxes that outline small stream processes and pathways important to downstream communities, and we identify informational gaps that, if filled, could significantly advance the understanding of linkages between headwater streams and larger rivers. The models, based on empirical evidence and best professional judgment, suggest that navigable waters are significantly influenced by headwater streams through hydrological and ecological connectivities, and land use can dramatically influence these natural connectivities, impacting downstream riverine ecosystems. ?? 2007 American Water

  9. Ecoregion and land-use influence invertebrate and detritus transport from headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Binckley, Christopher A.; Wipfli, Mark S.; Medhurst, R. Bruce; Polivka, Karl; Hessburg, Paul F.; Salter, R. Brion; Kill, Joshua Y.

    2010-01-01

    4. Understanding the quantity and variation of headwater subsidies across climate and disturbance gradients is needed to appreciate the significance of ecological linkages between headwaters and associated downstream habitats. This will enable the accurate assessment of resource management impacts on stream ecosystems. Predicting the consequences of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on headwater stream transport rates will require knowledge of how both local and regional factors influence these potential subsidies. Our results suggest that resources transported from headwater streams reflect both the meso-scale land-use surrounding these areas and the constraints imposed by the ecoregion in which they are embedded.

  10. Links between riparian landcover, instream environment and fish assemblages in headwater streams of south-eastern Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruz, Bruna B.; Miranda, Leandro E.; Cetra, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesised and tested a hierarchical organisation model where riparian landcover would influence bank composition and light availability, which in turn would influence instream environments and control fish assemblages. The study was conducted during the dry season in 11 headwater tributaries of the Sorocaba River in the upper Paraná River Basin, south-eastern Brazil. We focused on seven environmental factors each represented by one or multiple environmental variables and seven fish functional traits each represented by two or more classes. Multivariate direct gradient analyses suggested that riparian zone landcover can be considered a higher level causal factor in a network of relations that control instream characteristics and fish assemblages. Our results provide a framework for a hierarchical conceptual model that identifies singular and collective influences of variables from different scales on each other and ultimately on different aspects related to stream fish functional composition. This conceptual model is focused on the relationships between riparian landcover and instream variables as causal factors on the organisation of stream fish assemblages. Our results can also be viewed as a model for headwater stream management in that landcover can be manipulated to influence factors such as bank composition, substrates and water quality, whereas fish assemblage composition can be used as indicators to monitor the success of such efforts.

  11. Beyond Colorado's Front Range - A new look at Laramide basin subsidence, sedimentation, and deformation in north-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, James C.; Trexler, James H.; Cashman, Patricia H.; Miller, Ian M.; Shroba, Ralph R.; Cosca, Michael A.; Workman, Jeremiah B.

    2010-01-01

    This field trip highlights recent research into the Laramide uplift, erosion, and sedimentation on the western side of the northern Colorado Front Range. The Laramide history of the North Park?Middle Park basin (designated the Colorado Headwaters Basin in this paper) is distinctly different from that of the Denver basin on the eastern flank of the range. The Denver basin stratigraphy records the transition from Late Cretaceous marine shale to recessional shoreline sandstones to continental, fluvial, marsh, and coal mires environments, followed by orogenic sediments that span the K-T boundary. Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene strata in the Denver basin consist of two mega-fan complexes that are separated by a 9 million-year interval of erosion/non-deposition between about 63 and 54 Ma. In contrast, the marine shale unit on the western flank of the Front Range was deeply eroded over most of the area of the Colorado Headwaters Basin (approximately one km removed) prior to any orogenic sediment accumulation. New 40Ar-39Ar ages indicate the oldest sediments on the western flank of the Front Range were as young as about 61 Ma. They comprise the Windy Gap Volcanic Member of the Middle Park Formation, which consists of coarse, immature volcanic conglomerates derived from nearby alkalic-mafic volcanic edifices that were forming at about 65?61 Ma. Clasts of Proterozoic granite, pegmatite, and gneiss (eroded from the uplifted core of the Front Range) seem to arrive in the Colorado Headwaters Basin at different times in different places, but they become dominant in arkosic sandstones and conglomerates about one km above the base of the Colorado Headwaters Basin section. Paleocurrent trends suggest the southern end of the Colorado Headwaters Basin was structurally closed because all fluvial deposits show a northward component of transport. Lacustrine depositional environments are indicated by various sedimentological features in several sections within the >3 km of sediment

  12. Earth Science Studies in Support of Public Policy Development and Land Stewardship - Headwaters Province, Idaho and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey Headwaters Province Project Team Edited by Lund, Karen

    2007-01-01

    The USGS Headwaters Province project in western Montana and northern and central Idaho was designed to provide geoscience data and interpretations to Federal Land Management Agencies and to respond to specific concerns of USDA Forest Service Regions 1 and 4. The project has emphasized development of digital geoscience data, GIS analyses, topical studies, and new geologic interpretations. Studies were designed to more completely map lithologic units and determine controls of deformation, magmatism, and mineralizing processes. Topical studies of geologic basement control on these processes include study of regional metallogenic patterns and their relation to the composition and architecture of underlying, unexposed basement; timing of igneous and hydrothermal systems, to identify regionally important metallogenic magmatism; and the geologic setting of Proterozoic strata, to better understand how their sedimentary basins developed and to define the origin of sediment-hosted mineral deposits. Interrelated products of the project are at complementary scales.

  13. Influence of catchment land cover on stoichiometry and stable isotope compositions of basal resources and macroinvertebrate consumers in headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic land use affects aquatic landscapes. For example, landscape-level conversion to urban or agricultural land can heavily influence nutrient cycles in headwater streams via increased nutrient loading and altered hydrologic patterns. Recent studies in headwater streams ...

  14. Relative influence of different habitat factors on creek chub population structure within channelized agricultural headwater streams in central Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Creek chubs (Semotilus atromaculatus) are commonly found within channelized agricultural headwater streams within the Midwestern United States. Understanding the relationships of this headwater fish species with different habitat factors will provide information that can assist with developing resto...

  15. Relative importance of water chemistry and habitat to fish communities in headwater streams influenced by agricultural land use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channelized headwater streams are common throughout agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern United States. Understanding the relative impacts of agricultural contaminants and habitat degradation on the aquatic biota within agricultural headwater streams will provide information that can assist wi...

  16. Erosion, sediment discharge, and channel morphology in the upper Chattahoochee River basin, Georgia, with a discussion of the contribution of suspended sediment to stream quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.; Carey, W.P.; Stamer, J.K.; Kleckner, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The 3,550 square miles of the Upper Chattahoochee River basin is an area of diverse physiographic and land-use characteristics. The headwater areas are mountainous with steep, relatively narrow channels. Land in the headwater areas is heavily forested, but small towns and farms are common in the valleys of large streams. Downstream, the basin is characterized by low hills and wider stream channels. Land in this part of the basin is also predominantly forested; however, large agricultural and urban areas are common. Urban land use is particularly intensive within the Atlanta Metropolitan Area.

  17. Utilization of ancient permafrost carbon in headwaters of Arctic fluvial networks

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Paul J.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Zimov, Nikita; Davydova, Anna; Vonk, Jorien E.; Holmes, Robert M.; Spencer, Robert G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Northern high-latitude rivers are major conduits of carbon from land to coastal seas and the Arctic Ocean. Arctic warming is promoting terrestrial permafrost thaw and shifting hydrologic flowpaths, leading to fluvial mobilization of ancient carbon stores. Here we describe 14C and 13C characteristics of dissolved organic carbon from fluvial networks across the Kolyma River Basin (Siberia), and isotopic changes during bioincubation experiments. Microbial communities utilized ancient carbon (11,300 to >50,000 14C years) in permafrost thaw waters and millennial-aged carbon (up to 10,000 14C years) across headwater streams. Microbial demand was supported by progressively younger (14C-enriched) carbon downstream through the network, with predominantly modern carbon pools subsidizing microorganisms in large rivers and main-stem waters. Permafrost acts as a significant and preferentially degradable source of bioavailable carbon in Arctic freshwaters, which is likely to increase as permafrost thaw intensifies causing positive climate feedbacks in response to on-going climate change. PMID:26206473

  18. Utilization of ancient permafrost carbon in headwaters of Arctic fluvial networks.

    PubMed

    Mann, Paul J; Eglinton, Timothy I; McIntyre, Cameron P; Zimov, Nikita; Davydova, Anna; Vonk, Jorien E; Holmes, Robert M; Spencer, Robert G M

    2015-01-01

    Northern high-latitude rivers are major conduits of carbon from land to coastal seas and the Arctic Ocean. Arctic warming is promoting terrestrial permafrost thaw and shifting hydrologic flowpaths, leading to fluvial mobilization of ancient carbon stores. Here we describe (14)C and (13)C characteristics of dissolved organic carbon from fluvial networks across the Kolyma River Basin (Siberia), and isotopic changes during bioincubation experiments. Microbial communities utilized ancient carbon (11,300 to >50,000 (14)C years) in permafrost thaw waters and millennial-aged carbon (up to 10,000 (14)C years) across headwater streams. Microbial demand was supported by progressively younger ((14)C-enriched) carbon downstream through the network, with predominantly modern carbon pools subsidizing microorganisms in large rivers and main-stem waters. Permafrost acts as a significant and preferentially degradable source of bioavailable carbon in Arctic freshwaters, which is likely to increase as permafrost thaw intensifies causing positive climate feedbacks in response to on-going climate change. PMID:26206473

  19. Chloride sources in urban and rural headwater catchments, central New York.

    PubMed

    Gutchess, Kristina; Jin, Li; Lautz, Laura; Shaw, Stephen B; Zhou, Xiaoli; Lu, Zunli

    2016-09-15

    Road salt used as a deicing agent in winter months has become an emerging contaminant to streams and groundwater. In central New York, road salts are applied heavily during winter months. Recognizing potential sources of salinity to a river may reveal processes controlling the salinization of freshwater systems, with implications for future management practices. The Tioughnioga River, located in central New York, is a headwater of the Susquehanna River, which flows into the Chesapeake Bay. Salinity of the Tioughnioga River water has been increasing since the late 1930s. In this study, water samples were collected weekly at the East and West Branches of the Tioughnioga River from 2012 to 2014. We characterize natural and anthropogenic sources of salinity in the Tioughnioga River, using two independent approaches: (1) chloride to bromide ratios (Cl/Br) and (2) linear discriminant analysis. Ratios of Cl/Br suggest that road salt runoff influence is notable in both branches, but is more significant in the West Branch, consistent with a greater area of urban land. Linear discriminant analysis confirms the results of Cl/Br in the West Branch and further indicates presence of Appalachian Basin Brines in the East Branch, although their contribution may be volumetrically small. Longitudinal stream Cl concentration profiles indicate that sources of pollution are particularly concentrated around urban areas. Residence time of Cl in the watershed is estimated to be approximately 20 to 30years using a mixing model, suggesting that stream Cl concentrations likely will continue to rise for several decades.

  20. Utilization of ancient permafrost carbon in headwaters of Arctic fluvial networks.

    PubMed

    Mann, Paul J; Eglinton, Timothy I; McIntyre, Cameron P; Zimov, Nikita; Davydova, Anna; Vonk, Jorien E; Holmes, Robert M; Spencer, Robert G M

    2015-07-24

    Northern high-latitude rivers are major conduits of carbon from land to coastal seas and the Arctic Ocean. Arctic warming is promoting terrestrial permafrost thaw and shifting hydrologic flowpaths, leading to fluvial mobilization of ancient carbon stores. Here we describe (14)C and (13)C characteristics of dissolved organic carbon from fluvial networks across the Kolyma River Basin (Siberia), and isotopic changes during bioincubation experiments. Microbial communities utilized ancient carbon (11,300 to >50,000 (14)C years) in permafrost thaw waters and millennial-aged carbon (up to 10,000 (14)C years) across headwater streams. Microbial demand was supported by progressively younger ((14)C-enriched) carbon downstream through the network, with predominantly modern carbon pools subsidizing microorganisms in large rivers and main-stem waters. Permafrost acts as a significant and preferentially degradable source of bioavailable carbon in Arctic freshwaters, which is likely to increase as permafrost thaw intensifies causing positive climate feedbacks in response to on-going climate change.

  1. Chloride sources in urban and rural headwater catchments, central New York.

    PubMed

    Gutchess, Kristina; Jin, Li; Lautz, Laura; Shaw, Stephen B; Zhou, Xiaoli; Lu, Zunli

    2016-09-15

    Road salt used as a deicing agent in winter months has become an emerging contaminant to streams and groundwater. In central New York, road salts are applied heavily during winter months. Recognizing potential sources of salinity to a river may reveal processes controlling the salinization of freshwater systems, with implications for future management practices. The Tioughnioga River, located in central New York, is a headwater of the Susquehanna River, which flows into the Chesapeake Bay. Salinity of the Tioughnioga River water has been increasing since the late 1930s. In this study, water samples were collected weekly at the East and West Branches of the Tioughnioga River from 2012 to 2014. We characterize natural and anthropogenic sources of salinity in the Tioughnioga River, using two independent approaches: (1) chloride to bromide ratios (Cl/Br) and (2) linear discriminant analysis. Ratios of Cl/Br suggest that road salt runoff influence is notable in both branches, but is more significant in the West Branch, consistent with a greater area of urban land. Linear discriminant analysis confirms the results of Cl/Br in the West Branch and further indicates presence of Appalachian Basin Brines in the East Branch, although their contribution may be volumetrically small. Longitudinal stream Cl concentration profiles indicate that sources of pollution are particularly concentrated around urban areas. Residence time of Cl in the watershed is estimated to be approximately 20 to 30years using a mixing model, suggesting that stream Cl concentrations likely will continue to rise for several decades. PMID:27183460

  2. Where Did All the Streams Go? Effects of Urbanization on Hydrologic Permanence of Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams represent a majority (up to 70%) of the stream length in the United States; however, these small streams are often piped or filled to accommodate residential, commercial, and industrial development. Legal protection of headwater streams under the Clean Water Ac...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS, METHODS AND ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES FOR USE IN HEADWATER INTERMITTENT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite representing the most abundant and widespread of our nation's surface waters, regions, states and tribes have received little guidance specific to headwater intermittent streams from the U.S. EPA. Headwater streams lie at the terrestrial-aquatic interface both spatially,...

  4. 78 FR 42030 - Reservoirs at Headwaters of the Mississippi River; Use and Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    .... Moreover, the operating limits in the Water Control Manuals prescribe not only the minimum level at which a... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 207 Reservoirs at Headwaters of the Mississippi River... rules regarding use and administration of the reservoirs at the headwaters of the Mississippi River...

  5. Research to inform policy on headwater streams: ongoing and future directions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams are the exterior links of stream networks and represent a substantial proportion of U.S. stream miles. Alteration and loss of headwater streams have occurred without an understanding of the potential consequences to larger downstream waterbodies. Recent court ca...

  6. Headwater effects on downstream waters: Legal perspectives, science needs, and assessment approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams make up at least 53% of total stream length in the US. Although these systems are of interest for their own sake, there has recently been significant focus on how headwater streams contribute to downstream waters. This has resulted in part from recent legal op...

  7. Seasonal nitrate uptake and denitrification potential in small headwater streams in the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Headwater streams can serve as important sources and sinks for nitrogen (N) for downstream receiving waters. Prior research on N removal in small streams has largely focused on growing season conditions. Here we examine the influence of headwater...

  8. Annual and seasonal differences in pesticide mixtures within channelized agricultural headwater streams in central Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Only a limited amount of information on pesticide mixtures within agricultural headwater streams is available. A greater understanding of the characteristics of pesticide mixtures and their spatial and temporal trends within agricultural headwater streams is needed to evaluate the risks of pesticid...

  9. 18 CFR 11.11 - Energy gains method of determining headwater benefits charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... power generation is not a function of the headwater project, section 10(f) costs will be apportioned... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Energy gains method of determining headwater benefits charges. 11.11 Section 11.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...

  10. 18 CFR 11.11 - Energy gains method of determining headwater benefits charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... power generation is not a function of the headwater project, section 10(f) costs will be apportioned... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Energy gains method of determining headwater benefits charges. 11.11 Section 11.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...

  11. 18 CFR 11.11 - Energy gains method of determining headwater benefits charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... power generation is not a function of the headwater project, section 10(f) costs will be apportioned... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Energy gains method of determining headwater benefits charges. 11.11 Section 11.11 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...

  12. The effects of season and agriculture on nitrous oxide production in headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, J J; Arango, C P; Tank, J L

    2009-01-01

    Streams and rivers are a globally significant source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), a potent greenhouse gas. However, there remains much uncertainty in the magnitude of N(2)O emissions from these sources, partly due to an incomplete understanding of the factors that control microbial N(2)O production in lotic sediments. During 2004-2005 we measured sediment N(2)O production in 12 headwater streams across an agricultural land use gradient. Stream water nitrate (NO(3)(-)) concentrations were positively related to the proportion of agricultural land use in the basin and frequently exceeded 20 mg N L(-1) in the stream draining the most agricultural basin. Stream sediments were nearly always a net source of N(2)O, and production rates were positively related to stream water NO(3)(-) concentrations and sediment carbon content. There were no seasonal patterns in N(2)O production rates during 2004, but stream water NO(3)(-) and N(2)O production both peaked during the winter of 2005. The spike in NO(3)(-) concentrations likely resulted from winter rain and snowmelt that flushed NO(3)(-) from the soils following a dry summer and fall. In turn, the elevated stream water NO(3)(-) concentrations stimulated in-stream N(2)O production rates. Overall, we were only able to explain 29% of the variation in N(2)O production rates on a log scale. The unexplained variation may be due to differences in the fraction of denitrified NO(3)(-) that is converted to N(2)O among the study sites, or that our measures of substrate availability in the water column were not reflective of substrate availability in the porewater used by denitrifiers.

  13. Controls on River Longitudinal Profiles: Waipaoa River Basin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, D. M.; Gomez, B.

    2006-12-01

    In a regional sense, rivers adjust their gradient to discharge and the character of the rock or sediment that forms the channel boundary. Accordingly, as J.T. Hack demonstrated, rivers of the same size flowing across similar substrates tend to have similar profiles. The neighboring 222 km2 Mangatu and 239 km2 Upper Waipaoa catchments in the headwaters of the Waipaoa River basin, New Zealand, offer an ideal setting in which to examine the interaction of these and other variables on river longitudinal profiles. These two catchments are not only under laid by similar lithologies, but also have been subjected to a similar climatic regime and have experienced a similar rate of uplift during the past ~15 kyr. There is also little difference in total-relief, drainage density and the frequency distribution of slope angles between the two catchments, or in the median size of sediment present along the main stream channels. Yet, despite these similarities, the longitudinal profiles of the Mangatu and Upper Waipaoa rivers are quite different, and the upper reaches of the main stream in latter catchment are ~100-m lower than adjacent reaches along the neighboring Mangatu River. We attribute the difference in the longitudinal profiles to the way in which discharge increases in a downstream direction along the two rivers. Simply put, in the Mangatu catchment drainage area increases much more slowly with main stream channel length than it does in the Upper Waipaoa catchment. In the absence of obvious differences in the regional environment, the observed difference between the longitudinal profiles of similar sized rivers in neighboring basins serves to emphasize that the distribution of energy in the stream-channel system is dependent on the structure of the drainage network, and that an orderly empirical relationship between drainage basin area and the length of the main stream channel may not always apply.

  14. Are Salamanders Useful Indicators of Hydrologic Permanence in Headwater Streams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B.; Fritz, K.

    2005-05-01

    Regulatory agencies need appropriate indicators of stream permanence to aid in jurisdictional determinations for headwater streams. We evaluated salamanders as permanence indicators because they are often abundant in fishless headwaters. Salamander and habitat data were collected in spring and summer 2003 from 59 sites located longitudinally along 17 forested streams in KY, IN, and OH. Larval Eurycea bislineata/cirrigera dominated all forests, and their abundances were highly correlated with drainage areas and channel dimensions. Appalachian streams were more diverse and had intermittent sites with more Desmognathus and Gyrinophilus spp. Of 22 sites where larvae were collected in spring, 9 sites subsequently dried in summer, suggesting salamanders either emigrated or died. We therefore only used taxa with multi-year larval stages as indicators of perennial water. Salamander larvae >1 yr old were collected from each locality in drainage areas <0.17 km2. However, these older larvae were often found in isolated pools that serve as refugia during dry periods. Findings suggest salamanders with multi-year larval periods can indicate perennial waters and that their use is more effective in Appalachia where abundance and diversity are high. Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  15. Comprehensive multiyear carbon budget of a temperate headwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argerich, Alba; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Sherri L.; Wondzell, Steven M.; Dosch, Nicholas; Corson-Rikert, Hayley; Ashkenas, Linda R.; Pennington, Robert; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-05-01

    Headwater streams comprise nearly 90% of the total length of perennial channels in global catchments. They mineralize organic carbon entering from terrestrial systems, evade terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2), and generate and remove carbon through in-stream primary production and respiration. Despite their importance, headwater streams are often neglected in global carbon budgets primarily because of a lack of available data. We measured these processes, in detail, over a 10 year period in a stream draining a 96 ha forested watershed in western Oregon, USA. This stream, which represents only 0.4% of the watershed area, exported 159 kg C ha-1 yr-1, similar to the global exports for large rivers. Stream export was dominated by downstream transport of dissolved inorganic carbon (63 kg C ha-1 yr-1) and by evasion of CO2 to the atmosphere (42 kg C ha-1 yr-1), leaving the remainder of 51 kg C ha-1 yr-1 for downstream transport of organic carbon (17 kg C ha-1 yr-1 and 34 kg C ha-1 yr-1 in dissolved and particulate form, respectively).

  16. From headwaters to coast: influence of human activities on water quality of the Potomac River Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Suzanne B.; Rice, Karen C.; Bricker, Owen P.

    2014-01-01

    The natural aging process of Chesapeake Bay and its tributary estuaries has been accelerated by human activities around the shoreline and within the watershed, increasing sediment and nutrient loads delivered to the bay. Riverine nutrients cause algal growth in the bay leading to reductions in light penetration with consequent declines in sea grass growth, smothering of bottom-dwelling organisms, and decreases in bottom-water dissolved oxygen as algal blooms decay. Historically, bay waters were filtered by oysters, but declines in oyster populations from overfishing and disease have led to higher concentrations of fine-sediment particles and phytoplankton in the water column. Assessments of water and biological resource quality in Chesapeake Bay and tributaries, such as the Potomac River, show a continual degraded state. In this paper, we pay tribute to Owen Bricker’s comprehensive, holistic scientific perspective using an approach that examines the connection between watershed and estuary. We evaluated nitrogen inputs from Potomac River headwaters, nutrient-related conditions within the estuary, and considered the use of shellfish aquaculture as an in-the-water nutrient management measure. Data from headwaters, nontidal, and estuarine portions of the Potomac River watershed and estuary were analyzed to examine the contribution from different parts of the watershed to total nitrogen loads to the estuary. An eutrophication model was applied to these data to evaluate eutrophication status and changes since the early 1990s and for comparison to regional and national conditions. A farm-scale aquaculture model was applied and results scaled to the estuary to determine the potential for shellfish (oyster) aquaculture to mediate eutrophication impacts. Results showed that (1) the contribution to nitrogen loads from headwater streams is small (about 2 %) of total inputs to the Potomac River Estuary; (2) eutrophic conditions in the Potomac River Estuary have improved in

  17. Pattern and process in Northern Rocky Mountain headwaters: Ecological linkages in the headwaters of the Crown of the Continent

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, F.R.; Stanford, J.A.; Lorang, M.S.

    2007-02-15

    The Crown of the Continent is one of the premiere ecosystems in North America containing Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, the Bob Marshall-Great Bear-Scapegoat Wilderness Complex in Montana, various Provincial Parks in British Columbia and Alberta, several national and state forest lands in the USA, and Crown Lands in Canada. The region is also the headwater source for three of the continent's great rivers: Columbia, Missouri and Saskatchewan that flow to the Pacific, Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, respectively. While the region has many remarkably pristine headwater streams and receiving rivers, there are many pending threats to water quality and quantity. One of the most urgent threats comes from the coal and gas fields in the northern part of the Crown of the Continent, where coal deposits are proposed for mountain-top removal and open-pit mining operations. This will have significant effects on the waters of the region, its native plants and animals and quality of life of the people.

  18. Multi-Model CIMP5 projected impacts of increased greenhouse gases on the Niger basin and implications for hydropower production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyerinde, Ganiyu; Wisser, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    Climate change could potentially have large impacts on water availability in West Africa and the predictions are accrued with high uncertainties in this region. Countries in the Niger River basin (West Africa) plan the investment of 200 million in the installation of an additional 400MW of hydropower in the nearest future, adding to the existing 685MW. With the impacts of climate change in the basin already occurring, there is a need for comprehending the influence of future hydro-climatic changes on water resources and hydro-power generation in the basin. This study uses a hydrological model to simulate river flow under present and future conditions and evaluates the impacts of potential changes on electricity production of the largest hydroelectric dam (Kainji) in the Niger Basin. The Kainji reservoir produces 25 per cent of the current energy needs of Nigeria and was subject to large fluctuations in energy production as a result of variable inflow and operational reasons. Inflow into the reservoir was simulated using hydroclimatic data from a set of 7 regional climate models (RCM) with two emission scenarios from the CORDEX-Africa regional downscaling experiment, driven with CMIP5 data. Based on observations of inflow, water level in the reservoir, and energy production we developed a simple hydroelectricity production model to simulate future energy production for the reservoir. Results suggest increases in river flow for the majority of RCM data as a result of increases in precipitation in the headwaters of the basin around 2050 and slightly decreasing trends for low emission scenarios by the end of the century. Despite this consistent increase, shifts in timing of river flow can challenge the reliable production of energy. This analysis could help assess the planning of hydropower schemes in the basin for a sustainable production of hydroelectricity in the future.

  19. Predicting alpine headwater stream intermittency: a case study in the northern Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Thomas R.; Blasch, Kyle W.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation used climatic, geological, and environmental data coupled with observational stream intermittency data to predict alpine headwater stream intermittency. Prediction was made using a random forest classification model. Results showed that the most important variables in the prediction model were snowpack persistence, represented by average snow extent from March through July, mean annual mean monthly minimum temperature, and surface geology types. For stream catchments with intermittent headwater streams, snowpack, on average, persisted until early June, whereas for stream catchments with perennial headwater streams, snowpack, on average, persisted until early July. Additionally, on average, stream catchments with intermittent headwater streams were about 0.7 °C warmer than stream catchments with perennial headwater streams. Finally, headwater stream catchments primarily underlain by coarse, permeable sediment are significantly more likely to have intermittent headwater streams than those primarily underlain by impermeable bedrock. Comparison of the predicted streamflow classification with observed stream status indicated a four percent classification error for first-order streams and a 21 percent classification error for all stream orders in the study area.

  20. Large wood dynamics in central Appalachian hemlock headwater ravines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, K. H.; Soltesz, P.; Jaeger, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Large wood (LW) is a critical component to forested mountain headwater streams contributing significantly to geomorphic and ecological processes. The character of LW is a function of valley recruitment processes that influence LW entering the channel and instream retention processes that influence LW transport through the channel reach. In the central Appalachian Mountains, US, LW dynamics in eastern hemlock-dominated ravines may change due to the invasive insect Hemlock Wooly Adelgid (HWA). However, quantitative LW studies are lacking for this region, which are necessary for effective management of projected HWA-associated change. We examined LW dynamics across central Appalachian headwater streams to identify 1) the current state of LW load, 2) the relative environmental factors that influence LW load, 3) potential signs of HWA impact on LW dynamics, and 4) functional grouping patterns of LW pieces in these systems. In a field study that included 24 sites in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia, mean wood density was 36 pieces/100m ± 21 and mean wood volume was 5.6 m3/100m ± 3.5. Most pieces were less than bankfull width suggesting high transportability, but large pieces (>10m) contributed significantly to wood volume, jam formation, and geomorphic function. Central Appalachian LW load was on the lower end of mountain headwater streams, but comparable to the northeastern US. A mixture of recruitment and retention processes influence wood dynamics, but channel retention processes better explain jam dynamics. Specifically, higher wood load was associated with lower forest basal area, smaller channel dimensions, and lower hydraulic driving forces, which is consistent with other studies. We did not detect a significant influence on wood load as a result of HWA infestation of ~20 years, which may reflect a lag period between tree mortality, toppling, and LW load. Pieces clustered in three functional groups of 1) larger, stable pieces that store sediment, stabilize the

  1. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  2. Biotic controls on solute distribution and transport in headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, E. M.; Dere, A. L.; Sullivan, P. L.; Norris, D.; Reynolds, B.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Solute concentrations in stream water vary with discharge in patterns that record complex feedbacks between hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. In a comparison of headwater catchments underlain by shale in Pennsylvania, USA (Shale Hills) and Wales, UK (Plynlimon), dissimilar concentration-discharge behaviors are best explained by contrasting landscape distributions of soil solution chemistry - especially dissolved organic carbon (DOC) - that have been established by patterns of vegetation. Specifically, elements that are concentrated in organic-rich soils due to biotic cycling (Mn, Ca, K) or that form strong complexes with DOC (Fe, Al) are spatially heterogeneous in pore waters because organic matter is heterogeneously distributed across the catchments. These solutes exhibit non-chemostatic "bioactive" behavior in the streams, and solute concentrations either decrease (Shale Hills) or increase (Plynlimon) with increasing discharge. In contrast, solutes that are concentrated in soil minerals and form only weak complexes with DOC (Na, Mg, Si) are spatially homogeneous in pore waters across each catchment. These solutes are chemostatic in that their stream concentrations vary little with stream discharge, likely because these solutes are released quickly from exchange sites in the soils during rainfall events. Differences in the hydrologic connectivity of organic-rich soils to the stream drive differences in concentration behavior between catchments. As such, in catchments where soil organic matter (SOM) is dominantly in lowlands (e.g., Shale Hills), bioactive elements are released to the stream early during rainfall events, whereas in catchments where SOM is dominantly in uplands (e.g., Plynlimon), bioactive elements are released later during rainfall events. The distribution of vegetation and SOM across the landscape is thus a key component for predictive models of solute transport in headwater catchments.

  3. Rapid decomposition of maize detritus in agricultural headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Natalie A; Tank, Jennifer L; Royer, Todd V; Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Whiles, Matt R; Chambers, Catherine P; Frauendorf, Therese C; Evans-White, Michelle A

    2009-01-01

    Headwater streams draining agricultural landscapes receive maize leaves (Zea mays L.) via wind and surface runoff, yet the contribution of maize detritus to organic-matter processing in agricultural streams is largely unknown. We quantified decomposition and microbial respiration rates on conventional (non-Bt) and genetically engineered (Bt) maize in three low-order agricultural streams in northwestern Indiana, USA. We also examined how substrate quality and in-stream nutrient concentrations influenced microbial respiration on maize by comparing respiration on maize and red maple leaves (Acer rubrum) in three nutrient-rich agricultural streams and three low-nutrient forested streams. We found significantly higher rates of microbial respiration on maize vs. red maple leaves and higher rates in agricultural vs. forested streams. Thus both the elevated nutrient status of agricultural streams and the lability of maize detritus (e.g., low carbon-to-nitrogen ratio and low lignin content) result in a rapid incorporation of maize leaves into the aquatic microbial food web. We found that Bt maize had a faster decomposition rate than non-Bt maize, while microbial respiration rates did not differ between Bt and non-Bt maize. Decomposition rates were not negatively affected by genetic engineering, perhaps because the Bt toxin does not adversely affect the aquatic microbial assemblage involved in maize decomposition. Additionally, shredding caddisflies, which are known to have suppressed growth rates when fed Bt maize, were depauperate in these agricultural streams, and likely did not play a major role in maize decomposition. Overall, the conversion of native vegetation to row-crop agriculture appears to have altered the quantity, quality, and predictability of allochthonous carbon inputs to headwater streams, with unexplored effects on stream ecosystem structure and function. PMID:19323178

  4. Water-quality data for the American River basin, California, February-October 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shay, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Data were collected in the American River basin from February to October 1979 for use in assessing the water quality in the basin and developing land-use/water-quality relations. The basin covers 2,163 square miles of the western slope of the central Sierra Nevada. Basin headwaters are located primarily between Donner Summit and Echo Summit. Water-quality data were collected at 14 stream sites and at 3 sites on Folsom Lake and include selected measurements and analyses for physical, chemical, and biological properties and constituents. (USGS)

  5. Projections for headwater catchments of the Tarim River reveal glacier retreat and decreasing surface water availability but uncertainties are large

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duethmann, Doris; Menz, Christoph; Jiang, Tong; Vorogushyn, Sergiy

    2016-05-01

    In the Tarim River Basin, water resources from the mountain areas play a key role due to the extremely arid climate of the lowlands. This study presents an analysis of future climate change impacts on glaciers and surface water availability for headwater catchments of the Aksu River, the most important tributary to the Tarim River. We applied a glacio-hydrological model that underwent a comprehensive multivariable and multiobjective model calibration and evaluation, based on daily and interannual discharge variations and glacier mass changes. Transient glacier geometry changes are simulated using the Δh-approach. For the ensemble-based projections, we considered three different emission scenarios, nine global climate models (GCMs) and two regional climate models, and different hydrological model parameters derived from the multiobjective calibration. The results show a decline in glacier area of ‑90% to ‑32% until 2099 (reference ∼2008) (based on the 5–95 percentile range of the ensemble). Glacier melt is anticipated to further increase or stay at a high level during the first decades of the 21st century, but then declines because of decreased glacier extents. Overall discharge in the Aksu headwaters is expected to be increased in the period 2010–2039 (reference 1971–2000), but decreased in 2070–2099. Seasonally, projections show an increase in discharge in spring and early summer throughout the 21st century. Discharge changes in mid to late summer are more variable, with increases or decreases depending on the considered period and GCM. Uncertainties are largely caused by differences between the different GCMs, with further important contributions from different emission scenarios in the second half of the 21st century. Contributions from the hydrological model parameters to the ensemble uncertainty were generally found to be small.

  6. Projections for headwater catchments of the Tarim River reveal glacier retreat and decreasing surface water availability but uncertainties are large

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duethmann, Doris; Menz, Christoph; Jiang, Tong; Vorogushyn, Sergiy

    2016-05-01

    In the Tarim River Basin, water resources from the mountain areas play a key role due to the extremely arid climate of the lowlands. This study presents an analysis of future climate change impacts on glaciers and surface water availability for headwater catchments of the Aksu River, the most important tributary to the Tarim River. We applied a glacio-hydrological model that underwent a comprehensive multivariable and multiobjective model calibration and evaluation, based on daily and interannual discharge variations and glacier mass changes. Transient glacier geometry changes are simulated using the Δh-approach. For the ensemble-based projections, we considered three different emission scenarios, nine global climate models (GCMs) and two regional climate models, and different hydrological model parameters derived from the multiobjective calibration. The results show a decline in glacier area of -90% to -32% until 2099 (reference ˜2008) (based on the 5-95 percentile range of the ensemble). Glacier melt is anticipated to further increase or stay at a high level during the first decades of the 21st century, but then declines because of decreased glacier extents. Overall discharge in the Aksu headwaters is expected to be increased in the period 2010-2039 (reference 1971-2000), but decreased in 2070-2099. Seasonally, projections show an increase in discharge in spring and early summer throughout the 21st century. Discharge changes in mid to late summer are more variable, with increases or decreases depending on the considered period and GCM. Uncertainties are largely caused by differences between the different GCMs, with further important contributions from different emission scenarios in the second half of the 21st century. Contributions from the hydrological model parameters to the ensemble uncertainty were generally found to be small.

  7. Water quality in the Tibetan Plateau: major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Sillanpää, Mika; Gjessing, Egil T; Vogt, Rolf D

    2009-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau covers an area of about one fourth of Europe, has an average elevation over 4000m above sea level, and is the water sources for about 40% of world's population. In order to foresee future changes in water quality, it is important to understand what pressures are governing the spatial variation in water chemistry. In this paper the chemistry including major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers (i.e. the Salween, Mekong, Yangtze River and Yarlung Tsangpo) in the Tibetan Plateau was studied. The results showed that the content of dissolved salts in these Tibetan rivers was relatively high compared to waters from other parts of the world. The chemical composition of the four rivers were rather similar, with Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) being the dominating ions. The exception was the Yangtze River on the Plateau, which was enriched in Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) and Li due to silicate weathering followed by strong evaporation caused by a negative water balance, dissolution of evaporites in the catchment and some drainage from saline lakes. The concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Hg) and As, NH(4)(+) were generally low in all the rivers. Anthropogenic impacts on the quality of the rivers were identified at a few locations in the Mekong River and Yarlung Tsangpo basins. Generally, the main spatial variation in chemical compositions of these under studied rivers was found to be governed mainly by difference in geological variation and regional climatic-environment. Climate change is, therefore, one of main determining factors on the water chemical characteristics of these headwaters of Asian major rivers in the Tibetan Plateau. PMID:19783282

  8. Water quality in the Tibetan Plateau: major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang; Sillanpää, Mika; Gjessing, Egil T; Vogt, Rolf D

    2009-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau covers an area of about one fourth of Europe, has an average elevation over 4000m above sea level, and is the water sources for about 40% of world's population. In order to foresee future changes in water quality, it is important to understand what pressures are governing the spatial variation in water chemistry. In this paper the chemistry including major ions and trace elements in the headwaters of four major Asian rivers (i.e. the Salween, Mekong, Yangtze River and Yarlung Tsangpo) in the Tibetan Plateau was studied. The results showed that the content of dissolved salts in these Tibetan rivers was relatively high compared to waters from other parts of the world. The chemical composition of the four rivers were rather similar, with Ca(2+) and HCO(3)(-) being the dominating ions. The exception was the Yangtze River on the Plateau, which was enriched in Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) and Li due to silicate weathering followed by strong evaporation caused by a negative water balance, dissolution of evaporites in the catchment and some drainage from saline lakes. The concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Cd, Pb, and Hg) and As, NH(4)(+) were generally low in all the rivers. Anthropogenic impacts on the quality of the rivers were identified at a few locations in the Mekong River and Yarlung Tsangpo basins. Generally, the main spatial variation in chemical compositions of these under studied rivers was found to be governed mainly by difference in geological variation and regional climatic-environment. Climate change is, therefore, one of main determining factors on the water chemical characteristics of these headwaters of Asian major rivers in the Tibetan Plateau.

  9. Restoring the hydrologic response to pre-developed conditions in an urbanized headwater catchment: Reality or utopia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, O.; Istanbulluoglu, E.

    2012-12-01

    The conversion of forested areas to impervious surfaces, lawns and pastures alters the natural hydrology of an area by increasing the flashiness of stormwater generated runoff, resulting in increased streamflow peaks and volumes. Currently, most of the stormwater from developed areas in the Puget Sound region remains uncontrolled. The lack of adequate stormwater facilities along with increasing urbanization and population growth illustrates the importance of understanding urban watershed behavior and best management practices (BMPs) that improve changes in hydrology. In this study, we developed a lumped urban ecohydrology model that represents vegetation dynamics, connects pervious and impervious surfaces and implements various BMP scenarios. The model is implemented in an urban headwater subcatchment located in the Newaukum Creek Basin. We evaluate the hydrologic impact of controlling runoff at the source and disconnecting impervious surfaces from the storm drain using rain barrels and bioretention cells. BMP scenarios consider the basin's land use/land coverage, the response of different impervious surface types, the potential for BMP placement, the size and drainage area for BMPs, and the mitigation needs to meet in-stream flow goals.

  10. Aquatic hyphomycete communities associated with decomposing alder leaf litter in reference headwater streams of the Basque Country (northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Javier; Descals, Enrique; Pozo, Jesús

    2012-08-01

    The community of aquatic hyphomycetes associated with decomposing alder leaf litter was studied during autumn-winter in nine headwater reference streams of the Basque Country (northern Spain). In order to study the spatial variability in composition and community structure, three streams from each of three different river basins were compared. The colonization dynamics and community changes throughout the decomposition process were also followed in three of the rivers (one per basin). The taxonomic richness and community structure of these fungi varied among rivers, including similar streams of a given watershed. However, neither species diversity nor total abundance was statistically related to environmental variables. Only the conidial production of two of the species, Flagellospora curvula and Lunulospora curvula appeared to be enhanced by nitrate availability in the water. The taxonomic richness and the reproductive activity (sporulation rate) were positively related to the leaf litter decomposition rate. The changes in conidial production along the process were similar for all the streams and helped explain leaf litter quality dynamics.

  11. Influence of instream habitat and water chemistry on amphibians within channelized agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The widespread use of stream channelization and subsurface tile drainage for draining agricultural fields has led to the development of numerous channelized agricultural headwater streams within agricultural watersheds of the Midwestern United States, Canada, and Europe. Channelized agricultural he...

  12. IMPACTS OF LAND USE ON HYDROLOGIC FLOW PERMANENCE IN HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive urbanization in the watershed can alter the stream hydrology by increasing peak runoff frequency and reducing base flows, causing subsequent impairment of stream community structure. In addition, development effectively eliminates some headwater streams, being piped an...

  13. Use of spatially explicit physicochemical data to measure downstream impacts of headwater stream disturbance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulatory agencies need methods to quantify the influence of headwater streams on downstream water quality as a result of litigation surrounding jurisdictional criteria and the influence of mountaintop removal coal mining activities. We collected comprehensive, spatially-referen...

  14. Macroinvertebrate and organic matter export from headwater tributaries of a Central Appalachian stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams export organisms and other materials to their receiving streams and macroinvertebrate drift can shape colonization dynamics in downstream reaches while providing food for downstream consumers. Spring-time macroinvertebrate drift and organic matter export was me...

  15. Differences in instream wood characteristics between channelized and unchannelized agricultural headwater streams in central Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Instream wood is an important resource for stream biota because it provides cover for fishes, substrate for macroinvertebrates, and increases habitat diversity. However, current management of instream wood within channelized agricultural headwater streams (drainage ditches) involves removing instrea...

  16. Characterization and classification of invertebrates as indicators of flow permanence in headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams represent a large proportion of river networks and many have temporary flow. Litigation has questioned whether these streams are jurisdictional under the Clean Water Act. Our goal was to identify indicators of flow permanence by comparing invertebrate assemblage...

  17. Larval salamanders and channel geomorphology are indicators of hydrologic permanence in forested headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulatory agencies need rapid indicators of hydrologic permanence for jurisdictional determinations of headwater streams. Our study objective was to assess the utility of larval salamander presence and assemblage structure and habitat variables for determining stream permanence ...

  18. A synoptic survey of ecosystem services from headwater catchments in the United States- webinar

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem production functions for water supply, climate regulation, and water purification were estimated for 568 headwater streams and their catchments. Water supply per unit catchment area was highest in the Northern Appalachian Mountains and lowest in the Northern Plains. C, ...

  19. A synoptic survey of ecosystem services from headwater catchments in the United States (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecosystem production functions for water supply, climate regulation, and water purification were estimated for 568 headwater streams and their catchments. Water supply per unit catchment area was highest in the Northern Appalachian Mountains and lowest in the Northern Plains. C, ...

  20. Importance of environmental factors on the richness and distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates in tropical headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is essential to understand the interactions between local environmental factors (e.g., physical habitat and water quality) and aquatic assemblages to conserve biodiversity in tropical and subtropical headwater streams. Therefore, we evaluated the relative importance of multipl...

  1. Characteristics of instream wood within channelized agricultural headwater streams in the Midwestern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channelized agricultural headwater streams are a common feature within agricultural watersheds of the Midwestern United States. These small streams have been impacted by the physical and chemical habitat alterations incurred to facilitate agricultural drainage. Quantitative information on the instre...

  2. Importance of instream wood characteristics for developing restoration designs for channelized agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channelized agricultural headwater streams are a common feature within agricultural watersheds of the Midwestern United States. These small streams have been impacted by the physical and chemical habitat alterations incurred to facilitate agricultural drainage. Quantitative information on the instr...

  3. The importance of instream habitat modifications for restoring channelized agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Science based information on the influence of restoration practices on fishes within channelized agricultural headwater streams in the Midwestern United States is currently lacking. Understanding fish-habitat relationships and fish responses to specific restoration practices will provide informatio...

  4. Similarities in fish-habitat relationships within channelized agricultural headwater streams in Ohio and Indiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channelized agricultural headwater streams are common throughout agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern United States. Understanding the fish-habitat relationships within these streams will provide information that can assist with developing restoration strategies for these degraded streams. We...

  5. Can bryophytes be used to characterize hydrologic permanence in forested headwater streams?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent court cases have questioned whether all headwater streams, particularly those that are not perennial, fall within the protective boundaries of the Clean Water Act. Rapid field-based indicators of hydrologic permanence are critically needed for jurisdictional determination...

  6. Urbanization Affects the Extent and Hydrologic Permanence of Headwater Streams in a Midwestern US Metropolitan Area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams dominate natural landscapes and provide essential functions for downstream waters. However, because of minimal legal protection, they often are piped or buried to accommodate urban growth. Urbanization also alters stream base flows. The combined impact of these ...

  7. POTENTIAL USE OF ALGAE AS INDICATORS OF HYDROLOGIC PERMANENCE IN HEADWATER STREAMS: INITIAL DATA EXPLORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Periphyton from headwater intermittent streams was sampled in order to evaluate the potential use of algal assemblages as indicators of flow permanence. Streams from four forests near Cincinnati, Ohio were classified according to hydrologic permanence as ephemeral, intermittent ...

  8. Factors influencing water transit times in snowmelt-dominated, headwater catchments of the western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, D. W.; Mast, A.

    2015-12-01

    In catchments, water transit times (TTs) refer to the elapsed time between entry of water at the ground surface and exit of water at the catchment outlet. Transit times are an important characteristic of catchments in that they reflect the time available for interaction between water, soil, and biota within the system. Thus, they exert a strong influence on hydrologic resilience to drought and climate change, and on the sensitivity of aquatic ecosystems to atmospheric pollutants. Transit times may vary spatially due to variations in basin characteristics, such as slope, size, and amount and type of soil and vegetation; however, the relative influence of these factors on TTs is poorly known. In this study, we estimate mean transit times (MTTs) for 11 snowmelt-dominated, headwater catchments in the western U.S. using the convolution integral approach, which relies on differences in the magnitude of seasonal variability in δ18O in precipitation and stream water to estimate MTTs. Seasonal variability in δ18O was calculated based on analyses of precipitation and stream water samples collected at weekly to monthly intervals. Results indicate that MTTs ranged from 0.6 to 2.1 years, and were positively influenced by percent of the catchment covered by forest (r2 = 0.56; p = 0.008), and negatively influenced by barren terrain (e.g., bedrock; r2 = 0.48; p = 0.019). MTTs showed a weak negative relation to mean basin slope (r2 = 0.31; p = 0.076) and no relation to basin size or elevation. These results illustrate the importance of soil as a key factor influencing MTTs, with basin slope acting as a secondary influence. Heavily forested basins tend to have deep, well-developed soils with substantial water storage capacity; these soils help maintain baseflow during drought conditions, providing hydrologic resilience to the system, and they are an important location for geochemical and biological processes that neutralize acidity and assimilate atmospherically deposited nitrogen

  9. Spawning characteristics of redband trout in a headwater stream in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2002-01-01

    I investigated the spawning characteristics of redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri (a rainbow trout subspecies) during the spring of 1998 in Basin Creek, a third-order headwater stream located in the Kootenai River drainage in northwestern Montana. I examined the timing of spawning as related to discharge and water temperature and analyzed microhabitat selection of 30 completed redds in a low-gradient (0.5–1.5%) reach. Redband trout spawned as flow declined after peak runoff and as mean daily water temperature exceeded 6.0C and maximum daily temperature exceeded 7.0C. Redband trout began spawning on 6 June (mean daily discharge = 2.1 m3/s), 10 d after the peak discharge (8.7 m3/s) occurred. The last redd was completed on 24 June, when discharge was 1.5 m3/s. The mean total redd length was 53 cm (SD = 14; range = 31–91 cm), and the mean total area was 51 cm2 (SD = 8; range= 46– 76 cm2). Eighty percent of the redds were located in pool tailouts, 13% in runs, and 7% in riffles. Spawning redband trout selected redd sites based on substrate size and water depth but not water velocity. Fish selected substrate sizes of 2–6 mm, water depths of 20–30 cm, and water velocities of 40–70 cm/s. My results suggest that redband trout in a low-gradient, third-order mountain stream found suitable spawning habitat in pool tail-outs that contained abundant gravels.

  10. Runoff and Solute Mobilisation in a Semi-arid Headwater Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. D.; Khan, S.; Crosbie, R.; Helliwell, S.; Michalk, D.

    2006-12-01

    Runoff and solute transport processes contributing to stream flow were determined in a small headwater catchment in the eastern Murray-Darling Basin of Australia using hydrometric and tracer methods. Stream flow and electrical conductivity were monitored from two gauges draining a portion of upper catchment area (UCA), and a saline scalded area respectively. Results show that the bulk of catchment solute export, occurs via a small saline scald (< 2% of catchment area) where solutes are concentrated in the near surface zone (0-40 cm). Non-scalded areas of the catchment are likely to provide the bulk of catchment runoff, although the scalded area is a higher contributor on an areal basis. Runoff from the non-scalded area is about two orders of magnitude lower in electrical conductivity than the scalded area. This study shows that the scalded zone and non-scalded parts of the catchment can be managed separately since they are effectively de-coupled except over long time scales, and produce runoff of contrasting quality. Such differences are "averaged out" by investigations that operate at larger scales, illustrating that observations need to be conducted at a range of scales. EMMA modelling using six solutes shows that "event" or "new" water dominated the stream hydrograph from the scald. This information together with hydrometric data and soil physical properties indicate that saturated overland flow is the main form of runoff generation in both the scalded area and the UCA. Saturated areas make up a small proportion of the catchment, but are responsible for production of all run off in conditions experienced throughout the experimental period. The process of saturation and runoff bears some similarities to the VSA concept (Hewlett and Hibbert 1967).

  11. Biological Assessment to Support Ecological Recovery of a Degraded Headwater System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longing, Scott D.; Haggard, Brian E.

    2010-09-01

    An assessment of the benthic macroinvertebrate community was conducted to characterize the ecological recovery of a channelized main stem and two small tributaries at the Watershed Research and Education Center (WREC, Arkansas, USA). Three other headwater streams in the same basin were also sampled as controls and for biological reference information. A principal components analysis produced stream groupings along an overall gradient of physical habitat integrity, with degraded reaches showing lower RBP habitat scores, reduced flow velocities, smaller substrate sizes, greater conductivity, and higher percentages of sand and silt substrate. The benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage at WREC was dominated by fast-reproducing dipteran larvae (midge and mosquito larvae) and physid snails, which comprised 71.3% of the total macroinvertebrate abundance over three sampling periods. Several macroinvertebrate assemblage metrics should provide effective targets for monitoring overall improvements in the invertebrate assemblage including recovery towards a more complex food web (e.g., total number of taxa, number of EPT taxa, percent 2 dominant taxa). However, current habitat conditions and the extent of existing degradation, system isolation and surrounding urban or agricultural land-uses might affect the level of positive change to the system. We therefore suggest a preliminary restoration strategy involving the addition of pool habitats in the system. At one pool we collected a total of 29 taxa (dominated by water beetle predators), which was 59% of total number of taxa collected at WREC. Maintaining water-retentive pools to collect flows and maintain water permanence focuses on enhancing known biology and habitat, thus reducing the effects of abiotic filters on macroinvertebrate assemblage recovery. Furthermore, biological assessment prior to restoration supports a strategy primarily focused on improving the existing macroinvertebrate community in the current context of the

  12. Glacier contribution to streamflow in two headwaters of the Huasco River, Dry Andes of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascoin, S.; Kinnard, C.; Ponce, R.; Lhermitte, S.; MacDonell, S.; Rabatel, A.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative assessment of glacier contribution to present-day streamflow is a prerequisite to the anticipation of climate change impact on water resources in the Dry Andes. In this paper we focus on two glaciated headwater catchments of the Huasco Basin (Chile, 29° S). The combination of glacier monitoring data for five glaciers (Toro 1, Toro 2, Esperanza, Guanaco, Estrecho and Ortigas) with five automatic streamflow records at sites with glacier coverage of 0.4 to 11 % allows the estimation of the mean annual glacier contribution to discharge between 2003/2004 and 2007/2008 hydrological years. In addition, direct manual measurements of glacier runoff were conducted in summer at the snouts of four glaciers, which provide the instantaneous contribution of glacier meltwater to stream runoff during summer. The results show that the mean annual glacier contribution to streamflow ranges between 3.3 and 23 %, which is greater than the glaciated fraction of the catchments. We argue that glacier contribution is partly enhanced by the effect of snowdrift from the non-glacier area to the glacier surface. Glacier mass loss is evident over the study period, with a mean of -0.84 m w.e. yr-1 for the period 2003/2004-2007/2008, and also contributes to increase glacier runoff. An El Niño episode in 2002 resulted in high snow accumulation, modifying the hydrological regime and probably reducing the glacier contribution in favor of seasonal snowmelt during the subsequent 2002/2003 hydrological year. At the hourly timescale, summertime glacier contributions are highly variable in space and time, revealing large differences in effective melting rates between glaciers and glacierets (from 1 mm w.e. h-1 to 6 mm w.e. h-1).

  13. Influence of forest management on headwater stream amphibians at multiple spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoddard, Margo; Hayes, John P.; Erickson, Janet L.

    2004-01-01

    Background Amphibians are important components of headwater streams in forest ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest (PNW). They comprise the highest vertebrate biomass and density in these systems and are integral to trophic dynamics both as prey and as predators. The most commonly encountered amphibians in PNW headwater streams include the Pacific giant salamander (Dicamptodon tenebrosus), the tailed frog (Ascaphus truei), the southern torrent salamander (Rhyacotriton variegatus), and the Columbia torrent salamander (R. kezeri).

  14. Guiding soil conservation strategy in headwater mediterranean catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Slimane, Abir; Raclot, Damien; Evrard, Olivier; Sanaa, Mustapha; Lefèvre, Irène; Le Bissonnais, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir siltation due to water erosion is an important environmental issue in Mediterranean countries where storage of clear surface water is crucial for their economic and agricultural development. In order to reduce water erosion, this study aimed to design a methodology for guiding the implementation of efficient conservation strategies by identifying the dominant sediment sources in Mediterranean context. To this end, a fingerprinting method was combined with long-term field monitoring of catchment sediment yield in five headwater catchments (0.1-10 km2) equipped with a small reservoir between 1990 and 1995. The five catchments were chosen to cover the large diversity of environmental conditions found along the Tunisian Ridge and in the Cape Bon region. The fingerprinting techniques based on measurements of cesium-137 and Total Organic Carbon within the catchments and in reservoir sediment deposits successfully identified the contribution of rill/interrill and gully/channel erosion to sediment yield at the outlet of five small headwater catchments during the last 15-20 years. Results showed the very large variability of erosion processes among the selected catchments, with rill/interrill erosion contributions to sediment accumulated in outlet reservoirs ranging from 20 to 80%. Overall, rill/interrill erosion was the dominant process controlling reservoir siltation in three catchments whereas gully/channel erosion dominated in the other two catchments. This demonstrates that the dominant erosion process in the Mediterranean regions highly depends on the local environmental context. The lowest rill/interrill erosion contribution (2.2 Mg ha-1 yr-1) in the five catchments remained significantly higher than the tolerable soil loss indicating the severe levels reached by soil erosion along the Tunisian Ridge and in the Cape Bon region. This study also showed that although the implementation of improved topsoil management measures greatly reduced rill

  15. Creating a Population of 12-Digit Headwater Basins within the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuary System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological research within the US Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development has recently changed its focus to quantifying and mapping ecosystem services provided to humans. Our local research group has been charged to develop a regional assessment of se...

  16. PCBS IN LAKE HARTWELL, SC, HEADWATERS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination due to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) was discovered in the mid-1970s in the fish and sediments of Lake Hartwell, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoir on the border of South Carolina and Georgia that was formed from the Seneca and Tugaloo Rivers. Research by...

  17. Snow hydrology of a headwater Arctic basin. 1. Physical measurements and process studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.; Hinzman, L.D.; Benson, C.S.; Liston, G.E. )

    1991-06-01

    The hydrologic cycle of an Arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance, and phase change of snow and ice to water. Hydrologic data collected over a 5-year period (1985-1989) from an Arctic watershed in northern Alaska are presented. Processes related to snow accumulation, redistribution, ablation, evaporation and subsequent snowmelt-generated runoff are discussed. The total water content of the snowpack at the end of winter had comprised between 28 and 40% of the annual precipitation. Redistribution of snow on the ground by the wind is a major factor in increasing the snowmelt runoff. Much of the redistributed snow accumulates in the valley bottom along the stream and also along depressions on the hillslopes. These depressions are small surface drainage channels that are referred to as water tracks. Partitioning of the snowmelt into runoff, evaporation and increased soil water storage in the active layer was carried out on the plot and watershed scale. Over a 5-year period, the volume of snowmelt runoff varied from 50 to 66% of the average watershed snowpack, while evaporation varied from 20 to 34% and soil moisture storage increased between 10 and 19%. Much greater variation in these hydrologic components occurred at the plot scale.

  18. Snow hydrology of a headwater Arctic basin. 2. Conceptual analysis and computer modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hinzman, L.D.; Kane, D.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Lack of hydrologic data in the Arctic, particularly during snowmelt, severely limits modeling strategy. Spring snowmelt in Imnavait watershed is a very brief event, usually lasting about 10 days. Peak flow normally occurs within the top 10 cm of the highly organic soil mat or on the surface. Snow damming of snowmelt runoff is an important mechanism which must be considered in the modeling process of small watersheds. These unique characteristics of Arctic hydrology will affect the methodology and performance of a hydrologic model. The HBV model was used in an investigation of the hydrologic regime of an Arctic watershed during the spring snowmelt period. From the analysis of five spring melt events the authors found that HBV can adequately predict soil moisture, evaporation, snow ablation and accumulation, and runoff. It models the volumes of snowmelt runoff well, but more data are needed to improve the determination of snowmelt initiation. Use of HBV as a predictive tool is dependent upon the quality of the meteorologic forecast data.

  19. Primary production in headwater streams of the Seine basin: the Grand Morin river case study.

    PubMed

    Flipo, Nicolas; Rabouille, Christophe; Poulin, Michel; Even, Stéphanie; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène; Lalande, Marie

    2007-04-01

    Periphytic biomass has an important influence on the water quality of many shallow streams. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the knowledge obtained on periphyton during the PIREN Seine research program. Periphyton was sampled using chl a measurements by acetone extraction and oxygen measurements with microelectrodes. The experiments reveal the presence of an important fixed biomass ranging between 123 and 850 mgchl a m(-2) and the mean gross production (photosynthesis) is shown to range between 180 and 315 mgC m(-2) h(-1). An independent approach was performed using the ProSe model, which simulates transport and biogeochemical processes in 22 km of the Grand Morin stream. A strong agreement between in situ measurements and the model results was obtained. The gross production obtained using ProSe is 220 mgC m(-2) h(-1) for the periphyton, which matches the experimental data. Although the net photosynthetic activity of the phytoplankton (0.84 gC gC(-1) d(-1)) is higher than the periphytic one (0.33 gC gC(-1) d(-1)), the absolute periphytic activity is greater since the mean biomass (3.4 gC m(-)(2)) is 10 times higher than the phytoplanktonic one (0.3 gC m(-2)), due to the short residence time of the water body (1.5d).

  20. Temporal and spatial variation of factors controlling metabolism and primary productivity in headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. L.; Argerich, A.; Ashkenas, L.

    2013-12-01

    Headwater streams account for 60-80 percent of stream-channel length in river networks, yet the variability among these streams is often simplified or neglected. Better understanding of the drivers and ways to characterize this variability are crucial as we evaluate the contributions of headwaters to downstream ecosystems. Metrics of ecosystem processes, such as whole stream metabolism, incorporate numerous factors across trophic levels and are considered fundamental descriptors of ecosystem function. Because metabolism integrates the activity of all organisms carrying out photosynthesis and aerobic respiration, it has been proposed as useful in evaluating contributions from multiple headwaters to downstream sites as well as measuring how stream communities respond to environmental changes. Here we explore the spatial and temporal variation in ecosystem metabolism and primary productivity across multiple forested headwater streams and their cumulative downstream sites. We also quantify the environmental factors that most influence these processes, including stream chemistry, temperature, chlorophyll a, benthic and algal biomass, fine sediment, forest cover and shading in 14 headwater streams and four downstream sites. This study occurred as part of the pre-treatment research in the Trask River Watershed Study, which is a multi-disciplinary, multi-year research project designed to evaluate the impacts of current forest management practices on headwater and downstream aquatic ecosystems in NW Oregon. Over the four years, we consistently found the headwater and downstream reaches to be highly heterotrophic with P:R ratios less than 0.05. However nutrient concentrations were not good predictors of metabolism rates or the biomass and activity of primary producers. Even though all sites were within a 3000 ha catchment and had similar amounts of forest cover and riparian shading, we observed high spatial variability in concentrations of stream nutrients (C, N, P) and

  1. What's a stream without water? Disproportionality in headwater regions impacting water quality.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Andrea; Stedman, Richard C; Bishop, Joseph A; Sullivan, Patrick J

    2012-11-01

    Headwater streams are critical components of the stream network, yet landowner perceptions, attitudes, and property management behaviors surrounding these intermittent and ephemeral streams are not well understood. Our research uses the concept of watershed disproportionality, where coupled social-biophysical conditions bear a disproportionate responsibility for harmful water quality outcomes, to analyze the potential influence of riparian landowner perceptions and attitudes on water quality in headwater regions. We combine social science survey data, aerial imagery, and an analysis of spatial point processes to assess the relationship between riparian landowner perceptions and attitudes in relation to stream flow regularity. Stream flow regularity directly and positively shapes landowners' water quality concerns, and also positively influences landowners' attitudes of stream importance-a key determinant of water quality concern as identified in a path analysis. Similarly, riparian landowners who do not notice or perceive a stream on their property are likely located in headwater regions. Our findings indicate that landowners of headwater streams, which are critical areas for watershed-scale water quality, are less likely to manage for water quality than landowners with perennial streams in an obvious, natural channel. We discuss the relationships between streamflow and how landowners develop understandings of their stream, and relate this to the broader water quality implications of headwater stream mismanagement.

  2. Raton basin coalbed methane production picking up in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hemborg, H.T.

    1996-11-11

    Coalbed methane production in the Raton basin of south-central Colorado and northeast New Mexico has advanced past pilot testing and is entering into a development stage that should stretch out over several years. At last count 85 wells were producing nearly 17.5 MMcfd of coalbed methane from the basin`s Raton and Vermejo formation coals (Early Paleocene to Latest Maastrichtian). This development work is currently restricted to roughly a 25 mile by 15 mile wide ``fairway`` centered about 20 miles west of Trinidad, Colo., in the headwater area of the Purgatoire River. The paper discusses the companies involved in the basin development, geology of the coal seam, and water disposal from coal seam dewatering.

  3. Comparison of subsurface connectivity in Alpine headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuecco, Giulia; Rinderer, Michael; van Meerveld, Ilja; Penna, Daniele; Borga, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Saturation at the soil-bedrock interface or the rise of shallow groundwater into more permeable soil layers results in subsurface stormflow and can lead to hillslope-stream connectivity. Despite the importance of subsurface connectivity for streamflow and streamwater chemistry, the factors controlling its spatial and temporal variability are still poorly understood. This study takes advantage of networks of spatially-distributed piezometers in five small (<14 ha) headwater catchments in the Italian Dolomites and the Swiss pre-Alps to i) quantify and compare the spatial and temporal variability of subsurface connectivity and its relation to streamflow, and ii) assess whether the differences in connectivity between the catchments are related to climatological or morphological characteristics of the catchments (e.g. the presence of a riparian zone). Shallow groundwater levels were measured for two years from spring to fall in 16 and 12 piezometers in the 14 and 3.3 ha catchments in the Italian Dolomites, and for four years from spring to fall in 7-8 piezometers in three <1 ha Swiss pre-alpine catchments. Subsurface connectivity was quantified by a graph-theory approach, considering linear connections (edges) between the piezometers (nodes). A node was considered to be connected to the stream when shallow groundwater was observed in the piezometer and it was connected by the edges to the stream. Weights were given to each piezometer based on Thiessen polygons to determine the area of the catchment that was connected to the stream. For the Swiss pre-alpine catchments the duration that nodes were connected to the stream was significantly correlated to the local and upslope site characteristics, such as the topographic wetness index, local slope and curvature. For the dolomitic catchment with the largest riparian zone, the time that nodes were connected to the stream was correlated with downslope site characteristics, such as the vertical distance to the nearest stream

  4. Biological integrity in mid-atlantic coastal plains headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Megan, Mehaffey H; Nash, Maliha S; Neale, Anne C; Pitchford, Ann M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the applicability of using landscape variables in conjunction with water quality and benthic data to efficiently estimate stream condition of select headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plains. Eighty-two streams with riffle sites were selected from eight-two independent watersheds across the region for sampling and analyses. Clustering of the watersheds by landscape resulted in three distinct groups (forest, crop, and urban) which coincided with watersheds dominant land cover or use. We used non-parametric analyses to test differences in benthos and water chemistry between groups, and used regression analyses to evaluate responses of benthic communities to water chemistry within each of the landscape groups. We found that typical water chemistry measures associated with urban runoff such as specific conductance and dissolved chloride were significantly higher in the urban group. In the crop group, we found variables commonly associated with farming such as nutrients and pesticides significantly greater than in the other two groups. Regression analyses demonstrated that the numbers of tolerant and facultative macroinvertebrates increased significantly in forested watersheds with small shifts in pollutants, while in human use dominated watersheds the intolerant macroinvertebrates were more sensitive to shifts in chemicals present at lower concentrations. The results from this study suggest that landscape based clustering can be used to link upstream landscape characteristics, water chemistry and biotic integrity in order to assess stream condition and likely cause of degradation without the use of reference sites. Notice: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  5. Coupling nutrient uptake and energy flow in headwater streams

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Fellows, Christine; Valett, H. Maurice; Dahm, Cliff; Thomas, Steve

    2006-08-01

    Nutrient cycling and energy flow in ecosystems are tightly linked through the metabolic processes of organisms. Greater uptake of inorganic nutrients is expected to be associated with higher rates of metabolism [gross primary production (GPP) and respiration (R)], due to assimilatory demand of both autotrophs and heterotrophs. However, relationships between uptake and metabolism should vary with the relative contribution of autochthonous and allochthonous sources of organic matter. To investigate the relationship between metabolism and nutrient uptake, we used whole-stream and benthic chamber methods to measure rates of nitrate-nitrogen (NO{sub 3}-N) uptake and metabolism in four headwater streams chosen to span a range of light availability and therefore differing rates of GPP and contributions of autochthonous carbon. We coupled whole-stream metabolism with measures of NO{sub 3}-N uptake conducted repeatedly over the same stream reach during both day and night, as well as incubating benthic sediments under both light and dark conditions. NO{sub 3}-N uptake was generally greater in daylight compared to dark conditions, and although day-night differences in whole-stream uptake were not significant, light-dark differences in benthic chambers were significant at three of the four sites. Estimates of N demand indicated that assimilation by photoautotrophs could account for the majority of NO{sub 3}-N uptake at the two sites with relatively open canopies. Contrary to expectations, photoautotrophs contributed substantially to NO{sub 3}-N uptake even at the two closed-canopy sites, which had low values of GPP/R and relied heavily on allochthonous carbon to fuel R.

  6. Landscape influences on headwater streams on Fort Stewart, Georgia, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Jager, Yetta; Bevelhimer, Mark S; al., et.

    2011-01-01

    Military landscapes represent a mixture of undisturbed natural ecosystems, developed areas, and lands that support different types and intensities of military training. Research to understand water-quality influences of military landscapes usually involves intensive sampling in a few watersheds. In this study, we developed a survey design of accessible headwater watersheds intended to improve our ability to distinguish land water relationships in general, and training influences, in particular, on Fort Stewart, GA. We sampled and analyzed water from watershed outlets. We successfully developed correlative models for total suspended solids (TSS), total nitrogen (TN), organic carbon (OC), and organic nitrogen (ON), which dominated in this blackwater ecosystem. TSS tended to be greater in samples after rainfall and during the growing season, and models that included %Wetland suggested a build-and-flush relationship. We also detected a positive association between TSS and tank-training, which suggests a need to intercept sediment-laden runoff from training areas. Models for OC showed a negative association with %Grassland. TN and ON both showed negative associations with %Grassland, %Wetland, and %Forest. Unexpected positive associations were observed between OC and equipmenttraining activity and between ON and %Bare ground ? Roads. Future studies that combine our survey-based approach with more intensive monitoring of the timing and intensity of training would be needed to better understand the mechanisms for these empirical relationships involving military training. Looking beyond local effects on Fort Stewart streams, we explore questions about how exports of OC and nitrogen from coastal military installations ultimately influence estuaries downstream.

  7. Water balance of selected floodplain lake basins in the Middle Bug River valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidek, J.; Ferencz, B.

    2013-08-01

    This study is the first attempt in the literature on the subject of comparing water balance equations for floodplain lake basins depending on the type of connection the lake has to its parent river. Where confluent lakes (upstream connections) were concerned, it was only possible to apply a classic water balance equation. When dealing with contrafluent lakes (downstream connections) as well as lakes with a complex recharge type (contrafluent-confluent) modified equations were created. The hydrological type of a lake is decided by high water flow conditions and, consequently, the duration of potamophase (connection with a river) and limnophase (the isolation of the lake), which determine the values of particular components and the proportion of the vertical to horizontal water exchange rate. Confluent lakes are characterised by the highest proportion of horizontal components (the inflow and runoff of river water) to the vertical ones (precipitation and evaporation). The smallest differences occur with respect to a contrafluent lake. In the case of confluent lakes, the relationship between water balance components resulted from the consequent water flow through the basin, consistent with the slope of the river channel and valley. The supplying channels of contrafluent lakes had an obsequent character, which is why the flow rate was lower. Lakes with a complex, contrafluent-confluent recharge type showed intermediate features. After a period of slow contrafluent recharge, the inflow of water through a downstream crevasse from the area of the headwater of the river was activated; this caused a radical change of flow conditions into confluent ones. The conditions of water retention in lake basins were also varied. Apart from hydrological recharge, also the orographic features of the catchment areas of the lakes played an important role here, for example, the distance from the river channel, the altitude at which a given catchment was located within the floodplain and

  8. Processes and rates of sediment and wood accumulation in headwater streams of the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Channels that have been scoured to bedrock by debris flows provide unique opportunities to calculate the rate of sediment and wood accumulation in low-order streams, to understand the temporal succession of channel morphology following disturbance, and to make inferences about processes associated with input and transport of sediment. Dendrochronology was used to estimate the time since the previous debris flow and the time since the last stand-replacement fire in unlogged basins in the central Coast Range of Oregon. Debris flow activity increased 42 per cent above the background rate in the decades immediately following the last wildfire. Changes in wood and sediment storage were quantified for 13 streams that ranged from 4 to 144 years since the previous debris flow. The volume of wood and sediment in the channel, and the length of channel with exposed bedrock, were strongly correlated with the time since the previous debris flow. Wood increased the storage capacity of the channel and trapped the majority of the sediment in these steep headwater streams. In the absence of wood, channels that have been scoured to bedrock by a debris flow may lack the capacity to store sediment and could persist in a bedrock state for an extended period of time. With an adequate supply of wood, low-order channels have the potential of storing large volumes of sediment in the interval between debris flows and can function as one of the dominant storage reservoirs for sediment in mountainous terrain.

  9. Landscape Characteristics and Variations in Longitudinal Stream Flow Contribution in two Headwater Semi-Arid Mountain Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakespeare, B.; Gooseff, M. N.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding what role particular catchment attributes (slope, aspect, landcover, and contributing area) play in the contribution of stream flow is important for land management decisions, especially in the semi-arid western areas of the United States. Our study site is paired small catchments (approximately 9 and 11 km2) in the headwaters of the Weber drainage basin in Northern Utah. These catchments are surrounded by Wasatch formation with loamy textured soils. One catchment is predominantly underlain by quartzite while the other catchment is mostly underlain by limestone. We measured lateral flow gains every 200 to 400 meters using salt dilution gauging techniques throughout the ~5 km long streams. These measurements were taken synoptically 3 times during the seasonal discharge recession (summer 2005). The flows ranged spatially from 4 L s-1 to 55 L s-1 and varied temporally by as much as 50% when comparing the same reaches. Using GIS software, landscape analysis of slope, aspect, contributing area, topographic convergence, riparian and hillslope area, and landcover was performed for each of the delineated stream reach contributing areas. The results were tested for correlations between lateral flow gains measured in the field and different landscape characteristics. Each of the synoptic events was compared with each other to explore effects of seasonal recession on the relationships between flow gain and landscape characteristics.

  10. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Headwaters Region of the Cullasaja River, Macon and Jackson Counties, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, William C.

    2007-01-01

    The headwaters region of the Cullasaja River is underlain by metasedimentary and meta-igneous rocks of the Neoproterozoic Ashe Metamorphic Suite, including gneiss, schist, and amphibolite, that were intruded during Ordovician time by elongate bodies of trondhjemite, a felsic plutonic rock. Deformation, metamorphism, and intrusion occurred roughly simultaneously during the Taconic orogeny, about 470 million years ago, under upper-amphibolite-facies metamorphic conditions. Two generations of foliation and three major phases of folds are recognized. The second- and third-generation folds trend northeast and exert the most control on regional foliation trends. Since the orogeny, the region has undergone uplift, fracturing, and erosion. Resistance to erosion by the plutonic rock may be the primary reason for the relatively gentle relief of the high-elevation basin, compared to surrounding areas. Amphibolite is the most highly fractured lithology, followed by trondhjemite; the latter may have the best ground-water potential of the mapped lithologies by virtue of its high fracture density and high proportion of subhorizontal fractures.

  11. Comparing the extent and permanence of headwater streams from two field surveys to values from hydrographic databases and maps

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Recent US Supreme Court cases have questioned the jurisdictional scope of the Clean Water Act. Headwater streams are central to this issue because many headwater streams do not have year-round flow, and also because little is known about their contributions to navigable...

  12. The Estimated Likelihood of Nutrients and Pesticides in Nontidal Headwater Streams of the Maryland Coastal Plain During Base Flow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality in nontidal headwater (first-order) streams of the Coastal Plain during base flow in the late winter and spring is related to land use, hydrogeology, and other natural or human influences in contributing watersheds. A random survey of 174 headwater streams of the Mi...

  13. Shallow groundwater denitrification in riparian zones of a headwater agricultural landscape.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Todd R; Groffman, Peter M; Kaushal, Sujay S; Walter, M Todd

    2014-03-01

    Riparian zones adjacent to cropped lands are effective at reducing nitrate (NO) loads to receiving water bodies primarily through plant assimilation and denitrification. Denitrification represents a permanent removal pathway and a greenhouse gas source, converting NO to inert N gas or nitrous oxide (NO), and has been the subject of many studies in agricultural landscapes. Despite the prevailing notion that riparian zones can be areas of enhanced denitrification, there is a lack of in situ denitrification measurements from these areas that buffer streams and rivers from NO originating in upland cropped soils, especially over time scales that capture seasonal dynamics. We measured in situ groundwater denitrification rates in two riparian zones of an intensive dairy farm located in the headwaters of the Susquehanna River. Denitrification rates determined monthly over a 1-yr period with the N-NO push-pull method ranged from 0 to 4177 μg N kg soil d (mean, 830 ± 193 μg N kg soil d). Denitrification showed a distinct seasonal pattern, with highest rates observed in the spring and summer, concomitant with warmer temperatures and decreasing dissolved oxygen. We estimate an annual N loss of 470 ± 116 kg yr ha of riparian zone via denitrification in the shallow saturated zone, with the potential for >20% of this amount occurring as NO. Total denitrification from shallow groundwater in the riparian zone was equivalent to 32% of manure N spread on the adjacent upland field, confirming the importance of riparian zones in agricultural landscapes at controlling N loads entering downstream waters. PMID:25602674

  14. Predicting fine-scale distributions of peripheral aquatic species in headwater streams

    SciTech Connect

    DeRolph, Christopher R.; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Hain, Ernie F.

    2014-12-09

    Headwater species and peripheral populations that occupy habitat at the edge of a species range may hold an increased conservation value to managers due to their potential to maximize intraspecies diversity and species' adaptive capabilities in the context of rapid environmental change. The southern Appalachian Mountains are the southern extent of the geographic range of native Salvelinus fontinalis and naturalized Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta in eastern North America. In this paper, we predicted distributions of these peripheral, headwater wild trout populations at a fine scale to serve as a planning and management tool for resource managers to maximize resistance and resilience of these populations in the face of anthropogenic stressors. We developed correlative logistic regression models to predict occurrence of brook trout, rainbow trout, and brown trout for every interconfluence stream reach in the study area. A stream network was generated to capture a more consistent representation of headwater streams. Each of the final models had four significant metrics in common: stream order, fragmentation, precipitation, and land cover. Strahler stream order was found to be the most influential variable in two of the three final models and the second most influential variable in the other model. Greater than 70% presence accuracy was achieved for all three models. The underrepresentation of headwater streams in commonly used hydrography datasets is an important consideration that warrants close examination when forecasting headwater species distributions and range estimates. Finally and additionally, it appears that a relative watershed position metric (e.g., stream order) is an important surrogate variable (even when elevation is included) for biotic interactions across the landscape in areas where headwater species distributions are influenced by topographical gradients.

  15. Predicting fine-scale distributions of peripheral aquatic species in headwater streams.

    PubMed

    DeRolph, Christopher R; Nelson, Stacy A C; Kwak, Thomas J; Hain, Ernie F

    2015-01-01

    Headwater species and peripheral populations that occupy habitat at the edge of a species range may hold an increased conservation value to managers due to their potential to maximize intraspecies diversity and species' adaptive capabilities in the context of rapid environmental change. The southern Appalachian Mountains are the southern extent of the geographic range of native Salvelinus fontinalis and naturalized Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta in eastern North America. We predicted distributions of these peripheral, headwater wild trout populations at a fine scale to serve as a planning and management tool for resource managers to maximize resistance and resilience of these populations in the face of anthropogenic stressors. We developed correlative logistic regression models to predict occurrence of brook trout, rainbow trout, and brown trout for every interconfluence stream reach in the study area. A stream network was generated to capture a more consistent representation of headwater streams. Each of the final models had four significant metrics in common: stream order, fragmentation, precipitation, and land cover. Strahler stream order was found to be the most influential variable in two of the three final models and the second most influential variable in the other model. Greater than 70% presence accuracy was achieved for all three models. The underrepresentation of headwater streams in commonly used hydrography datasets is an important consideration that warrants close examination when forecasting headwater species distributions and range estimates. Additionally, it appears that a relative watershed position metric (e.g., stream order) is an important surrogate variable (even when elevation is included) for biotic interactions across the landscape in areas where headwater species distributions are influenced by topographical gradients. PMID:25628872

  16. Predicting fine-scale distributions of peripheral aquatic species in headwater streams

    PubMed Central

    DeRolph, Christopher R; Nelson, Stacy A C; Kwak, Thomas J; Hain, Ernie F

    2015-01-01

    Headwater species and peripheral populations that occupy habitat at the edge of a species range may hold an increased conservation value to managers due to their potential to maximize intraspecies diversity and species' adaptive capabilities in the context of rapid environmental change. The southern Appalachian Mountains are the southern extent of the geographic range of native Salvelinus fontinalis and naturalized Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta in eastern North America. We predicted distributions of these peripheral, headwater wild trout populations at a fine scale to serve as a planning and management tool for resource managers to maximize resistance and resilience of these populations in the face of anthropogenic stressors. We developed correlative logistic regression models to predict occurrence of brook trout, rainbow trout, and brown trout for every interconfluence stream reach in the study area. A stream network was generated to capture a more consistent representation of headwater streams. Each of the final models had four significant metrics in common: stream order, fragmentation, precipitation, and land cover. Strahler stream order was found to be the most influential variable in two of the three final models and the second most influential variable in the other model. Greater than 70% presence accuracy was achieved for all three models. The underrepresentation of headwater streams in commonly used hydrography datasets is an important consideration that warrants close examination when forecasting headwater species distributions and range estimates. Additionally, it appears that a relative watershed position metric (e.g., stream order) is an important surrogate variable (even when elevation is included) for biotic interactions across the landscape in areas where headwater species distributions are influenced by topographical gradients. PMID:25628872

  17. Predicting fine-scale distributions of peripheral aquatic species in headwater streams

    DOE PAGES

    DeRolph, Christopher R.; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Hain, Ernie F.

    2014-12-09

    Headwater species and peripheral populations that occupy habitat at the edge of a species range may hold an increased conservation value to managers due to their potential to maximize intraspecies diversity and species' adaptive capabilities in the context of rapid environmental change. The southern Appalachian Mountains are the southern extent of the geographic range of native Salvelinus fontinalis and naturalized Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta in eastern North America. In this paper, we predicted distributions of these peripheral, headwater wild trout populations at a fine scale to serve as a planning and management tool for resource managers to maximize resistancemore » and resilience of these populations in the face of anthropogenic stressors. We developed correlative logistic regression models to predict occurrence of brook trout, rainbow trout, and brown trout for every interconfluence stream reach in the study area. A stream network was generated to capture a more consistent representation of headwater streams. Each of the final models had four significant metrics in common: stream order, fragmentation, precipitation, and land cover. Strahler stream order was found to be the most influential variable in two of the three final models and the second most influential variable in the other model. Greater than 70% presence accuracy was achieved for all three models. The underrepresentation of headwater streams in commonly used hydrography datasets is an important consideration that warrants close examination when forecasting headwater species distributions and range estimates. Finally and additionally, it appears that a relative watershed position metric (e.g., stream order) is an important surrogate variable (even when elevation is included) for biotic interactions across the landscape in areas where headwater species distributions are influenced by topographical gradients.« less

  18. Predicting fine-scale distributions of peripheral aquatic species in headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeRolph, Christopher R.; Nelson, S.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Hain, Ernie F.

    2015-01-01

    Headwater species and peripheral populations that occupy habitat at the edge of a species range may hold an increased conservation value to managers due to their potential to maximize intraspecies diversity and species' adaptive capabilities in the context of rapid environmental change. The southern Appalachian Mountains are the southern extent of the geographic range of native Salvelinus fontinalis and naturalized Oncorhynchus mykiss and Salmo trutta in eastern North America. We predicted distributions of these peripheral, headwater wild trout populations at a fine scale to serve as a planning and management tool for resource managers to maximize resistance and resilience of these populations in the face of anthropogenic stressors. We developed correlative logistic regression models to predict occurrence of brook trout, rainbow trout, and brown trout for every interconfluence stream reach in the study area. A stream network was generated to capture a more consistent representation of headwater streams. Each of the final models had four significant metrics in common: stream order, fragmentation, precipitation, and land cover. Strahler stream order was found to be the most influential variable in two of the three final models and the second most influential variable in the other model. Greater than 70% presence accuracy was achieved for all three models. The underrepresentation of headwater streams in commonly used hydrography datasets is an important consideration that warrants close examination when forecasting headwater species distributions and range estimates. Additionally, it appears that a relative watershed position metric (e.g., stream order) is an important surrogate variable (even when elevation is included) for biotic interactions across the landscape in areas where headwater species distributions are influenced by topographical gradients.

  19. Climatic Variation And Runoff From Himalayan Mountain Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, L.; Collins, D. N.; Davenport, J.; Entwistle, N. S.

    2012-12-01

    Both precipitation and runoff usually increase with elevation in high mountain basins but Himalayan tributaries of both Indus and Ganges often rise in relatively dry interior areas, before flow downstream is modified on passing through areas receiving winter snowfall and summer monsoon snow and rain. Through time variations in tributary contributions to the major rivers, the upper Indus, Jhelum, Sutlej and Ganges therefore respond to differing climatic signals. Long term measurements of discharge upstream of large dams are available for the Jhelum and Sutlej since the 1920s, but show differing patterns of variation. Runoff in the Jhelum declined to the 1960s before recovering whereas flow in the Sutlej continued to decline. Highly glacierised areas south-east of Nanga Parbat receive considerable amounts of precipitation distributed throughout the year whereas other Jhelum headwaters and those of the Sutlej are summer monsoon dominated. Precipitation measurements exist for dry areas of the upper Indus basin since the early 1900s, but other measurements in the Kaghan valley and upstream of the Mangla dam only start in the 1960s. Correlation between year-to-year variations in precipitation across these headwater regions and between precipitation and runoff in headwater and main-stem basins suggest that runoff declines with summer snowfall on glaciers in areas of the Upper Indus where valleys at elevations below glaciers are dry, but runoff increases with summer precipitation south of the main Himalaya range in the Jhelum and Sutlej. Considerable differences arise therefore in water resources availability from year to year in the various basins downstream.

  20. Modeling flash flood events in an ungaged semi-arid basin using a real-time distributed model: Fish Creek near Anza Borrego, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fast responding headwater basins and canyons pose a significant threat to life and property throughout the semi-arid western United States. This paper presents the results from the application of the real-time distributed model KINematic runoff and EROsin model (KINEROS2) to the complex terrain of t...

  1. Impact of climate variability and anthropogenic activity on streamflow in the Three Rivers Headwater Region, Tibetan Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chong; Li, Daiqing; Gao, Yanni; Liu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Linbo

    2016-05-01

    Under the impacts of climate variability and human activities, there is violent fluctuation for streamflow in the large basins in China. Therefore, it is crucial to separate the impacts of climate variability and human activities on streamflow fluctuation for better water resources planning and management. In this study, the Three Rivers Headwater Region (TRHR) was chosen as the study area. Long-term hydrological data for the TRHR were collected in order to investigate the changes in annual runoff during the period of 1956-2012. The nonparametric Mann-Kendall test, moving t test, Pettitt test, Mann-Kendall-Sneyers test, and the cumulative anomaly curve were used to identify trends and change points in the hydro-meteorological variables. Change point in runoff was identified in the three basins, which respectively occurred around the years 1989 and 1993, dividing the long-term runoff series into a natural period and a human-induced period. Then, the hydrologic sensitivity analysis method was employed to evaluate the effects of climate variability and human activities on mean annual runoff for the human-induced period based on precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. In the human-induced period, climate variability was the main factor that increased (reduced) runoff in LRB and YARB (YRB) with contribution of more than 90 %, while the increasing (decreasing) percentage due to human activities only accounted for less than 10 %, showing that runoff in the TRHR is more sensitive to climate variability than human activities. The intra-annual distribution of runoff shifted gradually from a double peak pattern to a single peak pattern, which was mainly influenced by atmospheric circulation in the summer and autumn. The inter-annual variation in runoff was jointly controlled by the East Asian monsoon, the westerly, and Tibetan Plateau monsoons.

  2. Channel morphology and bed-load yield in fluvial, formerly-glaciated headwater streams of the Columbia Mountains, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, K. C.; Brardinoni, F.; Alila, Y.

    2013-04-01

    This study examines channel-reach morphology and bedload yield dynamics in relation to landscape structure and snowmelt hydrology in headwater streams of the Columbia Mountains, Canada. Data collection relies on field surveys and geographic information systems analysis in conjunction with a nested monitoring network of water discharge and bedload transfer. The landscape is characterized by subdued, formerly-glaciated upland topography in which the geomorphic significance of landslides and debris flows is negligible and fluvial processes prevail. While the spatial organization of channel morphology is chiefly controlled by glacially imposed local slope in conjunction with wood abundance and availability of glacigenic deposits, downstream patterns of the coarse grain-size fraction, bankfull width, bankfull depth, and stream power are all insensitive to systematic changes of local slope along the typically stepped long profiles. This is an indication that these alluvial systems have adjusted to the contemporary snowmelt-driven water and sediment transport regimes, and as such are able to compensate for the glacially-imposed boundary conditions. Bedload specific yield increases with drainage area suggesting that fluvial re-mobilization of glacial and paraglacial deposits dominate the sedimentary dynamics of basins as small as 2 km2. Stepwise multiple regression analysis shows that annual rates of sediment transfer are mainly controlled by the number of peak events over threshold discharge. During such events, repeated destabilization of channel bed armoring and re-mobilization of sediment temporarily stored behind LWD structures can generate bedload transport across the entire snowmelt season. In particular, channel morphology controls the variability of bedload response to hydrologic forcing. In the present case studies, we show that the observed spatial variability in annual bedload yield appears to be modulated by inter-basin differences in morphometric

  3. Cichlid fishes in the Angolan headwaters region: molecular evidence of the ichthyofaunal contact between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi systems.

    PubMed

    Musilová, Zuzana; Kalous, Lukáš; Petrtýl, Miloslav; Chaloupková, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The headwaters of five large African river basins flow through the Bié Plateau in Angola and still remain faunistically largely unexplored. We investigated fish fauna from the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi river systems from central Angola. We reconstructed molecular phylogenies of the most common cichlid species from the region, Tilapia sparrmanii and Serranochromis macrocephalus, using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. We found evidence for ichthyofaunal contact and gene flow between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi watersheds in the Bié Plateau in central Angola. Waterfalls and rapids also appeared to restrict genetic exchange among populations within the Cuanza basin. Further, we found that the Angolan Serranochromis cichlid fishes represent a monophyletic lineage with respect to other haplochromines, including the serranochromines from the Congo and Zambezi rivers. This study represents an important initial step in a biodiversity survey of this extremely poorly explored region, as well as giving further understanding to species distributions and gene flow both between and within river basins. PMID:23724120

  4. Cichlid fishes in the Angolan headwaters region: molecular evidence of the ichthyofaunal contact between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi systems.

    PubMed

    Musilová, Zuzana; Kalous, Lukáš; Petrtýl, Miloslav; Chaloupková, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The headwaters of five large African river basins flow through the Bié Plateau in Angola and still remain faunistically largely unexplored. We investigated fish fauna from the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi river systems from central Angola. We reconstructed molecular phylogenies of the most common cichlid species from the region, Tilapia sparrmanii and Serranochromis macrocephalus, using both mitochondrial and nuclear markers. We found evidence for ichthyofaunal contact and gene flow between the Cuanza and Okavango-Zambezi watersheds in the Bié Plateau in central Angola. Waterfalls and rapids also appeared to restrict genetic exchange among populations within the Cuanza basin. Further, we found that the Angolan Serranochromis cichlid fishes represent a monophyletic lineage with respect to other haplochromines, including the serranochromines from the Congo and Zambezi rivers. This study represents an important initial step in a biodiversity survey of this extremely poorly explored region, as well as giving further understanding to species distributions and gene flow both between and within river basins.

  5. Map-based prediction of organic carbon in headwater streams improved by downstream observations from the river outlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnerud, J.; von Brömssen, C.; Fölster, J.; Buffam, I.; Andersson, J.-O.; Nyberg, L.; Bishop, K.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the great abundance and ecological importance of headwater streams, managers are usually limited by a lack of information about water chemistry in these headwaters. In this study we test whether river outlet chemistry can be used as an additional source of information to improve the prediction of the chemistry of upstream headwaters (size < 2 km2), relative to models based on map information alone. We use the concentration of total organic carbon (TOC), an important stream ecosystem parameter, as the target for our study. Between 2000 and 2008, we carried out 17 synoptic surveys in 9 mesoscale catchments (size 32-235 km2). Over 900 water samples were collected in total, primarily from headwater streams but also including each catchment's river outlet during every survey. First we used partial least square regression (PLS) to model the distribution (median, interquartile range (IQR)) of headwater stream TOC for a given catchment, based on a large number of candidate variables including sub-catchment characteristics from GIS, and measured river chemistry at the catchment outlet. The best candidate variables from the PLS models were then used in hierarchical linear mixed models (MM) to model TOC in individual headwater streams. Three predictor variables were consistently selected for the MM calibration sets: (1) proportion of forested wetlands in the sub-catchment (positively correlated with headwater stream TOC), (2) proportion of lake surface cover in the sub-catchment (negatively correlated with headwater stream TOC), and (3) river outlet TOC (positively correlated with headwater stream TOC). Including river outlet TOC improved predictions, with 5-15 % lower prediction errors than when using map information alone. Thus, data on water chemistry measured at river outlets offer information which can complement GIS-based modelling of headwater stream chemistry.

  6. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m-2 yr-1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42- accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  7. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m‑2 yr‑1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42‑ accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  8. Hydrologic data for Paleozoic rocks in the upper Colorado River basin, Colorado, Utah, Wyoming, and Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geldon, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains data used to interpret the hydrology of Paleozoic rocks in the Upper Colorado River Basin under the U.S. Geological Survey 's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis program. The study area includes the drainages of the Green and Colorado Rivers from their headwaters to Lees Ferry, Arizona. Hydrologic data presented in this report include artesian yields from wells and springs, and values of porosity, intrinsic permeability, and hydraulic conductivity determined by laboratory analyses and aquifer tests. (USGS)

  9. Hybridization in headwater regions, and the role of rivers as drivers of speciation in Amazonian birds.

    PubMed

    Weir, Jason T; Faccio, Maya S; Pulido-Santacruz, Paola; Barrera-Guzmán, Alfredo O; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    Many understory birds and other groups form genetically differentiated subspecies or closely related species on opposite sides of major rivers of Amazonia, but are proposed to come into geographic contact in headwater regions where narrower river widths may present less of a dispersal barrier. Whether such forms hybridize in headwater regions is generally unknown, but has important implications to our understanding of the role of rivers as drivers of speciation. We used a dataset of several thousand single nucleotide polymorphisms to show that seven taxon pairs that differentiate across a major Amazonian river come into geographic contact and hybridize in headwater regions. All taxon pairs possessed hybrids with low numbers of loci in which alleles were inherited from both parental species, suggesting they are backcrossed with parentals, and indicating gene flow between parental populations. Ongoing gene flow challenges rivers as the sole cause of in situ speciation, but is compatible with the view that the wide river courses in the heart of Amazonia may have driven interfluvial divergence during episodes of wet forest retraction away from headwater regions. Taxa as old as 4 Ma in our Amazonian dataset continue to hybridize at contact zones, suggesting reproductive isolation evolves at a slow pace.

  10. Influence of instream habitat and water quality on aggressive behavior in crayfish of channelized headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many agricultural drainage ditches that border farm fields of the Midwestern United States are degraded headwater streams that possess communities of crayfish. We hypothesized that crayfish communities at sites with low instream habitat diversity and poor water quality would show greater evidence of...

  11. High frequency variability of environmental drivers determining benthic community dynamics in headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Snell, M A; Barker, P A; Surridge, B W J; Large, A R G; Jonczyk, J; Benskin, C McW H; Reaney, S; Perks, M T; Owen, G J; Cleasby, W; Deasy, C; Burke, S; Haygarth, P M

    2014-07-01

    Headwater streams are an important feature of the landscape, with their diversity in structure and associated ecological function providing a potential natural buffer against downstream nutrient export. Phytobenthic communities, dominated in many headwaters by diatoms, must respond to physical and chemical parameters that can vary in magnitude within hours, whereas the ecological regeneration times are much longer. How diatom communities develop in the fluctuating, dynamic environments characteristic of headwaters is poorly understood. Deployment of near-continuous monitoring technology in sub-catchments of the River Eden, NW England, provides the opportunity for measurement of temporal variability in stream discharge and nutrient resource supply to benthic communities, as represented by monthly diatom samples collected over two years. Our data suggest that the diatom communities and the derived Trophic Diatom Index, best reflect stream discharge conditions over the preceding 18-21 days and Total Phosphorus concentrations over a wider antecedent window of 7-21 days. This is one of the first quantitative assessments of long-term diatom community development in response to continuously-measured stream nutrient concentration and discharge fluctuations. The data reveal the sensitivity of these headwater communities to mean conditions prior to sampling, with flow as the dominant variable. With sufficient understanding of the role of antecedent conditions, these methods can be used to inform interpretation of monitoring data, including those collected under the European Water Framework Directive and related mitigation efforts.

  12. An Assessment of Cellulose Filters as a Standardized Material for Measuring Litter Breakdown in Headwater Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decay rate of cellulose filters and associated chemical and biological characteristics were compared to those of white oak (Quercus alba) leaves to determine if cellulose filters could be a suitable standardized material for measuring deciduous leaf breakdown in headwater str...

  13. An assessment of cellulose filters as a standardized material for measuring litter breakdown in headwater streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decay rate of cellulose filters and associated chemical and biological characteristics were compared to those of white oak (Quercus alba) leaves to determine if cellulose filters could be a suitable standardized material for measuring deciduous leaf breakdown in headwater str...

  14. Are bryophytes useful indicators of hydrologic permanence in forested headwater streams?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Court cases have recently questioned whether all headwater streams, particularly non-perennial streams, should be protected in the U.S. under the Clean Water Act. Rapid field-based indicators of hydrologic permanence are needed for jurisdictional determinations. The study objecti...

  15. 76 FR 66321 - Proposed Establishment of Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Establishment of Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area; Draft Land Protection Plan and Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: We, the Fish and...

  16. A synoptic survey of ecosystem services from headwater catchments in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    We combined data collected from 568 headwater streams as a part of the US Environmental Protection Agency’s National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA) with catchment attributes related to the production of the ecosystem services of water supply, carbon, nitrogen, and phosphoru...

  17. Influence of riparian seepage zones on nitrate variability in two agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian seepage zones are one of the primary pathways of groundwater transport to headwater streams. While seeps have been recognized for their contributions to streamflow, there is little information on how seeps affect stream water quality. The objective of this study was to examine the influence...

  18. Estimating contributions of nitrate and herbicides from groundwater to headwater streams, northern Atlantic Coastal Plain, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott; Denver, Judith M.

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater transport often complicates understanding of surface-water contamination. We estimated the regional flux of nitrate and selected herbicides from groundwater to nontidal headwater streams of the Atlantic Coastal Plain (New Jersey through North Carolina) based on late-winter or spring base-flow samples from 174 streams. Sampled streams were selected randomly, and flux estimates are based on resulting population estimates rather than on empirical models, which have been used previously for similar estimates. Base-flow flux in the estimated 8,834 headwater streams of the study area are an estimated 21,200 kg/day of nitrate (as N) and 5.83, 0.565, and 20.7 kg/day of alachlor, atrazine, and metolachlor (and selected degradates), respectively. Base-flow flux of alachlor and metolachlor is <3% of the total base-flow flux of those compounds plus degradates. Base-flow flux of nitrate and herbicides as a percentage of applications is typically highest in well-drained areas and lowest in areas with abundant poor drainage and anoxic conditions. In Coastal Plain watersheds of Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, <2% of applied nitrogen reaches headwater streams as base flow. On the Delmarva Peninsula part of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, however, more than 10% of such applications are transported through groundwater to streams, and base-flow nitrate flux represents 70% of total nitrogen flux in headwater streams.

  19. Hybridization in headwater regions, and the role of rivers as drivers of speciation in Amazonian birds.

    PubMed

    Weir, Jason T; Faccio, Maya S; Pulido-Santacruz, Paola; Barrera-Guzmán, Alfredo O; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2015-07-01

    Many understory birds and other groups form genetically differentiated subspecies or closely related species on opposite sides of major rivers of Amazonia, but are proposed to come into geographic contact in headwater regions where narrower river widths may present less of a dispersal barrier. Whether such forms hybridize in headwater regions is generally unknown, but has important implications to our understanding of the role of rivers as drivers of speciation. We used a dataset of several thousand single nucleotide polymorphisms to show that seven taxon pairs that differentiate across a major Amazonian river come into geographic contact and hybridize in headwater regions. All taxon pairs possessed hybrids with low numbers of loci in which alleles were inherited from both parental species, suggesting they are backcrossed with parentals, and indicating gene flow between parental populations. Ongoing gene flow challenges rivers as the sole cause of in situ speciation, but is compatible with the view that the wide river courses in the heart of Amazonia may have driven interfluvial divergence during episodes of wet forest retraction away from headwater regions. Taxa as old as 4 Ma in our Amazonian dataset continue to hybridize at contact zones, suggesting reproductive isolation evolves at a slow pace. PMID:26095719

  20. Linking nitrogen management, seep chemistry, and stream water quality in two agricultural headwater watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian seepage zones in headwater agricultural watersheds represent important sources of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) to surface waters, often connecting N-rich groundwater systems to streams. In this study, we examined how NO3-N concentrations in seep and stream water were affected by NO3-N processin...

  1. FIELD OPERATIONS MANUAL FOR ASSESSING THE HYDROLOGIC PERMANENCE AND ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this manual is to document procedures that were developed and used by the Ecological Exposure Research Division, NERL, ORD, for the assessment of the physical and biological characteristics of headwater streams; and to provide a catalog of procedures to other group...

  2. 33 CFR 207.340 - Reservoirs at headwaters of the Mississippi River; use and administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dams. (2) During the season of navigation on the upper Mississippi River, the volume of water... Mississippi River; use and administration. 207.340 Section 207.340 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF... headwaters of the Mississippi River; use and administration. (a) Description. These reservoirs...

  3. How agricultural landscape features control the transfer of nutrient and eutrophication risk in headwater catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, Rémi; Delmas, Magalie; Dorioz, Jean-Marcel; Garnier, Josette; Moatar, Florentina; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2014-05-01

    The degradation of surface water quality due to nitrogen and phosphorus pollution is a major concern for drinking water quality and ecosystems health. Numerous studies have demonstrated that headwater catchments are large contributors of nutrient loads to downstream waters bodies. In terms of scientific understanding of the processes controlling nutrient transfers, headwater catchments are relevant spatial units to study the role of landscape features because of the relatively low contribution of point sources and in-stream processes compared to larger river networks. This paper presents an analysis of the variability in space and time of observed N and P loads for a dataset of 160 headwater catchments at a national level (France). A multivariate statistical analysis was performed to relate observed N and P loads to spatial attributes describing agricultural landscapes and the physical characteristics of the catchments: climate, topography, soils, etc. We identified factors controlling N and P loads and N:P:Si ratios in freshwaters; and specifically spatially described factors, by considering river corridors and interaction between soils and land use attributes. The same catchment dataset is used to calibrate the Nutting model, i.e. a statistical model developed to estimate nutrient emission to surface water, using readily available data in France (Dupas et al., 2013). Nutting is a statistical model linking N/P sources and catchment land and river attributes to estimate mean interannual nitrate-N, total-N, dissolved-P and total-P loads. It allows to extrapolate nutrient loads in unmonitored catchments at a national level and to estimate the risk of eutrophication in freshwaters considering Redfield's (1963) N:P:Si ratios. Results show that N is in excess over silica in 93% of French headwater bodies, and that phosphorus is in excess over silica in 26%-65% of French headwater catchments. This means that between 26% and 63% of French headwaters are at risk of

  4. Significance of headwater streams and perennial springs in ecological monitoring in Shenandoah National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Craig D.; Webb, James R.; Young, John A.; Johnson, Zane B.

    2013-01-01

    Shenandoah National Park has been monitoring water chemistry and benthic macroinvertebrates in stream ecosystems since 1979. These monitoring efforts were designed to assess the status and trends in stream condition associated with atmospheric deposition (acid rain) and changes in forest health due to gypsy moth infestations. The primary objective of the present research was to determine whether the current long-term macroinvertebrate and water-quality monitoring program in Shenandoah National Park was failing to capture important information on the status and trends in stream condition by not sufficiently representing smaller, headwater streams. The current benthic-macroinvertebrate and water-chemistry sampling designs do not include routine collection of data from streams with contributing watershed areas smaller than 100 hectares, even though these small streams represent the overwhelming proportion of total stream length in the park. In this study, we sampled headwater sites, including headwater stream reaches (contributing watershed area approximately 100 hectares (ha) and perennial springs, in the park for aquatic macroinvertebrates and water chemistry and compared the results with current and historical data collected at long-term ecological monitoring (LTEM) sites on larger streams routinely sampled as part of ongoing monitoring efforts. The larger purpose of the study was to inform ongoing efforts by park managers to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of the current aquatic monitoring program in light of other potential stressors (for example, climate change) and limited resources. Our results revealed several important findings that could influence management decisions regarding long-term monitoring of park streams. First, we found that biological indicators of stream condition at headwater sites and perennial springs generally were more indicative of lower habitat quality and were more spatially variable than those observed at sites on routinely

  5. Map-based prediction of organic carbon in headwaters streams improved by downstream observations from the river outlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnerud, J.; von Brömssen, C.; Fölster, J.; Buffam, I.; Andersson, J.-O.; Nyberg, L.; Bishop, K.

    2015-06-01

    In spite of the great abundance and ecological importance of headwater streams, managers are usually limited by a lack of information about water chemistry in these headwaters. In this study we test whether river outlet chemistry can be used as an additional source of information to improve the prediction of the chemistry of upstream headwaters (size < 2 km2), relative to models based on map information alone. Between 2000 and 2008, we conducted 17 synoptic surveys of streams within 9 mesoscale catchments (size 32-235 km2). Over 900 water samples were collected from catchments ranging in size from 0.03 to 235 km2. First we used partial least square regression (PLS) to model headwater stream total organic carbon (TOC) median and interquartile values for a given catchment, based on a large number of candidate variables including catchment characteristics from GIS, and measured chemistry at the catchment outlet. The best candidate variables from the PLS models were then used in hierarchical linear mixed models (MM) to model TOC in individual headwater streams. Three predictor variables were consistently selected for the MM calibration sets: (1) proportion of forested wetlands in the sub-catchment (positively correlated with headwater stream TOC), (2) proportion of lake surface cover in the sub-catchment (negatively correlated with headwater stream TOC), and (3) whole-catchment river outlet TOC (positively correlated with headwater stream TOC). Including river outlet TOC as a predictor in the models gave 5-15% lower prediction errors than using map information alone. Thus, data on water chemistry measured at river outlets offers information which can complement GIS-based modelling of headwater stream chemistry.

  6. Arthropod prey for riparian associated birds in headwater forests of the Oregon Coast Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan C.; Li, Judith; Sobota, Janel; Jenkins, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Headwater riparian areas occupy a large proportion of the land base in Pacific Northwest forests, and thus are ecologically and economically important. Although a primary goal of management along small headwater streams is the protection of aquatic resources, streamside habitat also is important for many terrestrial wildlife species. However, mechanisms underlying the riparian associations of some terrestrial species have not been well studied, particularly for headwater drainages. We investigated the diets of and food availability for four bird species associated with riparian habitats in montane coastal forests of western Oregon, USA. We examined variation in the availability of arthropod prey as a function of distance from stream. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that (1) emergent aquatic insects were a food source for insectivorous birds in headwater riparian areas, and (2) the abundances of aquatic and terrestrial arthropod prey did not differ between streamside and upland areas during the bird breeding season. We found that although adult aquatic insects were available for consumption throughout the study period, they represented a relatively small proportion of available prey abundance and biomass and were present in only 1% of the diet samples from only one of the four riparian-associated bird species. Nonetheless, arthropod prey, comprised primarily of insects of terrestrial origin, was more abundant in streamside than upland samples. We conclude that food resources for birds in headwater riparian areas are primarily associated with terrestrial vegetation, and that bird distributions along the gradient from streamside to upland may be related to variation in arthropod prey availability. Because distinct vegetation may distinguish riparian from upland habitats for riparian-associated birds and their terrestrial arthropod prey, we suggest that understory communities be considered when defining management zones for riparian habitat.

  7. Mean annual runoff in the upper Ohio River basin, 1941-70, and its historic variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beall, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    A map of the Ohio River basin above the Muskingum River shows patterns of mean annual runoff for the climatologic and hydrologic reference period, 1941-70. The primary data base consisted of 98 long-term gaging-station records collected within this 27,300-square-mile headwater area of the Ohio River basin. Supplemental information was derived from 83 short-term records. Mean annual runoff is at a regional minimum of less than 12 inches in an area extending from the northern West Virginia panhandle to the headwaters of the Mahoning River in Ohio. Mean annual runoff of more than 32 inches occurs in parts of the upper Cheat River basin in West Virginia. The zone of high runoff trends northeastward along the western slopes of the Allegheny Mountains; magnitudes diminish to about 25 inches at the eastern basin boundary near Ebensburg, Pennsylvania. Runoff of this magnitude occurs also in a band across the upper Allegheny River basin in Pennsylvania. Ratios of mean annual discharge to the 30-year reference-period average were computed for each year of record for all long-term gaging stations. Annual discharges have ranged from about 30 percent to 200 percent of the 30-year mean. Graphed summaries of the annual ratios document the relative duration and magnitude of wet and dry periods during the past 65 years in the upper Ohio River basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Hydrologic response to valley-scale structure in alpine headwaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weekes, Anne A.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Montgomery, David R.; Woodward, Andrea; Bolton, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    To better evaluate potential differences in streamflow response among basins with extensive coarse depositional features and those without, we examined the relationships between streamflow discharge, stable isotopes, water temperature and the amplitude of the diurnal signal at five basin outlets. We also quantified the percentages of colluvial channel length measured along the stepped longitudinal profile. Colluvial channels, characterized by the presence of surficial, coarse-grained depositional features, presented sediment-rich, transport-limited morphologies that appeared to have a cumulative effect on the timing and volume of flow downstream. Measurements taken from colluvial channels flowing through depositional landforms showed median recession constants (Kr) of 0.9-0.95, δ18O values of ≥−14.5 and summer diurnal amplitudes ≤0.8 as compared with more typical surface water recession constant values of 0.7, δ18O ≤ −13.5 and diurnal amplitudes >2.0. Our results demonstrated strong associations between the percentage of colluvial channel length within a catchment and moderated streamflow regimes, water temperatures, diurnal signals and depleted δ18O related to groundwater influx.

  9. Climate Change and Its Impact on the Eco-Environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region on the Tibetan Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chong; Zhang, Linbo

    2015-09-25

    This study analyzes the impact of climate change on the eco-environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region (TRHR), Tibetan Plateau, China. Temperature and precipitation experienced sharp increases in this region during the past 57 years. A dramatic increase in winter temperatures contributed to a rise in average annual temperatures. Moreover, annual runoff in the Lancang (LRB) and Yangtze (YARB) river basins showed an increasing trend, compared to a slight decrease in the Yellow River Basin (YRB). Runoff is predominantly influenced by rainfall, which is controlled by several monsoon systems. The water temperature in the YRB and YARB increased significantly from 1958 to 2007 (p < 0.001), driven by air temperature changes. Additionally, owing to warming and wetting trends in the TRHR, the net primary productivity (NPP) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) showed significant increasing trends during the past half-century. Furthermore, although an increase in water erosion due to rainfall erosivity was observed, wind speeds declined significantly, causing a decline in wind erosion, as well as the frequency and duration of sandstorms. A clear regional warming trend caused an obvious increasing trend in glacier runoff, with a maximum value observed in the 2000s.

  10. Climate Change and Its Impact on the Eco-Environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region on the Tibetan Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chong; Zhang, Linbo

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of climate change on the eco-environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region (TRHR), Tibetan Plateau, China. Temperature and precipitation experienced sharp increases in this region during the past 57 years. A dramatic increase in winter temperatures contributed to a rise in average annual temperatures. Moreover, annual runoff in the Lancang (LRB) and Yangtze (YARB) river basins showed an increasing trend, compared to a slight decrease in the Yellow River Basin (YRB). Runoff is predominantly influenced by rainfall, which is controlled by several monsoon systems. The water temperature in the YRB and YARB increased significantly from 1958 to 2007 (p < 0.001), driven by air temperature changes. Additionally, owing to warming and wetting trends in the TRHR, the net primary productivity (NPP) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) showed significant increasing trends during the past half-century. Furthermore, although an increase in water erosion due to rainfall erosivity was observed, wind speeds declined significantly, causing a decline in wind erosion, as well as the frequency and duration of sandstorms. A clear regional warming trend caused an obvious increasing trend in glacier runoff, with a maximum value observed in the 2000s. PMID:26404333

  11. Climate Change and Its Impact on the Eco-Environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region on the Tibetan Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chong; Zhang, Linbo

    2015-10-01

    This study analyzes the impact of climate change on the eco-environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region (TRHR), Tibetan Plateau, China. Temperature and precipitation experienced sharp increases in this region during the past 57 years. A dramatic increase in winter temperatures contributed to a rise in average annual temperatures. Moreover, annual runoff in the Lancang (LRB) and Yangtze (YARB) river basins showed an increasing trend, compared to a slight decrease in the Yellow River Basin (YRB). Runoff is predominantly influenced by rainfall, which is controlled by several monsoon systems. The water temperature in the YRB and YARB increased significantly from 1958 to 2007 (p < 0.001), driven by air temperature changes. Additionally, owing to warming and wetting trends in the TRHR, the net primary productivity (NPP) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) showed significant increasing trends during the past half-century. Furthermore, although an increase in water erosion due to rainfall erosivity was observed, wind speeds declined significantly, causing a decline in wind erosion, as well as the frequency and duration of sandstorms. A clear regional warming trend caused an obvious increasing trend in glacier runoff, with a maximum value observed in the 2000s. PMID:26404333

  12. BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT APPROACHES FOR STREAM-RIPARIAN AREAS: PERSPECTIVES FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST HEADWATER FORESTS, MICROCLIMATES, AND AMPHIBIANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream-riparian areas represent a nexus of biodiversity, with disproportionate numbers of species tied to and interacting within this key habitat. New research in Pacific Northwest headwater forests, especially the characterization of microclimates and amphibian distributions, is...

  13. Subject Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gayle; And Others

    Three newspaper librarians described how they manage the files of newspaper clippings which are a necessary part of their collections. The development of a new subject classification system for the clippings files was outlined. The new subject headings were based on standard subject heading lists and on local need. It was decided to use a computer…

  14. Recharge estimation in a large semi-arid basin using storage - discharge relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulovic, Nena; Larsen, Joshua; Reading, Lucy; McIntyre, Neil; Jarihani, Abdollah; Sabburg, Letitia; Undershultz, Jim

    2015-04-01

    The characteristics of flow recession in the absence of precipitation have long been used to infer upstream catchment storage properties. An intriguing aspect of this storage - discharge relationship occurs when changes in flow recession occur following a rainfall event due to increased storage. The main assumption in this case is that additional groundwater recharge has increased the storage within flow systems connected to the stream, which is then reflected in the increased recessional flow. Using flow records from 4 catchments (~100 km2) across the headwaters of the semi-arid Condamine Basin (and the unconfined section of the Surat artesian groundwater basin) within central eastern Australia, we evaluate and compare storage -discharge relationships and the change in storage for large individual events. Converting this to recharge resulted in low values compared to a number of independent recharge estimation techniques (chloride mass balance, water balance, groundwater hydrograph analysis). This discrepancy may arise because of some inherent differences between the techniques, however some important assumptions in the storage - discharge analysis are worth exploring. These include: the impact of evapotranspiration (ET) on the flow recession, which is largely unaccounted for, and is likely to be significant in semi-arid environments, and the bias towards larger events within the analysis, which is related to the difficulty associated with incorporating the large number of small events within automated time series analysis. We propose accounting for these limitations through the inclusion of remote sensing based ET estimates, and the use of multiple automated hydrograph separation techniques in extracting flow recession periods for analysis, and preferably those with lower user subjectivity. Overcoming these limitations is essential if catchment storage - discharge analysis techniques are to be more broadly applied to groundwater recharge estimation problems

  15. Channel morphology and patterns of bedload transport in fluvial, formerly-glaciated, forested headwater streams of the Columbia Mountains, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Kim; Brardinoni, Francesco; Alila, Younes

    2013-04-01

    This study examines channel-reach morphology and bedload transport dynamics in relation to landscape structure and snowmelt hydrology in Cotton and Elk Creek, two headwater streams of the southern Columbia Mountains, Canada. Data collection is based on field surveys and GIS analysis in conjunction with a nested monitoring network of water discharge and bed load transfer. The nested monitoring network is designed to examine the effects of channel bed texture, and the influence of free-formed (i.e., boulder cascades, step pools, and riffle pools) and forced-alluvial morphologies (i.e., forced step pools) on bedload entrainment and transport. The landscape is characterized by subdued glaciated topography in which sediment is primarily supplied by bank failures and fluvial transfer dominates the channelized sediment cascade. The spatial distribution of channel types is mainly controlled by glacially imposed local slope together with availability of wood and glacigenic materials. Interestingly, downstream hydraulic geometry as well as downstream patterns of the coarse channel bed fraction and stream power are all insensitive to systematic changes of local slope along the typically stepped longitudinal profiles. An indication that the study alluvial systems are adjusted to the contemporary hydrologic and sedimentary regimes, and as such through post-LGM times have been able to compensate for the glacially-imposed boundary conditions. Stepwise multiple regression indicates that annual bedload yield is chiefly controlled by the number of peak events over threshold discharge. During such high flows, repeated destabilization of channel bed armouring and re-mobilization of sediment stored behind logjams can ensure sediment supply for bedload transport across the entire snowmelt season. In particular, channel morphology affects distinctively the variability of bed load response to hydrologic forcing. The observed spatial variability in annual bedload yield appears to correlate

  16. Selected elements and organic chemicals in bed sediment and fish tissue of the Tualatin River basin, Oregon, 1992-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonn, Bernadine A.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the results of a reconnaissance survey of elements and organic compounds found in bed sediment and fish tissue in streams of the Tualatin River Basin. The basin is in northwestern Oregon to the west of the Portland metropolitan area (fig. 1). The Tualatin River flows for about 80 miles, draining an area of about 712 square miles, before it enters the Willamette River. Land use in the basin changes from mostly forested in the headwaters, to mixed forest and agriculture, to predominately urban. The basin supports a growing population of more than 350,000 people, most of whom live in lower parts of the basin. Water quality in the Tualatin River and its tributaries is expected to be affected by the increasing urbanization of the basin.

  17. Non-linearity of runoff generation processes in an alpine headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Daniele; Tromp van-Meerveld, H. J.; Gobbi, Alberto; Borga, Marco

    2010-05-01

    Hydrological systems are often characterized by non-linear behaviours. Particularly, threshold effects due to the complex interactions of many physical controls are frequently observed at the hillslope and catchment scale. The presence of such non-linear behaviours at different scales can reduce our prediction capabilities of hydrological responses. Therefore, investigating the occurrence of hydrological thresholds can help to improve our understanding of the phenomenon and increase our ability to make reliable predictions. In this study we analyzed the runoff response of the small Bridge Creek Catchment (BBC, 0.11 km², North-Eastern Italian Alps). This headwater catchment consists of hillslopes and a distinctive, relatively narrow, riparian zone and is characterized by a fast runoff response. As such, BBC can be considered a representative catchment of the Dolomitic region. Forty rainfall-runoff events occurred between June to mid-October 2005 and 2006 were analyzed. In addition to precipitation and stream discharge measurements, soil moisture at 0-30 cm depth and water table level in 9 piezometers were monitored in two experimental hillslopes located in the lower part of the catchment. In this work we address the following questions: i) what is the dominant control on the threshold in runoff response at BBC? ii) what is the contribution of the hillslopes and riparian zone to the storage and release of water? iii) what controls do soil moisture and precipitation exert on the runoff volume? iv) what influence do soil moisture and precipitation have on the water table variations and the hysteretic relationship between streamflow and groundwater level? Results highlight the strong control exerted by soil moisture on runoff in this catchment: a sharp threshold exists in the relationship between soil water content and runoff coefficient, streamflow, and basin-averaged depth to water table. Low runoff ratios were related to the fast response of the nearly saturated

  18. Forested headwaters mitigate pesticide effects on macroinvertebrate communities in streams: Mechanisms and quantification.

    PubMed

    Orlinskiy, Polina; Münze, Ronald; Beketov, Mikhail; Gunold, Roman; Paschke, Albrecht; Knillmann, Saskia; Liess, Matthias

    2015-08-15

    Pesticides impact invertebrate communities in freshwater ecosystems, leading to the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem functions. One approach to reduce such effects is to maintain uncontaminated stream reaches that can foster recovery of the impacted populations. We assessed the potential of uncontaminated forested headwaters to mitigate pesticide impact on the downstream macroinvertebrate communities in 37 streams, using the SPEARpesticides index. Pesticide contamination was measured with runoff-triggered techniques and Chemcatcher® passive samplers. The data originated from 3 field studies conducted between 1998 and 2011. The proportion of vulnerable species decreased significantly after pesticide exposure even at low toxicity levels (-4headwaters was not associated with reduced pesticide exposure 3 km downstream and did not reduce the loss of vulnerable taxa after exposure. Nevertheless, forested headwaters were associated with the absence of long-term pesticide effects on the macroinvertebrate community composition. We conclude that although pesticides can cause the loss of vulnerable aquatic invertebrates even at low toxicity levels, forested headwaters enhance the recovery of vulnerable species in agricultural landscapes.

  19. Reach-scale geomorphic differences between headwater streams draining mountaintop mined and unmined catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Kristin L.

    2015-05-01

    Mountaintop surface mining (MTM) is a controversial coal extraction method commonly practiced in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains, USA, that drastically reengineers previously steep, forested landscapes and alters sediment and water delivery processes to and along headwater channels draining mined areas. Although sediment delivery and hydrologic response from MTM operations remain highly variable and poorly resolved, the inherent close coupling between hillslopes and headwater channels is expected to result in geomorphic differences in stream channels draining MTM landscapes relative to unmined landscapes. Dedicated geomorphic studies are severely lacking in comparison to extensive research on water quality impacts of MTM. This study reports moderate geomorphic differences between headwater (catchment area <~ 6 km2) stream channels draining MTM and unmined catchments in tributaries of the Mud River in southern West Virginia. Univariate and multivariate analyses indicate that MTM streams are characterized by deeper maximum channel depths, smaller width-to-depth ratios, increased bedrock exposure along the streambed, and increased frequency of very fine silt and sand deposition relative to channels draining unmined catchments. Geomorphic differences are most pronounced for streams draining the smallest catchment areas (< 3.5 km2). Collectively, geomorphic differences provide evidence for relatively rapid channel adjustment of accelerated bedrock incision attributed to potential increased hydraulic driving forces and altered sediment regimes in MTM channels, notably sustained delivery of very fine sediment and potentially reduced coarse sediment delivery. More rapid delivery and transfer of water in addition to excess delivery of very fine sediments to and through headwater channels will have consequences to flooding and water quality in the short term and landscape evolution processes over longer time scales. Given the extent of MTM operations in this

  20. Scale effects on headwater catchment runoff timing, flow sources, and groundwater-streamflow relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlynn, B.L.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Seibert, J.; Kendall, C.

    2004-01-01

    [1] The effects of catchment size and landscape organization on runoff generation are poorly understood. Little research has integrated hillslope and riparian runoff investigation across catchments of different sizes to decipher first-order controls on runoff generation. We investigated the role of catchment sizes on riparian and hillslope dynamics, based on hydrometric and tracer data observed at five scales ranging from trenched hillslope sections (55-285 m 2) to a 280-ha catchment at Maimai on the west coast of the South Island, New Zealand. The highly organized landscape is comprised of similar headwater catchments, regular geology, steep highly dissected topography, relatively consistent soil depths, and topographically controlled shallow through flow. We found a strong correlation between riparian zone groundwater levels and runoff for the headwaters, whereas the water tables in the valley bottom of the larger catchments were uncorrelated to runoff for 14 months of record. While there was no clear relationship between catchment size and new water contribution to runoff in the two storms analyzed in detail, lag times of tracer responses increased systematically with catchment size. The combination of hydrometric and tracer data allowed assessment of the runoff contributions from different parts of the landscape. Runoff was generated consistently in headwater riparian zones. This agreed also with the observed variations of tracer (18O and silica) responses for the different catchments. During wetter antecedent conditions or during larger events (>30 mm under dry antecedent conditions) hillslope and valley bottom floodplains did contribute to event runoff directly. We propose that analysis of landscape-scale organization and the distribution of dominant landscape features provide a structure for investigation of runoff production and solute transport, especially as catchment-scale increases from headwaters to the mesoscale.

  1. Spatial Variations in Carbon Storage along Headwater Fluvial Networks with Differing Valley Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E. E.; Dwire, K. A.; Polvi, L. E.; Sutfin, N. A.; Bazan, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    We distinguish multiple valley types along headwater fluvial networks in the Colorado Front Range based on valley geometry (downstream gradient and valley-bottom width relative to active channel width) and the presence of biotic drivers (beaver dams or channel-spanning logjams associated with old-growth forest) capable of creating a multi-thread channel pattern. Valley type influences storage of fine sediment, organic matter, and carbon. Deep, narrow valleys have limited storage potential, whereas wide, shallow valleys with multi-thread channels have substantial storage potential. Multi-thread channels only occur in the presence of a biotic driver. Given the importance of headwater streams in the global carbon cycle, it becomes important to understand the spatial distribution and magnitude of carbon storage along these streams, as well as the processes governing patterns of storage. We compare carbon stored in three reservoirs: riparian vegetation (live, dead, and litter), instream and floodplain large wood, and floodplain soils for 100-m-long valley segments in seven different valley types. The valley types are (i) laterally confined valleys in old-growth forest, (ii) partly confined valleys in old-growth forest, (iii) laterally unconfined valleys with multi-thread channels in old-growth forest, (iv) laterally unconfined valleys with single-thread channels in old-growth forest, (v) laterally confined valleys in younger forest, (vi) recently abandoned beaver-meadow complexes with multi-thread channels and willow thickets, and (vii) longer abandoned beaver-meadow complexes with single-thread channels and very limited woody vegetation. Preliminary results suggest that, although multi-thread channel segments driven by beavers or logjams cover less than 25 percent of the total length of headwater river networks in the study area, they account for more than three-quarters of the carbon stored along the river network. Historical loss of beavers and old-growth forest has

  2. Forested headwaters mitigate pesticide effects on macroinvertebrate communities in streams: Mechanisms and quantification.

    PubMed

    Orlinskiy, Polina; Münze, Ronald; Beketov, Mikhail; Gunold, Roman; Paschke, Albrecht; Knillmann, Saskia; Liess, Matthias

    2015-08-15

    Pesticides impact invertebrate communities in freshwater ecosystems, leading to the loss of biodiversity and ecosystem functions. One approach to reduce such effects is to maintain uncontaminated stream reaches that can foster recovery of the impacted populations. We assessed the potential of uncontaminated forested headwaters to mitigate pesticide impact on the downstream macroinvertebrate communities in 37 streams, using the SPEARpesticides index. Pesticide contamination was measured with runoff-triggered techniques and Chemcatcher® passive samplers. The data originated from 3 field studies conducted between 1998 and 2011. The proportion of vulnerable species decreased significantly after pesticide exposure even at low toxicity levels (-4headwaters was not associated with reduced pesticide exposure 3 km downstream and did not reduce the loss of vulnerable taxa after exposure. Nevertheless, forested headwaters were associated with the absence of long-term pesticide effects on the macroinvertebrate community composition. We conclude that although pesticides can cause the loss of vulnerable aquatic invertebrates even at low toxicity levels, forested headwaters enhance the recovery of vulnerable species in agricultural landscapes. PMID:25889550

  3. Patterns and structures of land use change in the Three Rivers Headwaters Region of China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingbiao; Wang, Yi Chen; Guo, Luo; Xue, Dayuan

    2015-01-01

    Located in Qinghai Province of China, the Three Rivers Headwaters Region is the source region of the Yangtze, Yellow and Lantsang Rivers, and plays an important role in biodiversity conservation and regulating water supply. Despite many efforts on land use change in Qinghai, knowledge of the spatial variation of land use change is still lacking. This study examines the patterns of land use change across various watersheds, prefectures and the temple surroundings. Remote sensing images of 1987, 1997 and 2007 were analyzed to derive land use distributions; patterns and structures of the landscape were then quantified with landscape metrics. The results illustrated that the Yangtze River headwater region had more diverse and more evenly distributed landscape, while the Lantsang and the Yellow headwater regions showed a decline in landscape diversity. Comparison of the land use patterns of four prefectures revealed that Yushu Prefecture experienced an increase in landscape diversity from 1987 to 2007 while the land use patches in Guoluo Prefecture exhibited more aggregated patterns than other prefectures. Analysis of the spatial variations of land use change in the temple surroundings illustrated that 19.7% and 35.9% of the temples in Guoluo and Yushu Prefectures, respectively, encountered land use change for their immediate areas within 2 km. Comparison of the surroundings of temples and human settlements found that land use change was not evenly distributed, and that greater land use change had occurred for the surroundings of human settlements. Such findings provided insights into the spatial variation of land use change in the Three Rivers Headwaters Region. PMID:25816147

  4. Effect of riparian vegetation on diatom assemblages in headwater streams under different land uses.

    PubMed

    Hlúbiková, Daša; Novais, Maria Helena; Dohet, Alain; Hoffmann, Lucien; Ector, Luc

    2014-03-15

    Differences in the structure of diatom assemblages in headwaters with contrasting shading conditions and different land use in the buffer zone and upper catchment were studied in order to evaluate the influence of the lack of riparian vegetation on the biofilm. The objective was to ascertain whether a riparian buffer can mitigate the negative influence of human induced disturbance and pollution on diatom assemblages in headwaters. Four streams were selected in order to maximize the differences in the land cover and minimize other environmental gradients. Multivariate statistics, different comparative and permutation tests and correlations were applied to compare the diatom assemblages, the Specific Polluosensitivity Index (IPS) and the diatom ecological guilds (low profile, high profile and motile) among the sites studied and to evaluate their responses to disturbances. The analysis showed that low profile diatoms typically dominated in forested headwaters with limited resources, whilst assemblages at impacted sites showed a wider range of growth forms. In unimpacted streams, the diatom assemblages were influenced by temperature, pH, conductivity and calcium, as usually reported for oligotrophic streams with high natural disturbance due to fast current and shading. In both shaded and unshaded impacted streams, the importance of nutrients and land use disturbance, especially urbanization, prevailed. This trend was also reflected by the IPS index that showed consistently lower values at impacted sites, correlating most significantly with nutrients. The diatom species composition as well as diatom guilds at impacted sites were similar, regardless of the presence or absence of riparian vegetation, and were significantly influenced by seasonal changes. Our results indicate that diatoms react sensitively to alterations of the water environment in headwaters, induced by anthropogenic activities, and these impacts are not buffered by an intact riparian zone. Diatoms

  5. Patterns and structures of land use change in the Three Rivers Headwaters Region of China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingbiao; Wang, Yi Chen; Guo, Luo; Xue, Dayuan

    2015-01-01

    Located in Qinghai Province of China, the Three Rivers Headwaters Region is the source region of the Yangtze, Yellow and Lantsang Rivers, and plays an important role in biodiversity conservation and regulating water supply. Despite many efforts on land use change in Qinghai, knowledge of the spatial variation of land use change is still lacking. This study examines the patterns of land use change across various watersheds, prefectures and the temple surroundings. Remote sensing images of 1987, 1997 and 2007 were analyzed to derive land use distributions; patterns and structures of the landscape were then quantified with landscape metrics. The results illustrated that the Yangtze River headwater region had more diverse and more evenly distributed landscape, while the Lantsang and the Yellow headwater regions showed a decline in landscape diversity. Comparison of the land use patterns of four prefectures revealed that Yushu Prefecture experienced an increase in landscape diversity from 1987 to 2007 while the land use patches in Guoluo Prefecture exhibited more aggregated patterns than other prefectures. Analysis of the spatial variations of land use change in the temple surroundings illustrated that 19.7% and 35.9% of the temples in Guoluo and Yushu Prefectures, respectively, encountered land use change for their immediate areas within 2 km. Comparison of the surroundings of temples and human settlements found that land use change was not evenly distributed, and that greater land use change had occurred for the surroundings of human settlements. Such findings provided insights into the spatial variation of land use change in the Three Rivers Headwaters Region.

  6. The role of ground water in generating streamflow in headwater areas and in maintaining base flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.

    2007-01-01

    The volume and sustainability of streamflow from headwaters to downstream reaches commonly depend on contributions from ground water. Streams that begin in extensive aquifers generally have a stable point of origin and substantial discharge in their headwaters. In contrast, streams that begin as discharge from rocks or sediments having low permeability have a point of origin that moves up and down the channel seasonally, have small incipient discharge, and commonly go dry. Nearly all streams need to have some contribution from ground water in order to provide reliable habitat for aquatic organisms. Natural processes and human activities can have a substantial effect on the flow of streams between their headwaters and downstream reaches. Streams lose water to ground water when and where their head is higher than the contiguous water table. Although very common in arid regions, loss of stream water to ground water also is relatively common in humid regions. Evaporation, as well as transpiration from riparian vegetation, causing ground-water levels to decline also can cause loss of stream water. Human withdrawal of ground water commonly causes streamflow to decline, and in some regions has caused streams to cease flowing. ?? 2007 American Water Resources Association.

  7. Soil water flow is a source of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in subalpine headwaters.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Caroline L; Lafolie, François; Laurent, Jimmy; Clement, Jean-Christophe; Simler, Roland; Travi, Yves; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-07-01

    The airborne plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is ubiquitous in headwaters, snowpack and precipitation where its populations are genetically and phenotypically diverse. Here, we assessed its population dynamics during snowmelt in headwaters of the French Alps. We revealed a continuous and significant transport of P.syringae by these waters in which the population density is correlated with water chemistry. Via in situ observations and laboratory experiments, we validated that P.syringae is effectively transported with the snow melt and rain water infiltrating through the soil of subalpine grasslands, leading to the same range of concentrations as measured in headwaters (10(2) -10(5) CFU l(-1) ). A population structure analysis confirmed the relatedness between populations in percolated water and those above the ground (i.e. rain, leaf litter and snowpack). However, the transport study in porous media suggested that water percolation could have different efficiencies for different strains of P.syringae. Finally, leaching of soil cores incubated for up to 4 months at 8°C showed that indigenous populations of P.syringae were able to survive in subalpine soil under cold temperature. This study brings to light the underestimated role of hydrological processes involved in the long distance dissemination of P.syringae.

  8. Large carbon dioxide fluxes from headwater boreal and sub-boreal streams.

    PubMed

    Venkiteswaran, Jason J; Schiff, Sherry L; Wallin, Marcus B

    2014-01-01

    Half of the world's forest is in boreal and sub-boreal ecozones, containing large carbon stores and fluxes. Carbon lost from headwater streams in these forests is underestimated. We apply a simple stable carbon isotope idea for quantifying the CO2 loss from these small streams; it is based only on in-stream samples and integrates over a significant distance upstream. We demonstrate that conventional methods of determining CO2 loss from streams necessarily underestimate the CO2 loss with results from two catchments. Dissolved carbon export from headwater catchments is similar to CO2 loss from stream surfaces. Most of the CO2 originating in high CO2 groundwaters has been lost before typical in-stream sampling occurs. In the Harp Lake catchment in Canada, headwater streams account for 10% of catchment net CO2 uptake. In the Krycklan catchment in Sweden, this more than doubles the CO2 loss from the catchment. Thus, even when corrected for aquatic CO2 loss measured by conventional methods, boreal and sub-boreal forest carbon budgets currently overestimate carbon sequestration on the landscape.

  9. Large Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from Headwater Boreal and Sub-Boreal Streams

    PubMed Central

    Venkiteswaran, Jason J.; Schiff, Sherry L.; Wallin, Marcus B.

    2014-01-01

    Half of the world's forest is in boreal and sub-boreal ecozones, containing large carbon stores and fluxes. Carbon lost from headwater streams in these forests is underestimated. We apply a simple stable carbon isotope idea for quantifying the CO2 loss from these small streams; it is based only on in-stream samples and integrates over a significant distance upstream. We demonstrate that conventional methods of determining CO2 loss from streams necessarily underestimate the CO2 loss with results from two catchments. Dissolved carbon export from headwater catchments is similar to CO2 loss from stream surfaces. Most of the CO2 originating in high CO2 groundwaters has been lost before typical in-stream sampling occurs. In the Harp Lake catchment in Canada, headwater streams account for 10% of catchment net CO2 uptake. In the Krycklan catchment in Sweden, this more than doubles the CO2 loss from the catchment. Thus, even when corrected for aquatic CO2 loss measured by conventional methods, boreal and sub-boreal forest carbon budgets currently overestimate carbon sequestration on the landscape. PMID:25058488

  10. Headwater streams and forest management: does ecoregional context influence logging effects on benthic communities?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medhurst, R. Bruce; Wipfli, Mark S.; Binckley, Chris; Polivka, Karl; Hessburg, Paul F.; Salter, R. Brion

    2010-01-01

    Effects of forest management on stream communities have been widely documented, but the role that climate plays in the disturbance outcomes is not understood. In order to determine whether the effect of disturbance from forest management on headwater stream communities varies by climate, we evaluated benthic macroinvertebrate communities in 24 headwater streams that differed in forest management (logged-roaded vs. unlogged-unroaded, hereafter logged and unlogged) within two ecological sub-regions (wet versus dry) within the eastern Cascade Range, Washington, USA. In both ecoregions, total macroinvertebrate density was highest at logged sites (P = 0.001) with gathering-collectors and shredders dominating. Total taxonomic richness and diversity did not differ between ecoregions or forest management types. Shredder densities were positively correlated with total deciduous and Sitka alder (Alnus sinuata) riparian cover. Further, differences in shredder density between logged and unlogged sites were greater in the wet ecoregion (logging × ecoregion interaction; P = 0.006) suggesting that differences in post-logging forest succession between ecoregions were responsible for differences in shredder abundance. Headwater stream benthic community structure was influenced by logging and regional differences in climate. Future development of ecoregional classification models at the subbasin scale, and use of functional metrics in addition to structural metrics, may allow for more accurate assessments of anthropogenic disturbances in mountainous regions where mosaics of localized differences in climate are common.

  11. Mapping Water Resources, Allocation and Consumption in the Mills River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodes, J.; Jeuland, M. A.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Mountain basins and the headwaters of river basins along the foothills of major mountain ranges are undergoing rapid environmental change due to urban development, land acquisition by investors, population increase, and climate change. Classical water infrastructure in these regions is primarily designed to meet human water demand associated with agriculture, tourism, and economic development. Often overlooked and ignored is the fundamental interdependence of human water demand, ecosystem water demand, water rights and allocation, and water supply. A truly sustainable system for water resources takes into account ecosystem demand along with human infrastructure and economic demand, as well as the feedbacks that exist between them. Allocation policies need to take into account basin resilience that is the amount of stress the system can handle under varying future scenarios. Changes in stress on the system can be anthropogenic in the form of population increase, land use change, economic development, or may be natural in the form of climate change and decrease in water supply due to changes in precipitation. Mapping the water rights, supply, and demands within the basin can help determine the resiliency and sustainability of the basin. Here, we present a coupled natural human system project based in the French Broad River Basin, in the Southern Appalachians. In the first phase of the project, we are developing and implementing a coupled hydro-economics modeling framework in the Mills River Basin (MRB), a tributary of the French Broad. The Mills River Basin was selected as the core basin for implementing a sustainable system of water allocation that is adaptive and reflects the interdependence of water dependent sectors. The headwaters of the Mills River are in the foothills of the Appalachians, and are currently under substantial land use land cover (LULC) change pressure for agricultural purposes. In this regard, the MRB is representative of similar headwater

  12. Genetic variation in brown trout Salmo trutta across the Danube, Rhine, and Elbe headwaters: a failure of the phylogeographic paradigm?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brown trout Salmo trutta have been described in terms of five major mtDNA lineages, four of which correspond to major ocean basins, and one, according to some authors, to a distinct taxon, marbled trout Salmo marmoratus. The Atlantic and Danubian lineages of brown trout meet in a poorly documented contact zone in Central Europe. The natural versus human mediated origin of the Atlantic lineage in the upper Danube is a question of both theoretical and practical importance with respect to conservation management. We provide a comprehensive population genetic analysis of brown trout in the region with the aim of evaluating the geographic distribution and genetic integrity of these two lineages in and around their contact zone. Results Genetic screening of 114 populations of brown trout across the Danube/Rhine/Elbe catchments revealed a counter-intuitive phylogeographic structure with near fixation of the Atlantic lineage in the sampled portions of the Bavarian Danube. Along the Austrian Danube, phylogeographic informative markers revealed increasing percentages of Danube-specific alleles with downstream distance. Pure Danube lineage populations were restricted to peri-alpine isolates within previously glaciated regions. Both empirical data and simulated hybrid comparisons support that trout in non-glaciated regions north and northeast of the Alps have an admixed origin largely based on natural colonization. In contrast, the presence of Atlantic basin alleles south and southeast of the Alps stems from hatchery introductions and subsequent introgression. Despite extensive stocking of the Atlantic lineage, little evidence of first generation stocked fish or F1 hybrids were found implying that admixture has been established over time. Conclusions A purely phylogeographic paradigm fails to describe the distribution of genetic lineages of Salmo in Central Europe. The distribution pattern of the Atlantic and Danube lineages is extremely difficult to explain without

  13. Phosphorus fluxes in headwater streams draining non-research poultry-pasture operations in north-central Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeis, J. J.; Jackson, C. R.; Radcliffe, D. E.; Risse, M. L.; Bryant, J.

    2007-12-01

    Poultry production is the largest agricultural commodity in Georgia, USA. Due to inefficient utilization of the phosphorus (P) in poultry feed, the manure contains high concentrations of P. When used as fertilizer for crops and pasture, poultry manure may be washed from the soil surface and increase eutrophication risks to downstream lakes and reservoirs. Long term application of poultry manure may result in P saturation of the soils. In the upper Etowah River basin in north-central Georgia, a long history of poultry farming has resulted in high P levels in soils receiving regular poultry manure applications. Few studies to date have been performed on the estimation of P fluxes from operational commercial poultry farms in Georgia. In Fall 2006, a 20-month surface water quality monitoring program was completed that was aimed at estimating P and suspended sediment fluxes in nine headwater streams draining poultry-pasture operations in the upper Etowah River basin. The nine catchments differed in terms of land use history, soil P levels, best management practices and other factors. An additional three streams draining U.S. National Forest were also monitored to provide reference concentrations and loads. Monitoring data included continuous (5-minute) streamflow, rainfall, and water quality samples. Water quality samples included biweekly grab samples plus storm samples collected using conventional autosamplers. Storm sampling using autosamplers included collection of discrete samples and composite samples. In particular instances, the two types of storm sample were collected simultaneously. Discrete storm sampling methods enabled collection of both rising and falling hydrograph limb samples to identify potential hysteretic water quality effects. Water samples were analyzed for total P, filterable reactive P, and total suspended solids. We are using this data to compare different flux estimation methods with emphasis on regression models that utilize laboratory results

  14. Influence of Forest Disturbance on Hydrologic Extremes in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, K. E.; Middleton, R. S.; McDowell, N. G.; Xu, C.; Wilson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Colorado River is one of the most important freshwater rivers in the United States: it provides water supply to more than 30 million people, irrigation to 5.7 million acres of cropland, and produces over 8 billion kilowatt hours of hydroelectric power each year. Our study focuses on changes to hydrological extremes and threshold responses across the Colorado River basin due to forest fires, infestations, and stress-induced tree mortality using a scenario-based approach to estimate forest cover disturbance. Scenarios include static vegetation reductions and dynamic reductions in forest compositions based on three CMIP5 global climate models and one emission scenario (1950-2099). For headwater systems, large intra-year variability exists, indicating the influence of climate on these snowmelt driven basins. Strong seasonality in flow responses are also noted; in the Piedra River higher runoff occurs during freshet under a no-forest condition, with the greatest changes observed for maximum streamflow. Conversely, during the recessional period, flows are lower in scenarios with reduced forest compositions. Low-flows appear to be affected in some basins but not others; for example small headwater systems demonstrate higher low-flows with increased disturbance. Global Climate Model scenarios indicate a range of responses in these basins, characterized by lower peak streamflow but with higher winter flows. This response is influenced by shifts in water, and energy balances associated with a combined response of changing climate and forest cover compositions. Results also clearly show how changes in extreme events are forced by shifts in major water balance parameters (runoff, evapotranspiration, snow water equivalent, and soil moisture) from headwater basins spanning a range of hydrological regimes and ecological environments across the Colorado.

  15. Interaction of esker groundwater with headwater lakes and streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ala-aho, Pertti; Rossi, Pekka M.; Kløve, Bjørn

    2013-09-01

    Groundwater-surface water interactions were studied in a Finnish esker aquifer system where some lakes suffer from periodic water level decline and others from eutrophication. Natural tracers (Ca2+, SiO2 and PO43-) were used on the aquifer scale and seepage meter measurements and water level recordings on the single lake scale to better understand the complex interactions between groundwater, lakes and streams in the area. The natural tracers showed that lakes located in lower landscape positions and connected with streams were richer in tracer concentrations and that their water chemistry resembled that of the groundwater. On the other hand, closed basin lakes located at higher altitudes were nutrient-poor seepage lakes with some groundwater through flow. The data suggests that the subsurface acts as a phosphate source for the surface water bodies and the nutrient rich groundwater inseepage dictates the trophic status of the lakes in the area. The seepage meter measurements verified a strong interaction between groundwater and surface water and revealed spatial distribution of lake seepage and a temporal co-variation in lake seepage rates. A statistical analysis of seepage meter and water level observation time series were useful to show groundwater flow regimes controlling lake seepage. Using the natural tracer analysis and seepage meter measurements, we developed a novel conceptual model for the study site where the differences in lake trophic state and water table behavior were explained by assigning lakes to local and regional groundwater flow regimes. The obtained results provide new knowledge on using natural tracers in complex glacial aquifer systems and can be used in integrated groundwater-surface water management.

  16. Seasonal variability of microbial use of dissolved organic matter in Coastal Plain headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosen, J. D.; Febria, C. M.; Palmer, M.

    2013-12-01

    At the interface between land and water, headwater streams are conduits for a globally relevant amount of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Headwater systems act as more than pipes, but rather as sites where substantial DOM processing by heterotrophic microbial communities are known to occur. The amount of DOM processed by microorganisms has been shown to be related to the composition of the organic matter source. Other factors are also important to varying degrees, including the availability of inorganic nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, and the activity and composition of the microbial community itself. Despite a widespread appreciation of microbial DOM cycling in headwaters, empirical studies that address the interaction of these factors at the watershed scale are needed to help fully understand and predict DOM processing across large environmental gradients, especially in the face of climate change. To address this need, we studied several properties of DOM and microbial communities in Coastal Plain headwater streams of Maryland, USA. Baseflow stream water samples were collected from 8 sites on a quarterly basis from November 2011 through Feburary 2013. Streamwater was filtered to 0.2 μm and a downstream common inoculum was added to each replicate. DOM bioavailability was determined by measuring non-purgeable organic carbon concentration before and after a 28 day incubation at 20 degrees Celsius. Other measurements collected on unamended stream water included DOM fluorescence spectroscopy, nitrogen species, ortho-phosphate, and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA). The most important factors related to DOM bioavailability changed across seasons. DOM bioavailability was positively related to fluorescence index values, indicating greater bioavailability of autochthonous material. Bioavailability also increased with increasing nitrogen concentrations, indicating that nitrogen was a limiting resource for heterotrophic microbes in the streams studied. DOM

  17. Water-quality investigation, Upper Santa Clara River Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowers, James C.; Irwin, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Water-quality data are summarized for the upper Santa Clara River basin, California from studies beginning August 1974 through June 1976 and during past monitoring programs. Data were collected for nitrogen, phosphorus, total organic carbon, trace elements, detergents, and pesticide compounds. Because of the limited number of samples, the data are only an estimate of conditions that existed in the basin. Sampling was designed so that samples from each site would represent seasonal variations in discharge. Most constituents were fairly low in concentration near the headwaters at Ravenna and higher below the urban and agricultural area near Saugus. Mean specific conductance in the river ranged from 745 micromhos per centimeter at 25 deg C below the headwaters near Lang to 2,640 micromhos at the Los Angeles-Ventura County line. Results also indicate that discharge was not the single factor controlling the concentration variance for most constituents. Regression analyses indicated a high correlation between specific conductance and most major inorganic chemical constituents, and between specific conductance and discharge. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Comparison of organic matter composition in agricultural versus forest affected headwaters with special emphasis on organic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Marlen; Graeber, Daniel; Zak, Dominik; Zwirnmann, Elke; Gelbrecht, Joerg; Pusch, Martin T

    2015-02-17

    Agricultural management practices promote organic matter (OM) turnover and thus alter both the processing of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils and presumably also the export of DOM to headwater streams, which intimately connect the terrestrial with the aquatic environment. Size-exclusion chromatography, in combination with absorbance and emission matrix fluorometry, was applied to assess how agricultural land use alters the amount and composition of DOM, as well as dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) forms in headwater streams, including temporal variations, in a temperate region of NE Germany. By comparing six agriculturally and six forest-impacted headwater streams, we demonstrated that agriculture promotes increased DOC and DON concentrations, entailing an even more pronounced effect on DON. The major part of DOC and DON in agricultural and forest reference streams is exported in the form of humic-like material with high molecular weight, which indicates terrestrial, i.e., allochthonous sources. As an obvious difference in agricultural streams, the contribution of DOC and particularly DON occurring in the form of nonhumic high-molecular-weight, presumably proteinous material is clearly elevated. Altogether, DOM in agricultural headwaters is mainly complex-soil-derived and aromatic material with a low C:N ratio, which is more microbial processed than its counterpart from forest reference catchments. Our results emphasize the importance of agricultural land use on DOM loss from soils and identify agricultural soils as important DOC and particularly DON sources to headwater streams. PMID:25594834

  19. Terrace Formation in the Upper Headwater Region of the Mattole River Watershed Across the Mendocino Triple Junction, Northwest California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, M.; Flanagan, S., II; Hemphill-Haley, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Mattole River, in northwestern California, is located in a tectonically active and geologically complex area, the Mendocino triple junction (MTJ), where the North American, Pacific and Gorda plates meet. The Mattole River does not follow the classic river "concave-up" profile. Instead, the river headwaters have wide valleys of low gradient fill, cut and strath terraces with deeply incised active channels. In fact, the river has a "convex-up" profile with a low gradient headwater leading to a higher gradient midcourse. Terrace formation in the upper headwater region of the Mattole River records times of disequilibrium of channel profile and incision as the river responds to changes that are, in large part, due to the passage of the northwardly migrating, thermally buoyant MTJ. In order to investigate the distribution and relative ages of terraces, detailed surveys of terrace surfaces and bedrock strath positions were conducted along four headwater tributaries: Thompson Creek, Baker Creek, Lost River and Ancestor Creek. Additionally, across the terraces, hand borings were excavated to bedrock to provide a three dimensional image of terrace thickness. Terrace morphology and stratigraphy provide information on terrace forming mechanisms and timing. This study includes high-resolution geomorphic data regarding the relation of Mattole headwater terraces to the MTJ, as well as provides more temporal information about the fluvial system's response to the ongoing northward migration of the MTJ.

  20. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  1. Influence of basin connectivity on sediment source, transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. R.; Mackin, G.; Lechler, P.; Lord, M.; Lorentz, S.

    2012-09-01

    The management of sediment and other non-point source (NPS) pollution has proven difficult, and requires a sound understanding of particle movement through the drainage system. The primary objective of this investigation was to obtain an understanding of NPS sediment source(s), transport, and storage within the Mkabela basin, a representative agricultural catchment within the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands of southeastern South Africa, by combining geomorphic, hydrologic and geochemical fingerprinting analyses. The Mkabela Basin can be subdivided into three distinct subcatchments that differ in their ability to transport and store sediment along the axial valley. Headwater (upper catchment) areas are characterized by extensive wetlands that act as significant sediment sinks. Mid-catchment areas, characterized by higher relief and valley gradients, exhibit few wetlands, but rather are dominated by a combination of alluvial and bedrock channels that are conducive to sediment transport. The lower catchment exhibits a low-gradient alluvial channel that is boarded by extensive riparian wetlands that accumulate large quantities of sediment (and NPS pollutants). Fingerprinting studies suggest that silt- and clay-rich layers found within wetland and reservoir deposits are derived from the erosion of fine-grained, valley bottom soils frequently utilized as vegetable fields. Coarser-grained deposits within both wetlands and reservoirs result from the erosion of sandier hillslope soils extensively utilized for sugar cane, during relatively high magnitude runoff events that are capable of transporting sand-sized sediment off the slopes. Thus, the source of sediment to the axial valley varies as a function of sediment size and runoff magnitude. Sediment export from the basin was limited until the early 1990s, in part because the upper catchment wetlands were hydrologically disconnected from lower parts of the watershed during low- to moderate flood events. The construction of a

  2. A River Runs Under It: Modeling the Distribution of Streams and Stream Burial in Large River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, A. J.; Julian, J.; Guinn, S.; Weitzell, R.; Fitzpatrick, M.

    2011-12-01

    Stream network density exerts a strong control on hydrologic processes in watersheds. Over land and through soil and bedrock substrate, water moves slowly and is subject to chemical transformations unique to conditions of continuous contact with geologic materials. In contrast, once water enters stream channels it is efficiently transported out of watersheds, reducing the amount of time for biological uptake and stream nutrient processing. Therefore, stream network density dictates both the relative importance of terrestrial and aquatic influences to stream chemistry and the residence time of water in watersheds, and is critical to modeling and empirical studies aimed at understanding the impact of land use on stream water quantity and quality. Stream network density is largely a function of the number and length of the smallest streams. Methods for mapping and measuring these headwater streams range from simple measurement of stream length from existing maps, to detailed field mapping efforts, which are difficult to implement over large areas. Confounding the simplest approaches, many headwater stream reaches are not included in hydrographical maps, such as the U.S. National Hydrography Dataset (NHD), either because they were buried during the course of urban development or because they were seen as smaller than the minimum mapping size at the time of map generation. These "missing streams" severely limit the effective analyses of stream network density based on the NHD, constituting a major problem for many efforts to understand land-use impacts on streams. Here we report on research that predicts stream presence and absence by coupling field observations of headwater stream channels with maximum entropy models (MaxEnt) commonly implemented in biogeographical studies to model species distributions. The model utilizes terrain variables that are continuously accumulated along hydrologic flowpaths derived from a 10-m digital elevation model. In validation, the model

  3. The Impact of Enhanced Summer Thaw, Hillslope Disturbances, and Late Season Rainfall on Solute Fluxes from High Arctic Headwater Catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafreniere, M. J.; Lamoureux, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    This study examines variations in the composition and total seasonal fluxes of dissolved solutes in several small High Arctic headwater catchments at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory (CBAWO), Melville Island, Nunavut (74°54'N, 109°35'W) over multiple snowmelt seasons (2007, 2008, 2009) with contrasting climate and permafrost active layer conditions. Climate warming in the High Arctic will affect a number processes that will alter the hydrological and biogeochemical exports from the landscape. Climate change is projected to alter precipitation regimes, resulting in increases in both winter and summer precipitation in the High Arctic, thereby altering hydrological regimes. Warming will result in thickening of the seasonal active layer, which will alter hydrological flow paths and water and solute sources. Additionally, active layer thickening and permafrost warming is also project to enhance the development of thermokarst features, including hillslope disturbances, such as active layer detachment slides and retrogressive thaw slumps. This research compares the flux of inorganic and organic solutes emanating from a group of catchments that were subject to a range hillslope disturbances, or active layer detachment slides (ALDs), at the end of summer 2007. One of the catchments, Goose, was not subject to any disturbance, while active layer slides covered between 6% and 46% of the catchment area in the disturbed catchments. It was hypothesised that solute fluxes would increase primarily with increasing extent and degree of disturbance. This however, was not observed. Rather, comparing five sites with varying degrees of disturbance in 2009 illustrates that on a specific area and specific volume of runoff basis, solute fluxes were unrelated to disturbance extent. Comparing two catchments that were monitored from 2007 (pre-disturbance) through to 2009 (2 yrs post disturbance), shows that both catchments were subject to solute flux increases, however the solute

  4. Space-time Variability of Baseflow in Headwater Streams of the Southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Emanuel, R. E.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    How hillslope shape and structure affect the spatial and temporal variability of streamflow is a key question in catchment hydrology. In particular, the role of hillslope structure and arrangement in mediating the longitudinal variability of streamflow in first-order headwater catchments remains poorly understood. Here we assess the spatio-temporal variability of streamflow under baseflow conditions in forested headwater catchments characterized by different topography and vegetation. We studied the relationship between hillslope structure and baseflow along a series of first-order streams using a combination of in-stream water isotope sampling, stream gauging, and geospatial analysis. We studied two pairs of small (< 15 ha) forested catchments at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (CHL), a long-term ecological research (LTER) site in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The catchments comprise different combinations of aspect (north and south) and vegetation type (deciduous and evergreen), and they contain hillslopes covering a range of sizes. We sampled water along first-order streams, from shallow hillslope wells, and from rainfall collectors distributed across CHL. These monthly samples, collected from June 2011 through June 2013, were analyzed for stable isotopes of water (18O and 2H) using laser spectrometry. During the same period, we quantified longitudinal changes in stream discharge at different baseflow states for each catchment and developed discharge versus contributing area relationships along streams within each continuously gauged catchment. We found relationships between stream water isotopic composition, landscape variables, and hillslope discharge, which was estimated as the difference in streamflow between consecutive measurement locations. Results showed that landscape heterogeneity exerts a strong control over longitudinal variability of baseflow by modulating the timing and volume of lateral flow along the stream gradient. However, the strength

  5. Human impacts on headwater fluvial systems in the northern and central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harden, Carol P.

    2006-09-01

    South America delivers more freshwater runoff to the ocean per km 2 land area than any other continent, and much of that water enters the fluvial system from headwaters in the Andes Mountains. This paper reviews ways in which human occupation of high mountain landscapes in the Andes have affected the delivery of water and sediment to headwater river channels at local to regional scales for millennia, and provides special focus on the vulnerability of páramo soils to human impact. People have intentionally altered the fluvial system by damming rivers at a few strategic locations, and more widely by withdrawing surface water, primarily for irrigation. Unintended changes brought about by human activities are even more widespread and include forest clearance, agriculture, grazing, road construction, and urbanization, which increase rates of rainfall runoff and accelerate processes of water erosion. Some excavations deliver more sediment to river channels by destabilizing slopes and triggering processes of mass-movement. The northern and central Andes are more affected by human activity than most high mountain regions. The wetter northern Andes are also unusual for the very high water retention characteristics of páramo (high elevation grass and shrub) soils, which cover most of the land above 3000 m. Páramo soils are important regulators of headwater hydrology, but human activities that promote vegetation loss and drying cause them to lose water storage capacity. New data from a case study in southern Ecuador show very low bulk densities (median 0.26 g cm - 3 ), high organic matter contents (median 43%), and high water-holding capacities (12% to 86% volumetrically). These data document wetter soils under grass than under tree cover. Effects of human activity on the fluvial system are evident at local scales, but difficult to discern at broader scales in the regional context of geomorphic adjustment to tectonic and volcanic processes.

  6. Dissolved Organic Matter in Headwater Streams: Compositional Variability across Climatic Regions of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffé, R.; Yamashita, Y.; Maie, N.; Cooper, W. T.; Dittmar, T.; Dodds, W. K.; Jones, J. B.; Myoshi, T.; Ortiz-Zayas, J. R.; Podgorski, D. C.; Watanabe, A.

    2012-10-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents the largest organic matter pool in freshwater systems, but much of it remains molecularly uncharacterized. Although freshwater systems cover only a small area of the earth's surface, inland waters are an important component of the global carbon cycle. The traditional idea that rivers are simply conduits for refractory carbon delivery to coastal areas is inconsistent with carbon flux estimates, and streams have been shown to serve as reactors for DOM cycling. The overall quality of DOM, and its associated reactivity, can be related to its chemical composition and molecular structure. However, the variability of DOM composition in freshwater ecosystems, particularly in headwater streams, is poorly characterized. Detailed molecular studies of DOM from small streams across climatic regions, which could provide critical information regarding carbon dynamics on a more global scale, have not been performed. To address these issues, this study applies a multi-method analytical approach in an attempt to assess molecular characteristics of DOM and ultrafiltered DOM (UDOM) in headwater streams from different climatic regions in North America. In general terms the chemical and molecular characteristics of UDOM from six different biomes were determined in unsurpassed detail to feature some clear general similarities but also specific differences. While the degree of similarity is remarkable, and suggests similar source strengths, such as soil-derived organic matter and/or similar diagenetic degradation processes for DOM from vastly different environments, each sample was clearly unique in its overall composition, featuring some distinct molecular patterns for at least one or more of the analytical determinations. Molecular and compositional differences of DOM from headwater streams should result from variations in DOM sources and localized environmental conditions, and consequently feature different photo- and bio-reactivity and

  7. Evaluation of agricultural best-management practices in the Conestoga River headwaters, Pennsylvania; effects of nutrient management on water quality in the Little Conestoga Creek headwaters, 1983-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koerkle, E.H.; Fishel, D.K.; Brown, M.J.; Kostelnik, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    Water quality in the headwaters of the Little Conestoga Creek, Lancaster County, Pa., was investigated from April 1986 through September 1989 to determine possible effects of agricultural nutrient management on water quality. Nutrient management, an agricultural Best-Management Practice, was promoted in the 5.8-square-mile watershed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Clean Water Program. Nonpoint-source- agricultural contamination was evident in surface water and ground water in the watershed; the greatest contamination was in areas underlain by carbonate rock and with intensive row-crop and animal production. Initial implementation of nutrient management covered about 30 percent of applicable land and was concentrated in the Nutrient-Management Subbasin. By 1989, nutrient management covered about 45 percent of the entire Small Watershed, about 85 percent of the Nutrient- Management Subbasin, and less than 10 percent of the Nonnutrient-Management Subbasin. The number of farms implementing nutrient management increased from 14 in 1986 to 25 by 1989. Nutrient applications to cropland in the Nutrient- Management Subbasin decreased by an average of 35 percent after implementation. Comparison of base- flow surface-water quality from before and after implementation suggests that nutrient management was effective in slowing or reversing increases in concentrations of dissolved nitrate plus nitrite in the Nutrient-Management Subbasin. Although not statistically significant, the Mann-Whitney step-trend coefficient for the Nutrient-Management Subbasin was 0.8 milligram per liter, whereas trend coefficients for the Nonnutrient-Management Subbasin and the Small Watershed were 0.4 and 1.4 milligrams per liter, respectively, for the period of study. Analysis of covariance comparison of concurrent concentrations from the two sub- basins showed a significant decrease in concen- trations from the Nutrient-Management Subbasin compared to the Nonnutrient-Management Subbasin

  8. Potential Seasonal Terrestrial Water Storage Monitoring from GPS Vertical Displacements: A Case Study in the Lower Three-Rivers Headwater Region, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao; Yao, Yibin; Fok, Hok Sum; Hu, Yufeng; Chen, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    This study uses the observed vertical displacements of Global Positioning System (GPS) time series obtained from the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) with careful pre- and post-processing to estimate the seasonal crustal deformation in response to the hydrological loading in lower three-rivers headwater region of southwest China, followed by inferring the annual EWH changes through geodetic inversion methods. The Helmert Variance Component Estimation (HVCE) and the Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE) criterion were successfully employed. The GPS inferred EWH changes agree well qualitatively with the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)-inferred and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS)-inferred EWH changes, with a discrepancy of 3.2–3.9 cm and 4.8–5.2 cm, respectively. In the research areas, the EWH changes in the Lancang basin is larger than in the other regions, with a maximum of 21.8–24.7 cm and a minimum of 3.1–6.9 cm. PMID:27657064

  9. Bedrock and soil contribution to the runoff formation in a headwater catchment: experimental observations and simulation using the hydrological distributed model GEOtop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Miller, N. L.; Rigon, R.

    2005-12-01

    Most of the models used to reproduce the runoff at hillslope scale and at small-catchment scale are based on the assumption that the sub-surface runoff flows following the bedrock topography, often considered impermeable and parallel to the surface. Another common hypothesis is that the motion can be described as a function of the only topographic gradient rather than of the hydraulic head gradient. In this contribution, to assess the importance of these statements the distributed model GEOtop has been applied to a flood event in a small headwater catchment (2.3 ha) located in Marin County, California, USA. A measuring campaign has recognized a motion field where the fractured bedrock contribution appears significant. During storms, hillslopes do not saturate at the soil-bedrock interface, while a shallow water table remains in hollows also during the dry season. Simulations under different conditions (with uniform and measured soil thickness) have been performed, and different degrees of bedrock permeability have been simulated. The model makes it possible to reproduce the outgoing discharges, the saturated areas, and the observed water table in a suitable way and the results confirm the importance of considering the flow inside the bedrock to reproduce the basin response. Lastly, the model shows that a significant contribution to the saturated area is given by the potential suction gradient which forms at the interface between unsaturated hillslopes and saturated hollows, whose modelling can be neglected.

  10. Headwater management alters sources, flowpaths, and fluxes of water, carbon, and nitrogen in urban watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennino, M. J.; Kaushal, S.; Mayer, P. M.; Welty, C.; Miller, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Increased urbanization has altered watershed hydrology and increased nutrient pollution, leading to eutrophication and hypoxia in downstream coastal ecosystems. Due to urban stream degradation, there have been efforts to restore streams and reduce peak-flow discharges and contaminant export through stormwater management and stream restoration. However, there have been relatively few studies comparing watershed scale impacts of contrasting headwater management practices on sources and fluxes of water, carbon, and nutrients across space and time. In this study we compared sources and fluxes of water, carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) along 4 watersheds of contrasting headwater management: 2 urban degraded watersheds with minimal or no stormwater management and 2 managed urban watersheds with stormwater controls and stream restoration. Surface water samples were collected biweekly at USGS gauging stations located within each watershed over 2 years. Spatially, watersheds were sampled longitudinally during 4 seasons. Sources of water, nitrate, and carbon were investigated using isotopic and spectroscopic tracer techniques. Indicator anions (F-, Cl-, I-, SO42-) were also used to trace anthropogenic vs. natural water sources. Hydrologic flowpaths (groundwater vs. overland flow) were assessed with longitudinal synoptic surveys using stable water isotopes of H and O. Annual fluxes of water, C, and N, were estimated using the USGS program LOADEST. H and O isotope data showed that the source of stream water is primarily groundwater during summer months, with greater contributions from stormflow during winter months for all 4 watersheds. Elevated levels of indicator anions (F-, Cl-, I-, SO42-) as well as greater "pulses" of C and N over time in the degraded vs. managed watersheds indicate potential sewage sources due to leaky sanitary sewers and greater stormdrain inputs. Unlike the managed watersheds where hydrologic flowpaths were from groundwater in headwaters, the longitudinal

  11. Do the coarsest bed fractions and stream power record contemporary trends in steep headwater channels?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galia, Tomáš; Škarpich, Václav

    2016-11-01

    Three stream channels that were devoid of evidence of past debris flows and one headwater channel that contained debris flow deposits in the flysch western Carpathians, Czech Republic were selected to test relationships between in-channel processes, bed sediments, and unit stream power calculated for bankfull and Q20 flows. Contemporary depositional or erosional trends in the examined headwaters were linked with bed sediments that were represented by the coarsest cobble and boulder fraction with a mean calculated from the five largest particles. The downstream trends of the unit stream power were derived for a bankfull discharge and a well-documented 20-year flood event. In addition, the flow competences during the discharges were calculated using indirect bedload transport measurements. Downstream fining of the cobble and boulder fraction was observed in all of the studied headwaters, and unique downstream variations of the unit stream power were calculated for the longitudinal profiles. The single-thread streams that were devoid of evidence of debris flow events exhibited direct relations between the coarsest sediment size and the unit stream power, especially as calculated for the 20-year flood event and for erosional/depositional trends of the channel. The downstream coarsening of the bed material that was accompanied by an increase in the unit stream power was usually observed in the case of deeply incised (> 0.5 m above the assumed bankfull depth) channel reaches. The calculated competence of the 20-year flow was up to twofold higher than that required to entrain the largest bed particle diameters in those channel reaches, and even the bankfull flow was potentially capable of transporting the coarsest bed particles in certain of the reaches. On the other hand, some depositional channel reaches evidently led to the disconnectivity of transport of the coarsest bed material even in the case of the 20-year flood event. The longitudinal profile of the channel that

  12. An evaluation of the effects of acid rain on low conductivity headwater streams in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.; Brown, Ann E.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses of water collected at 32 sites on headwater streams in Pennsylvania during low-flow conditions in 1970-80 were compared to pre-1971 data to evaluate whether acid rain had changed the chemistry of the streams in the previous decade. Most pH, alkalinity, and sulfate values of the samples collected in 1970-80 fell within the ranges of values for samples collected before 1971. The limited data indicate, however, that pH may have increased and alkalinity and sulfate may have decreased with time.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of acid rain on low conductivity headwater streams in Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.R.; Brown, A.E.

    1981-09-01

    Analyses of water collected at 32 sites on headwater streams in Pennsylvania during low-flow conditions in 1979-1980 were compared to pre-1971 data to evaluate whether acid rain had changed the chemistry of the streams in the previous decade. Most pH alkalinity, and sulfate values of the samples collected in 1979-1980 fell within the ranges of values for samples collected before 1971. The limited data indicate, however, that pH may have increased and alkalinity and sulfate may have decreased with time. 7 references, 10 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Principles of Sedimentary Basin Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Robert J., Jr.

    Basin analysis is the ultimate act of synthesis in stratigraphy. Its objective is to weave together the diverse strands of information in order to portray the tectonic evolution of a basin, its filling with sediments in a broad range of depositional environments, the subsequent diagenesis and lithification of these sediments, and the localization therein of mineral and petroleum resources. Thus, although the primary emphasis in basin analysis is stratigraphic and sedimentologic in nature, paleontologic, tectonic, and geophysical data, among others, are also integral components of the effort. It is scientifically challenging and, in practical terms, forms the foundation for the exploration for strata-bound resources. The wide range of topics that must be incorporated into a basin analysis requires that it be a group project of specialists and means that it is a difficult subject to teach or to present in a book.

  15. Integrated Hydro-geomorphological Monitoring System of the Upper Bussento river basin (Cilento and Vallo Diano Geopark, S-Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, D.; Cuomo, A.; Longobardi, A.; Villani, P.; Guida, M.; Guadagnuolo, D.; Cestari, A.; Siervo, V.; Benevento, G.; Sorvino, S.; Doto, R.; Verrone, M.; De Vita, A.; Aloia, A.; Positano, P.

    2012-04-01

    are organized into a relational geodatabase supporting tracer testings, space-time analysis and hydrological modeling. At the moment, three main station for hourly streamflow measurements are located at the terminal sections of the main basin and the two main sub-basin; secondary stations for weekly discharge measurements are located along the Upper Bussento river segment, upstream and downstream of each river reach or tributary catchments or karst spring inflow. Temporary stations are located in the representative sections of the catchments to detect stream flow losses into alluvial beds or experimental parcels in the bare karst and forested sandstone headwaters. Streamflow measurements are combined with geochemical survey and water sampling for Radon activity concentration measurements. Results of measurement campains in Radon space-time distribution within the basin are given in other contribution of same EGU session. Monitoring results confirm the hourly, daily, weekly and monthly hydrological data and validate outcomes of semi-distributed hydrological models based on previously time series, allowing both academic consultants and institutional subject to extend the Integrated Hydro-geomorphological Monitoring System to the surrounding drainage areas of the Cilento and Vallo di Diano Geopark. Keywords: River-aquifer interaction, Upper Bussento river basin, monitoring system, hydro-geomorphology, semi-distributed hydrological model. Table 1: Comparative, hierarchical Hydro-morpho-climate entities Hierarchy levelArea (Km2) Scale Orography Entity Climate Entity Morfological Entity Areal Drainage Entity Linear Drainage Entity VIII 106 1:15E6 Orogen Macroscale α Morphological Region Hydrological Region VII 105 1:10E6 Chain Sistem Macroscale β Morphological Province Hydrological Province VI 104 1:5E5 Chain Mesoscale α Morphological Sistem Basin River V 103 1:2,5E5Chain Segment Mesoscale β Morphological Sub-systemSub-Basin Torrent IV 100 1:1,0E5Orographic Group

  16. Susquehanna River Basin Hydrologic Observing System (SRBHOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, P. M.; Duffy, C. J.; Dressler, K. A.

    2004-12-01

    In response to the NSF-CUAHSI initiative for a national network of Hydrologic Observatories, we propose to initiate the Susquehanna River Basin Hydrologic Observing System (SRBHOS), as the northeast node. The Susquehanna has a drainage area of 71, 410 km2. From the headwaters near Cooperstown, NY, the river is formed within the glaciated Appalachian Plateau physiographic province, crossing the Valley and Ridge, then the Piedmont, before finishing its' 444 mile journey in the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay. The Susquehanna is the major source of water and nutrients to the Chesapeake. It has a rich history in resource development (logging, mining, coal, agriculture, urban and heavy industry), with an unusual resilience to environmental degradation, which continues today. The shallow Susquehanna is one of the most flood-ravaged rivers in the US with a decadal regularity of major damage from hurricane floods and rain-on-snow events. As a result of this history, it has an enormous infrastructure for climate, surface water and groundwater monitoring already in place, including the nations only regional groundwater monitoring system for drought detection. Thirty-six research institutions have formed the SRBHOS partnership to collaborate on a basin-wide network design for a new scientific observing system. Researchers at the partner universities have conducted major NSF research projects within the basin, setting the stage and showing the need for a new terrestrial hydrologic observing system. The ultimate goal of SRBHOS is to close water, energy and solute budgets from the boundary layer to the water table, extending across plot, hillslope, watershed, and river basin scales. SRBHOS is organized around an existing network of testbeds (legacy watershed sites) run by the partner universities, and research institutions. The design of the observing system, when complete, will address fundamental science questions within major physiographic regions of the basin. A nested

  17. [Phosphorus Fractions and Release Risk in Surface Sediments of an Agricultural Headwater Stream System in Hefei Suburban, China].

    PubMed

    Pei, Ting-ting; Li, Ru-zhong; Gao, Su-di; Luo, Yue-ying

    2016-02-15

    A typical water system of agricultural headwater stream in Chaohu Lake basin was selected as the study area, and 17, 16, 14 and 13 surface sediments were collected from the four styles of stream, respectively, including ponds, branches, main channel and mainstream deep pools, in October 2014 (in autumn) and April 2015 (in spring). The forms and space-time variations of phosphorus in the sediments were analyzed. Clustering and variance analysis were conducted on the phosphorus forms data from the four styles of stream by means of multivariate statistical analyses. We quantified the phosphorus release risk (PSI) and identified the main impact factors of PSI via calculating the phosphorus sorption index (PSI) and the correlation analysis. The results showed that: (1) The contents of TP in the surface sediments ranged from 137.517 to 1709.229 mg x kg(-1) with an average value of 532. 245 mg x kg(-1), and the order of the average contents of phosphorus forms was IP (350.347 mg x kg(-1)) > OP (167.333 mg x kg(-1)) > Fe/Al-P ( 78. 869 mg x kg(-1)) > Ca-P (56.343 mg x kg(-1)) > Ex-P (6.609 mg x kg(-1)); (2) The contents of phosphorus forms had the same trend in all the four stream styles, which was deep pool > main channel > branch > pond; (3) In autumn, the deep pool and main channel were clustered into one class, while the pond and branch were clustered into the other class. In spring, branch, main channel and deep pool were clustered into the same class; (4) Variance analysis showed that the differences among the four stream styles were larger in autumn than in spring; (5) The PSI of the surface sediments ranged between 24.49 and 69.94 (mg x L(-1) x (100 g x micromol)(-1). The PSI in spring was lower than that in spring, indicating that phosphorus release risk of surface sediment was higher in spring than in autumn. (6) PSI had a significant negative correlation with Ex-P, IP and pH.

  18. [Phosphorus Fractions and Release Risk in Surface Sediments of an Agricultural Headwater Stream System in Hefei Suburban, China].

    PubMed

    Pei, Ting-ting; Li, Ru-zhong; Gao, Su-di; Luo, Yue-ying

    2016-02-15

    A typical water system of agricultural headwater stream in Chaohu Lake basin was selected as the study area, and 17, 16, 14 and 13 surface sediments were collected from the four styles of stream, respectively, including ponds, branches, main channel and mainstream deep pools, in October 2014 (in autumn) and April 2015 (in spring). The forms and space-time variations of phosphorus in the sediments were analyzed. Clustering and variance analysis were conducted on the phosphorus forms data from the four styles of stream by means of multivariate statistical analyses. We quantified the phosphorus release risk (PSI) and identified the main impact factors of PSI via calculating the phosphorus sorption index (PSI) and the correlation analysis. The results showed that: (1) The contents of TP in the surface sediments ranged from 137.517 to 1709.229 mg x kg(-1) with an average value of 532. 245 mg x kg(-1), and the order of the average contents of phosphorus forms was IP (350.347 mg x kg(-1)) > OP (167.333 mg x kg(-1)) > Fe/Al-P ( 78. 869 mg x kg(-1)) > Ca-P (56.343 mg x kg(-1)) > Ex-P (6.609 mg x kg(-1)); (2) The contents of phosphorus forms had the same trend in all the four stream styles, which was deep pool > main channel > branch > pond; (3) In autumn, the deep pool and main channel were clustered into one class, while the pond and branch were clustered into the other class. In spring, branch, main channel and deep pool were clustered into the same class; (4) Variance analysis showed that the differences among the four stream styles were larger in autumn than in spring; (5) The PSI of the surface sediments ranged between 24.49 and 69.94 (mg x L(-1) x (100 g x micromol)(-1). The PSI in spring was lower than that in spring, indicating that phosphorus release risk of surface sediment was higher in spring than in autumn. (6) PSI had a significant negative correlation with Ex-P, IP and pH. PMID:27363143

  19. Temporal and spatial dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in headwater snow-dominated catchments, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannemann, F. K.; Zapata, X.; McIntosh, J. C.; Perdrial, J. N.; Brooks, P. D.; Chorover, J.; Lohse, K. A.; Fricke, H. C.

    2011-12-01

    The concentration and availability of stream nutrients, particularly dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen species, determine aquatic system productivity, and are important indicators of catchment hydrobiogeochemical processes. In semi-arid montane areas, such as the Valles Caldera National Preserve located within the Jemez River Basin, NM, an understanding of the relationship between discharge and nutrient concentrations is particularly important. Although the annual hydrograph is dominated (~40%) by spring snowmelt, similar to well studies sites in the northern Rockies, the JRB region receives a much larger percentage of precipitation associated with summer rainfall, and consequently may provide insight into how more northerly catchments will respond to changing climate. This study focuses on four headwater catchments: History Grove, La Jara, Upper Jaramillo and Upper Redondo, over two water years (2009 to 2011) to examine how nutrient concentrations vary as a function of hillslope aspect, catchment hydrologic responses, seasonality, and discharge. Stream water grab samples were collected on a monthly to weekly basis from 2009 to 2011 and analyzed for inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen species (total dissolved nitrogen (DN), NO3, NO2, NH4). DOC and DN concentrations in stream waters from all 4 catchments are positively correlated, indicating a tight coupling of carbon and nitrogen. During dry periods (September to February) stream waters have high DIC (4.8-7.6 mg/L), and low DOC (1.6-2.7 mg/L) and DN (<0.3 mg/L) concentrations, indicating that stream water is dominated by groundwater inputs. In contrast, during spring snowmelt (March-May) stream waters have high DOC (2.9-6.2 mg/L) and DN (0.2-0.5mg/L) concentrations and low DIC (3.1-4.5mg/L) values; the majority of DN is comprised of organic-N. These results suggest flushing of shallow soil waters during snowmelt periods. High DIC (5.8-6.3mg/L), and low DOC (1.7-4.0mg/L) and

  20. The relationship between soil heterotrophic activity, soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leachate, and catchment-scale DOC export in headwater catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, P.D.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from terrestrial sources forms the major component of the annual carbon budget in many headwater streams. In high-elevation catchments in the Rocky Mountains, DOC originates in the upper soil horizons and is flushed to the stream primarily during spring snowmelt. To identify controls on the size of the mobile soil DOC pool available to be transported during the annual melt event, we measured soil DOC production across a range of vegetation communities and soil types together with catchment DOC export in paired watersheds in Summit County, Colorado. Both surface water DOC concentrations and watershed DOC export were lower in areas where pyrite weathering resulted in lower soil pH. Similarly, the amount of DOC leached from organic soils was significantly smaller (p < 0.01) at sites having low soil p H. Scaling point source measurements of DOC production and leaching to the two basins and assuming only vegetated areas contribute to DOC production, we calculated that the amount of mobile DOC available to be leached to surface water during melt was 20.3 g C m-2 in the circumneutral basin and 17.8 g C m-2 in the catchment characterized by pyrite weathering. The significant (r2 = 0.91 and p < 0.05), linear relationship between overwinter CO2 flux and the amount of DOC leached from upper soil horizons during snowmelt suggests that the mechanism for the difference in production of mobile DOC was heterotrophic processing of soil carbon in snow-covered soil. Furthermore, this strong relationship between over-winter heterotrophic activity and the size of the mobile DOC pool present in a range of soil and vegetation types provides a likely mechanism for explaining the interannual variability of DOC export observed in high-elevation catchments.

  1. Forest management for water: a hydro-ecological modeling exercise of headwater catchments in the mixed-conifer belt of the Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksa, P. C.; Bales, R. C.; Ray, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Hydro-ecological modeling provides a cost-effective method for evaluating the effects of vegetation change on water cycling within a catchment. In mountain watersheds, change in forest vegetation not only has direct effects on transpiration rates, but also energy exchanges that influence patterns of snow ablation. In this study, treatment scenarios were implemented using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys) to estimate impacts on key elements of the hydrologic cycle affected by forest harvesting - snowpack accumulation, ablation, transpiration, and streamflow. Twelve headwater catchments (0.5 - 2.6 km2, 1460 - 2450m) in the mixed-conifer zone of the central Sierra Nevada, within the Sierra and Tahoe National Forests, were included for analysis. These research sites are part of the Sierra Nevada Adaptive Management Project (SNAMP), located in the headwaters of the American and Merced Rivers, and the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) in the Kings River basin. Two methods of forest harvesting were simulated in the study watersheds: 1) uniform canopy thinning, through reduction of Leaf Area Index (LAI) values and 2) strip-cut treatments, suggested as the best method for retaining snowpack. Results from this study compare the influence of vegetation on water cycle dynamics through the two harvesting treatments, initial vegetation densities, and individual catchment size. Model simulations for pre-treatment snow depth, soil moisture, and streamflow were validated with SNAMP and CZO in-situ measurements. Preliminary results show that a linear reduction of forest canopy reduces transpiration accordingly, but produces a non-linear increase in streamflow. Peak discharges also increased, occurring earlier in the spring and having more pronounced effects in the smaller catchments. Based on these results, harvesting thresholds required for obtaining increases in water yield are evaluated. Investigating the impact of forest management on these

  2. Hydrogeomorphic connectivity on roads crossing in rural headwaters and its effect on stream dynamics.

    PubMed

    Thomaz, Edivaldo L; Peretto, Gustavo T

    2016-04-15

    Unpaved roads are ubiquitous features that have been transforming the landscape through human history. Unpaved roads affect the water and sediment pathways through a catchment and impacts the aquatic ecosystem. In this study, we describe the effect of unpaved road on the hydrogeomorphic connectivity at the rural headwater scale. Measurement was based on the stream crossing approach, i.e., road superimposing the drainage system. We installed a Parshall flume coupled with single-stage suspended sediment sampler at each stream crossing. In addition, we displayed our monitoring scheme with an upscaling perspective from second-order to third-order stream. We concluded that the road-stream coupling dramatically changed the stream dynamic. The increase of discharge caused by roads at the headwater was 50% larger compared to unaffected streams. Additionally, suspended sediment concentration enhancement at stream crossings ranged from to 413% at second-order streams to 145% at third-order streams. The landform characteristics associated with the road network produced an important hydrogeomorphic disruption in the landscape. As a result, the sediment filter function of the riparian zone was reduced dramatically. Therefore, we recommend that projects for aquatic system restoration or conservation in rural landscape consider the role of the road network on stream dynamics.

  3. Quantifying spatial scaling patterns and their local and regional correlates in headwater streams: Implications for resilience

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gothe, Emma; Sandin, Leonard; Allen, Craig R.; Angeler, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of functional traits within and across spatiotemporal scales has been used to quantify and infer the relative resilience across ecosystems. We use explicit spatial modeling to evaluate within- and cross-scale redundancy in headwater streams, an ecosystem type with a hierarchical and dendritic network structure. We assessed the cross-scale distribution of functional feeding groups of benthic invertebrates in Swedish headwater streams during two seasons. We evaluated functional metrics, i.e., Shannon diversity, richness, and evenness, and the degree of redundancy within and across modeled spatial scales for individual feeding groups. We also estimated the correlates of environmental versus spatial factors of both functional composition and the taxonomic composition of functional groups for each spatial scale identified. Measures of functional diversity and within-scale redundancy of functions were similar during both seasons, but both within- and cross-scale redundancy were low. This apparent low redundancy was partly attributable to a few dominant taxa explaining the spatial models. However, rare taxa with stochastic spatial distributions might provide additional information and should therefore be considered explicitly for complementing future resilience assessments. Otherwise, resilience may be underestimated. Finally, both environmental and spatial factors correlated with the scale-specific functional and taxonomic composition. This finding suggests that resilience in stream networks emerges as a function of not only local conditions but also regional factors such as habitat connectivity and invertebrate dispersal.

  4. Productivity of ephemeral headwater riparian forests impacted by sedimentation in the southeastern United States coastal plain.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Rachel L; Lockaby, B Graeme; Cavalcanti, Guadalupe G

    2009-01-01

    Riparian forests serve an essential function in improving water quality through the filtering of sediments and nutrients from surface runoff. However, little is known about the impact of sediment deposition on productivity of riparian forests. Sediment inputs may act as a subsidy to forest productivity by providing additional nutrients for plant uptake or may act as a stress by creating anoxic soil conditions. This study determined how sediment deposition affected riparian forests along ephemeral headwater streams at Ft. Benning, Georgia, USA. Above- and belowground productivity, leaf-area index (LAI), and standing crop biomass for fine roots, shrubs, and trees were compared along a gradient of present sedimentation rates in 17 riparian forests. Annual litterfall production was determined from monthly collections using 0.25- m(2) traps; woody biomass was determined from annual diameter at breast height (DBH) measurements using species-specific allometric equations; fine root productivity was determined using sequential coring; LAI was measured by expanding specific leaf area by annual litterfall production; and shrub biomass was determined using species-specific biomass equations based on height and root collar diameter. Significant declines in litterfall, woody biomass production, fine root production, LAI, and shrub biomass were found with as little as 0.1 to 0.4 cm yr(-2) sedimentation. We conclude that the levels of sedimentation in this study do not subsidize growth in ephemeral headwater riparian forests but instead create a stress similar to that found under flooded conditions.

  5. [Spatiotemporal differentiation of land cover change and grassland degradation pattern in Yangtze River headwaters area].

    PubMed

    Guo, Luo; Du, Shi-Hong; Xue, Da-Yuan; Cai, Liang

    2012-05-01

    Based on field survey data, remote sensing images and statistical data, this paper analyzed the spatiotemporal differentiation of land use and grassland degradation patterns in Yangtze River headwaters area in 1987-2007, and discussed the main natural factors (elevation, position and slope) leading to the changes of this area's grassland ecological environment. In 1987-2007, the fragmentation of this area' s landscape patterns had an increasing trend, and natural environment and climate change were the main driving forces of land use pattern change. There existed significant differences in the areas of grassland degradation at different altitudes. Grassland degradation mainly occurred at altitudes 4800-5100 m. The grassland degradation area tended to increase with increasing elevation, and the proportions of the degradation area varied greatly over different slopes and aspects. The climate in the study area became warm and dry, and the spatial structure of regional land cover changed obviously. The distribution patterns of grassland degradation at different elevation, position and slope coincided with alpine environment and human disturbances, suggesting that alpine environment and climatic change were the decisive factors to the grassland ecosystem pattern in Yangtze River headwaters area. PMID:22919830

  6. Hydrogeomorphic connectivity on roads crossing in rural headwaters and its effect on stream dynamics.

    PubMed

    Thomaz, Edivaldo L; Peretto, Gustavo T

    2016-04-15

    Unpaved roads are ubiquitous features that have been transforming the landscape through human history. Unpaved roads affect the water and sediment pathways through a catchment and impacts the aquatic ecosystem. In this study, we describe the effect of unpaved road on the hydrogeomorphic connectivity at the rural headwater scale. Measurement was based on the stream crossing approach, i.e., road superimposing the drainage system. We installed a Parshall flume coupled with single-stage suspended sediment sampler at each stream crossing. In addition, we displayed our monitoring scheme with an upscaling perspective from second-order to third-order stream. We concluded that the road-stream coupling dramatically changed the stream dynamic. The increase of discharge caused by roads at the headwater was 50% larger compared to unaffected streams. Additionally, suspended sediment concentration enhancement at stream crossings ranged from to 413% at second-order streams to 145% at third-order streams. The landform characteristics associated with the road network produced an important hydrogeomorphic disruption in the landscape. As a result, the sediment filter function of the riparian zone was reduced dramatically. Therefore, we recommend that projects for aquatic system restoration or conservation in rural landscape consider the role of the road network on stream dynamics. PMID:26849320

  7. The role of red alder in riparian forest structure along headwater streams in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlikowska, E.H.; Deal, R.L.; Hennon, P.E.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the influence of red alder on tree species composition, stand density, tree size distribution, tree mortality, and potential for producing large conifers, in 38-42 yr old riparian forests along 13 headwater streams in the Maybeso and Harris watersheds on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Red alder ranged from 0 to 53% of the total live basal area of the stands. Tree density, basal area of live and dead trees, and mean diameter of live conifers were not significantly related to the percent of alder as a proportion of total stand live basal area within these riparian forests. The mean diameter of the 100 largest conifers per hectare (the largest trees) was similar among different sites and appeared unrelated to the amount of alder in the stands. The mean diameter of dead conifers increased slightly with increasing proportion of red alder. Most dead trees were small and died standing. Red alder was much more concentrated immediately along stream margins (within 0-1 m distance from the stream bank vs. > 1 m). The presence of red alder did not inhibit the production of large-diameter conifers, and both alder and conifers provided small woody debris for fishless headwater streams in southeastern Alaska. Red alder is an important structural component of young-growth riparian stands.

  8. [Hydrologic processes of the different landscape zones in Fenhe River headwater catchment].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Gang; Li, Cai-Mei; Qin, Zuo-Dong; Zou, Song-Bing

    2014-06-01

    There are few studies on the hydrologic processes of the landscape zone scales at present. Since the water environment is worsening, there is sharp contradiction between supply and demand of water resources in Shanxi province. The principle of the hydrologic processes of the landscape zones in Fenhe River headwater catchment was revealed by means of isotope tracing, hydrology geological exploration and water chemical signal study. The results showed that the subalpine meadow zone and the medium high mountain forest zone were main runoff formation regions in Fenhe River headwater catchment, while the sparse forest shrub zone and the mountain grassland zone lagged the temporal and spatial collection of the precipitation. Fenhe River water was mainly recharged by precipitation, groundwater, melt water of snow and frozen soil. This study suggested that the whole catchment precipitation hardly directly generated surface runoff, but was mostly transformed into groundwater or interflow, and finally concentrated into river channel, completed the "recharge-runoff-discharge" hydrologic processes. This study can provide scientific basis and reference for the containment of water environment deterioration, and is expected to deliver the comprehensive restoration of clear-water reflowing and the ecological environment in Shanxi province.

  9. Sediment storage quantification and postglacial evolution of an inner-alpine sedimentary basin (Gradenmoos, Schober Mountains, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, J.; Buckel, J.; Otto, J. C.; Schrott, L.

    2012-04-01

    Knickpoints in longitudinal valley profiles of alpine headwater catchments can be frequently assigned to the lithological and tectonical setting, to damming effects through large (rockfall) deposits, or to the impact of Pleistocene glaciations causing overdeepened basins. As a consequence various sedimentary sinks developed, which frequently interrupt sediment flux in alpine drainage basins. Today these locations may represent landscape archives documenting a sedimentary history of great value for the understanding of alpine landscape evolution. The glacially overdeepened Gradenmoos basin at 1920 m a.s.l. (an alpine lake mire with adjacent floodplain deposits and surrounding slope storage landforms; approx. 4.1 km2) is the most pronounced sink in the studied Gradenbach catchment (32.5 km2). The basin is completely filled up with sediments delivered by mainly fluvial processes, debris flows, and rock falls, it is assumed to be deglaciated since Egesen times and it is expected to archive a continuous stratigraphy of postglacial sedimentation. As the analysis of denudation-accumulation-systems is generally based on back-calculation of stored sediment volumes to a specific sediment delivering area, most reliable results will be consequently obtained (1) if sediment output of the system can be neglected for the investigated period of time, (2) if - due to spatial scale - sediment storage can be assessed quantitatively with a high level of accuracy, and (3) if the sediment contributing area can be clearly delimited. All three aspects are considered to be fulfilled to a high degree within the Gradenmoos basin. Sediment storage is quantified using geophysical methods, core drillings and GIS modelling whereas postglacial reconstruction is based on radiocarbon dating and palynological analyses. Subject to variable subsurface conditions, different geophysical methods were applied to detect bedrock depth. Electrical resistivity surveying (2D/3D) was used most extensively as it

  10. Influence of basin connectivity on sediment source, transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. R.; Mackin, G.; Lechler, P.; Lord, M.; Lorentz, S.

    2013-02-01

    The management of sediment and other non-point source (NPS) pollution has proven difficult, and requires a sound understanding of particle movement through the drainage system. The primary objective of this investigation was to obtain an understanding of NPS sediment source(s), transport, and storage within the Mkabela Basin, a representative agricultural catchment within the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands of eastern South Africa, by combining geomorphic, hydrologic and geochemical fingerprinting analyses. The Mkabela Basin can be subdivided into three distinct subcatchments that differ in their ability to transport and store sediment along the axial valley. Headwater (upper catchment) areas are characterized by extensive wetlands that act as significant sediment sinks. Mid-catchment areas, characterized by higher relief and valley gradients, exhibit few wetlands, but rather are dominated by a combination of alluvial and bedrock channels that are conducive to sediment transport. The lower catchment exhibits a low-gradient alluvial channel that is boarded by extensive riparian wetlands that accumulate large quantities of sediment (and NPS pollutants). Fingerprinting studies suggest that silt- and clay-rich layers found within wetland and reservoir deposits of the upper and upper-mid subcatchments are derived from the erosion of fine-grained, valley bottom soils frequently utilized as vegetable fields. Coarser-grained deposits within these wetlands and reservoirs result from the erosion of sandier hillslope soils extensively utilized for sugar cane, during relatively high magnitude runoff events that are capable of transporting sand-sized sediment off the slopes. Thus, the source of sediment to the axial valley varies as a function of sediment size and runoff magnitude. Sediment export from upper to lower catchment areas was limited until the early 1990s, in part because the upper catchment wetlands were hydrologically disconnected from lower parts of the watershed during

  11. Flow origin, drainage area, and hydrologic characteristics for headwater streams in the mountaintop coal-mining region of Southern West Virginia, 2000-01

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paybins, Katherine S.

    2003-01-01

    Characteristics of perennial and intermittent headwater streams were documented in the mountaintop removal coal-mining region of southern West Virginia in 2000?01. The perennial-flow origin points were identified in autumn during low base-flow conditions. The intermittent-flow origin points were identified in late winter and early spring during high base-flow conditions. Results of this investigation indicate that the median drainage area upstream of the origin of intermittent flow was 14.5 acres, and varied by an absolute median of 3.4 acres between the late winter measurements of 2000 and early spring measurements of 2001. Median drainage area in the northeastern part of the study unit was generally larger (20.4 acres), with a lower median basin slope (322 feet per mile) than the southwestern part of the study unit (12.9 acres and 465 feet per mile, respectively). Both of the seasons preceding the annual intermittent flow visits were much drier than normal. The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection reports that the median size of permitted valley fills in southern West Virginia is 12.0 acres, which is comparable to the median drainage area upstream of the ephemeralintermittent flow point (14.5 acres). The maximum size of permitted fills (480 acres), however, is more than 10 times the observed maximum drainage area upstream of the ephemeral-intermittent flow point (45.3 acres), although a single valley fill may cover more than one drainage area. The median drainage area upstream of the origin of perennial flow was 40.8 acres, and varied by an absolute median of 18.0 acres between two annual autumn measurements. Only basins underlain with mostly sandstone bedrock produced perennial flow. Perennial points in the northeast part of the study unit had a larger median drainage area (70.0 acres) and a smaller median basin slope (416 feet per mile) than perennial points in the southwest part of the study unit (35.5 acres and 567 feet per mile, respectively

  12. Documentation of input datasets for the soil-water balance groundwater recharge model of the Upper Colorado River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D

    2015-01-01

    The Colorado River and its tributaries supply water to more than 35 million people in the United States and 3 million people in Mexico, irrigating more than 4.5 million acres of farmland, and generating about 12 billion kilowatt hours of hydroelectric power annually. The Upper Colorado River Basin, encompassing more than 110,000 square miles (mi2), contains the headwaters of the Colorado River (also known as the River) and is an important source of snowmelt runoff to the River. Groundwater discharge also is an important source of water in the River and its tributaries, with estimates ranging from 21 to 58 percent of streamflow in the upper basin. Planning for the sustainable management of the Colorado River in future climates requires an understanding of the Upper Colorado River Basin groundwater system. This report documents input datasets for a Soil-Water Balance groundwater recharge model that was developed for the Upper Colorado River Basin.

  13. The burial of headwater streams in drainage pipes reduces in-stream nitrate retention: results from two US metropolitan areas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban watersheds. Stream burial occurs when segments of a channel are encased in drainage pipe and buried beneath the land surface to...

  14. Dissolved Organic Carbon in Headwater Streams and Riparian Soil Organic Carbon along an Altitudinal Gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; McDowell, William H.; Zou, Xiaoming; Ruan, Honghua; Wang, Jiashe; Li, Liguang

    2013-01-01

    Stream water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) correlates positively with soil organic carbon (SOC) in many biomes. Does this relationship hold in a small geographic region when variations of temperature, precipitation and vegetation are driven by a significant altitudinal gradient? We examined the spatial connectivity between concentrations of DOC in headwater stream and contents of riparian SOC and water-soluble soil organic carbon (WSOC), riparian soil C:N ratio, and temperature in four vegetation types along an altitudinal gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China. Our analyses showed that annual mean concentrations of headwater stream DOC were lower in alpine meadow (AM) than in subtropical evergreen broadleaf forest (EBF), coniferous forest (CF), and subalpine dwarf forest (SDF). Headwater stream DOC concentrations were negatively correlated with riparian SOC as well as WSOC contents, and were unrelated to riparian soil C:N ratio. Our findings suggest that DOC concentrations in headwater streams are affected by different factors at regional and local scales. The dilution effect of higher precipitation and adsorption of soil DOC to higher soil clay plus silt content at higher elevation may play an important role in causing lower DOC concentrations in AM stream of the Wuyi Mountains. Our results suggest that upscaling and downscaling of the drivers of DOC export from forested watersheds when exploring the response of carbon flux to climatic change or other drivers must done with caution. PMID:24265737

  15. Dissolved organic carbon in headwater streams and riparian soil organic carbon along an altitudinal gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; McDowell, William H; Zou, Xiaoming; Ruan, Honghua; Wang, Jiashe; Li, Liguang

    2013-01-01

    Stream water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) correlates positively with soil organic carbon (SOC) in many biomes. Does this relationship hold in a small geographic region when variations of temperature, precipitation and vegetation are driven by a significant altitudinal gradient? We examined the spatial connectivity between concentrations of DOC in headwater stream and contents of riparian SOC and water-soluble soil organic carbon (WSOC), riparian soil C:N ratio, and temperature in four vegetation types along an altitudinal gradient in the Wuyi Mountains, China. Our analyses showed that annual mean concentrations of headwater stream DOC were lower in alpine meadow (AM) than in subtropical evergreen broadleaf forest (EBF), coniferous forest (CF), and subalpine dwarf forest (SDF). Headwater stream DOC concentrations were negatively correlated with riparian SOC as well as WSOC contents, and were unrelated to riparian soil C:N ratio. Our findings suggest that DOC concentrations in headwater streams are affected by different factors at regional and local scales. The dilution effect of higher precipitation and adsorption of soil DOC to higher soil clay plus silt content at higher elevation may play an important role in causing lower DOC concentrations in AM stream of the Wuyi Mountains. Our results suggest that upscaling and downscaling of the drivers of DOC export from forested watersheds when exploring the response of carbon flux to climatic change or other drivers must done with caution.

  16. Peak Flow Responses and Recession Flow Characteristics After Thinning of Japanese Cypress Forest in a Headwater Catchment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the effects of forest thinning on peak flow and recession characteristics of storm runoff in headwater catchments at Mie Prefecture, Japan. In catchment M5, 58.3% of stems were removed, whereas catchment M4 remained untreated as a control catchment. Storm precipitati...

  17. Export of detritus and invertebrate from headwater streams: linking mountaintop removal and valley fill coal mining to downstream receiving waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal and valley fill (MTR/VF) coal mining has resulted in large scale alteration of the topography, reduced forest productivity, and burial of headwater streams in the U.S. Central Appalachians. Although MTR/VF coal mining has occurred for several decades and the ...

  18. Implications of the results of colonization experiments for designing riparian restoration projects adjacent to agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many headwater streams and their riparian habitats in the Midwestern United States have been modified for agricultural drainage. Agricultural drainage often results in reductions of physical habitat diversity, shifts from woody to herbaceous riparian vegetation, and the loss of riparian habitat. T...

  19. Influence of adding small instream wood on fishes and hydrology within channelized agricultural headwater streams in central Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large instream wood is well known for its importance in headwater streams because it promotes the development of pool habitat for fishes and provides them with cover from predators during the summer. However, little is known about the influence of small instream wood (diameter < 10 cm, length < 1 m...

  20. Distribution of Amphipods (Gammarus nipponensis Ueno) Among Mountain Headwater Streams with Different Legacies of Debris Flow Occurrence

    EPA Science Inventory

    To understand the impacts of debris flows on the distribution of an amphipod with limited dispersal ability in the context of stream networks, we surveyed the presence of Gammarus nipponensis in 87 headwater streams with different legacies of debris flow occurrence within an 8.5-...

  1. Mean annual runoff in the upper Ohio River basin, 1941-70, and its historical variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beall, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    A map of the Ohio River basin above the Muskingum River shows patterns of mean annual runoff for the new climatologic and hydrologic reference period, 1941-70, and provides an up-to-date, consistent basis for consideration of this streamflow characteristic. The primary data base consisted of 98 long-term gaging-station records collected within this 27,300-square-mile (70,700-square-kilometer) headwater area of the Ohio River basin. Supplemental information was derived from 83 short-term records. Mean annual runoff is at a regional minimum of less than 12 inches (300 millimeters) in an area extending from the northern West Virginia panhandle to the headwaters of the Mahoning River in Ohio. Mean annual runoff of more than 32 inches {810 millimeters) occurs in parts of the upper Cheat River basin in West Virginia. The zone of high runoff trends northeastward along the western slopes of tile Allegheny Mountains; magnitudes diminish to about 25 inches (630 millimeters) at the eastern basin boundary near Ebensburg, Pa. Runoff of this magnitude occurs also in a band across tile upper Allegheny River basin in Pennsylvania. Ratios of mean annual discharge to the 30-year reference-period average were computed for each year of record for all long-term gaging stations. Annual discharges have ranged from about 30 percent to 200 percent of the 30-year mean. Graphed summaries of the annual ratios document the relative duration and magnitude of wet and dry periods during the past 65 years in the upper Ohio River basin.

  2. Assessing mercury exposure and effects to American dippers in headwater streams near mining sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, Charles J.; Kaiser, James L.; Packard, Heidi A.; Grove, Robert A.; Taft, Mike R.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate mercury (Hg) exposure and possible adverse effects of Hg on American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus) reproduction, we collected eggs and nestling feathers and the larval/nymph form of three Orders of aquatic macroinvertebrates (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera = EPT) important in their diet from three major headwater tributaries of the upper Willamette River, Oregon in 2002. The Coast Fork Willamette River is contaminated with Hg due to historical cinnabar (HgS) mining at the Black Butte Mine; the Row River is affected by past gold-mining operations located within the Bohemia Mining District, where Hg was used in the amalgamation process to recover gold; and the Middle Fork Willamette River is the reference area with no known mining. Methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations (geometric mean) in composite EPT larvae (111.9 ng/g dry weight [dw] or 19.8 ng/g wet weight [ww]), dipper eggs (38.5 ng/g ww) and nestling feathers (1158 ng/g ww) collected from the Coast Fork Willamette were significantly higher than MeHg concentrations in EPT and dipper samples from other streams. Total mercury (THg) concentrations in surface sediments along the same Hg-impacted streams were investigated by others in 1999 (Row River tributaries) and 2002 (Coast Fork). The reported sediment THg concentrations paralleled our biological findings. Dipper breeding territories at higher elevations had fewer second clutches; however, dipper reproductive success along all streams (including the lower elevation and most Hg-contaminated Coast Fork), was judged excellent compared to other studies reviewed. Furthermore, MeHg concentrations in EPT samples from this study were well below dietary concentrations in other aquatic bird species, such as loons and ducks, reported to cause Hg-related reproductive problems. Our data suggest that either dipper feathers or EPT composites used to project MeHg concentrations in dipper feathers (with biomagnification factor of 10a??20??) may be used, but

  3. Lessons in collaboration and effective field research from the Appalachian Headwaters Research Experience for Undergraduates Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. L.; Fox, J.; Wilder, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    In the summer of 2009, the authors launched year one of a three-year National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates entitled "Carbon Storage and Headwater Health in the Appalachian Headwaters." Eight undergraduates selected from a nationally competitive field of more than 60 applicants participated in the ten-week field- and laboratory-based program along with three middle- and high-school teachers. Each student developed and completed an independent research project related to coal mining’s impact on soil organic carbon and sediment transport processes. Specifically, they used isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signature of soils and sediments in the Appalachian headwater landscapes and first order streams of Kentucky's southeastern coalfields. Among the program's innovative features was its fundamentally collaborative nature--which was represented in several ways. First, the background of the three program leaders was very different: an environmental planner with an academic background in land use planning and administration (Jones); a civil engineer trained in biogeochemistry and watershed modeling (Fox); and an environmental educator experienced in both formal and nonformal educator training and certification (Wilder). The program was also a collaboration between a Carnegie 1 research-oriented institution and an undergraduate/ teaching -focused regional comprehensive university. Finally, the participants themselves represented a diversity of disciplines and institutional backgrounds--including biology, geology, chemistry, environmental science and civil engineering. The Research Experience for Teachers component was another innovative program element. The teachers participated in all field and laboratory research activities during the first six weeks, then developed a unit of study for their own classrooms to be implemented during the current school year. In addition to the six

  4. Headwater Stream Management Dichotomies: Local Amphibian Habitat vs. Downstream Fish Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C. R.

    2002-12-01

    Small headwater streams in mountainous areas of the Pacific Northwest often do not harbor fish populations because of low water depth and high gradients. Rather, these streams provide habitat for dense assemblages of stream-dwelling amphibians. A variety of management goals have been suggested for such streams such as encouraging large woody debris recruitment to assist in sediment trapping and valley floor formation, encouraging large woody debris recruitment to provide downstream wood when debris flows occur, providing continuous linear stream buffers within forest harvest areas to provide shade and bank stability, etc. A basic problem with analying the geomorphic or biotic benefits of any of these strategies is the lack of explicit management goals for such streams. Should managers strive to optimize downstream fish habitat, local amphibian habitat, or both? Through observational data and theoretical considerations, it will be shown that these biotic goals will lead to very different geomorphic management recommendations. For instance, woody debris greater than 60 cm diameter may assist in valley floor development, but it is likely to create subsurface channel flow of unknown value to amphibians. Trapping and retention of fine sediments within headwater streams may improve downstream spawning gravels, but degrades stream-dwelling amphibian habitat. In response to the need for descriptive information on habitat and channel morphology specific to small, non-fish-bearing streams in the Pacific Northwest, morphologies and wood frequencies in forty-two first- and second-order forested streams less than four meters wide were surveyed. Frequencies and size distributions of woody debris were compared between small streams and larger fish-bearing streams as well as between second-growth and virgin timber streams. Statistical models were developed to explore dominant factors affecting channel morphology and habitat. Findings suggest geomorphological relationships

  5. Assessing mercury exposure and effects to American dippers in headwater streams near mining sites.

    PubMed

    Henny, Charles J; Kaiser, James L; Packard, Heidi A; Grove, Robert A; Taft, Michael R

    2005-10-01

    To evaluate mercury (Hg) exposure and possible adverse effects of Hg on American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus) reproduction, we collected eggs and nestling feathers and the larval/nymph form of three Orders of aquatic macroinvertebrates (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera = EPT) important in their diet from three major headwater tributaries of the upper Willamette River, Oregon in 2002. The Coast Fork Willamette River is contaminated with Hg due to historical cinnabar (HgS) mining at the Black Butte Mine; the Row River is affected by past gold-mining operations located within the Bohemia Mining District, where Hg was used in the amalgamation process to recover gold; and the Middle Fork Willamette River is the reference area with no known mining. Methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations (geometric mean) in composite EPT larvae (111.9 ng/g dry weight [dw] or 19.8 ng/g wet weight [ww]), dipper eggs (38.5 ng/g ww) and nestling feathers (1158 ng/g ww) collected from the Coast Fork Willamette were significantly higher than MeHg concentrations in EPT and dipper samples from other streams. Total mercury (THg) concentrations in surface sediments along the same Hg-impacted streams were investigated by others in 1999 (Row River tributaries) and 2002 (Coast Fork). The reported sediment THg concentrations paralleled our biological findings. Dipper breeding territories at higher elevations had fewer second clutches; however, dipper reproductive success along all streams (including the lower elevation and most Hg-contaminated Coast Fork), was judged excellent compared to other studies reviewed. Furthermore, MeHg concentrations in EPT samples from this study were well below dietary concentrations in other aquatic bird species, such as loons and ducks, reported to cause Hg-related reproductive problems. Our data suggest that either dipper feathers or EPT composites used to project MeHg concentrations in dipper feathers (with biomagnification factor of 10-20x) may be used, but with

  6. Empirical Relationships Between Watershed Attributes and Headwater Lake Chemistry in the Adirondack Region

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    Surface water acidification may be caused or influenced by both natural watershed processes and anthropogenic actions. Empirical models and observational data can be useful for identifying watershed attributes or processes that require further research or that should be considered in the development of process models. This study focuses on the Adirondack region of New York and has two purposes: to (1) develop empirical models that can be used to assess the chemical status of lakes for which no chemistry data exist and (2) determine on a regional scale watershed attributes that account for variability in lake pH and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). Headwater lakes, rather than lakes linked to upstream lakes, were selected for initial analysis. The Adirondacks Watershed Data Base (AWDB), part of the Acid Deposition Data Network maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), integrates data on physiography, bedrock, soils, land cover, wetlands, disturbances, beaver activity, land use, and atmospheric deposition with the water chemistry and morphology for the watersheds of 463 headwater lakes. The AWD8 facilitates both geographic display and statistical analysis of the data. The report, An Adirondack Watershed Data Base: Attribute and Mapping Information for Regional Acidic Deposition Studies (ORNL/TM--10144), describes the AWDB. Both bivariate (correlations and Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests) and multivariate analyses were performed. Fifty-seven watershed attributes were selected as input variables to multiple linear regression and discriminant analysis. For model development -200 lakes for which pH and ANC data exist were randomly subdivided into a specification and a verification data set. Several indices were used to select models for predicting lake pH (31 variables) and ANC (27 variables). Twenty-five variables are common to the pH and ANC models: four lake morphology, nine soil/geology, eight land cover, three disturbance, and one watershed aspect. An

  7. Diurnal variation of dominant nitrate retention processes in an agricultural headwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Tobias; Ryabenko, Evgenia; Stumpp, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Nitrate and ammonium are introduced by agricultural practice into the environment and are transformed and retained on their pathway through aquatic environments. In particular, biological transformation processes (i.e. microbial denitrification or ammonium oxidation and assimilation) are responsible for the largest part of nitrate removal, which are also crucial processes in headwater streams. It is well known, that most of the biological processes are influenced by available (solar) energy fluxes, temperatures and dissolved oxygen concentrations, which vary with time and space. However, looking at biogeochemical hot spots in the landscapes` hydrological interface, the stream and river network (e.g. stream sections with a high biological activity), the temporal variability of biological processes can be an important control on total nitrate export. In this study, we therefore identified most important diurnal time periods for nitrate retention in a 75 m impervious section of an agricultural headwater stream using oxygen saturation dynamics and nitrate isotopes. We regularly measured discharge, hydro-geochemical and climate parameters, as well as nitrate and water isotopes in grab samples at three locations along the reach. On average, we observed a decrease of 10% in nitrate concentration from up- to downstream, which was only caused by biological processes and not by dilution. Nitrate isotope analysis indicated distinct trends along the reach and with time of the day. Both nitrate assimilation and nitrification caused significant changes in nitrate isotope distribution in the early day. To explain the distinct observed process dynamics from the morning to the afternoon, we simulated net primary production (NEP) and respiration using the river metabolism model RIVERMETC with observed oxygen concentrations and water temperatures. Comparing the results with the observed nitrate dynamics, the short time period when NEP occurs (~10:30 -12:30) seems to be crucial for

  8. Incorporating preferential flow into a 3D model of a forested headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Barbara; Jackisch, Conrad; Hopp, Luisa; Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian

    2016-04-01

    Preferential flow plays an important role for water flow and solute transport. The inclusion of preferential flow, for example with dual porosity or dual permeability approaches, is a common feature in transport simulations at the plot scale. But at hillslope and catchment scales, incorporation of macropore and fracture flow into distributed hydrologic 3D models is rare, often due to limited data availability for model parameterisation. In this study, we incorporated preferential flow into an existing 3D integrated surface subsurface hydrologic model (HydroGeoSphere) of a headwater region (6 ha) of the forested Weierbach catchment in western Luxembourg. Our model philosophy was a strong link between measured data and the model setup. The model setup we used previously had been parameterised and validated based on various field data. But existing macropores and fractures had not been considered in this initial model setup. The multi-criteria validation revealed a good model performance but also suggested potential for further improvement by incorporating preferential flow as additional process. In order to pursue the data driven model philosophy for the implementation of preferential flow, we analysed the results of plot scale bromide sprinkling and infiltration experiments carried out in the vicinity of the Weierbach catchment. Three 1 sqm plots were sprinkled for one hour and excavated one day later for bromide depth profile sampling. We simulated these sprinkling experiments at the soil column scale, using the parameterisation of the base headwater model extended by a second permeability domain. Representing the bromide depth profiles was successful without changing this initial parameterisation. Moreover, to explain the variability between the three bromide depth profiles it was sufficient to adapt the dual permeability properties, indicating the spatial heterogeneity of preferential flow. Subsequently, we incorporated the dual permeability simulation in the

  9. Identifying dissolved organic carbon sources at a gaged headwater catchment using FDOM sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malzone, J. M.; Shanley, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) W-9 gage at the headwaters of Sleepers River, Vermont has been monitored for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration for more than 20 years. However, the sources of this DOC during base flow and hydrologic events remain unclear. The major objectives of this research were to identify sources of DOC during storm events and to explain the observed DOC-streamflow counterclockwise hysteresis during hydrologic events. Two main hypotheses to explain hysteresis during hydrologic events were tested: (1) distant headwater wetlands are the major DOC source, which lags behind peak flow due to travel time; and (2) the entire watershed contributes to the DOC at the gage, but the response of DOC lags behind the period when groundwater contributes most to streamflow. Sources of DOC were tracked using fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) sensors in surface water and groundwater wells. Wells were installed at four depths, 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 m, at four sites: a peaty low-gradient riparian area near the headwaters; a mid-hillslope area on a long hillslope mid-watershed; a near-stream area on a long hillslope mid-watershed; and a low-gradient tributary confluence area just above the gage. During storm events, FDOM and hydraulic head were measured at the nested groundwater wells. Samples for DOC analysis were also taken to determine the relationship between FDOM and DOC. Results suggest that both distant sources and the greater watershed played a role in the transport of DOC to the W-9 gage. Distant peaty sources dominated during large storms and contributed the highest surface water FDOM measurements. The peak FDOM at the gage was therefore best described as a result of transport. However, export from these distant sources terminated rapidly and did not explain continued elevated FDOM at the gage. Groundwater across the watershed exhibited hysteresis analogous to that in the stream itself, with FDOM peaking as head receded

  10. Understanding Changes in Water Availability in the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo del Norte Basin Under the Influence of Large-Scale Circulation Indices Using the Noah Land Surface Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khedun, C. Prakash; Mishra, Ashok K.; Bolten, John D.; Beaudoing, Hiroko K.; Kaiser, Ronald A.; Giardino, J. Richard; Singh, Vijay P.

    2012-01-01

    Water availability plays an important role in the socio-economic development of a region. It is however, subject to the influence of large-scale circulation indices, resulting in periodic excesses and deficits. An assessment of the degree of correlation between climate indices and water availability, and the quantification of changes with respect to major climate events is important for long-term water resources planning and management, especially in transboundary basins as it can help in conflict avoidance. In this study we first establish the correlation of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) with gauged precipitation in the Rio Grande basin, and quantify the changes in water availability using runoff generated from the Noah land surface model. Both spatial and temporal variations are noted, with winter and spring being most influenced by conditions in the Pacific Ocean. Negative correlation is observed at the headwaters and positive correlation across the rest of the basin. The influence of individual ENSO events, classified using four different criteria, is also examined. El Ninos (La Ninas) generally cause an increase (decrease) in runoff, but the pattern is not consistent; percentage change in water availability varies across events. Further, positive PDO enhances the effect of El Nino and dampens that of La Nina, but during neutral/transitioning PDO, La Nina dominates meteorological conditions. Long El Ninos have more influence on water availability than short duration high intensity events. We also note that the percentage increase during El Ninos significantly offsets the drought-causing effect of La Ninas.

  11. Managing the three-rivers headwater region, china: from ecological engineering to social engineering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yiping

    2013-09-01

    The three-rivers headwater region (THRHR) of Qinghai province, China plays a key role as source of fresh water and ecosystem services for central and eastern China. Global warming and human activities in the THRHR have threatened the ecosystem since the 1980s. Therefore, the Chinese government has included managing of the THRHR in the national strategy since 2003. The State Integrated Test and Demonstration Region of the THRHR highlights the connection with social engineering (focus on improving people's livelihood and well-being) in managing nature reserves. Based on this program, this perspective attempts a holistic analysis of the strategic role of the THRHR, requirements for change, indices of change, and approaches to change. Long-term success of managing nature reserves requires effective combination of ecological conservation, economic development, and social progress. Thus, the philosophy of social engineering should be employed as a strategy to manage the THRHR.

  12. 'invisible' DOM in hourly-resolved headwater river records from Northern Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, R.; Bovolo, C.; Spencer, R. G.; Hernes, P. J.; Tipping, E.; Vieth-Hillebrand, A.; Chappell, N.; Lewis-Franklin, A.; Parkin, G.; Wagner, T.

    2012-12-01

    Global river networks annually process ~3 billion tonnes of organic carbon but only ~17% reaches the ocean. These estimates suggest rivers are not mere transportation pipes but biogeochemical reactors. Inland waters are therefore fundamental to the understanding of carbon and nutrient interactions between land and ocean. Within these global estimates, tropical rivers contribute ~two-thirds of the global dissolved organic matter flux to the ocean. Recent studies suggest that up to 50% of the CO2 outgassed from tropical rivers is derived from terrestrial organic matter and that the terrestrial-aquatic interface in river headwaters are hotspots of biochemical activity. However, to date, most tropical riverine studies focus on the main river stem or mouth and therefore the dynamics of tropical headwater organic matter cycling within the global carbon cycle are unknown. We present a geochemical and hydrological time-series (sub-hourly resolution) of river water DOC concentration, source and composition from a pristine lowland rainforest headwater of the Burro Burro River, a tributary of the Essequibo River, the 3rd largest river in S. America. We show that during and after a rainstorm event, DOC concentrations increase an order of magnitude (10 to 114mg/L) in less than 30 mins, far exceeding the entire seasonal DOC range measured in 2010 and 2011 (17-28mg/L). The source (δ13C-DOC) of DOC during the rainstorm event changes from microbial/aquatic (-21.9‰ to -25.7‰) at low/intermediate DOC concentration to C3 vegetation supply (-26.8‰ to -30.3‰) during peak DOC flushing. First radiocarbon data shows that riverine DOC is relatively young (106.8-110.9 %modern), however, tropical soils suggest a potential for organic matter to be preserved (360-1200 BP). The fundamental relationship between DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM), measured as UV absorbance (SUVA254), holds only for low riverine DOC concentrations with proportionally high lignin contribution

  13. Recovery of headwater stream flora following the 1989-1992 groundwater drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Nigel T. H.

    1999-02-01

    Over a three year period in spring, summer and autumn from 1993 to 1995 118 sites on 24 headwater reaches of groundwater streams were investigated. Half were also surveyed at least once the previous year. Example rivers were chosen from catchments where there are no abstractions, where there are small or large historical ones, and where reductions or variations in abstractions were likely to occur during the study period.Key objectives of the study were to identify the effects of atypical low flows and bed drying on aquatic and wetland plants following an exceptionally long period of poor groundwater recharge between 1989-92. The extended drought, followed by two years of very good groundwater recharge, provided a unique opportunity to determine the rate, and extent, of recovery. Such knowledge is crucial for conservation bodies, water regulators and water utilities to help them make judgements on the degree of impacts groundwater abstractions have/could have on river flows, and separating these from natural causes.The macrophyte survey data have been used to develop a classification system for headwater streams fed by groundwater. Thirteen different community types were recognised, these giving a clear insight into the flora expected in groundwater streams based primarily on flow periodicity and channel form. Determining the behaviour of individual species helps in environmental assessment of proposed new abstractions, and allows accurate predictions on which ones might decline, be lost or invade. It is equally valuable for predicting the benefits of alleviation strategies based on target flows.Lesser water-parsnip, brook water-crowfoot, blunt-fruited water-starwort and whorl-grass were identified as the most characteristic species of perennial reaches of headwater chalk streams. Pond water-crowfoot only dominates in reaches where flow fails for short periods in late autumn. Marsh foxtail is a classic indicator of winter wet/summer dry flow channels.The River Ver

  14. Freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the headwaters of Chipola River, Houston County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garner, J.T.; McGregor, S.W.; Tarpley, T.A.; Buntin, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Big and Cowarts creeks lie in extreme southeastern Alabama and form the headwaters of Chipola River. Qualitative and quantitative sampling for freshwater mussels in these reaches during 2006 and 2007 revealed an intact fauna, relative to historical reports. A cumulative total of 17 species, including federally protected Elliptio chipolaensis (Chipola Slabshell), Lampsilis subangulata (Shinyrayed Pocketbook), Medionidus penicillatus (Gulf Moccasinshell), and Pleurobema pyriforme (Oval Pigtoe), was encountered. A total of 3382 mussels (density 5.84 per m2) was estimated for one 65-m reach of Big Creek and 9627 mussels (density 8.09 per m2) were estimated to occur in one 170-m reach of Cowarts Creek. Tributaries had depauperate faunas, apparently due to substrate instability.

  15. Longitudinal patterns in carbon and nutrient export from urban watersheds with contrasting headwater management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. M.; Kaushal, S.; Pennino, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Stormwater management in urban areas presents challenges and opportunities to enhance water quality while simultaneously protecting property and infrastructure. Through several generations, stormwater management practices have evolved from 'gray infrastructure' such as pipes and ditches designed to quickly transport water away from the landscape, to more 'green infrastructure' projects meant to allow for biological processing and retention of urban runoff. Implementation of these practices has replaced traditional stream burial with bioretention cells, wetlands, and ponds. We hypothesize that these contrasting green versus gray strategies for headwater management may have significant consequences for the delivery and processing of dissolved carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous. To address this hypothesis, we compared two paired urbanized watersheds with different stormwater management by measuring the longitudinal export of DOC, DIC, TDN, PO4+, and major anions, and characterizing dissolved organic matter using Fluorescence Index (FI) and Spectral Slope. Both watersheds were located in the Baltimore Ecosystem Study Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Dead Run is an urbanized catchment with prevalent stream burial and minimal stormwater management which was implemented after initial development. Red Run is a similarly sized watershed with more recent development and comprehensive stormwater management (wetlands, ponds, bioretention cells, sand filters) and 100m wide stream buffer areas. In each of these contrasting watersheds, we chose two headwater streams which drain SWM features and one stream that terminates at a storm drain. We measured longitudinal changes in export by conducting a synoptic survey of both watersheds in which flow and water chemistry were measured every 500m in the main stem and approximately every 250m in the selected tributaries. Within watersheds, we found differences in the C, N and P loads from SWM and non-SWM streams. In Red Run, DOC

  16. A hydrologic connectivity index for jurisdictional analysis of headwater streams in a montane watershed.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Brian S

    2015-10-01

    A hydrologic connectivity index (HCI) was developed to aid the US Clean Water Act Section 404 jurisdictional evaluation of headwater streams in montane watersheds, using the Cement Creek Watershed in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado as a case study. Jurisdictional determinations are required for many intermittent and ephemeral streams, where significant nexus with downstream traditional navigable waters (TNWs) must be evaluated. Three biophysical metrics (a streamflow metric, distance from the stream to the TNW, and slope between the stream and the TNW) for 239 streams in the watershed were used to develop three indices. These were then combined to develop the HCI, which is a compound, additive index. There was a large range of HCI values for ephemeral streams, which all require a significant nexus evaluation to determine jurisdiction. Statistical analysis of HCI values across stream duration and order classes showed that mean values differed significantly among classes. The flow index component constituted the greatest proportion of the HCI for perennial streams, was sensitive to the flow metrics used, and was greatest for high flows. Although ephemeral streams are only connected to the TNW less than 3 months of the year, the cumulative average annual flow contribution of ephemeral first-order streams can be 5% of the total to the TNW, and their flow contribution is larger during high flows. Some ephemeral streams with high HCI values are farthest from the TNW but contribute the greatest flow out of all ephemeral reaches, and may have significant nexus with the river. The study shows that the HCI can be useful for initial evaluation of connectivity, significant nexus, and jurisdiction of headwaters at the watershed scale. PMID:26391489

  17. Carbon Dynamics in the Hyporheic Zone of a Headwater Mountain Stream in the Cascade Mountains, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wondzell, S. M.; Corson-rikert, H.; Haggerty, R.; Dosch, N.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated carbon dynamics in the hyporheic zone of a steep, forested, headwater catchment in the Cascade Mountains of western Oregon, USA. Water samples were collected monthly from the stream and a well network between July and December 2013 and again in March 2014. Samples collected from the well network showed that DOC concentrations decreased, and that DIC concentrations increased, with median travel time through the hyporheic zone on all sample dates. Further, the magnitude of the observed increase in DIC was approximately 10-times too large to be explained by metabolism of stream-source DOC. We examined two alternative explanations: 1) that different source waters - either groundwater rich in DIC or lateral inputs of soil water rich in labile DOC that was subsequently metabolized to DIC - mixed with stream water and thereby accounted for the high concentrations of DIC observed in the hyporheic zone, or 2) that changes in the concentrations of DOC and DIC were best explained by in-situ biogeochemical processing of buried particulate organic matter. End-member mixing analyses showed that neither groundwater nor lateral inputs of soil water influenced carbon chemistry within the hyporheic zone. The analyses could not rule out leaching from the overlying unsaturated riparian soils as a potential source of DOC, but the rate of input from this source would have to be much smaller than the rate at which DOC was metabolized in the hyporheic zone because concentrations of DOC in the hyporheic zone were always lower than in the stream. Overall, our results suggest that particulate organic carbon, perhaps augmented with DOC leached from the overlying soils, is the primary source of organic carbon to the hyporheic zone. Further, these measurements suggest that riparian zones supply, via hyporheic exchange, a disproportionately large fraction of carbon to headwater streams and may therefore play an outsized role in the global carbon cycle.

  18. Investigating thickness and physical properties of forest soil along headwater hillslopes by hole drilling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaole; Liu, Jintao

    2015-04-01

    Mountain torrents along headwater hillslopes usually occur during heavy rainfall and bring damage to people's lives and properties. Thus, the mechanism for flood generation process in mountain areas must be well studied. Soil acts as an important factor controlling this process. However, systematic studies the spatial distribution of soil properties, including soil thickness, bulky density, texture and infiltration rate along headwater hillslopes are rarely obtained. Therefore, the objective of this study is to explore the variation trend of these soil properties in a 3-D perspective. To do this, a total of 39 probe measurements were made by using a 70-mm-diameter gasoline vibrating drill in a small catchment (0.42 hectare). Measurements were made by push the gasoline drill into the soil until the bedrock was encounted. Then, the drill was pushed out from the soil and the undisturbed soil was obtained. The main results of the experiment show that: (a) soil thickness decreased significantly from the valley to the ridge (e.g., the maximum soil thickness in the valley and ridge are 164cm and 81 cm, respectively). (b)Vertically, taking borehole #1 as an example (148cm deep), the saturated hydraulic conductivity decreased significantly from 1.5 mm/min (0cm deep) to 0.01 mm/min (140cm deep). Spatially, the saturated hydraulic conductivity at same depth increased with the elevation increasing. (c) Particle size analysis indicated that the soil clay content increased with increasing sampling depth. To conclude, our study reveals the spatial distribution of soil properties which can help us to explore flowpaths and store in three-dimensional at hillslope scale and develop a parsimonious 3-D physics-based model to simulate hillslope hydrological response.

  19. Unraveling soil moisture responses to storms and relationships to runoff in a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture exhibits complex spatiotemporal patterns, both laterally across landscapes and vertically within soil profiles. These patterns of soil moisture can have strong influences on runoff generation, especially in catchments having large capacities for soil water storage and transmission. The body of literature on runoff generation is expansive, yet we still have a great deal to learn about how the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of soil moisture influences catchment-scale hydrologic responses to storm events. With this in mind, we investigated soil moisture responses to storm events across several landscape positions in a steep, forested headwater catchment. We measured volumetric water content (VWC) continuously for two years at 45 points representing different combinations of landscape position and soil depth within a 13 ha catchment at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in the Southern Appalachian Mountains. We also monitored shallow groundwater levels at six locations within the catchment along with runoff at the catchment outlet. To investigate soil moisture response during events, we assessed absolute change in magnitude of VWC (Δs) and lag time (Δt) between peak VWC and peak precipitation for 39 events during the two-year study period. Our results showed that storm depth and antecedent moisture explained some of the spatiotemporal patterns of Δs; however, the explanatory power varied with the hillslope and season. Furthermore, we did not detect topographic control of Δs or Δt at most of the locations monitored. By evaluating the sequence of Δt, groundwater response, and runoff response for each storm, we characterized the hydrologic behavior of the study hillslopes for the 39 storm events.The characterization of hydrologic behavior reveals interrelationships between soil moisture and shallow groundwater, and their combined influence on runoff at the catchment outlet. This work provides new insights on links between the spatiotemporal variability

  20. Headwater sediment dynamics in a debris flow catchment constrained by high-resolution topographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loye, Alexandre; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Theule, Joshua Isaac; Liébault, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Debris flows have been recognized to be linked to the amounts of material temporarily stored in torrent channels. Hence, sediment supply and storage changes from low-order channels of the Manival catchment, a small tributary valley with an active torrent system located exclusively in sedimentary rocks of the Chartreuse Massif (French Alps), were surveyed periodically for 16 months using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to study the coupling between sediment dynamics and torrent responses in terms of debris flow events, which occurred twice during the monitoring period. Sediment transfer in the main torrent was monitored with cross-section surveys. Sediment budgets were generated seasonally using sequential TLS data differencing and morphological extrapolations. Debris production depends strongly on rockfall occurring during the winter-early spring season, following a power law distribution for volumes of rockfall events above 0.1 m3, while hillslope sediment reworking dominates debris recharge in spring and autumn, which shows effective hillslope-channel coupling. The occurrence of both debris flow events that occurred during the monitoring was linked to recharge from previous debris pulses coming from the hillside and from bedload transfer. Headwater debris sources display an ambiguous behaviour in sediment transfer: low geomorphic activity occurred in the production zone, despite rainstorms inducing debris flows in the torrent; still, a general reactivation of sediment transport in headwater channels was observed in autumn without new debris supply, suggesting that the stored debris was not exhausted. The seasonal cycle of sediment yield seems to depend not only on debris supply and runoff (flow capacity) but also on geomorphic conditions that destabilize remnant debris stocks. This study shows that monitoring the changes within a torrent's in-channel storage and its debris supply can improve knowledge on recharge thresholds leading to debris flow.

  1. Glacial geology of the Shingobee River headwaters area, north-central Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melchior, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    During middle and late Wisconsin time in the Shingobee River headwaters area, the Laurentide Wadena lobe, Hewitt and Itasca phases, produced terminal and ground moraine along with a variety of associated glacial features. The stratigraphic record is accessible and provides details of depositional mode as well as principal glacial events during the advance and retreat of middle and late Wisconsin ice tongues. Geomorphic features such as tunnel valleys, stream terraces, and postglacial stream cuts formed by erosional events persist to the present day. Middle Wisconsin Hewitt phase deposits are the oldest and include drumlins, ground moraine, boulder pavements, and outwash. Together, these deposits suggest a wet-based, periodically surging glacier in a subpolar thermal state. Regional permafrost and deposition from retreating ice are inferred between the end of the Hewitt phase and the advance of late Wisconsin Itasca phase ice. Itasca phase glaciation occurred as a contemporaneous pair of adjacent ice tongues whose contrasting moraine styles suggest independent flow modes. The western (Shingobee) portion of the Itasca moraine contains composite ridges, permafrost phenomena, hill-hole pairs, and debris flows. By contrast, eastern (Onigum) moraine deposits generally lack glaciotectonic features and consist almost exclusively of mud and debris flows. Near the end of the Itasca phase, large-scale hill-hole pairs developed in the Shingobee division, and debris flows from the Onigum division blocked the preexisting Shingobee tunnel valley to form glacial lake Willobee. Postglacial streams formed deep valleys as glacial lake Willobee catastrophically drained. Dates based on temperature trends in Greenland ice cores are proposed for prominent glacial events in the Shingobee area. This report proposes that Hewitt phase glaciation occurred between 27.2 and 23.6 kiloannum and Itasca phase glaciation between 22.8 and 14.7 kiloannum. Des Moines lobe (Younger Dryas) glaciation

  2. Hydrologically Driven Dynamics of Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentration and Composition in a Headwater Stream Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, L. A.; McLaughlin, C.; Hogan, K. R.; Newbold, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    A 34-year record of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and compositions was used to assess the role of hydrologic variability in the carbon cycle of a headwater stream. The DOC concentration record is characterized by sharply increasing values during storms and annual minima associated with soil freezing in winter (Fig. 1). Baseflow discharge accounts for approximately 67% of the total runoff in this 3rd-order stream in the Pennsylvania Piedmont but storm flows transport approximately 75% of the DOC flux. The annual DOC flux varies as much as 3-fold and this variability is driven by unusual events such as major storms and prolonged droughts. During storms DOC quality changes as water moves to the stream through organic matter-rich upper soil horizons, by passing terrestrial controls on DOC content. The pool of biodegradable DOC (BDOC) as a percentage of total DOC increases from 33% to 73% with the most labile BDOC class increasing 4-fold while the semi-labile BDOC pool increases 2-fold. Storms also alter the structure and productivity of benthic bacterial communities that metabolize DOC in streams, though the impacts are tempered by stability of streambed substrata. For example, a February storm reduced the biomass and productivity of bacteria attached to sediments by 48% and 90%, respectively, while reducing the biomass of bacteria attached to rocks by 21% but increasing bacterial productivity by 22%. Molecular fingerprints of community compositions revealed a stable "climax community" whose alteration is influenced by the magnitude of the storm flows and eventually returns to its original composition. Actual measurements of carbon cycling based on whole-stream releases and sampling the stream bed microbial community are not feasible during storms, but we argue that for headwater streams it is the post-disturbance condition rather than any processing which occurs during storm flows that shapes the magnitude and dynamics of carbon cycling.

  3. Linking nitrogen management, seep chemistry, and stream water quality in two agricultural headwater watersheds.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark R; Buda, Anthony R; Elliott, Herschel A; Collick, Amy S; Dell, Curtis; Kleinman, Peter J A

    2015-05-01

    Riparian seepage zones in headwater agricultural watersheds represent important sources of nitrate-nitrogen (NO-N) to surface waters, often connecting N-rich groundwater systems to streams. In this study, we examined how NO-N concentrations in seep and stream water were affected by NO-N processing along seep surface flow paths and by upslope applications of N from fertilizers and manures. The research was conducted in two headwater agricultural watersheds, FD36 (40 ha) and RS (45 ha), which are fed, in part, by a shallow fractured aquifer system possessing high (3-16 mg L) NO-N concentrations. Data from in-seep monitoring showed that NO-N concentrations generally decreased downseep (top to bottom), indicating that most seeps retained or removed a fraction of delivered NO-N (16% in FD36 and 1% in RS). Annual mean N applications in upslope fields (as determined by yearly farmer surveys) were highly correlated with seep NO-N concentrations in both watersheds (slope: 0.06; = 0.79; < 0.001). Strong positive relationships also existed between seep and stream NO-N concentrations in FD36 (slope: 1.01; = 0.79; < 0.001) and in RS (slope: 0.64; = 0.80; < 0.001), further indicating that N applications control NO-N concentrations at the watershed scale. Our findings clearly point to NO-N leaching from upslope agricultural fields as the primary driver of NO-N losses from seeps to streams in these watersheds and therefore suggest that appropriate management strategies (cover crops, limiting fall/winter nutrient applications, decision support tools) be targeted in these zones. PMID:26024271

  4. Predicting spatial distribution of postfire debris flows and potential consequences for native trout in headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedell, Edwin R; Gresswell, Bob; McMahon, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and degradation and invasion of nonnative species have restricted the distribution of native trout. Many trout populations are limited to headwater streams where negative effects of predicted climate change, including reduced stream flow and increased risk of catastrophic fires, may further jeopardize their persistence. Headwater streams in steep terrain are especially susceptible to disturbance associated with postfire debris flows, which have led to local extirpation of trout populations in some systems. We conducted a reach-scale spatial analysis of debris-flow risk among 11 high-elevation watersheds of the Colorado Rocky Mountains occupied by isolated populations of Colorado River Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii pleuriticus). Stream reaches at high risk of disturbance by postfire debris flow were identified with the aid of a qualitative model based on 4 primary initiating and transport factors (hillslope gradient, flow accumulation pathways, channel gradient, and valley confinement). This model was coupled with a spatially continuous survey of trout distributions in these stream networks to assess the predicted extent of trout population disturbances related to debris flows. In the study systems, debris-flow potential was highest in the lower and middle reaches of most watersheds. Colorado River Cutthroat Trout occurred in areas of high postfire debris-flow risk, but they were never restricted to those areas. Postfire debris flows could extirpate trout from local reaches in these watersheds, but trout populations occupy refugia that should allow recolonization of interconnected, downstream reaches. Specific results of our study may not be universally applicable, but our risk assessment approach can be applied to assess postfire debris-flow risk for stream reaches in other watersheds.

  5. Long-Term Trends in DOC Concentrations and Fluxes in a Southern Appalachian Headwater Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Reyes, W. M.; Bhattacharya, R.; Meyer, J. L.; Knoepp, J. D.; Emanuel, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Dramatic increases in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of stream water have been reported for aquatic ecosystems of the Northern Hemisphere and have been attributed variously to global warming, recovery from acid rain, or to altered hydrologic connections between watersheds and receiving streams. Here, we analyzed one of the longest continuous records of stream water DOC available in the Southeastern US. The record comes from a forested headwater stream at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in the Southern Appalachians (NC, USA). In contrast to the increasing DOC trends reported for northern temperate watersheds, we observed steep declines in both the volume-weighted concentrations of stream DOC (43% decline) and DOC fluxes (55% decline) between 1988 and 2005. Annual mean runoff declined by 38%, which we attributed mainly to a 47% decline in baseflow during the study period. Increased soil [SO42-] and ionic strength of soil water indicate that soils within the watershed are becoming more acidic through time. Together, these results suggest that the dramatic decline in DOC concentrations can be attributed to: 1) a decline in runoff, which affected the mobilization of DOC from uplands to the stream, and 2) gradual soil acidification, which probably restricted the formation of DOC within the watershed. Declining DOC in headwater streams has implications not only for carbon and other nutrient cycles but also for the health of aquatic habitats throughout this region. More broadly, these results emphasize that long-term trends in DOC may differ for streams across the Northern Hemisphere. Long-term datasets have the potential to reveal the range of these trends and the underlying processes that drive them.

  6. Microbial responses to changes in flow status in temporary headwater streams: a cross-system comparison.

    PubMed

    Febria, Catherine M; Hosen, Jacob D; Crump, Byron C; Palmer, Margaret A; Williams, D Dudley

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are responsible for the bulk of biogeochemical processing in temporary headwater streams, yet there is still relatively little known about how community structure and function respond to periodic drying. Moreover, the ability to sample temporary habitats can be a logistical challenge due to the limited capability to measure and predict the timing, intensity and frequency of wet-dry events. Unsurprisingly, published datasets on microbial community structure and function are limited in scope and temporal resolution and vary widely in the molecular methods applied. We compared environmental and microbial community datasets for permanent and temporary tributaries of two different North American headwater stream systems: Speed River (Ontario, Canada) and Parkers Creek (Maryland, USA). We explored whether taxonomic diversity and community composition were altered as a result of flow permanence and compared community composition amongst streams using different 16S microbial community methods (i.e., T-RFLP and Illumina MiSeq). Contrary to our hypotheses, and irrespective of method, community composition did not respond strongly to drying. In both systems, community composition was related to site rather than drying condition. Additional network analysis on the Parkers Creek dataset indicated a shift in the central microbial relationships between temporary and permanent streams. In the permanent stream at Parkers Creek, associations of methanotrophic taxa were most dominant, whereas associations with taxa from the order Nitrospirales were more dominant in the temporary stream, particularly during dry conditions. We compared these results with existing published studies from around the world and found a wide range in community responses to drying. We conclude by proposing three hypotheses that may address contradictory results and, when tested across systems, may expand understanding of the responses of microbial communities in temporary streams to

  7. Microbial responses to changes in flow status in temporary headwater streams: a cross-system comparison

    PubMed Central

    Febria, Catherine M.; Hosen, Jacob D.; Crump, Byron C.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Williams, D. Dudley

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are responsible for the bulk of biogeochemical processing in temporary headwater streams, yet there is still relatively little known about how community structure and function respond to periodic drying. Moreover, the ability to sample temporary habitats can be a logistical challenge due to the limited capability to measure and predict the timing, intensity and frequency of wet-dry events. Unsurprisingly, published datasets on microbial community structure and function are limited in scope and temporal resolution and vary widely in the molecular methods applied. We compared environmental and microbial community datasets for permanent and temporary tributaries of two different North American headwater stream systems: Speed River (Ontario, Canada) and Parkers Creek (Maryland, USA). We explored whether taxonomic diversity and community composition were altered as a result of flow permanence and compared community composition amongst streams using different 16S microbial community methods (i.e., T-RFLP and Illumina MiSeq). Contrary to our hypotheses, and irrespective of method, community composition did not respond strongly to drying. In both systems, community composition was related to site rather than drying condition. Additional network analysis on the Parkers Creek dataset indicated a shift in the central microbial relationships between temporary and permanent streams. In the permanent stream at Parkers Creek, associations of methanotrophic taxa were most dominant, whereas associations with taxa from the order Nitrospirales were more dominant in the temporary stream, particularly during dry conditions. We compared these results with existing published studies from around the world and found a wide range in community responses to drying. We conclude by proposing three hypotheses that may address contradictory results and, when tested across systems, may expand understanding of the responses of microbial communities in temporary streams to

  8. A hydrologic connectivity index for jurisdictional analysis of headwater streams in a montane watershed.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Brian S

    2015-10-01

    A hydrologic connectivity index (HCI) was developed to aid the US Clean Water Act Section 404 jurisdictional evaluation of headwater streams in montane watersheds, using the Cement Creek Watershed in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado as a case study. Jurisdictional determinations are required for many intermittent and ephemeral streams, where significant nexus with downstream traditional navigable waters (TNWs) must be evaluated. Three biophysical metrics (a streamflow metric, distance from the stream to the TNW, and slope between the stream and the TNW) for 239 streams in the watershed were used to develop three indices. These were then combined to develop the HCI, which is a compound, additive index. There was a large range of HCI values for ephemeral streams, which all require a significant nexus evaluation to determine jurisdiction. Statistical analysis of HCI values across stream duration and order classes showed that mean values differed significantly among classes. The flow index component constituted the greatest proportion of the HCI for perennial streams, was sensitive to the flow metrics used, and was greatest for high flows. Although ephemeral streams are only connected to the TNW less than 3 months of the year, the cumulative average annual flow contribution of ephemeral first-order streams can be 5% of the total to the TNW, and their flow contribution is larger during high flows. Some ephemeral streams with high HCI values are farthest from the TNW but contribute the greatest flow out of all ephemeral reaches, and may have significant nexus with the river. The study shows that the HCI can be useful for initial evaluation of connectivity, significant nexus, and jurisdiction of headwaters at the watershed scale.

  9. Nutrients, Select Pesticides, and Suspended Sediment in the Karst Terrane of the Sinking Creek Basin, Kentucky, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crain, Angela S.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, on nutrients, select pesticides, and suspended sediment in the karst terrane of the Sinking Creek Basin. Streamflow, nutrient, select pesticide, and suspended-sediment data were collected at seven sampling stations from 2004 through 2006. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate ranged from 0.21 to 4.9 milligrams per liter (mg/L) at the seven stations. The median concentration of nitrite plus nitrate for all stations sampled was 1.6 mg/L. Total phosphorus concentrations were greater than 0.1 mg/L, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recommended maximum concentration, in 45 percent of the samples. Concentrations of orthophosphates ranged from less than 0.006 to 0.46 mg/L. Concentrations of nutrients generally were larger during spring and summer months, corresponding to periods of increased fertilizer application on agricultural lands. Concentrations of suspended sediment ranged from 1.0 to 1,490 mg/L at the seven stations. Of the 47 pesticides analyzed, 14 were detected above the adjusted method reporting level of 0.01 micrograms per liter (mug/L). Although these pesticides were detected in water-quality samples, they generally were found at less than part-per-billion concentrations. Atrazine was the only pesticide detected at concentrations greater than U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 3 mug/L, and the maximum detected concentration was 24.6 mug/L. Loads and yields of nutrients, selected pesticides, and suspended sediment were estimated at two mainstream stations on Sinking Creek, a headwater station (Sinking Creek at Rosetta) and a station at the basin outlet (Sinking Creek near Lodiburg). Mean daily streamflow data were available for the estimation of loads and yields from a stream gage at the basin outlet station; however, only periodic instantaneous flow measurements were available for the

  10. Development and Application of a Simple Hydrogeomorphic Model for Headwater Catchments

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a catchment model based on a hydrogeomorphic concept that simulates discharge from channel-riparian complexes, zero-order basins (ZOB, basins ZB and FA), and hillslopes. Multitank models simulate ZOB and hillslope hydrological response, while kinematic wave models pr...

  11. Evaluating the operational changes in the Alabama and Chattahoochee basins

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.K.; Mittelstadt, R.I.

    1995-12-31

    During the 1950`s and 1970`s, the Corps of Engineers constructed three major storage projects on the headwaters of the Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa Rivers, referred to as the Alabama Basin and Apalachicola-Chattahoochee Rivers, referred to as the Chattahoochee Basins in northern Georgia. Carters and Allatoona are located in the Alabama Basin while Buford is located in the Chattahoochee Basin. The three projects have 1.8 billion cubic meters (1.5 million acre-feet) of conservation storage, and can be regulated for navigation, hydropower, recreation, water supply, water quality, and for fish and wildlife purposes. Above the conservation pools is additional space reserved for flood control. For many years, the conservation storage at the three projects has been regulated primarily for hydropower and navigation, although maintaining the reservoirs at near full pool during the recreation season has taken on increased importance. More recently, rapid growth and development in Atlanta and the surrounding area have led to proposals for reallocating much of this storage to water supply. These reallocations could have an impact on downstream river uses, including power production at twenty-seven Federal and non-Federal hydroelectric projects. The Mobile District, Corps of Engineers, is conducting a comprehensive study of the Alabama and Chattahoochee Basins in order to evaluate impacts of the proposed changes as well as other possible future changes in reservoir system operation. This study is being conducted in partnership with the States of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. A major objective of the study will be the development of a long range water budget and water management strategy. This strategy will enable the three states to effectively coordinate the management of the basins` water resources in concert with appropriate Federal agencies.

  12. Simulating surface and subsurface water flow for a headwater catchment in the Eifel National Park, Germany.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciuto, G.; Diekkrüger, B.

    2009-04-01

    The system of equations governing water flow and solute transport is highly non-linear. Moreover at the soil surface, boundary condition changes rapidly and irregularly. Therefore, the equations describing hydrological processes are usually solved by numerical methods. This work is part of the Transregio-SFB 32 (TR32) research project with the title "Pattern in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation". The TR32 works on exchange processes among soil, vegetation and the adjacent atmospheric boundary layer.A fully-integrated surface-subsurface flow model is applied to the Wüstebach basin which is a tributary to the Erkensruhr river, Germany, with a catchment size of about 27 ha. This catchment is part of the new Eifel National Park. The catchment is well characterized and monitored. The simulation of surface/subsurface flow and the interaction between these domains are studied here with the three-dimensional finite-element code HydroGeoSphere (Therrien et al., 2007). With increasing computer power, process-based models that use grids to discretize space have become popular. For such models, the simulation results depend on both grid cell size and on the time step length used in the model. The choice of the space and time resolution results from a subjective balance between acceptable accuracy and such as calculation time and use of hard-disk space. In this study the effect of grid cell size and time step length on model results is studied. The results show that before model calibration a choice for a certain grid cell size and a certain time step length has to be made. References: Therrien, R.; McLaren, R.G.; Sudicky, E.A.; Panday, S.M. (2007). HydroGeoSphere; A three-dimensional numerical model describing fully-integrated subsurface and surface flow and solute transport: User manual, 362 pp.

  13. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark; Perkins, Raymond R.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

  14. Effects of Reservoirs on Nutrient Concentrations and Ratios along the Longitudinal Gradient of Danube River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo Borda, J. S.; Gettel, G. M.; Irvine, K.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoirs reduce water flow and increase the retention time which can provide conditions to increase primary production, sedimentation and nutrient retention. As a consequence, nutrient ratios and fluxes of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and silica (Si) may be altered which in turn affects the identity of limiting nutrients and the dynamics of primary production in downstream ecosystems. Residence time as well as the position of reservoirs along the longitudinal gradient (headwaters vs. mouth) may affect these processes. The Danube River Basin is one example where reservoirs have likely altered nutrient stoichiometry along the longitudinal gradient. It has a dam every 17 Km in the upper 1000 km of the river along with a very large dam complex (Iron Gates Dam) 117- Km from the mouth. There has been there has been an observed decline in Si flux, which may have led to changes in phytoplankton community structure in the Black Sea, but for which the causes for this decline are not yet clear. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of reservoirs from headwaters to the mouth on nutrient stoichiometry in the Danube Basin. Data on dissolved Si, N, and P concentrations from 1996 to 2012 were analyzed from 40 monitoring stations from the TransNational Monitoring Network (TNMN), which are located in the main stem of the Danube. Time series analysis is used to compare nutrient concentrations and ratios both through seasons and through the 15 year time-period. The monitoring stations are located above and below reservoirs in order to analyze the effect of reservoirs on nutrient ratios and fluxes. Preliminary results show that relationship of dissolved inorganic N (DIN): soluble reactive P (SRP) range from 207 to 76, while DIN:Si ratio ranges from 1.89 to 0.2 from the headwaters to the mouth.

  15. Modelling soil erosion and associated sediment yield for small headwater catchments of the Daugava spillway valley, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soms, Juris

    2015-04-01

    The accelerated soil erosion by water and associated fine sediment transfer in river catchments has various negative environmental as well as economic implications in many EU countries. Hence, the scientific community had recognized and ranked soil erosion among other environmental problems. Moreover, these matters might worsen in the near future in the countries of the Baltic Region, e.g. Latvia considering the predicted climate changes - more precisely, the increase in precipitation and shortening of return periods of extreme rainfall events, which in their turn will enable formation of surface runoff, erosion and increase of sediment delivery to receiving streams. Thereby it is essential to carry out studies focused on these issues in order to obtain reliable data in terms of both scientific and applied aims, e.g. environmental protection and sustainable management of soils as well as water resources. During the past decades, many of such studies of soil erosion had focused on the application of modelling techniques implemented in a GIS environment, allowing indirectly to estimate the potential soil losses and to quantify related sediment yield. According to research results published in the scientific literature, this approach currently is widely used all over the world, and most of these studies are based on the USLE model and its revised and modified versions. Considering that, the aim of this research was to estimate soil erosion rates and sediment transport under different hydro-climatic conditions in south-eastern Latvia by application of GIS-based modelling. For research purposes, empirical RUSLE model and ArcGIS software were applied, and five headwater catchments were chosen as model territories. The selected catchments with different land use are located in the Daugava spillway valley, which belongs to the upper Daugava River drainage basin. Considering lithological diversity of Quaternary deposits, a variety of soils can be identified, i.e., Stagnic

  16. Constraints upon the response of fish and crayfish to environmental flow releases in a regulated headwater stream network.

    PubMed

    Chester, Edwin T; Matthews, Ty G; Howson, Travis J; Johnston, Kerrylyn; Mackie, Jonathon K; Strachan, Scott R; Robson, Belinda J

    2014-01-01

    In dry climate zones, headwater streams are often regulated for water extraction causing intermittency in perennial streams and prolonged drying in intermittent streams. Regulation thereby reduces aquatic habitat downstream of weirs that also form barriers to migration by stream fauna. Environmental flow releases may restore streamflow in rivers, but are rarely applied to headwaters. We sampled fish and crayfish in four regulated headwater streams before and after the release of summer-autumn environmental flows, and in four nearby unregulated streams, to determine whether their abundances increased in response to flow releases. Historical data of fish and crayfish occurrence spanning a 30 year period was compared with contemporary data (electrofishing surveys, Victoria Range, Australia; summer 2008 to summer 2010) to assess the longer-term effects of regulation and drought. Although fish were recorded in regulated streams before 1996, they were not recorded in the present study upstream or downstream of weirs despite recent flow releases. Crayfish (Geocharax sp. nov. 1) remained in the regulated streams throughout the study, but did not become more abundant in response to flow releases. In contrast, native fish (Gadopsis marmoratus, Galaxias oliros, Galaxias maculatus) and crayfish remained present in unregulated streams, despite prolonged drought conditions during 2006-2010, and the assemblages of each of these streams remained essentially unchanged over the 30 year period. Flow release volumes may have been too small or have operated for an insufficient time to allow fish to recolonise regulated streams. Barriers to dispersal may also be preventing recolonisation. Indefinite continuation of annual flow releases, that prevent the unnatural cessation of flow caused by weirs, may eventually facilitate upstream movement of fish and crayfish in regulated channels; but other human-made dispersal barriers downstream need to be identified and ameliorated, to allow

  17. A neglected riverine carbon transfer: The importance of coarse particulate organic matter for carbon export from a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turowski, Jens; Hilton, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Erosion in mountain uplands can mobilize particulate organic matter (POM) from vegetation and soil and input carbon to headwater streams and rivers. The resulting lateral flux of atmospheric CO2 is thought to be of global importance. While sampling of mountain rivers has provided improved constraint on the transport of POM in fine grained suspended load (typically <500 μm) and the dissolved load, we lack information on the erosion and riverine transport of coarse POM (CPOM), particles with a diameter larger than 1 mm up to meter-sized logs and whole trees, which escape most sampling protocols. Carbon budgets of headwater streams are thus incomplete and we cannot fully assess how the fate of CPOM impacts net carbon transfers from the atmosphere. . Here we have calculated a decadal organic carbon budget for the Erlenbach, a pre-Alpine headwater stream, using a novel sampling protocol that recovers transported CPOM. We find that the rate of CPOM transport increases in a strongly non-linear manner with water discharge, meaning that flood events dominate the CPOM transport. Rating curves for CPOM, suspended load POM and dissolved organic carbon show that in the Erlenbach, CPOM carbon may contribute up to 90% of the total organic carbon export from the headwater catchment We also find that much of the CPOM load is water-logged and therefore supplied to larger fluvial networks as bedload. Subsequent grinding by clastic material may result in important contributions of CPOM to the finer grained sediment export in these systems, an important in-stream source of POM that has so far been overlooked.

  18. Mean transit times in contrasting headwater catchments from southeast Australia determined using Tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe; Irvine, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    Headwater streams contribute a significant proportion of the total discharge of many river systems. However, despite their importance, the time taken for rainfall to pass through the catchment into the streams (the transit time) in headwater catchments is largely unknown as are the catchment characteristics (such as drainage density, topography, landuse, or geology) that determine variations in transit times. Because the peak in Tritium activities in rainfall produced by atmospheric nuclear tests in the1950's and 1960's (the "bomb-pulse") was several orders of magnitude lower in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere, Tritium activities of remnant bomb pulse water in the southern hemisphere have decayed below those of modern rainfall. This allows mean transit times to be estimated from single Tritium measurements. Here we use Tritium to estimate transit times of water contributing to perennial streams in the adjacent upper catchments of the Yarra and Latrobe Rivers (southeast Australia). Samples were collected at varying flow from six headwater tributary sites in the Latrobe catchment, which is largely forested and four tributaries in the Yarra catchment which has been extensively cleared for dryland agriculture. The lowest Tritium activities were recorded during summer baseflow conditions and are between 1.25 and 1.75 TU, these are significantly below the Tritium activity of local rainfall (~2.8 TU). Mean transit times calculated using an exponential-piston flow lumped parameter model are 21 to 47 years. Tritium activities during the recession periods following winter high flows are higher (1.54 to 2.1 TU), which may reflect either the dilution of a baseflow component with recent surface runoff or mobilisation of different stores of water with different residence times (e.g., from the soils or the regolith) from within the catchment. The variation of major ion concentrations with discharge suggests it is more likely that that different stores of

  19. Understanding drivers of the export of dissolved organic carbon from headwater catchments in Germany using Generalised Additive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, Benny; Tittel, Jörg; Musolff, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    In the literature, several causes of recently increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in headwaters across eastern North America and northern and central Europe have been debated. One likely driver of the widespread increase of DOC concentrations since the early to mid 1990s are decreasing depositions of acid rain resulting in an increased solubility of organic carbon compounds including humic acids. Here, we tested the hypothesis if the reduced availability of both nitrate and sulfate stimulated the reduction of ferric iron soil minerals and the mobilisation of DOC. Decreasing depositions often resulted in a reduced availability of both nitrate and sulphate, which are preferred electron acceptors in microbial decomposition processes. As iron minerals act as efficient sorbents of organic compounds in soils its reduction may have caused a release of humic substances and hence an increasing export of DOC from headwater catchments. To test this hypothesis, time series of DOC, dissolved iron, sulfate and nitrate from several German headwater catchments were examined using Generalised Additive Models. Using this modelling technique, discharge corrected time series of concentrations were represented as a sum of a seasonal and a non-linear trend component. Both, the computed trends and seasonalities supported the redox hypothesis.

  20. Tracing bed load sediment using PIT tags in a steep headwater channel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Y.; Hiraoka, M.; Gomi, T.; Nidaira, K.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Bed load transport in steep headwater channels is complex because of the particle size distribution, topography, channel roughness, and sediment supply from adjacent hillslope. We monitored movement bed load sediment using PIT tags in a steep headwater channel segments. Study area is located in 7.0ha Oobora-sawa observatory from 50km west of Tokyo metropolitan. Annual precipitation is 3000mm and mean temperature is 10°. Annual bed load sediment yields in the study catchment was from 6.5 to 7.6 t/ha/yr. Mean channel gradient is 24° with 0.5m low flow width. The channel is consisted by 0.2 to 1.6m interval of step-pool sequences. Based on pebble count method, D10, D50 and D90 of channel substrate were 8, 28 and 206mm respectively. We deployed 134 bed load tracers with five classes of diameter ranges (Class1:17.7, Class2:24.8, Class3:35.8, Class4:54.1 and Class5:83.8mm). Selected tracers represented from D20 to D77 of channel bed substrates. PIT tags (diameter 2mm, length 9mm and weight 0.1g) were placed into the particles by drilling and refilled with non-corrosive epoxy. We investigated the movement of bed load tracers every major storm event since February 2015. Channel morphology was measured using photographic survey and topographic model was developed using software of Surface from motion (PhotoScan). Mean bed load movement in the 5 storm event with 438 mm total and 33 mm maximum intensity was 168 mm. Then 51 mm of bed load movement occurred in 43 mm total and 16 mm intensity of rainfall. Recurrence interval of the two storm event was 1 and 4 year respectively. Receivable rates of bed load tracers was 70 and 74 % in the two events. Mobilized bed load (7 to 18%) deposited at cascade, pool and riffle, and among step clusters. Mobilized bed load tracers is rather random and we do not find any patterns for particle size for the movement and distance. Our field monitoring showed that bed load tracers were not mobilized for storm events with 10.5mm/h intensity of

  1. Riparian and in-stream controls on nutrient concentrations along a headwater forested stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Lupon, A.; Ribot, M.; Sabater, F.; Martí, E.

    2014-07-01

    Headwater streams have a strong capacity to transform and retain nutrients, and thus, a longitudinal decrease in stream nutrient concentrations would be expected from in-stream nutrient removal alone. Yet, a number of other factors within the catchment, including biogeochemical processing within the riparian zone and export to streams, can contribute to stream nutrient concentration, which may overcome the effect of in-stream biogeochemical processing. To explore this idea, we analyzed the longitudinal patterns of stream and riparian groundwater concentrations for chloride (Cl-), nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), and phosphate (PO43-) along a 3.7 km reach at an annual scale. The reach showed a gradual increase in stream and riparian width, riparian tree basal area, and abundance of riparian N2-fixing tree species. Concentrations of Cl- indicated a~strong hydrological connection at the riparian-stream edge. However, stream and riparian groundwater nutrient concentrations showed a moderate to null correlation, suggesting high biogeochemical processing at the riparian-stream edge and within the stream. A mass balance approach along the reach indicated that, on average, in-stream net nutrient uptake prevailed over release for NH4+ and PO43-, but not for NO3-. On an annual basis, in-stream processes contributed to change stream input fluxes by 11%, 26%, and 29% for NO3-, NH4+, and PO43-, respectively. Yet, longitudinal trends in concentration were not consistent with the prevailing in-stream biogeochem ical processes. During the riparian dormant period, stream concentration decreased along the reach for NO3-, but increased for NH4+ and PO43-. During the riparian vegetative period, NO3- and PO43- increased along the reach while NH4+ showed no clear pattern. These longitudinal trends were partially related to riparian forest features and groundwater inputs, especially for NO3- and PO43-. Our study suggests that even though in-stream biogeochemical

  2. Landscape heterogeneity drives contrasting concentration-discharge relationships in shale headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, E. M.; Dere, A. L.; Sullivan, P. L.; Norris, D.; Reynolds, B.; Brantley, S. L.

    2015-08-01

    Solute concentrations in stream water vary with discharge in patterns that record complex feedbacks between hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. In a comparison of three shale-underlain headwater catchments located in Pennsylvania, USA (the forested Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory), and Wales, UK (the peatland-dominated Upper Hafren and forest-dominated Upper Hore catchments in the Plynlimon forest), dissimilar concentration-discharge (C-Q) behaviors are best explained by contrasting landscape distributions of soil solution chemistry - especially dissolved organic carbon (DOC) - that have been established by patterns of vegetation and soil organic matter (SOM). Specifically, elements that are concentrated in organic-rich soils due to biotic cycling (Mn, Ca, K) or that form strong complexes with DOC (Fe, Al) are spatially heterogeneous in pore waters because organic matter is heterogeneously distributed across the catchments. These solutes exhibit non-chemostatic behavior in the streams, and solute concentrations either decrease (Shale Hills) or increase (Plynlimon) with increasing discharge. In contrast, solutes that are concentrated in soil minerals and form only weak complexes with DOC (Na, Mg, Si) are spatially homogeneous in pore waters across each catchment. These solutes are chemostatic in that their stream concentrations vary little with stream discharge, likely because these solutes are released quickly from exchange sites in the soils during rainfall events. Furthermore, concentration-discharge relationships of non-chemostatic solutes changed following tree harvest in the Upper Hore catchment in Plynlimon, while no changes were observed for chemostatic solutes, underscoring the role of vegetation in regulating the concentrations of certain elements in the stream. These results indicate that differences in the hydrologic connectivity of organic-rich soils to the stream drive differences in concentration behavior between catchments. As such, in

  3. Carbon dioxide transport across the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum in a boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, F. I.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Wallin, M. B.; Billett, M. F.; Heal, K. V.; Laudon, H.; Öquist, M. G.; Bishop, K.

    2015-03-01

    Headwater streams export CO2 as lateral downstream export and vertical evasion from the stream surface. CO2 in boreal headwater streams generally originates from adjacent terrestrial areas, so determining the sources and rate of CO2 transport along the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum could improve estimates of CO2 export via the aquatic pathway, especially by quantifying evasion at higher temporal resolutions. Continuous measurements of dissolved CO2 concentrations and water table were made along the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum in the Västrabäcken sub-catchment of the Krycklan catchment, Sweden. Daily water and CO2 export from the hillslope and riparian zone were estimated over one hydrological year (October 2012-September 2013) using a flow-concentration model and compared with measured lateral downstream CO2 export. Total water export over the hydrological year from the hillslope was 230 mm yr-1 compared with 270 mm yr-1 from the riparian zone. This corresponds well (proportional to the relative upslope contributing area) to the annual catchment runoff of 265 mm yr-1. Total CO2 export from the riparian zone to the stream was 3.0 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1. A hotspot for riparian CO2 export was observed at 30-50 cm depth (accounting for 71 % of total riparian export). Seasonal variability was high with export peaks during the spring flood and autumn storm events. Downstream lateral CO2 export (determined from stream water dissolved CO2 concentrations and discharge) was 1.2 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1. Subtracting downstream lateral export from riparian export (3.0 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) gives 1.8 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 which can be attributed to evasion losses (accounting for 60 % of export via the aquatic pathway). The results highlight the importance of terrestrial CO2 export, especially from the riparian zone, for determining catchment aquatic CO2 losses and the importance of the CO2 evasion component to carbon export via the aquatic conduit.

  4. Carbon dioxide transport across the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum in a boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, F. I.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Wallin, M. B.; Billett, M. F.; Heal, K. V.; Laudon, H.; Öquist, M. G.; Bishop, K.

    2014-11-01

    Headwater streams export CO2 as lateral downstream export and vertical evasion from the stream surface. CO2 in boreal headwater streams generally originates from adjacent terrestrial areas, so determining the sources and rate of CO2 transport along the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum could improve estimates of CO2 export via the aquatic pathway, especially by quantifying evasion at higher temporal resolutions. Continuous measurements of dissolved CO2 concentrations and water table were made along the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum in the Västrabäcken sub-catchment of the Krycklan Catchment, Sweden. Daily water and CO2 export from the hillslope and riparian zone were estimated over one hydrological year (October 2012-September 2013) using a flow-concentration model and compared with measured lateral downstream CO2 export. Total water export over the hydrological year from the hillslope was 230 mm yr-1 compared with 270 mm yr-1 from the riparian zone. This corresponds well (proportional to the relative upslope contributing area) to the annual catchment runoff of 265 mm yr-1. Total CO2 export from the riparian zone to the stream was 3.0 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1. A hotspot for riparian CO2 export was observed at 30-50 cm depth (accounting for 71% of total riparian export). Seasonal variability was high with export peaks during the spring flood and autumn storm events. Downtream lateral CO2 export (determined from stream water dissolved CO2 concentrations and discharge) was 1.2 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1. Subtracting downstream lateral export from riparian export (3.0 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1) gives 1.8 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 which can be attributed to evasion losses (accounting for 60% of export via the aquatic pathway). The results highlight the importance of terrestrial CO2 export, especially from the riparian zone, for determining catchment aquatic CO2 losses and the importance of the CO2 evasion component to carbon export via the aquatic conduit.

  5. Active Stream Length Dynamics in Headwater Catchments Spanning Physiographic Provinces in the Appalachian Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C.; McGuire, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the most basic descriptions of streams is the presence of channelized flow. However, this seemingly simple query goes unanswered for the majority of headwater networks, as stream length expands and contracts with the wetness of catchments seasonally, interannually, and in response to storm events. Although streams are known to grow and shrink, a lack of information on longitudinal dynamics across different geographic regions precludes effective management. Understanding the temporal variation in temporary network length over a broad range of settings is critical for policy decisions that impact aquatic ecosystem health. This project characterizes changes in active stream length for forested headwater catchments spanning four physiographic provinces of the Appalachian Highlands: the New England at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire; Valley and Ridge at Poverty Creek and the North Fork of Big Stony Creek in Jefferson National Forest, Virginia; Blue Ridge at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, North Carolina; and Appalachian Plateau at Fernow Experimental Forest, West Virginia. Multivariate statistical analysis confirms these provinces exhibit characteristic topographies reflecting differences in climate, geology, and environmental history and, thus, merit separate consideration. The active streams of three watersheds (<45 ha) in each study area were mapped six times to capture a variety of moderate flow conditions that can be expected most of the time (i.e., exceedance probabilities between 25 to 75%). The geomorphic channel and channel heads were additionally mapped to determine how active stream length variability relates to the development of the geomorphic network. We found that drainage density can vary up to four-fold with discharge. Stream contraction primarily proceeds by increasing disconnection and disintegration into pools, while the number of flow origins remains constant except at high and low extremes of discharge. This work demonstrates

  6. Factors regulating the use of dissolved organic matter by heterotrophic biofilm communities in boreal headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, D.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    Biofilm communities in headwater streams are the primary drivers of carbon and nutrient cycling, and are critical to our understanding of ecosystem processes and environmental change in boreal watersheds. In situ experiments were conducted using stream water and colonized tiles to assess how biofilm heterotrophic activity, e.g. use of dissolved organic matter (DOM), may be regulated by carbon and nutrient availability at sites within headwater streams of forest, wetland, and nutrient-impacted catchments. Community level respiration and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) uptake were measured and indicate highest microbial activity within wetland-dominated and pond-influenced sites congruent with both the elevated DOC concentrations and greater proportion of carbohydrate carbon in DOM sources in these watersheds. Further, trends of decreasing respiration rates downstream in the forest and wetland catchments followed decreases in DOM carbohydrate and aromatic relative to aliphatic content. These findings suggest that wetland and pond derived sources may increase the bioavailability of DOM relative to DOM derived from landscapes with lower contributions of these sources. To investigate this further, we conducted an additional set of short-term in situ experiments using additions of pond and bog derived DOM concentrates added as substrates to biofilms collected from sites that have exhibited significantly different levels of biofilm activity. Heterotrophic biofilm activity response to these changes in DOM source and composition did not vary significantly relative to the incubations without DOM additions, whether added within or outside the source area. This suggests that DOM lability and the microbial community developed to use this DOM are likely responsible for greater respiration rates and DOC uptake at pond and wetland-influenced locations. Furthermore, nutrient addition treatments in these experiments indicate heterotrophic activity within these catchments was co

  7. Rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Yamamiya, K.; Shimada, J.

    2008-12-01

    Many researchers have studied about the hydrological process, especially rainfall-runoff process, in the headwater region using multi hydrometric methods. Since the possibility has been recognized that bedrock groundwater has important role to play in the rainfall-runoff process, it is important to comprehend the rainfall infiltration process within fluctuations of bedrock groundwater. However, we would need many hydrological instruments to understand this process precisely. So we have applied electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method to understand rainfall infiltration process in the area that is estimated the contribution of bedrock groundwater for rainfall-runoff processes. Resistivity changes with the saturation rate of the pore fluid in the subsurface material. So it is possible to estimate spatial and temporal distribution of subsurface water by using ERT. In this study, we will estimate rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using resistivity method. The study area is the Mamushi-dani watershed in Shiranui, Kumamoto, Japan. We described the bedrock groundwater storage systems using resistivity method in this watershed previously. Resistivity has been observed at 2 measurement lines in slope areas of this watershed. Both measurement lines have 47m in length, 1m electrode spacing and 48 electrodes. We used the multi-electrode system, NEXT-400(Kowa Co. Ltd., Japan) for measuring apparent resistivity and the application software, E-tomo (Diaconsultant Co. Ltd., Japan) for inversion of apparent resistivity data. The observed resistivity data were compared with water head observed at borehole and specific discharge observed at foot of the watershed. Inverted resistivity profiles and observed hydrological data showed the interface between saturated and unsaturated zone. During rainfall occurs, resistivity in surface area gets lower than that before the rainfall and resistivity in some part of unsaturated area shows increasing tendency. Both

  8. Prediction of glacier melt and runoff for a high-altitude headwater catchment in Bolivian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Kinouchi, T.; Mendoza, J.; Asaoka, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In Andes, retreat of tropical glaciers is rapid, thus water resources currently available from glacierized catchments would be changed in its volume and temporal variations due to climate change and glacier shrinkage. Water resources in La Paz and El Alto, Bolivia, strongly depend on the runoff from glacierized headwater catchments in the Cordillera Real, Andes, which is a combined contribution from glacier and snow melts in glacierized areas and surface and subsurface runoff due to snowmelt and rainfall in non-glacierized areas. To predict long-term availability of water resources from glacierized catchments in the Cordillera Real, we developed a semi-distributed conceptual glacio-hydrological model applicable for the partially glacierized catchments in high mountains by considering different phases of precipitation, various runoff components from glacierized and non-glacierized areas, the retarding effect by lakes and wetlands, and the change of glacierized areas based on the area-volume relationship. The model was successfully applied to the Huayna West headwater catchment located in the Cordillera Real, Bolivian Andes, for the period of June 2011 to May 2013, after calibrating by observed meteorological and hydrological conditions. Our results indicate that the glacier melt is enhanced during two transition periods, i.e. from the dry to wet season (October to early December) and the wet to dry season (March to May), while the surface runoff from snowmelt and subsurface runoff are more dominant between the two periods from December to February. It was found that the simulated runoff was highly sensible to spatial and temporal variation of air temperature, and smoothed by the subsurface flow and retarding processes in lakes and wetlands. We predicted the change of glacierized area and runoff until 2050 under different climate scenarios, which indicates that the glacier continues to shrink by 2050 resulting in the areal reduction ranging from 65% to 73% and

  9. Effects of themokarst on sediment deposition rates in two arctic headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampman, J.; Flinn, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has revealed increased permafrost degradation and incidences of thermokarst features as products of a changing arctic climate. These features have important implications for aquatic ecosystems across the landscape, as increased frequencies of such features are expected to increase sediment load into affected streams. We examined two headwater streams impacted by thermokarst failures near Toolik Lake Field Station in Northern Alaska, USA. Samples were collected using 3” diameter PVC traps nested in the substrate which were then partitioned into four individual size classes (2mm, 1mm, >250um and <250um) and normalized for period of deployment. Each individual size fraction was collected within a reference and impacted reach at each site, dried for a 24hr period to quantify dry mass, then ashed in a muffle furnace to quantify ash-free dry mass. Rates of sedimentation were quantified as grams*m-2*d-1. Data collected in summer 2010 revealed a significant input of total sediment deposited in areas impacted by thermokarst failures relative to reference reaches which were unaffected. We observed a near doubling of total sedimentation rates in the impacted reaches compared to our reference reaches (p<0.01). There was a significant increase in the amount of organic matter delivered to the impacted sites (p<0.01). However, this increase contributes to only a small fraction (~10-15%) of the total composition of sediment delivered to impacted reaches. Inorganic deposits were insignificant within affected reaches, which we attribute to large variability within each trap, as a possible consequence of varying geomorphology between each study stream. The largest inputs of organic matter were deposited in the form of VFPOM (<250um), while inorganic deposits were variable across all class sizes. The results from our study indicate thermokarst failures have a significant impact on sedimentation rates in headwater streams. We predict this may have various ecological

  10. Surface-water quality changes after 5 years of nutrient management in the Little Conestoga Creek headwaters, Pennsylvania, 1989-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koerkle, Edward H.; Gustafson-Minnich, Linda C.; Bilger, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    A 5.82-square-mile drainage basin in the headwaters of the Little Conestoga Creek in Lancaster County, Pa., was investigated from October 1989 through September 1991 as part of a longer-term effort to determine the effects of nutrient management on surface-water quality. A previous investigation found no statistical evidence that implementation of nutrient management from 1986 to 1989 affected water quality. Basin land use is 68 percent agriculture and includes all or part of 51 farms. Agricultural land under nutrient management ranged from 55 percent in 1989 to 80 percent in 1991. Nitrate nitrogen, the dominant nonpoint-source contaminant, averaged about 7.5 milligrams per liter in base flow. Implementation of nutrient management on 90 percent of applicable land in a 1.42-square-mile subbasin resulted in a 7 percent decrease in nitrogen applications from before nutrient management. Recognizing that some uncertainty exists in the nutrient-application data, the decrease consisted of a 44-percent decrease in commercial fertilizer nitrogen combined with a 3-percent increase in manure nitrogen applications. Manure accounted for 83 percent of the applied nitrogen. Amounts of nitrate nitrogen in the top 4 feet of soil ranged from 43 to 315 pounds per acre in the subbasin and were not substantially reduced from before nutrient management. Statistical analysis of nutrient and suspended-sediment concentrations detected few significant step trends in water quality in a comparison with water quality before nutrient management. A decrease in base-flow concentrations of dissolved ammonium and suspended sediment was detected at a site draining a 1.43-square-mile subbasin with 40-percent implementation of nutrient-management plans. An increase in base-flow concentrations of suspended sediment was detected at a site draining the 1.42-square-mile subbasin with 90-percent implementation. A comparison of the dissolved nitrate plus nitrite in base-flow relations between paired

  11. Benthic invertebrate assemblages and their relation to physical and chemical characteristics of streams in the Eastern Iowa Basins, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brigham, Allison R.; Sadorf, Eric M.

    2001-01-01

    Stream size, a reflection of basin area, was a principal influence in categorizing the benthic invertebrate assemblages, with sites that have the largest basin areas forming a separate group. Although it is difficult to distinguish among the contributions of large basin area, increased concentrations of nutrients and pesticides, and decreasing instream habitat diversity, the resulting invertebrate assemblage described was distinct. The remaining sites were headwater or tributary streams that reflected conditions more common to smaller streams, such as higher gradients and the potential for more diverse or extensive riparian habitat, but were distinguished by landform. Following basin area in importance, landform contributed to the differences observed among the benthic invertebrate communities at the remaining sites.

  12. Arid ephemeral stream classification using channel geometry and basin characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutfin, N. A.; Wohl, E. E.; Shaw, J.

    2011-12-01

    Because understanding of ephemeral stream characteristics is limited and many stream classifications do not adequately describe them, it is necessary to develop a better understanding of these dryland fluvial systems and develop more precise terminology to discuss their physical attributes. In addition to development of a geomorphic classification system, we examine relationships between basin characteristics and channel geometry that will indicate where these ephemeral stream types might occur. Our conceptual model includes five geomorphic ephemeral stream types; 1) braided washes, 2) incised alluvium, 3) bedrock with alluvium, 4) bedrock, and 5) piedmont headwater channels. Preliminary watershed classification and cluster analysis of the U.S. Sonoran Desert was conducted using NHD 10-digit Hydrologic Unit Boundaries, PRISM precipitation data, state geologic survey lithology, and data derived from 30m DEMs. A total of 85 reaches were surveyed on the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in southwestern Arizona representing the five stream types within three watershed categories. Following delineation of small-scale watershed characteristics using 10m DEMs for each reach location, statistical analysis will be performed to examine correlations and significant relationships among stream type, basin and channel characteristics. We hope to identify physical drivers resulting in the development of distinct geomorphic stream types and predict where the relative abundance of those stream types are likely to exist in arid environments of the southwestern U.S. We posit that locations and relative distributions of the five stream types will correlate significantly to local basin characteristics. Initial findings verify that composition of confining material dictates the level of confinement and largely influences occurrence of the five channel types. Additionally, we expect to see significant differences in width/depth ratios, grain size, stream gradient, basin hillslope gradient

  13. Hyphessobrycon lucenorum (Characiformes: Characidae), a new species from the rio Madeira basin, Rondônia State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Willian M; Lima, Flávio C T

    2015-01-01

    A new species of characid is described from the upper rio Machado, a tributary of the rio Madeira basin, Rondônia, Brazil. Hyphessobrycon lucenorum can be distinguished from all congeners by the unique combination of the presence of a conspicuous rounded humeral blotch and a broad and diffuse longitudinal stripe. The new species is included within the Hyphessobrycon agulha group. The high number of endemic species of fishes occurring in the headwater tributaries of three river systems (rio Madeira, rio Tapajós, and rio Paraguai) draining the watershed defined by the Chapada dos Parecis is discussed. PMID:26249511

  14. Evaluating the effects of land use on headwater wetland amphibian assemblages in coastal Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alix, Diane M.; Anderson, Christopher J.; Grand, James B.; Guyer, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic land use is known to impact aquatic ecosystems in several ways, including increased frequency and intensity of floods, stream channel incision, sedimentation, and loss of microtopography. Amphibians are susceptible to changes in wetland and surrounding habitats. This study evaluated amphibian assemblages of fifteen headwater slope wetlands in coastal Alabama across a gradient of land uses. Amphibians were surveyed on a seasonal basis and land use was delineated within wetland watersheds and within a 200-m buffer surrounding each wetland. Amphibian presence/absence and land use data were used to develop species occupancy models. Both urban and agricultural land use were shown to influence amphibian occurrence. Species richness ranged from five to ten species across sites; however, five species only occurred in wetlands surrounded by forested lands. Many species were detected more frequently on these wetlands compared to wetlands surrounded by urban or mixed land uses. Occupancy models showed Acris gryllus was negatively associated with the amount of agriculture within a buffer around the wetland. Hyla squirella, Lithobates clamitans, and L. sphenocephalus were positively associated with agricultural land within a watershed. Anaxyrus terrestris and the non-native Eleutherodactylus planirostris were positively associated with the amount of impervious surface area within the wetland buffer.

  15. Markers of genetic variation among the Waorani Indians of the Ecuadorian Amazon headwaters.

    PubMed

    Larrick, J W; Yost, J; Gourley, C; Buckley, C E; Plato, C C; Pandey, J P; Burck, K B; Kaplan, J

    1985-04-01

    Until recently, the Waorani Indians of Ecuador's Amazon headwaters maintained a fierce resistance to all intruders into their territory, and as a result of their actions and reputations a population of 600 people controlled a very large territory (about 8,000 square miles). The isolation of the Waorani has resulted in a large linguistic and genetic distance from their neighbors. Our survey of red cell enzymes, immunoglobulin allotypes, and dermatoglyphics demonstrates that the Waorani are a highly inbred and homogeneous population. Of 18 red cell enzymes studied, the Waorani have a limited polymorphism for only 6. Only two Gm haplotypes (Gm1,2,17,21, Gm1,17,21) were found and 60% of those tested were homozygous for the Gm1,17,21 haplotype. All individuals were A2m (1) and 95% of these were homozygous. The Waorani's dermatoglyphic traits fell within the wide range found among other South American Indians with close affinity to the Ecuadorian Jivaro group. Despite the limitations of these genetic systems, they demonstrate that the Waorani share limited genetic traits with the neighboring Jivaro Indians and are isolated from other tribal populations in South America. PMID:3857868

  16. Fate and Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Upland Irish Headwater Lake Catchments

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Heidi E. M.; Aherne, Julian; Metcalfe, Chris D.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a concern due to their carcinogenicity and propensity for transboundary atmospheric transport. Ireland is located on the western periphery of Europe and assumed to receive clean Atlantic air. As such, it has been used as an atmospheric reference for comparison to other regions. Nonetheless, few studies have evaluated concentrations of PAHs within the Irish environment. In the current study, PAHs were measured at five upland (500–800 masl) headwater lake catchments in coastal regions around Ireland, remote from industrial point source emissions. Semipermeable membrane devices were deployed in lakes for a 6-month period in July 2009, and topsoils were sampled from each catchment during October 2010. The concentrations of PAHs were low at most study sites with respect to other temperate regions. Homologue groups partitioned between lake and soil compartments based on their molecular weight were: “lighter” substances, such as Phenanthrene and Fluorene, were found in higher proportions in lakes, whereas “heavier” compounds, such as Chrysene and Benz[a]anthracene, were more prominent in soils. Concentrations of PAHs were highest at the east coast sites, potentially due to contributions from historical transboundary and regional combustion sources. PMID:23346024

  17. Before and After Integrated Catchment Management in a Headwater Catchment: Changes in Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Andrew O.; Quinn, John M.

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures.

  18. Influence of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) forests on aquatic invertebrate assemblages in headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, C.D.; Young, J.A.; Lemarie, D.P.; Smith, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    We conducted a comparative study in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area to determine the potential long-term impacts of hemlock forest decline on stream benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Hemlock forests throughout eastern North America have been declining because of the hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic insect pest. We found aquatic invertebrate community structure to be strongly correlated with forest composition. Streams draining hemlock forests supported significantly more total taxa than streams draining mixed hardwood forests, and over 8% of the taxa were strongly associated with hemlock. In addition, invertebrate taxa were more evenly distributed (i.e., higher Simpson's evenness values) in hemlock-drained streams. In contrast, the number of rare species and total densities were significantly lower in streams draining hemlock, suggesting that diversity differences observed between forest types were not related to stochastic factors associated with sampling and that streams draining mixed hardwood forests may be more productive. Analysis of stream habitat data indicated that streams draining hemlock forests had more stable thermal and hydrologic regimes. Our findings suggest that hemlock decline may result in long-term changes in headwater ecosystems leading to reductions in both within-stream (i.e., alpha) and park-wide (i.e., gamma) benthic community diversity.

  19. Before and after integrated catchment management in a headwater catchment: changes in water quality.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew O; Quinn, John M

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures. PMID:25228091

  20. Effect of land use on mayfly assemblages structure in Neotropical headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Siegloch, Ana Emilia; Suriano, Marcia; Spies, Marcia; Fonseca-Gessner, Alaíde

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of agricultural and forestry land use on the structure of mayfly assemblages in low-order streams. Twenty-nine headwater streams were investigated in the state of São Paulo. We analyzed 15 streams in pristine areas (mixed tropical rainforest, semideciduous forest and dense tropical rainforest), and 14 streams covered with sugarcane, eucalyptus and pasture. Mayfly richness obtained by rarefaction curves was higher in pristine areas (21 genera), especially in mixed and semideciduous forest when compared to land use (9 genera), where values were particularly low in sugarcane plantation (3 genera). The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination showed clear difference in mayfly assemblages between land uses and pristine areas, supported by analysis of similarity (R=0.67, p=0.001). In partial redundancy analysis (pRDA), the environmental descriptors that best explained differences in assemblage structure were Riparian, Channel and Environmental Inventory (RCE) index score, percentage of fine sediment stream substrate, water pH and land elevation. Our results show that agricultural and forestry land use has a strong negative effect on the structure of mayfly assemblages. These results also support the use of mayflies as environmental indicators, as some genera were sensitive to changes in land use, while others responded to naturally occurring changes in the study area. PMID:25590712

  1. Effect of land use on mayfly assemblages structure in Neotropical headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Siegloch, Ana Emilia; Suriano, Marcia; Spies, Marcia; Fonseca-Gessner, Alaíde

    2014-10-14

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of agricultural and forestry land use on the structure of mayfly assemblages in low-order streams. Twenty-nine headwater streams were investigated in the state of São Paulo. We analyzed 15 streams in pristine areas (mixed tropical rainforest, semideciduous forest and dense tropical rainforest), and 14 streams covered with sugarcane, eucalyptus and pasture. Mayfly richness obtained by rarefaction curves was higher in pristine areas (21 genera), especially in mixed and semideciduous forest when compared to land use (9 genera), where values were particularly low in sugarcane plantation (3 genera). The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination showed clear difference in mayfly assemblages between land uses and pristine areas, supported by analysis of similarity (R=0.67, p=0.001). In partial redundancy analysis (pRDA), the environmental descriptors that best explained differences in assemblage structure were Riparian, Channel and Environmental Inventory (RCE) index score, percentage of fine sediment stream substrate, water pH and land elevation. Our results show that agricultural and forestry land use has a strong negative effect on the structure of mayfly assemblages. These results also support the use of mayflies as environmental indicators, as some genera were sensitive to changes in land use, while others responded to naturally occurring changes in the study area. PMID:25317730

  2. Nutrient availability for phytoplankton production along a headwater-to-mainstream reservoir gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Elser, J.J.; Kimmel, B.L.

    1984-12-01

    The occurrence of phytoplankton nutrient deficiency in a headwater-to-mainstream series of three reservoirs was examined using analyses of dissolved nutrients, nutrient enrichment experiments and an alkaline phosphatase bioassay. Size-fractionation of APA showed it to be primarily (75%) associated with 1.0-..mu..m particles, and enzyme suppression experiments demonstrated that, while APA was suppressed by phosphorus enrichment, a residual amount was insensitive to elevated PO/sub 4/-P. Nutrient analyses and nutrient enrichment experiments indicated potential phosphorus limitation of phytoplankton growth in the series, but comparisons of nutrient analyses, enrichment experiments, and APA patterns emphasized the importance of multiple limiting factors in situ. Specific APA increased moving downlake within individual reservoirs in a manner consistent with the river-lake hybrid analogy. A pattern of decreasing phosphorus deficiency moving downstream in the series agreed with predictions based on possible effects of hypolimnetic releases on downstream nutrient availability, but other factors may have contributed to this pattern. 90 references, 16 figures, 8 tables.

  3. Holocene Glacier Advances in the Headwaters of Sredniaya Avacha, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoskul, Oxana S.

    1999-07-01

    Holocene glacial deposits in Sredniya Avacha headwaters are subdivided into three age groups (events A, B, and C) based upon geomorphic features, tephrochronology, and lichenometry. Tephras of Opala volcano (1400-1500 yr B.P.), Ksudach volcano (1700-1800 and 6000 yr B.P.), and Zavaritskiy volcano (2800 yr B.P.) are used as stratigraphic markers. Rhizocarpon geographicum (L.) DC and Rhizocarpon section Alpicola growth curves are established using tephrochronologically dated and historical surfaces. The age of event A (pre-Hypsitermal?) moraines is constrained by an age of 6000 yr B.P. for overlying Ksudach-2 tephra and an age of 7200 (?) lichenometric (L) yr B.P. Event B (Neoglaciation) had a multiple nature, with the most prominent advances at 4300-3500, 3300-2800, 2600-2100, 1800-1400, and 1300-1100 (L) yr B.P.; the culmination occurred before 2800 yr B.P., as suggested by a date for Zavaritskiy volcano tephra found on the glacial and outwash deposits. Less-extensive glacier advances of event C ("Little Ice Age"), occurred at 800-600, 500-200, 180-110, and 90-40 (L) yr B.P. The ELA depression was 200-250, 100-150, 30-70 m during the culmination of events A, B, and C, respectively.

  4. Dissolved organic matter quality and bioavailability changes across an urbanization gradient in headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Hosen, Jacob D; McDonough, Owen T; Febria, Catherine M; Palmer, Margaret A

    2014-07-15

    Landscape urbanization broadly alters watersheds and stream ecosystems, yet the impact of nonpoint source urban inputs on the quantity, quality, and ultimate fate of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is poorly understood. We assessed DOM quality and microbial bioavailability in eight first-order Coastal Plain headwater streams along a gradient of urbanization (i.e., percent watershed impervious cover); none of the streams had point source discharges. DOM quality was measured using fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Bioavailability was assessed using biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) incubations. Results showed that watershed impervious cover was significantly related to stream DOM composition: increasing impervious cover was associated with decreased amounts of natural humic-like DOM and enriched amounts of anthropogenic fulvic acid-like and protein-like DOM. Microbial bioavailability of DOM was greater in urbanized streams during spring and summer, and was related to decreasing proportions of humic-like DOM and increasing proportions of protein-like DOM. Increased bioavailability was associated with elevated extracellular enzyme activity of the initial microbial community supplied to samples during BDOC incubations. These findings indicate that changes in stream DOM quality due to watershed urbanization may impact stream ecosystem metabolism and ultimately the fate of organic carbon transported through fluvial systems.

  5. Before and after integrated catchment management in a headwater catchment: changes in water quality.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Andrew O; Quinn, John M

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have comprehensively measured the effect on water quality of catchment rehabilitation measures in comparison with baseline conditions. Here we have analyzed water clarity and nutrient concentrations and loads for a 13-year period in a headwater catchment within the western Waikato region, New Zealand. For the first 6 years, the entire catchment was used for hill-country cattle and sheep grazing. An integrated catchment management plan was implemented whereby cattle were excluded from riparian areas, the most degraded land was planted in Pinus radiata, channel banks were planted with poplar trees and the beef cattle enterprise was modified. The removal of cattle from riparian areas without additional riparian planting had a positive and rapid effect on stream water clarity. In contrast, the water clarity decreased in those sub-catchments where livestock was excluded but riparian areas were planted with trees and shrubs. We attribute the decrease in water clarity to a reduction in groundcover vegetation that armors stream banks against preparatory erosion processes. Increases in concentrations of forms of P and N were recorded. These increases were attributed to: (i) the reduction of instream nutrient uptake by macrophytes and periphyton due to increased riparian shading; (ii) uncontrolled growth of a nitrogen fixing weed (gorse) in some parts of the catchment, and (iii) the reduction in the nutrient attenuation capacity of seepage wetlands due to the decrease in their areal coverage in response to afforestation. Our findings highlight the complex nature of the water quality response to catchment rehabilitation measures.

  6. Morphology of step-pools in a wilderness headwater stream: The importance of standardizing geomorphic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickolotsky, Aaron; Pavlowsky, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    The morphology of step-pools and cascades reflect the geological and climatic factors affecting channels in mountain watersheds. This study uses longitudinal and cross-section surveys to describe a headwater stream in the Boston Mountains of the Ozarks Plateau region in Arkansas and develop morphological relationships for comparisons with other regions. In the Bowers Hollow Creek watershed (3.5 km 2), located within the boundaries of the Upper Buffalo Wilderness Area, step height and wavelength relationships are generally similar to those reported from other regions. Step-pool reaches were widely distributed in a discontinuous manner throughout the watershed. Average values of the sampled reaches are: reach slopes, 0.105 m/m; width, 6.10 m; crest particle sizes, 440 mm; step heights, 0.87 m; and step wavelengths, 6.62 m. The mean step steepness for the watershed was 0.13, whereas the mean length of a reach step to height ratio was 9:1. A comparison of morphological definitions found that the values of step height and steepness can vary by > 30% according to how step parameters are defined. Step height is particularly sensitive; thus, comparison of step height-based relationships from published data requires great care.

  7. Contemporary (1979-1988) and inferred historical status of headwater lakes in North Central Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Kelso, J R; Shaw, M A; Jeffries, D S

    1992-01-01

    Fifty-six headwater Canadian Shield lakes were repetitively sampled from 1979 to 88 to determine their response to changes in acidic deposition of the period. Annual wet sulphate loadings varied between 38 and 83 meq m(-2), with highest deposition in the late 1970s followed by somewhat lower but variable deposition in the 1980s. Median pH of the lakes increased 0.42 pH units from 1979 to 1985 and decreased by 0.15 units between 1985 and 1988. Short water renewal times (x=1.1 y) promoted rapid equilibration. Since lake were so responsive to changes in SO4(2-) inputs, they were at or near steady state at all times. Comparison of predicted original pH and ANC with 1979 data indicate a median decline of 0.45 pH units and a loss of 34 microeq litre(-1). ANC. Four of 9 lakes were found to be historically fishless, based on the continued presence of Chaoborus americanus in sediment cores. The remaining five lakes historically had fish populations, but fish were not collected in 1979 when pH ranged betwen 4.6 and 5.3. By 1987, fish species were found in five of these lakes where pH had increased on average by 0.9 pH units. Our data indicate that water quality improvements could allow for the reinvasion or resumption of recruitment for a significant number of Ontario lakes. PMID:15091929

  8. Stable isotope analyses of web-spinning spider assemblages along a headwater stream in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Elvira; Ramírez, Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Web-spinning spiders that inhabit stream channels are considered specialists of aquatic ecosystems and are major consumers of emerging aquatic insects, while other spider taxa are more commonly found in riparian forests and as a result may consume more terrestrial insects. To determine if there was a difference in spider taxa abundance between riverine web-spinning spider assemblages within the stream channel and the assemblages 10 m into the riparian forest, we compared abundances for all web-spinning spiders along a headwater stream in El Yunque National Forest in northeast Puerto Rico. By using a nonmetric dimensional scaling (NMDS) abundance analysis we were able to see a clear separation of the two spider assemblages. The second objective of the study was to determine if aquatic insects contributed more to the diet of the spider assemblages closest to the stream channel and therefore stable isotope analyses of δ15N and δ13C for web-spinning spiders along with their possible prey were utilized. The results of the Bayesian mixing model (SIAR) however showed little difference in the diets of riverine (0 m), riparian (10 m) and upland (25 m) spiders. We found that aquatic insects made up ∼50% of the diet for web-spinning spiders collected at 0 m, 10 m, and 25 m from the stream. This study highlights the importance of aquatic insects as a food source for web-spinning spiders despite the taxonomic differences in assemblages at different distances from the stream. PMID:26500830

  9. Reconciling stream dissolved organic matter with snowmelt-driven subsurface flowpaths in a montane, headwater catchment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Burns, M. A.; McKnight, D. M.; Gabor, R. S.; Brooks, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) transport is a key biogeochemical link across the terrestrial-aquatic interface in headwater catchments, and therefore is intimately linked with the hydrologic connectivity of the catchment to the stream. This study evaluated the mobility of specific chemical constituents of DOM during snowmelt in a montane, semi-arid catchment in the Boulder Creek CZO. Dissolved organic matter quality was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy on a daily basis from water sampled from the soil (10 - 25 cm depth) via tension lysimeters and from the stream during snowmelt and was compared to approximately bi-monthly groundwater samples (~18 m depth). In the stream, a transition occurred from fluorescent DOM (FDOM) being dominated by protein-like material to FDOM being dominated by more humic-like material. The FDOM in the interstitial water of the soils and the groundwater did not change in character. Thus, the stream transition is indicative of an engagement of DOM originating from hillslope soils during snowmelt. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) normalization of these fluorescent loadings suggest that the peak in DOC concentration seen in the stream is mainly controlled by the non-fluorescent fraction of DOM. These results indicate that shifts in hydrologic connectivity of different watershed units to the stream are a major control on DOM export from the watershed.

  10. Stable isotope analyses of web-spinning spider assemblages along a headwater stream in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sean P; Cuevas, Elvira; Ramírez, Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Web-spinning spiders that inhabit stream channels are considered specialists of aquatic ecosystems and are major consumers of emerging aquatic insects, while other spider taxa are more commonly found in riparian forests and as a result may consume more terrestrial insects. To determine if there was a difference in spider taxa abundance between riverine web-spinning spider assemblages within the stream channel and the assemblages 10 m into the riparian forest, we compared abundances for all web-spinning spiders along a headwater stream in El Yunque National Forest in northeast Puerto Rico. By using a nonmetric dimensional scaling (NMDS) abundance analysis we were able to see a clear separation of the two spider assemblages. The second objective of the study was to determine if aquatic insects contributed more to the diet of the spider assemblages closest to the stream channel and therefore stable isotope analyses of δ (15)N and δ (13)C for web-spinning spiders along with their possible prey were utilized. The results of the Bayesian mixing model (SIAR) however showed little difference in the diets of riverine (0 m), riparian (10 m) and upland (25 m) spiders. We found that aquatic insects made up ∼50% of the diet for web-spinning spiders collected at 0 m, 10 m, and 25 m from the stream. This study highlights the importance of aquatic insects as a food source for web-spinning spiders despite the taxonomic differences in assemblages at different distances from the stream.

  11. Impacts of fish farm pollution on ecosystem structure and function of tropical headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rodrigo dos Santos; Aguiar, Anna Carolina Fornero; Boëchat, Iola Gonçalves; Gücker, Björn

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the impacts of effluent discharge from small flow-through fish farms on stream water characteristics, the benthic invertebrate community, whole-system nitrate uptake, and ecosystem metabolism of three tropical headwater streams in southeastern Brazil. Effluents were moderately, i.e. up to 20-fold enriched in particulate organic matter (POM) and inorganic nutrients in comparison to stream water at reference sites. Due to high dilution with stream water, effluent discharge resulted in up to 2.0-fold increases in stream water POM and up to 1.8-fold increases in inorganic nutrients only. Moderate impacts on the benthic invertebrate community were detected at one stream only. There was no consistent pattern of effluent impact on whole-stream nitrate uptake. Ecosystem metabolism, however, was clearly affected by effluent discharge. Stream reaches impacted by effluents exhibited significantly increased community respiration and primary productivity, stressing the importance of ecologically sound best management practices for small fish farms in the tropics.

  12. Stable isotope analyses of web-spinning spider assemblages along a headwater stream in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sean P; Cuevas, Elvira; Ramírez, Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Web-spinning spiders that inhabit stream channels are considered specialists of aquatic ecosystems and are major consumers of emerging aquatic insects, while other spider taxa are more commonly found in riparian forests and as a result may consume more terrestrial insects. To determine if there was a difference in spider taxa abundance between riverine web-spinning spider assemblages within the stream channel and the assemblages 10 m into the riparian forest, we compared abundances for all web-spinning spiders along a headwater stream in El Yunque National Forest in northeast Puerto Rico. By using a nonmetric dimensional scaling (NMDS) abundance analysis we were able to see a clear separation of the two spider assemblages. The second objective of the study was to determine if aquatic insects contributed more to the diet of the spider assemblages closest to the stream channel and therefore stable isotope analyses of δ (15)N and δ (13)C for web-spinning spiders along with their possible prey were utilized. The results of the Bayesian mixing model (SIAR) however showed little difference in the diets of riverine (0 m), riparian (10 m) and upland (25 m) spiders. We found that aquatic insects made up ∼50% of the diet for web-spinning spiders collected at 0 m, 10 m, and 25 m from the stream. This study highlights the importance of aquatic insects as a food source for web-spinning spiders despite the taxonomic differences in assemblages at different distances from the stream. PMID:26500830

  13. Detection of salmonellae in different turtle species within a headwater spring ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, James P; Hahn, Dittmar; Rose, Francis L; Forstner, Michael R J

    2008-04-01

    Sediments and water from the slough arm of Spring Lake, the headwaters of the San Marcos River, Texas, USA, as well as swabs from biofilms on carapaces and from the cloacae of 18 common musk turtles (Sternotherus odoratus), 21 red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans), nine Texas river cooters (Pseudemys texana), one snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina serpentina), and three Guadalupe spiny soft-shell turtles (Apalone spinifera guadalupensis), caught at the same site, were analyzed for salmonellae by culture and molecular techniques. Although enrichment cultures from sediment and water samples were negative for salmonellae in polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analyses, this technique detected salmonellae in the enrichments from both carapaces and cloacae of 11 musk turtles (61%), eight red-eared sliders (38%), and the snapping turtle. Salmonellae could also be detected in the enrichments from the carapaces of two additional red-eared sliders and two Texas river cooters; the remaining samples were negative. Further characterization of isolates obtained from the enrichment cultures of seven selected individuals that represented all turtle species with salmonellae confirmed the presence of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica, with serovars Rubislaw, Newport, Gaminara, and Thompson identified. These results demonstrate the presence of different strains of potentially human pathogenic salmonellae naturally occurring on several turtle species with different life histories even within supposedly pristine environments. PMID:18436690

  14. Impacts of fish farm pollution on ecosystem structure and function of tropical headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rodrigo dos Santos; Aguiar, Anna Carolina Fornero; Boëchat, Iola Gonçalves; Gücker, Björn

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the impacts of effluent discharge from small flow-through fish farms on stream water characteristics, the benthic invertebrate community, whole-system nitrate uptake, and ecosystem metabolism of three tropical headwater streams in southeastern Brazil. Effluents were moderately, i.e. up to 20-fold enriched in particulate organic matter (POM) and inorganic nutrients in comparison to stream water at reference sites. Due to high dilution with stream water, effluent discharge resulted in up to 2.0-fold increases in stream water POM and up to 1.8-fold increases in inorganic nutrients only. Moderate impacts on the benthic invertebrate community were detected at one stream only. There was no consistent pattern of effluent impact on whole-stream nitrate uptake. Ecosystem metabolism, however, was clearly affected by effluent discharge. Stream reaches impacted by effluents exhibited significantly increased community respiration and primary productivity, stressing the importance of ecologically sound best management practices for small fish farms in the tropics. PMID:23274449

  15. Effect of land use on mayfly assemblages structure in Neotropical headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Siegloch, Ana Emilia; Suriano, Marcia; Spies, Marcia; Fonseca-Gessner, Alaíde

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of agricultural and forestry land use on the structure of mayfly assemblages in low-order streams. Twenty-nine headwater streams were investigated in the state of São Paulo. We analyzed 15 streams in pristine areas (mixed tropical rainforest, semideciduous forest and dense tropical rainforest), and 14 streams covered with sugarcane, eucalyptus and pasture. Mayfly richness obtained by rarefaction curves was higher in pristine areas (21 genera), especially in mixed and semideciduous forest when compared to land use (9 genera), where values were particularly low in sugarcane plantation (3 genera). The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination showed clear difference in mayfly assemblages between land uses and pristine areas, supported by analysis of similarity (R=0.67, p=0.001). In partial redundancy analysis (pRDA), the environmental descriptors that best explained differences in assemblage structure were Riparian, Channel and Environmental Inventory (RCE) index score, percentage of fine sediment stream substrate, water pH and land elevation. Our results show that agricultural and forestry land use has a strong negative effect on the structure of mayfly assemblages. These results also support the use of mayflies as environmental indicators, as some genera were sensitive to changes in land use, while others responded to naturally occurring changes in the study area.

  16. Climatic Variation and River Flows in Himalayan Basins Upstream of Large Dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, D.; Collins, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    High specific discharges from Himalayan headwater basins feed major reservoirs generating hydropower and supplying water to irrigation schemes across the Punjab plains of north-west India and Pakistan. Flow arises from seasonal winter snow cover, summer monsoon precipitation and melting glacier ice in varying proportions and differing absolute quantities along west -east axes of the Karakoram and western Himalaya. Discharge records for stations above Tarbela (Indus), Mangla (Jhelum), Marala (Chenab) and Bhakra (Sutlej) dams have been examined for periods between 1920 and 2009, together with precipitation and air temperature data for stations with long records (within the period 1893 to 2013) at elevations between 234 and 3015 m a.s.l. Ice-cover age in the basins above the dams was between 1 and 12 %. Flows in the Sutlej, Chenab and Jhelum reached maxima in the 1950s before declining to the 1970s. Flow in the Chenab and Jhelum increased to 1950s levels in the 1990s, before falling steeply into the 2000s mimicking variations in winter and monsoon precipitation. Discharge in the Indus at Tarbela increased from the 1970s, reaching a maximum in the late 1980s/early 1990s, before declining back to 1970s levels in the 2000s, flow being influenced not only by precipitation fluctuations but also by changes in air temperature affecting glacier melt in headwater basins. Runoff at Bhakra was augmented by flow from the Beas-Sutlej link canal after 1977, but natural flow in the Sutlej above Luhri reduced considerably from the 1990s influenced by declining flows in the relatively dry but large Tibetan portion of the basin area. Large year-to-year fluctuations of reservoir inflows are nonetheless based on significant sustained underlying discharge levels at all four reservoirs.

  17. Spatial and Temporal influence of Redondo Peak headwaters in the East Fork Jemez River using Principal Component Analysis approach, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Rodrigo; Meixner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The Valles Caldera is a volcanic collapse feature located in the Jemez Mountains in northern New Mexico, southwestern United States. This region is characterized by a bimodal precipitation pattern, i.e. spring snowmelt and summer monsoon rains. Two main streams flow through the Valles Caldera: San Antonio and East Fork Jemez. The junction of these two rivers form the Jemez River which is an important contributor to the Rio Grande that supplies water to cities located in southwestern U.S. Redondo Peak is located in the center of the Valles Caldera that has several springs that drain around all sides of the peak with different hydrologic responses. The main catchments (headwaters) identified in Redondo Peak are: La Jara, Upper Jaramillo, History Grove and Upper Redondo. The main questions that are going to be answered in this research are: Do these head waters affect the chemistry in East Fork Jemez river? and if so, how does this influence vary in space and time? A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed using analyzed water samples for water isotopes and major anions and cations. These samples were collected from the flumes located at each catchment in Redondo Peak, and at different locations along the East Fork Jemez. Samples from the most consistent analytes from 2011 to 2013 were used in this present work. A first PCA was performed to assess how different the La Jara catchment is from Upper Redondo, Upper Jaramillo and History Grove based on the geochemistry of each basin. Prior the analysis the data needs to be normalized in order to avoid biasing towards extreme values. Since La Jara is the reference site for this analysis, its mean and standard deviation were used to normalized the data set of the other catchments. In order to simplify this analysis the two first principal components for each catchment were used to do the projections regardless how much of the variability can be explained. However future analyses are going to be performed with those

  18. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigations of the Han River basin, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jong-Sik; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Chang, Ho-Wan

    2007-10-01

    SummaryThe Han River, the largest river in South Korea draining approximately 26,000 km 2, comprises two major tributaries: the North and the South Han Rivers. Seasonal and spatial variations in the major ion chemistry and isotope compositions of the Han River were monitored for one year at 14-23 locations, covering about 80% of the entire drainage basin. Compared to the South Han River (SHR), the North Han River (NHR) was much lower in total dissolved solids (TDS), Sr, and major ion concentrations, but higher in Si concentration, δ 34S SO 4 values, and 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios. These observations suggest strong influence of prevailing rock types in the drainage basins on the chemical and isotopic compositions of the river waters. These are silicate rocks in the NHR basin and carbonate rocks in the SHR basin. The headwaters of the NHR basin, where several flood control dams have been constructed, show enrichment in deuterium and oxygen-18, indicating evaporative loss. The δ 34S SO 4 data suggest dissolved sulfates in the NHR and SHR are mostly derived from atmospheric deposition, and variable mixtures of atmospheric deposition and sulfide oxidation, respectively. The 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios are much higher in the NHR (0.71793-0.72722) than in the SHR (0.71495-0.71785) with one exception, indicating weathering of Precambrian and Mesozoic granitic rocks and marine carbonates, respectively.

  19. Reserves in Western Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of overpressured tight (OPT) gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins. These are the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB), Uinta Basin and Piceance Basin. By documenting productive characteristics in these basins and characterizing the nature of the vast gas resources in place, the reserves potential may be understood and quantified. Through this understanding, it is hoped that the oil and gas industry will be encouraged to pursue exploitation of this resource. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and the final report submitted for publication. Work on the Uinta basin has just commenced and work on the Piceance basin will commence next year. Since the GGRB portion of this project has been completed, further discussion centers upon this Basin.

  20. The Imbalance between Nature and Management: Jurisdictional Evaluation of Headwaters in a Mountain Watershed (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruso, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    In mountain ecoregions of the semi-arid western U.S., there is an imbalance between science and policy for jurisdictional determinations of aquatic resource as ';waters of the US' that can be protected under Clean Water Act Section 404 (permitting discharge of dredged and fill materials into wetlands and other waters). This leads to continued degradation of surface waters due to the imbalance of key biophysical and societal/regulatory components; the imbalance of water across these drier landscapes, and the imbalance between the critical ecological services provided by these headwater areas and the increasing impacts from urbanization and energy development in previously undeveloped areas. This study analysed headwater streams in a mountain watershed in southwestern Colorado and developed a classification scheme and hydrological connectivity index to demonstrate jurisdictional evaluation at a watershed scale. The National Hydrography Dataset and USGS program StreamStats were used with field observations to classify flow duration and stream order used for Level 1 and 2 classification. Kruskall Wallis tests and discriminant analysis were used to evaluate differences among Level 1 and 2 classes. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to develop Level 3 classes based on stream length, distance to the nearest downstream traditional navigable water (TNW), and the ratio of mean annual flow from the source stream to the TNW. Three primary metrics were used for HCI development: Avg Q/AQ, or the average streamflow metric as a proportion of the metric for the TNW, distance from the stream to the TNW, and slope to the TNW. Additional metrics were also analyzed including stream length, elevation, channel slope and type, and riparian zone types. Perennial waters constitute over a third of all streams (the highest order of which is 4th order), 64% of all reaches are intermittent or ephemeral, and almost half are ephemeral 1st order (E1). The perennial and intermittent streams are

  1. Instream wood in a steep headwater channel: geomorphic significance of large and small wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galia, Tomáš; Šilhán, Karel; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Tichavský, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Besides the well-known significance of large wood (LW), also small woody pieces (SW; here defined as pieces with dimensions at least 0.5 m length and 0.05 m diameter), can play an important role in steep narrow headwaters. We inventoried instream wood in the 0.4 km long Mazák headwater channel, Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mts, Czech Republic (2

  2. Riparian zone flowpath dynamics during snowmelt in a small headwater catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGlynn, B.L.; McDonnell, Jeffery J.; Shanley, J.B.; Kendall, C.

    1999-01-01

    The hydrology of the near-stream riparian zone in upland humid catchments is poorly understood. We examined the spatial and temporal aspects of riparian flowpaths during snowmelt in a headwater catchment within the Sleepers River catchment in northern Vermont. A transect of 15 piezometers was sampled for Ca, Si, DOC, other major cations, and ??18O. Daily piezometric head values reflected variations in the stream hydrograph induced by melt and rainfall. The riparian zone exhibited strong upward discharge gradients. An impeding layer was identified between the till and surficial organic soil. Water solute concentrations increased toward the stream throughout the melt. Ca concentrations increased with depth and DOC concentrations decreased with depth. The concentrations of Ca in all piezometers were lower during active snowmelt than during post-melt low flow. Ca data suggest snowmelt infiltration to depth; however, only upslope piezometers exhibited snowmelt infiltration and consequent low ??18O values, while ??18O values varied less than 0.5% in the deep riparian piezometers throughout the study period. Ca and ??18O values in upslope piezometers during low streamflow were comparable to Ca and ??18O in riparian piezometers during high streamflow. The upland water Ca and ??18O may explain the deep riparian Ca dilution and consistent ??18O composition. The temporal pattern in Ca and ??18O indicate that upland water moves to the stream via a lateral displacement mechanism that is enhanced by the presence of distinct soil/textural layers. Snowmelt thus initiates the flux of pre-melt, low Ca upland water to depth in the riparian zone, but itself does not appear at depth in the riparian zone during spring melt. This is despite the coincident response of upland groundwater and stream discharge.The hydrology of the near-stream riparian zone in upland humid catchments is poorly understood. We examined the spatial and temporal aspects of riparian flowpaths during snowmelt in a

  3. Cosmogenic nuclide-derived sediment budget of the Amazon basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Dr.; von Blanckenburg, Dr.; Guyot, Dr.; Maurice, Dr.; Kubik, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    Sediment gauging suggests that the annual sediment mass discharged into the main Amazon basin from the Andes and the cratonic shields is not in steady state with the mass discharged to the Atlantic Ocean. Here we use sediment production rates from cosmogenic 10Be in sediment to compare these with transport rates from river load gauging. About 1 million km2 or 95% of the total Andean area draining to the Amazon provide sediment to the central Amazon river with an averaged 10Be nuclide concentration of 5.0 +- 0.5x1e4 at/g(Qz). Average nuclide concentrations for Brazilian shield headwaters amount to 15.3 +- 1.2x1e4 at/g(Qz), and to 38.6 +- 2.4x1e4 at/g(Qz) for the Guyana shield headwaters, respectively. For the Andes, nuclide concentrations translate to an integrated Andean denudation rate of 0.35 ± 0.05 mm/yr. Sediment from the headwaters of the Brazilian and Guyana shields translate into very low denudation rates (0.02 and 0.01 mm/yr, respectively), as is expected for tectonically stable tropical highlands. These headwater 10Be nuclide concentrations and derived denudation rates can now be compared with those derived from central Amazon stream sediment including the main Amazon, which was sampled over ~1000 km from Manaus to Óbidos. Cosmogenic nuclide concentration analyses of several grain sizes (from 125 up to 800 µm) show large variations; we found that coarse-grained material records the nuclide signal of the cratonic shield areas, whereas the Andean signal is best represented by the fine sand fraction, which is preserved virtually unaltered over 1000s of km of sediment transport. In all central Amazon trunk stream samples and tributaries, the fine grain size fraction (125-250 µm) contains 10Be at 6.5 +- 1.2x1e4 at/g(Qz), which is similar to that of the Andean source areas. The integrated denudation rate from this fraction is 0.23 +- 0.04 mm/yr for the entire Amazon basin at Óbidos, which compares well with the mean Andean denudation rate of 0.35 +- 0.05 mm

  4. Upland disturbance affects headwater stream nutrients and suspended sediments during baseflow and stormflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.; Mulholland, P.J.; Maloney, K.O.

    2006-01-01

    Because catchment characteristics determine sediment and nutrient inputs to streams, upland disturbance can affect stream chemistry. Catchments at the Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia) experience a range of upland disturbance intensities due to spatial variability in the intensity of military training. We used this disturbance gradient to investigate the effects of upland soil and vegetation disturbance on stream chemistry. During baseflow, mean total suspended sediment (TSS) concentration and mean inorganic suspended sediment (ISS) concentration increased with catchment disturbance intensity (TSS: R2 = 0.7, p = 0.005, range = 4.0-10.1 mg L-1; ISS: R2 = 0.71, p = 0.004, range = 2.04-7.3 mg L-1); dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R2 = 0.79, p = 0.001, range = 1.5-4.1 mg L-1) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration (R2 = 0.75, p = 0.008, range = 1.9-6.2 ??g L-1) decreased with increasing disturbance intensity; and ammonia (NH 4+), nitrate (NO3-), and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were unrelated to disturbance intensity. The increase in TSS and ISS during storms was positively correlated with disturbance (R2 = 0.78 and 0.78, p = 0.01 and 0.01, respectively); mean maximum change in SRP during storms increased with disturbance (r = 0.7, p = 0.04); and mean maximum change in NO3- during storms was marginally correlated with disturbance (r = 0.58, p = 0.06). Soil characteristics were significant predictors of baseflow DOC, SRP, and Ca 2+, but were not correlated with suspended sediment fractions, any nitrogen species, or pH. Despite the largely intact riparian zones of these headwater streams, upland soil and vegetation disturbances had clear effects on stream chemistry during baseflow and stormflow conditions. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  5. Downstream Warming and Headwater Acidity May Diminish Coldwater Habitat in Southern Appalachian Mountain Streams.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, T C; Sloat, M R; Sullivan, T J; Dolloff, C A; Hessburg, P F; Povak, N A; Jackson, W A; Sams, C

    2015-01-01

    Stream-dwelling species in the U.S. southern Appalachian Mountains region are particularly vulnerable to climate change and acidification. The objectives of this study were to quantify the spatial extent of contemporary suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive aquatic species and to forecast future habitat loss resulting from expected temperature increases on national forest lands in the southern Appalachian Mountain region. The goal of this study was to help watershed managers identify and assess stream reaches that are potentially vulnerable to warming, acidification, or both. To our knowledge, these results represent the first regional assessment of aquatic habitat suitability with respect to the combined effects of stream water temperature and acid-base status in the United States. Statistical models were developed to predict July mean daily maximum water temperatures and air-water temperature relations to determine potential changes in future stream water temperatures. The length of stream considered suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive species, based on temperature and acid neutralizing capacity thresholds of 20°C and 50 μeq/L, was variable throughout the national forests considered. Stream length displaying temperature above 20°C was generally more than five times greater than the length predicted to have acid neutralizing capacity below 50 μeq/L. It was uncommon for these two stressors to occur within the same stream segment. Results suggested that species' distributional shifts to colder, higher elevation habitats under a warming climate can be constrained by acidification of headwater streams. The approach used in this study can be applied to evaluate climate change impacts to stream water resources in other regions. PMID:26247361

  6. Predicting glacio-hydrologic change in the headwaters of the Zongo River, Cordillera Real, Bolivia

    DOE PAGES

    Frans, Chris; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Lettenmaier, Dennis; Naz, Bibi S.; Clarke, Garry K. C.; Condom, Thomas; Burns, Pat; Nolin, Anne W.

    2015-11-19

    In many partially glacierized watersheds glacier recession driven by a warming climate could lead to complex patterns of streamflow response over time, often marked with rapid increases followed by sharp declines, depending on initial glacier ice cover and rate of climate change. Capturing such "phases'' of hydrologic response is critical in regions where communities rely on glacier meltwater, particularly during low flows. In this study, we investigate glacio-hydrologic response in the headwaters of the Zongo River, Bolivia, under climate change using a distributed glacio-hydrological model over the period of 1987-2100. Model predictions are evaluated through comparisons with satellite-derived glacier extentmore » estimates, glacier surface velocity, in situ glacier mass balance, surface energy flux, and stream discharge measurements. Historically (1987-2010) modeled glacier melt accounts for 27% of annual runoff, and 61% of dry season (JJA) runoff on average. During this period the relative glacier cover was observed to decline from 35 to 21% of the watershed. In the future, annual and dry season discharge is projected to decrease by 4% and 27% by midcentury and 25% and 57% by the end of the century, respectively, following the loss of 81% of the ice in the watershed. Modeled runoff patterns evolve through the interplay of positive and negative trends in glacier melt and increased evapotranspiration as the climate warms. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the selection of model surface energy balance parameters greatly influences the trajectory of hydrological change projected during the first half of the 21st century. In conclusion, these model results underscore the importance of coupled glacio-hydrology modeling.« less

  7. Predicting glacio-hydrologic change in the headwaters of the Zongo River, Cordillera Real, Bolivia

    SciTech Connect

    Frans, Chris; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Lettenmaier, Dennis; Naz, Bibi S.; Clarke, Garry K. C.; Condom, Thomas; Burns, Pat; Nolin, Anne W.

    2015-11-19

    In many partially glacierized watersheds glacier recession driven by a warming climate could lead to complex patterns of streamflow response over time, often marked with rapid increases followed by sharp declines, depending on initial glacier ice cover and rate of climate change. Capturing such "phases'' of hydrologic response is critical in regions where communities rely on glacier meltwater, particularly during low flows. In this study, we investigate glacio-hydrologic response in the headwaters of the Zongo River, Bolivia, under climate change using a distributed glacio-hydrological model over the period of 1987-2100. Model predictions are evaluated through comparisons with satellite-derived glacier extent estimates, glacier surface velocity, in situ glacier mass balance, surface energy flux, and stream discharge measurements. Historically (1987-2010) modeled glacier melt accounts for 27% of annual runoff, and 61% of dry season (JJA) runoff on average. During this period the relative glacier cover was observed to decline from 35 to 21% of the watershed. In the future, annual and dry season discharge is projected to decrease by 4% and 27% by midcentury and 25% and 57% by the end of the century, respectively, following the loss of 81% of the ice in the watershed. Modeled runoff patterns evolve through the interplay of positive and negative trends in glacier melt and increased evapotranspiration as the climate warms. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the selection of model surface energy balance parameters greatly influences the trajectory of hydrological change projected during the first half of the 21st century. In conclusion, these model results underscore the importance of coupled glacio-hydrology modeling.

  8. Biotic drivers of anastomosing channel pattern in headwater streams of the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E. E.

    2010-12-01

    Most of the headwater rivers in the Colorado Rocky Mountains, USA occur as single channels in steep, narrow valleys. Where variations in bedrock erodibility create segments of wider, lower gradient valleys, however, anastomosing channels can occur if one of two biotic drivers is present. Where a disturbance such as a forest fire or windstorm allows pioneer woody species to colonize valley bottoms, beavers can establish colonies. Beavers build dams that enhance overbank flooding and raise the local water table, limiting the return of conifers and promoting aspen-willow (Populus-Salix) forests that provide food for the beavers. Beavers facilitate the formation of multiple channels by digging small canal-like features across the floodplain and by damming the main channel and promoting channel avulsion. In old-growth conifer forests, channel-spanning logjams can enhance overbank flows that facilitate the development of multiple (sub)parallel channels that extend for 50-300 m downstream. Enhanced overbank flows and multiple channels increase the retention of instream wood, creating a self-enhancing feedback of more jams. At least two thresholds must be crossed for anastomosing driven by logjams to develop; a valley morphology threshold and a wood load threshold. Anastomosing channels are present where stream gradient < 4% and the ratio of (channel width/valley-bottom width) < 0.2; only single channels flow through old-growth forests in valley segments that are steeper and narrower. The average wood piece diameter in old-growth anastomosing channel segments > 20 cm, whereas average piece diameter in forests that have not been disturbed in a century is 10-20 cm; channels in these younger forests do not exhibit anastomosing planforms. Wood load in old-growth anastomosing channels averages 200 m3/ha; old-growth and younger forest single channels average < 100 m3/ha.

  9. Predicting glacio-hydrologic change in the headwaters of the Zongo River, Cordillera Real, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frans, Chris; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Naz, Bibi S.; Clarke, Garry K. C.; Condom, Thomas; Burns, Pat; Nolin, Anne W.

    2015-11-01

    In many partially glacierized watersheds glacier recession driven by a warming climate could lead to complex patterns of streamflow response over time, often marked with rapid increases followed by sharp declines, depending on initial glacier ice cover and rate of climate change. Capturing such "phases" of hydrologic response is critical in regions where communities rely on glacier meltwater, particularly during low flows. In this paper, we investigate glacio-hydrologic response in the headwaters of the Zongo River, Bolivia, under climate change using a distributed glacio-hydrological model over the period of 1987-2100. Model predictions are evaluated through comparisons with satellite-derived glacier extent estimates, glacier surface velocity, in situ glacier mass balance, surface energy flux, and stream discharge measurements. Historically (1987-2010) modeled glacier melt accounts for 27% of annual runoff, and 61% of dry season (JJA) runoff on average. During this period the relative glacier cover was observed to decline from 35 to 21% of the watershed. In the future, annual and dry season discharge is projected to decrease by 4% and 27% by midcentury and 25% and 57% by the end of the century, respectively, following the loss of 81% of the ice in the watershed. Modeled runoff patterns evolve through the interplay of positive and negative trends in glacier melt and increased evapotranspiration as the climate warms. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the selection of model surface energy balance parameters greatly influences the trajectory of hydrological change projected during the first half of the 21st century. These model results underscore the importance of coupled glacio-hydrology modeling.

  10. Blanket peatland restoration leads to reduced storm runoff from headwater systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Allott, Tim; Evans, Martin; Pilkington, Mike

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents data on the impact of largescale peatland restoration on catchment runoff from peatlands in northern England. The blanket peatlands of the Pennine hills are important sources of water supply and form the headwaters of major river systems. These peatlands are severely eroded with extensive gullying and bare peat resulting from the impacts of industrial pollution, overgrazing, wildfire and climatic change over the last millennium. In the last decade there has been a major programme of peatland restoration through re-vegetation and blocking of drainage lines in these systems. The Making Space for Water project has collected hydrological data from five micro-catchments(two restoration treatments, a bare peat control, a vegetated control and a previously restored site) over a four year period. This has allowed for both Before-After-Control-Intervention and Space for Time analysis of the impact of restoration on downstream runoff. Catchments became wetter following re-vegetation, water tables rose by 35 mm and overland flow production increased by 18%. Storm-flow lag times in restored catchments increased by up to 267 %, while peak storm discharge decreased by up to 37%. There were no statistically significant changes in percentage runoff, indicating limited changes to within-storm catchment storage. Natural flood management solutions are typically focussed around one of two main mechanisms, either enhanced storage of water in catchments or measures which slow transmission of water to channels and within channels. Upland peatlands are often mischaracterised as sponges and assumed to mitigate downstream runoff through additional storage. The results of this study suggest that whilst restoration of upland peatlands can lead to significant reductions in peak discharge, and has potential to contribute to natural flood risk management, the mechanism is an increase in catchment roughness and an associated decrease in flow velocities.

  11. Large eddy simulation of turbulence and solute transport in a forested headwater stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosronejad, A.; Hansen, A. T.; Kozarek, J. L.; Guentzel, K.; Hondzo, M.; Guala, M.; Wilcock, P.; Finlay, J. C.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2016-01-01

    The large eddy simulation (LES) module of the Virtual StreamLab (VSL3D) model is applied to simulate the flow and transport of a conservative tracer in a headwater stream in Minnesota, located in the south Twin Cities metropolitan area. The detailed geometry of the stream reach, which is ˜135 m long, ˜2.5 m wide, and ˜0.15 m deep, was surveyed and used as input to the computational model. The detailed geometry and location of large woody debris and bed roughness elements up to ˜0.1 m in size were also surveyed and incorporated in the numerical simulation using the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary approach employed in VSL3D. The resolution of the simulation, which employs up to a total of 25 million grid nodes to discretize the flow domain, is sufficiently fine to directly account for the effect of large woody debris and small cobbles (on the streambed) on the flow patterns and transport processes of conservative solutes. Two tracer injection conditions, a pulse and a plateau release, and two cross sections of measured velocity were used to validate the LES results. The computed results are shown to be in good agreement with the field measurements and tracer concentration time series. To our knowledge, the present study is the first attempt to simulate via high-resolution LES solute transport in a natural stream environment taking into account a range of roughness length scales spanning an order of magnitude: from small cobbles on the streambed (˜0.1 m in diameter) to large woody debris up to ˜3 m long.

  12. Sources of stream sulphate in headwater catchments in Otter Creek Wilderness, West Virginia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzhugh, Ross D.; Furman, Tanya; Korsak, Andrea K.

    2001-03-01

    Upland forested catchments in the Appalachian Plateau region receive among the greatest rates of atmospheric sulphur (S) deposition in the eastern USA, although coal mines and S-bearing minerals in bedrock may also contribute to stream acidity in this region. Watershed mass balance and stable S isotopic values (34S) of sulphate (SO42-) were used to assess the contributions to stream SO42- from atmospheric and lithogenic sources at Yellow Creek (YC), a headwater catchment on the Appalachian Plateau in West Virginia. Oxygen isotopic values (18O) of water were used to study catchment hydrology. Stream output of SO42- was c. 60% of atmospheric S deposition during a relatively dry year, whereas atmospheric S input was nearly balanced by stream output during a year with above normal amounts of precipitation. The temporal patterns and values of 34S were similar between bulk precipitation and stream water at two upper elevation sites. At the lowest elevation site, stream 34S values were similar to bulk precipitation values during the dormant season but were slightly lower than precipitation during the low-flow summer, probably as the result of a greater proportion of stream water being derived from deep hydrological flowpaths that have contacted S-bearing minerals with low 34

  13. The Influence of Environmental, Biotic and Spatial Factors on Diatom Metacommunity Structure in Swedish Headwater Streams

    PubMed Central

    Göthe, Emma; Angeler, David G.; Gottschalk, Steffi; Löfgren, Stefan; Sandin, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Stream assemblages are structured by a combination of local (environmental filtering and biotic interactions) and regional factors (e.g., dispersal related processes). The relative importance of environmental and spatial (i.e., regional) factors structuring stream assemblages has been frequently assessed in previous large-scale studies, but biotic predictors (potentially reflecting local biotic interactions) have rarely been included. Diatoms may be useful for studying the effect of trophic interactions on community structure since: (1) a majority of experimental studies shows significant grazing effects on diatom species composition, and (2) assemblages can be divided into guilds that have different susceptibility to grazing. We used a dataset from boreal headwater streams in south-central Sweden (covering a spatial extent of ∼14000 km2), which included information about diatom taxonomic composition, abundance of invertebrate grazers (biotic factor), environmental (physicochemical) and spatial factors (obtained through spatial eigenfunction analyses). We assessed the relative importance of environmental, biotic, and spatial factors structuring diatom assemblages, and performed separate analyses on different diatom guilds. Our results showed that the diatom assemblages were mainly structured by environmental factors. However, unique spatial and biological gradients, specific to different guilds and unrelated to each other, were also evident. We conclude that biological predictors, in combination with environmental and spatial variables, can reveal a more complete picture of the local vs. regional control of species assemblages in lotic environments. Biotic factors should therefore not be overlooked in applied research since they can capture additional local control and therefore increase accuracy and performance of predictive models. The inclusion of biotic predictors did, however, not significantly influence the unique fraction explained by spatial factors

  14. Downstream Warming and Headwater Acidity May Diminish Coldwater Habitat in Southern Appalachian Mountain Streams.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, T C; Sloat, M R; Sullivan, T J; Dolloff, C A; Hessburg, P F; Povak, N A; Jackson, W A; Sams, C

    2015-01-01

    Stream-dwelling species in the U.S. southern Appalachian Mountains region are particularly vulnerable to climate change and acidification. The objectives of this study were to quantify the spatial extent of contemporary suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive aquatic species and to forecast future habitat loss resulting from expected temperature increases on national forest lands in the southern Appalachian Mountain region. The goal of this study was to help watershed managers identify and assess stream reaches that are potentially vulnerable to warming, acidification, or both. To our knowledge, these results represent the first regional assessment of aquatic habitat suitability with respect to the combined effects of stream water temperature and acid-base status in the United States. Statistical models were developed to predict July mean daily maximum water temperatures and air-water temperature relations to determine potential changes in future stream water temperatures. The length of stream considered suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive species, based on temperature and acid neutralizing capacity thresholds of 20°C and 50 μeq/L, was variable throughout the national forests considered. Stream length displaying temperature above 20°C was generally more than five times greater than the length predicted to have acid neutralizing capacity below 50 μeq/L. It was uncommon for these two stressors to occur within the same stream segment. Results suggested that species' distributional shifts to colder, higher elevation habitats under a warming climate can be constrained by acidification of headwater streams. The approach used in this study can be applied to evaluate climate change impacts to stream water resources in other regions.

  15. Spatial patterns of soil nitrification and nitrate export from forested headwaters in the northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.; Shanley, J.B.; Campbell, J.L.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bailey, S.W.; Likens, G.E.; Wemple, B.C.; Fredriksen, G.; Jamison, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen export from small forested watersheds is known to be affected by N deposition but with high regional variability. We studied 10 headwater catchments in the northeastern United States across a gradient of N deposition (5.4 - 9.4 kg ha -1 yr -1) to determine if soil nitrification rates could explain differences in stream water NO 3 - export. Average annual export of two years (October 2002 through September 2004) varied from 0.1 kg NO 3 --N ha -1 yr -1 at Cone Pond watershed in New Hampshire to 5.1 kg ha -1 yr -1 at Buck Creek South in the western Adirondack Mountains of New York. Potential net nitrification rates and relative nitrification (fraction of inorganic N as NO 3 -) were measured in Oa or A soil horizons at 21-130 sampling points throughout each watershed. Stream NO 3 - export was positively related to nitrification rates (r 2 = 0.34, p = 0.04) and the relative nitrification (r 2 = 0.37, p = 0.04). These relationships were much improved by restricting consideration to the 6 watersheds with a higher number of rate measurements (59-130) taken in transects parallel to the streams (r 2 of 0.84 and 0.70 for the nitrification rate and relative nitrification, respectively). Potential nitrification rates were also a better predictor of NO 3 - export when data were limited to either the 6 sampling points closest to the watershed outlet (r 2 = 0.75) or sampling points <250 m from the watershed outlet (r 2 = 0.68). The basal area of conifer species at the sampling plots was negatively related to NO 3 - export. These spatial relationships found here suggest a strong influence of near-stream and near-watershed-outlet soils on measured stream NO 3 - export. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Spatial patterns of soil nitrification and nitrate export from forested headwaters in the northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Donald S.; Shanley, James B.; Campbell, John L.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Bailey, Scott W.; Likens, Gene E.; Wemple, Beverley C.; Fredriksen, Guinevere; Jamison, Austin E.

    2012-03-01

    Nitrogen export from small forested watersheds is known to be affected by N deposition but with high regional variability. We studied 10 headwater catchments in the northeastern United States across a gradient of N deposition (5.4 - 9.4 kg ha-1 yr-1) to determine if soil nitrification rates could explain differences in stream water NO3- export. Average annual export of two years (October 2002 through September 2004) varied from 0.1 kg NO3--N ha-1 yr-1 at Cone Pond watershed in New Hampshire to 5.1 kg ha-1 yr-1 at Buck Creek South in the western Adirondack Mountains of New York. Potential net nitrification rates and relative nitrification (fraction of inorganic N as NO3-) were measured in Oa or A soil horizons at 21-130 sampling points throughout each watershed. Stream NO3- export was positively related to nitrification rates (r2 = 0.34, p = 0.04) and the relative nitrification (r2 = 0.37, p = 0.04). These relationships were much improved by restricting consideration to the 6 watersheds with a higher number of rate measurements (59-130) taken in transects parallel to the streams (r2 of 0.84 and 0.70 for the nitrification rate and relative nitrification, respectively). Potential nitrification rates were also a better predictor of NO3- export when data were limited to either the 6 sampling points closest to the watershed outlet (r2 = 0.75) or sampling points <250 m from the watershed outlet (r2 = 0.68). The basal area of conifer species at the sampling plots was negatively related to NO3-export. These spatial relationships found here suggest a strong influence of near-stream and near-watershed-outlet soils on measured stream NO3- export.

  17. Variability in isotopic composition of base flow in two headwater streams of the southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nitin K.; Emanuel, Ryan E.; McGlynn, Brian L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the influence of hillslope scale topographic characteristics and the relative position of hillslopes along streams (i.e., internal catchment structure) on the isotopic composition of base flow in first-order, forested headwater streams at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory. The study focused on two adjacent forested catchments with different topographic characteristics. We used stable isotopes (18O and 2H) of water together with stream gauging and geospatial analysis to evaluate relationships between internal catchment structure and the spatiotemporal variability of base flow δ18O. Base flow δ18O was variable in space and time along streams, and the temporal variability of base flow δ18O declined with increasing drainage area. Base flow became enriched in 18O moving along streams from channel heads to catchment outlets but the frequency of enrichment varied between catchments. The spatiotemporal variability in base flow δ18O was high adjacent to large hillslopes with short flow paths, and it was positively correlated with the relative arrangement of hillslopes within the catchment. These results point to influence of unique arrangement of hillslopes on the patterns of downstream enrichment. Spatial variability in base flow δ18O within the streams was relatively low during dry and wet conditions, but it was higher during the transition period between dry and wet conditions. These results suggest that the strength of topographic control on the isotopic composition of base flow can vary with catchment wetness. This study highlights that topographic control on base flow generation and isotopic composition is important even at fine spatial scales.

  18. DOC Dynamics in Small Headwater Streams: the Role of Hydrology, Climate, and Land Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajtha, K.; Lee, B. S.; Jones, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a critical component of the carbon (C) cycle of both terrestrial and aquatic systems. For small headwater allochthonous streams, terrestrial C delivery fuels the metabolism of receiving waters and significantly influences biotic diversity and function. While nutrient fluxes in streams have long been used as indicators of terrestrial ecosystem processes, less attention has been given to terrestrial controls on DOC export. We used the long-term stream chemistry records from the H.J. Andrews Forest LTER to examine forest management, climatic, and hydrologic controls on both seasonal and annual DOC fluxes. Within a watershed, annual DOC flux was highly related to annual discharge (Q), although considerable variability in higher discharge years suggested a role for indices of storminess, especially early in the water year. Among watersheds, younger, previously harvested watersheds generally had significantly lower DOC fluxes for a given Q than old-growth watersheds, even 4+ decades after harvest. The exception to this pattern was a harvested watershed that had significant downed wood retained on site, and had densities of coarse woody debris (CWD) close to that of the old-growth watersheds even though live tree biomass was similar to the other harvested watersheds. Other climatic factors did not appear to have significant roles in predicting either seasonal or annual fluxes of DOC. This is in sharp contrast to fluxes of nitrate at our site, which appears to be related most significantly to the presence of alder within the watershed. Taken together, our data suggest a persistent and cascading role for CWD in old-growth forest ecosystems.

  19. Hillslope versus riparian zone runoff contributions in headwater catchments: A multi-watershed comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, B. L.; McGlynn, B. L.; McDonnell, J. J.; Hooper, R. P.; Shanley, J. B.; Hjerdt, K. N.; Hjerdt, K. N.

    2001-12-01

    It is often assumed that hillslope and riparian areas constitute the two most important and identifiable landscape units contributing to catchment runoff in upland humid catchments. Nevertheless, the relative amount and timing of hillslope versus riparian contributions to stormflow are poorly understood across different watersheds. We quantified the contributions of hillslopes and riparian zones to stormflow using physical, chemical, and isotopic techniques across 3 diverse ({ ~}15 ha) headwater catchments: a highly responsive steep wet watershed (Maimai, New Zealand), a moderately steep snowmelt dominated watershed (Sleepers, River, VT), and at a highly seasonal relatively low relief watershed (Panola Mt., Georgia). We monitored catchment runoff, internal hydrological response, and isotopic and solute dynamics for discrete riparian and hillslope zones within each catchment. Monitored catchment positions, including hillslope trenches at Maimai and Panola, were used to characterize directly, the hydrologic response and source water signatures for hillslope zones and riparian zones. We also examined the spatial and temporal source components of catchment stormflow using 3-component mass balance hydrograph separation techniques. At Maimai, NZ we found that hillslope runoff comprised 47-55% of total runoff during a 70 mm event. Despite the large amount of subsurface hillslope runoff in total catchment stormflow, riparian and channel zones accounted for 28% out of 29% of the total new water measured catchment runoff. Riparian water dominated the storm hydrograph composition early in the event, although hillslope water reached the catchment outlet soon after hillslope water tables were developed. Preliminary results for Sleepers River, VT and Panola Mountain, GA indicate that the timing and relative proportion of hillslope water in catchment runoff is later and smaller than at Maimai. Our multi-catchment comparison suggests that the ratio of the riparian reservoir to the

  20. A Mechanistic Assessment of a Near-stream Saturated Area Dynamics in a Headwater Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frentress, J.; Pfister, L.; McDonnell, J.

    2015-12-01

    Saturation excess overland flow generated in near-stream saturated areas is a mixture of rainfall and exfiltrating sub-surface water that can be quickly transported to the stream network during rainfall events. While many isotope hydrograph separation studies have demonstrated generally the dominance of pre-event water in the channel hydrograph, the mixing processes within the saturated area itself are poorly understood. Here, we isolated and measured discharge generated within a 100-m2 saturated area of a headwater reach of the 45-ha Weierbach catchment (Luxembourg). We quantified surface saturation using ground-based thermal infrared imagery and in-site piezometers throughout a series of rainfall events. This, combined with isotope and geochemical tracing enabled us to assess the role of surface saturation dynamics on mixing and storm hydrograph response. Surprisingly, our detailed analysis showed that surface saturation dynamics were weakly correlated to discharge and precipitation; cumulative rainfall on near-stream saturated areas alone was unable to explain the flow generated within this reach. Streamflow isotopic response was essentially unchanging within the 5-week monitoring period (-55 to -58 δ2D and -8.5 to -9 for δ18O ‰) suggesting that well-mixed streamflow sources that were little affected by rainfall sources. While Na+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ show slight flushing and dilution responses, riparian and streamflow sources responded differently across the event. Overall, groundwater exfiltration within the saturated area appeared to generate streamflow throughout the reach, effectively erasing any rainfall onto saturated area signal.

  1. Assessing the Success of Regional Measures for Lowering Agricultural Nutrient Pollution in Headwater Streams.

    PubMed

    Barry, C D; Foy, R H

    2016-07-01

    Lowland waters in Northern Ireland experience elevated agricultural phosphorus (P) inputs, and in response a variety of control measures targeting farm nutrient management have been implemented. Their efficacy in lowering nitrogen (N) and P exports and improving water quality is examined in 40 headwater streams from 1990 to 2009, and to 2014 for 24 of these. Over this period manure production in the study catchments declined by 7%, but regional chemical fertilizer inputs declined by 37% for N and 79% for P, and the regional nutrient surplus was lowered by 18% for N and 49% for P. Diminished pollution by organic wastes meant that 85% of streams exhibited chemistry suitable for salmonids in 2009 compared to 40% in 1990. Flow-weighted mean concentrations (FWMCs) of nutrients declined between 1990 and 2009, and their correlations with catchment stocking rates became stronger over time. For catchments with manure inputs <16.6 kg P ha, total P and nitrate FWMCs declined from 123 ± 19 μg P L and 1.92 ± 0.5 mg N L in 1990 at rates of 2.2 ± 0.5 and 30 ± 10 μg L yr, respectively. For catchments with higher manure inputs the respective rates of decline were greater at 5.8 ± 1.0 μg P L yr and 160 ± 20 μg N L yr from 1990 concentrations of 270 ± 25 μg P L and 5.99 ± 0.4 mg N L. Although now lower, P concentrations in the more highly stocked catchments still exceed regional nutrient standards so that the identification of further factors impinging on nutrient losses is critical if such standards are to be achieved. PMID:27380082

  2. The influence of environmental, biotic and spatial factors on diatom metacommunity structure in Swedish headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Göthe, Emma; Angeler, David G; Gottschalk, Steffi; Löfgren, Stefan; Sandin, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Stream assemblages are structured by a combination of local (environmental filtering and biotic interactions) and regional factors (e.g., dispersal related processes). The relative importance of environmental and spatial (i.e., regional) factors structuring stream assemblages has been frequently assessed in previous large-scale studies, but biotic predictors (potentially reflecting local biotic interactions) have rarely been included. Diatoms may be useful for studying the effect of trophic interactions on community structure since: (1) a majority of experimental studies shows significant grazing effects on diatom species composition, and (2) assemblages can be divided into guilds that have different susceptibility to grazing. We used a dataset from boreal headwater streams in south-central Sweden (covering a spatial extent of ∼14000 km(2)), which included information about diatom taxonomic composition, abundance of invertebrate grazers (biotic factor), environmental (physicochemical) and spatial factors (obtained through spatial eigenfunction analyses). We assessed the relative importance of environmental, biotic, and spatial factors structuring diatom assemblages, and performed separate analyses on different diatom guilds. Our results showed that the diatom assemblages were mainly structured by environmental factors. However, unique spatial and biological gradients, specific to different guilds and unrelated to each other, were also evident. We conclude that biological predictors, in combination with environmental and spatial variables, can reveal a more complete picture of the local vs. regional control of species assemblages in lotic environments. Biotic factors should therefore not be overlooked in applied research since they can capture additional local control and therefore increase accuracy and performance of predictive models. The inclusion of biotic predictors did, however, not significantly influence the unique fraction explained by spatial factors

  3. [Spatial and temporal patterns of stream fish assemblages in the Qiupu Headwaters National Wetland Park].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Jian; Chu, Ling; Si, Chun; Zhu, Ren; Chen, Wen-Hao; Chen, Fang-Ming; Yan, Yun-Zhi

    2013-08-01

    Identifying and clarifying how stream fish assemblage patterns vary spatially and temporally are basic measures for the conservation and management of fish species. Based on data collected from 24 wadeable reaches within the Qiupu Headwaters National Wetland Park between May and October 2012, we examined the spatial and temporal patterns of the assemblage structures and diversities, collecting a total of 29 fish species belonging to four orders and ten families. The results of our survey showed influences of local habitat and tributary spatial position variables on fish assemblages. Fish diversity showed significant variations across stream-orders and seasons, which were higher in the second-order streams than in first-order streams and higher in October than in May. Habitat factors such as substrate coarseness and heterogeneity, water temperature and water depth, as well as tributary position factor-link, showed significant effects on fish diversity. Fish assemblages fitted the nested pattern that upstream assemblages presented as a nested subset of downstream assemblages. Fish assemblage structures did not vary significantly across seasons but did across stream-orders; fish assemblages between first- and second-order streams showed significant differences despite some overlap. These spatial differences mainly resulted from spatial variations of the relative abundance of Cobitis rarus, Ctenogobius sp., Zacco platypus, Phoxinus oxycephalus, Rhodeus ocellatus and Vanmanenia stenosoma, among which P. oxycephalus had higher abundance in first-order than in second-order streams but the other five species were more abundant in second-order streams. Fish assemblage structures were significantly related to substrate heterogeneity, water depth, stream order, link and C-link. PMID:23913894

  4. Stream Ammonium Uptake Across Scales in Headwater Catchments of a Tropical Rainforest, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brereton, R. L.; McDowell, W. H.; Wymore, A.

    2015-12-01

    Many tropical forest streams export high amounts of nitrogen relative to streams draining undisturbed watersheds of other biomes. With their low DOC concentrations and high rates of respiration, headwater streams in the Luquillo Mountains have been previously characterized as energy-limited, suggesting that NH4+ uptake is dominated not by N demand but by energy demand. In the Rio Icacos watershed, high concentrations of NH4+ (>1 mg N/L) are found in groundwater adjacent to the streams, making high inputs of NH4+ to the stream channel via groundwater seepage likely. Stream nutrient spiraling metrics can be used to quantify uptake and retention rates of specific nutrients, and can be measured by solute additions. Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization (TASCC) is a recently developed method (Covino et al. 2010) for quantifying nutrient uptake with a single slug addition of nutrient and conservative tracer. Here we present NH4+ uptake metrics from TASCC additions in three Luquillo streams of different sizes, ranging from 2nd to 4th order: the Rio Icacos, a larger, 3rd order tributary and a smaller 2nd order tributary. Background NH4+ concentrations vary by up to an order of magnitude, with highest concentrations (27 μg N/L) found in the smaller tributary. Background DOC concentrations are uniformly low and show no difference between the three streams (500-600 μg C/L). The smaller tributary has the shortest uptake length (155 m) and highest uptake velocity (2.9 mm/min) of the three streams. Unexpectedly, the Rio Icacos has a higher uptake velocity (1.7 mm/min) than the larger tributary (1.0 mm/min), despite having an uptake length more than double (1400 m) that of the larger tributary (596 m). Overall, NH4+ uptake is substantial in all three streams and varies with background concentrations, not stream size.

  5. Riparian forest buffers mitigate the effects of deforestation on fish assemblages in tropical headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Lorion, Christopher M; Kennedy, Brian P

    2009-03-01

    Riparian forest buffers may play a critical role in moderating the impacts of deforestation on tropical stream ecosystems, but very few studies have examined the ecological effects of riparian buffers in the tropics. To test the hypothesis that riparian forest buffers can reduce the impacts of deforestation on tropical stream biota, we sampled fish assemblages in lowland headwater streams in southeastern Costa Rica representing three different treatments: (1) forested reference stream reaches, (2) stream reaches adjacent to pasture with a riparian forest buffer averaging at least 15 m in width on each bank, and (3) stream reaches adjacent to pasture without a riparian forest buffer. Land cover upstream from the study reaches was dominated by forest at all of the sites, allowing us to isolate the reach-scale effects of the three study treatments. Fish density was significantly higher in pasture reaches than in forest and forest buffer reaches, mostly due to an increase in herbivore-detritivores, but fish biomass did not differ among reach types. Fish species richness was also higher in pasture reaches than in forested reference reaches, while forest buffer reaches were intermediate. Overall, the taxonomic and trophic structure of fish assemblages in forest and forest buffer reaches was very similar, while assemblages in pasture reaches were quite distinct. These patterns were persistent across three sampling periods during our 15-month study. Differences in stream ecosystem conditions between pasture reaches and forested sites, including higher stream temperatures, reduced fruit and seed inputs, and a trend toward increased periphyton abundance, appeared to favor fish species normally found in larger streams and facilitate a native invasion process. Forest buffer reaches, in contrast, had stream temperatures and allochthonous inputs more similar to forested streams. Our results illustrate the importance of riparian areas to stream ecosystem integrity in the tropics

  6. Instream Wood Loads and Channel Complexity in Headwater Streams Under Alternative Stable States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livers, B.; Wohl, E.

    2014-12-01

    Channel morphology and irregularities in stream boundaries can create zones of flow separation, where lower velocities trap fine sediment and organic matter and increase opportunities for nutrient processing and biological uptake. This effect is most pronounced with channel-spanning structures such as logjams. Humans have changed the spatial and temporal characteristics of wood distribution in streams, with lasting effects on instream wood recruitment, wood loads, logjam distribution, and hydraulic roughness. Previous studies in the Colorado Front Range show that contemporary headwater streams flowing through old-growth, unmanaged forests have more wood than streams flowing through younger-growth, managed forests, but do not evaluate the effects of wood on channel complexity. 'Managed' versus 'unmanaged' refers to whether forests were or are currently exposed to human alteration. Although some alteration has long since ceased, reduced wood loads in managed streams persist. Our primary objective was to quantify differences in logjams, wood volumes, stream complexity, and organic carbon storage on streams with different management and disturbance histories in order to examine legacy effects across a gradient of stream management. Data were collected during the summers of 2013 and 2014 in the Southern Rocky Mountains. The 25 stream reaches studied are 2nd to 3rd order, subalpine streams that are categorized into: old-growth unmanaged forests; younger, naturally disturbed unmanaged forests; and younger managed forests. We assessed instream and floodplain wood loads and logjams and evaluated the role that large wood plays in local channel complexity, pool volume, and storage of organic carbon. Preliminary results show that greatest wood and carbon storage in sediments, as well as channel complexity, occurs in streams in old-growth, unmanaged forests and the least wood and carbon storage and channel complexity occurs in younger-growth, managed forests.

  7. Downstream Warming and Headwater Acidity May Diminish Coldwater Habitat in Southern Appalachian Mountain Streams

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, W. A; Sams, C.

    2015-01-01

    Stream-dwelling species in the U.S. southern Appalachian Mountains region are particularly vulnerable to climate change and acidification. The objectives of this study were to quantify the spatial extent of contemporary suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive aquatic species and to forecast future habitat loss resulting from expected temperature increases on national forest lands in the southern Appalachian Mountain region. The goal of this study was to help watershed managers identify and assess stream reaches that are potentially vulnerable to warming, acidification, or both. To our knowledge, these results represent the first regional assessment of aquatic habitat suitability with respect to the combined effects of stream water temperature and acid-base status in the United States. Statistical models were developed to predict July mean daily maximum water temperatures and air-water temperature relations to determine potential changes in future stream water temperatures. The length of stream considered suitable habitat for acid- and thermally sensitive species, based on temperature and acid neutralizing capacity thresholds of 20°C and 50 μeq/L, was variable throughout the national forests considered. Stream length displaying temperature above 20°C was generally more than five times greater than the length predicted to have acid neutralizing capacity below 50 μeq/L. It was uncommon for these two stressors to occur within the same stream segment. Results suggested that species’ distributional shifts to colder, higher elevation habitats under a warming climate can be constrained by acidification of headwater streams. The approach used in this study can be applied to evaluate climate change impacts to stream water resources in other regions. PMID:26247361

  8. High-resolution analysis of salmonellae from turtles within a headwater spring ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Dittmar; Gaertner, James; Forstner, Michael R J; Rose, Francis L

    2007-04-01

    Sediments and water from the pristine headwaters of the San Marcos River, Texas, USA, as well as swabs from biofilms on the carapace and from the cloacae of 17 musk turtles (Sternotherus odoratus) and one snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina serpentina) caught at the same site, were analysed for salmonellae by culture and molecular techniques. Whereas enrichment cultures from sediment and water samples were negative for salmonellae in PCR- and in situ hybridization-based analyses, both techniques detected salmonellae after enrichments from both carapace and cloacae of nine (i.e. of 53%) musk turtles. Further characterization of 10 isolates obtained from the enrichment cultures of four selected individuals and confirmed as salmonellae by PCR analysis was achieved by fingerprinting techniques (rep-PCR). The results show differences between individuals and, in one case, variation among isolates from a single individual. All isolates from two individuals displayed identical profiles. These profiles were different from those obtained from the isolates of the third individual, which were, themselves, also identical for all isolates. Salmonellae were much more diverse in samples from the carapace of the last individual with five different rep-PCR profiles retrieved. Serotyping of seven isolates representative for each rep-PCR profile identified all isolates as representing Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype Rubislaw, which demonstrates the presence of different strains of potentially human pathogenic salmonellae naturally occurring on turtles even within pristine environments. The frequent detection of these organisms in biofilms on the carapace opens the door for speculations on the role of this habitat as a reservoir for salmonellae, and on potential implications for turtles acting as a dispersal vector. PMID:17250751

  9. Distance, flow and PCR inhibition: eDNA dynamics in two headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Jane, Stephen F; Wilcox, Taylor M; McKelvey, Kevin S; Young, Michael K; Schwartz, Michael K; Lowe, Winsor H; Letcher, Benjamin H; Whiteley, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) detection has emerged as a powerful tool for monitoring aquatic organisms, but much remains unknown about the dynamics of aquatic eDNA over a range of environmental conditions. DNA concentrations in streams and rivers will depend not only on the equilibrium between DNA entering the water and DNA leaving the system through degradation, but also on downstream transport. To improve understanding of the dynamics of eDNA concentration in lotic systems, we introduced caged trout into two fishless headwater streams and took eDNA samples at evenly spaced downstream intervals. This was repeated 18 times from mid-summer through autumn, over flows ranging from approximately 1-96 L/s. We used quantitative PCR to relate DNA copy number to distance from source. We found that regardless of flow, there were detectable levels of DNA at 239.5 m. The main effect of flow on eDNA counts was in opposite directions in the two streams. At the lowest flows, eDNA counts were highest close to the source and quickly trailed off over distance. At the highest flows, DNA counts were relatively low both near and far from the source. Biomass was positively related to eDNA copy number in both streams. A combination of cell settling, turbulence and dilution effects is probably responsible for our observations. Additionally, during high leaf deposition periods, the presence of inhibitors resulted in no amplification for high copy number samples in the absence of an inhibition-releasing strategy, demonstrating the necessity to carefully consider inhibition in eDNA analysis.

  10. Application of a basin management approach to groundwater utilization in the Otavi Mountain Land, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyns, P.

    The purpose of the paper is to provide an analysis of sustainability issues related to the practical implementation of the concept of basin management with reference to the Karst Water Management Body (KWMB) in Namibia. A river basin is regarded as an appropriate management unit and the concept of establishing basin management institutions was introduced to achieve the objectives of sustainable natural resources management in general. However, the karst aquifer is unique because it lies in the headwaters of a number of river basins and the management of this groundwater resource goes a little beyond the logic of water resource management as it is understood for surface water sources. In view of the unacceptability of the perceived top down management of water resources, a need was identified for a participatory approach to integrated groundwater resources management in the Otavi Mountain Land in Namibia. After consultations with the Government of Namibia (Government), the KWMB was established to assist stakeholders who obtained water for domestic use, mining and irrigation from aquifers in a karstified hydrogeological environment located in the Otavi Mountain Land in northern Namibia with the management of their water sources. The karst area has been declared a groundwater control area by the Government and provides the framework for efficient and sustainable management of groundwater resources. The eventual sustainability of a basin management institution depends on the justification for such an institution, the capacity of the stakeholders to drive the required activities, the resources at the disposal of the institution and numerous other factors beyond the control of the institution. The paper discusses the practical application of the principles and concepts of basin management, the challenge of stakeholder participation, the impact of Government policy and legislation as well as the sustainability of the basin management institution. The paper demonstrates

  11. Estimating gas exchange of CO2 and CH4 between headwater systems and the atmosphere in Southwest Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somlai, Celia; Natchimuthu, Sivakiruthika; Bastviken, David; Lorke, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the role of inland water systems in terms of carbon sinks and sources and their connection to the terrestrial ecosystems and landscapes is fundamental for improving the balance approach of regional and global carbon budgets. Recent research showed that freshwater bodies emit significant amounts of CO2 and CH4 into the atmosphere. The extent of the emissions from small streams and headwaters, however, remains uncertain due to a limited availability of data. Studies have shown that headwater systems receive most of the terrestrial organic carbon, have the highest dissolved CO2 concentration and the highest gas exchange velocities and cover the largest fractional surface area within fluvial networks. The gas exchange between inland waters and the atmosphere is controlled by two factors: the difference between the dissolved gas concentration and its atmospheric equilibrium concentration, and the gas exchange velocity. The direct measurement of the dissolved gas concentration of greenhouse gases can be measured straightforwardly, for example, by gas chromatography from headspace extraction of water sample. In contrast, direct measurement of gas exchange velocity is more complex and time consuming, as simultaneous measurements with a volatile and nonvolatile inert tracer gas are needed. Here we analyze measurements of gas exchange velocities, concentrations and fluxes of dissolved CO2 and CH4, as well as loads of total organic and inorganic carbon in 10 reaches in headwater streams in Southwest Sweden. We compare the gas exchange velocities measured directly through tracer injections with those estimated through various empirical approaches, which are based on modelled and measured current velocity, stream depth and slope. Furthermore, we estimate the resulting uncertainties of the flux estimates. We also present different time series of dissolved CO2, CH4 and O2 concentration, water temperature, barometric pressure, electro conductivity, and pH values

  12. Fine-scale population structure and riverscape genetics of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) distributed continuously along headwater channel networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanno, Yoichiro; Vokoun, Jason C.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2011-01-01

    Linear and heterogeneous habitat makes headwater stream networks an ideal ecosystem in which to test the influence of environmental factors on spatial genetic patterns of obligatory aquatic species. We investigated fine-scale population structure and influence of stream habitat on individual-level genetic differentiation in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) by genotyping eight microsatellite loci in 740 individuals in two headwater channel networks (7.7 and 4.4 km) in Connecticut, USA. A weak but statistically significant isolation-by-distance pattern was common in both sites. In the field, many tagged individuals were recaptured in the same 50-m reaches within a single field season (summer to fall). One study site was characterized with a hierarchical population structure, where seasonal barriers (natural falls of 1.5–2.5 m in height during summer base-flow condition) greatly reduced gene flow and perceptible spatial patterns emerged because of the presence of tributaries, each with a group of genetically distinguishable individuals. Genetic differentiation increased when pairs of individuals were separated by high stream gradient (steep channel slope) or warm stream temperature in this site, although the evidence of their influence was equivocal. In a second site, evidence for genetic clusters was weak at best, but genetic differentiation between individuals was positively correlated with number of tributary confluences. We concluded that the population-level movement of brook trout was limited in the study headwater stream networks, resulting in the fine-scale population structure (genetic clusters and clines) even at distances of a few kilometres, and gene flow was mitigated by ‘riverscape’ variables, particularly by physical barriers, waterway distance (i.e. isolation-by-distance) and the presence of tributaries.

  13. Carbon cycling and exports over diel and flood-recovery timescales in a subtropical rainforest headwater stream.

    PubMed

    Looman, Arún; Santos, Isaac R; Tait, Douglas R; Webb, Jackie R; Sullivan, Caroline A; Maher, Damien T

    2016-04-15

    Catchment headwaters comprise the majority of all stream length globally, however, carbon (C) dynamics in these systems remains poorly understood. We combined continuous measurements of pCO2 and radon ((222)Rn, a natural groundwater tracer) with discrete sampling for particulate organic, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (POC, DOC, and DIC) to assess the short-term carbon dynamics of a pristine subtropical headwater stream in Australia, over contrasting hydrologic regimes of drought, flash-flooding and recovery. Observations over 23days revealed a shift from carbon losses dominated by CO2 outgassing under conditions of low flow (66.4±0.4% of carbon export) to downstream exports of carbon during the flood (87.8±9.7% of carbon export). DOC was the dominant form of downstream exports throughout the study (DOC:DIC:POC=0.82:0.05:0.13). The broadest diel variability among variables occurred during the drought phase, with diel variability up to 662μatmd(-1) (or 27μM[CO2*]d(-1)), 17μMd(-1) and 268Bqm(-3)d(-1) for pCO2, dissolved oxygen and (222)Rn, respectively. Diel dynamics indicated multiple interrelated drivers of stream water chemistry including groundwater seepage and in-stream metabolism. The catchment exported terrestrial carbon throughout the field campaign, with a mean net stream flux of 4.7±7.8mmolCm(-2)(catchment area)d(-1) which is equivalent to 1.4±2.3% of the estimated local terrestrial net primary production. Our observations highlight the importance of accounting for hydrological extremes when assessing the carbon budgets and ecosystem metabolism of headwater streams, and provide a first estimate of aquatic carbon exports from a pristine Australian subtropical rainforest. PMID:26849329

  14. Terrestrial and in-stream influences on the spatial variability of nitrate in a forested headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Todd M.; Ingram, Spencer M.; Riscassi, Ami L.

    2010-06-01

    A vast majority of monitoring programs designed to assess nutrient fluxes from headwater systems rely upon temporally intensive sampling at a single position within the stream network, essentially measuring the integrated response of the catchment. Missing from such an approach is spatial information related to how nutrient availability varies throughout the network, where freshwater biota live and where biogeochemical processes ultimately shape the downstream water chemistry. Here, we examine the spatial distribution of nitrate (NO3-) concentrations within the Paine Run catchment, a forested headwater catchment in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. Nitrate concentrations throughout the stream network were measured as part of synoptic surveys conducted in 1992-1994, in the aftermath of region-wide gypsy moth defoliation that caused dramatic increases in stream water NO3- concentrations. A follow-up synoptic survey was conducted in 2007, when the stream water NO3- concentrations had returned to predefoliation levels. Common to each of the eight synoptic surveys were observations of multiple-fold declines in NO3- concentration along the main stem of the stream network from the headwaters to the catchment outlet. A portion of this decline was caused by dilution, as water input by tributaries at the lower elevations of the catchment tended to have lower NO3- concentrations. A stream network model was applied to determine the relative contributions of terrestrial versus in-stream processes to the spatial variability of the NO3- concentrations. Model results suggest that even though nitrate removal within the stream network can be substantial, terrestrial factors that determine the NO3- inputs to streams account for the vast majority of the spatial variability in stream water NO3- concentrations.

  15. Carbon cycling and exports over diel and flood-recovery timescales in a subtropical rainforest headwater stream.

    PubMed

    Looman, Arún; Santos, Isaac R; Tait, Douglas R; Webb, Jackie R; Sullivan, Caroline A; Maher, Damien T

    2016-04-15

    Catchment headwaters comprise the majority of all stream length globally, however, carbon (C) dynamics in these systems remains poorly understood. We combined continuous measurements of pCO2 and radon ((222)Rn, a natural groundwater tracer) with discrete sampling for particulate organic, dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (POC, DOC, and DIC) to assess the short-term carbon dynamics of a pristine subtropical headwater stream in Australia, over contrasting hydrologic regimes of drought, flash-flooding and recovery. Observations over 23days revealed a shift from carbon losses dominated by CO2 outgassing under conditions of low flow (66.4±0.4% of carbon export) to downstream exports of carbon during the flood (87.8±9.7% of carbon export). DOC was the dominant form of downstream exports throughout the study (DOC:DIC:POC=0.82:0.05:0.13). The broadest diel variability among variables occurred during the drought phase, with diel variability up to 662μatmd(-1) (or 27μM[CO2*]d(-1)), 17μMd(-1) and 268Bqm(-3)d(-1) for pCO2, dissolved oxygen and (222)Rn, respectively. Diel dynamics indicated multiple interrelated drivers of stream water chemistry including groundwater seepage and in-stream metabolism. The catchment exported terrestrial carbon throughout the field campaign, with a mean net stream flux of 4.7±7.8mmolCm(-2)(catchment area)d(-1) which is equivalent to 1.4±2.3% of the estimated local terrestrial net primary production. Our observations highlight the importance of accounting for hydrological extremes when assessing the carbon budgets and ecosystem metabolism of headwater streams, and provide a first estimate of aquatic carbon exports from a pristine Australian subtropical rainforest.

  16. Hydrology of a Basin Fen Complex in Northeastern Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, C. M.; Ketcheson, S. J.; Price, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Western Boreal Plains (WBP) landscape is a mosaic of wetlands, lakes, and forested uplands, of which wetlands comprise nearly half. Along wetland-forestland transitions, dynamic ground/surface water interactions can have a strong influence on the quantity and chemistry of runoff to downstream basins. In a region affected by large-scale industrial development, there exists the need to better understand the hydrology of wetland-forestland complexes and their interactions, particularly over the long-term in order to capture inter-year climate variability. Pauciflora Basin (750 masl) is a 43 ha basin comprised of a poor fen bordered by forested uplands located on a prominent topographic high ~40 km SE of Fort McMurray (250 masl). Over the four-year study (April-Sept), the basin received 67% more precipitation (P) per month on average compared to 30-year climate normals and an average of 100 mm more P per season than the nearby regional weather station (360 masl). Wetland-forestland connectivity was highly dynamic both spatially and temporally but typically followed a trend of (1) upland water tables (UWT) sloping towards the wetland during spring and early summer and (2) a steady decline in UWT as the season progressed leading to flow reversals and decoupling. Runoff generation from the catchment was typically greatest in the spring and early summer when wetland and forestlands were coupled. However, runoff remained sensitive to P throughout the season for most years due to frequent rain events in excess of 20 mm d-1. Inter-year variability in storage on UWT appeared to be driven by slope characteristics, and upland runoff to the fen was high when UWT was within the more hydrologically active soil layer, which may influence solute and runoff processes downstream. Headwater catchments with above average P and significant wetland-upland connectivity may represent an important water supply for downstream catchments in an otherwise subhumid climate.

  17. Episodic Emplacement of Sediment + Carbon within Large Tropical River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, R.; Aufdenkampe, A.

    2012-04-01

    Application of advanced methods for imaging (sub-bottom sonar and ERGI), dating (high resolution 210-Pb and 14-C from deep cores), and biogeochemical analysis have facilitated the characterization and inter-comparison of floodplain sedimentation rates, styles, and carbon loading across disparate large river basins. Two examples explored here are the near-pristine 72,000 km2 Beni River basin in northern Bolivia and the similarly natural 36,000 km2 Strickland River basin in Papua New Guinea - that are located on either side of the Equatorial Pacific warm pool that drives the ENSO phenomenon. Our published research suggests that large, rapid-rise, cold-phase ENSO floods account for the preponderance of sediment accumulation within these two tropical systems. New results to be presented at EGU further clarify the extent of modern deposits (~100 yrs) within both systems and add a deeper perspective into how these extensive floodplains developed over the Holocene, both in response to external forcing (climate and base level) and internal system morphodynamics. The vast scale of these temporally discrete deposits (typically 100s of millions of tonnes over relatively short time periods) involved equate to high burial rates, which in turn support the high carbon loadings sequestered within the resulting sedimentary deposits. We have identified the principal source of this carbon and sedimentary material to be extensive landslides throughout the high-relief headwaters - failures that deliver huge charges of pulverized rock and soil directly into canyons (in both the Bolivian Andes and the PNG Highlands), where raging floodwaters provide efficient transport to lowland depocentres. We present recent results from our research in these basins, providing insight into the details of such enormous mass budgets that result in a signicant carbon sink within the floodplains. Processes, timing, and rates are compared between the two systems, providing insight into the nature of

  18. Hydrogeologic comparison of an acidic-lake basin with a neutral-lake basin in the West-Central Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    1985-01-01

    Two small headwater lake basins that receive similar amounts of acidic atmospheric deposition have significantly different lake outflow pH values; pH at Panther Lake (neutral) ranges from about 4.7 to 7; that at Woods Lake (acidic) ranges from about 4.3 to 5. A hydrologic analysis, which included monthly water budgets, hydrograph analysis, examination of flow duration and runoff recession curves, calculation of ground-water storage, and an analysis of lateral flow capacity of the soil, indicates that differences in lakewater pH can be attributed to differences in the ground-water contribution to the lakes. A larger percentage of the water discharged from the neutral lake is derived from ground water than that from the acidic lake. Ground water has a higher pH resulting from a sufficiently long residence time for neutralizing chemical reactions to occur with the till. The difference in ground-water contribution is attributed to a more extensive distribution of thick till (<3m) in the neutral-lake basin than in the acidic-lake basin; average thickness of till in the neutral-lake basin is 24m whereas that in the other is 2.3m. During the snowmelt period, as much as three months of accumulated precipitation may be released within two weeks causing the lateral flow capacity of the deeper mineral soil to be exceeded in the neutral-lake basin. This excess water moves over and through the shallow acidic soil horizons and causes the lakewater pH to decrease during snowmelt.Two small headwater lake basins that receive similar amounts of acidic atmospheric deposition have significantly different lake outflow pH values; pH at Panther Lake (neutral) ranges from about 4. 7 to 7; that at Woods Lake (acidic) ranges from about 4. 3 to 5. A hydrologic analysis, which included monthly water budgets, hydrograph analysis, examination of flow duration and runoff recession curves, calculation of ground-water storage, and an analysis of lateral flow capacity of the soil, indicates that

  19. Thrace basin: An extensional Tertiary sedimentary basin in an area of major plate convergences, northwest Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Turgut, S.; Atalik, E.

    1988-08-01

    The Thrace basin forms one of the largest Tertiary basins in Turkey. Paleontological and sedimentological evidence suggests sedimentation and basin formation commenced by a major transgression from the southwest in the middle to late middle Eocene. The basin formed over an extremely deformed crustal block. It straddles an Upper Cretaceous suture zone which later became a major mobile belt in Turkey. Syndepositional fault patterns and sedimentary thickness indicate the basin was evolved tectonically by north-south extension. Large listric normal faults and east-west depositional axis are evidence of this extension. Early marine sedimentation in the basin was accompanied by an intense volcanism which poured large quantities of ash into the depositional environment. Normal basement faults were active and great thicknesses of clastic sediments accumulated along faults. Reefal to shallow marine carbonates were deposited on shelves and over intrabasinal paleohighs. Sedimentation became regressive in the early Oligocene. Alternation of marine and nonmarine clastic deposition continued without interruption until the end of the Oligocene. By the late Oligocene to early Miocene, the whole basin was subjected to intense tectonism that caused uplift and faulting. Seismic reflection profiles reveal a very complex tectonic style in the basin. Fault-related inversion and flowage structures involving shale diapirism are quite common. Eocene and Oligocene shales are mature enough to generate economical quantities of hydrocarbons. Their source quality is fair to poor. Sand bodies in the Eocene-Oligocene series and reefal carbonates form the reservoir facies, and they are targets for exploration.

  20. Factors affecting distribution of wood, detritus, and sediment in headwater streams draining managed young-growth red alder - Conifer forests in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomi, T.; Johnson, A.C.; Deal, R.L.; Hennon, P.E.; Orlikowska, E.H.; Wipfli, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Factors (riparian stand condition, management regimes, and channel properties) affecting distributions of wood, detritus (leaves and branches), and sediment were examined in headwater streams draining young-growth red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) - conifer riparian forests (40 years old) remained in channels and provided sites for sediment and organic matter storage. Despite various alder-conifer mixtures and past harvesting effects, the abundance of large wood, fine wood, and detritus accumulations significantly decreased with increasing channel bank-full width (0.5-3.5 m) along relatively short channel distances (up to 700 m). Changes in wood, detritus, and sediment accumulations together with changes in riparian stand characteristics create spatial and temporal variability of in-channel conditions in headwater systems. A component of alder within young-growth riparian forests may benefit both wood production and biological recovery in disturbed headwater stream channels. ?? 2006 NRC.

  1. How integrated is river basin management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Peter W.; Gregory, Kenneth J.; Brookes, Andrew

    1991-05-01

    Land and water management is increasingly focused upon the drainage basin. Thirty-six terms recently used for schemes of “integrated basin management” include reference to the subject or area and to the aims of integrated river basin management, often without allusion to the multiobjective nature. Diversity in usage of terms has occurred because of the involvement of different disciplines, of the increasing coherence of the drainage basin approach, and the problems posed in particular parts of the world. The components included in 21 different approaches are analyzed, and, in addition to showing that components related broadly to water supply, river channel, land, and leisure aspects, it is concluded that there are essentially five interrelated facets of integrated basin management that involved water, channel, land, ecology, and human activity. Two aspects not fully included in many previous schemes concern river channel changes and the dynamic integrity of the fluvial system. To clarify the terminology used, it is suggested that the term comprehensive river basin management should be used where a wide range of components is involved, whereas integrated basin management can signify the interactions of components and the dominance of certain components in the particular area. Holistic river basin management is advocated as a term representing an approach that is both fully comprehensive and integrated but also embraces the energetics of the river system and consideration of changes of river channels and of human impacts throughout the river system. The paradigm of working with the river can be extended to one of working with the river in the holistic basin context.

  2. Hydrogeologic Framework and Occurrence and Movement of Ground Water in the Upper Humboldt River Basin, Northeastern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plume, Russell W.

    2009-01-01

    The upper Humboldt River basin encompasses 4,364 square miles in northeastern Nevada, and it comprises the headwaters area of the Humboldt River. Nearly all flow of the river originates in this area. The upper Humboldt River basin consists of several structural basins, in places greater than 5,000 feet deep, in which basin-fill deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age and volcanic rocks of Tertiary age have accumulated. The bedrock of each structural basin and adjacent mountains is composed of carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age and crystalline rocks of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic age. The permeability of bedrock generally is very low except for carbonate rocks, which can be very permeable where circulating ground water has widened fractures through geologic time. The principal aquifers in the upper Humboldt River basin occur within the water-bearing strata of the extensive older basin-fill deposits and the thinner, younger basin-fill deposits that underlie stream flood plains. Ground water in these aquifers moves from recharge areas along mountain fronts to discharge areas along stream flood plains, the largest of which is the Humboldt River flood plain. The river gains flow from ground-water seepage to its channel from a few miles west of Wells, Nevada, to the west boundary of the study area. Water levels in the upper Humboldt River basin fluctuate annually in response to the spring snowmelt and to the distribution of streamflow diverted for irrigation of crops and meadows. Water levels also have responded to extended periods (several years) of above or below average precipitation. As a result of infiltration from the South Fork Reservoir during the past 20 years, ground-water levels in basin-fill deposits have risen over an area as much as one mile beyond the reservoir and possibly even farther away in Paleozoic bedrock.

  3. Summary of Hydrologic Data for the Tuscarawas River Basin, Ohio, with an Annotated Bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haefner, Ralph J.; Simonson, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    . Although hydraulic connection between the sandstone bedrock and the sands and gravels in valleys is likely, it has not been assessed in the Tuscarawas River Basin. In 2001, the major land uses in the basin were approximately 40 percent forested, 39 percent agricultural, and 17 percent urban/residential. Between 1992 and 2001, forested land use decreased by 2 percent with correspondingly small increases in agricultural and urban land uses, but from 1980 to 2005, the 13-county area that encompasses the basin experienced a 7.1-percent increase in population. Higher population density and percentages of urban land use were typical of the northern, headwaters parts of the basin in and around the cities of Akron, Canton, and New Philadelphia; the southern area was rural. The basin receives approximately 38 inches of precipitation per year that exits the basin through evapotranspiration, streamflow, and groundwater withdrawals. Recharge to groundwater is estimated to range from 6 to 10 inches per year across the basin. In 2000, approximately 89 percent of the 116 million gallons per day of water used in the basin came from groundwater sources, whereas 11 percent came from surface-water sources. To examine directions of groundwater flow in the basin, a new dataset of water-level contours was developed by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. The contours were compiled on a map that shows that groundwater flows from the uplands towards the valleys and that the water-level surface mimics surface topography; however, there are areas where data were too sparse to adequately map the water-level surface. Additionally, little is known about deep groundwater that may be flowing into the basin from outside the basin and groundwater interactions with surface-water bodies. Many previous reports as well as new data collected as part of this study show that water quality in the streams and aquifers in the Tuscarawas River Basin has been degraded by urban, suburban, and rural

  4. Sediment and nutrient delivery from thermokarst features in the foothills of the North Slope, Alaska: Potential impacts on headwater stream ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowden, W.B.; Gooseff, M.N.; Balser, A.; Green, A.; Peterson, B.J.; Bradford, J.

    2008-01-01

    Permafrost is a defining characteristic of the Arctic environment. However, climate warming is thawing permafrost in many areas leading to failures in soil structure called thermokarst. An extensive survey of a 600 km2 area in and around the Toolik Lake Natural Research Area (TLNRA) revealed at least 34 thermokarst features, two thirds of which were new since ???1980 when a high resolution aerial survey of the area was done. Most of these thermokarst features were associated with headwater streams or lakes. We have measured significantly increased sediment and nutrient loading from thermokarst features to streams in two well-studied locations near the TLNRA. One small thermokarst gully that formed in 2003 on the Toolik River in a 0.9 km2 subcatchment delivered more sediment to the river than is normally delivered in 18 years from 132 km2 in the adjacent upper Kuparuk River basin (a long-term monitoring reference site). Ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations downstream from a thermokarst feature on Imnavait Creek increased significantly compared to upstream reference concentrations and the increased concentrations persisted over the period of sampling (1999-2005). The downstream concentrations were similar to those we have used in a long-term experimental manipulation of the Kuparuk River and that have significantly altered the structure and function of that river. A subsampling of other thermokarst features from the extensive regional survey showed that concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate were always higher downstream of the thermokarst features. Our previous research has shown that even minor increases in nutrient loading stimulate primary and secondary production. However, increased sediment loading could interfere with benthic communities and change the responses to increased nutrient delivery. Although the terrestrial area impacted by thermokarsts is limited, the aquatic habitat altered by these failures can be extensive. If warming in

  5. Soil moisture mapping in torrential headwater catchments using a local interpolation method (Draix-Bléone field observatory, South Alps, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Florian; Marc, Vincent; Douvinet, Johnny; Rossello, Philippe; Le Bouteiller, Caroline; Malet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key parameter that controls runoff processes at the watershed scale. It is characterized by a high area and time variability, controlled by site properties such as soil texture, topography, vegetation cover and climate. Several recent studies showed that changes in water storage was a key variable to understand the distribution of water residence time and the shape of flood's hydrograph (McDonnell and Beven, 2014; Davies and Beven, 2015). Knowledge of high frequency soil moisture variation across scales is a prerequisite for better understanding the areal distribution of runoff generation. The present study has been carried out in the torrential Draix-Bléone's experimental catchments, where water storage processes are expected to occur mainly on the first meter of soil. The 0,86 km2 Laval marly torrential watershed has a peculiar hydrological behavior during flood events with specific discharge among the highest in the world. To better understand the Laval internal behavior and to identify explanatory parameters of runoff generation, additional field equipment has been setup in sub-basins with various land use and morphological characteristics. From fall 2015 onwards this new instrumentation helped to supplement the routine measurements (rainfall rate, streamflow) and to develop a network of high frequency soil water content sensors (moisture probes, mini lysimeter). Data collected since early May and complementary measurement campaigns (itinerant soil moisture measurements, geophysical measurements) make it now possible to propose a soil water content mapping procedure. We use the LISDQS spatial extrapolation model based on a local interpolation method (Joly et. al, 2008). The interpolation is carried out from different geographical variables which are derived from a high resolution DEM (1m LIDAR) and a land cover image. Unlike conventional interpolation procedure, this method takes into account local forcing parameters such as slope, aspect

  6. The impact of land-cover change on flood peaks in peatland basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jihui; Holden, Joseph; Kirkby, Mike

    2016-05-01

    In headwater peatlands, saturation-excess overland flow is a dominant source of river discharge. Human modifications to headwater peatlands result in vegetation cover change but there is a lack of understanding about how the spatial distribution of such change impacts flood peaks. A fully distributed version of TOPMODEL with an overland flow velocity module was used to simulate flood response for three upland peat basins. Bare peat strips adjacent to channels resulted in a higher and faster flow peak; for a 20 mm h-1 rainfall event, with bare riparian zones covering 10% of the basin area, peaks were increased, compared to the current hydrograph, by 12.8%, 1.8%, and 19.6% in the three basins. High density Sphagnum ground cover over the same riparian zones reduced flow peaks (e.g., by 10.1%, 1.8%, and 13.4% for the 20 mm h-1 event) compared to the current hydrograph. With similar total areas of land-cover change, the size of randomly located patches of changed cover had no effect on peak flow for patch sizes up to 40,000 m2. However, cover changes on gentle slope areas generally resulted in a larger change in peak flow when compared with the same changes on steeper slopes. Considering all results for the same proportion of catchment area that undergoes change, land-cover change along narrow riparian buffer strips had the highest impact on river flow. Thus, the protection and revegetation of damaged riparian areas in upland peat catchments may be highly beneficial for flood management.

  7. Hisonotusacuen, a new and phenotypically variable cascudinho (Siluriformes, Loricariidae, Hypoptopomatinae) from the upper rio Xingu basin, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriel S C; Roxo, Fábio F; Oliveira, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    A new species of Hisonotus is described from the headwaters of the rio Xingu. The new species is distinguished from its congeners by having a functional V-shaped spinelet, odontodes not forming longitudinal aligned rows on the head and trunk, lower counts of the lateral and median series of abdominal figs, presence of a single rostral fig at the tip of the snout, absence of the unpaired figlets at typical adipose fin position, yellowish-tipped teeth, absence of conspicuous dark saddles and stripe on the body and higher number of teeth on the premaxillary and dentary. The new species, Hisonotusacuen, is restricted to headwaters of the rio Xingu basin, and is the first species of the genus Hisonotus described from the rio Xingu basin. Hisonotusacuen is highly variable in aspects of external body proportions, including body depth, snout length, and abdomen length. This variation is partly distributed within and among populations, and is not strongly correlated with body size. PCA of 83 adult specimens from six allopatric populations indicates the presence of continuous variation. Therefore, the available morphological data suggest that the individuals inhabiting the six localities of rio Xingu represent different populations of a single species. Low intraspecific variation in mitochondrial Cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) provides corroborative evidence. PMID:25349492

  8. Rhinolekoscapetinga: a new cascudinho species (Loricariidae, Otothyrinae) from the rio Tocantins basin and comments on its ancestral dispersal route.

    PubMed

    Roxo, Fábio F; Ochoa, Luz E; Silva, Gabriel S C; Oliveira, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The present study deals with the description of a new species of Rhinolekos. It can be distinguished from its congeners by having 31 vertebrae, the anterior portion of the compound supraneural-first dorsal-fin proximal radial contacting the neural spine of the 9(th) vertebra, the absence of transverse dark bands in the pectoral, pelvic and anal-fin rays, 24-28 plates in the dorsal series, the lack of odontodes on the ventral tip of the snout, the absence of accessory teeth, a greater prenasal length, a smaller head length, and by a greater snout length. Rhinolekoscapetinga is restricted to the headwaters of the rio Tocantins and it is the first species of this genus in the Amazon basin. Additionally, we present a brief discussion of a biogeographic scenario that may explain the dispersal of the new species from the rio Paranaíba to the rio Tocantins basin. We suggest that the ancestral lineage of Rhinolekoscapetinga reached the rio Tocantins from portions of the rio Paranaíba at the end of the Miocene, about 6.3 Mya (4.1-13.9 Mya 95% HPD), probably as a result of headwater capture processes among adjacent drainages. PMID:25685034

  9. Hisonotus acuen, a new and phenotypically variable cascudinho (Siluriformes, Loricariidae, Hypoptopomatinae) from the upper rio Xingu basin, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gabriel S. C.; Roxo, Fábio F.; Oliveira, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Hisonotus is described from the headwaters of the rio Xingu. The new species is distinguished from its congeners by having a functional V-shaped spinelet, odontodes not forming longitudinal aligned rows on the head and trunk, lower counts of the lateral and median series of abdominal figs, presence of a single rostral fig at the tip of the snout, absence of the unpaired figlets at typical adipose fin position, yellowish-tipped teeth, absence of conspicuous dark saddles and stripe on the body and higher number of teeth on the premaxillary and dentary. The new species, Hisonotus acuen, is restricted to headwaters of the rio Xingu basin, and is the first species of the genus Hisonotus described from the rio Xingu basin. Hisonotus acuen is highly variable in aspects of external body proportions, including body depth, snout length, and abdomen length. This variation is partly distributed within and among populations, and is not strongly correlated with body size. PCA of 83 adult specimens from six allopatric populations indicates the presence of continuous variation. Therefore, the available morphological data suggest that the individuals inhabiting the six localities of rio Xingu represent different populations of a single species. Low intraspecific variation in mitochondrial Cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) provides corroborative evidence. PMID:25349492

  10. Rhinolekos capetinga: a new cascudinho species (Loricariidae, Otothyrinae) from the rio Tocantins basin and comments on its ancestral dispersal route

    PubMed Central

    Roxo, Fábio F.; Ochoa, Luz E.; Silva, Gabriel S. C.; Oliveira, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study deals with the description of a new species of Rhinolekos. It can be distinguished from its congeners by having 31 vertebrae, the anterior portion of the compound supraneural-first dorsal-fin proximal radial contacting the neural spine of the 9th vertebra, the absence of transverse dark bands in the pectoral, pelvic and anal-fin rays, 24–28 plates in the dorsal series, the lack of odontodes on the ventral tip of the snout, the absence of accessory teeth, a greater prenasal length, a smaller head length, and by a greater snout length. Rhinolekos capetinga is restricted to the headwaters of the rio Tocantins and it is the first species of this genus in the Amazon basin. Additionally, we present a brief discussion of a biogeographic scenario that may explain the dispersal of the new species from the rio Paranaíba to the rio Tocantins basin. We suggest that the ancestral lineage of Rhinolekos capetinga reached the rio Tocantins from portions of the rio Paranaíba at the end of the Miocene, about 6.3 Mya (4.1–13.9 Mya 95% HPD), probably as a result of headwater capture processes among adjacent drainages. PMID:25685034

  11. Understanding drivers of the export of dissolved organic carbon from a German headwater catchment using Generalised Additive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, Benny; Musolff, Andreas; Tittel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    In the literature, several causes of recently increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in headwaters across eastern North America and northern and central Europe have been debated. One likely driver of the widespread increase of DOC concentrations since the early 1990s are decreasing depositions of acid rain resulting in an increased solubility of organic carbon compounds including humic acids. Here, we tested the hypothesis if the reduced availability of nitrate stimulated the microbial reduction of ferric iron soil minerals and the mobilisation of DOC. Forested catchments are relatively unaffected by agricultural and urban nitrate inputs. In these catchments, decreasing depositions often resulted in a reduced availability of nitrate, which are preferred electron acceptors in microbial decomposition processes. As ferric iron minerals act as efficient sorbents of organic compounds in soils its reduction may cause a release of humic substances and hence an export of DOC. To test this hypothesis, time series of DOC, dissolved iron and nitrate from a forested headwater catchment in Germany were examined using Generalised Additive Models. We found that rising DOC concentrations most likely resulted from a reductive dissolution of iron(III) minerals in soils and the associated mobilisation of adsorbed organic carbon. Phosphate, which can trigger undesired algal growth and is also known to be adsorbed by particulate iron(III), was released as well.

  12. When the entire landscape is riparian: the challenges to understanding and modeling ecosystem dynamics in lowland headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, E. S.; Poole, G.; Ardon, M.; Helton, A. M.; Morse, J. L.; Payn, R.; Burgin, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    In the low relief landscapes of the southeastern coastal plain, headwater ecosystems have ill defined channels and lack visible valleys. The links between rivers and their floodplains in such landscapes are so spatially extensive that many headwaters in this region are classified as stream swamps or riverine wetlands. Frequently flooded soils are highly organic and drain slowly so that the water table often rises above the ground surface. Hydrologic flowpaths through the riparian zone are thus quite different from upland systems and are often dominated by lateral surface water connections, while the vertical movement of the water table is a critical control over biogeochemical function within all landscape patches. Linking the variation in vertical hydrologic connectivity to biogeochemical function at the patch scale and setting patch dynamics into a landscape level hydrologic context are ultimately necessary steps towards building a mechanistic, ecosystem-level understanding of these extensive coastal habitats. In this talk I will discuss our progress in developing conceptual and empirical models of riverine wetland biogeochemistry based upon four years of intensive observational and experimental research in a large (440ha) restored coastal plain wetland in the North Carolina coastal plain.

  13. Estimation of pesticide and transformation product export pathways in a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassmann, Matthias; Olsson, Oliver; Stamm, Christian; Weiler, Markus; Lange, Jens; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Following their application, pesticide residues are exported towards rivers along several hydrological pathways in agricultural areas. The importance of each pathway is influenced by the substances' physico-chemical characteristics, mainly sorption and degradation. Incomplete mineralization results in the formation of transformation products (TPs) which have generally different environmental fate characteristics than their parent compounds (PCs). Therefore, the export pathways of pesticides and their transformation products towards rivers may also be different. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we extended a distributed process-based hydrological model (ZIN-AgriTra) by the environmental fate of pesticides and their TPs. The process-based nature of the model allowed for an analysis of PC and TP export pathways including overland flow, lateral preferential flow in soils and soil water flow to tile drains. The model was applied to a Swiss headwater catchment using three pesticides and their TPs as test substances. It was successfully calibrated to three sampling stations in the catchment. At the end of the simulated three-months period, most of the applied pesticides were either fully mineralized or incompletely transformed. Less than 2% of each pesticide was exported to the river as PC or TP. Although all three pesticides could be classified as slightly mobile they remained in the top soil layer during the whole period, whereas the more mobile TPs were additionally leached through the soil towards tile drains. Accordingly, PCs were exported largely by surface runoff, while a larger share of TPs was exported via tile drains. Additionally, the delayed formation and degradation of TPs led to an export under different hydrological conditions resulting in an increased subsurface export of TPs towards the end of the simulation period. A consequence of the different export pathways of PCs and TPs could be shown by an assessment of critical source areas (CSA) in the

  14. Riparian and in-stream controls on nutrient concentrations and fluxes in a headwater forested stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Lupon, A.; Ribot, M.; Sabater, F.; Martí, E.

    2015-03-01

    Headwater streams are recipients of water sources draining through terrestrial ecosystems. At the same time, stream biota can transform and retain nutrients dissolved in stream water. Yet studies considering simultaneously these two sources of variation in stream nutrient chemistry are rare. To fill this gap of knowledge, we analyzed stream water and riparian groundwater concentrations and fluxes as well as in-stream net uptake rates for nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) along a 3.7 km reach on an annual basis. Chloride concentrations (used as conservative tracer) indicated a strong hydrological connection at the riparian-stream interface. However, stream and riparian groundwater nutrient concentrations showed a moderate to null correlation, suggesting high in-stream biogeochemical processing. In-stream net nutrient uptake (Fsw) was highly variable across contiguous segments and over time, but its temporal variation was not related to the vegetative period of the riparian forest. For NH4+, the occurrence of Fsw > 0 μg N m-1 s-1 (gross uptake > release) was high along the reach, while for NO3-, the occurrence of Fsw < 0 μg N m-1 s-1 (gross uptake < release) increased along the reach. Within segments and dates, Fsw, whether negative or positive, accounted for a median of 6, 18, and 20% of the inputs of NO3-, NH4+, and SRP, respectively. Whole-reach mass balance calculations indicated that in-stream net uptake reduced stream NH4+ flux up to 90%, while the stream acted mostly as a source of NO3- and SRP. During the dormant period, concentrations decreased along the reach for NO3-, but increased for NH4+ and SRP. During the vegetative period, NH4+ decreased, SRP increased, and NO3- showed a U-shaped pattern along the reach. These longitudinal trends resulted from the combination of hydrological mixing with terrestrial inputs and in-stream nutrient processing. Therefore, the assessment of these two sources of variation in stream

  15. Determining surface water sources using spatial and temporal variation in stream chemistry in a headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, M. A.; Bailey, S. W.; McGuire, K. J.; Bullen, T. D.

    2010-12-01

    Fine scale sampling of a first order headwater catchment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA showed similar spatial variation in stream chemistry to other studies of fifth order catchments in the area. We sampled on five dates representing varying flow conditions at 110 surface water locations in Watershed 3, the 41-ha hydrologic reference catchment at Hubbard Brook. Samples were collected at 50 meter intervals along the stream network and at discrete groundwater seeps, and were analyzed for concentrations of major and trace ions. In order to determine catchment characteristics controlling stream chemistry, we evaluated surface and subsurface catchment structure. Surface structure was analyzed with topographic indices describing land surface patterns, which were derived from terrain analysis of a LiDAR based 5 m DEM. Subsurface structure, such as soil horizon development and type of parent material, was investigated through soil profiles along transects of wells established in seven distinct soil types. Height and duration of water table were measured with capacitance water level recorders and samples were taken to characterize groundwater chemistry. Spatial patterns in chemistry and timing of water table response to rain events were used to infer subsurface flowpaths. Four potential sources and mechanisms controlling surface water characteristics were identified: discrete soil horizons, drainage from distinct soil types, riparian zone and near stream exchanges, and isolated seeps as distinct groundwater inputs. Sub-catchments west of the main stream had relatively high concentrations of silicon, calcium and sodium as well as more persistent stream flow and groundwater seeps, suggesting deep flowpaths through the soils. Sub-catchments east of the main stream had low pH and high concentrations of DOC and aluminum, as well as more ephemeral flow and a lack of seeps, suggesting shallow flowpaths through the soils. Upslope accumulated area, distance from the

  16. A national scale monitoring network for nutrients in agriculture dominated headwaters in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broers, H. P.; Rozemeijer, J.; Klein, J.

    2012-04-01

    Although specific monitoring networks exist in the Netherlands which assess the leaching of nutrients to surface waters and groundwater, none of them was capable to quantify the effects of nutrient reduction schemes to agriculture dominated headwaters. Thus, an important link was missing which relates the nutrient concentrations measured in shallow groundwater at farm scale to nutrient concentrations measured at the scale of Water Framework Directive water bodies. A new network was composed using existing monitoring locations and water quality time series owned by the 24 water boards in the Netherlands. Only monitoring locations were selected where no other pollution sources , such as water sewage treatment plants were influencing water quality. Eventually, 168 monitoring locations were selected to assess compliance to environmental standards and 80 for trend analysis. Compliance was tested applying environmental quality standards (EQS) based on summer averaged concentrations, which are set by the water boards and which are water type and location dependent. Compliance was strongly weather dependent, and only 24% of the locations complied for N and P under all weather conditions. Trends were assessed using a combination of seasonal Mann-Kendall tests and Theil-Sen robust lines for individual time series, and aggregating those trends to acquire median and average trend slopes for the sand, clay and peat regions in the Netherlands. Significant downward trends were demonstrated for N and P over the whole period (slopes between -0,55 mgN/l and -0.015 and 0.02 mg P/l per 10 year). Slopes were even more pronounced for winter concentrations of N (-0.89 mg N/l per 10 year). The slopes were relevant and environmentally significant in relation to the height of the EQS and were attributed to the effective reduction of nutrient leaching as the result of adapted farming practices. The presentation will highlight and evaluate choices in the design of the newly composed network

  17. Channel and Catchment Morphology, Spatial Intermittency, and Carbon Chemistry of a Headwater Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, B.; Wondzell, S. M.; Serchan, S. P.; Haggerty, R.; Ward, A. S.; Schmadel, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated carbon dynamics in a steep, forested, headwater stream in the Cascade Mountains of western Oregon, USA. Measurements from a continuously recording pCO2 probe located near the mouth of the catchment showed that the stream was always super saturated with CO2 with respect to atmospheric concentrations, ranging from 500 ppm in mid-winter to as much as 3,500 ppm in late summer. Continuous measurements of pCO2 from a hyporheic well suggested that the hyporheic zone was a likely source of the super-saturated stream water because the hyporheic concentrations of CO2 ranged from a mid-winter low of 4,000 ppm to a late summer high of 16,000 ppm. Here, we investigate the causes for the large seasonal changes in pCO2 in the stream water. We conducted longitudinal synoptic surveys of flow and carbon chemistry over the period of baseflow recession during summer 2015. The channel is narrow and steep with occasional bedrock segments. However, debris flow deposits in the lower portions of the studied reach create wider valley floors where hyporheic exchange can capture 100% of the streamflow when discharge is very low. At the beginning of the summer when discharge was relatively high, flow was spatially continuous, but by mid-summer, stream flow became spatially discontinuous. Upwelling hyporheic water in these locations appears to be super saturated with CO2. In early summer, the amount of upwelling hyporheic water was small relative to stream discharge so that hyporheic exchange had only a modest influence on stream pCO2. Later in the summer, when discharge was much smaller relative to hyporheic exchange, we observed much greater spatial variability in CO2, which averaged 2720 ppm downstream of dry segments longer than 5 m but only averaged 980 ppm in wet segments and below shorter dry segments