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Sample records for health behavior program

  1. Behavioral Health Program Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveton, Lauren B.

    2006-01-01

    The project goal is to develop behavioral health prevention and maintenance system for continued crew health, safety, and performance for exploration missions. The basic scope includes a) Operationally-relevant research related to clinical cognitive and behavioral health of crewmembers; b) Ground-based studies using analog environments (Antarctic, NEEMO, simulations, and other testbeds; c) ISS studies (ISSMP) focusing on operational issues related to behavioral health outcomes and standards; d) Technology development activities for monitoring and diagnostic tools; and e) Cross-disciplinary research (e.g., human factors and habitability research, skeletal muscle, radiation).

  2. NASA Human Research Program: Behavioral Health and Performance Program Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveton, Lauren B.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the performance errors associated with sleep loss, fatigue and psychomotor factors during manned space flight. Short and long term behavioral health factors are also addressed

  3. Health plans' disease management programs: extending across the medical and behavioral health spectrum?

    PubMed

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; Hodgkin, Dominic; Morley, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Although the disease management industry has expanded rapidly, there is little nationally representative data regarding medical and behavioral health disease management programs at the health plan level. National estimates from a survey of private health plans indicate that 90% of health plan products offered disease management for general medical conditions such as diabetes but only 37% had depression programs. The frequency of specific depression disease management activities varied widely. Program adoption was significantly related to product type and behavioral health contracting. In health plans, disease management has penetrated more slowly into behavioral health and depression program characteristics are highly variable.

  4. Health Plans' Disease Management Programs: Extending across the Medical and Behavioral Health Spectrum?

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Horgan, Constance M.; Garnick, Deborah W.; Hodgkin, Dominic; Morley, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    While the disease management industry has expanded rapidly, there is little nationally representative data regarding medical and behavioral health disease management programs at the health plan level. National estimates from a survey of private health plans indicate that 90% of health plan products offered disease management for general medical conditions such as diabetes, but only 37% had depression programs. The frequency of specific depression disease management activities varied widely. Program adoption was significantly related to product type and behavioral health contracting. In health plans, disease management has penetrated more slowly into behavioral health, and depression program characteristics are highly variable. PMID:18806594

  5. Virtual Behavioral Health Program at TAMC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-25

    Guam  Services to National Guard/Army Reserve Families and Soldiers living on the Hawaiian Islands and remote islands of the Pacific  Services to...Assessment Program 2011 MHS Conference Mahalo! 27 raymond.folen@us.army.mil suzie.martin@us.army.mil brenda.edmonds@us.army.mil Tue 80°F | 69°F Wed 80°F...70°F Thur 78°F | 69°F Fri 78°F | 68°F Weather for Honolulu, HI Tue 50°F | 35°F Wed 41°F | 34°F Thu 39°F | 27°F Fri 39°F | 30°F Weather for Washington, DC

  6. 25 CFR 36.91 - What are the program requirements for behavioral health services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the program requirements for behavioral health... SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Program Requirements § 36.91 What are the program requirements for behavioral health services? (a) The homeliving behavioral health program must make available the following services...

  7. 25 CFR 36.91 - What are the program requirements for behavioral health services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What are the program requirements for behavioral health... SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Program Requirements § 36.91 What are the program requirements for behavioral health services? (a) The homeliving behavioral health program must make available the following services...

  8. 25 CFR 36.91 - What are the program requirements for behavioral health services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are the program requirements for behavioral health... SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Program Requirements § 36.91 What are the program requirements for behavioral health services? (a) The homeliving behavioral health program must make available the following services...

  9. Behavioral Health and Performance Operations During the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beven, G.; Holland, A.; Moomaw, R.; Sipes, W.; Vander Ark, S.

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the Columbia STS 107 disaster in 2003, the Johnson Space Center s Behavioral Health and Performance Group (BHP) became involved in Space Shuttle Operations on an as needed basis, occasionally acting as a consultant and primarily addressing crew-crew personality conflicts. The BHP group also assisted with astronaut selection at every selection cycle beginning in 1991. Following STS 107, an event that spawned an increased need of behavioral health support to STS crew members and their dependents, BHP services to the Space Shuttle Program were enhanced beginning with the STS 114 Return to Flight mission in 2005. These services included the presence of BHP personnel at STS launches and landings for contingency support, a BHP briefing to the entire STS crew at L-11 months, a private preflight meeting with the STS Commander at L-9 months, and the presence of a BHP consultant at the L-1.5 month Family Support Office briefing to crew and family members. The later development of an annual behavioral health assessment of all active astronauts also augmented BHP s Space Shuttle Program specific services, allowing for private meetings with all STS crew members before and after each mission. The components of each facet of these BHP Space Shuttle Program support services will be presented, along with valuable lessons learned, and with recommendations for BHP involvement in future short duration space missions

  10. 25 CFR 36.91 - What are the program requirements for behavioral health services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dealing with emergency behavioral health care issues. (c) Parents or guardians may opt out of any non... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are the program requirements for behavioral health... health services? (a) The homeliving behavioral health program must make available the following...

  11. Behavioral health services in separate CHIP programs on the eve of parity.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Rachel L; Beardslee, William R; Greenfield, Shelly F; Meara, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) plays a vital role in financing behavioral health services for low-income children. This study examines behavioral health benefit design and management in separate CHIP programs on the eve of federal requirements for behavioral health parity. Even before parity implementation, many state CHIP programs did not impose service limits or cost sharing for behavioral health benefits. However, a substantial share of states imposed limits or cost sharing that might hinder access to care. The majority of states use managed care to administer behavioral health benefits. It is important to monitor how states adapt their programs to comply with parity.

  12. A sustainable behavioral health program integrated with public health primary care.

    PubMed

    Mims, Susan

    2006-01-01

    The need for behavioral healthcare for the poor and indigent is well documented in rural North Carolina, and integrated behavioral healthcare--that is, mental health screening and treatment offered as part of primary care services--has proven a very effective and efficient method to improve patients' health. In 2000, the Buncombe County Health Center (BCHC) began a grant-funded program treating depressed patients in its public health clinics and school health programs. The Health Center used the opportunity to send a team to the Management Academy for Public Health to learn business principles that could be applied to the challenge of sustaining this program as part of its ongoing public health service delivery for the county. Using their business plan from the Management Academy, the BCHC sought funding from various stakeholders, and, through their support, was able to institute a fully integrated behavioral health program in 2004. The BCHC has now joined forces with other partners in the state to address statewide policy changes in support of such programs. These efforts are an example of how a community health center can apply entrepreneurial thinking and strategic business planning to improve healthcare and effect wide-ranging change.

  13. 25 CFR 36.91 - What are the program requirements for behavioral health services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... health services? (a) The homeliving behavioral health program must make available the following services: (1) Behavioral Health Screening/Assessment; (2) Diagnosis; (3) Treatment Plan; (4) Treatment and... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the program requirements for behavioral...

  14. Systematic Review of Health Promotion Programs Focused on Behavioral Changes for People With Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Scott, Haleigh M; Havercamp, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    People with intellectual disability (ID) experience high rates of chronic health problems and poor overall health compared to people without disabilities. Recent attention to health risk behaviors such as poor diet, lack of physical activity, and underuse of health care has led to the development of several programs intended to reduce disparities in this population through health promotion programs. A review of the literature was conducted focusing on programs developed to target behavioral changes in the person with ID. Thirteen studies, evaluating 10 different health promotion programs, were found. Programs varied significantly in design, targeted health change, and demonstrated effectiveness. Components of each program are systematically reviewed and recommendations made for future programs based upon the current evidence.

  15. Comparing Two Models of Integrated Behavioral Health Programs in Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Germán, Miguelina; Rinke, Michael L; Gurney, Brittany A; Gross, Rachel S; Bloomfield, Diane E; Haliczer, Lauren A; Colman, Silvie; Racine, Andrew D; Briggs, Rahil D

    2017-10-01

    This study examined how to design, staff, and evaluate the feasibility of 2 different models of integrated behavioral health programs in pediatric primary care across primary care sites in the Bronx, NY. Results suggest that the Behavioral Health Integration Program model of pediatric integrated care is feasible and that hiring behavioral health staff with specific training in pediatric, evidence-informed behavioral health treatments may be a critical variable in increasing outcomes such as referral rates, self-reported competency, and satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. NASA Human Research Program Behavioral Health and Performance Element (BHP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmire, Sandra; Faulk, Jeremy; Leveton, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    The goal of NASA BHP is to identify, characterize, and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration, and return to terrestrial life. The NASA Behavioral Health and Performance Operations Group (BHP Ops) supports astronauts and their families before, during, and after a long-duration mission (LDM) on the ISS. BHP Ops provides ISS crews with services such as preflight training (e.g., psychological factors of LDM, psychological support, cross-cultural); preflight, in-flight, and postflight support services, including counseling for astronauts and their families; and psychological support such as regular care packages and a voice-over IP phone system between crew members and their families to facilitate real-time one-on-one communication.

  17. Programs-That-Work: CDC's Guide to Effective Programs that Reduce Health-Risk Behavior of Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Janet; Robin, Leah; Wooley, Susan; Fenley, Dean; Hunt, Peter; Taylor, Julie; Haber, Deborah; Kolbe, Lloyd

    2002-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated "Programs-That-Work" (PTW) in 1992 to identify health education programs with credible evidence of effectiveness and disseminate them to schools and youth agencies. Two tobacco use reduction programs and eight sexual risk behavior reduction programs were identified. This paper…

  18. Does Information Improve the Health Behavior of Adults Targeted by a Conditional Transfer Program?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avitabile, Ciro

    2012-01-01

    We use data from the evaluation sample of Mexico's Food Assistance Program (PAL) to study whether including the attendance at health and nutrition classes among the requirements for receiving a transfer affects the health behavior of adults living in localities targeted by the program. The experimental trial has four different treatment types,…

  19. Does Information Improve the Health Behavior of Adults Targeted by a Conditional Transfer Program?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avitabile, Ciro

    2012-01-01

    We use data from the evaluation sample of Mexico's Food Assistance Program (PAL) to study whether including the attendance at health and nutrition classes among the requirements for receiving a transfer affects the health behavior of adults living in localities targeted by the program. The experimental trial has four different treatment types,…

  20. The effects of behavioral modification based on client center program to health behaviors among obese university students.

    PubMed

    Intarakamhang, Ungsinun; Malarat, Anan

    2013-10-08

    The objectives of this research were to examine the effectiveness of Health Behavioral Modification based on the Client Center Program (HBMCCP) and to study behavioral change in relation to self - efficacy, self- regulation, self-care behaviors and body weight. The sample was 59 undergraduate students, who were selected by cluster random sampling. 29 participated in the HBMCCP for 8 weeks, and were followed up 4 weeks after the program, and 30 students in the control group. Data was collected 3 times, before, immediately after and 4 weeks after the program, by 6 scale - questionnaires which had high reliability of Cronbach's alpha-coefficient between .81 to.94. The stratified variables were psycho-social variables, being a positive attitude towards health behavior and social support. Data were analyzed by MANOVA and ANCOVA. Results showed that 1) Obese students in the experimental group with HBMCCP had self - efficacy, self- regulation and self-care behavior at immediately after and 4 weeks later program significantly higher scores than before the program (p<0.000). For body weights at immediately after program were significantly lower scores than before the program (p=0.02), 2) Obese students in the program had self - efficacy, self- regulation and self-care behavior scores at immediately after and 4 weeks after the program significantly higher than obese students in the control group (p=0.009) and significantly lower body weights than obese students in the control group (p=0.026), and 3) No three - way interaction among positive attitude towards health behavior, social support and the program was found, although there was a two- way interaction between positive attitude towards health behavior and the program (p=0.001) and effect size=0.272.

  1. The Effects of Behavioral Modification Based on Client Center Program to Health Behaviors among Obese University Students

    PubMed Central

    Intarakamhang, Ungsinun; Malarat, Anan

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to examine the effectiveness of Health Behavioral Modification based on the Client Center Program (HBMCCP) and to study behavioral change in relation to self – efficacy, self- regulation, self-care behaviors and body weight. The sample was 59 undergraduate students, who were selected by cluster random sampling. 29 participated in the HBMCCP for 8 weeks, and were followed up 4 weeks after the program, and 30 students in the control group. Data was collected 3 times, before, immediately after and 4 weeks after the program, by 6 scale – questionnaires which had high reliability of Cronbach’s alpha-coefficient between .81 to .94. The stratified variables were psycho-social variables, being a positive attitude towards health behavior and social support. Data were analyzed by MANOVA and ANCOVA. Results showed that 1) Obese students in the experimental group with HBMCCP had self – efficacy, self- regulation and self-care behavior at immediately after and 4 weeks later program significantly higher scores than before the program (p<0.000). For body weights at immediately after program were significantly lower scores than before the program (p=0.02), 2) Obese students in the program had self – efficacy, self- regulation and self-care behavior scores at immediately after and 4 weeks after the program significantly higher than obese students in the control group (p=0.009) and significantly lower body weights than obese students in the control group (p=0.026), and 3) No three - way interaction among positive attitude towards health behavior, social support and the program was found, although there was a two-way interaction between positive attitude towards health behavior and the program (p=0.001) and effect size=0.272. PMID:24373262

  2. Integrating multiple health behavior theories into program planning: the PER worksheet.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Marietta A; Hallam, Jeffrey S

    2010-03-01

    The foundation of a logic model or any theory-based planning model is the identification of the behavioral antecedents and the relationship of these variables to the target behavior. Applying theoretical concepts to specific behaviors and populations is often challenging for practitioners and program planning students. The challenge comes from the abstract definition of theoretical constructs, the duplication of similar constructs in multiple theories, and the need to combine multiple theories. To simplify the planning process when utilizing logic models and health behavior theory, we recommend the use of the PER Worksheet. The PER Worksheet is a planning tool that provides layman-term prompts for identifying health behavior antecedents. It encompasses five common health behavior theories-health belief model, theory of planned behavior, social cognitive theory, an ecological perspective, and transtheoretical model. The PER Worksheet is organized into three columns: Predisposing, Enabling, and Reinforcing factors, terms of the PRECEDE/PROCEED model.

  3. Developing and Pretesting a Text Messaging Program for Health Behavior Change: Recommended Steps

    PubMed Central

    Mendel Van Alstyne, Judith; Schindler-Ruwisch, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence demonstrates that text messaging-based programs (short message service [SMS]) on mobile phones can help people modify health behaviors. Most of these programs have consisted of automated and sometimes interactive text messages that guide a person through the process of behavior change. Objective This paper provides guidance on how to develop text messaging programs aimed at changing health behaviors. Methods Based on their collective experience in designing, developing, and evaluating text messaging programs and a review of the literature, the authors drafted the guide. One author initially drafted the guide and the others provided input and review. Results Steps for developing a text messaging program include conducting formative research for insights into the target audience and health behavior, designing the text messaging program, pretesting the text messaging program concept and messages, and revising the text messaging program. Conclusions The steps outlined in this guide may help in the development of SMS-based behavior change programs. PMID:26690917

  4. 25 CFR 36.81 - May a homeliving program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... meet behavioral health staffing requirements? 36.81 Section 36.81 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements? No, a homeliving program must not use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements. The only...

  5. 25 CFR 36.81 - May a homeliving program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... meet behavioral health staffing requirements? 36.81 Section 36.81 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements? No, a homeliving program must not use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements. The only...

  6. Healthy Behavior Change of Adults with Mental Retardation: Attendance in a Health Promotion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Joshua; Zhou, Huafeng; McDermott, Suzanne; Poston, Mary Beth

    2006-01-01

    Participation in a health promotion program for 192 overweight and obese adults with mental retardation was associated with behavior change resulting in reduction of body mass index--BMI (weight in kg, divided by height in meters, squared) by the end of the program. We analyzed the mediating and intermediate factors contributing to weight…

  7. Healthy Behavior Change of Adults with Mental Retardation: Attendance in a Health Promotion Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Joshua; Zhou, Huafeng; McDermott, Suzanne; Poston, Mary Beth

    2006-01-01

    Participation in a health promotion program for 192 overweight and obese adults with mental retardation was associated with behavior change resulting in reduction of body mass index--BMI (weight in kg, divided by height in meters, squared) by the end of the program. We analyzed the mediating and intermediate factors contributing to weight…

  8. Community supported agriculture programs: a novel venue for theory-based health behavior change interventions.

    PubMed

    Wharton, Christopher M; Hughner, Renee Shaw; MacMillan, Lexi; Dumitrescu, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Local foods programs such as community supported agriculture programs (CSAs) and farmers' markets have increased greatly in popularity. However, little research has been conducted regarding the effect of involvement in local foods programs on diet-related attitudes and behaviors. A series of focus groups was conducted to identify the motives that propel individuals to join a CSA, the experiences of belonging to a CSA, and the diet-related outcomes of CSA membership. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) as a framework to categorize findings, data suggest the potential of CSAs as a viable intervention strategy for promoting healthful diets and behaviors.

  9. The Role of Leadership Support for Health Promotion in Employee Wellness Program Participation, Perceived Job Stress, and Health Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hoert, Jennifer; Herd, Ann M; Hambrick, Marion

    2016-12-05

    The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between leadership support for health promotion and job stress, wellness program participation, and health behaviors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Four worksites with a range of wellness programs were selected for this study. Participants in this study were employees (n = 618) at 4 organizations (bank, private university, wholesale supplier, and public university) in the southeastern United States, each offering an employee wellness program. Response rates in each organization ranged from 3% to 34%. Leadership support for health promotion was measured with the Leading by Example instrument. Employee participation in wellness activities, job stress, and health behaviors were measured with multi-item scales. Correlation/regression analysis and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the relationships among the scaled variables. Employees reporting higher levels of leadership support for health promotion also reported higher levels of wellness activity participation, lower job stress, and greater levels of health behavior (P = .001). To ascertain the amount of variance in health behaviors accounted for by the other variables in the study, a hierarchical regression analysis revealed a statistically significant model (model F 7,523 = 27.28; P = .001), with leadership support for health promotion (β = .19, t = 4.39, P = .001), wellness activity participation (β = .28, t = 6.95, P < .001), and job stress (β = -.27, t = -6.75, P ≤ .001) found to be significant predictors of health behaviors in the model. Exploratory regression analyses by organization revealed the focal variables as significant model predictors for only the 2 larger organizations with well-established wellness programs. Results from the study suggest that employees' perceptions of organizational leadership support for health promotion are related to their participation in wellness activities, perceived job stress levels, and

  10. Impact of financial incentives on behavior change program participation and risk reduction in worksite health promotion.

    PubMed

    Gingerich, Stefan B; Anderson, David R; Koland, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    To examine the impact of financial incentives on behavior change program registration, completion, and risk improvement rates. Retrospective cohort study conducted to observe the relationship between financial incentives and behavior change program registration, completion, and risk improvement rates. Large public- or private-sector employers. Twenty-four organizations (n = 511,060 eligible employees) that offered comprehensive worksite health promotion (WHP) programs. Financial incentives offered for completion of a behavior change program as part of a WHP program. Behavior change program registration and completion data were obtained from standard reports. Company-level risk change was calculated from the average per-person number of risks on baseline and follow-up health risk assessments. Incentive design was determined from questionnaires completed by WHP program managers. Average registration rates, program completion rates, and risk improvement rates were compared using t-tests for companies that did versus did not offer incentives. Comparisons were also made between companies with incentives of less than $100 and those with incentives of $100 or more. Correlations between incentive value and outcome variables were assessed using Pearson correlations. Companies that offered incentives had significantly higher health coaching completion rates than companies not offering an incentive (82.9% vs. 76.4%, respectively, p = .017) but there was no significant association with registration (p = .384) or risk improvement rates (p = .242). Incentive values were not significantly associated with risk improvement rates (p = .240). Offering incentives for completing behavior change programs may increase completion rates, but increased health improvement does not necessarily follow.

  11. 25 CFR 36.81 - May a homeliving program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a homeliving program use support staff or teachers to... program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements? No, a homeliving program must not use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements. The...

  12. 25 CFR 36.81 - May a homeliving program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a homeliving program use support staff or teachers to... program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements? No, a homeliving program must not use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements. The...

  13. 25 CFR 36.81 - May a homeliving program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true May a homeliving program use support staff or teachers to... program use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements? No, a homeliving program must not use support staff or teachers to meet behavioral health staffing requirements. The...

  14. Baseline assessment of the health status and health behaviors of African Americans participating in the activities-for-life program: a community-based health intervention program.

    PubMed

    Paschal, Angelia M; Lewis, Rhonda K; Martin, Arneatha; Dennis-Shipp, Donna; Simpson, Donna Sanders

    2004-08-01

    Obesity is a serious problem in the United States and is associated with hypertension, diabetes, and other health problems such as heart disease and some forms of cancer. There is a higher prevalence of being overweight among African American adults than among their Caucasian counterparts. The objective of this study was to assess baseline health behaviors and health status (hypertension, body mass indices, cholesterol and blood sugar levels) of African Americans participating in a community-based health education and physical fitness program. The sample consisted of 1.34 African American adults (30% males) from a low-income urban area in the Midwest. A health survey was administered to assess their health behaviors and previously diagnosed health problems. Additional data was obtained from health screenings to obtain current information on height, weight, and blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. In addition to the sample being markedly overweight and obese (30% and 60% respectively), the results of the health screenings indicated a disproportionate number of participants (62%) with hypertension; 74% of the male participants had high blood pressure. Moreover, the self-reported data suggested that the participants had poor eating habits, sedentary lifestyles, and previously diagnosed health conditions (hypertension, diabetes, and high cholesterol levels) that were comparable to the results of their health screenings. These findings suggest that culturally-relevant, community-based programs that incorporate both nutritionl education and physical fitness are needed in order to educate and motivate participants to decrease behaviors that put them at risk for obesity and other health related problems.

  15. Developing parenting programs to prevent child health risk behaviors: a practice model

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christine; Dickinson, Denise M.

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that developing public health programs to modify parenting behaviors could lead to multiple beneficial health outcomes for children. Developing feasible effective parenting programs requires an approach that applies a theory-based model of parenting to a specific domain of child health and engages participant representatives in intervention development. This article describes this approach to intervention development in detail. Our presentation emphasizes three points that provide key insights into the goals and procedures of parenting program development. These are a generalized theoretical model of parenting derived from the child development literature, an established eight-step parenting intervention development process and an approach to integrating experiential learning methods into interventions for parents and children. By disseminating this framework for a systematic theory-based approach to developing parenting programs, we aim to support the program development efforts of public health researchers and practitioners who recognize the potential of parenting programs to achieve primary prevention of health risk behaviors in children. PMID:19661165

  16. Incorporating Health and Behavioral Consequences of Child Abuse in Prevention Programs Targeting Female Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzi, Ruth S.; Weinman, Maxine L.; Smith, Peggy B.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the health and behavioral consequences of child abuse, comparing parenting and never-pregnant teens. Both groups identified major consequences of suicide, prostitution, school drop-out, crime, and substance abuse. Parenting teens expressed interest in prevention programs that would address these consequences. Recommendations for child…

  17. Incorporating Health and Behavioral Consequences of Child Abuse in Prevention Programs Targeting Female Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzi, Ruth S.; Weinman, Maxine L.; Smith, Peggy B.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the health and behavioral consequences of child abuse, comparing parenting and never-pregnant teens. Both groups identified major consequences of suicide, prostitution, school drop-out, crime, and substance abuse. Parenting teens expressed interest in prevention programs that would address these consequences. Recommendations for child…

  18. Broadening measures of success: results of a behavioral health translational research training program.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Julie A; Williamson, Heather J; Eaves, Emery R; Levin, Bruce L; Burton, Donna L; Massey, Oliver T

    2017-07-24

    While some research training programs have considered the importance of mentoring in inspiring professionals to engage in translational research, most evaluations emphasize outcomes specific to academic productivity as primary measures of training program success. The impact of such training or mentoring programs on stakeholders and local community organizations engaged in translational research efforts has received little attention. The purpose of this evaluation is to explore outcomes other than traditional academic productivity in a translational research graduate certificate program designed to pair graduate students and behavioral health professionals in collaborative service-learning projects. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with scholars, community mentors, and academic mentors were conducted regarding a translational research program to identify programmatic impacts. Interviews were transcribed and coded by the research team to identify salient themes related to programmatic outcomes. Results are framed using the Translational Research Impact Scale which is organized into three overarching domains of potential impact: (1) research-related impacts, (2) translational impacts, and (3) societal impacts. This evaluation demonstrates the program's impact in all three domains of the TRIS evaluation framework. Graduate certificate participants (scholars) reported that gaining experience in applied behavioral health settings added useful skills and expertise to their present careers and increased their interest in pursuing translational research. Scholars also described benefits resulting from networks gained through participation in the program, including valuable ties between the university and community behavioral health organizations. This evaluation of the outcomes of a graduate certificate program providing training in translational research highlights the need for more community-oriented and practice-based measures of success. Encouraging practitioner

  19. The Effects of a Disease Management Program on Self-Reported Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes: Evidence from the "Florida--A Healthy State (FAHS)" Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; Kominski, Gerald F.; Afifi, Abdelmonem A.; Kotlerman, Jenny B.

    2009-01-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of…

  20. The Effects of a Disease Management Program on Self-Reported Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes: Evidence from the "Florida--A Healthy State (FAHS)" Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; Kominski, Gerald F.; Afifi, Abdelmonem A.; Kotlerman, Jenny B.

    2009-01-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of…

  1. A Simulation Modeling Framework to Optimize Programs Using Financial Incentives to Motivate Health Behavior Change.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Kiernan, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    While increasingly popular among mid- to large-size employers, using financial incentives to induce health behavior change among employees has been controversial, in part due to poor quality and generalizability of studies to date. Thus, fundamental questions have been left unanswered: To generate positive economic returns on investment, what level of incentive should be offered for any given type of incentive program and among which employees? We constructed a novel modeling framework that systematically identifies how to optimize marginal return on investment from programs incentivizing behavior change by integrating commonly collected data on health behaviors and associated costs. We integrated "demand curves" capturing individual differences in response to any given incentive with employee demographic and risk factor data. We also estimated the degree of self-selection that could be tolerated: that is, the maximum percentage of already-healthy employees who could enroll in a wellness program while still maintaining positive absolute return on investment. In a demonstration analysis, the modeling framework was applied to data from 3000 worksite physical activity programs across the nation. For physical activity programs, the incentive levels that would optimize marginal return on investment ($367/employee/year) were higher than average incentive levels currently offered ($143/employee/year). Yet a high degree of self-selection could undermine the economic benefits of the program; if more than 17% of participants came from the top 10% of the physical activity distribution, the cost of the program would be expected to always be greater than its benefits. Our generalizable framework integrates individual differences in behavior and risk to systematically estimate the incentive level that optimizes marginal return on investment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. A simulation modeling framework to optimize programs using financial incentives to motivate health behavior change

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanjay; Kiernan, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction While increasingly popular among mid- to large-size employers, using financial incentives to induce health behavior change among employees has been controversial, in part due to poor quality and generalizability of studies to date. Thus, fundamental questions have been left unanswered: to generate positive economic returns on investment, what level of incentive should be offered for any given type of incentive program and among which employees? Methods We constructed a novel modeling framework that systematically identifies how to optimize marginal return on investment from programs incentivizing behavior change by integrating commonly-collected data on health behaviors and associated costs. We integrated “demand curves” capturing individual differences in response to any given incentive with employee demographic and risk factor data. We also estimated the degree of self-selection that could be tolerated, i.e., the maximum percentage of already-healthy employees who could enroll in a wellness program while still maintaining positive absolute return on investment. In a demonstration analysis, the modeling framework was applied to data from 3,000 worksite physical activity programs across the nation. Results For physical activity programs, the incentive levels that would optimize marginal return on investment ($367/employee/year) were higher than average incentive levels currently offered ($143/employee/year). Yet a high degree of self-selection could undermine the economic benefits of the program; if more than 17% of participants came from the top 10% of the physical activity distribution, the cost of the program would be expected to always be greater than its benefits. Discussion Our generalizable framework integrates individual differences in behavior and risk to systematically estimate the incentive level that optimizes marginal return on investment. PMID:25977362

  3. Participation in an Older Adult Heart Health Program affects lifestyle behavior.

    PubMed

    Pescatello, Linda S; Delaney, Katherine E; Brennan, Patrick; Marschke, Lisa; Coble, Denis; Belyea, Monica; Hasson, Scott

    2005-01-01

    The Older Adult Heart Health Program (HHP) was a university-based outreach health screen and education program. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the HHP was associated with lifestyle behavior change among participants. HHP volunteers (n=136) were mostly white (98.5%) women (79.4%) with a mean (+/- SEM) age of 75.1+/-0.6 years. A follow-up survey was sent to the participants' homes 4 months after the HHP inquiring about physician office visitation and adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors since the HHP. A majority (n=60, 64.5%) of those who completed the survey (n=93, 68.4% response rate) indicated they visited their physician after the HHP. A greater percentage of survey respondents who visited their physician made lifestyle behavior changes than those who did not, 71.1% vs. 45.4%, respectively (p=0.032). These findings suggest participating in programs such as the HHP prompt physician visitation and behavior change among older adults residing in the community.

  4. Implementing a cognitive-behavioral pain self-management program in home health care, part 1: program adaptation.

    PubMed

    Beissner, Katherine; Bach, Eileen; Murtaugh, Christopher; Parker, Samantha J; Trachtenberg, Melissa; Reid, M Carrington

    2013-01-01

    Pain is highly prevalent among older adults receiving home care, contributing to disability, increased health care utilization, nursing home placement, and diminished quality of life. Pain is a particular problem in the home care setting, where current approaches are often inadequate, resulting in persistent high levels of pain and disability in this vulnerable population. Cognitive-behavioral approaches to pain management have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing pain intensity and associated disability but have not been systematically implemented in home health care. The purpose of this project was to adapt a community-based, cognitive-behavioral pain self-management program designed for patients with persistent back pain for implementation by physical therapists (PTs) to use with patients with activity-limiting pain in the home care setting. In this observational study, 2 groups of PTs practicing in home care were trained in the community-based program and completed surveys and participated in discussions during the training workshops to gather input on the program components perceived to be most helpful for their patients with pain; modifications to the program and the patient education materials for use in home care; and recommendations concerning program training and support required for successful implementation. Data collected during the workshops were summarized and presented to 2 expert panels for additional input and final decisions regarding program adaptations. Seventeen PTs with an average of 16.6 years of practice as a PT received the training and provided input on the community-based program. Program modifications based upon PT and expert panel review included reduction in the number of sessions, deletion of content, modification of the exercise component of the program, revision of patient materials, and modification of therapist training. This study successfully adapted a group-based pain management program for implementation by health care

  5. Comparing rating paradigms for evidence-based program registers in behavioral health: evidentiary criteria and implications for assessing programs.

    PubMed

    Means, Stephanie N; Magura, Stephen; Burkhardt, Jason T; Schröter, Daniela C; Coryn, Chris L S

    2015-02-01

    Decision makers need timely and credible information about the effectiveness of behavioral health interventions. Online evidence-based program registers (EBPRs) have been developed to address this need. However, the methods by which these registers determine programs and practices as being “evidence-based” has not been investigated in detail. This paper examines the evidentiary criteria EBPRs use to rate programs and the implications for how different registers rate the same programs. Although the registers tend to employ a standard Campbellian hierarchy of evidence to assess evaluation results, there is also considerable disagreement among the registers about what constitutes an adequate research design and sufficient data for designating a program as evidence-based. Additionally, differences exist in how registers report findings of “no effect,” which may deprive users of important information. Of all programs on the 15 registers that rate individual programs, 79% appear on only one register. Among a random sample of 100 programs rated by more than one register, 42% were inconsistently rated by the multiple registers to some degree.

  6. COMPARING RATING PARADIGMS FOR EVIDENCE-BASED PROGRAM REGISTERS IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH: EVIDENTIARY CRITERIA AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ASSESSING PROGRAMS

    PubMed Central

    Means, Stephanie N.; Magura, Stephen; Burkhardt, Jason T.; Schröter, Daniela C.; Coryn, Chris L.S.

    2014-01-01

    Decision makers need timely and credible information about the effectiveness of behavioral health interventions. Online evidence-based program registers (EBPRs) have been developed to address this need. However, the methods by which these registers determine programs and practices as being “evidence-based” has not been investigated in detail. This paper examines the evidentiary criteria EBPRs use to rate programs and the implications for how different registers rate the same programs. Although the registers tend to employ a standard Campbellian hierarchy of evidence to assess evaluation results, there is also considerable disagreement among the registers about what constitutes an adequate research design and sufficient data for designating a program as evidence-based. Additionally, differences exist in how registers report findings of “no effect,” which may deprive users of important information. Of all programs on the 15 registers that rate individual programs, 79% appear on only one register. Among a random sample of 100 programs rated by more than one register, 42% were inconsistently rated by the multiple registers to some degree. PMID:25450778

  7. Three-Year Longitudinal Study of School Behavior and Academic Outcomes: Results from a Comprehensive Expanded School Mental Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Brian P.; Sander, Mark A.; Nicholls, Elizabeth G.; Medhanie, Amanuel; Vanden Berk, Eric; Johnson, James

    2014-01-01

    While there has been encouraging growth in the number of expanded school mental health programs (ESMH) across the country, few programs rigorously evaluate long-term academic outcomes associated with receipt of these services. This study examined the effects of services from an ESMH program on school behavior (number of out-of-school suspensions…

  8. Online health behavior and disease management programs: are we ready for them? Are they ready for us?

    PubMed

    Evers, Kerry E; Cummins, Carol O; Prochaska, James O; Prochaska, Janice M

    2005-07-01

    Advancing the science and practice of health promotion and disease management on the Internet requires a systematic program of research examining the population impact of such programs. With impact described as the combination of effectiveness and participation, such research needs to include the examination of the quality and effectiveness of programs that are available to the general public, as well as descriptive and predictive knowledge about population readiness to participate in such programs. There have been few studies examining the quality of interactive health behavior change (HBC) programs on the Internet, and even fewer investigations of the effectiveness of such programs. Based on the review of over 300 HBC programs on the Internet using the "5 A's" of Health Behavior Change on the Internet (HBC-I Screener), which represent standard minimum guidelines for evaluation, it appears HBC on the Internet is in the early stages of development. As health behavior change on the Internet matures from the provision of health information to meeting the requirements necessary to produce health behavior change, and as program developers take advantage of the interactive nature of the Internet, the basic screening and expanded evaluation criteria developed in this project will provide templates for both consumers and developers of programs. The second component necessary for evaluating the impact of HBC on the Internet is the extent to which the population is ready to participate in such programs. We need to move beyond a narrow focus on early adopters and produce a population perspective that includes those not ready, those getting ready, and those ready to use such programs, as well as those already participating. By understanding participation levels of such programs, and what drives this participation, the development and dissemination of practical tailored and targeted interventions can help maximize population participation in Internet programs for health

  9. Real-world program evaluation of integrated behavioral health care: Improving scientific rigor.

    PubMed

    Funderburk, Jennifer S; Shepardson, Robyn L

    2017-06-01

    Designing systematic, scientifically rigorous program evaluations (PE) is 1 way to contribute to the significant need to build best practices and a stronger evidence base for integrated behavioral health care. However, there are many potential pitfalls when conducting PE in real-world settings, and many clinicians and administrators may be hesitant to engage in PE due to lack of training or resources. Rigorous PE can be achieved feasibly and efficiently. This article discusses common challenges that arise when conducting PE in integrated behavioral health care settings and illustrates ways to increase the methodological quality of PE efforts using lessons learned from 2 real-world case examples. The first example included a PE of a training program for brief alcohol interventions, and the second example included a PE of a depression medication monitoring service. The case examples demonstrate the need for strategic planning beforehand, including the use of a conceptual framework as well as appropriate study designs/methodology, measurement, and the need for consistency to achieve a well-designed PE. Using the recommendations within this article, it is hoped that the quality of PEs can be improved resulting in more generalizable data that can be used to inform organizations and policymakers to improve health care delivery. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Oral health promotion in early childhood: age of joining preventive program and behavioral aspects

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Letícia Vargas Freire Martins; Myaki, Silvio Issáo; Walter, Luiz Reynaldo de Figueiredo; Zuanon, Angela Cristina Cilense

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the interference of age in the entrance into a public dental care program for infants as well as family behavioral aspects about tooth decay experience in children 0 to 4 years old. Methods: Cross-sectional study involving 465 children who were divided into 3 groups: infants whose mothers joined the program during pregnancy (n=50); infants enrolled in the program during the first year of life (n=230); and infants enrolled in the program between 13 and 18 months old (n=185). The χ2 and Kruskal-Walis tests (95% confidence interval) were used to assess the relationship among variables. Results: There was an association between the age of entrance in the programs and dental caries (p<0.001). A lower prevalence was seen in infants whose mothers joined the program during pregnancy, and among those infants enrolled in the program during the first year of life. The same low prevalence occurred in relation to mothers' commitment to attend follow-up visits with their infants, cariogenic diet, nighttime oral care, duration of night feeding and parents' educational level (p<0.001). Unfavorable socioeconomic conditions (p>0.05) and daily oral care (p=0.214) were common variables in the groups with 99% of occurrence. Commitment to attend follow-up visits, nighttime oral care and parents' educational level (p>0.05) were considered protective factors for dental caries. Cariogenic diet and night feeding were determinant factors to the appearance of dental caries. Conclusion: To promote children oral health it is essential to enroll children in oral health programs and adopt healthy habits as early as possible, besides the adherence of the child to their parents' advice. PMID:24728238

  11. Health Education and Behavioral Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prue, Donald M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A review of theoretical and experimental literature on school health education indicates that most programs have focused on health knowledge despite conflicting information on the impact of knowledge based programs on health behaviors. Needed are interventions that include environmental engineering to support health behaviors and use of…

  12. A CBPR Study to Test the Impact of a Church-Based Health Empowerment Program on Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes of Black Adult Churchgoers.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Carolyn M; Wippold, Guillermo M; Williams, Jaime L; Arthur, Tya M; Desmond, Frederic F; Robinson, Karlyne C

    2017-02-01

    Black adults in the United States are disproportionately affected by health disparities, such as overweight and obesity. Research suggests that Black adults engage in fewer health-promoting behaviors (e.g., physical activity and healthy eating) than their non-Hispanic White counterparts. These health-promoting behaviors are known protective factors against overweight/obesity and related health concerns. This community-based participatory research study employed a waitlist control design and a university-church partnership approach to test the impact of a church-based health-empowerment program designed to increase health-promoting behaviors (called health-smart behaviors) and improve health indicators (e.g., reduce weight) among overweight/obese Black adult churchgoers. Results indicate that the intervention group (n = 37) experienced a significant increase in levels of healthy eating and physical activity and a significant decrease in weight compared to the waitlist control group (n = 33). Results from this study have implications for the design of church-based, culturally sensitive health promotion interventions to increase health-smart behaviors and ultimately prevent and reduce obesity and related diseases in Black communities.

  13. The role of disease management programs in the health behavior of chronically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Adams, Samantha A; Walters, Bethany Hipple; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-04-01

    Investigate the effects of disease management program (DMP) implementation on physical activity, smoking, and physical quality of life among chronically ill patients. This study used a mixed-methods approach involving qualitative (35 interviews with project managers) and quantitative (survey of patients from 18 DMPs) data collection. Questionnaire response rates were 51% (2010; 2619/5108) at T0 and 47% (2011; 2191/4693) at T1. Physical activity and the percentage of smokers improved significantly over time, whereas physical quality of life declined. After adjusting for patients' physical quality of life at T0, age, educational level, marital status, and gender, physical activity at T0 (p<0.01), changes in physical activity (p<0.001), and percentage of smokers at T0 (p<0.05) predicted physical quality of life at T1. Project managers reported that DMPs improved patient-professional interaction. The ability to set more concrete targets improved patients' health behaviors. DMPs appear to improve physical activity among chronically ill patients over time. Furthermore, (changes in) health behavior are important for the physical quality of life of chronically ill patients. Redesigning care systems and implementing DMPs based on the chronic care model may improve health behavior among chronically ill patients. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Integrated employee assistance program/managed behavioral health plan utilization by persons with substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Elizabeth S Levy; Hodgkin, Dominic; Hiatt, Deirdre; Horgan, Constance M; Greenfield, Shelly F; McCann, Bernard

    2011-04-01

    New federal parity and health reform legislation, promising increased behavioral health care access and a focus on prevention, has heightened interest in employee assistance programs (EAPs). This study investigated service utilization by persons with a primary substance use disorder (SUD) diagnosis in a managed behavioral health care (MBHC) organization's integrated EAP/MBHC product (N = 1,158). In 2004, 25.0% of clients used the EAP first for new treatment episodes. After initial EAP utilization, 44.4% received no additional formal services through the plan, and 40.4% received regular outpatient services. Overall, outpatient care, intensive outpatient/day treatment, and inpatient/residential detoxification were most common. About half of the clients had co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses. Mental health service utilization was extensive. Findings suggest that for service users with primary SUD diagnoses in an integrated EAP/MBHC product, the EAP benefit plays a key role at the front end of treatment and is often only one component of treatment episodes.

  15. Infusing Integrated Behavioral Health in an MSW Program: Curricula, Field, and Interprofessional Educational Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerden, Lisa de Saxe; Jones, Anne; Brigham, Rebecca; Kanfer, Meryl; Zomorodi, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    An essential aspect of integrated care is the coordination of medical and behavioral health needs concurrently. This has sparked renewed emphasis on interprofessional (IP) education and practice. The impetus for IP efforts was crystalized in large part because of health care reforms, and federal funding to expand the behavioral health work force.…

  16. Journey to Healthy Aging: Impact of Community Based Education Programs on Knowledge and Health Behavior in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLarry, Sue

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if community based health education programs increased knowledge and health behavior in older adults. The study was a pretest-posttest design with a convenience sample of 111 independent community dwelling older adults. Participants received two disease prevention education presentations: type 2…

  17. Managed behavioral health care: an instrument to characterize critical elements of public sector programs.

    PubMed

    Ridgely, M Susan; Giard, Julienne; Shern, David; Mulkern, Virginia; Burnam, M Audrey

    2002-08-01

    To develop an instrument to characterize public sector managed behavioral health care arrangements to capture key differences between managed and "unmanaged" care and among managed care arrangements. The instrument was developed by a multi-institutional group of collaborators with participation of an expert panel. Included are six domains predicted to have an impact on access, service utilization, costs, and quality. The domains are: characteristics of the managed care plan, enrolled population, benefit design, payment and risk arrangements, composition of provider networks, and accountability. Data are collected at three levels: managed care organization, subcontractor, and network of service providers. Data are collected through contract abstraction and key informant interviews. A multilevel coding scheme is used to organize the data into a matrix along key domains, which is then reviewed and verified by the key informants. This instrument can usefully differentiate between and among Medicaid fee-for-service programs and Medicaid managed care plans along key domains of interest. Beyond documenting basic features of the plans and providing contextual information, these data will support the refinement and testing of hypotheses about the impact of public sector managed care on access, quality, costs, and outcomes of care. If managed behavioral health care research is to advance beyond simple case study comparisons, a well-conceptualized set of instruments is necessary.

  18. Managed Behavioral Health Care: An Instrument to Characterize Critical Elements of Public Sector Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ridgely, M Susan; Giard, Julienne; Shern, David; Mulkern, Virginia; Burnam, M Audrey

    2002-01-01

    Objective To develop an instrument to characterize public sector managed behavioral health care arrangements to capture key differences between managed and “unmanaged” care and among managed care arrangements. Study Design The instrument was developed by a multi-institutional group of collaborators with participation of an expert panel. Included are six domains predicted to have an impact on access, service utilization, costs, and quality. The domains are: characteristics of the managed care plan, enrolled population, benefit design, payment and risk arrangements, composition of provider networks, and accountability. Data are collected at three levels: managed care organization, subcontractor, and network of service providers. Data Collection Methods Data are collected through contract abstraction and key informant interviews. A multilevel coding scheme is used to organize the data into a matrix along key domains, which is then reviewed and verified by the key informants. Principal Findings This instrument can usefully differentiate between and among Medicaid fee-for-service programs and Medicaid managed care plans along key domains of interest. Beyond documenting basic features of the plans and providing contextual information, these data will support the refinement and testing of hypotheses about the impact of public sector managed care on access, quality, costs, and outcomes of care. Conclusions If managed behavioral health care research is to advance beyond simple case study comparisons, a well-conceptualized set of instruments is necessary. PMID:12236386

  19. The Effect of a Training Program on Oral Health and Behavior Change in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Feride Taşkın; Çınar, Sezgi; Yılmaz, Adnan; Kumsar, Azime Karakoç

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asthma is a chronic disease which is prevalent throughout the world. Physical problems such as deterioration in oral health, which may occur due to the triggering factors of asthma as well as the ineffective use of asthma medicine, seem to affect the daily lives of asthma patients. Therefore, it is important to protect oral health and promote positive behavior changes in asthma patients in order to achieve effective treatment and asthma control. Aims: The present study aimed to determine the effects of a training program provided for asthma patients on oral health, inhaler use skills, and behavior change. Study Design: Controlled experimental study. Methods: A total of 124 asthma patients were included in the study. Of the patients, 62 were assigned to the experimental group and the other 62 were assigned to the control group. Data were collected using the patient identification form, the oral assessment guide, the inhaler use skill form, and the evaluation form for behavior change over time. The experimental group received training provided by the researchers on the first meeting and one month later. Written and visual training material were used. Both groups were subject to a final evaluation which was conducted 4 months after their first meeting. Results: It was determined that the oral assessment guide scores (p<0.01) and inhaler use skills of the experimental group improved significantly after the training compared to the control group (p<0.01). In addition, it was observed that the number of patients in the experimental group who quit smoking (p<0.05), used their medicine (p<0.01) and brushed their teeth on a regular basis (p<0.01), and washed their mouth after inhaler use significantly increased in the experimental group after training compared to the control group (p<0.01). Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the training provided for asthma patients improved oral health and promoted inhaler use skills and was partially effective in

  20. The adolescents training and learning to avoid steroids program: preventing drug use and promoting health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, L; MacKinnon, D P; Elliot, D L; Moe, E L; Clarke, G; Cheong, J

    2000-04-01

    Use of alcohol and other illicit drugs by adolescent male athletes is a significant problem. Participation in sports may encourage use of drugs that enhance athletic performance, especially anabolic steroids (AS). Because, to our knowledge, no other intervention has successfully altered substance abuse by athletes, we developed and assessed the efficacy of a team-centered, sex-specific education program designed to reduce adolescent athletes' intentions to use and use of AS and alcohol and other illicit drugs. We studied 31 high school football teams that comprised 3207 athletes in 3 successive annual cohorts (1994-1996). The intervention included interactive classroom and exercise training sessions given by peer educators and facilitated by coaches and strength trainers. Program content included discussion of sports nutrition, exercise alternatives to AS and sport supplements, and the effects of substance abuse in sports, drug refusal role-playing, and the creation of health promotion messages. Questionnaires assessing AS, the use of sport supplements and alcohol and other illicit drugs, and potential risk and protective factors were administered before and after the intervention (before and after the football season) and up to 1 year after the program. At season's end, intentions to use (P<.05) and actual AS use (P<.04) were significantly lower among students who participated in the study. Although AS reduction did not achieve significance at 1 year (P<.08), intentions to use AS remained lower (P = .02). Illicit drug use (marijuana, amphetamines, and narcotics) was reduced at 1 year, whether alcohol was included (P = .04) or excluded (P = .02) from the index. Other long-term effects included fewer students reporting drinking and driving (P = .004), less sport supplement use (P = .009), and improved nutrition behaviors (P<.02). Use of alcohol and other illicit drugs and associated harmful activities can be prevented with a sex-specific, team-centered education

  1. A Meta-Analysis of Health Status, Health Behaviors, and Health Care Utilization Outcomes of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise; O’Colmain, Benita J.; Beauchesne, Danielle; Daniels, Brandy; Greenberg, Michael; House, Marnie; Chervin, Doryn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is a community-based self-management education program designed to help participants gain confidence (self-efficacy) and skills to better manage their chronic conditions; it has been implemented worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively synthesize the results of CDSMP studies conducted in English-speaking countries to determine the program’s effects on health behaviors, physical and psychological health status, and health care utilization at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months after baseline. Methods We searched 8 electronic databases to identify CDSMP-relevant literature published from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2009; experts identified additional unpublished studies. We combined the results of all eligible studies to calculate pooled effect sizes. We included 23 studies. Eighteen studies presented data on small English-speaking groups; we conducted 1 meta-analysis on these studies and a separate analysis on results by other delivery modes. Results Among health behaviors for small English-speaking groups, aerobic exercise, cognitive symptom management, and communication with physician improved significantly at 4- to 6-month follow-up; aerobic exercise and cognitive symptom management remained significantly improved at 9 to 12 months. Stretching/strengthening exercise improved significantly at 9 to 12 months. All measures of psychological health improved significantly at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months. Energy, fatigue, and self-rated health showed small but significant improvements at 4 to 6 months but not at 9 to 12 months. The only significant change in health care utilization was a small improvement in the number of hospitalization days or nights at 4 to 6 months Conclusion Small to moderate improvements in psychological health and selected health behaviors that remain after 12 months suggest that CDSMP delivered in small English-speaking groups produces

  2. Effectiveness of health education programs on exercise behavior among patients with heart disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Xia; Ho, Shuk-Ching; Wong, Thomas K S

    2013-11-01

    Regular exercise has been shown to be beneficial to patients with heart disease. Previous studies have indicated that health education can effectively increase participants' physical activity. However, no systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of health education programs on changing exercise behavior among patients with heart disease. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of health education programs on exercise behavior among heart disease patients. Potential studies were retrieved in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMbase, PsycINFO, the British Nursing Index and Archive, Science Direct, and ERIC via EBSCOhost. Meta-analysis was done using the random-effect model. Thirty-seven studies were identified. Only 12 studies delivered health education based on various theories/models. Twenty-eight studies were included in the meta-analyses. The results showed that health education had significantly positive effects on exercise adherence (risk ratio = 1.35 to 1.48), exercise duration (SMD = 0.25 to 0.69), exercise frequency (MD = 0.54 to 1.46 session/week), and exercise level (SMD = 0.25), while no significant effects were found on exercise energy expenditure and cognitive exercise behavior. Health education has overall positive effects on changing exercise behavior among heart disease patients. Few theoretical underpinning studies were conducted for changing exercise behavior among heart disease patients. The findings suggest that health education improves exercise behavior for heart disease patients. Health professionals should reinforce health education programs for them. © 2013 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. 25 CFR 36.84 - Can a program hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? 36.84 Section 36.84 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? A program may hire or contract behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements or...

  4. 25 CFR 36.84 - Can a program hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? 36.84 Section 36.84 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? A program may hire or contract behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements or...

  5. 25 CFR 36.84 - Can a program hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? 36.84 Section 36.84 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? A program may hire or contract behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements or...

  6. 25 CFR 36.84 - Can a program hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? 36.84 Section 36.84 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? A program may hire or contract behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements or...

  7. An Exploratory Study of College Health-Risk Behaviors: Implications for Campus Programs and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetro, Joyce V.; Wood, Ralph; Drolet, Judy C.

    2000-01-01

    Assessed six categories of college students' health risk behaviors. Student survey data indicated that respondents were engaging in risk behaviors that could impact educational achievement and lead to serious consequences. Youth tended to enter college with established patterns of risk. Most regularly consumed large amounts of alcohol. Differences…

  8. An Exploratory Study of College Health-Risk Behaviors: Implications for Campus Programs and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetro, Joyce V.; Wood, Ralph; Drolet, Judy C.

    2000-01-01

    Assessed six categories of college students' health risk behaviors. Student survey data indicated that respondents were engaging in risk behaviors that could impact educational achievement and lead to serious consequences. Youth tended to enter college with established patterns of risk. Most regularly consumed large amounts of alcohol. Differences…

  9. Community-Based Mental Health and Behavioral Programs for Low-Income Urban Youth: A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farahmand, Farahnaz K.; Duffy, Sophia N.; Tailor, Megha A.; Dubois, David L.; Lyon, Aaron L.; Grant, Kathryn E.; Zarlinski, Jennifer C.; Masini, Olivia; Zander, Keith J.; Nathanson, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analytic review of 33 studies and 41 independent samples was conducted of the effectiveness of community-based mental health and behavioral programs for low-income urban youth. Findings indicated positive effects, with an overall mean effect of 0.25 at post-test. While this is comparable to previous meta-analytic intervention research with…

  10. Effects of a Web-Based Health Program on Fifth Grade Children's Physical Activity Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen; Graham, George; Elliott, Eloise

    2005-01-01

    American children continue to be less physically active than they were a decade ago. Web-based programs (e-Learning), requiring minimal teacher training and expertise, could contribute to improvements in children's health-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the e-Learning module…

  11. Social Learning versus Traditional Teaching in an Elementary School Cardiovascular Health Promotion Program. Applied Research Brief: Behavior Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Kerry J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Reports a study that compared a program of nutrition education guided by social learning theory with a more traditional teaching approach for elementary students. Pretests and posttests of students' nutrition knowledge and behavior and physical health indicated that children in both groups showed similar improvements. (SM)

  12. Behavioral Health & Performance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Summary of the Behavioral Health and Performance Operations Group’s work including an overview of astronaut selection, behavioral health services provided to astronauts, the psychological aspects o...

  13. Associations between Poor Sleep Quality and Stages of Change of Multiple Health Behaviors among Participants of Employee Wellness Program.

    PubMed

    Hui, Siu-Kuen Azor; Grandner, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Using the Transtheoretical Model of behavioral change, this study evaluates the relationship between sleep quality and the motivation and maintenance processes of healthy behavior change. The current study is an analysis of data collected in 2008 from an online health risk assessment (HRA) survey completed by participants of the Kansas State employee wellness program (N=13,322). Using multinomial logistic regression, associations between self-reported sleep quality and stages of change (i.e. precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance) in five health behaviors (stress management, weight management, physical activities, alcohol use, and smoking) were analyzed. Adjusted for covariates, poor sleep quality was associated with an increased likelihood of contemplation, preparation, and in some cases action stage when engaging in the health behavior change process, but generally a lower likelihood of maintenance of the healthy behavior. The present study demonstrated that poor sleep quality was associated with an elevated likelihood of contemplating or initiating behavior change, but a decreased likelihood of maintaining healthy behavior change. It is important to include sleep improvement as one of the lifestyle management interventions offered in EWP to comprehensively reduce health risks and promote the health of a large employee population.

  14. Associations between poor sleep quality and stages of change of multiple health behaviors among participants of employee wellness program

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Siu-kuen Azor; Grandner, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Using the Transtheoretical Model of behavioral change, this study evaluates the relationship between sleep quality and the motivation and maintenance processes of healthy behavior change. Methods The current study is an analysis of data collected in 2008 from an online health risk assessment (HRA) survey completed by participants of the Kansas State employee wellness program (N = 13,322). Using multinomial logistic regression, associations between self-reported sleep quality and stages of change (i.e. precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance) in five health behaviors (stress management, weight management, physical activities, alcohol use, and smoking) were analyzed. Results Adjusted for covariates, poor sleep quality was associated with an increased likelihood of contemplation, preparation, and in some cases action stage when engaging in the health behavior change process, but generally a lower likelihood of maintenance of the healthy behavior. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that poor sleep quality was associated with an elevated likelihood of contemplating or initiating behavior change, but a decreased likelihood of maintaining healthy behavior change. It is important to include sleep improvement as one of the lifestyle management interventions offered in EWP to comprehensively reduce health risks and promote the health of a large employee population. PMID:26046013

  15. Long-term analysis of health status and preventive behavior in music students across an entire university program.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Claudia; Nusseck, Manfred; Zander, Mark

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to analyze longitudinal data concerning physical and psychological health, playing-related problems, and preventive behavior among music students across their complete 4- to 5-year study period. In a longitudinal, observational study, we followed students during their university training and measured their psychological and physical health status and preventive behavior using standardized questionnaires at four different times. The data were in accordance with previous findings. They demonstrated three groups of health characteristics observed in beginners of music study: healthy students (cluster 1), students with preclinical symptoms (cluster 2), and students who are clinically symptomatic (cluster 3). In total, 64% of all students remained in the same cluster group during their whole university training. About 10% of the students showed considerable health problems and belonged to the third cluster group. The three clusters of health characteristics found in this longitudinal study with music students necessitate that prevention programs for musicians must be adapted to the target audience.

  16. Skin Cancer Protective Behaviors among the Elderly: Explaining Their Response to a Health Education Program Using the Health Belief Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, Sara; And Others

    1996-01-01

    In 4 kibbutzim, 43 adults over 60 completed a questionnaire on sun-exposure protective behaviors before and 2 weeks and 4 months after a skin cancer intervention. Beliefs about skin cancer did not change, but beliefs about the value of health and internal health locus of control changed significantly. (SK)

  17. Skin Cancer Protective Behaviors among the Elderly: Explaining Their Response to a Health Education Program Using the Health Belief Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, Sara; And Others

    1996-01-01

    In 4 kibbutzim, 43 adults over 60 completed a questionnaire on sun-exposure protective behaviors before and 2 weeks and 4 months after a skin cancer intervention. Beliefs about skin cancer did not change, but beliefs about the value of health and internal health locus of control changed significantly. (SK)

  18. 25 CFR 36.84 - Can a program hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can a program hire or contract or acquire by other means... hire or contract or acquire by other means behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements? A program may hire or contract behavioral health professionals to meet staffing requirements...

  19. Health Behavior in Ecological Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Health is best understood within an ecological context. Accordingly, health promotion involves processes that foster supportive environments and healthful behavior. Thus, effective health promotion programs are typically multilevel, focusing not only on the population at risk but also on the environmental conditions that contribute so importantly…

  20. Health Behavior in Ecological Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Health is best understood within an ecological context. Accordingly, health promotion involves processes that foster supportive environments and healthful behavior. Thus, effective health promotion programs are typically multilevel, focusing not only on the population at risk but also on the environmental conditions that contribute so importantly…

  1. Effect of combining a health program with a microfinance-based self-help group on health behaviors and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, S.; Kermode, M.; Annear, P.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Women's participation in microfinance-based self-help groups (SHGs) and the resultant social capital may provide a basis to address the gap in health attainment for poor women and their children. We investigated the effect of combining a health program designed to improve health behaviours and outcomes with a microfinance-based SHG program. Design A mixed method study was conducted among 34 villages selected from three blocks or district subdivisions of India; one in Gujarat, two in Karnataka. Methods A set of 17 villages representing new health program areas were pair-matched with 17 comparison villages. Two rounds of surveys were conducted with a total of 472 respondents, followed by 17 key informant interviews and 17 focus group discussions. Results Compared to a matched comparison group, women in SHGs that received the health program had higher odds of delivering their babies in an institution (OR: 5.08, 95% CI 1.21–21.35), feeding colostrum to their newborn (OR: 2.83, 95% CI 1.02–5.57), and having a toilet at home (OR: 1.53, 95% CI 0.76–3.09). However, while the change was in the expected direction, there was no statistically significant reduction in diarrhoea among children in the intervention community (OR: 0.86, 95% CI 0.42–1.76), and the hypothesis that the health program would result in decreased out-pocket expenditures on treatment was not supported. Conclusion Our study found evidence that health programs implemented with microfinance-based SHGs is associated with improved health behaviours. With broad population coverage of SHGs and the social capital produced by their activities, microfinance-based SHGs may provide an avenue for addressing the health needs of poor women. PMID:26304181

  2. The effects of a disease management program on self-reported health behaviors and health outcomes: evidence from the "Florida: a healthy state (FAHS)" Medicaid program.

    PubMed

    Morisky, Donald E; Kominski, Gerald F; Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Kotlerman, Jenny B

    2009-06-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of 15,275 patients with one or more chronic illnesses (congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, or asthma) was undertaken. Control of hypertension improved from baseline to Year 1 (adjusted odds ratio = 1.60, p < .05), with maintenance at Year 2. Adjusted cholesterol declined by 6.41 mg/dl from baseline to Year 1 and by 12.41 mg/dl (p < .01) from baseline to Year 2. Adjusted average medication compliance increased by 0.19 points (p < .01) in Year 1 and 0.29 points (p < .01) in Year 2. Patients in the disease management program benefited in terms of controlling hypertension, asthma symptoms, and cholesterol and blood glucose levels.

  3. Do Children with Multiple Patterns of Problem Behavior Improve? The Effectiveness of an Intensive Bio-Behaviorally Oriented School-Based Behavioral Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cautilli, Joseph; Harrington, Nadine; Gillam, Emma Vila; Denning, Jamie; Helwig, Ileana; Ettingoff, Andrea; Valdes, Antonio; Angert, Ashley

    2004-01-01

    Over the last thirty years, children's behavioral health services in the school have witnessed drastic progress. Over this time, medications for mental health problems have improved. In addition, empirically validated treatments, most of which have come from behavioral psychology, have made their way into Best Practice guidelines for the treatment…

  4. Utilizing a Health Behavior Model to Design Drug Education/Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Donald C.

    1978-01-01

    The underlying philosophical and practical problems encountered when designing drug education/prevention programs are reviewed. The Health Belief Model is described and its most relevant components are outlined. The drug education material and teaching methodology which complement the model are reviewed as well. (Author)

  5. Defining participant exposure measures in Web-based health behavior change programs.

    PubMed

    Danaher, Brian G; Boles, Shawn M; Akers, Laura; Gordon, Judith S; Severson, Herbert H

    2006-08-30

    Published research on the use of Web-based behavior change programs is growing rapidly. One of the observations characterized as problematic in these studies is that participants often make relatively few website visits and spend only a brief time accessing the program. Properly structured websites permit the unobtrusive measurement of the ways in which participants access (are exposed to) program content. Research on participant exposure to Web-based programs is not merely of interest to technologists, but represents an important opportunity to better understand the broader theme of program engagement and to guide the development of more effective interventions. The current paper seeks to provide working definitions and describe initial patterns of various measures of participant exposure to ChewFree.com, a large randomized controlled trial of a Web-based program for smokeless tobacco cessation. We examined measures of participant exposure to either an Enhanced condition Web-based program (interactive, tailored, and rich-media program) or a Basic condition control website (static, text-based material). Specific measures focused on email prompting, participant visits (number, duration, and pattern of use over time), and Web page viewing (number of views, types of pages viewed, and Web forum postings). Participants in the ChewFree.com Enhanced condition made more visits and spent more time accessing their assigned website than did participants assigned to the Basic condition website. In addition, exposure data demonstrated that Basic condition users thoroughly accessed program content, indicating that the condition provided a meaningful, face-valid control to the Enhanced condition. We recommend that researchers conducting evaluations of Web-based interventions consider the collection and analysis of exposure measures in the broader context of program engagement in order to assess whether participants obtain sufficient exposure to relevant program content.

  6. Developing a Behavioral Health Screening Program for BSL-4 Laboratory Workers at the National Institutes of Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Deborah E.

    2011-01-01

    The events and aftermath of September 11, 2001, accelerated a search for personnel reliability test measures to identify individuals who could pose a threat to our nation's security and safety. The creation and administration of a behavioral health screen for BSL-4 laboratory workers at the National Institutes of Health represents a pioneering effort to proactively build a BSL-4 safety culture promoting worker cohesiveness, trust, respect, and reliability with a balance of worker privacy and public safety. PMID:21361798

  7. Making Behavior Change Interventions Available to Young African American Women: Development and Feasibility of an eHealth Lifestyle Program.

    PubMed

    Staffileno, Beth A; Tangney, Christy C; Fogg, Louis; Darmoc, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Less is known about young African American (AA) women, largely because the young are hard to reach. Traditional approaches to behavior changes interventions impose several challenges, especially for AA women at risk for developing hypertension. This feasibility study describes the process of transforming a face-to-face lifestyle change intervention into a Web-based platform (eHealth) accessible by iPads, iPhones, smartphones, and personal computers. Four sequential phases were conducted using elements of formative evaluation and quantitative analysis. A convenience sample of AA women, aged 18 to 45 years, with self-reported prehypertension and regular access to the Internet were eligible to participate. Eleven women involved in phase 1 expressed that they (1) currently use the Internet to retrieve health-related information, (2) prefer to use the Internet rather than face-to-face contact for nonserious conditions, (3) need convenience and easily accessible health-related interventions, and (4) are amenable to the idea of an eHealth lifestyle modification program. During phase 2, learning modules derived from printed manuals were adapted and compressed for a Web audience. The modules were designed to present evidence-based content but allowed for tailoring and individualization according to the needs of the target population. During phase 3, 8 women provided formative information concerning appeal and usability of the eHealth program in relation to delivery, visual quality, interactivity, and engagement. Phase 4 involved 8 women beta testing the 12-week program, with a 63% completion rate. Most of the women agreed that the program and screens opened with ease, the functions on the screens did what they were supposed to do, and the discussion board was easy to access. Program completion was greater for physical activity compared with dietary content. This study outlines a step-by-step process for transforming face-to-face content into a Web-based platform, which

  8. School-based mental health programming for children with inattentive and disruptive behavior problems: first-year treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Owens, Julie Sarno; Richerson, Lauren; Beilstein, Elizabeth A; Crane, Anna; Murphy, Caroline E; Vancouver, Jeffrey B

    2005-08-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of an evidence-based behavioral treatment package for children with inattentive and disruptive behavior problems when delivered in the context of a school-based mental health program. Child symptomatology and functioning are assessed in a treatment group (n = 30) and a waitlist control group (n = 12) across multiple time points (fall, winter, and spring). Treatment includes a daily report card procedure, year-long teacher consultation, and parenting sessions. According to the parent report, treated children show marked reductions in hyperactive and impulsive, oppositional or defiant and aggressive behavior, and marked improvement in peer relationships. Teachers observe treatment-related group differences in inattention, academic functioning, and the student-teacher relationship. Feasibility and acceptability data have implications for transporting evidence-based treatments to community settings and for integrating mental health services into the culture of the school community.

  9. Gaming Your Way to Health: A Systematic Review of Exergaming Programs to Increase Health and Exercise Behaviors in Adults.

    PubMed

    Street, Tamara D; Lacey, Sarah J; Langdon, Rebecca R

    2017-06-01

    Adults who are not engaged by traditional exercise methods require a strategy to achieve and maintain sufficient physical activity for health benefits. Exergames, or active videogames, may motivate some adults to engage in physical activity. This review explored the use of exergaming to promote physical activity behaviors and health in adults. A systematic literature review of the use of exergaming was conducted. The review included experimental studies with a nonclinical adult population, which measured changes in physical activity behaviors and changes in anthropometric healthy weight indicators. From an initial search that yielded 1644 results, nine articles were found to satisfy the predetermined inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Exergaming provided a novel method for increasing or substituting physical activity in the short term. Although low participation was not associated with anthropometric changes, significant healthy anthropometric changes were associated with moderate to high exergaming participation. Exergaming may be employed as an effective exercise behavior change strategy in the short term and may have positive health benefits if recommendations are made regarding intensity and duration of play for optimal health outcomes. However, additional research is required to evaluate the effectiveness of exergaming as a long-term health promotion strategy.

  10. A meta-analysis of health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization outcomes of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program.

    PubMed

    Brady, Teresa J; Murphy, Louise; O'Colmain, Benita J; Beauchesne, Danielle; Daniels, Brandy; Greenberg, Michael; House, Marnie; Chervin, Doryn

    2013-01-01

    The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is a community-based self-management education program designed to help participants gain confidence (self-efficacy) and skills to better manage their chronic conditions; it has been implemented worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively synthesize the results of CDSMP studies conducted in English-speaking countries to determine the program's effects on health behaviors, physical and psychological health status, and health care utilization at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months after baseline. We searched 8 electronic databases to identify CDSMP-relevant literature published from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2009; experts identified additional unpublished studies. We combined the results of all eligible studies to calculate pooled effect sizes. We included 23 studies. Eighteen studies presented data on small English-speaking groups; we conducted 1 meta-analysis on these studies and a separate analysis on results by other delivery modes. Among health behaviors for small English-speaking groups, aerobic exercise, cognitive symptom management, and communication with physician improved significantly at 4- to 6-month follow-up; aerobic exercise and cognitive symptom management remained significantly improved at 9 to 12 months. Stretching/strengthening exercise improved significantly at 9 to 12 months. All measures of psychological health improved significantly at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months. Energy, fatigue, and self-rated health showed small but significant improvements at 4 to 6 months but not at 9 to 12 months. The only significant change in health care utilization was a small improvement in the number of hospitalization days or nights at 4 to 6 months Small to moderate improvements in psychological health and selected health behaviors that remain after 12 months suggest that CDSMP delivered in small English-speaking groups produces health benefits for participants and would be

  11. Effects of the COPE Cognitive Behavioral Skills Building TEEN Program on the Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors and Mental Health of Appalachian Early Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hoying, Jacqueline; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Arcoleo, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Appalachian adolescents have a high prevalence of obesity and mental health problems that exceed national rates, with the two conditions often co-existing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a 15-session cognitive-behavioral skills building intervention (COPE [Creating Opportunities for Personal Empowerment] Healthy Lifestyles TEEN [Thinking, Emotions, Exercise, and Nutrition] Program) on healthy lifestyle behaviors, physical health, and mental health of rural early adolescents. A pre- and posttest pre-experimental design was used with follow-up immediately after the intervention. Results support improvement in the students' anxiety, depression, disruptive behavior, and self-concept scores after the COPE intervention compared with baseline. Additionally, healthy lifestyle behavior scores improved before the intervention compared with after the intervention. COPE is a promising intervention that improves mental health and healthy lifestyle behaviors and can be integrated routinely into school-based settings. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of a group-focused cognitive behavioral health education program on cigarette smoking in a sample of Nigerian prisoners.

    PubMed

    Onyechi, Kay C N; Eseadi, Chiedu; Umoke, Prince C I; Ikechukwu-Ilomuanya, Amaka B; Otu, Mkpoikanke S; Obidoa, Jaachimma C; Agu, Fedinand U; Nwaubani, Okechukwu O; Utoh-Ofong, Anthonia N; Ncheke, Chijioke D; Ugwuozor, Felix O

    2017-01-01

    Smoking is a learned habit that has an impact on the psychological and biochemical health of individuals. It is the leading preventable cause of chronic illness worldwide. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a group-focused cognitive behavioral health education program (GCBHEP) on cigarette smoking in a sample of Nigerian prisoners. The study used a pretest-posttest randomized control group design. Twenty inmates were identified through self-reporting, 1-to-1 counseling, and observation. The treatment group took part in a GCBHEP for 10 weeks, while the control group received 10 weeks' conventional counseling. After the intervention program, both the treatment and control groups were evaluated. The repeated measures analysis of variance was used for data analysis and partial η was also used as a measure of effect size. The findings showed that the GCBHEP had a strong effect on cigarette-smoking habits among the inmates in the treatment group compared with those in the control group. The effect of the GCBHEP by age was moderate, and modest by educational qualification. Group-focused cognitive behavioral health education is effective in breaking the habit of cigarette smoking among Nigerian prisoners. Therefore, future researchers are encouraged to adopt this approach in helping individuals with a smoking problem and other drug-abuse behaviors in Nigerian prisons.

  13. Effects of a group-focused cognitive behavioral health education program on cigarette smoking in a sample of Nigerian prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Onyechi, Kay C.N.; Eseadi, Chiedu; Umoke, Prince C.I.; Ikechukwu-Ilomuanya, Amaka B.; Otu, Mkpoikanke S.; Obidoa, Jaachimma C.; Agu, Fedinand U.; Nwaubani, Okechukwu O.; Utoh-Ofong, Anthonia N.; Ncheke, Chijioke D.; Ugwuozor, Felix O.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Smoking is a learned habit that has an impact on the psychological and biochemical health of individuals. It is the leading preventable cause of chronic illness worldwide. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a group-focused cognitive behavioral health education program (GCBHEP) on cigarette smoking in a sample of Nigerian prisoners. Methods: The study used a pretest–posttest randomized control group design. Twenty inmates were identified through self-reporting, 1-to-1 counseling, and observation. The treatment group took part in a GCBHEP for 10 weeks, while the control group received 10 weeks’ conventional counseling. After the intervention program, both the treatment and control groups were evaluated. The repeated measures analysis of variance was used for data analysis and partial η2 was also used as a measure of effect size. Results: The findings showed that the GCBHEP had a strong effect on cigarette-smoking habits among the inmates in the treatment group compared with those in the control group. The effect of the GCBHEP by age was moderate, and modest by educational qualification. Conclusion: Group-focused cognitive behavioral health education is effective in breaking the habit of cigarette smoking among Nigerian prisoners. Therefore, future researchers are encouraged to adopt this approach in helping individuals with a smoking problem and other drug-abuse behaviors in Nigerian prisons. PMID:28072681

  14. Dialectical Behavior Therapy Training and Desired Resources for Implementation: Results From a National Program Evaluation in the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Landes, Sara J; Matthieu, Monica M; Smith, Brandy N; Trent, Lindsay R; Rodriguez, Allison L; Kemp, Janet; Thompson, Caitlin

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about nonresearch training experiences of providers who implement evidence-based psychotherapies for suicidal behaviors among veterans. This national program evaluation identified the history of training, training needs, and desired resources of clinicians who work with at-risk veterans in a national health care system. This sequential mixed methods national program evaluation used a post-only survey design to obtain needs assessment data from clinical sites (N = 59) within Veterans Health Administration (VHA) facilities that implemented dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Data were also collected on resources preferred to support ongoing use of DBT. While only 33% of clinical sites within VHA facilities reported that staff attended a formal DBT intensive training workshop, nearly 97% of participating sites reported having staff who completed self-study using DBT manuals. Mobile apps for therapists and clients and templates for documentation in the electronic health records to support measurement-based care were desired clinical resources. Results indicate that less-intensive training models can aid staff in implementing DBT in real-world health care settings. While more training is requested, a number of VHA facilities have successfully implemented DBT into the continuum of care for veterans at risk for suicide. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Effectiveness of a workplace wellness program for maintaining health and promoting healthy behaviors.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ray M; Aldana, Steven G; Garrett, Judy; Ross, Chip

    2011-07-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a worksite wellness program. A within-group study design was conducted. Assessment was based on 3737 continuously employed workers at a large agribusiness during 2007-2009. More than 80% of employees participated in the program, with a higher percentage of women participating. Clinically significant improvements occurred in those who were underweight, those with high systolic or diastolic blood pressure, high total cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein, low high-density lipoprotein, high triglycerides, and high glucose. Among obese employee participants, significant improvements occurred in selected mental health and dietary variables. Among those who lowered their BMI, significant decrease occurred in fat intake, and significant increase resulted in weekly aerobic exercise and feelings of calmness and peace, happiness, ability to cope with stress, and more physical energy.

  16. The Mokihana Program: The effectiveness of an integrated department of education and department of health school-based behavioral health approach.

    PubMed

    Klontz, Bradley T; Bivens, Alex; Michels, Stanton; DeLeon, Patrick H; Tom, Lyndsey

    2015-05-01

    As a result of difficulties with access to care and resulting low levels of service utilization, the mental health problems of children often go undiagnosed and untreated. One of the most promising approaches to increasing access to care is the delivery of mental health services in school settings, where almost all of the children in a community can be accessed. However, as a result of competing needs, cultures, and objectives, integrating mental health services into schools can be challenging. In the wake of a devastating hurricane in 1992 and efforts to identify and treat children with posttraumatic stress, many of these barriers were overcome on the island of Kauai, Hawaii and led to the development of the Mokihana Program, an integrated Department of Education and Hawaii Department of Health initiative for providing school-based behavioral health services. This study examined the effectiveness of the Mokihana Program in the treatment of 123 elementary age children and 56 adolescents by comparing teacher ratings of behavior problems and adaptive skills at intake and at 1-year follow-up. It was hypothesized that symptom severity would decrease from pretreatment to follow-up. Findings showed statistically significant improvements across a wide spectrum of behavioral problems and adaptive functioning. The authors explore the challenges and opportunities in sustaining and replicating this type of departmental integration in the service of children and youth. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. School-Based Mental Health and Behavioral Programs for Low-Income, Urban Youth: A Systematic and Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farahmand, Farahnaz K.; Grant, Kathryn E.; Polo, Antonio J.; Duffy, Sophia N.; Dubois, David L.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic and meta-analytic review was conducted of the effectiveness of school-based mental health and behavioral programs for low-income, urban youth. Applying criteria from an earlier systematic review (Rones & Hoagwood, 2000) of such programs for all populations indicated substantially fewer effective programs for low-income, urban…

  18. Advocate program for healthy traditional houses, Ume Kbubu, in a Timor community: preserving traditional behavior and promoting improved health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Prasodjo, Rachmalina; Musadad, D Anwar; Muhidin, Salut; Pardosi, Jerico; Silalahi, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Families in the Timor society of Indonesia have customarily used traditional houses, called Ume Kbubu, for confinement practices of a newborn baby and the mother during the first 40 days after birth. The practice, known as Sei (smoke) tradition, involves retaining heat, which is believed to foster healing, inside the house by continuously burning a wood burning stove. Exacerbated by inadequate ventilation in the traditional house, this practice results in poor indoor air quality and negatively affects the health of the mother and baby. Preliminary findings from a baseline study conducted in 2009 identified high levels of indoor air pollution in Ume Kbubu where mothers practiced the Sei tradition. Many respondents expressed that they suffered from respiratory health problems during the practice. On the basis of those results, a follow-up study was conducted in 2011 to develop and test a communication-focused behavior change intervention that would foster conversion of traditional houses into healthy Ume Kbubu and promote changes to traditional practices for better health outcomes. The study suggests that redesigning an Ume Kbubu house could promote better air quality inside the house and involving the community in the health intervention program led to positive changes in the Sei practice (i.e., decreasing the Sei period's length from 40 days to 4 days on average and attempting to reduce household air pollution). The study resulted in several recommendations in relation to sustained transformation to improve health behaviors.

  19. Pilot Study: Implementing a Brief DBT Skills Program in Schools to Reduce Health Risk Behaviors among Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapolski, Tamika C. B.; Smith, Gregory T.

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of youth engage in health risk behaviors, which are of concern, as they are associated with adverse health consequences across development. Two factors associated with engagement in such behaviors are emotion dysregulation and impulsivity. Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) is an effective intervention that enhances…

  20. Behavioral and psychosocial effects of two middle school sexual health education programs at tenth-grade follow-up.

    PubMed

    Markham, Christine M; Peskin, Melissa F; Shegog, Ross; Baumler, Elizabeth R; Addy, Robert C; Thiel, Melanie; Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Robin, Leah; Tortolero, Susan R

    2014-02-01

    An earlier randomized controlled trial found that two middle school sexual education programs-a risk avoidance (RA) program and a risk reduction (RR) program-delayed initiation of sexual intercourse (oral, vaginal, or anal sex) and reduced other sexual risk behaviors in ninth grade. We examined whether these effects extended into 10th grade. Fifteen middle schools were randomly assigned to RA, RR, or control conditions. Follow-up surveys were conducted with participating students in 10th grade (n = 1,187; 29.2% attrition). Participants were 60% female, 50% Hispanic, and 39% black; seventh grade mean age was 12.6 years. In 10th grade, compared with the control condition, both programs significantly delayed anal sex initiation in the total sample (RA: adjusted odds ratio [AOR], .64, 95% confidence interval [CI], .42-.99; RR: AOR, .65, 95% CI, .50-.84) and among Hispanics (RA: AOR, .53, 95% CI, .31-.91; RR: AOR, .82, 95% CI, .74-.93). Risk avoidance students were less likely to report unprotected vaginal sex, either by using a condom or by abstaining from sex (AOR: .61, 95% CI, .45-.85); RR students were less likely to report recent unprotected anal sex (AOR: .34, 95% CI, .20-.56). Both programs sustained positive impact on some psychosocial outcomes. Although both programs delayed anal sex initiation into 10th grade, effects on the delayed initiation of oral and vaginal sex were not sustained. Additional high school sexual education may help to further delay sexual initiation and reduce other sexual risk behaviors in later high school years. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of a self-directed behavioral health change program: weight, body composition, cardiovascular fitness, blood pressure, health risk, and psychosocial mediating variables.

    PubMed

    Clifford, P A; Tan, S Y; Gorsuch, R L

    1991-06-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of a comprehensive behavioral health program designed to promote self-initiated change in overweight healthy middle-aged adults (M = 49 years). Three treatment groups (total n = 25) differing in type of social support provided (i.e., group plus professional versus group plus peer versus group only) received 13 treatment sessions and 6 maintenance sessions scheduled over a full year. A self-directed change intervention taught several cognitive-behavioral techniques as they applied to exercise adherence, weight reduction/maintenance, and stress management. Combined treatment groups (n = 25) improved significantly more than an assessment only control group (n = 9) in weight, percentage body fat, cardiovascular fitness, exercise adherence, health-risk appraisal, chronic tension (MBHI, scale A), and systolic and diastolic blood pressure at both post-treatment and 6-month follow-up assessments. Self-motivation, group treatment attendance, and health-risk appraisal significantly related (r's = .30-.56) to several posttreatment and follow-up measures of behavioral health change. No significant differences were found among the three treatment groups on any of the outcome measures.

  2. Effects of a School-Based Social-Emotional and Character Development Program on Health Behaviors: A Matched-Pair, Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Bavarian, Niloofar; Lewis, Kendra M; Acock, Alan; DuBois, David L; Yan, Zi; Vuchinich, Samuel; Silverthorn, Naida; Day, Joseph; Flay, Brian R

    2016-02-01

    There is considerable research that suggests that school-based social-emotional programs can foster improved mental health and reduce problem behaviors for participating youth; in contrast, much less is known about the impact of these programs on physical health, even though some of these programs also include at least limited direct attention to promoting physical health behaviors. We examined the effects of one such program, Positive Action (PA), on physical health behaviors and body mass index (BMI), and tested for mediation of program effects through a measure of social-emotional and character development (SECD). Participating schools in the matched-pair, cluster-randomized trial were 14 low-performing K-8 Chicago Public Schools. We followed a cohort of students in each school from grades 3 to 8 (eight waves of data collection; 1170 total students). Student self-reports of health behaviors served as the basis for measures of healthy eating and exercise, unhealthy eating, personal hygiene, consistent bedtime, and SECD. We collected height and weight measurements at endpoint to calculate age- and gender-adjusted BMI z-scores. Longitudinal multilevel modeling analyses revealed evidence of favorable program effects on personal hygiene [effect size (ES) = 0.48], healthy eating and exercise (ES = 0.21), and unhealthy eating (ES = -0.19); in addition, BMI z-scores were lower among students in PA schools at endpoint (ES = -0.21). Program effects were not moderated by either gender or student mobility. Longitudinal structural equation modeling demonstrated mediation through SECD for healthy eating and exercise, unhealthy eating, and personal hygiene. Findings suggest that a SECD program without a primary focus on health behavior promotion can have a modest impact on outcomes in this domain during the childhood to adolescence transition.

  3. Effects of a School-Based Social-Emotional and Character Development Program on Health Behaviors: A Matched-Pair, Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bavarian, Niloofar; Lewis, Kendra M.; Acock, Alan; DuBois, David L.; Yan, Zi; Vuchinich, Samuel; Silverthorn, Naida; Day, Joseph; Flay, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable research that suggests that school-based social-emotional programs can foster improved mental health and reduce problem behaviors for participating youth; in contrast, much less is known about the impact of these programs on physical health, even though some of these programs also include at least limited direct attention to promoting physical health behaviors. We examined the effects of one such program, Positive Action (PA), on physical health behaviors and body mass index (BMI), and tested for mediation of program effects through a measure of social-emotional and character development (SECD). Participating schools in the matched-pair, cluster-randomized trial were 14 low-performing K-8 Chicago Public Schools. We followed a cohort of students in each school from grades 3 to 8 (eight waves of data collection; 1,170 total students). Student self-reports of health behaviors served as the basis for measures of healthy eating and exercise, unhealthy eating, personal hygiene, consistent bedtime, and SECD. We collected height and weight measurements at endpoint to calculate age- and gender-adjusted BMI z-scores. Longitudinal multilevel modeling analyses revealed evidence of favorable program effects on personal hygiene (effect size [ES] = 0.48), healthy eating and exercise (ES = 0.21), and unhealthy eating (ES = −0.19); in addition, BMI z-scores were lower among students in PA schools at endpoint (ES = −0.21). Program effects were not moderated by either gender or student mobility. Longitudinal structural equation modeling demonstrated mediation through SECD for healthy eating and exercise, unhealthy eating, and personal hygiene. Findings suggest that a social-emotional and character development program without a primary focus on health behavior promotion can have a modest impact on outcomes in this domain during the childhood to adolescence transition. PMID:26781590

  4. Behavior and Behaviorism in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stainbrook, Gene; Green, Lawrence W.

    1982-01-01

    The issue of the degree to which behavioral objectives and behavior change should be emphasized in health education is discussed. Topics included in the discussion concern the health educator's responsibilities and accountability, needs for behavioral sciences in health education, the behaviorism controversy, and dissemination of behavioral…

  5. Effectiveness evaluation of Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program for improving Spanish-speaking parents' preventive oral health knowledge and behaviors for their young children.

    PubMed

    Hoeft, K S; Barker, J C; Shiboski, S; Pantoja-Guzman, E; Hiatt, R A

    2016-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program (CCOHEP) for improving low-income, Spanish-speaking parents' oral health knowledge and behaviors for their young children. Mexican American children in the United States suffer disproportionately high prevalence and severity of early childhood caries, yet few evaluated, theory-based behavioral interventions exist for this population. CCOHEP is a theory-based curriculum consisting of four 2-h interactive classes designed for and by Spanish speakers and led by designated community health educators (promotoras). Topics included children's oral hygiene, caries etiology, dental procedures, nutrition, child behavior management, and parent skill-building activities. Low-income Spanish-speaking parents/caregivers of children aged 0-5 years were recruited through community services in an agricultural city in California. Survey questions from the Oral Health Basic Research Facts Questionnaire measuring oral health-related behaviors and knowledge were verbally administered before, immediately after, and 3 months after attendance at CCOHEP. Five questions measured aspects of parental toothbrushing for their children (frequency, using fluoridated toothpaste, brushing before bed, not drinking or eating after nighttime brushing, adult assistance), three questions measured other oral health behaviors, and 16 questions measured oral health-related knowledge. Analyses of within-person changes between pre- and post-tests and again between post-test and 3-month follow-up consisted of McNemar's test for binary outcomes and sign tests for ordinal outcomes. Overall, 105 caregivers participated in CCOHEP (n = 105 pretest, n = 95 post-test, n = 79 second post-test). At baseline, all parents self-reported doing at least one aspect of toothbrushing correctly, but only 13% reported performing all five aspects according to professional guidelines. At post-test, 44% of parents reported completing all aspects of

  6. Health Knowledge and Behavior of Junior High School Students: Nebraska Regional Medical Program. Final Report: Project 0013.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian M.; And Others

    This paper reports on a survey conducted to assist the health education faculty of the Nebraska Center for Health Education, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The objectives of the study were to: (1) gather base line data on the health knowledge and behavior of a sample of Nebraska junior high school students; (2) compare Nebraska junior high school…

  7. Determinants of customers' intention to participate in a Korean restaurant health promotion program: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyungeui; Gittelsohn, Joel; Joung, Hyojee

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of personal characteristics and theory of planned behavior (TPB) constructs on the intention to participate in a restaurant health promotion program. In total, 830 adults residing in Seoul were sampled by a multi-stage cluster and random sampling design. Data were collected from a structured self-administered questionnaire, which covered variables concerning demographics, health status and TPB constructs including attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control. A path analysis combining personal characteristics and TPB constructs was used to investigate determinants of the customers' intention. Positive and negative attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control directly affected the intention to participate. Demographics and health status both directly and indirectly affected the intention to participate. This study identifies personal characteristics and TPB constructs that are important to planning and implementing a restaurant health promotion program.

  8. Health Behaviors of Psychotherapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royak-Schaler, Renee; Feldman, Robert H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the health behaviors practiced by psychotherapists (N=86) themselves and the extent to which they focus on these behaviors with their clients. Results indicated that psychotherapists actively evaluate and make recommendations to their clients in the areas of diet, physical exercise, and relaxation practice. (JAC)

  9. Text Messaging, Teen Outreach Program, and Sexual Health Behavior: A Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Devine, Sharon; Schmiege, Sara J.; Pickard, Leslie; Campbell, Jon; Shlay, Judith C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To consider whether Youth All Engaged! (a text message intervention) intensified the effects of the adolescent pregnancy prevention Teen Outreach Program (control) for youths. Methods. In this trial performed in Denver, Colorado, from 2011 to 2014, we randomized 8 Boys & Girls Clubs each of 4 years into 32 clubs per year combinations to ensure each club would serve as a treatment site for 2 years and a control site for 2 years. Control intervention consisted of the Teen Outreach Program only. We enrolled 852 youths (aged 14–18 years), and 632 were retained at follow-up, with analytic samples ranging from 50 to 624 across outcomes. We examined program costs, and whether the intervention increased condom and contraceptive use, access to care, and pregnancy prevention. Results. Control program costs were $1184 per participant, and intervention costs were an additional $126 per participant (+10.6%). There were no statistically significant differences in primary outcomes for the full sample. Hispanic participants in the intervention condition had fewer pregnancies at follow-up (1.79%) than did those in the control group (6.72%; P = .02). Conclusions. Youth All Engaged is feasible, low cost, and could have potential benefits for Hispanic youths. PMID:27689478

  10. Text Messaging, Teen Outreach Program, and Sexual Health Behavior: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Bull, Sheana; Devine, Sharon; Schmiege, Sara J; Pickard, Leslie; Campbell, Jon; Shlay, Judith C

    2016-09-01

    To consider whether Youth All Engaged! (a text message intervention) intensified the effects of the adolescent pregnancy prevention Teen Outreach Program (control) for youths. In this trial performed in Denver, Colorado, from 2011 to 2014, we randomized 8 Boys & Girls Clubs each of 4 years into 32 clubs per year combinations to ensure each club would serve as a treatment site for 2 years and a control site for 2 years. Control intervention consisted of the Teen Outreach Program only. We enrolled 852 youths (aged 14-18 years), and 632 were retained at follow-up, with analytic samples ranging from 50 to 624 across outcomes. We examined program costs, and whether the intervention increased condom and contraceptive use, access to care, and pregnancy prevention. Control program costs were $1184 per participant, and intervention costs were an additional $126 per participant (+10.6%). There were no statistically significant differences in primary outcomes for the full sample. Hispanic participants in the intervention condition had fewer pregnancies at follow-up (1.79%) than did those in the control group (6.72%; P = .02). Youth All Engaged is feasible, low cost, and could have potential benefits for Hispanic youths.

  11. Effectiveness of a School- and Community-based Academic Asthma Health Education Program on Use of Effective Asthma Self-care Behaviors in Older School-age Students

    PubMed Central

    Kintner, Eileen K.; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C. Nathan; Allen, April; Stoddard, Debbie; Harmon, Phyllis; Gomes, Melissa; Meeder, Linda; Van Egeren, Laurie A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of SHARP, an academic asthma health education and counseling program, on fostering use of effective asthma self-care behaviors. Design and Methods This was a phase III, two-group, cluster randomized, single-blinded, longitudinal design guided the study. Caregivers of 205 fourth- and fifth-grade students completed the asthma health behaviors survey at pre-intervention and 1, 12, and 24 months post-intervention. Analysis involved multilevel modeling. Results All students demonstrated improvement in episode management, risk-reduction/prevention, and health promotion behaviors; SHARP students demonstrated increased improvement in episode management and risk-reduction/prevention behaviors. Practice Implications Working with schoolteachers, nurses can improve use of effective asthma self-care behaviors. PMID:25443867

  12. Multiple behavioral risk factors among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer in the Survivor Health and Resilience Education (SHARE) program.

    PubMed

    Tercyak, Kenneth P; Donze, Jessica R; Prahlad, Sowmya; Mosher, Revonda B; Shad, Aziza T

    2006-11-01

    Health-compromising behaviors among survivors of childhood cancer may increase their risks of cancer recurrence and the onset of chronic disease in adulthood. Regardless of whether such behaviors occur singly or in combination with one another, multiple behavioral risk factors must be identified and addressed early to promote better health outcomes within this special population. Adolescent survivors may be especially vulnerable, as reported rates of smoking and other risky behaviors are at or near levels of their healthy peers. The psychological literature suggests stress may play a role in risk behavior initiation and maintenance, including multiple behavioral risks, and that adolescent survivors are stress-prone. This report focuses on the prevalence and co-occurrence of three behavioral risk factors (cigarette use, insufficient physical activity, and non-adherence to sun protection recommendations) and describes stress-health behavior relationships in this special population. All patients in this study (n = 75) were adolescent survivors of childhood cancer and completed a baseline assessment of their health behaviors and stress as part of a randomized controlled trial of health promotion. Twenty-eight percent of the patients reported one of three risk factors, 12% reported two of three risk factors, and 7% reported all three risk factors. Non-adherence to sun protection was the single most common risk factor; physical inactivity and non-adherent sun protection were the most common co-occurring risk factors. Greater age and stress were significantly associated with the presence of more behavioral risk factors. The evidence suggests interventions to reduce multiple health-compromising behaviors in these patients are warranted, and that efforts to address these patients' personal and family stress levels are important as well. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. [Sexual behaviors and incidence of sexual and reproductive health programs among poor secondary students and public university students in Cali, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Urrea-Giraldo, Fernando; Congolino, Mary Lily; Herrera, Hernán Darío; Reyes, José Ignacio; Botero, Waldor Federico

    2006-01-01

    In order to qualitatively evaluate sexual behaviors or practices and the incidence of sexual and reproductive health programs in adolescent and postadolescent users educated in Cali, Colombia, two quota samples were carried out, one in schools in poor neighborhoods of the city and one at Valle University (UNIVALLE). In addition, a limited number of twelve open interviews was made among two different student population groups, the schools and the university. The study addresses the sexual behaviors of adolescents and postadolescents, contraceptive methods and prevention of STDs and HIV/AIDS, and the uses of sexual and reproductive health programs by both populations, controlling for social class (socioeconomic stratum), gender, and race. Two sexual and reproductive health programs were taken as reference: that of PROFAMILIA (Pro-Wellbeing of the Colombian Family Association), and the sexual and reproductive health program of the University Medical Service of the UNIVALLE. Results show how the behaviors and responses to sexual and reproductive health programs are mediated by multiple sociological categories that orient the analysis.

  14. The Role of Program-Supported Mentoring Relationships in Promoting Youth Mental Health, Behavioral and Developmental Outcomes.

    PubMed

    DeWit, David J; DuBois, David; Erdem, Gizem; Larose, Simon; Lipman, Ellen L

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between youth mentoring status and behavioral, developmental, and emotional outcomes for 859 youths aged 6-17 participating in a national survey of Big Brothers Big Sisters community mentoring relationships (MRs). Youth self-reported behaviors and mental health occurred at the baseline assessment (before being paired to a mentor) and at 18 months follow-up. Youth mentoring status was categorized as follows: (1) continuous MR less than 12 months (n = 131); (2) continuous MR 12 or more months (n = 253); (3) dissolved MR less than 12 months (n = 110); (4) dissolved MR 12 or more months (n = 70); 5) MR with a second mentor (re-matched; n = 83); and (6); never mentored (n = 212). Structural equation model results at 18 months revealed that mentored youths, especially those in MR lasting 12 or more months (continuous or dissolved), reported significantly fewer behavioral problems and fewer symptoms of depression and social anxiety than did non-mentored youths. They also reported stronger coping skills and emotional support from parents. Mentored girls and boys in long-term relationships experienced positive outcomes. Re-matched girls displayed better outcomes than did never-mentored girls while there was some evidence of harmful outcomes for re-matched boys. Threats to internal validity are examined including the possibility of pre-existing baseline differences between mentored and non-mentored youths. Implications for mentoring programs are discussed.

  15. Parental and child health beliefs and behavior.

    PubMed

    Dielman, T E; Leech, S; Becker, M H; Rosenstock, I M; Horvath, W J; Radius, S M

    1982-01-01

    Personal interviews concerning health beliefs and behaviors were conducted with a parent and child in each of 250 households. Index scores were constructed for parental and child health beliefs, and these scores were entered, along with demographic variables, in a series of multiple regression analyses predicting child health beliefs and behaviors. The age of the child was the variable most highly associated with three of four child health behaviors and four of six child health beliefs. The children's snacking between meals and cigarette smoking were related to several parental behaviors and, to a lesser extent, parental health beliefs. The children's health beliefs were less predictable than were their health behaviors, and the observed significant relationships were with parental health beliefs and demographics. The implications for the design of health education programs are discussed.

  16. [Effects of an infant/toddler health program on parenting knowledge, behavior, confidence, and home environment in low-income mothers].

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyungjoo; Yang, Soo; Jang, Mi Heui; Yeom, Mijung

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a mother/infant-toddler health program developed to enhance parenting knowledge, behavior and confidence in low income mothers and home environment. A one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was used. Sixty-nine dyads of mothers and infant-toddlers (aged 0-36 months) were provided with weekly intervention for seven session. Each session consisted of three parts; first, educating to increase integrated knowledge related to the development of the infant/toddler including nutrition, first aid and home environment; second, counseling to share parenting experience among the mothers and to increase their nurturing confidence; third, playing with the infant/toddler to facilitate attachment-based parenting behavior for the mothers. Following the programs, there were significant increases in parenting knowledge on nutrition and first aid. A significant improvement was found in attachment-based parenting behavior, but not in home safety practice. Nurturing confidence was not significantly increased. The program led to more positive home environment for infant/toddler's health and development. The findings provide evidence for mother-infant/toddler health program to improve parenting knowledge, attachment-based parenting behavior and better home environment in low income mothers. Study of the long term effectiveness of this program is recommended for future research.

  17. Differences in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Behaviors Between Black and Non-Black Students Participating in a School-Based Health Promotion Program.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Taylor; Sylvester, Rachel; Jiang, Qingmei; Corriveau, Nicole; DuRussel-Weston, Jean; Kline-Rogers, Eva; Jackson, Elizabeth A; Eagle, Kim A

    2017-07-01

    To compare cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors of black and non-black children participating in Project Healthy Schools (PHS), a school-based wellness program. Participants were surveyed and participated in physiological screenings pre- and post-PHS intervention. Middle schools in 4 Michigan communities of varying socioeconomic status. A total of 3813 sixth-grade students comprised the survey sample, and 2297 sixth-grade students comprised the screening sample. Project Healthy Schools is a school-based intervention designed to reduce the risk of obesity and CVD in children through the promotion of healthy eating and physical activity. Physical examination, blood test, and self-reported survey data on dietary habits, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors were collected pre- and post-PHS. Paired and independent t tests were used for physiologic variables. Wilcoxon sign-rank and rank-sum tests were used for survey variables. At baseline, blacks had a higher percentage of overweight/obese students (43% vs 34%; P < .0001) and demonstrated poorer health habits than non-blacks; however, non-blacks had poorer lipid profiles. At follow-up (post-PHS intervention), both groups demonstrated significant improvements in physiological measures and health behaviors. Despite disparities between the groups at both baseline and follow-up, changes seen post-PHS intervention were beneficial in both groups. These results suggest that early intervention for risk factor modification is possible and may be of great importance in the prevention of CVD, particularly in high-risk groups.

  18. A Twelve-Week Lifestyle Program to Improve Cardiometabolic, Behavioral, and Psychological Health in Hispanic Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yli-Piipari, Sami; Berg, Alison; Laing, Emma M; Hartzell, Diane L; Parris, Kenneth O; Udwadia, Jon; Lewis, Richard D

    2017-10-10

    To examine the effectiveness of a 12-week lifestyle program on cardiometabolic, behavioral, and psychological outcomes among overweight Hispanic children and adolescents. A case series study with pre- and post-test analyses. Subjects/Settings/Location: A convenience sample of high-risk pediatric primary care patients (n = 22; 6 girls, 16 boys; M age = 11.73 ± 1.39 years) and their guardians in the Southeast United States. Twice per week 60 min (total of 24 h) of moderate-to-vigorous intensity boxing exercise training, 12 h of nutrition education for guardians, and a 30-min pediatrician appointment. Cardiometabolic (height [m], weight [kg], waist circumference [cm], body-mass index [BMI], BMI-z, BMI%, cholesterol [mg/dL], triglycerides [mg/dL], glucose [mg/dL], and low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [mg/dL]), behavioral (objective free time physical activity [PA] and sedentary time [min/day]), and psychological (self-determined exercise motivation) outcomes were measured/calculated, and paired-samples t-tests were conducted. A significant reduction was observed in waist circumference t(17) = -2.57, p = 0.020, d = 0.64; BMI% t(15) = -2.53, p = 0.023, d = 0.20; fasting glucose t(15) = -6.43, p < 0.001, d = 1.67; and amotivation (-) t(17) = -2.29, p = 0.036, d = 0.64; whereas a significant increase was identified in moderate t(10) = 4.01, p = 0.002, d = 1.23 and vigorous t(10) = 3.41, p = 0.007, d = 1.07 intensity PA; intrinsic motivation t(17) = 2.71, p = 0.015, d = 0.38; and introjected regulation t(17) = 2.74, p = 0.014, d = 0.64. A 12-week lifestyle program can be effective in improving selected health markers among overweight Hispanic children and adolescents. The positive changes in fasting glucose, BMI, and waist suggest that the participants are currently at lower risk for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular

  19. Targeting Medication Non-Adherence Behavior in Selected Autoimmune Diseases: A Systematic Approach to Digital Health Program Development.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Fournier, Rachel; Ingham, Michael

    2015-01-01

    29 autoimmune diseases, including Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn's Disease, and Systematic Lupus Erythematosus affect 7.6-9.4% of the population. While effective therapy is available, many patients do not follow treatment or use medications as directed. Digital health and Web 2.0 interventions have demonstrated much promise in increasing medication and treatment adherence, but to date many Internet tools have proven disappointing. In fact, most digital interventions continue to suffer from high attrition in patient populations, are burdensome for healthcare professionals, and have relatively short life spans. Digital health tools have traditionally centered on the transformation of existing interventions (such as diaries, trackers, stage-based or cognitive behavioral therapy programs, coupons, or symptom checklists) to electronic format. Advanced digital interventions have also incorporated attributes of Web 2.0 such as social networking, text messaging, and the use of video. Despite these efforts, there has not been little measurable impact in non-adherence for illnesses that require medical interventions, and research must look to other strategies or development methodologies. As a first step in investigating the feasibility of developing such a tool, the objective of the current study is to systematically rate factors of non-adherence that have been reported in past research studies. Grounded Theory, recognized as a rigorous method that facilitates the emergence of new themes through systematic analysis, data collection and coding, was used to analyze quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies addressing the following autoimmune diseases: Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn's Disease, Systematic Lupus Erythematosus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were only included if they contained primary data addressing the relationship with non-adherence. Out of the 27 studies, four non-modifiable and 11 modifiable risk factors were discovered. Over one

  20. Psychological well-being, health behaviors, and weight loss among participants in a residential, Kripalu yoga-based weight loss program.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tosca D; Park, Crystal L; Conboy, Lisa Ann

    2012-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in humans is a growing public health concern in the United States. Concomitants include poor health behaviors and reduced psychological well-being. Preliminary evidence suggests yoga and treatment paradigms incorporating mindfulness, self-compassion (SC), acceptance, non-dieting, and intuitive eating may improve these ancillary correlates, which may promote long-term weight loss. We explored the impact of a 5-day residential weight loss program, which was multifaceted and based on Kripalu yoga, on health behaviors, weight loss, and psychological well-being in overweight/obese individuals. Thirty-seven overweight/obese program participants (age 32-65, BMI<25) completed validated mind-fulness, SC, lifestyle behavior, and mood questionnaires at baseline, post-program, and 3-month follow-up and reported their weight 1 year after program completion. Significant improvements in nutrition behaviors, SC, mindfulness, stress management, and spiritual growth were observed immediately post-program (n = 31, 84% retention), with medium to large effect sizes. At 3-month follow-up (n = 18, 49% retention), most changes persisted. Physical activity and mood disturbance had improved significantly post-program but failed to reach significance at 3-month follow-up. Self-report weight loss at 1 year (n = 19, 51% retention) was significant. These findings suggest a Kripalu yoga-based, residential weight loss program may foster psychological well-being, improved nutrition behaviors, and weight loss. Given the exploratory nature of this investigation, more rigorous work in this area is warranted.

  1. Using behavior change communication to lead a comprehensive family planning program: the Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Krenn, Susan; Cobb, Lisa; Babalola, Stella; Odeku, Mojisola; Kusemiju, Bola

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (NURHI), a 6-year comprehensive family planning program (2009–2015) in 4 cities, intentionally applies communication theories to all program elements, not just the demand generation ones, relying mainly on a theory called ideation—the concept that contraceptive use is influenced by people's beliefs, ideas, and feelings and that changing these ideational factors can change people's behavior. Program Description: The project used multiple communication channels to foster dialogue about family planning, increase social approval for it, and improve accurate knowledge about contraceptives. Mobile service delivery was started in the third year to improve access to clinical methods in slums. Methods: Data from representative baseline (2010–11) and midterm (2012) surveys of women of reproductive age in the project cities were analyzed. We also used propensity score matching to create a statistically equivalent control group of women not exposed to project activities, and we examined service delivery data from NURHI-supported clinics (January 2011–May 2013) to determine the contribution of mobile services to total family planning services. Results: Three years into the initiative, analysis of longitudinal data shows that use of modern contraceptives has increased in each city, varying from 2.3 to 15.5 percentage points, and that the observed increases were predicted by exposure to NURHI activities. Of note is that modern method use increased substantially among the poorest wealth quintiles in project cities, on average, by 8.4 percentage points. The more project activities women were exposed to, the greater their contraceptive use. For example, among women not using a modern method at baseline, contraceptive prevalence among those with no exposure by midterm was 19.1% vs. 43.4% among those with high exposure. Project exposure had a positive dose-response relationship with ideation, as did

  2. Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, Cheryl

    The Health Promotion Program began with establishment of a one-credit course in health promotion and wellness and the training of family practice residents at the Mountain Area Health Education Center to serve as lab leaders in the course. The course later became part of the university's general education requirements. In addition, a health…

  3. Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, Cheryl

    The Health Promotion Program began with establishment of a one-credit course in health promotion and wellness and the training of family practice residents at the Mountain Area Health Education Center to serve as lab leaders in the course. The course later became part of the university's general education requirements. In addition, a health…

  4. Hormonal programming of rat social play behavior: Standardized techniques will aid synthesis and translation to human health.

    PubMed

    Blake, Bevin E; McCoy, Krista A

    2015-08-01

    Early social behaviors like juvenile play are important for normal cognitive and social development. Deficits in these behaviors are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism. Rat juvenile rough-and-tumble play is a useful behavioral biomarker of neurodevelopment, and is sensitive to chemical factors such as pre and neonatal hormones. Despite a rich body of literature characterizing hormonal programming of rodent juvenile play, the physiological mechanisms that regulate the organization of play behavior are not well characterized. Synthesizing results to understand the role of endocrine signaling in the development of play behavior remains difficult due to methodological inconsistency across studies. In this review, we synthesize what is known about hormonal mechanisms programming play, advocate standardized protocols for investigating rat play, and identify key areas where future research is needed. A synthetic understanding of the relationship between endocrine signaling and behavioral programming will improve our ability to understand the development and onset of neurodevelopmental disorders in humans and ultimately will help prevent these devastating conditions.

  5. Impacts of Family Rewards on Adolescents' Mental Health and Problem Behavior: Understanding the Full Range of Effects of a Conditional Cash Transfer Program.

    PubMed

    Morris, Pamela A; Aber, J Lawrence; Wolf, Sharon; Berg, Juliette

    2017-04-01

    This paper examines the effects of Opportunity New York City-Family Rewards, the first holistic conditional cash transfer (CCT) program evaluated in the USA, on adolescents' mental health and problem behavior (key outcomes outside of the direct targets of the program) as well as on key potential mechanisms of these effects. The Family Rewards program, launched by the Center for Economic Opportunity in the Mayor's Office of the City of New York in 2007 and co-designed and evaluated by MDRC, offered cash assistance to low-income families to reduce economic hardship. The cash rewards were offered to families in three key areas: children's education, family preventive health care, and parents' employment. Results that rely on the random assignment design of the study find that Family Rewards resulted in statistically significant reductions in adolescent aggression and rates of substance use by program group adolescents as well as their friends, relative to adolescents in the control condition, but no statistically significant impacts on adolescent mental health. One possible mechanism for the benefits to adolescent behavior appears to be time spent with peers, as fewer adolescents in the program group spent time with friends and more adolescents in the program group spent time with family. Findings are discussed with regard to their implication for conditional cash transfer programs as well as for interventions targeting high-risk youth.

  6. [An oral function improvement program utilizing health behavior theories ameliorates oral functions and oral hygienic conditions of pre-frail elderly persons].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hideo

    2014-06-01

    Oral function improvement programs utilizing health behavior theories are considered to be effective in preventing the need for long-term social care. In the present study, an oral function improvement program based upon health behavior theories was designed, and its utility was assessed in 102 pre-frail elderly persons (33 males, 69 females, mean age: 76.9 +/- 5.7) considered to be in potential need of long-term social care and attending a long-term care prevention class in Sayama City, Saitama Prefecture, Japan. The degree of improvement in oral functions (7 items) and oral hygienic conditions (3 items) was assessed by comparing oral health before and after participation in the program. The results showed statistically significant improvements in the following oral functions: (1) lip functions (oral diadochokinesis, measured by the regularity of the repetition of the syllable "Pa"), (2) tongue functions, (3) tongue root motor skills (oral diadochokinesis, measured by the regularity of the repetition of the syllables "Ta" and "Ka"), (4) tongue extension/retraction, (5) side-to-side tongue movement functions, (6) cheek motor skills, and (7) repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST). The following measures of oral hygiene also showed a statistically significant improvement: (1) debris on dentures or teeth, (2) coated tongue, and (3) frequency of oral cleaning. These findings demonstrated that an improvement program informed by health behavior theories is useful in improving oral functions and oral hygiene conditions.

  7. Education, cognition, health knowledge, and health behavior.

    PubMed

    Mocan, Naci; Altindag, Duha T

    2014-04-01

    Using data from NLSY97, we analyze the impact of education on health behavior. Controlling for health knowledge does not influence the impact of education on health behavior, supporting the productive efficiency hypothesis. Accounting for cognitive ability does not significantly alter the relationship between education and health behavior. Similarly, the impact of education on health behavior is the same between those with and without a learning disability, suggesting that cognition is not likely to be a significant factor in explaining the impact of education on health behavior.

  8. Changes in Attitudes, Knowledge and Behavior Associated with Implementing a Comprehensive School Health Program in a Province of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldinger, Carmen; Zhang, Xin-Wei; Liu, Li-Qun; Pan, Xue-Dong; Yu, Sen-Hai; Jones, Jack; Kass, Jared

    2008-01-01

    After successful pilot projects, Zhejiang Province, China, decided to systematically scale-up health promoting schools (HPS) over the entire province of 47 million. This study describes the interventions and self-reported changes in attitudes, knowledge and behavior during the first phase of scaling-up. Group interviews were conducted with a…

  9. Changes in Attitudes, Knowledge and Behavior Associated with Implementing a Comprehensive School Health Program in a Province of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldinger, Carmen; Zhang, Xin-Wei; Liu, Li-Qun; Pan, Xue-Dong; Yu, Sen-Hai; Jones, Jack; Kass, Jared

    2008-01-01

    After successful pilot projects, Zhejiang Province, China, decided to systematically scale-up health promoting schools (HPS) over the entire province of 47 million. This study describes the interventions and self-reported changes in attitudes, knowledge and behavior during the first phase of scaling-up. Group interviews were conducted with a…

  10. Early Childhood Behavioral Health Integration in Pediatric Primary Care: Serving Refugee Families in the Healthy Steps Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchholz, Melissa; Fischer, Collette; Margolis, Kate L.; Talmi, Ayelet

    2016-01-01

    Primary care settings are optimal environments for providing comprehensive, family-centered care to young children and their families. Primary care clinics with integrated behavioral health clinicians (BHCs) are well-positioned to build trust and create access to care for marginalized and underserved populations. Refugees from around the world are…

  11. Early Childhood Behavioral Health Integration in Pediatric Primary Care: Serving Refugee Families in the Healthy Steps Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchholz, Melissa; Fischer, Collette; Margolis, Kate L.; Talmi, Ayelet

    2016-01-01

    Primary care settings are optimal environments for providing comprehensive, family-centered care to young children and their families. Primary care clinics with integrated behavioral health clinicians (BHCs) are well-positioned to build trust and create access to care for marginalized and underserved populations. Refugees from around the world are…

  12. Randomized pilot trial of a cognitive-behavioral alcohol, self-harm, and HIV prevention program for teens in mental health treatment.

    PubMed

    Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Hadley, Wendy; Curby, Timothy W; Brown, Larry K

    2017-02-01

    Adolescents with mental health conditions represent a high-risk group for substance use, deliberate self-harm (DSH), and risky sexual behavior. Mental health treatment does not uniformly decrease these risks. Effective prevention efforts are needed to offset the developmental trajectory from mental health problems to these behaviors. This study tested an adjunctive cognitive-behavioral family-based alcohol, DSH, and HIV prevention program (ASH-P) for adolescents in mental healthcare. A two group randomized design was used to compare ASH-P to an assessment only control (AO-C). Participants included 81 adolescents and a parent. Assessments were completed at pre-intervention as well as 1, 6, and 12-months post-enrollment, and included measures of family-based mechanisms and high-risk behaviors. ASH-P relative to AO-C was associated with greater improvements in most family process variables (perceptions of communication and parental disapproval of alcohol use and sexual behavior) as well as less DSH and greater refusal of sex to avoid a sexually transmitted infection. It also had a moderate (but non-significant) effect on odds of binge drinking. No differences were found in suicidal ideation, alcohol use, or sexual intercourse. ASH-P showed initial promise in preventing multiple high-risk behaviors. Further testing of prevention protocols that target multiple high-risk behaviors in clinical samples is warranted.

  13. Targeting Medication Non-Adherence Behavior in Selected Autoimmune Diseases: A Systematic Approach to Digital Health Program Development

    PubMed Central

    van Mierlo, Trevor; Fournier, Rachel; Ingham, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background 29 autoimmune diseases, including Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn’s Disease, and Systematic Lupus Erythematosus affect 7.6-9.4% of the population. While effective therapy is available, many patients do not follow treatment or use medications as directed. Digital health and Web 2.0 interventions have demonstrated much promise in increasing medication and treatment adherence, but to date many Internet tools have proven disappointing. In fact, most digital interventions continue to suffer from high attrition in patient populations, are burdensome for healthcare professionals, and have relatively short life spans. Objective Digital health tools have traditionally centered on the transformation of existing interventions (such as diaries, trackers, stage-based or cognitive behavioral therapy programs, coupons, or symptom checklists) to electronic format. Advanced digital interventions have also incorporated attributes of Web 2.0 such as social networking, text messaging, and the use of video. Despite these efforts, there has not been little measurable impact in non-adherence for illnesses that require medical interventions, and research must look to other strategies or development methodologies. As a first step in investigating the feasibility of developing such a tool, the objective of the current study is to systematically rate factors of non-adherence that have been reported in past research studies. Methods Grounded Theory, recognized as a rigorous method that facilitates the emergence of new themes through systematic analysis, data collection and coding, was used to analyze quantitative, qualitative and mixed method studies addressing the following autoimmune diseases: Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, Crohn’s Disease, Systematic Lupus Erythematosus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Studies were only included if they contained primary data addressing the relationship with non-adherence. Results Out of the 27 studies, four non-modifiable and 11 modifiable

  14. The Effect of Multifactorial Intervention Programs on Health Behavior and Symptom Control Among Community-Dwelling Overweight Older Adults With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Saraboon, Yuwadee; Aree-Ue, Suparb; Maruo, Suchinda Jarupat

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee (OA knee), especially in older adults, is the most common chronic illness and a major public health problem. Overweight older adults are at a high risk of developing OA knee and suffering from OA knee symptoms, which cause older adults to become disabled and have functional limitations. The reduction of knee pain and the maintenance of physical functions of overweight older adults with OA knee are critical. To examine the effect of multifactorial intervention programs (MUFIPs) on health behavior and symptoms control in overweight older Thais with knee osteoarthritis. Eighty overweight older Thais with knee osteoarthritis living in communities were randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. The experimental group received MUFIPs, including health education, a weight-reduction/control program, a quadriceps exercise training class followed by a home-based exercise program, and a home visit program. The control group did not receive the MUFIPs. Changes in the study variables were assessed at baseline and 8- week follow-ups. Data were analyzed by using descriptive and independent t test analyses. The experimental group had significant improvement in osteoarthritis knowledge, illness representation, health behavior, movement ability, and joint range of motion, and had reduction in knee pain and body weight. All these variables were observed to have significant differences between experimental and control groups. The MUFIPs can break down the progression of the disease among overweight older Thais with knee osteoarthritis.

  15. Reaching men who have sex with men in Myanmar: population characteristics, risk and preventive behavior, exposure to health programs.

    PubMed

    Aung, Tin; McFarland, Willi; Paw, Ehthi; Hetherington, John

    2013-05-01

    To estimate risk behavior and HIV program reach among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Myanmar, we conducted cross-sectional surveys in four cities (Yangon, Mandalay, Pathein, Monywa) using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Prevention response indicators across the cities ranged from 56 to 70 % testing for HIV and receiving results last year, 89-100 % identifying ways of preventing transmission, 50-95 % rejecting misconceptions about HIV, and 82-94 % using a condom at last anal sex. MSM in smaller cities had similar or higher use of programs compared those in larger cities. MSM classified as Ah Chawk Ma (broadly feminine gender presentation) reported having more sex partners, less consistent condom use, and more frequent history of sexually transmitted infections compared to those described as Tha Ngwe (broadly masculine gender presentation). Our behavioral survey data help advocate for appropriate services and form a baseline to gauge future impact of the HIV response for this marginalized population.

  16. Use of a Text Message Program to Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk Awareness and Promote Health Behavior Change (Part II): Assessment of Participants' Perceptions on Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Hirzel, Lindsey; Turske, Scott A; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Yarandi, Hossein; Bondurant, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Background Although there is great enthusiasm in both the public and private sector for the further development and use of large-scale consumer-facing public health applications for mobile platforms, little is known about user experience and satisfaction with this type of approach. As a part of the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program, txt4health, a public-facing, mobile phone-based health information service targeting type 2 diabetes, was launched in 3 Beacon Communities: the Southeast Michigan Beacon Community in Detroit, MI, the Greater Cincinnati Beacon Community in Cincinnati, OH, and the Crescent City Beacon Community in New Orleans, LA. This program was marketed via large public health campaigns and drew many users within the respective communities. Objective The purpose of this investigation was to use the RE-AIM framework to document txt4health efficacy by focusing on perceptions of satisfaction, usage, and behavior change among individuals who used txt4health in pilot studies in Southeast Michigan and Greater Cincinnati. Methods We conducted a multimodal user survey with txt4health users recruited via text message through the program to understand participant perceptions of program use and satisfaction, as well as self-reported perceptions of behavior change as a result of using txt4health. Results Txt4health users reported very high levels of program satisfaction, with 67.1% (108/161) reporting satisfaction scores of ≥8 on a 10-point scale, with 10 equivalent to most satisfied (mean 8.2, SD 1.6). All survey participants agreed/strongly agreed that the messages included in txt4health were clear and easy to understand (100.0%, 160/160), and most found txt4health made them knowledgeable about their risk for type 2 diabetes (88.1%, 140/159) and made them conscious of their diet and physical activity (88.8%, 142/160). Most participants reported that txt4health helped them to make behavior changes related to diet; after having completed txt4health

  17. Using behavior change communication to lead a comprehensive family planning program: the Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Susan; Cobb, Lisa; Babalola, Stella; Odeku, Mojisola; Kusemiju, Bola

    2014-12-10

    The Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (NURHI), a 6-year comprehensive family planning program (2009-2015) in 4 cities, intentionally applies communication theories to all program elements, not just the demand generation ones, relying mainly on a theory called ideation-the concept that contraceptive use is influenced by people's beliefs, ideas, and feelings and that changing these ideational factors can change people's behavior. The project used multiple communication channels to foster dialogue about family planning, increase social approval for it, and improve accurate knowledge about contraceptives. Mobile service delivery was started in the third year to improve access to clinical methods in slums. Data from representative baseline (2010-11) and midterm (2012) surveys of women of reproductive age in the project cities were analyzed. We also used propensity score matching to create a statistically equivalent control group of women not exposed to project activities, and we examined service delivery data from NURHI-supported clinics (January 2011-May 2013) to determine the contribution of mobile services to total family planning services. Three years into the initiative, analysis of longitudinal data shows that use of modern contraceptives has increased in each city, varying from 2.3 to 15.5 percentage points, and that the observed increases were predicted by exposure to NURHI activities. Of note is that modern method use increased substantially among the poorest wealth quintiles in project cities, on average, by 8.4 percentage points. The more project activities women were exposed to, the greater their contraceptive use. For example, among women not using a modern method at baseline, contraceptive prevalence among those with no exposure by midterm was 19.1% vs. 43.4% among those with high exposure. Project exposure had a positive dose-response relationship with ideation, as did ideation and contraceptive use. By the end of the observation period

  18. After School: Connecting Children at Risk with Responsible Adults to Help Reduce Youth Substance Abuse and Other Health-Compromising Behaviors--An RWJF National Program. Program Results Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "After School: Connecting Children at Risk With Responsible Adults to Help Reduce Youth Substance Abuse and Other Health-Compromising Behaviors (After School)" helped develop intermediary organizations in Boston, Chicago and the San Francisco Bay Area in order to create citywide systems of after-school programs. The…

  19. Problem and pro-social behavior among Nigerian children with intellectual disability: the implication for developing policy for school based mental health programs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background School based mental health programs are absent in most educational institutions for intellectually disabled children and adolescents in Nigeria and co-morbid behavioral problems often complicate intellectual disability in children and adolescents receiving special education instructions. Little is known about prevalence and pattern of behavioral problems existing co-morbidly among sub-Saharan African children with intellectual disability. This study assessed the prevalence and pattern of behavioral problems among Nigerian children with intellectual disability and also the associated factors. Method Teachers' rated Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was used to screen for behavioral problems among children with intellectual disability in a special education facility in south eastern Nigeria. Socio-demographic questionnaire was used to obtain socio-demographic information of the children. Results A total of forty four (44) children with intellectual disability were involved in the study. Twenty one (47.7%) of the children were classified as having behavioral problems in the borderline and abnormal categories on total difficulties clinical scale of SDQ using the cut-off point recommended by Goodman. Mild mental retardation as compared to moderate, severe and profound retardation was associated with highest total difficulties mean score. Males were more likely to exhibit conduct and hyperactivity behavioral problems compared to the females. The inter-clinical scales correlations of teachers' rated SDQ in the studied population also showed good internal consistency (Cronbach Alpha = 0.63). Conclusion Significant behavioral problems occur co-morbidly among Nigerian children with intellectual disability receiving special education instructions and this could impact negatively on educational learning and other areas of functioning. There is an urgent need for establishing school-based mental health program and appropriate screening measure in this

  20. Relationships among work stress, job satisfaction, mental health, and healthy lifestyle behaviors in new graduate nurses attending the nurse athlete program: a call to action for nursing leaders.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Hrabe, David P; Szalacha, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Although nurses are educated to take outstanding care of others, they themselves often have poor health outcomes, including high rates of depression and obesity, which are associated with stressful work environments. Furthermore, a high percentage of new graduate nurses leave their positions in the first year of employment, resulting in exorbitant costs to health care systems. The aim of this study was to determine the relationships among key variables that influence job satisfaction and healthy lifestyle behaviors of new graduate nurses, including workplace stress, work environment, lifestyle beliefs, and mental health. A descriptive correlational design was used with baseline data from 61 new graduate nurses attending the 2-day Nurse Athlete program, a workshop that focuses on nutrition, energy management, and physical activity. Higher levels of workplace stress were associated with higher levels of depression and anxiety as well as lower levels of resiliency, job satisfaction, and healthy lifestyle beliefs. Nurse leaders and managers must invest in creating healthy work environments for new and experienced nurses as well as provide mental health screening, resources, and intervention programs that focus on education and skills-building in health promoting behaviors, including emotional regulation of stress, anxiety, and depression.

  1. Hypertension Education: Impact on Parent Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Peter; Portnoy, Barry

    This study sought to determine the effects of a high blood pressure education program for sixth graders on the preventive hypertension health attitudes and behaviors of their parents. Attention was focused on the role of students ("significant others") in affecting parental attitude and behavior changes relating to the three risk factors of…

  2. Applying Behavioral Economics to Public Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Matjasko, Jennifer L.; Cawley, John H.; Baker-Goering, Madeleine M.; Yokum, David V.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral economics provides an empirically informed perspective on how individuals make decisions, including the important realization that even subtle features of the environment can have meaningful impacts on behavior. This commentary provides examples from the literature and recent government initiatives that incorporate concepts from behavioral economics in order to improve health, decision making, and government efficiency. The examples highlight the potential for behavioral economics to improve the effectiveness of public health policy at low cost. Although incorporating insights from behavioral economics into public health policy has the potential to improve population health, its integration into government public health programs and policies requires careful design and continual evaluation of such interventions. Limitations and drawbacks of the approach are discussed. PMID:27102853

  3. Marketing impact of health education programs.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, W R; Briller, S; Fishleder, A; Bat-Cirjak, E; Rothner, A D; Secic, M

    1997-01-01

    A study evaluating whether a lay public education program caused initiation of health-related behaviors was conducted at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Attendees of three individual "Health Talks" were surveyed: endometriosis (n = 78), men's health (n = 62) and cancer (n = 57). Participants were surveyed at three points: (a) before the talk, (b) immediately following the talk and (c) six weeks after the talk concerning their knowledge and health behaviors. The results indicated that community health education produces a substantial improvement in health-related knowledge and after attending the seminars, 81.3% of respondents initiated a positive health behavior. Of interest to health care marketers are the 30.8% of attendees who initiated health behaviors which have marketing implications.

  4. Teaching Behavior Improvement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehn, Lilburn P., Ed.

    This document, intended for use by those who might wish to implement such a program, describes an inservice teacher self-improvement program based on goal setting by the teacher, practice of new skills, feedback about teaching performance, and self-analysis of the dissonance between goals and practice. Chapter 1 presents rationale and history of…

  5. Cost and utilization of behavioral health medications associated with rescission of an exemption for prior authorization for severe and persistent mental illness in the Vermont Medicaid Program.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Jason C; Marcoux, Rita M; Quilliam, Brian J

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, many state Medicaid programs have implemented preferred drug lists (PDL) to control pharmaceutical costs by generating supplemental rebate revenues and directing providers to the most cost-effective treatments. Two states, Michigan and Vermont, sought approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for supplemental rebates for their Medicaid fee-for-service programs in 2002. Behavioral health medications were largely excluded from PDLs and other managed care initiatives implemented by state Medicaid programs because of significant opposition to any impact on this "vulnerable" population. In November 2001, the Vermont Medicaid program implemented the Vermont Health Access Pharmacy Benefit Management Program, a PDL designed to promote cost-effective use of medications. Despite the potential cost savings resulting from implementation of a PDL, behavioral health providers and advocates in the state of Vermont opposed the implementation of the managed care initiative for beneficiaries with severe mental illness, and after January of 2002, Vermont's program was changed to exempt beneficiaries meeting the "severe and persistent mental illness" (SPMI) criteria from prior authorization (PA) for behavioral health medications not on the Medicaid PDL. The SPMI exemption was phased out by June 30, 2006. To determine the effects of the rescission of the PA exemption on utilization and costs of 3 classes of behavioral health medications (antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anxiolytics/sedatives). Secondary analyses were conducted to assess the association between rescission of the PA exemption and 2 quality measures that might be associated with pharmacy management policy: (a) behavioral health hospitalizations and (b) high-dose prescribing of antipsychotics, defined as dosing that exceeded the manufacturer-recommended maximum dose by 25%. This was a retrospective analysis of pharmacy claims for beneficiaries of the Office of Vermont Health Access

  6. Risk perceptions and health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Rebecca; Klein, William M

    2015-01-01

    Risk perceptions – or an individual’s perceived susceptibility to a threat – are a key component of many health behavior change theories. Risk perceptions are often targeted in health behavior change interventions, and recent meta-analytic evidence suggests that interventions that successfully engage and change risk perceptions produce subsequent increases in health behaviors. Here, we review recent literature on risk perceptions and health behavior, including research on the formation of risk perceptions, types of risk perceptions (including deliberative, affective, and experiential), accuracy of risk perceptions, and associations and interactions among types of risk perceptions. Taken together, existing research suggests that disease risk perceptions are a critical determinant of health behavior, although the nature of the association among risk perceptions and health behavior may depend on the profile of different types of risk perceptions and the accuracy of such perceptions. PMID:26258160

  7. Design of a behavioral health program for urban American Indian/Alaska Native youths: a community informed approach.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Daniel L; Johnson, Carrie L

    2011-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) urban youths experience significant mental health and substance use problems. However, culturally relevant treatment approaches that incorporate community perspectives within the urban setting are limited. This study analyzes community perspectives from AI/AN parents, AI/AN youths, and services providers within Los Angeles County. Information gathered was utilized to develop a needs assessment for AI/AN youths with mental health and substance use problems and to design a community-informed treatment approach. Nine focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted. The Los Angeles County community strongly expressed the need for providing urban AI/AN youths with traditional healing services and cultural activities within their treatment program. However, various barriers to accessing mental health and substance abuse treatment services were identified. An integrated treatment approach was subsequently designed as a result of input derived from community perspectives. The community believed that providing urban AI/AN youths with an integrated treatment approach has the potential to decrease the risk of mental health and substance abuse problems in addition to enhancing their cultural identity and self esteem.

  8. The Effect of Stress Management Program Using Cognitive Behavior Approach on Mental Health of the Mothers of the Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Zarei, Shekufe; Alavi Shooshtari, Ali; Vossoughi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in children. Objectives: The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management program using cognitive behavior approach on mental health of the mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Patients and Methods: In this interventional study, 90 mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were randomly allocated into three intervention, placebo, and control groups. The general health questionnaire was used to measure mental health. Besides, stress was assessed through the depression-anxiety-stress scale. The two instruments were completed at baseline, immediately after, and one month after the intervention by the mothers. Afterwards, within group comparisons were made using one-sample repeated measurement ANOVA. One-way ANOVA was used for inter group comparisons. Mothers in the placebo group only participated in meetings to talk and express feelings without receiving any interventions. Results: At the baseline, no significant difference was found among the three groups regarding the means of stress, anxiety, depression, and mental health. However, a significant difference was observed in the mean score of stress immediately after the intervention (P = 0.033). The results also showed a significant difference among the three groups regarding the mean score of mental health (P < 0.001). One month after the intervention, the mean difference of mental health score remained significant only in the intervention group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The study findings confirmed the effectiveness of stress management program utilizing cognitive behavior approach in mental health of the mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:26199709

  9. The Effect of Stress Management Program Using Cognitive Behavior Approach on Mental Health of the Mothers of the Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Zarei, Shekufe; Alavi Shooshtari, Ali; Vossoughi, Mehrdad

    2015-06-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in children. The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management program using cognitive behavior approach on mental health of the mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In this interventional study, 90 mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were randomly allocated into three intervention, placebo, and control groups. The general health questionnaire was used to measure mental health. Besides, stress was assessed through the depression-anxiety-stress scale. The two instruments were completed at baseline, immediately after, and one month after the intervention by the mothers. Afterwards, within group comparisons were made using one-sample repeated measurement ANOVA. One-way ANOVA was used for inter group comparisons. Mothers in the placebo group only participated in meetings to talk and express feelings without receiving any interventions. At the baseline, no significant difference was found among the three groups regarding the means of stress, anxiety, depression, and mental health. However, a significant difference was observed in the mean score of stress immediately after the intervention (P = 0.033). The results also showed a significant difference among the three groups regarding the mean score of mental health (P < 0.001). One month after the intervention, the mean difference of mental health score remained significant only in the intervention group (P < 0.001). The study findings confirmed the effectiveness of stress management program utilizing cognitive behavior approach in mental health of the mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  10. Innovating team-based outpatient mental health care in the Veterans Health Administration: Staff-perceived benefits and challenges to pilot implementation of the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP).

    PubMed

    Barry, Catherine N; Abraham, Kristen M; Weaver, Kendra R; Bowersox, Nicholas W

    2016-05-01

    In the past decade, the demand for Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health care has increased rapidly. In response to the increased demand, the VHA developed the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP) team model as an innovative approach to transform VHA general outpatient mental health delivery. The present formative evaluation gathered information about pilot implementation of BHIP to understand the struggles and successes that staff experienced during facility transitions to the BHIP model. Using a purposive, nonrandom sampling approach, we conducted 1-on-1, semistructured interviews with 37 licensed and nonlicensed clinical providers and 13 clerical support staff assigned to BHIP teams in 21 facilities across the VHA. Interviews revealed that having actively involved facility mental health leaders, obtaining adequate staffing for teams to meet the requirements of the BHIP model, creating clear descriptions and expectations for team member roles within the BHIP framework, and allocating designated time for BHIP team meetings challenged many VHA sites but are crucial for successful BHIP implementation. Despite the challenges, staff reported that the transition to BHIP improved team work and improved patient care. Staff specifically highlighted the potential for the BHIP model to improve staff working relationships and enhance communication, collaboration, morale, and veteran treatment consistency. Future evaluations of the BHIP implementation process and BHIP team functioning focusing on patient outcomes, organizational outcomes, and staff functioning are recommended for fully understanding effects of transitioning to the BHIP model within VHA general mental health clinics and to identify best practices and areas for improvement. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Increasing US health plan coverage for exercise programming in community mental health settings for people with serious mental illness: a position statement from the Society of Behavior Medicine and the American College of Sports Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Sarah I; Jerome, Gerald J; Schneider, Kristin L; Craft, Lynette L; Buman, Matthew P; Stoutenberg, Mark; Daumit, Gail L; Bartels, Stephen J; Goodrich, David E

    2016-09-01

    Adults with serious mental illness die more than 10 years earlier than the average American. Premature mortality is due to the high prevalence of preventable diseases including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Poor lifestyle behaviors including lack of exercise and physical inactivity contribute to the epidemic levels of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease observed among adults with serious mental illness. Not surprisingly, people with serious mental illness are among the most costly consumers of health services due to increased visits for poorly managed mental and physical health. Recent studies have demonstrated that exercise interventions based on community mental health settings can significantly improve physical and mental health in people with serious mental illness. However, current funding regulations limit the ability of community mental health settings to offer exercise programming services to people with serious mental illness. Policy efforts are needed to improve the dissemination and sustainability of exercise programs for people with serious mental illness.

  12. Behavioral Health and Performance Operations at the NASA Johnson Space Center: A Comprehensive Program that Addresses Flight and Spaceflight Duty Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beven, G. E.

    2017-01-01

    NASA astronauts on active status require medical certification for aircraft flying duties as well as readiness for long duration spaceflight training, launch to the International Space Station (ISS), and mission continuation during spaceflight operations. Behavioral fitness and adaptability is an inherent component of medical certification at NASA and requires a unique approach that spans the professional life-span of all active astronauts. TOPIC: This presentation will address the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) operations program at the Johnson Space Center. Components of BHP operations include astronaut selection, as well as annual, elective, preflight, inflight, and postflight BHP assessments. Each aspect of the BHP operations program will be discussed, with a focus on behavioral fitness determination and resultant outcomes. Specifically, astronaut selection generates a rating of suitability for long duration spaceflight as well as psychiatric qualification; annual, preflight and postflight BHP assessments provoke a decision regarding the presence of any aeromedical concerns; and inflight assessment requires a conclusion pertaining to mission impact. The combination of these elements provide for a unique, comprehensive approach to flight and spaceflight adaptability. APPLICATIONS: Attendees will understand the differing facets of NASA's comprehensive BHP operations program that occurs over the course of an astronaut's career and be able to compare and contrast this to the Adaptability Rating for Military Aviation (ARMA) and proposed models presented by others on this panel.

  13. Effects of a training program for home health care workers on the provision of preventive activities and on the health-related behavior of their clients: A quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Walters, Maaike E; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van der Meulen, Anja; Dijkstra, Arie; de Winter, Andrea F

    2017-05-21

    the first and second effect-measurements. This training program had hardly any effect on preventive activities performed by home health care workers and on the health-related behavior of older adults. Offering health promotion via home health care workers may be promising but its delivery should be enhanced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of a nutritional education program on the nutritional status of elderly patients in a long-term care hospital in Jeollanamdo province: health behavior, dietary behavior, nutrition risk level and nutrient intake

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bok Hee; Kim, Mi-Ju

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess improvements in nutritional status following the application of nutrition education to elderly patients in a long-term care hospital. The study was carried out from January to May 2009, during which a preliminary survey, a pretest, the application of nutrition education, and a post-test were applied in stages. The number of subjects at pretest was 81, and the number of participants included in the final analysis was 61 (18 men, 43 women), all of whom participated in both the nutrition education program and the post-test. The survey consisted of general demographic items, health behaviors, dietary behaviors, the Nutrition Screening Initiative checklist, and nutrient intake assessment (24 hour recall method). The nutrition education program lasted for four weeks. It included a basic education program, provided once a week, and mini-education program, which was offered daily during lunch times. The survey was conducted before and after the education program using the same assessment method, although some items were included only at pretest. When analyzing the changes in elderly patients after the nutritional education program, we found that, among subjective dietary behaviors, self-rated perceptions of health (P < 0.001) and of depression (P < 0.001) improved significantly and that dietary behavior scores also improved significantly (P < 0.001), while nutritional risk levels decreased. In terms of nutrient intake, subjects' intake of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, calcium, phosphorus, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin C all increased significantly (P < 0.001). These results indicated that nutritional education is effective in improving the nutritional status of elderly patients. We hope that the results of this study can be used as preliminary data for establishing guidelines for nutrition management tailored to elderly patients in long-term care hospitals. PMID:22413039

  15. The effect of a nutritional education program on the nutritional status of elderly patients in a long-term care hospital in Jeollanamdo province: health behavior, dietary behavior, nutrition risk level and nutrient intake.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bok Hee; Kim, Mi-Ju; Lee, Yoonna

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to assess improvements in nutritional status following the application of nutrition education to elderly patients in a long-term care hospital. The study was carried out from January to May 2009, during which a preliminary survey, a pretest, the application of nutrition education, and a post-test were applied in stages. The number of subjects at pretest was 81, and the number of participants included in the final analysis was 61 (18 men, 43 women), all of whom participated in both the nutrition education program and the post-test. The survey consisted of general demographic items, health behaviors, dietary behaviors, the Nutrition Screening Initiative checklist, and nutrient intake assessment (24 hour recall method). The nutrition education program lasted for four weeks. It included a basic education program, provided once a week, and mini-education program, which was offered daily during lunch times. The survey was conducted before and after the education program using the same assessment method, although some items were included only at pretest. When analyzing the changes in elderly patients after the nutritional education program, we found that, among subjective dietary behaviors, self-rated perceptions of health (P < 0.001) and of depression (P < 0.001) improved significantly and that dietary behavior scores also improved significantly (P < 0.001), while nutritional risk levels decreased. In terms of nutrient intake, subjects' intake of energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, calcium, phosphorus, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin C all increased significantly (P < 0.001). These results indicated that nutritional education is effective in improving the nutritional status of elderly patients. We hope that the results of this study can be used as preliminary data for establishing guidelines for nutrition management tailored to elderly patients in long-term care hospitals.

  16. Transformational leadership behaviors in allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Wylie, David A; Gallagher, Helen L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore self-reported transformational leadership behavior profiles within the six largest allied health profession groups in the National Health Service in Scotland and to determine whether factors such as seniority of grade, locus of employment, and/or leadership training have a positive influence on transformational leadership behaviors. A postal survey comprising the shorter version of the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) and contextual demographic information was completed by 753 allied health professionals from four Health Board areas across Scotland who were randomly selected through a modified cluster sampling technique. The MLQ contains 36 items that measure nine identified leadership factors; however, only the responses to the five transformational leadership factors are reported here. The study identified significant differences in transformational leadership behaviors between individual allied health professions. Radiographers and podiatrists scored consistently lower than the other professional groups across the range of transformational behaviors. Seniority of grade significantly influenced the scores, with higher-graded staff reporting greater leadership behaviors (p < 0.001). Prior leadership training also positively influenced transformational behaviors (p < 0.001). However, locus of employment within a primary or secondary care setting or even a multidisciplinary or unidisciplinary team had no effect. This research identified significant differences in transformational leadership behaviors between individual allied health professions, indicating that some professional groups are inherently advantaged in embracing the modernization agenda. This highlights an as-yet missed opportunity for effectively targeting and evaluating multidisciplinary leadership training programs across the allied health professions.

  17. A prevention program for multiple health-compromising behaviors in adolescence: baseline results from a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Allara, Elias; Angelini, Paola; Gorini, Giuseppe; Bosi, Sandra; Carreras, Giulia; Gozzi, Cristina; Martini, Andrea; Tamelli, Marco; Storani, Simone; Faggiano, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    To describe the design and present the baseline findings of the evaluation study of 'Paesaggi di Prevenzione', a school-based prevention program tackling smoking, alcohol misuse, dietary risks, and physical inactivity in 12- to 14-year-olds. The program was implemented from January 2011 to April 2012 in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, and comprised classroom activities and school-wide policies. A two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial was designed. Schools were the units of randomization and were matched by socioeconomic status, size, and type. Data from 4700 middle school students and 2952 high school students were collected anonymously from October to December 2010. Past-30-day smoking prevalence was 1.9% among middle school students and 20.8% among high school students. Past-30-day prevalence of alcohol intoxication was 2.2% among middle school students and 11.4% among high school students. A total of 39.7% of middle school students and 48.0% of high school students drank sugar-sweetened beverages four or more times per week; 7.5% of middle school students and 7.1% of high school students had intense physical activity every day. This study seems adequately powered and baseline variables appear evenly distributed between study groups. Findings are in line with those of the WHO Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of the Nurse Athlete Program on the Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors, Physical Health, and Mental Well-being of New Graduate Nurses.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, David P; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Buck, Jacalyn; Sinnott, Loraine T

    Recognizing that transition from nursing student to point-of-care nurse can be a stressful time period in one's career. A pilot study at a large Midwestern medical center tested the preliminary effects of a health-oriented workshop, the Nurse Athlete, on new graduate nurses' healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle behaviors, depressive and anxiety symptoms, as well as health outcomes. The Nurse Athlete workshop, provided in partnership with Johnson & Johnson's Human Performance Institute (HPI), used materials from HPI's Corporate Athlete program. The 2-day workshop focuses on energy management through a comprehensive examination of goals and values in relation to one's spiritual, mental, emotional, and physical development and provides practical strategies to improve self-care. Eighty-eight new graduate nurses hired at the university's medical center were offered the opportunity to participate in the Nurse Athlete program and associated study. Sixty-nine percent of these new graduate nurses (n = 61) consented and participated in the program. There was a statistically significant decrease in the participants' weight and body mass index from baseline to the 6-month follow-up assessment, which resulted in small to medium positive effects for the Nurse Athlete program. There was also a significant decrease in body fat percentage across time, resulting in a large positive intervention effect. Statistically significant reductions in depressive symptoms were measured between baseline and 6 months.

  19. Predictors of behavior change intention using health risk appraisal data.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Mary L; Lee, Seung Pil; Cornwell, T Bettina; Burton, Wayne N; McMullen, Judith; Edington, Dee W

    2013-07-01

    To investigate predictors of behavior change intention and discuss potential implications for practitioners. Health risk appraisal (HRA) data from 2 organizations were used to develop and confirm a path analysis model for predictors of intention to change behavior. Lower self-rated health perception and higher ratings of stress corresponded to higher behavior-change intention scores. Stress was associated with poorer health perception. Higher stress and lower perception of health status were directly associated with intention to change behavior. Incorporating stress management and awareness of health perception into health promotion strategies could enhance wellness programs by aligning programs with motivating factors.

  20. [Health knowledge, health promoting behavior and factors influencing health promoting behavior of north korean defectors in South Korea].

    PubMed

    Choe, Myoung Ae; Yi, Myungsun; Choi, Jung An; Shin, Gisoo

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify health knowledge, health promoting behavior and factors influencing health promoting behavior of North Korean defectors in South Korea. Participants in this study were 410 North Korean defectors, over 20 years of age residing in Seoul. They were recruited by snowball sampling. Data were collected from April to June, 2010. Health knowledge, health promoting behavior, self-efficacy, perceived barriers to health promoting behavior and social support were measured by structured questionnaires, and perceived physical and mental health status were measured by one item with 10-point numeric rating scale. The data were analyzed using t-test, ANOVA, and multiple regression. Health knowledge, health promoting behavior, and perceived barriers to health promoting behavior were moderate while self-efficacy and social support were high. Factors influencing health promoting behavior of the participants were found to be self-efficacy, social support and perceived barrier to health promoting behavior. The results of this study indicate that nursing intervention programs enhancing self-efficacy, social support and reducing perceived barriers to health promoting behavior need to be developed for North Korean defectors in South Korea.

  1. Can health care organizations improve health behavior and treatment adherence?

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2014-04-01

    Many Americans are failing to engage in both the behaviors that prevent and those that effectively manage chronic health conditions, including pulmonary disorders, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and cancer. Expectations that health care providers are responsible for changing patients' health behaviors often do not stand up against the realities of clinical care that include large patient loads, limited time, increasing co-pays, and restricted access. Organizations and systems that might share a stake in changing health behavior include employers, insurance payers, health care delivery systems, and public sector programs. However, although the costs of unhealthy behaviors are evident, financial resources to address the problem are not readily available. For most health care organizations, the return on investment for developing behavior change programs appears highest when addressing treatment adherence and disease self-management, and lowest when promoting healthy lifestyles. Organizational strategies to improve adherence are identified in 4 categories: patient access, provider training and support, incentives, and information technology. Strategies in all 4 categories are currently under investigation in ongoing studies and have the potential to improve self-management of many chronic health conditions.

  2. Society for Health Psychology (APA Division 38) and Society of Behavioral Medicine joint position statement on the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L; Wilson, Dawn K; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2017-06-01

    Beginning in January 2018, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) plans to cover the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), also referred to as Medicare DPP. The American Psychological Association Society for Health Psychology (SfHP) and the Society for Behavioral Medicine (SBM) reviewed the proposed plan. SfHP and SBM are in support of the CMS decision to cover DPP for Medicare beneficiaries but have a significant concern that aspects of the proposal will limit the public health impact. Concerns include the emphasis on weight outcomes to determine continued coverage and the lack of details regarding requirements for coaches. SfHP and SBM are in strong support of modifications to the proposal that would remove the minimum weight loss stipulation to determine coverage and to specify type and qualifications of "coaches."

  3. Changes of levels of depression and quality of life after short-term cognitive behavioral educational program for adolescent students in health class.

    PubMed

    Aki, Atsuko; Tomotake, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the changes of levels of depression and quality of life in adolescent students after receiving short-term cognitive behavioral educational program in health class for stress management. Subjects were 176 middle school students aged 12 to 14 years. They completed the Depression Self-Rating Scale for Children (DSRS-C) and the Revised Children Quality of Life Questionnaire (Kiddo-KINDL(R)) before, after and 6-months after the program. The three-session program consisted of psychoeducation and learning skills of cognitive restructuring and problem solving. The total scores of the DSRS-C and the Kiddo-KINDL(R) in all subjects did not significantly change after the completion of program. However, as for the high risk group (score of the DSRS-C≥16), significant improvement in the two scales was found after the program. Especially, depression level in the high risk group significantly decreased and the improvement was maintained 6-months later. These results suggest that this type of approach may be effective for adolescents with high risk of depression in terms of improving not only depressive symptom but also quality of life.

  4. [Life style: instrument in health promotion programs].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, D

    1993-05-01

    Non communicable diseases are increasing in third world countries, including Chile. Life style is one of the principal factors influencing this increase. Therefore programs and health strategies to modify the population life styles are needed. The programs developed to change life styles depend on the medical sociocultural scenery and the concept becomes outstanding when disease prevention is replaced by health promotion. The requirements for the application of the concept of life style in health promotion plans and fostering of healthy life styles are: 1) Training in behavioral epidemiology. 2) Election of a biopsychosocial concept of life style. 3) Identify the predominant scenery and target population. 4) Choose the appropriate educational methodologies to change behaviors. 5) Formalize strategies according to the boundaries where the program is applied. 6) Specify the qualifying requisites of the change agents, health promoters and program operators.

  5. Assessing the effect of an educational intervention program based on Health Belief Model on preventive behaviors of internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Maheri, Aghbabak; Tol, Azar; Sadeghi, Roya

    2017-01-01

    Internet addiction refers to the excessive use of the internet that causes mental, social, and physical problems. According to the high prevalence of internet addiction among university students, this study aimed to determine the effect of an educational intervention on preventive behaviors of internet addiction among Tehran University of Medical Sciences students. This study was a quasi-experimental study conducted among female college students who live in the dormitories of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Two-stage cluster sampling was used for selection of eighty participants in each study groups; data were collected using "Young's Internet Addiction" and unstructured questionnaire. Validity and reliability of unstructured questionnaire were evaluated by expert panel and were reported as Cronbach's alpha. Information of study groups before and 4 months after the intervention was compared using statistical methods by SPSS 16. After the intervention, the mean scores of internet addiction, perceived barriers construct, and the prevalence of internet addiction significantly decreased in the intervention group than that in the control group and the mean scores of knowledge and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs (susceptibility, severity, benefits, self-efficacy) significantly increased. Education based on the HBM was effective on the reduction and prevention of internet addiction among female college students, and educational interventions in this field are highly recommended.

  6. Assessing the effect of an educational intervention program based on Health Belief Model on preventive behaviors of internet addiction

    PubMed Central

    Maheri, Aghbabak; Tol, Azar; Sadeghi, Roya

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Internet addiction refers to the excessive use of the internet that causes mental, social, and physical problems. According to the high prevalence of internet addiction among university students, this study aimed to determine the effect of an educational intervention on preventive behaviors of internet addiction among Tehran University of Medical Sciences students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a quasi-experimental study conducted among female college students who live in the dormitories of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Two-stage cluster sampling was used for selection of eighty participants in each study groups; data were collected using “Young's Internet Addiction” and unstructured questionnaire. Validity and reliability of unstructured questionnaire were evaluated by expert panel and were reported as Cronbach's alpha. Information of study groups before and 4 months after the intervention was compared using statistical methods by SPSS 16. RESULTS: After the intervention, the mean scores of internet addiction, perceived barriers construct, and the prevalence of internet addiction significantly decreased in the intervention group than that in the control group and the mean scores of knowledge and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs (susceptibility, severity, benefits, self-efficacy) significantly increased. CONCLUSIONS: Education based on the HBM was effective on the reduction and prevention of internet addiction among female college students, and educational interventions in this field are highly recommended. PMID:28852654

  7. Associations between Major Domains of Personality and Health Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    lead to more effective, efficient health behavior modification programs. Aeoesson 7or ITI GRA&I DTIC TAB5 Unnnnoanced 5 SJu~ti:Icrti or D31tt ’bu𔃿iOn...further study, however, these barriers might be overcome by designing health behavior modification programs in which participants were assigned to... behavior modification programs matched to their personality predispositions. References Aho, W. R. (1979a). Participation of senior citizens in the

  8. Barriers, facilitators, and benefits of implementation of dialectical behavior therapy in routine care: results from a national program evaluation survey in the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Landes, Sara J; Rodriguez, Allison L; Smith, Brandy N; Matthieu, Monica M; Trent, Lindsay R; Kemp, Janet; Thompson, Caitlin

    2017-02-06

    National implementation of evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides important lessons on the barriers and facilitators to implementation in a large healthcare system. Little is known about barriers and facilitators to the implementation of a complex EBP for emotional and behavioral dysregulation-dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT). The purpose of this study was to understand VHA clinicians' experiences with barriers, facilitators, and benefits from implementing DBT into routine care. This national program evaluation survey measured site characteristics of VHA sites (N = 59) that had implemented DBT. DBT was most often implemented in general mental health outpatient clinics. While 42% of sites offered all four modes of DBT, skills group was the most frequently implemented mode. Fifty-nine percent of sites offered phone coaching in any form, yet only 11% of those offered it all the time. Providers were often provided little to no time to support implementation of DBT. Barriers that were difficult to overcome were related to phone coaching outside of business hours. Facilitators to implementation included staff interest and expertise. Perceived benefits included increased hope and functioning for clients, greater self-efficacy and compassion for providers, and ability to treat unique symptoms for clinics. There was considerable variability in the capacity to address implementation barriers among sites implementing DBT in VHA routine care. Mental health policy makers should note the barriers and facilitators reported here, with specific attention to phone coaching barriers.

  9. Associations between Drug Use and Deviant Behavior in Teenagers. Health Sciences Program Reprint Series, 96-23D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Ron D.; Ellickson, Phyllis L.

    1996-01-01

    Drug use and delinquency share many common antecedents: early antisocial behavior, difficulties in school, impaired family relationships, delinquent or drug-using peers, and rebelliousness. But these common factors could underlie a cluster of problem behaviors or lead to distinctly different behavioral manifestations. Using data from 1,363 West…

  10. Impact of a Program for the Management of Aggressive Behaviors on Seclusion and Restraint Use in Two High-Risk Units of a Mental Health Institute.

    PubMed

    Geoffrion, Steve; Goncalves, Jane; Giguère, Charles-Édouard; Guay, Stéphane

    2017-05-13

    The Omega Program for the Management of Aggressive Behaviors aims to reduce patients' dangerous behaviors, towards themselves or others, and to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint (S/R). A previous study in a Mental Health Institute (Montreal, Canada) showed that implementing this program allowed employees of the intensive care and emergency units to gain confidence in coping with patients' aggressions and to reduce their psychological distress. The present study, conducted in the same high-risk units, assesses the effect of the program on S/R use. We hypothesize that the incidence and duration of S/R should diminish significantly following the implementation of the program in both units. This naturalistic, prospective study covered archival data between April 2010 and July 2014. Pre-training data (April 2010-December 2011) were compared to data during training (January 2012-October 2012) and to post-training data (November 2012-July 2014) for both units. In the intensive care unit, we confirmed an increase of both mean daily number and duration of S/R by admissions in pre-training, followed by a decrease during the training and post-training. In the emergency unit, a decreasing trend is seen during the entire period thus suggesting that the decrease in S/R may be independent of the training. These findings suggest that Omega is a promising intervention program to use in an intensive care unit. However, a more global approach, including institutional changes in culture and attitude, can be important factors to develop to increase the positive outcomes.

  11. Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pampel, Fred C.; Krueger, Patrick M.; Denney, Justin T.

    2011-01-01

    The inverse relationships between socioeconomic status (SES) and unhealthy behaviors such as tobacco use, physical inactivity, and poor nutrition have been well demonstrated empirically but encompass diverse underlying causal mechanisms. These mechanisms have special theoretical importance because disparities in health behaviors, unlike disparities in many other components of health, involve something more than the ability to use income to purchase good health. Based on a review of broad literatures in sociology, economics, and public health, we classify explanations of higher smoking, lower exercise, poorer diet, and excess weight among low-SES persons into nine broad groups that specify related but conceptually distinct mechanisms. The lack of clear support for any one explanation suggests that the literature on SES disparities in health and health behaviors can do more to design studies that better test for the importance of the varied mechanisms. PMID:21909182

  12. A small business worksite wellness model for improving health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ray M

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a wellness program delivered by WellSteps, LLC, aimed at improving employee health behaviors in small companies that lack the resources to independently develop and manage a wellness program. Analyses are based on 618 employees from five diverse companies that completed an initial personal health assessment. Exercise and dietary behaviors significantly improved across the five companies. Significant improvements in health perception and life satisfaction also resulted and were associated with improvements in health behaviors. Three of the five companies, each with fewer than 50 employees, were most effective in influencing positive health behaviors, health perceptions, and life satisfaction. The worksite wellness program effectively improved health behaviors, health perceptions, and life satisfaction.

  13. Physicians' attitudes and behaviors toward home health care services.

    PubMed

    Javalgi, R; Joseph, W B

    1991-12-01

    The authors investigate physicians' attitudes, information-seeking behaviors, and behavioral intentions toward home health care programs. Survey results show that physicians favor the concept, but knowledge and awareness levels about available programs vary with the physicians' specialties. Evidence also is reported on specific problems encountered, sources of information used to make home care referrals, and physicians' perceptions of the impact of home care programs on their practice. Finally, policy implications are drawn for marketers of home health care programs.

  14. Electronic Behavioral Health "Health-E"

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    of our organization. The "Health- E Clinic" web enabled behavioral health clinic provides patients access to behavioral health services 24 hours a day...7 days a week. This e -clinic modifies clinical business processes to offer services on-line. Integration with clinical pathways is inherent in this

  15. Health behaviors of Operating Engineers.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Sonia A; Missel, Amanda L; Waltje, Andrea H; Ronis, David L; Fowler, Karen E; Hong, OiSaeng

    2011-07-01

    Operating Engineers (heavy equipment operators in construction) may be at particular risk for heart disease and cancer related to their exposure to environmental dust and smoking, the sedentary nature of their job, and long hours of exposure to the sun. The aim of this study was to characterize the health behaviors of Operating Engineers. This cross-sectional survey from a convenience sample of Operating Engineers (N = 498) used validated instruments to measure smoking, drinking, diet, exercise, sleep, and sun exposure. Univariate and bivariate analyses to detect differences by age were conducted. The sample scored significantly worse on all five health behaviors compared to population norms. Those who were older were less likely to smoke and chew tobacco and more likely to eat fruits and vegetables. Many were interested in services to improve their health behaviors. Health behavior interventions are needed and wanted by Operating Engineers. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Flight crew health stabilization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, B. C.; Mccollum, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The flight crew health stabilization program was developed to minimize or eliminate the possibility of adverse alterations in the health of flight crews during immediate preflight, flight, and postflight periods. The elements of the program, which include clinical medicine, immunology, exposure prevention, and epidemiological surveillance, are discussed briefly. No crewmember illness was reported for the missions for which the program was in effect.

  17. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  18. Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

  19. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

  20. Heal Thyself...: Faculty Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Kathleen E.

    1985-01-01

    A study was designed to assess faculty health behaviors at the beginning of each of the three years of a Health Promotion/Disease Prevention grant for comparisons over time. This article reports the results of the first comparison between the two faculties. (CT)

  1. The Effect of an Educational Intervention Program on the Adoption of Low Back Pain Preventive Behaviors in Nurses: An Application of the Health Belief Model.

    PubMed

    Sharafkhani, Naser; Khorsandi, Mahboobeh; Shamsi, Mohsen; Ranjbaran, Mehdi

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Objective The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of a theory-based educational intervention program on the level of knowledge and Health Belief Model (HBM) constructs among nurses in terms of the adoption of preventive behaviors. Methods This pretest/posttest quasi-experimental study was conducted on 100 nurses who were recruited through the multistage sampling method. The nurses were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The participants were evaluated before and 3 months after the educational intervention. A multidimensional questionnaire was prepared based on the theoretical structures of the HBM to collect the data. Data analysis was performed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results There was no significant difference in the mean values of HBM constructs prior to the intervention between the intervention and control groups. However, after the administration of the educational program, the mean scores of knowledge and HBM constructs significantly increased in the intervention group when compared with the control group (p < 0.0001). Conclusion The results of the current study revealed that the educational intervention based on the HBM was effective in improving the nurses' scores of knowledge and HBM constructs; therefore, theory-based health educational strategies are suggested as an effective alternative to traditional educational interventions.

  2. Touching Hearts, Touching Minds: Using Emotion-Based Messaging to Promote Healthful Behavior in the Massachusetts WIC Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colchamiro, Rachel; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Hause, Judith

    2010-01-01

    The "Touching Hearts, Touching Minds" initiative was funded through a 2003 United States Department of Agriculture Special Projects grant to revitalize nutrition education and services in the Massachusetts Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program. The 30 nutrition education materials and…

  3. Touching Hearts, Touching Minds: Using Emotion-Based Messaging to Promote Healthful Behavior in the Massachusetts WIC Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colchamiro, Rachel; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Hause, Judith

    2010-01-01

    The "Touching Hearts, Touching Minds" initiative was funded through a 2003 United States Department of Agriculture Special Projects grant to revitalize nutrition education and services in the Massachusetts Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program. The 30 nutrition education materials and…

  4. Individualized Behavioral Health Monitoring Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollicone, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral health risks during long-duration space exploration missions are among the most difficult to predict, detect, and mitigate. Given the anticipated extended duration of future missions and their isolated, extreme, and confined environments, there is the possibility that behavior conditions and mental disorders will develop among astronaut crew. Pulsar Informatics, Inc., has developed a health monitoring tool that provides a means to detect and address behavioral disorders and mental conditions at an early stage. The tool integrates all available behavioral measures collected during a mission to identify possible health indicator warning signs within the context of quantitatively tracked mission stressors. It is unobtrusive and requires minimal crew time and effort to train and utilize. The monitoring tool can be deployed in space analog environments for validation testing and ultimate deployment in long-duration space exploration missions.

  5. Source Reduction Behavior as an Independent Measurement of the Impact of a Public Health Education Campaign in an Integrated Vector Management Program for the Asian Tiger Mosquito

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett-Healy, Kristen; Hamilton, George; Healy, Sean; Crepeau, Taryn; Unlu, Isik; Farajollahi, Ary; Fonseca, Dina; Gaugler, Randy; Clark, Gary G.; Strickman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive: (1) both education and mosquito control, (2) education only, and (3) no education or mosquito control. Four separate educational events included a 5-day elementary school curriculum in the spring, and three door to door distributions of educational brochures. Before and after each educational event, the numbers of mosquito-larval container habitats were counted in 50 randomly selected homes per study area. Container surveys allowed us to measure source reduction behavior. Although we saw reductions in container habitats in sites receiving education, they were not significantly different from the control. Our results suggest that traditional passive means of public education, which were often considered the gold standard for mosquito control programs, are not sufficient to motivate residents to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. PMID:21655124

  6. The Ramathibodi Community Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, Prem; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The Ramathibodi Faculty of Medicine in Bangkok, Thailand, has developed a teaching and research program in community health aimed at brining the institution into close association with the health needs of the country. (Editor)

  7. Changes in Weight Loss, Health Behaviors, and Intentions among 400 Participants Who Dropped out from an Insurance-Sponsored, Community-Based Weight Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Zizzi, Sam J.; Lima Fogaca, Jana; Sheehy, Tammy; Welsh, Myia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of weight management research is based on data from randomized controlled studies conducted in clinical settings. As these findings are translated into community-based settings, additional research is needed to understand patterns of lifestyle change and dropout. The purpose of this study was to examine reasons for and consequences associated with dropout (or removal) from an insurance-funded weight management program. Using a mixed methods approach with objectively measured changes in body weight and attendance along with quantitative and qualitative survey data, patterns of intention and behavior change were explored. The results from a sample of 400 respondents support the idea that there are both positive and negative consequences of program participation. Overall, 1 in 5 respondents lost a clinically significant amount of weight during the program (>5% of baseline body weight) and 1 in 3 experienced a positive consequence, while only 6% expressed a negative outcome of participation. Additionally, nearly 90% of all of the consequences that emerged from the data were positive. Attitude change was a major theme, including positive health intentions, perceived success, learning skills, and new appreciation of exercise. PMID:27413546

  8. Effects of the Dutch Skills for Life Program on the Health Behavior, Bullying, and Suicidal Ideation of Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fekkes, M.; van de Sande, M. C. E.; Gravesteijn, J. C.; Pannebakker, F. D.; Buijs, G. J.; Diekstra, R. F. W.; Kocken, P. L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of the Dutch "Skills for Life" programme on students' health behaviours, bullying behaviour and suicidal ideation. Design/methodology/approach: The effectiveness of the "Skills for Life" programme on health behaviour outcomes was evaluated at three points in time in…

  9. The Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness Program Evaluation. Report 4. Evaluation of Resilience Training and Mental and Behavioral Health Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Department’s Patient Administration Systems and Biostatistics Activity (PASBA). Specifically, International Statistical Classification of Diseases...disorders are a leading cause for hospitalization in the Armed Forces (Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, 2012b), the findings provide evidence that...the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC) indicated that mental disorders were the second leading reason for hospitalization in 2007 and

  10. Effects of the Dutch Skills for Life Program on the Health Behavior, Bullying, and Suicidal Ideation of Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fekkes, M.; van de Sande, M. C. E.; Gravesteijn, J. C.; Pannebakker, F. D.; Buijs, G. J.; Diekstra, R. F. W.; Kocken, P. L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of the Dutch "Skills for Life" programme on students' health behaviours, bullying behaviour and suicidal ideation. Design/methodology/approach: The effectiveness of the "Skills for Life" programme on health behaviour outcomes was evaluated at three points in time in…

  11. Use of a Text Message Program to Raise Type 2 Diabetes Risk Awareness and Promote Health Behavior Change (Part I): Assessment of Participant Reach and Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Hirzel, Lindsey; Turske, Scott A; Des Jardins, Terrisca R; Yarandi, Hossein; Bondurant, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Background There are an estimated 25.8 million American children and adults, equivalent to 8.3% of the US population, living with diabetes. Diabetes is particularly burdensome on minority populations. The use of mobile technologies for reaching broad populations is a promising approach, given its wide footprint and ability to deliver inexpensive personalized messages, to increase awareness of type 2 diabetes and promote behavior changes targeting risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes. As a part of the Beacon Community Cooperative Agreement Program, txt4health, a public-facing mobile health information service, was launched in 3 Beacon Communities: the Southeast Michigan Beacon Community in Detroit, MI, the Greater Cincinnati Beacon Community in Cincinnati, OH, and the Crescent City Beacon Community in New Orleans, LA. Txt4health is a mobile health information service designed to help people understand their risk for type 2 diabetes and become more informed about the steps they can take to lead healthy lives. Objective The purpose of this investigation was to use the RE-AIM framework to document txt4health reach and adoption by focusing on enrollment and participant engagement in program pilots in Southeast Michigan and Greater Cincinnati. Methods We conducted a retrospective records analysis of individual-level txt4health system data from participants in Southeast Michigan and Greater Cincinnati to determine participant usage of txt4health and engagement with the program. Results Results from the retrospective records analysis revealed that 5570 participants initiated the 2-step enrollment process via 1 of 3 enrollment strategies: text message, website, or directly with Beacon staff who signed participants up via the website. In total, 33.00% (1838/5570) of participants completed the 2-step enrollment process and were fully enrolled in the program. All participants (100.00%, 1620/1620) who enrolled via text message completed the entire 2-step enrollment

  12. Migrant Health - Legislation and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    The Public Health Service Act was amended in 1962 to authorize grants to establish family health service clinics for domestic agricultural migratory workers and to improve the health conditions of these workers and their families. Approximately 100 programs currently provide migrant health services. As a result of the low level of funding of these…

  13. Changing health behaviors with social marketing.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Almazor, M E

    2011-08-01

    Social marketing uses marketing techniques to promote healthy attitudes and behaviors. As in traditional marketing, the development and implementation of social marketing programs is based on the four P's: product, price, place, and promotion, but it also incorporates the partnership and participation of stakeholders to enhance public health and engage policy makers. The "product" in social marketing is generally a behavior, such as a change in lifestyle (e.g., diet) or an increase in a desired health practice (e.g., screening). In order for people to desire this product, it must offer a solution to a problem that is weighed with respect to the price to pay. The price is not just monetary, and it often involves giving something up, such as time (e.g., exercising) or a wanted, satisfying behavior (e.g., smoking). In its development phase, social marketing incorporates qualitative methods to create messages that are powerful and potentially effective. The implementation of the programs commonly involves mass campaigns with advertisement in various media. There have been a few social media campaigns targeting bone health that have been disseminated with substantial outreach. However, these have not been systematically evaluated, specifically with respect to change in behavior and health outcomes. Future campaigns should identify target behaviors that are amenable to change such as bone mass measurement screening or exercise. Audience segmentation will be crucial, since a message for young women to increase peak bone mass would be very different from a message for older individuals who have just experienced a fracture. Campaigns should involve key stakeholders, including policy makers, health providers, and the public. Finally, success must be carefully evaluated, not just by the outreach of the campaign, but also by a change in relevant behaviors and a decrease in deleterious health outcomes.

  14. A Cognitive Behavioral Depression Prevention Program for Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miloseva, Lence

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present results of our one year experience with Cognitive Behavioral Psychology Program, in order to contribute to the building of whole school approach and positive psychology preventive mental health problems model. Based on Penn Resilience program (PRP), we modify and create program for early adolescents: how to…

  15. Behavioral health: the propaedeutic requirement.

    PubMed

    Brady, Joseph V

    2005-06-01

    Concern about the behavioral effects of spaceflight can be traced back a half century to the earliest preparatory bioastronautics experiments in the mid-1 950s. A central focus of the first primate suborbital flights, as well as the orbital chimpanzee pretest flights of Project Mercury, was the effects of such stressful ventures on the learned performances of these space behavioral health pioneers. The hiatus in spaceflight behavioral health experimental investments that followed these early initiatives began with the advent of the 'human astronaut' era of the mid-1960s, and has dominated the last several decades. Contemporary concerns in this regard have most recently been articulated by a turn-of-the-century Committee of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, providing a visionary view of space medicine during travel beyond Earth orbit. This 2-yr study focused on those most complex behavioral health interactions involving humans in extreme, isolated, and confined microsocieties-areas that have not received the necessary level of attention. The evident behavioral health issues raised by the prospect of long-duration exploratory missions beyond Earth orbit, including performance and general living conditions, recovery and support systems, and the screening, selection, and training of candidate participants are reviewed and discussed.

  16. Revitalizing school health programs worldwide.

    PubMed

    Benzian, Habib

    2010-10-01

    Each year, the Shils Fund recognizes outstanding activities that help improve oral health. The program is named in memory of Dr. Edward B. Shils, who led the Dental Manufacturers of America and Dental Dealers of America for more than 50 years. A 2010 Shils Award will be given to an innovative school health initiative called Fit For Schools Program (FFSP) in the Philippines. Such recognition in the US indicates the lessons that can be learned from a program initially tailored for another country. Health in a highly industrialized nation can be enhanced by heeding the FFSP principles used to craft an effective health promotion initiative. This evidence-based intervention is not exclusively an oral health initiative; it is an integration with other evidence-based health interventions and models a sustainable public-private partnership to advance positive health outcomes in socially responsible entrepreneurial ways. As the editor of this column in Compendium, I wish to applaud both leaders of FFSP: Dr. Habib Benzian and Dr. Bella Monse. The following article was written by the senior advisor, Dr. Benzian, who modestly refers to the program's receipt of another award from the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, and the World Health Organization in 2009. To my knowledge, the presentation of that award was the first time a health promotion project led by dentists has ever received such high-level global recognition and was one of three projects so recognized for innovative solutions to global health in that year.

  17. Health Instruction Packages: Behavioral Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Dianne Dee; And Others

    These four learning modules present text and exercises designed to help allied health students understand various elements of positive interaction with people. The first module, "Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs" by Dianne Mackey, defines human needs, presents Maslow's theories, and helps the learner identify behaviors that reflect the…

  18. Health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of Dominican women with lymphoedema of the leg: implications for lymphoedema management programs

    PubMed Central

    Person, Bobbie; Addiss, David G; Bartholomew, L Kay; Meijer, Cecilia; Pou, Victor; van den Borne, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Background In the Dominican Republic, a Latin American country with filariasis-endemic areas, more than 63,000 people have lymphatic filariasis and more than 400,000 people are at risk of future infection. In this paper, we explore the health beliefs, health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of women with lymphoedema in filariasis-endemic areas to better understand the needs of women when developing lymphoedema morbidity control programs. Methods Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews of 28 women, 3 focus group discussions with 28 women, field notes and photographs. Results Women described exhaustive and expensive attempts at seeking a cure for their lymphoedema. Family members were influential in providing women with initial care seeking referrals to indigenous healers credited with influence over physical, mental, spiritual and supernatural properties of illness. When indigenous treatments proved to be ineffectual, the women sought care from trained healthcare providers. Most healthcare providers incorrectly diagnosed the edema, failed to adequately treat and meet the needs of women and were viewed as expensive. Most women resorted to self-prescribing injectable, oral, or topical antibiotics along with oral analgesics as a standard practice of self-care. Conclusion Healthcare providers must understand a woman's cultural perspectives of illness, her natural networks of support and referral, her behavioural practices of care-seeking and self-care and the financial burden of seeking care. In the culture of the Dominican Republic family members and traditional healthcare providers are influential advisors on initial health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices. For this reason family-oriented interventions, support groups for women and their families, community education and training on simple, low cost lymphoedema management techniques for indigenous healers are viable ways to influence the early detection, diagnosis and

  19. Employment and Training Programs: A Context for Reaching Out of School Youth with Mental Health and Other Health Programs

    PubMed Central

    Sonenstein, Freya Lund; Marshall, Beth Dail; Tandon, S. Darius

    2014-01-01

    Youth who have dropped out of school engage in health risk behaviors and have low access to health care. It is difficult for health experts to develop programs that successfully reach this population. Employment and training programs for youth who have dropped out are a potential venue for addressing the many health needs of these youth. This article reviews the history of these programs and the available evidence about their health services and health outcomes. It also describes the development of a mental health intervention in an employment and training program in Baltimore and the lessons learned from that experience. PMID:22423459

  20. Health Programs for Veterans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and friends with qualified, caring VA responders Weight Management The MOVE! program: helping veterans lose weight, keep it off and improve ... Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required Button ...

  1. Educational Outcomes Associated with School Behavioral Health Interventions: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kase, Courtney; Hoover, Sharon; Boyd, Gina; West, Kristina D.; Dubenitz, Joel; Trivedi, Pamala A.; Peterson, Hilary J.; Stein, Bradley D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is an unmet need for behavioral health support and services among children and adolescents, which school behavioral health has the potential to address. Existing reviews and meta-analyses document the behavioral health benefits of school behavioral health programs and frameworks, but few summaries of the academic benefits of such…

  2. [Empowerment and health promotion programming].

    PubMed

    Laverack, G

    2008-12-01

    Health promotion often presents a tension between "bottom up" and "top down" programming. "Bottom-up" is associated with community empowerment and begins on issues of concern to particular groups or individuals and regards an increase in overall control as an important element of the health outcome. "Top-down" is associated with disease prevention efforts and begins by seeking to involve beneficiaries on issues defined by health agencies. It regards improvements in health behaviours or bio-medical indicators as the important outcome and community empowerment is viewed simply as a means to the end of health behaviour change. The tension between these two approaches is not unresolvable, and this article presents a framework, the "parallel-track", intended to assist health promotion practitioners to systematically accommodate community empowerment goals within "top-down" health programming.

  3. The Effect of a Multi-Strategy Program on Developing Social Behaviors Based on Pender’s Health Promotion Model to Prevent Loneliness of Old Women Referred to Gonabad Urban Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Alaviani, Mehri; Khosravan, Shahla; Alami, Ali; Moshki, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Loneliness is one of the most significant problems during aging. This research has been done to determine the effect of a multi-strategy program based on Pender’s Health Promotion model to prevent loneliness of elderly women by improving social relationships. Methods In this quasi-experimental study done in 2013 from January to November, 150 old women suffering medium loneliness referred to Gonabad urban Health Centers were enrolled. Data were gathered using Russell’s UCLA loneliness questionnaire and the questionnaires based on Pender’s Health Promotion Model about loneliness. The results were analyzed by descriptive statistics and Chi-square, T-pair, and independent-T tests through SPSS, version 20. Results Loneliness decreased significantly in the interventional group compared to the control group (P<0.00). In addition, mean scores related to variables of Health Promotion Model (received benefits and barriers, self-efficacy, interpersonal effectives of loneliness) in both groups were significantly different before and after the study (P<0.05). Conclusion Constructs of Pender’s Health Promotion Model can be used as a framework for planning interventions in order to anticipate, improve and modify related behaviors related to loneliness in old women.   PMID:26005693

  4. BEHAVIORAL HAZARD IN HEALTH INSURANCE*

    PubMed Central

    Baicker, Katherine; Mullainathan, Sendhil; Schwartzstein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental implication of standard moral hazard models is overuse of low-value medical care because copays are lower than costs. In these models, the demand curve alone can be used to make welfare statements, a fact relied on by much empirical work. There is ample evidence, though, that people misuse care for a different reason: mistakes, or “behavioral hazard.” Much high-value care is underused even when patient costs are low, and some useless care is bought even when patients face the full cost. In the presence of behavioral hazard, welfare calculations using only the demand curve can be off by orders of magnitude or even be the wrong sign. We derive optimal copay formulas that incorporate both moral and behavioral hazard, providing a theoretical foundation for value-based insurance design and a way to interpret behavioral “nudges.” Once behavioral hazard is taken into account, health insurance can do more than just provide financial protection—it can also improve health care efficiency. PMID:23930294

  5. [Health behavior change: motivational interviewing].

    PubMed

    Pócs, Dávid; Hamvai, Csaba; Kelemen, Oguz

    2017-08-01

    Public health data show that early mortality in Hungary could be prevented by smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, regular exercise, healthy diet and increased adherence. Doctor-patient encounters often highlight these aspects of health behavior. There is evidence that health behavior change is driven by internal motivation rather than external influence. This finding has led to the concept of motivational interview, which is a person-centered, goal-oriented approach to counselling. The doctor asks targeted questions to elicit the patient's motivations, strengths, internal resources, and to focus the interview around these. The quality and quantity of the patient's change talk is related to better outcomes. In addition, the interview allows the patient to express ambivalent feelings and doubts about the change. The doctor should use various communication strategies to resolve this ambivalence. Furthermore, establishing a good doctor-patient relationship is the cornerstone of the motivational interview. An optimal relationship can evoke change talk and reduce the patient's resistance, which can also result in a better outcome. The goal of the motivational interview is to focus on the 'why' to change health behavior rather than the 'how', and to utilize internal motivation instead of persuasion. This is the reason why motivational interview has become a widely-accepted evidence based approach. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(34): 1331-1337.

  6. Environmental health program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  7. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    PubMed Central

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Background In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities. PMID:23984306

  8. [Mental health in the family health program].

    PubMed

    Souza, Aline de Jesus Fontineli; Matias, Gina Nogueira; Gomes, Kenia de Fátima Alencar; Parente, Adriana da Cunha Menezes

    2007-01-01

    A descriptive study whose objective was to identify the education and actions of the nurse in Mental Health (MH), in the Family Health Program. The sample consisted of 134 acting nurses at the Family Health Program in Teresina, Piauí The results show that 95.5% don't have the specified education in MH. Of those interviewed, 97% state that there are patients, in their assigned areas, that need this type of care. The referenced actions were home visits (60%) appointments (27.7%), referrals (21.5%), medication delivery (15.4%), inactivity (14.6%), ambulatory service (7.7%), community therapy (5.4%) and casework (0.8%). Methods and strategies of public policies related to this area should be revisited and instituted in order to (re)direct ways of reform in the actions and services of mental health.

  9. Health Literacy and Women's Health-Related Behaviors in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N.

    2012-01-01

    Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food…

  10. Health Literacy and Women's Health-Related Behaviors in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Tsai, Tzu-I; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Ken N.

    2012-01-01

    Extant health literacy research is unclear about the contribution of health literacy to health behaviors and is limited regarding women's health issues. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the association between health literacy and five health behaviors (Pap smear screening, annual physical checkup, smoking, checking food…

  11. Religion and health-promoting behaviors among emerging adults.

    PubMed

    Horton, Shalonda E B

    2015-02-01

    Studies suggest we capitalize upon religion's health benefits to prevent obesity. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to determine how emerging adults used religion to manage their health. Two focus groups were conducted among White and African American participants. Content analysis of the data revealed categories about their attitudes regarding parental and religious influences, religion's influence on behavior, negative health effects of religion, barriers, obesity prevention, and health promotion programs. Society sends out "easy" solutions for unhealthy behaviors, but we should focus on healthy behavior benefits, remove barriers, and consider religion's part in health promotion (obesity prevention).

  12. An Operating Environmental Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipana, J. G.; Masters, R. L.; Winter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some concepts of an operational program for medical and environmental health are outlined. Medical services of this program are primarily concerned with emergency care, laboratory examinations, advice to private physician with patient permission, medical monitoring activities, and suggestions for treatment or control of the malfunction.

  13. An Operating Environmental Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipana, J. G.; Masters, R. L.; Winter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some concepts of an operational program for medical and environmental health are outlined. Medical services of this program are primarily concerned with emergency care, laboratory examinations, advice to private physician with patient permission, medical monitoring activities, and suggestions for treatment or control of the malfunction.

  14. Development of a Medicaid Behavioral Health Case-Mix Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robst, John

    2009-01-01

    Many Medicaid programs have either fully or partially carved out mental health services. The evaluation of carve-out plans requires a case-mix model that accounts for differing health status across Medicaid managed care plans. This article develops a diagnosis-based case-mix adjustment system specific to Medicaid behavioral health care. Several…

  15. Development of a Medicaid Behavioral Health Case-Mix Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robst, John

    2009-01-01

    Many Medicaid programs have either fully or partially carved out mental health services. The evaluation of carve-out plans requires a case-mix model that accounts for differing health status across Medicaid managed care plans. This article develops a diagnosis-based case-mix adjustment system specific to Medicaid behavioral health care. Several…

  16. 76 FR 1441 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  17. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health System. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring...

  18. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  19. 76 FR 17139 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  20. JACS: A Behavior Modification Program That Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, R. Louis; Vincent, Jerry J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a program at the Juvenile Achievement Center in Waco, Texas, that serves students rejected in regular school programs because of overt behavior problems, social maladjustment, academic deficiencies, and poor self-concepts. (Author/JF)

  1. JACS: A Behavior Modification Program That Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, R. Louis; Vincent, Jerry J.

    1973-01-01

    Describes a program at the Juvenile Achievement Center in Waco, Texas, that serves students rejected in regular school programs because of overt behavior problems, social maladjustment, academic deficiencies, and poor self-concepts. (Author/JF)

  2. 78 FR 54256 - Health Careers Opportunity Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Careers Opportunity Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive Program...

  3. The financial health of global health programs.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Winston; Bazemore, Andrew; Mishori, Ranit; Diller, Philip; Bardella, Inis; Chang, Newton

    2014-10-01

    No studies have examined how established global health (GH) programs have achieved sustainability. The objective of this study was to describe the financial status of GH programs. In this cross-sectional survey of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's Group on Global Health, we assessed each program's affiliation, years of GH activities, whether or not participation was formalized, time spent on GH, funding, and anticipated funding. We received 31 responses (30% response rate); 55% were affiliated with residencies, 29% were affiliated with medical schools, 16% were affiliated with both, and 68% had formalized programs. Respondents spent 19% full-time equivalent (FTE) on GH and used a mean of 3.3 funding sources to support GH. Given a mean budget of $28,756, parent institutions provided 50% while 15% was from personal funds. Twenty-six percent thought their funding would increase in the next 2 years. Compared to residencies, medical school respondents devoted more time (26% FTE versus 13% FTE), used more funding categories (4.7 versus 2.2), and anticipated funding increases (42.8% versus 12.0%). Compared to younger programs (? 5 years), respondents from older programs (> 5 years) devoted more time (25% FTE versus 16% FTE) and used more funding categories (3.8 versus 2.9). Compared to those lacking formal programs, respondents from formalized programs were less likely to use personal funds (19% versus 60%). This limited descriptive study offers insight into the financial status of GH programs. Despite institutional support, respondents relied on personal funds and were pessimistic about future funding.

  4. The Influence of Wireless Self-Monitoring Program on the Relationship Between Patient Activation and Health Behaviors, Medication Adherence, and Blood Pressure Levels in Hypertensive Patients: A Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Young; Wineinger, Nathan. E

    2016-01-01

    Background Active engagement in the management of hypertension is important in improving self-management behaviors and clinical outcomes. Mobile phone technology using wireless monitoring tools are now widely available to help individuals monitor their blood pressure, but little is known about the conditions under which such technology can effect positive behavior changes or clinical outcomes. Objective To study the influence of wireless self-monitoring program and patient activation measures on health behaviors, medication adherence, and blood pressure levels as well as control of blood pressure in hypertensive patients. Methods We examined a subset of 95 hypertensive participants from a 6-month randomized controlled trial designed to determine the utility of a wireless self-monitoring program (n=52 monitoring program, n=43 control), which consisted of a blood pressure monitoring device connected with a mobile phone, reminders for self-monitoring, a Web-based disease management program, and a mobile app for monitoring and education, compared with the control group receiving a standard disease management program. Study participants provided measures of patient activation, health behaviors including smoking, drinking, and exercise, medication adherence, and blood pressure levels. We assessed the influence of wireless self-monitoring as a moderator of the relationship between patient activation and health behaviors, medication adherence, and control of blood pressure. Results Improvements in patient activation were associated with improvements in cigarette smoking (beta=−0.46, P<.001) and blood pressure control (beta=0.04, P=.02). This relationship was further strengthened in reducing cigarettes (beta=−0.60, P<.001), alcohol drinking (beta=−0.26, P=.01), and systolic (beta=−0.27, P=.02) and diastolic blood pressure (beta=−0.34, P=.007) at 6 months among individuals participating in the wireless self-monitoring program. No differences were observed with

  5. The Influence of Wireless Self-Monitoring Program on the Relationship Between Patient Activation and Health Behaviors, Medication Adherence, and Blood Pressure Levels in Hypertensive Patients: A Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju Young; Wineinger, Nathan E; Steinhubl, Steven R

    2016-06-22

    Active engagement in the management of hypertension is important in improving self-management behaviors and clinical outcomes. Mobile phone technology using wireless monitoring tools are now widely available to help individuals monitor their blood pressure, but little is known about the conditions under which such technology can effect positive behavior changes or clinical outcomes. To study the influence of wireless self-monitoring program and patient activation measures on health behaviors, medication adherence, and blood pressure levels as well as control of blood pressure in hypertensive patients. We examined a subset of 95 hypertensive participants from a 6-month randomized controlled trial designed to determine the utility of a wireless self-monitoring program (n=52 monitoring program, n=43 control), which consisted of a blood pressure monitoring device connected with a mobile phone, reminders for self-monitoring, a Web-based disease management program, and a mobile app for monitoring and education, compared with the control group receiving a standard disease management program. Study participants provided measures of patient activation, health behaviors including smoking, drinking, and exercise, medication adherence, and blood pressure levels. We assessed the influence of wireless self-monitoring as a moderator of the relationship between patient activation and health behaviors, medication adherence, and control of blood pressure. Improvements in patient activation were associated with improvements in cigarette smoking (beta=-0.46, P<.001) and blood pressure control (beta=0.04, P=.02). This relationship was further strengthened in reducing cigarettes (beta=-0.60, P<.001), alcohol drinking (beta=-0.26, P=.01), and systolic (beta=-0.27, P=.02) and diastolic blood pressure (beta=-0.34, P=.007) at 6 months among individuals participating in the wireless self-monitoring program. No differences were observed with respect to medication adherence. Participation in a

  6. The Cardiovascular Health Impact of an Incentive Worksite Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pescatello, Linda S.; Murphy, Donna; Vollono, Jeannine; Lynch, Elizabeth; Bernene, James; Costanzo, Dino

    2001-01-01

    Examined the cardiovascular health profiles of hospital employees participating in an incentive screening program for 4 years. The program involved cardiovascular screenings, results counseling, and encouragement to participate in education and behavioral support programs. Cardiovascular health improvements related to long-term program…

  7. The Cardiovascular Health Impact of an Incentive Worksite Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pescatello, Linda S.; Murphy, Donna; Vollono, Jeannine; Lynch, Elizabeth; Bernene, James; Costanzo, Dino

    2001-01-01

    Examined the cardiovascular health profiles of hospital employees participating in an incentive screening program for 4 years. The program involved cardiovascular screenings, results counseling, and encouragement to participate in education and behavioral support programs. Cardiovascular health improvements related to long-term program…

  8. An Evaluation of the Behavioral Aspect of the American Dental Association's "Learning About Your Oral Health" Teaching and Learning Program, Level 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinson, Laurna; Stone, Donald B.

    The major purpose of this study was to assess the behavioral impact of the American Dental Association's (ADA) Teaching and Learning Program, Level 2. A second purpose was to determine the reliability of the Navy Plaque Index (NPI) when administered to a relatively large sample of elementary school students. The NPI, which has demonstrated…

  9. The Relationships Between Health Attitudes and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Bonnie L.

    1970-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the effects of health attitudes on behavior as well as the effects of a persuasive communication on health attitudes and behavior and the effects of attitudes and behavior on receptivity to health educational materials. Teenagers exposed to two persuasive communications about diabetes exhibited no effects on…

  10. How behavioral science can advance digital health.

    PubMed

    Pagoto, Sherry; Bennett, Gary G

    2013-09-01

    The field of behavioral science has produced myriad data on health behavior change strategies and leveraged such data into effective human-delivered interventions to improve health. Unfortunately, the impact of traditional health behavior change interventions has been heavily constrained by patient and provider burden, limited ability to measure and intervene upon behavior in real time, variable adherence, low rates of implementation, and poor third-party coverage. Digital health technologies, including mobile phones, sensors, and online social networks, by being available in real time, are being explored as tools to increase our understanding of health behavior and to enhance the impact of behavioral interventions. The recent explosion of industry attention to the development of novel health technologies is exciting but has far outpaced research. This Special Section of Translational Behavioral Medicine, Smartphones, Sensors, and Social Networks: A New Age of Health Behavior Change features a collection of studies that leverage health technologies to measure, change, and/or understand health behavior. We propose five key areas in which behavioral science can improve the impact of digital health technologies on public health. First, research is needed to identify which health technologies actually impact behavior and health outcomes. Second, we need to understand how online social networks can be leveraged to impact health behavior on a large scale. Third, a team science approach is needed in the developmental process of health technologies. Fourth, behavioral scientists should identify how a balance can be struck between the fast pace of innovation and the much slower pace of research. Fifth, behavioral scientists have an integral role in informing the development of health technologies and facilitating the movement of health technologies into the healthcare system.

  11. Correlates of Adherence to a Telephone-Based Multiple Health Behavior Change Cancer Preventive Intervention for Teens: The Healthy for Life Program (HELP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N.; Sharff, McKane E.; Walker, Leslie R.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Hawkins, Kirsten B.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens' adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial eligible. White teens were more…

  12. Correlates of Adherence to a Telephone-Based Multiple Health Behavior Change Cancer Preventive Intervention for Teens: The Healthy for Life Program (HELP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N.; Sharff, McKane E.; Walker, Leslie R.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Hawkins, Kirsten B.; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens' adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial eligible. White teens were more…

  13. [Attitudes and behavior for reproductive health].

    PubMed

    Salinas-Martínez, A M; Martinez-Sanchez, C; Perez-Segura, J

    1993-05-01

    Educational interventions represent an alternative for the reproductive well-being. The objective of this investigation was to identify in a mexican community, attitudes and behaviors related to reproductive health, with the goal of implementing a specific health education program. The study population consisted of women between 12 and 44 years old, living in non-residential areas of the Delegation Miguel Hidalgo, D.F. Variables of interest were analyzed only in women with parity (n = 300). Data were collected through interview. The mean age was 31 +/- 8 years. 93.3% were married or in consensual union. 63% had elementary, junior high or prevocational studies. 89% answered that would visit the doctor before considering a pregnancy (junior high+, p < .05), 99% would seek prenatal care if they were pregnant, and 92.7% would have a hospital delivery (parity < or = 3, p < .003). 69.5% had a preconceptional visit before their last pregnancy and 89.9% received prenatal care (junior high+, p < .008). 92.5% had only hospital deliveries (< or = 30 years, p < .05, junior high+, p < .0001, primigravida p < .002, with institutionalized medical services, p < .001), 1.7% had only out-of-hospital deliveries, and 5.8% both. Agreement between attitudes and behaviors are presented. An educational program consisting of confirmation and support to positive attitudes, values and beliefs, and reinforcement to decision making, will result in a final behavior: early assistance to medical care.

  14. Military Occupational Health Surveillance Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Responses were received from 37 HSC medical treatment facilities (100%) regarding their occupational health surveillance programs. The occupational ...personnel determined to be potentially exposed to occupational or job- related hazards, medical surveillance programs are limited, if available at all. An...exposed to occupational or job-related hazards would require more adequate staffing to provide the services. Identification of personnel at risk could be

  15. 75 FR 21001 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Cornerstone Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring...

  16. 75 FR 73110 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Room AIDS Ministry, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will transfer...

  17. Cost of behavior change communication channels of Manoshi -a maternal, neonatal and child health (MNCH) program in urban slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cost of behavior change communication (BCC) interventions has not been rigorously studied in Bangladesh. This study was conducted to assess the implementation costs of a BCC intervention in a maternal, neonatal and child health program (Manoshi) run by BRAC, which has been operating in the urban slums of Dhaka since 2007. The study estimates the costs of BCC tools per exposure among the different types of BCC channels: face-to-face, group counseling, and mass media. Methods The study was conducted from November 2010 to April 2011 in the Dhaka urban slum area. A micro-costing approach was applied using primary and secondary data sources to estimate the cost of BCC tools. Primary data were collected through interviews with service-providers and managers from the Manoshi program, observations of group counseling, and mass media events. Results Per exposure, the cost of face-to-face counseling was found to be 3.08 BDT during pregnancy detection, 3.11 BDT during pregnancy confirmation, 12.42 BDT during antenatal care, 18.96 BDT during delivery care and 22.65 BDT during post-natal care. The cost per exposure of group counseling was 22.71 BDT (95% CI 21.30-24.87) for Expected Date of Delivery (EDD) meetings, 14.25 BDT (95% CI 12.37-16.12) for Women Support Group meetings, 17.83 BDT (95% CI 14.90-20.77) for MNCH committee meetings and 6.62 BDT (95% CI 5.99-7.26) for spouse forum meetings. We found the cost per exposure for mass media interventions was 9.54 BDT (95% CI 7.30-12.53) for folk songs, 26.39 BDT (95% CI 23.26-32.56) for street dramas, 0.39 BDT for TV-broadcasting and 7.87 BDT for billboards. Considering all components reaching the target audience under each broader type of channel, the total cost per exposure was found to be 60.22 BDT (0.82 USD) for face-to-face counseling, 61.40 BDT (0.82 USD) for group counseling and 44.19 BDT (0.61 USD) for mass media. Conclusions The total cost for group counseling was the highest per exposure, followed by face

  18. Health Information–Seeking Behaviors, Health Indicators, and Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Darren; Weaver, Stephanie Sargent; Hopkins, Gary L.; Eroğlu, Doğan; Bernhardt, Jay M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We examined how different types of health information–seeking behaviors (HISBs)—no use, illness information only, wellness information only, and illness and wellness information combined—are associated with health risk factors and health indicators to determine possible motives for health information seeking. Methods. A sample of 559 Seattle–Tacoma area adults completed an Internet-based survey in summer 2006. The survey assessed types of HISB, physical and mental health indicators, health risks, and several covariates. Covariate-adjusted linear and logistic regression models were computed. Results. Almost half (49.4%) of the sample reported HISBs. Most HISBs (40.6%) involved seeking a combination of illness and wellness information, but both illness-only (28.6%) and wellness-only (30.8%) HISBs were also widespread. Wellness-only information seekers reported the most positive health assessments and the lowest occurrence of health risk factors. An opposite pattern emerged for illness-only information seekers. Conclusions. Our findings reveal a unique pattern of linkages between the type of health information sought (wellness, illness, and so on) and health self-assessment among adult Internet users in western Washington State. These associations suggest that distinct health motives may underlie HISB, a phenomenon frequently overlooked in previous research. PMID:20558794

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors of Older Adults and College Students Participating in Recycling Mentors, a Service-Learning, Environmental Health Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Fugate-Whitlock, Elizabeth; Fiala, Kelly Ann; Covan, Eleanor Krassen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of both students and older adults that participated in a service-learning, environmental health education program called Recycling Mentors (RM). Methods: Surveys were conducted before and after participation in RM. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS.…

  20. Health Occupations Extended Campus Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likhite, Vivek

    A Health Occupations Program designed as an integrated science course offers students at Evanston Township High School (Illinois) an opportunity to master science skills, content, and laboratory techniques while working and studying within local hospitals (the Evanston Hospital and St. Francis Hospital) as well as within their high school…

  1. [An epidemiological study of health behavior and health consciousness in smoking behavior modification].

    PubMed

    Izuno, T; Yoshida, K; Shimada, N; Muto, T

    1990-05-01

    Among health enhancement activities which have been promoted at various worksites smoking cessation is the most common but is seldom very successful. Smoking cessation programs have almost always neglected individual background factors. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the factors critical to behavior modification with respect to smoking cessation at worksites. Five hundred and sixty-five chemical factory workers responded to questionnaires on their smoking behavior lifestyle, drinking habits, opinions on smoking, opinions on quitting smoking, knowledge about the effects of smoking on health, and type A behavior pattern. Two hundred thirty two male smokers (age 20-58) were chosen for the smoking cessation program, which was administered during the periodical health examinations. One year after receiving the anti-smoking education their smoking behaviors were again surveyed. Fifteen employees had quit smoking and 79 had reduced consumption by more than 10 cigarettes per day. A principal component analysis was performed in order to extract factors from the numerous items on the questionnaire. Principal component scores were compared between the group that had stopped smoking or had cut back by more than 10 cigarettes per day (Responsive Group) and the rest of the smokers (Unresponsive Group). Principal component scores, which appear to be related to levels of individual health consciousness and levels of regular exercise, were significantly higher in the responsive group than in the unresponsive group. No significant differences were noted between the two groups for principal component scores for knowledge of effects of smoking on health, drinking habits, opinions on smoking, opinions on quitting smoking, and type A behavior.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Theory's role in shaping behavioral health research for population health.

    PubMed

    King, Abby C

    2015-11-26

    The careful application of theory often is used in the behavioral health field to enhance our understanding of how the world currently works. But theory also can help us visualize what the world can become, particularly through its potential impacts on population-wide health. Applying a multi-level ecological perspective can help in expanding the field's focus upward toward the population at large. While ecological frameworks have become increasingly popular, arguably such perspectives have fallen short of their potential to actively bridge conceptual constructs and, by extension, intervention approaches, across different levels of population impact. Theoretical and conceptual perspectives that explicitly span levels of impact offer arguably the greatest potential for achieving scientific insights that may in turn produce the largest population health effects. Examples of such "bridging" approaches include theories and models that span behavioral + micro-environment, behavioral + social/cultural, and social + physical environment constructs. Several recommendations are presented related to opportunities for leveraging theories to attain the greatest impact in the population health science field. These include applying the evidence obtained from person-level theories to inform methods for positively impacting the behaviors of community gatekeepers and decision-makers for greater population change and reach; leveraging the potential of residents as "citizen scientists"--a resource for enacting behavioral health changes at the individual, environmental, and policy levels; using empirical observations and theory in equal parts to build more robust, relevant, and solution-oriented behavior change programs; exploring moderators and mediators of change at levels of impact that go beyond the individual; and considering the circumstances in which applying conceptual methods that embrace a "complexity" as opposed to "causality" perspective may lead to more

  3. Information and Communication Technologies in Behavioral Health

    PubMed Central

    Breslau, Joshua; Engel, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The dramatic evolution in information and communication technologies (ICTs) online and on smartphones has led to rapid innovations in behavioral health care. To assist the U.S. Air Force in developing a strategy for use of ICTs, the authors reviewed the scientific literature on their use to prevent and treat behavioral health conditions, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and alcohol misuse. There is currently little scientific evidence supporting additional investment in ICT-based psychosocial programs for resilience or prevention of posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, or anxiety. Instead, preventive interventions might prioritize problems of alcohol misuse and intimate partner violence. ICT applications that play a role in the treatment process may be used for patient education and activation, to improve decisionmaking by clinicians, to provide a therapy, to improve adherence to treatment, or to maintain treatment gains over time. However, partly due to the rapid pace of development of the technology, there is little or no evidence in the literature regarding the efficacy of the most recently developed types of ICTs, in particular those using smartphones. Despite the lack of solid research evidence to date, ICTs hold promise in addressing the challenges of mental health care. One promising avenue is development of reliable methods for patient-clinician communication between therapy sessions; another is Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy. The authors recommend that the Air Force should take an incremental approach to adopting the use of ICTs—one that involves a program of measurement-based implementation and process and outcome monitoring rather than urgent dissemination. PMID:28083427

  4. Integrated Behavioral Health in Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Wanjiku F M; Hostutler, Cody A; Schwartz, Billie S; Mautone, Jennifer A

    2016-12-01

    There are multiple barriers to accessing high quality, evidence-based behavioral health care for children and adolescents, including stigma, family beliefs, and the significant paucity of child and adolescent psychiatrists. Although equal access continues to be an unmet need in the USA, there is growing recognition that integrated behavioral health services in pediatric primary care have the potential to reduce health disparities and improve service utilization. In a joint position paper, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) highlighted the multiple benefits of children receiving initial behavioral health screening, assessment, and evidence-based behavioral health treatments in the medical home. The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of the literature related to integrated behavioral health services in pediatric primary care. Specifically, innovative models of integrated behavioral health care are discussed.

  5. Credentialing behavior analysts and the Florida behavior analysis certification program

    PubMed Central

    Starin, Stephen; Hemingway, Michael; Hartsfield, Fae

    1993-01-01

    Nearly 1,000 professions are regulated in one or more of the 50 states. Behavior analysis is not regulated as a distinct profession except in Florida. Typically, the regulation of behavior analysis is subsumed within other professions (such as psychology) whose practices often differ considerably from those of behavior analysis. This paper provides an overview of the common methods of regulation and discusses the pros and cons of regulating behavior analysis independently of other professions. It also describes how one state agency in Florida has regulated behavior analysts through the Behavior Analysis Certification Program, with a historical summary of the development of the training curriculum and certification examination and description of current efforts to refine and expand the regulation of behavior analysts. Suggestions for establishing formal regulation of behavior analysts in other states are also given. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:22478143

  6. Demonstration of Replicable Dimensions of Health Behaviors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-06

    the antecedents of these behavioral dimensions should help define potential targets for behavior modification programs and permit evaluations of those...defining observations that can be used for measurement. The behavior modification implications are linked to the assumption that behaviors which co-occur

  7. Preventing Health Damaging Behaviors in Male and Female Army Recruits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    intervention, an Army-specific video, and the comparison nutrition , fitness and injury prevention intervention. Based on our focus group discussions, it is...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0159 TITLE: Preventing Health Damaging Behaviors in...NUMBER Preventing Health Damaging Behaviors in Male and Female Army Recruits 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0159 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  8. Health Behaviors among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal…

  9. Health Behaviors among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal…

  10. The Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program: a public health framework.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, James J; Oppenheimer, Sarah C; Judge, Christine M; Taube, Robert L; Blanchfield, Bonnie B; Swain, Stacy E; Koh, Howard K

    2010-08-01

    During the past 25 years, the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program has evolved into a service model embodying the core functions and essential services of public health. Each year the program provides integrated medical, behavioral, and oral health care, as well as preventive services, to more than 11 000 homeless people. Services are delivered in clinics located in 2 teaching hospitals, 80 shelters and soup kitchens, and an innovative 104-bed medical respite unit. We explain the program's principles of care, describe the public health framework that undergirds the program, and offer lessons for the elimination of health disparities suffered by this vulnerable population.

  11. The Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program: A Public Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Sarah C.; Judge, Christine M.; Taube, Robert L.; Blanchfield, Bonnie B.; Swain, Stacy E.; Koh, Howard K.

    2010-01-01

    During the past 25 years, the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program has evolved into a service model embodying the core functions and essential services of public health. Each year the program provides integrated medical, behavioral, and oral health care, as well as preventive services, to more than 11 000 homeless people. Services are delivered in clinics located in 2 teaching hospitals, 80 shelters and soup kitchens, and an innovative 104-bed medical respite unit. We explain the program's principles of care, describe the public health framework that undergirds the program, and offer lessons for the elimination of health disparities suffered by this vulnerable population. PMID:20558804

  12. The Influence of Health Behaviors During Childhood on Adolescent Health Behaviors, Health Indicators, and Academic Outcomes Among Participants from Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Claudio R; Amato, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Health behaviors during childhood may influence adolescent health behaviors and be related to other important outcomes, but no longitudinal research has examined this in a multicultural population in Hawaii to date. This study investigated if childhood moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), fruit and vegetable consumption, and sedentary behavior influence adolescent (1) MVPA, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sedentary behavior; (2) body mass index (BMI) percentile, general health, and stress; and (3) school marks and school absenteeism. Three cohorts of public elementary school children (fourth to sixth graders) who participated in a state-mandated after-school program in 2004, 2005, and 2006 completed baseline (demographics, MVPA, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sedentary behavior) and 5-year follow-up surveys (demographics, MVPA, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sedentary behavior; BMI, general health, stress, school marks, and absenteeism; combined follow-up n = 334; 14.76 ± 0.87 years old; 55.1% female; 53% Asian, 19.8% Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander, 15.3% White, and 11.9% other). Regressions found that childhood MVPA (mean [m] = 45.42, standard deviation [SD] = 31.2 min/day) and fruit and vegetable consumption (m = 6.96, SD = 4.54 servings/day) predicted these behaviors in adolescence (m = 47.22, SD = 27.04 min/day and m = 4.63, SD = 3.03 servings/day, respectively, p < 0.05). Childhood sedentary behavior (m = 3.85, SD = 2.85 h/day)) predicted adolescent BMI percentile (m = 60.93, SD = 28.75, p < 0.05). Childhood fruit and vegetable consumption and sedentary behavior negatively predicted adolescent marks (B average, p < 0.05). Childhood health behaviors do influence adolescent health behaviors, some health outcomes, and some academic indicators in this population, especially childhood sedentary behavior, which underlines the importance of sedentary behavior

  13. Training Employers to Implement Health Promotion Programs: Results From the CDC Work@Health® Program.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Laurie A; Lang, Jason E; Rineer, Jennifer R; Jones-Jack, Nkenge H; Strazza, Karen M

    2017-01-01

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) initiated the Work@Health Program to teach employers how to improve worker health using evidence-based strategies. Program goals included (1) determining the best way(s) to deliver employer training, (2) increasing employers' knowledge of workplace health promotion (WHP), and (3) increasing the number of evidence-based WHP interventions at employers' worksites. This study is one of the few to examine the effectiveness of a program designed to train employers how to implement WHP programs. Pre- and posttest design. Training via 1 of 3 formats hands-on, online, or blended. Two hundred six individual participants from 173 employers of all sizes. Eight-module training curriculum to guide participants through building an evidence-based WHP program, followed by 6 to 10 months of technical assistance. The CDC Worksite Health ScoreCard and knowledge, attitudes, and behavior survey. Descriptive statistics, paired t tests, and mixed linear models. Participants' posttraining mean knowledge scores were significantly greater than the pretraining scores (61.1 vs 53.2, P < .001). A year after training, employers had significantly increased the number of evidence-based interventions in place (47.7 vs 35.5, P < .001). Employers' improvements did not significantly differ among the 3 training delivery formats. The Work@Health Program provided employers with knowledge to implement WHP interventions. The training and technical assistance provided structure, practical guidance, and tools to assess needs and select, implement, and evaluate interventions.

  14. Directory of Health Education Programs for Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Kansas City. Center on Rural Elderly.

    Health education programs for older adults can be an efficient and cost-effective way to meet the challenge of a healthy old age. This directory describes 36 health education programs for the rural elderly in the areas of comprehensive programs, mental health, nutrition, physical health (including exercise), medication, safety, and health…

  15. Migrant Education Health Program 1990. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    The Colorado Migrant Education Program and the Colorado Migrant Health Program (CMHP) together plan and implement a comprehensive health program for migrant summer school students on a yearly basis. This report provides statistical data about the health status of the migrant students and the health services provided to them during the 1990…

  16. New Careers in the Indian Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    The Indian Health Service program has enabled large numbers of American Indians to play a significant role in the design and delivery of health services to their communities. The Indian Health Service provides training programs in various health-related areas. These programs have provided many Indians their first opportunity for employment, while…

  17. 3 CFR - State Children's Health Insurance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State Children's Health Insurance Program... Insurance Program Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services The State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) encourages States to provide health coverage for uninsured children in...

  18. Effects of Health Status and Health Behaviors on Depression Among Married Female Immigrants in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung A; Yang, Sook Ja; Chee, Yeon Kyung; Kwon, Kyoung Ja; An, Jisook

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effects of health status and health behaviors on depression in married female immigrants in South Korea. Sampling 316 immigrant women from the Philippines, Vietnam, China, and other Asian countries, a cross-sectional research design was used with self-report questionnaires that assessed sociodemographic characteristics, health status, health behaviors, and depression. There were significant differences in stillbirth experience, induced abortion, morbidity, perceived health status, meal skipping, and physical activity between depressed and nondepressed immigrant women. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, stillbirth experience, poorer perceived health status, more meal skipping, and less physical activity were associated with greater depressive symptoms. Both health status and health behaviors had significant impacts on depression, suggesting that development of nursing interventions and educational programs should be targeted towards improving maternal health, healthy lifestyle, and subjective health perception to promote married female immigrants' psychological well-being. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Fetal health locus of control: Scale properties and applications in preconception health programs.

    PubMed

    Soliday, Elizabeth; Strahm, Anna; Mammenga, Stefani

    2016-04-01

    Preconception health programs have resulted in improved health behaviors among participants and have shown promise in reducing adverse birth outcomes. However, the role of health beliefs in preconception health program outcomes has been overlooked but warrants attention due to reported positive associations between women's views of control over fetal health and health behavior in pregnancy. Towards an ultimate aim of improving preconception health program reach and effectiveness, we examined properties of a fetal health locus of control (FHLC; Labs & Wurtele, 1986) measure in nulliparous, childbearing aged university women and men. Students (n=1467) completed an online survey that included the FHLC subscales maternal, powerful others', and chance control over fetal health. Factor analyses and correlations with related scales supported the soundness of FHLC constructs in both women and men. All participants rated maternal control in fetal health nearly twice as highly as powerful others' and chance. We therefore recommend that FHLC be integrated into preconception health program evaluation as personal agency in fetal health likely has an important role in women's and men's preconception health behavior and health behavior change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictors of Health Behavior from a Behavior-Analytic Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkimer, John C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discovers a high correlation between positive emotional states, supportive self talk, and specific healthy behaviors in college students. The correlated health behaviors were vigorous exercise, mild exercise, seat belts, and avoidance of alcohol and junk food. Considers the impact of negative self talk on the avoidance of negative behavior. (MJP)

  1. 38 CFR 52.90 - Participant behavior and program practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.90 Participant behavior and program practices. (a) Restraints. (1) The participant has a right to be free from any chemical or physical restraints imposed for purposes of discipline or convenience. When a...

  2. 38 CFR 52.90 - Participant behavior and program practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.90 Participant behavior and program practices. (a) Restraints. (1) The participant has a right to be free from any chemical or physical restraints imposed for purposes of discipline or convenience. When a...

  3. 38 CFR 52.90 - Participant behavior and program practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.90 Participant behavior and program practices. (a) Restraints. (1) The participant has a right to be free from any chemical or physical restraints imposed for purposes of discipline or convenience. When a...

  4. 38 CFR 52.90 - Participant behavior and program practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.90 Participant behavior and program practices. (a) Restraints. (1) The participant has a right to be free from any chemical or physical restraints imposed for purposes of discipline or convenience. When a...

  5. Programming for Adolescents with Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braaten, Sheldon, Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 17 papers from a 1982 national multidisciplinary conference on services for behaviorally disordered adolescents. The following papers are included: "Programming for Youth in Secondary Schools and the Community," (W. Van Til); "Who's Crazy? II" (C. Michael Nelson); "Correlates of Successful Adaptive Behavior: Comparative Studies…

  6. Programming for Adolescents with Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braaten, Sheldon, Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 17 papers from a 1982 national multidisciplinary conference on services for behaviorally disordered adolescents. The following papers are included: "Programming for Youth in Secondary Schools and the Community," (W. Van Til); "Who's Crazy? II" (C. Michael Nelson); "Correlates of Successful Adaptive Behavior: Comparative Studies…

  7. Effects of a nurse-led transitional care program on readmission, self-efficacy to implement health promoting behaviors, functional status and life quality among Chinese patients with coronary artery disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan; Xing, Feng-Mei; Li, Chang-Zai; Lan, Wang-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Li

    2017-09-07

    To examine the effectiveness of a nurse-led transitional care program on readmission, self-efficacy to implement health promoting behaviors, functional status and life quality among Chinese patients with coronary artery disease. Coronary artery disease is a major cause of mortality in China. Transitional care could help to ensure improved patient outcomes. Nevertheless, our knowledge of how to perform transitional care for patients with coronary artery disease is insufficient in mainland China. Randomized controlled trial. The nurse-led transitional care intervention in the experimental group adopted the Omaha system and Pender's health promoting model as its frameworks. The control group received a comparable length routine care and follow-up contacts. Evaluations were conducted at baseline before discharge and after 7 months after discharge using hospital readmission rate, self-rated abilities for health practices scale and Seattle Angina Questionnaire for functional status and life quality. Data were collected between March 2014 and October 2014. Compared with the control group, participants in the experimental group showed greater self-efficacy to implement health promoting behaviors, more angina stability, less angina frequency, more satisfaction with treatment and better quality of life. The difference in readmission rate and physical limitations was not significant between the two groups. This study provides evidence for the effectiveness of a nurse-led transitional care program in improving the ability to implement health promoting behaviors, the functional status and life quality among Chinese patients with coronary artery disease. The nurse-led transitional care program is helpful for CAD patients to promote their effective transfer from hospital to community and provide an evidence for nursing managers to train their nurses for transitional care knowledge and skills. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected

  8. Health behaviors and participation in health promotion activities among hospital staff: which occupational group performs better?

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Huang, Nicole; Chien, Li-Yin

    2014-10-22

    Staff health behaviors affect not only their own health but also their provision of health promotion services to their patients. Although different occupational groups work in hospitals, few studies have compared health behaviors among them. The objectives of this study were to examine health behaviors, including physical activity, eating 5 portions of fruits and vegetables per day (5 a day), and stress adaptation, and participation in hospital-based health promotion activities by occupational groups in hospitals. This cross-sectional survey was conducted among full-time employees in 100 hospitals across Taiwan. This analysis included 4202 physicians, 31639 nurses, 2315 pharmacists, 8161 other health professionals, and 13079 administrative personnel. Administrative personnel attended more health promotion lectures and clubs/groups than other health professionals, pharmacists and physicians, and those workers participated more than nurses. Participation in health promotion activities provided by hospitals was associated with better practice of health behaviors. After adjustment for socio-demographics and participation in health promotion activities, physicians, pharmacists, and other health professionals reported more 5 a day than administrative staff. Other health professionals reported more physical activity than administrative staff, and they reported more than physicians. Nurses reported the lowest level of physical activity, 5 a day, and stress adaptation of all occupational groups. Nurses had worse health behaviors and less participation in health promotion activities than other groups. Workplace health promotion program for health professionals is needed, with special emphasis on nurses. Hospital-based health promotion programs could take the differences of occupational groups into consideration to tailor programs to the needs of different occupational groups.

  9. Space radiation health program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Radiation Health Program intends to establish the scientific basis for the radiation protection of humans engaged in the exploration of space, with particular emphasis on the establishment of a firm knowledge base to support cancer risk assessment for future planetary exploration. This document sets forth the technical and management components involved in the implementation of the Space Radiation Health Program, which is a major part of the Life Sciences Division (LSD) effort in the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). For the purpose of implementing this program, the Life Sciences Division supports scientific research into the fundamental mechanisms of radiation effects on living systems and the interaction of radiation with cells, tissues, and organs, and the development of instruments and processes for measuring radiation and its effects. The Life Sciences Division supports researchers at universities, NASA field centers, non-profit research institutes and national laboratories; establishes interagency agreements for cooperative use and development of facilities; and conducts a space-based research program using available and future spaceflight vehicles.

  10. Behavioral Health and Performance Element: Tools and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveton, Lauren B.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the research into the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) of the Human Research Program. The program element goal is to identify, characterize and prevent or reduce behavioral health and performance risks associated with space travel, exploration, and return to terrestrial life. To accomplish this goal the program focuses on applied research that is designed to yield deliverables that reduce risk. There are several different elements that are of particular interest: Behavioral Medicine, Sleep, and team composition, and team work. In order to assure success for NASA missions the Human Research Program develops and validate the standards for each of the areas of interest. There is discussion of the impact on BHP while astronauts are on Long Duration Missions. The effort in this research is to create tools to meet the BHP concerns, these prospective tools are reviewed.

  11. Assessing environmental assets for health promotion program planning: a practical framework for health promotion practitioners.

    PubMed

    Springer, Andrew E; Evans, Alexandra E

    2016-01-01

    Conducting a health needs assessment is an important if not essential first step for health promotion planning. This paper explores how health needs assessments may be further strengthened for health promotion planning via an assessment of environmental assets rooted in the multiple environments (policy, information, social and physical environments) that shape health and behavior. Guided by a behavioral-ecological perspective- one that seeks to identify environmental assets that can influence health behavior, and an implementation science perspective- one that seeks to interweave health promotion strategies into existing environmental assets, we present a basic framework for assessing environmental assets and review examples from the literature to illustrate the incorporation of environmental assets into health program design. Health promotion practitioners and researchers implicitly identify and apply environmental assets in the design and implementation of health promotion interventions;this paper provides foundation for greater intentionality in assessing environmental assets for health promotion planning.

  12. Assessing environmental assets for health promotion program planning: a practical framework for health promotion practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Andrew E.; Evans, Alexandra E.

    2016-01-01

    Conducting a health needs assessment is an important if not essential first step for health promotion planning. This paper explores how health needs assessments may be further strengthened for health promotion planning via an assessment of environmental assets rooted in the multiple environments (policy, information, social and physical environments) that shape health and behavior. Guided by a behavioral-ecological perspective- one that seeks to identify environmental assets that can influence health behavior, and an implementation science perspective- one that seeks to interweave health promotion strategies into existing environmental assets, we present a basic framework for assessing environmental assets and review examples from the literature to illustrate the incorporation of environmental assets into health program design. Health promotion practitioners and researchers implicitly identify and apply environmental assets in the design and implementation of health promotion interventions;this paper provides foundation for greater intentionality in assessing environmental assets for health promotion planning. PMID:27579254

  13. Self-Care Education Programs Based on a Trans-Theoretical Model in Women Referring to Health Centers: Breast Self-Examination Behavior in Iran

    PubMed

    Ghahremani, Leila; mousavi, Zakiyeh; Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein; Ghaem, Haleh

    2016-12-01

    Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and a major public health problem in developing countries. However, early detection and treatment may be achieved by breast self-examination (BSE). Despite the importance of BSE in reducing the incidence of breast cancer and esultant deaths, the disease continues to be the most common cause of cancer death among women in Iran.This study aimed to determine the effects of self-care education on performance of BSE among women referring to health centers in our country. Materials and Methods: This quasiexperimental interventional study with pretest/posttest control group design was conducted on 168 women referred to health centers. The data were collected using a validated researcher-made questionnaire including demographic variables and trans-theoretical model constructs as well as a checklist assessing BSE behavior. The instruments were administered to groups with and without self-care education before, a week after, and 10 weeks after the intervention. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (version 19) and analyzed using independent sample t-tests, paired sample t-test, repeated measures ANOVA, Chi-square, and Friedman tests (p<0.05). Results: The results showed an increase in the intervention group’s mean scores of trans-theoretical model constructs (stages of change, self-efficacy, decisional balance, and processes of change) and BSE behavior compared to the control group (p<0.001). Conclusion: The study confirmed the effectiveness of aneducational intervention based ona trans-theoretical model in performing BSE. Therefore, designing educational interventions based on this model is recommended to improve women’s health and reduce deaths due to breast cancer.

  14. Clustering of health-related behaviors, health outcomes and demographics in Dutch adolescents: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Busch, Vincent; Van Stel, Henk F; Schrijvers, Augustinus J P; de Leeuw, Johannes R J

    2013-12-04

    significant meaning for future public health programs, which should be more tailored with use of such knowledge on behavioral clustering via e.g. Transfer Learning.

  15. Clustering of health-related behaviors, health outcomes and demographics in Dutch adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    and physical health. These findings have significant meaning for future public health programs, which should be more tailored with use of such knowledge on behavioral clustering via e.g. Transfer Learning. PMID:24305509

  16. Responsible leader behavior in health sectors.

    PubMed

    Longest, Beaufort

    2017-02-06

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to expand attention to responsible leader behavior in the world's health sectors by explaining how this concept applies to health sectors, considering why health sector leaders should behave responsibly, reviewing how they can do so, and asserting potential impact through an applied example. Design/methodology/approach This paper is a viewpoint, reflecting conceptualizations rooted in leadership literature which are then specifically applied to health sectors. A definition of responsible leader behavior is affirmed and applied specifically in health sectors. Conceptualizations and viewpoints about practice of responsible leader behavior in health sectors and potential consequences are then discussed and asserted. Findings Leadership failures and debacles found in health, but more so in other sectors, have led leadership researchers to offer insights, many of them empirical, into the challenges of leadership especially by more clearly delineating responsible leader behavior. Practical implications Much of what has been learned in the research about responsible leader behavior offers pathways for health sector leaders to more fully practice responsible leadership. Social implications This paper asserts and provides a supporting example that greater levels of responsible leader behavior in health sectors hold potentially important societal benefits. Originality/value This paper is the first to apply emerging conceptualizations and early empirical findings about responsible leader behavior specifically to leaders in health sectors.

  17. Health Education: Results from the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kann, Laura; Telljohann, Susan K.; Wooley, Susan F.

    2007-01-01

    Background: School health education can effectively help reduce the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among students and have a positive influence on students' academic performance. This article describes the characteristics of school health education policies and programs in the United States at the state, district, school, and classroom…

  18. HIT: time to end behavioral health discrimination.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Linda

    2012-10-01

    While the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, enacted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, provided $20.6 billion for incentive payments to support the adoption and meaningful use of health information technology (HIT), behavioral health organizations were not eligible to receive facility payments. The consequences of excluding behavioral health from HIT incentive payments are found in the results of the "HIT Adoption and Meaningful Use Readiness in Community Behavioral Health" survey. The survey found that only 2% of community behavioral health organizations are able to meet federal meaningful use (MU) requirements-compare this to the 27% of Federally Qualified Health Centers and 20% of hospitals that already meet some level of MU requirements. Behavioral health organizations, serving more than eight million adults, children, and families with mental illnesses and addiction disorders, are ready and eager to adopt HIT to meet the goals of better healthcare, better health, and lower costs. But reaching these goals may prove impossible unless behavioral health achieves "parity" within healthcare and receives resources for the adoption of HIT.

  19. Strategies for Improving Compliance with Health Promotion Programs in Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Robert H. L.

    1983-01-01

    Behavioral, educational, and organizational methods for improving the degree to which workers comply with the objectives of industrial health promotion programs are discussed. Compliance can be enhanced through: (1) better program location and scheduling; (2) increased worker satisfaction; (3) use of psychological and educational techniques; and…

  20. Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.

    2010-01-01

    This document establishes the policy and procedures for the HSP and is authorized through the Director, Johnson Space Center (JSC). This document delineates the medical operations requirements for the HSP. The HSP goals are accomplished through an awareness campaign and procedures such as limiting access to flight crewmembers, medical screening, and controlling flight crewmember activities. NASA's Human Space Flight Program uses strategic risk mitigation to achieve mission success while protecting crew health and safety. Infectious diseases can compromise crew health and mission success, especially in the immediate preflight period. The primary purpose of the Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program (HSP) is to mitigate the risk of occurrence of infectious disease among astronaut flight crews in the immediate preflight period. Infectious diseases are contracted through direct person-to-person contact, and through contact with infectious material in the environment. The HSP establishes several controls to minimize crew exposure to infectious agents. The HSP provides a quarantine environment for the crew that minimizes contact with potentially infectious material. The HSP also limits the number of individuals who come in close contact with the crew. The infection-carrying potential of these primary contacts (PCs) is minimized by educating them in ways to avoid infections and avoiding contact with the crew if they are or may be sick. The transmission of some infectious diseases can be greatly curtailed by vaccinations. PCs are strongly encouraged to maintain updated vaccinations.

  1. Migrant Education Health Program, 1985. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    During 1985 the Colorado Migrant Education Program and the Colorado Migrant Health Program provided a comprehensive health program for students enrolled in migrant summer schools. A total of 1,889 migrant children through age 21 (60% between 5 and 10 years of age) received health screening and physical assessment, referral for diagnosis and…

  2. Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

  3. Age Related Changes in Preventive Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Elaine A.; And Others

    Health behavior may be influenced by age, beliefs, and symptomatology. To examine age-related health beliefs and behaviors with respect to six diseases (the common cold, colon-rectal cancer, lung cancer, heart attack, high blood pressure, and senility), 396 adults (196 males, 200 females) divided into three age groups completed a questionnaire…

  4. Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia.

    The 1992 Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors (WSSAHB) was created to collect information regarding a variety of adolescent health behaviors among students in the state of Washington. It expands on two previous administrations of a student tobacco, alcohol, and other drug survey and includes questions about medical care, safety,…

  5. Total quality management in behavioral health care.

    PubMed

    Sluyter, G V

    1998-01-01

    The literature on total quality management or continuous quality improvement in the behavioral health care field is just beginning to emerge. Although most of the evidence on its effectiveness remains anecdotal, it seems clear that it can work in behavioral health care organizations with strong leadership support and a long-term commitment.

  6. Health-Seeking Behavior Among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausell, R. Barker

    1986-01-01

    Compared persons 65 years of age or older (N=177) to younger adults (n=997) with respect to compliance with 20 recommended health-seeking behaviors. Overall, the elderly group reported greater compliance with these behaviors, attributed more importance to their value, but perceived themselves as having less control over their future health.…

  7. How Do Mobile Phone Diabetes Programs Drive Behavior Change?

    PubMed Central

    Nundy, Shantanu; Mishra, Anjuli; Hogan, Patrick; Lee, Sang Mee; Solomon, Marla C.; Peek, Monica E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioral effects of a theory-driven, mobile phone–based intervention that combines automated text messaging and remote nursing, using an automated, interactive text messaging system. Methods This was a mixed methods observational cohort study. Study participants were members of the University of Chicago Health Plan (UCHP) who largely reside in a working-class, urban African American community. Surveys were conducted at baseline, 3 months (mid-intervention), and 6 months (postintervention) to test the hypothesis that the intervention would be associated with improvements in self-efficacy, social support, health beliefs, and self-care. In addition, in-depth individual interviews were conducted with 14 participants and then analyzed using the constant comparative method to identify new behavioral constructs affected by the intervention. Results The intervention was associated with improvements in 5 of 6 domains of self-care (medication taking, glucose monitoring, foot care, exercise, and healthy eating) and improvements in 1 or more measures of self-efficacy, social support, and health beliefs (perceived control). Qualitatively, participants reported that knowledge, attitudes, and ownership were also affected by the program. Together these findings were used to construct a new behavioral model. Conclusions This study’s findings challenge the prevailing assumption that mobile phones largely affect behavior change through reminders and support the idea that behaviorally driven mobile health interventions can address multiple behavioral pathways associated with sustained behavior change. PMID:25278512

  8. Behavioral health and disasters: looking to the future.

    PubMed

    Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2015-01-01

    Along with other manmade and natural disasters, oil spills produce profound and long-term impacts on the behavioral health of their survivors. Although previous and ongoing research has focused on producing evidence of the breadth and depth of these impacts, future efforts must begin to translate this evidence into developing and implementing policies, programs, and practices that effectively contribute to their prevention and mitigation. Drawing upon a conceptual framework of the behavioral health impacts of oil spills developed from data collected in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, this paper examines potential interventions designed to prevent or mitigate biopsychosocial, interpersonal, and intrapersonal impacts on behavioral health. Future efforts to translate behavioral health research into effective practice will require the formation and maintenance of academic-community partnerships for the purpose of building resilience to these impacts and providing targeted services to those most vulnerable to their long-term consequences.

  9. Behavioral Health and Disasters: Looking to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Palinkas, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Along with other manmade and natural disasters, oil spills produce profound and long-term impacts on the behavioral health of their survivors. While previous and ongoing research has focused on producing evidence of the breadth and depth of these impacts, future efforts must begin to translate this evidence into developing and implementing policies, programs and practices that effectively contribute to their prevention and mitigation. Drawing upon a conceptual framework of the behavioral health impacts of oil spills developed from data collected in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, this paper examines potential interventions designed to prevent or mitigate biopsychosocial, interpersonal and intrapersonal impacts on behavioral health. Future efforts to translate behavioral health research into effective practice will require the formation and maintenance of academic-community partnerships for the purpose of building resilience to these impacts and providing targeted services to those most vulnerable to their long-term consequences. PMID:24443145

  10. Health Risk Behaviors and Academic Achievement

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2009 † Health-Risk Behaviors Percentage of U.S. high school students who engaged in each risk behavior, by type of grades mostly earned A’s B’s C’s D’s/F’s Unintentional Injury and Violence-Related Behaviors Rarely or never wore a seat ...

  11. Impact of a school health coordinator intervention on health-related school policies and student behavior.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Liam M; Polacsek, Michele; Macdonald, Pamela B; Ellis, Jacqueline; Berry, Susan; Martin, Maurice

    2010-04-01

    Health-related, school-based interventions may serve to prevent disease and improve academic performance. The Healthy Maine Partnerships (HMP) initiative funded local school health coordinators (SHCs) as a part of Maine's Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP) beginning in January 2001. SHCs established school health leadership teams and implemented annual work plans to address health risk behaviors. This study evaluates the impact of the Healthy Maine Partnerships SHC (HMPSHC) intervention on school policies and student risk behaviors after its first 5 years. Data sources include the Maine School Health Profiles Survey and the Maine Youth Drug and Alcohol Use Survey/Youth Tobacco Survey. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on 2006 data to assess physical activity, nutrition, and tobacco-related policy associations with the HMPSHC intervention. Finally, policy and student behavior analyses were conducted to assess associations. Intervention schools were more likely to be associated with physical activity intramural offerings, improved nutritional offerings, and tobacco cessation programs. In intervention schools, supportive school policies were associated with decreased soda consumption, decreased inactivity, and decreased tobacco use. Required school health education curricula were more predictive of decreased risk behavior in intervention schools than in nonintervention schools. In schools with SHCs, there exists a stronger association with improved school programs. Improved policies and programs were associated with decreases in risk behavior among students in intervention schools. The HMPSHC intervention may be a viable CSHP model to replicate and evaluate in other settings.

  12. Early Childhood Health--Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lawrence S.

    The Maimonides Early Childhood Health-Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program is described. The program provides a broad range of preventive services to children who are five years of age and younger. Services are organized into Post-Natal and Pre-School Programs. The Post-Natal Program offers group education and counseling, individual…

  13. 75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Area Primary Health Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  14. 75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...-53702] [FR Doc No: 2010-21836] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Non-competitive Replacement Awards to Sunset Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources...

  15. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  16. Health behavior: issues, contradictions and dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, A A

    1993-10-01

    American medicine faces many contradictions and dilemmas. This is especially the case with regard to preventive health behavior. This paper explores the effects of several issues, contradictions and dilemmas on the American experience with primary preventive health behavior. These issues include: individualism, victim blaming, therapeutic nihilism, the over abundance of health information, America as a culture of risk takers, and the dilemma of the jungle vs the zoo. Four types of health behavior are defined. The first type of health behavior is the primary prevention of disease, defect, injury or disability. The second type is detection of asymptomatic disease, injury and defect. Third, is the promotion of enhanced levels of health, wellness and quality of life. And the fourth, at a more societal level, protective behaviors to make environmental transactions safe from disease, injury, defect and disability. These four types of health behavior are each explored in relation to societal values, technology and economics to determine which of these facilitate or impede health behavior at both the individual and societal levels.

  17. The economic impact of adolescent health promotion policies and programs.

    PubMed

    Aratani, Yumiko; Schwarz, Susan Wile; Skinner, Curtis

    2011-12-01

    Adolescence is a critical period in the human lifecycle, a time of rapid physical and socioemotional growth and a time when individuals establish lifestyle habits and health behaviors that often endure into and have lasting effects in adulthood. Adolescent health promotion programs play a critical role in helping youth establish healthy lifestyles. In this article, we present a socio-ecological model as a framework for identifying effective policy and program areas that have a positive impact on adolescent health behaviors. Our discussion focuses on 4 key areas: reproductive health; obesity prevention; mental health and substance use, including smoking; and injury and violence prevention. We proceed with an overview of the current status of state-led adolescent health promotion policies and programs from a newly created policy database and then examine the evidence on the cost of preventable adolescent health problems and the cost-effectiveness of health promotion programs and policies. We conclude by discussing the threat posed to adolescent health promotion services and state-led policy initiatives by proposed and implemented federal and state-level budget cuts and examine the possible health and economic repercussions of reducing or eliminating these programs.

  18. Relationship between health literacy, health information access, health behavior, and health status in Japanese people.

    PubMed

    Suka, Machi; Odajima, Takeshi; Okamoto, Masako; Sumitani, Masahiko; Igarashi, Ataru; Ishikawa, Hirono; Kusama, Makiko; Yamamoto, Michiko; Nakayama, Takeo; Sugimori, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between health literacy (HL), health information access, health behavior, and health status in Japanese people. A questionnaire survey was conducted at six healthcare facilities in Japan. Eligible respondents aged 20-64 years (n=1218) were included. Path analysis with structural equation modeling was performed to test the hypothesis model linking HL to health information access, health behavior, and health status. The acceptable fitting model indicated that the pathways linking HL to health status consisted of two indirect paths; one intermediated by health information access and another intermediated by health behavior. Those with higher HL as measured by the 14-item Health Literacy Scale (HLS-14) were significantly more likely to get sufficient health information from multiple sources, less likely to have risky habits of smoking, regular drinking, and lack of exercise, and in turn, more likely to report good self-rated health. HL was significantly associated with health information access and health behavior in Japanese people. HL may play a key role in health promotion, even in highly educated countries like Japan. In order to enhance the effects of health promotion interventions, health professionals should aim at raising HL levels of their target population groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Training Experiences of Family Medicine Residents on Behavioral Health Rotations.

    PubMed

    Zubatsky, Max; Brieler, Jay; Jacobs, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Although accreditation guidelines for residency in family medicine include behavioral health curriculum, little is known about resident learning activities in real world training. Our study explored residents' perceptions about and exposure to specific activities during their behavioral health rotations. Family medicine residents (N=84) recruited via faculty list serves completed a survey about their experiences during behavioral health rotations. The survey included quantitative Likert scale questions, along with open-ended questions on which a qualitative content analysis was performed. Open-ended responses indicated that many residents receive constructive observation and collaboration opportunities during their training month. However, residents wanted more time to practice behavioral health skills beyond the rotation, more practice in psychotherapy skills, and additional education on medication management. Most residents (62%) received either limited or no training in couples or family therapy during their behavioral health rotation. Residents who reported more behavioral health knowledge gain during the rotation also reported higher self-perceived competency using Motivational Interviewing (M=3.82, P<.01). While family medicine as a discipline is based on the biopsychosocial model of care, residents reported deficits in education about family systems. Residents desire additional opportunities to learn psychotherapy techniques and practice counseling skills. Family medicine residency programs and faculty may consider supplementing their core behavioral curriculum to include these content areas.

  20. The behavioral economics of health and health care.

    PubMed

    Rice, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    People often make decisions in health care that are not in their best interest, ranging from failing to enroll in health insurance to which they are entitled, to engaging in extremely harmful behaviors. Traditional economic theory provides a limited tool kit for improving behavior because it assumes that people make decisions in a rational way, have the mental capacity to deal with huge amounts of information and choice, and have tastes endemic to them and not open to manipulation. Melding economics with psychology, behavioral economics acknowledges that people often do not act rationally in the economic sense. It therefore offers a potentially richer set of tools than provided by traditional economic theory to understand and influence behaviors. Only recently, however, has it been applied to health care. This article provides an overview of behavioral economics, reviews some of its contributions, and shows how it can be used in health care to improve people's decisions and health.

  1. Personal Benefits of a Health Evaluation and Enhancement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinzelmann, F.; Durbeck, D. C.

    1970-01-01

    A study was made of the benefits reported by participants in a health evaluation and enhancement program dealing with physical activity. Program benefits were identified and defined in regard to three major areas: program effects on work; program effects on health; and program effects on habits and behavior. A strong positive and consistent relationship was found between reported benefits in each of these areas and measures of improvement in cardiovascular functioning based on treadmill performance. Significant differences in these measures of improvement were also found between participants who reported program benefits and those persons who did not. These findings provide a meaningful profile of the pattern of benefits generated by this kind of health program.

  2. Personal Benefits of a Health Evaluation and Enhancement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinzelmann, F.; Durbeck, D. C.

    1970-01-01

    A study was made of the benefits reported by participants in a health evaluation and enhancement program dealing with physical activity. Program benefits were identified and defined in regard to three major areas: program effects on work; program effects on health; and program effects on habits and behavior. A strong positive and consistent relationship was found between reported benefits in each of these areas and measures of improvement in cardiovascular functioning based on treadmill performance. Significant differences in these measures of improvement were also found between participants who reported program benefits and those persons who did not. These findings provide a meaningful profile of the pattern of benefits generated by this kind of health program.

  3. Two-Generation Programs and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glied, Sherry; Oellerich, Don

    2014-01-01

    Parents' health and children's health are closely intertwined--healthier parents have healthier children, and vice versa. Genetics accounts for some of this relationship, but much of it can be traced to environment and behavior, and the environmental and behavioral risk factors for poor health disproportionately affect families living in…

  4. [Health and health-related behaviors according to sexual attraction and behavior].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Glòria; Martí-Pastor, Marc; Gotsens, Mercè; Bartoll, Xavier; Diez, Elia; Borrell, Carme

    2015-01-01

    to Describe perceived health, mental health and certain health-related behaviors according to sexual attraction and behavior in the population residing in Barcelona in 2011. Perceived health, mental health, chronic conditions and health-related behaviors were analyzed in 2675 people aged 15 to 64 years. The Barcelona Health Survey for 2011 was used, which included questions on sexual attraction and behavior. Multivariate robust Poisson regression models were fitted to obtain adjusted prevalence ratios. People feeling same-sex attraction reported a higher prevalence of worse perceived and mental health. These people and those who had had sex with persons of the same sex more frequently reported harmful health-related behaviors. Lesbian, gay, transgender and bisexual people may have health problems that should be explored in depth, prevented, and attended. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Global health training in ophthalmology residency programs.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Peter G; Feldman, Brad H; Lauer, Andreas K; Paul Chan, Robison V; Sun, Grace

    2015-01-01

    To assess current global health education and international electives in ophthalmology residency programs and barriers to global health implementation in ophthalmology resident education. A web-based survey regarding participation in global health and international electives was emailed to residency program directors at 116 accredited ophthalmology residency programs via an Association of University Professors in Ophthalmology (AUPO) residency program director listserv. Fifty-nine (51%) ophthalmology residency program directors responded. Thirty-seven program directors (63%) said global health was important to medical students when evaluating residency programs. Thirty-two program directors (55%) reported developing international electives. Reported barriers to resident participation in international electives were: 1) insufficient financial support, 2) inadequate resident coverage at home, and 3) lack of ACGME approval for international electives. Program directors requested more information about resident international electives, funding, and global ophthalmology educational resources. They requested ACGME recognition of international electives to facilitate resident participation. More than half (54%) of program directors supported international electives for residents. This survey demonstrates that program directors believe global health is an important consideration when medical students evaluate training programs. Despite perceived barriers to incorporating global health opportunities into residency training, program directors are interested in development of global health resources and plan to further develop global health opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Health seeking behaviors of African Americans: implications for health administration.

    PubMed

    Hewins-Maroney, Barbara; Schumaker, Alice; Williams, Ethel

    2005-01-01

    Disparities in health care and good health between African Americans and other populations while established in the literature are traditionally based on socioeconomic measures of race, income, age, and education (Bailey, 2000; Lillie-Blanton, Brodie, Rowland, Altman and McIntosh, 2000; Ren and Amick, 1996; Watson, 2001; Weinick, Zuvekas, and Cohen, 2000). This study broadens the scope by exploring how sociocultural (poverty, racism, prejudice, and discrimination) and psychosocial factors (perceived health status, the lack of personal efficacy in contributing to decisions about health care. feelings of helplessness, and the lack of trust in the health care providers) relate to health-seeking behaviors of African Americans (Bailey, 1991; Ren and Amick, 1996, Watson, 2001). Interviews were conducted with 111 African American adult patients at a community health center, focusing on health-seeking behaviors, and sociocultural and psychosocial factors. Results suggest that when these negative factors are removed, the health seeking behaviors of African Americans closely mirror the behaviors of the majority population. Subjects did not view themselves in poorer health, fail to seek medical attention when needed, or distrust their primary health care providers. In general, fears associated with health care were attributed to illness rather than health care providers, although a weak linkage was found between patient self-esteem and fear or dislike of future treatment by physicians (adj R2= .362, S.E. =15, F=21, sig. <.001). The study highlights the need for further study in two areas: cultural competency of health care providers, especially those from Asia and Africa who are often assigned to community health centers, and the impact of an accessible community health center on the health seeking behaviors and health status of predominately African American communities.

  7. The effect of a behavioral activation program on improving mental and physical health complaints associated with radiation stress among mothers in Fukushima: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Kotaro; Sekiya, Yuki; Asai, Yumi; Umeda, Maki; Horikoshi, Naoko; Yasumura, Seiji; Yabe, Hirooki; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Kawakami, Norito

    2016-11-08

    Mothers living with small children in Fukushima prefecture may experience radiation anxiety and related symptoms after the Fukushima Dai'ich Nuclear Power Plant Accident. A behavioral activation (BA) program was developed to improve their psychosomatic symptoms. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to examine the effectiveness of a BA program for improving psychological distress and physical symptoms among mothers with preschool children in Fukushima-prefecture 3 years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Participants were recruited from mothers living with a preschool child(ren) in Fukushima city and surrounding areas though a newspaper advertisement, posters, and flyers. Participants allocated to the intervention group received a newly developed group-based BA program, which consisted of two 90- min lessons with a 1-week interval. Psychological distress and physical symptoms as a primary outcome, and radiation anxiety and positive well-being (liveliness and life satisfaction) as a secondary outcome, were measured at baseline, 1- and 3-month follow-ups. Participants were randomly allocated to either an intervention or a control group (18 and 19, respectively). The BA program showed a marginally significant intervention effect on psychological distress (p = 0.051) and physical symptoms (p = 0.07) at 1-month follow-up, while the effect became smaller at 3-month follow-up. The effect sizes at 1-month were medium to large (-0.72 and -0.56, respectively). There was a significant intervention effect on increasing liveliness at 3-month follow-up (p = 0.02); and there were marginally significant effects on life satisfaction at 1- and 3-month follow-ups (both p = 0.09). This BA program may be effective for improving psychological distress, physical symptoms, and well-being, at least for a short duration, among mothers with preschool children after the nuclear power plant accident in Fukushima, while a further large

  8. Instructional design strategies for health behavior change.

    PubMed

    Kinzie, Mable B

    2005-01-01

    To help health educators build upon the best of different health behavior change theories, this paper offers a unified set of instructional design strategies for health education interventions. This set draws upon the recommendations of Rosenstock (Health Belief Model), Bandura (Social Cognitive Theory), and Dearing (Diffusion Theory), and uses a modified Events of Instruction framework (adapted from Robert Gagne): gain attention (convey health threats and benefits), present stimulus material (tailor message to audience knowledge and values, demonstrate observable effectiveness, make behaviors easy-to-understand and do), provide guidance (use trustworthy models to demonstrate), elicit performance and provide feedback (to enhance trialability, develop proficiency and self-efficacy), enhance retention and transfer (provide social supports and deliver behavioral cues). Sample applications of these strategies are provided. A brief review of research on adolescent smoking prevention enables consideration of the frequency with which these strategies are used, and possible patterns between strategy use and behavioral outcomes.

  9. Mapping health behaviors: Constructing and validating a common-sense taxonomy of health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Gabriel; Shiloh, Shoshana

    2015-12-01

    Health behaviors (HBs) are major determinants of health, illness, and mortality. Theoretical efforts aimed at understanding their nature and the processes involved in their initiation and maintenance have largely ignored differences among them. Therefore, the objective of this research was to establish a reliable and valid common-sense taxonomy of HBs. The first study created a comprehensive list of 66 HBs based on the views of laypeople (N = 70), health professionals (N = 30), and a literature review. In the second study, a sample of laypeople (N = 268) selected the most important HBs. In the third study, a similarity card-sorting technique was administered to a representative sample (N = 450) in an effort to uncover the structure of HBs. The fourth study replicated the structure (N = 627) and assessed its stability and generalizability. A complete list of 66 HBs was developed, of which 45 were judged as most important. Classifications of HBs identified two main categories: psychosocial, including psychological, social, and work issues; and physical, composed of risk avoidance, nutritional habits, and prevention. The hierarchical classification further separated each category into distinguishable clusters and subclusters. The results were replicated, and additional analyses revealed a high level of stability of the taxonomy across different demographic sub-groups. The taxonomy can provide a framework for research and a map for program developers looking for meaningful links between specific groups of HBs and particular behavior change techniques. This should optimize the cost-effectiveness of promotion and intervention programs, and thus increase health and decrease health-care burden. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Evaluation of the 4-H "Health Rocks" Program: Implications for Program Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Carlton; Morgan, A. Christian; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.; Navarro, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The National 4-H Council developed the Health Rocks substance abuse educational program to prevent youth from engaging in risky behaviors. The program was presented in 2010 to more than 8,000 middle school youth in Georgia. A post-then-pre evaluation was conducted with youth who completed 10 hours of instruction to determine if changes in youth…

  11. An Evaluation of the 4-H "Health Rocks" Program: Implications for Program Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Carlton; Morgan, A. Christian; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.; Navarro, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The National 4-H Council developed the Health Rocks substance abuse educational program to prevent youth from engaging in risky behaviors. The program was presented in 2010 to more than 8,000 middle school youth in Georgia. A post-then-pre evaluation was conducted with youth who completed 10 hours of instruction to determine if changes in youth…

  12. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Disease screening instruments used for secondary prevention can facilitate early determination and treatment of pathogenic factors, effectively reducing disease incidence, mortality rates, and health complications. Therefore, people should be encouraged to receive health examinations for discovering potential pathogenic factors before symptoms occur. Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan. In total, 388 effective questionnaires were analyzed through structural model analysis. Consequently, this study yielded four crucial findings: (1) The established extended health belief model could effectively predict health examination behavioral intention; (2) Self-efficacy was the factor that most strongly influenced health examination behavioral intention, followed by health knowledge; (3) Self-efficacy substantially influenced perceived benefits and perceived barriers; (4) Health knowledge and social support indirectly influenced health examination behavioral intention. The preceding results can effectively increase the acceptance and use of health examination services among the public, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately reducing disease and mortality rates. PMID:27043606

  13. Structural Factors Affecting Health Examination Behavioral Intention.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Ting; Kuo, Yu-Ming; Wang, Shiang-Ru; Wang, Chia-Fen; Tsai, Chung-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Disease screening instruments used for secondary prevention can facilitate early determination and treatment of pathogenic factors, effectively reducing disease incidence, mortality rates, and health complications. Therefore, people should be encouraged to receive health examinations for discovering potential pathogenic factors before symptoms occur. Here, we used the health belief model as a foundation and integrated social psychological factors and investigated the factors influencing health examination behavioral intention among the public in Taiwan. In total, 388 effective questionnaires were analyzed through structural model analysis. Consequently, this study yielded four crucial findings: (1) The established extended health belief model could effectively predict health examination behavioral intention; (2) Self-efficacy was the factor that most strongly influenced health examination behavioral intention, followed by health knowledge; (3) Self-efficacy substantially influenced perceived benefits and perceived barriers; (4) Health knowledge and social support indirectly influenced health examination behavioral intention. The preceding results can effectively increase the acceptance and use of health examination services among the public, thereby facilitating early diagnosis and treatment and ultimately reducing disease and mortality rates.

  14. Child Health, Developmental Plasticity, and Epigenetic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Feil, R.; Constancia, M.; Fraga, M.; Junien, C.; Carel, J.-C.; Boileau, P.; Le Bouc, Y.; Deal, C. L.; Lillycrop, K.; Scharfmann, R.; Sheppard, A.; Skinner, M.; Szyf, M.; Waterland, R. A.; Waxman, D. J.; Whitelaw, E.; Ong, K.; Albertsson-Wikland, K.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to the organism under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology and long-term health. Developmental origins of health and disease and life-history transitions are purported to use placental, nutritional, and endocrine cues for setting long-term biological, mental, and behavioral strategies in response to local ecological and/or social conditions. The window of developmental plasticity extends from preconception to early childhood and involves epigenetic responses to environmental changes, which exert their effects during life-history phase transitions. These epigenetic responses influence development, cell- and tissue-specific gene expression, and sexual dimorphism, and, in exceptional cases, could be transmitted transgenerationally. Translational epigenetic research in child health is a reiterative process that ranges from research in the basic sciences, preclinical research, and pediatric clinical research. Identifying the epigenetic consequences of fetal programming creates potential applications in clinical practice: the development of epigenetic biomarkers for early diagnosis of disease, the ability to identify susceptible individuals at risk for adult diseases, and the development of novel preventive and curative measures that are based on diet and/or novel epigenetic drugs. PMID:20971919

  15. Behavioral Health and Performance, Risk to Mitigation Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveton, Lauren; Whitemire, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This poster reviews the working of the Behavioral Health and Performance (BHP) group, which supports the research element which manages an integrated program for future space flight. The BHP operations group supports astronauts and their families in all phases of the International Space Station Mission, and post mission effects.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Before the start of the kickoff presentation for Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day, Center Director Jim Kennedy (left) chats with guest speaker Capt. Charles Plumb (USNR retired) and United Space Alliance Vice President and Deputy Program Manager, Florida Operations, Bill Pickavance. Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day is an annual event at KSC and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station dedicated to reinforcing safe and healthful behaviors in the workforce. Safety Awards were also given to individuals and groups.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-15

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Before the start of the kickoff presentation for Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day, Center Director Jim Kennedy (left) chats with guest speaker Capt. Charles Plumb (USNR retired) and United Space Alliance Vice President and Deputy Program Manager, Florida Operations, Bill Pickavance. Spaceport Super Safety and Health Day is an annual event at KSC and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station dedicated to reinforcing safe and healthful behaviors in the workforce. Safety Awards were also given to individuals and groups.

  17. 78 FR 25457 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Center, Inc. for provision of services in Gwinnett County, Georgia. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and...

  18. Relationship between peer status and health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Terre, L; Drabman, R S; Meydrech, E F; Hsu, H S

    1992-01-01

    Over the past decade, univariate studies have identified peer-rated popularity/sociability as a correlate of individual health practices (e.g., alcohol and drug use, exercise habits). Yet, the relationship between multiple health habits and broader social competencies rarely has been systematically examined. Accordingly, using a multivariate approach, the present study investigated the relative influence of background characteristics (i.e., age, gender, race, family type, and socioeconomic status) and peer status on health-related behaviors (i.e., physical activity, eating habits, smoking, alcohol use, and stress-related behaviors) in 589 junior high school students (ages 11-13). In this sample, peer popularity provided no significant increment in the prediction of health habits over and above the effects explained by demographics. These results are consistent with current perspectives on health and interpersonal behaviors, and have important practical implications for the initiation and maintenance of healthful and risky practices in the natural environment.

  19. Public Housing, Health, and Health Behaviors: Is There a Connection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fertig, Angela R.; Reingold, David A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between public housing, health outcomes, and health behaviors among low-income housing residents. While public housing can be a dangerous and unhealthy environment in which to live, the subsidized rent may free up resources for nutritious food and health care. In addition, public housing may be of higher…

  20. A GUIDE FOR HEALTH TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KAHLER, CAROL; AND OTHERS

    THIS GUIDE TO THE PREPARATION OF A 2-YEAR COLLEGE PROGRAM IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY LISTS CERTAIN NECESSARY PRE-CONDITIONS. BEFORE THE COURSE CAN BE ESTABLISHED, THE ADMINISTRATION MUST (1) DEFINE THE SCOPE OF THE PROGRAM, (2) BE AWARE OF ACCEPTED STANDARDS FOR TECHNICIANS IN THE HEALTH FIELD, (3) NOTE THE POSSIBLE IMPACT OF THE PROGRAM ON THE…

  1. Transtheoretical model of health behavior change applied to voice therapy.

    PubMed

    van Leer, Eva; Hapner, Edie R; Connor, Nadine P

    2008-11-01

    Studies of patient adherence to health behavior programs, such as physical exercise, smoking cessation, and diet, have resulted in the formulation and validation of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change. Although widely accepted as a guide for the development of health behavior interventions, this model has not been applied to vocal rehabilitation. Because resolution of vocal difficulties frequently depends on a patient's ability to make changes in vocal and health behaviors, the TTM may be a useful way to conceptualize voice behavior change processes, including the patient's readiness for change. The purpose of this paper is to apply the TTM to the voice therapy process to: (1) provide an organizing framework for understanding of behavior change in voice therapy, (2) explain how treatment adherence problems can arise, and (3) provide broad strategies to improve treatment adherence. Given the significant role of treatment adherence in treatment outcome, considering readiness for behavior change should be taken into account when planning treatment. Principles of health behavior change can aid speech pathologists in such understanding and estimating readiness for voice therapy.

  2. A health education program for underserved community youth led by health professions students.

    PubMed

    Begley, Kimberley; Haddad, Ann Ryan; Christensen, Carla; Lust, Elaine

    2009-10-01

    To develop and implement a health fair and educational sessions for elementary school children led by health professions students. The structure and process were developed with elementary school administration to determine the health topics to be covered. Students and faculty members created a "hands-on," youth-oriented health fair and interactive health educational sessions. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected on learning outcomes from the underserved child population and health professions students. The health fair and educational sessions increased awareness of underserved youth in the areas of critical health behaviors, purposeful education on health issues facing their community, and exposure to careers in various health professions. The activities provided meaningful learning experiences for the health professions students. The health education program model is an excellent way to teach health education, communication and critical thinking skills, and service learning to health professions students.

  3. The NASA Radiation Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, Walter

    1991-01-01

    The Space Radiation Health Program (SRHP) is defined in terms of motivation and methodology with specific reference given to the impacts of HZE particles and solar energetic particles. The biological hazards are mentioned that can be associated with the two particle types and ionizing radiation in general. The lack of data on the impact of such radiation and effective shielding countermeasures is identified as the primary motivation for worst-case assumptions. However, the resulting shielding designs can potentially overestimate the thickness by a factor of 10 and add unnecessarily to vehicle take-off mass. A space-based validation system is proposed to complement ground-based investigations of the effects of ionizing radiation in interplanetary space. The Lifesat satellite is proposed as a part of the SRHP effort to determine the requirements for protection and future shielding specifications.

  4. Risky music-listening behaviors and associated health-risk behaviors.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Ineke; van de Looij-Jansen, Petra M; Mieloo, Cathelijne L; Burdorf, Alex; de Waart, Frouwkje

    2012-06-01

    To examine, among adolescents and emerging adults attending inner-city lower education, associations between risky music-listening behaviors (from MP3 players and in discotheques and at pop concerts) and more traditional health-risk behaviors: substance use (cigarettes, alcohol, cannabis, and hard drugs) and unsafe sexual intercourse. A total of 944 students in Dutch inner-city senior-secondary vocational schools completed questionnaires about their music-listening and traditional health-risk behaviors. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to examine associations between music-listening and traditional health-risk behaviors. Risky MP3-player listeners used cannabis more often during the past 4 weeks. Students exposed to risky sound levels during discotheque and pop concert attendance used cannabis less often during the past 4 weeks, were more often binge drinkers, and reported inconsistent condom use during sexual intercourse. The coexistence of risky music-listening behaviors with other health-risk behaviors provides evidence in support of the integration of risky music-listening behaviors within research on and programs aimed at reducing more traditional health-risk behaviors, such as substance abuse and unsafe sexual intercourse.

  5. Health Is Academic. A Guide to Coordinated School Health Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Eva, Ed.; Wooley, Susan Frelick, Ed.; Northrop, Daphne, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of papers that define comprehensive school health programs and their components and provide action steps for their implementation at the local, state, and national levels: (1) "Linking Health and Learning: An Overview of Coordinated School Health Programs" (Floretta Dukes McKenzie and Julius B. Richmond); (2)…

  6. Promoting Health and Behavioral Health Equity in California.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Meenoo; Lupi, Monica Valdes; Miller, Wm Jahmal; Nolfo, Tamu

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral health disparities are not usually considered part of the same system of health disparities. However, the California Department of Public Health focused its health equity strategies on reducing behavioral health disparities through its California Statewide Plan to Promote Health and Mental Health Equity. This statewide plan was developed through a community-wide stakeholder engagement and outreach process. In addition, the California Reducing Disparities Project is a prevention and early intervention effort to reduce mental health disparities in underserved populations. This strategic plan represents the voice of several racial/ethnic communities, such as African American, Asian and Pacific Islander, Latino, Native American, as well as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer and questioning communities in California, through 5 strategic planning workgroups. The workgroups were composed of a broad range of stakeholders, including community leaders, mental health care providers, consumer and family members, individuals with lived experience, and academia. This case example highlights the various efforts of California's Office of Health Equity in eliminating behavioral health disparities and promoting mental health equity, as well as discusses the unique statutory and regulatory role of the Office of Health Equity's deputy director.

  7. [Education for responsible health behavior].

    PubMed

    Steffens, M C; Bergler, R

    1996-12-01

    34 nursery school teachers, 40 primary school teachers, and 40 parents of primary school children were interviewed. Based on the results of these interviews, standardized questionnaires were developed and answered by 100 mothers of primary school children. Main results are as follows. Most of the nursery school teachers, primary school teachers, and mothers don't show great interest in health-related information, despite the fact that they lack knowledge in this area. Health risks which children could be educated to know, like unhealthy nutrition, are underestimated, whereas ecological risks which cannot be affected are overrated. Nursery and primary school teachers hold that parents are responsible for the health education of their children. Consequently, health-related behaviour in kindergarten and health-related teaching in school are unsatisfactory. Mothers, however, expect schools to teach health-related topics concerning dependencies of all sorts--nicotine, alcohol, illegal drugs, and medication. Nursery school teachers as well as mothers demonstrate little systematic control and few sanctions when it comes to teaching children hygienic behaviour. Therefore, most children show satisfactory preventive behaviour only with regard to brushing their teeth. There are clear deficits in other areas. The mothers act only partly as good role models--for example, many mothers smoke when their children are around. Additionally, mothers don't regularly talk to their children about health-related topics.

  8. 78 FR 59121 - Basic Health Program: State Administration of Basic Health Programs; Eligibility and Enrollment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ...This proposed rule would establish the Basic Health Program, as required by section 1331 of the Affordable Care Act. The Basic Health Program provides states the flexibility to establish a health benefits coverage program for low-income individuals who would otherwise be eligible to purchase coverage through the state's Affordable Insurance Exchange (Exchange, also called a Health Insurance......

  9. College Student Adjustment and Health Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Lisa Anne

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between student adjustment theory and college student health behaviors. Specifically, this research examined first-year freshmen college student physical activity and nutrition behaviors and impact on adjustment to college (N = 37,564). The design for this study was a non-experimental "ex post facto"…

  10. Relationship between Peer Status and Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terre, Lisa; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated relative influence of background characteristics (age, gender, race, socioeconomic status, family type) and peer status on health-related behaviors (physical activity, eating habits, smoking, alcohol use, stress-related behaviors) in 589 junior high school students. Peer popularity provided no significant increment in prediction of…

  11. College Student Adjustment and Health Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Lisa Anne

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between student adjustment theory and college student health behaviors. Specifically, this research examined first-year freshmen college student physical activity and nutrition behaviors and impact on adjustment to college (N = 37,564). The design for this study was a non-experimental "ex post facto"…

  12. Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    RYAN, POLLY

    2009-01-01

    An essential characteristic of advanced practice nurses is the use of theory in practice. Clinical nurse specialists apply theory in providing or directing patient care, in their work as consultants to staff nurses, and as leaders influencing and facilitating system change. Knowledge of technology and pharmacology has far outpaced knowledge of how to facilitate health behavior change, and new theories are needed to better understand how practitioners can facilitate health behavior change. In this article, the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change is described, and an example of its use as foundation to intervention development is presented. The Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change suggests that health behavior change can be enhanced by fostering knowledge and beliefs, increasing self-regulation skills and abilities, and enhancing social facilitation. Engagement in self-management behaviors is seen as the proximal outcome influencing the long-term distal outcome of improved health status. Person-centered interventions are directed to increasing knowledge and beliefs, self-regulation skills and abilities, and social facilitation. Using a theoretical framework improves clinical nurse specialist practice by focusing assessments, directing the use of best-practice interventions, and improving patient outcomes. Using theory fosters improved communication with other disciplines and enhances the management of complex clinical conditions by providing holistic, comprehensive care. PMID:19395894

  13. Project Health: Evaluation of a Project-Based Health Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zusevics, Kaija L.; Lemke, Melissa A.; Harley, Amy E.; Florsheim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Milwaukee has very high rates of risky sexual behavior and low rates of academic achievement among adolescents. Milwaukee school representatives partnered with researchers to create and implement an innovative project-based learning (PBL) high school health curriculum to engage students in school. This health education program, Project…

  14. Project Health: Evaluation of a Project-Based Health Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zusevics, Kaija L.; Lemke, Melissa A.; Harley, Amy E.; Florsheim, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Milwaukee has very high rates of risky sexual behavior and low rates of academic achievement among adolescents. Milwaukee school representatives partnered with researchers to create and implement an innovative project-based learning (PBL) high school health curriculum to engage students in school. This health education program, Project…

  15. Correlates of adherence to a telephone-based multiple health behavior change cancer preventive intervention for teens: the Healthy for Life Program (HELP).

    PubMed

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N; Sharff, McKane E; Walker, Leslie R; Abraham, Anisha A; Hawkins, Kirsten B; Tercyak, Kenneth P

    2012-02-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens' adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial eligible. White teens were more likely to enroll than non-Whites (χ(2)[1] df = 4.49, p = .04). Among enrolled teens, 76% (n = 50) completed the run-in; there were no differences between run-in completers and noncompleters. A majority of run-in completers (70%, n = 35) initiated the intervention, though teens who initiated the intervention were significantly younger than those who did not (p < .05). The mean number of sessions completed was 5.7 (SD = 2.6; maximum = 8). After adjusting for age, teens with poorer session engagement (e.g., less cooperative) completed fewer sessions (B = -1.97, p = .003, R (2) = .24). Implications for adolescent cancer prevention research are discussed.

  16. Correlates of Adherence to a Telephone-Based Multiple Health Behavior Change Cancer Preventive Intervention for Teens: The Healthy for Life Program (HELP)

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Darren; Peshkin, Beth N.; Sharff, McKane E.; Walker, Leslie R.; Abraham, Anisha A.; Hawkins, Kirsten; Tercyak, Kenneth P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with teens’ adherence to a multiple health behavior cancer preventive intervention. Analyses identified predictors of trial enrollment, run-in completion, and adherence (intervention initiation, number of sessions completed). Of 104 teens screened, 73% (n = 76) were trial-eligible. White teens were more likely to enroll than non-whites (χ2 [1] df = 4.49, p = 0.04). Among enrolled teens, 76% (n = 50) completed the run-in; there were no differences between run-in completers and non-completers. A majority of run-in completers (70%, n = 35) initiated the intervention, though teens who initiated the intervention were significantly younger than those who did not (p < 0.05). The mean number of sessions completed was 5.7 (SD = 2.6; maximum = 8). After adjusting for age, teens with poorer session engagement (e.g., less cooperative) completed fewer sessions (B = -1.97, p = 0.003, R2 = 0.24). Implications for adolescent cancer prevention research are discussed. PMID:21632437

  17. Behavioral patterns of environmental performance evaluation programs.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanxin; Mauerhofer, Volker

    2016-11-01

    During the past decades numerous environmental performance evaluation programs have been developed and implemented on different geographic scales. This paper develops a taxonomy of environmental management behavioral patterns in order to provide a practical comparison tool for environmental performance evaluation programs. Ten such programs purposively selected are mapped against the identified four behavioral patterns in the form of diagnosis, negotiation, learning, and socialization and learning. Overall, we found that schemes which serve to diagnose environmental abnormalities are mainly externally imposed and have been developed as a result of technical debates concerning data sources, methodology and ranking criteria. Learning oriented scheme is featured by processes through which free exchange of ideas, mutual and adaptive learning can occur. Scheme developed by higher authority for influencing behaviors of lower levels of government has been adopted by the evaluated to signal their excellent environmental performance. The socializing and learning classified evaluation schemes have incorporated dialogue, participation, and capacity building in program design. In conclusion we consider the 'fitness for purpose' of the various schemes, the merits of our analytical model and the future possibilities of fostering capacity building in the realm of wicked environmental challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Health psychology meets behavioral economics: introduction to special issue.

    PubMed

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Finkelstein, Eric Andrew

    2013-09-01

    Introduces the special issue of Health Psychology, entitled Health Psychology Meets Behavioral Economics. Psychologists have long been interested in understanding the processes that underlie health behaviors and, based on health behavior models that they have developed, have devised a spectrum of effective prevention and treatment programs. More recently, behavioral economists have also provided evidence of effective behavior change strategies through nonprice mechanisms in a variety of contexts, including smoking cessation, weight loss, and illicit drug use. Yet, although all are addressing similar issues, surprisingly little cross-fertilization has taken place between traditional economists, behavioral economists, and psychologists. This special issue is rooted in the assumption that collaboration between economists and psychologists can promote the development of new methodologies and encourage exploration of novel solutions to enduring health problems. The hope is that readers will be intrigued and inspired by the methodologies used in the different articles and will explore whether they might be applicable to the problems they are addressing. Collaborative efforts, although challenging and at times risky, are a promising way to produce more innovative studies, results, and interventions.

  19. Impact of a nurse-directed, coordinated school health program to enhance physical activity behaviors and reduce body mass index among minority children: a parallel-group, randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kynna; Giger, Joyce Newman; Norris, Keth; Suro, Zulma

    2013-06-01

    Underserved children, particularly girls and those in urban communities, do not meet the recommended physical activity guidelines (>60min of daily physical activity), and this behavior can lead to obesity. The school years are known to be a critical period in the life course for shaping attitudes and behaviors. Children look to schools for much of their access to physical activity. Thus, through the provision of appropriate physical activity programs, schools have the power to influence apt physical activity choices, especially for underserved children where disparities in obesity-related outcomes exist. To evaluate the impact of a nurse directed, coordinated, culturally sensitive, school-based, family-centered lifestyle program on activity behaviors and body mass index. This was a parallel group, randomized controlled trial utilizing a community-based participatory research approach, through a partnership with a University and 5 community schools. Participants included 251 children ages 8-12 from elementary schools in urban, low-income neighborhoods in Los Angeles, USA. The intervention included Kids N Fitness(©), a 6-week program which met weekly to provide 45min of structured physical activity and a 45min nutrition education class for parents and children. Intervention sites also participated in school-wide wellness activities, including health and counseling services, staff professional development in health promotion, parental education newsletters, and wellness policies for the provision of healthy foods at the school. The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health School Physical Activity and Nutrition Student Questionnaire measured physical activity behavior, including: daily physical activity, participation in team sports, attending physical education class, and TV viewing/computer game playing. Anthropometric measures included height, weight, body mass index, resting blood pressure, and waist circumference. Measures were collected at baseline

  20. Impact of a nurse-directed, coordinated school health program to enhance physical activity behaviors and reduce body mass index among minority children: A parallel-group, randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Kynna; Giger, Joyce Newman; Norris, Keth; Suro, Zulma

    2013-01-01

    Background Underserved children, particularly girls and those in urban communities, do not meet the recommended physical activity guidelines (>60 min of daily physical activity), and this behavior can lead to obesity. The school years are known to be a critical period in the life course for shaping attitudes and behaviors. Children look to schools for much of their access to physical activity. Thus, through the provision of appropriate physical activity programs, schools have the power to influence apt physical activity choices, especially for underserved children where disparities in obesity-related outcomes exist. Objectives To evaluate the impact of a nurse directed, coordinated, culturally sensitive, school-based, family-centered lifestyle program on activity behaviors and body mass index. Design, settings and participants: This was a parallel group, randomized controlled trial utilizing a community-based participatory research approach, through a partnership with a University and 5 community schools. Participants included 251 children ages 8–12 from elementary schools in urban, low-income neighborhoods in Los Angeles, USA. Methods The intervention included Kids N Fitness©, a 6-week program which met weekly to provide 45 min of structured physical activity and a 45 min nutrition education class for parents and children. Intervention sites also participated in school-wide wellness activities, including health and counseling services, staff professional development in health promotion, parental education newsletters, and wellness policies for the provision of healthy foods at the school. The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health School Physical Activity and Nutrition Student Questionnaire measured physical activity behavior, including: daily physical activity, participation in team sports, attending physical education class, and TV viewing/computer game playing. Anthropometric measures included height, weight, body mass index, resting blood

  1. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

  2. Health Knowledge and Behavior Four Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lottes, Christine R.

    This document reports on a study to analyze the success of a revised health/wellness course at Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania). The research focused on two questions: (1) what increased knowledge and behavioral change students report once they have completed their health course; and (2) after a period of time, what students will say about the…

  3. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

  4. The Relationship Between Health Attitudes and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Bonnie L.

    This study was undertaken to examine the constellation of attitudes and beliefs felt to be related to health behavior. Two types of health messages were delivered to a group of teenage camp counselors on the disease diabetes. Their attitudes toward the disease in terms of their perception of vulnerability to it, their perception of its severity,…

  5. Health literacy and nutrition behaviors among low-income adults.

    PubMed

    Speirs, Katherine E; Messina, Lauren A; Munger, Ashley L; Grutzmacher, Stephanie K

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between health literacy and nutrition behaviors using a low-income sample. Face-to-face surveys at 11 social services offices generated a convenience sample of 154 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-eligible adults. We assessed health literacy, fruit and vegetable intake, food label use, consumption of healthy foods, and demographic characteristics. Thirty seven percent of the sample had adequate health literacy as measured by the Newest Vital Sign (NVS). Race and parenthood were significantly related to health literacy scores. Adequate health literacy, as measured by the NVS, was associated with frying chicken less often and eating the peels of fresh fruit more often. The findings suggest that health practitioners should ensure nutrition-related messages are accessible to all of their clients, especially those with the lowest health literacy levels.

  6. Systematic literature review of Internet interventions across health behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Su-I; Charlery, Su-Anne Robyn; Roberson, Kiersten

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This review examines Internet interventions aiming to change health behaviors in the general population. Methods: Internet health interventions in the USA published between January 2005 and December 2013 were identified through Medline and CINAHL. Keywords used were (Internet or e-health or social media or web) paired with (intervention or program*). A total of 38 articles met all criteria and were reviewed. Results: Studies were analyzed by targeted health behavior interventions: tobacco (5), alcohol (4), weight loss (7), physical activity (PA) (7), nutrition (2), PA and nutrition combined (5), HIV or sexual health (4), and chronic diseases (4). Interventions ranged from one session to 24  weeks (average 6–12 weeks). Common strategies used, including web-based information, tailored feedback, weekly e-mails, goal setting, and self-assessment. Social cognitive theory and the transtheoretical models were the most commonly used frameworks. Recruitment strategies were typically media based varied by settings and populations. Except for the tobacco interventions, the majority studies yielded significant outcomes. Conclusion: This review provides updates and synthesized knowledge on the design and consistent effectiveness of Internet interventions across health behaviors. Results have implications for public health and healthcare professionals, as they play a key role in developing and delivering health promotion interventions as well as in assisting the communities and clients serviced obtaining evidence-based health information. PMID:25750795

  7. Evaluating Components of Behavior-Analytic Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Blydenburg, Dana M; Diller, James W

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the consistency of behavior-analytic training with the Behavior Analysis Certification Board's task list. A survey about the content of behavior-analytic training programs was sent to Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB)-approved training program directors. There were many program directors that felt particular areas do not have sufficient coverage (e.g., Behavioral Pharmacology, Biological Bases of Behavior, Organizational Behavior Management), and several program directors reported that their course sequence does not adequately prepare students in basic research. Results suggest that the evaluation of behavior-analytic training content may be warranted.

  8. Lifestyle Assessment: Helping Patients Change Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ciliska, Donna; Wilson, Douglas M. C.

    1984-01-01

    This article is the second in a series of six on lifestyle assessment and behavior change. The first article presented an assessment tool called FANTASTIC, which has been tested for reliability and is currently in wide use. After assessment, family physicians must help patients decide to change—and give them guidance on how to change—unhealthy behaviors. This article explains how the family physician can use educational, behavioral and relaxation strategies to increase patients' motivation, maintain their commitment and teach them the skills needed to effect changes in health behavior.

  9. Global health training in pediatric residency programs.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brett D; Lee, Anne Cc; Newby, P K; Chamberlin, M Robert; Huang, Chi-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    Our goal was to describe current resident interest, participation, curricula, resources, and obstacles related to global health training within pediatric residency programs. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the 201 accredited pediatric residency programs in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean from October 2006 to January 2007. Survey topics included resident interest and participation in electives, training opportunities, program support, and educational curricular content related to global health. Of the 201 surveyed pediatric residency programs, 106 (53%) responded. Fifteen percent of responding programs reported that a majority of their residents were interested in global health. Fifty-two percent offered a global health elective within the previous year, and 47% had formally incorporated global health into their training curricula. Six percent of the programs reported a formalized track or certificate in global health. The median number of residents per program participating in global health electives within the previous year was 0 during postgraduate year 1, 1 during postgraduate year 2, and 2 during postgraduate year 3. The median number of all residents per program participating in a global health elective in the previous year was 3 (7.4% of program size). Among programs that offered a global health elective, support to participating residents included prerequisite clinical training (36%), cultural orientation (36%), language training (15%), faculty mentorship (82%), and post-elective debriefing (77%). Fourteen percent of the programs provided full funding for resident electives. Characteristics of pediatric residency programs that were significantly associated with higher resident participation in a global health elective were larger program size, university affiliation, greater reported resident interest, and faculty involvement in global health. More than half of the pediatric residency programs surveyed offered a global health

  10. Health education and multimedia learning: educational psychology and health behavior theory (Part 1).

    PubMed

    Mas, Francisco G Soto; Plass, Jan; Kane, William M; Papenfuss, Richard L

    2003-07-01

    When health education researchers began to investigate how individuals make decisions related to health and the factors that influence health behaviors, they referred to frameworks shared by educational and learning research. Health education adopted the basic principles of the cognitive revolution, which were instrumental in advancing the field. There is currently a new challenge to confront: the widespread use of new technologies for health education. To better overcome this challenge, educational psychology and instructional technology theory should be considered. Unfortunately, the passion to incorporate new technologies too often overshadows how people learn or, in particular, how people learn through computer technologies. This two-part article explains how educational theory contributed to the early development of health behavior theory, describes the most relevant multimedia learning theories and constructs, and provides recommendations for developing multimedia health education programs and connecting theory and practice.

  11. Health Promotion and Health Behaviors of Diverse Ethnic/Racial Women Cosmetologists: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Thelusma, Naomi; Ralston, Penny

    2016-01-01

    Women from diverse ethnic/racial backgrounds have higher chronic disease mortality rates when compared to White non-Hispanic women. Community-based programs, such as beauty salons, have been used to reach diverse ethnic/racial women, yet little is known about diverse ethnic/racial women cosmetologists’ involvement in health promotion and their health behaviors, which is the purpose of this review. The growing beauty salon health promotion literature indicates that their roles in these studies have been varied, not only as health promoters but also as recruiters, facilitators, and in general major catalysts for investigator-initiated studies. However, the review also identified a major void in the literature in that there were few studies on health behaviors of diverse ethnic/racial women cosmetologists, especially African American women cosmetologists. Recommendations include increasing the capacity of diverse ethnic/racial women cosmetologists as community health leaders and investigating their health status, knowledge, attitudes, and practices. PMID:27199580

  12. The Mechanisms Linking Health Literacy to Behavior and Health Status

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Wolf, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine the mechanisms linking health literacy to physical activity and self-reported health. Methods From 2005–2007, patients (N=330) with hypertension were recruited from safety net clinics. Path analytic models tested the pathways linking health literacy to physical activity and self-reported health. Results There were significant paths from health literacy to knowledge (r=0.22, P<0.001), knowledge to self-efficacy (r=0.13, P<0.01), self-efficacy to physical activity (r=0.17, P<0.01), and physical activity to health status (r=0.17, P<0.01). Conclusions Health education interventions should be literacy sensitive and aim to enhance patient health knowledge and self-efficacy to promote self-care behavior and desirable health outcomes. PMID:20950164

  13. Women's health and behavioral health issues in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jean Lau; Yee, Barbara W K; Banks, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    As health care reform promises to change the landscape of health care delivery, its potential impact on women's health looms large. Whereas health and mental health systems have historically been fragmented, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates integrated health care as the strategy for reform. Current systems fragment women's health not only in their primary care, mental health, obstetrical, and gynecological needs, but also in their roles as the primary caregivers for parents, spouses, and children. Changes in reimbursement, and in restructuring financing and care coordination systems through accountable care organizations and medical homes, will potentially improve women's health care.

  14. SBIRT as a Vital Sign for Behavioral Health Identification, Diagnosis, and Referral in Community Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Dwinnells, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental design study was to examine the effectiveness of the behavioral health Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) program at a community health center. The study group was twice as likely (25.3%) to have depression and substance abuse diagnosed compared with the control group (11.4%) (P <.001). Referral rates for the study group were more likely to occur (12.4%) compared with referral rates for the control group (1.0%) (P <.001); however, the kept appointment rates by patients for behavioral health problems referrals remained low for both groups. SBIRT was effectively utilized in a community health center, resulting in increased rates for diagnosis of behavioral health problems and referrals of patients. PMID:25964405

  15. SBIRT as a Vital Sign for Behavioral Health Identification, Diagnosis, and Referral in Community Health Care.

    PubMed

    Dwinnells, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental design study was to examine the effectiveness of the behavioral health Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) program at a community health center. The study group was twice as likely (25.3%) to have depression and substance abuse diagnosed compared with the control group (11.4%) (P <.001). Referral rates for the study group were more likely to occur (12.4%) compared with referral rates for the control group (1.0%) (P <.001); however, the kept appointment rates by patients for behavioral health problems referrals remained low for both groups. SBIRT was effectively utilized in a community health center, resulting in increased rates for diagnosis of behavioral health problems and referrals of patients. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  16. Health Status, Personal Definition of Health, and Health Behavior Choice in the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Norma J.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among health status, personal definition of health, and health behavior choice in the elderly. Self-assessed health status was measured using a modified Cantril Ladder, personal definition of health was measured using the Laffrey Health Conception Scale (LHCS), and health behavior…

  17. Peer coaching: building collegial support for using innovative health programs.

    PubMed

    Gingiss, P L

    1993-02-01

    To ensure students achieve intended benefits from effective health programs, it is necessary to maximize program implementation and maintenance. Peer coaching provides a post-inservice staff development approach for health educators to strengthen teacher use of new health programs during implementation trials. While peer coaching positively influences teacher behavior and student outcomes, previous coaching programs have been limited in scope, have not been theoretically derived or adequately evaluated, and have not been systematically applied to health programs. This paper addresses teacher needs during trials, reviews peer coaching program features, and proposes a model to guide future planning, evaluation, and research. In this model, critical components of the coaching program include classroom assessments, coaching team cluster meetings, and administrative support. Strategies based on Social Learning Theory and Diffusion Theory are incorporated into the peer coaching program to influence teacher perceptions of their work roles, capability to implement a program, and commitment to the new instructional program. Interrelations among components are discussed and directions for future research and practice are suggested.

  18. Anger and health risk behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Cuţov, M

    2010-01-01

    The present paper makes a research about negative effects of anger and hostile conduct on peoples' health status. We have studied scientific articles published between 2000 and 2010, that did not contradict our initial assumption. The literature demonstrates that anger, wheatear suppressed or expressed, can determine various diseases, it can influence the conduct of people suffering from bulimia nervosa or it can be the cause of the growing number of car accidents. In order to avoid these risks, the intervention should not be limited to medication, but it should also involve a psychological help that should insist on ways of dealing with anger without exposing the person to any kind of risk for his health or wellbeing. PMID:21254733

  19. Electronic health records: eliciting behavioral health providers' beliefs.

    PubMed

    Shank, Nancy; Willborn, Elizabeth; Pytlikzillig, Lisa; Noel, Harmonijoie

    2012-04-01

    Interviews with 32 community behavioral health providers elicited perceived benefits and barriers of using electronic health records. Themes identified were (a) quality of care, (b) privacy and security, and (c) delivery of services. Benefits to quality of care were mentioned by 100% of the providers, and barriers by 59% of providers. Barriers involving privacy and security concerns were mentioned by 100% of providers, and benefits by 22%. Barriers to delivery of services were mentioned by 97% of providers, and benefits by 66%. Most providers (81%) expressed overall positive support for electronic behavioral health records.

  20. Health and Oral Health Care Needs and Health Care-Seeking Behavior Among Homeless Injection Drug Users in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Lynn; Lorvick, Jennifer; Shiboski, Caroline; Kral, Alex H.

    2010-01-01

    Few existing studies have examined health and oral health needs and treatment-seeking behavior among the homeless and injection drug users (IDUs). This paper describes the prevalence and correlates of health and oral health care needs and treatment-seeking behaviors in homeless IDUs recruited in San Francisco, California, from 2003 to 2005 (N = 340). We examined sociodemographic characteristics, drug use patterns, HIV status via oral fluid testing, physical health using the Short Form 12 Physical Component Score, self-reported needs for physical and oral health care, and the self-reported frequency of seeking medical and oral health care. The sample had a lower health status as compared to the general population and reported a frequent need for physical and oral health care. In bivariate analysis, being in methadone treatment was associated with care-seeking behavior. In addition, being enrolled in Medi-Cal, California’s state Medicaid program, was associated with greater odds of seeking physical and oral health care. Methamphetamine use was not associated with higher odds of needing oral health care as compared to people who reported using other illicit drugs. Homeless IDUs in San Francisco have a large burden of unmet health and oral health needs. Recent cuts in Medi-Cal’s adult dental coverage may result in a greater burden of oral health care which will need to be provided by emergency departments and neighborhood dental clinics. PMID:20945108

  1. Planning and Implementing Health Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Katherine P.

    1980-01-01

    School health screening programs, which include screening, education of children and parents, and follow-up in the form of appropriate treatment, are described. A scoliosis screening program is described as an example of the model presented. Suggestions for planners, participants, and evaluators of any school health screening are summarized. (JMF)

  2. Migrant Education Health Program, 1984. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Compensatory Education Services Unit.

    During 1984 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  3. Migrant Education Health Program, 1982. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Charles L.; Swanson, Terri M.

    During 1982 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  4. Migrant Education Health Program, 1983. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    During 1983 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  5. Migrant Education Health Program, 1984. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver. Compensatory Education Services Unit.

    During 1984 the Colorado Migrant Health Program, together with the Colorado Migrant Education Program, provided students enrolled in migrant summer schools with a continuum of care which included screening and physical assessment for detection of existing and potential health problems, referral for diagnosis and treatment of identified…

  6. Profiles of Grant Programs: Public Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health , Education, and Welfare, Washington., DC. Office of the Secretary.

    For potential grant applicants and for the general public, the booklet describes the programs of the six Public Health Service agencies in the American health care system. Each program is described concisely in terms of: its purpose and legal basis; applicants' eligibility for grants and the basis for their award; the special requirements made of…

  7. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. VI; Programming School Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, William G.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this guide deals with programming school mental health in Vance and Franklin counties. Detailing both successes and failures, this booklet presents the following program activities: (1)…

  8. Improving Defense Health Program Medical Research Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-08-08

    solutions that protect, treat, and optimize the health and performance of the total force; 2) improve the quality of patient care in the MHS by improving... Quality and Safety. 60 Improving Defense Health Program Medical Research Processes 13 Defense Health Board Navy The Navy Surgeon General, also...in how the MHS is approaching health care administration, such as the movement toward value-based health care, adoption of core quality performance

  9. Health-related behavior and adolescent mothers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Yen; James, Kathy; Hsu, Li-Ling; Chang, Shu-Wen; Huang, Lian-Hua; Wang, Edward K

    2005-01-01

    To explore health-related behaviors among adolescent mothers living in the rural area of Taoyuan, Taiwan. A cross-sectional descriptive design and nonrandom survey method were used. The sample consisted of 37 adolescent mothers, identified by public health nurses. Standardized interview and Adolescent Health Promotion (AHP) questionnaire. Findings revealed a pattern of economic disadvantage. Nearly half of the participants still lived with their biological parents. Two-thirds needed economic support from their parents (generally coming from their biological mother). Thirty-five percent of participants reported never using contraceptives, two-thirds had never had a Pap smear, and 44% did not breast-feed their infants. Nearly 60% of the children were cared for by the biological mothers of the participants. Adolescent mothers with high school education, and who were employed, married, and received parental economic support had better health-related behaviors than adolescent mothers without these characteristics. Although the study sample has geographic limitations, future international studies with similar populations of adolescent mothers in rural settings will help public health nurses understand adolescent mothers' stressors and needs which in turn affect their health-related behaviors. Intervention strategies are needed to encourage behaviors to keep this population healthy.

  10. Behavioral health leadership: new directions in occupational mental health.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amy B; Saboe, Kristin N; Anderson, James; Sipos, Maurice L; Thomas, Jeffrey L

    2014-10-01

    The impact of stress on mental health in high-risk occupations may be mitigated by organizational factors such as leadership. Studies have documented the impact of general leadership skills on employee performance and mental health. Other researchers have begun examining specific leadership domains that address relevant organizational outcomes, such as safety climate leadership. One emerging approach focuses on domain-specific leadership behaviors that may moderate the impact of combat deployment on mental health. In a recent study, US soldiers deployed to Afghanistan rated leaders on behaviors promoting management of combat operational stress. When soldiers rated their leaders high on these behaviors, soldiers also reported better mental health and feeling more comfortable with the idea of seeking mental health treatment. These associations held even after controlling for overall leadership ratings. Operational stress leader behaviors also moderated the relationship between combat exposure and soldier health. Domain-specific leadership offers an important step in identifying measures to moderate the impact of high-risk occupations on employee health.

  11. Examining the health information-seeking behaviors of Korean Americans.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyeung Mi; Kreps, Gary L; Jun, Jungmi; Chong, Elizabeth; Ramsey, Lolita

    2012-08-01

    Many Korean Americans suffer from high levels of cancer incidence and have low cancer screening rates. A significant number of Korean Americans lack adequate information about cancer screening tests. However, little is known about their health behaviors. This article examines exposure to mass media and health information-seeking behaviors for Korean Americans, and their associations with demographic characteristics influencing variations in exposure to the different health information and trust in health information sources. The authors gathered data for this study using a cross-sectional, community-based survey conducted in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area during 2006 and 2007. It was administered to 254 Korean Americans who were 40 years of age or older. This study is part of the first health-related program of research to study exposure to mass media, health and cancer information sources, and seeking preferences and experiences of Korean Americans. Results indicated that Korean ethnic media sources and Internet are important sources used regularly. Age, years of education completed, and English proficiency levels for Korean Americans significantly predicted the likelihood of their Internet use. Low-income Korean Americans with less education were more likely to seek health information in Korean ethnic magazines and newspapers, whereas Korean Americans with higher education and English proficiency were more likely to seek information online. The most trusted source of health information among respondents was from a doctor or other health care professional. Future research should be conducted to determine whether physicians are actually used as a primary source for health information.

  12. Health coaching to improve healthy lifestyle behaviors: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jeanette M; Nesbitt, Bonnie J

    2010-01-01

    Chronic diseases account for 70% of U.S. deaths. Health coaching may help patients adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors that prevent and control diseases. This integrative review analyzed health coaching studies for evidence of effectiveness and to identify key program features. Multiple electronic databases were utilized, yielding a final sample of 15 documents. The search was limited to peer-reviewed research articles published between 1999 and 2008. Studies were further analyzed if they (1) specifically cited coaching as a program intervention, and (2) applied the intervention to research. Articles describing various quantitative and qualitative methodologies were critically analyzed using a systematic method. Data were synthesized using a matrix format according to purpose, method, intervention, findings, critique, and quality rating. All 15 studies utilized nonprobability sampling, 7 (47%) with randomized intervention and control groups. Significant improvements in one or more of the behaviors of nutrition, physical activity, weight management, or medication adherence were identified in six (40%) of the studies. Common features of effective programs were goal setting (73%), motivational interviewing (27%), and collaboration with health care providers (20%). Health coaching studies with well-specified methodologies and more rigorous designs are needed to strengthen findings; however, this behavioral change intervention suggests promise.

  13. Harnessing social media for health promotion and behavior change.

    PubMed

    Korda, Holly; Itani, Zena

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and innovative advances in participative Internet communications, referred to as "social media," offer opportunities for modifying health behavior. Social media let users choose to be either anonymous or identified. People of all demographics are adopting these technologies whether on their computers or through mobile devices, and they are increasingly using these social media for health-related issues. Although social media have considerable potential as tools for health promotion and education, these media, like traditional health promotion media, require careful application and may not always achieve their desired outcomes. This article summarizes current evidence and understanding of using social media for health promotion. More important, it discusses the need for evaluating the effectiveness of various forms of social media and incorporating outcomes research and theory in the design of health promotion programs for social media.

  14. Health risk and promotion behaviors in refugee populations.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Donelle M; Harrison, Cara; Heneghan, Richard

    2004-08-01

    Refugees resettling in the U.S. are generally low-income and underserved by health promotion interventions. To begin to address refugee health promotion issues, this study describes health behaviors of newly arrived (less than 90 days) adult refugees in the U.S. The methods used were retrospective description of clients from one refugee health screening program. The sample consisted of adult refugees (n=591), men and women, from Cuba, Bosnia, Vietnam, Kosovo, Iran, Iraq, and other countries. Rates of overweight were highest among Bosnians and lowest among Vietnamese. Cubans reported the most physical activity and Kosovars the least. Rates of smoking were highest among Bosnians and lowest among Cubans. Older refugees were more overweight and reported less physical activity and more smoking than younger adults. In some cases, different refugee groups have similar health promotion needs, while in others needs differ. This baseline descriptive data supports calls for further health promotion research and interventions in refugee populations.

  15. Evaluation of a Child Health Associate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungy, Claiborne I.; Sander, Daryl L.

    1977-01-01

    The staff of the University of Colorado Child Health Associate Program critically reviewed the effectiveness of the program's structure and content during an intensive two-day seminar. Focus was on basic and clinical sciences, psychosocial skills, and proficiency testing, and the evaluations were used to improve the program. (Editor/LBH)

  16. Effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Mathew; Melancon, Jim; Sneed, Demarcus; Nunning, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Currently, heart disease and diabetes dominate society as the leading cause of death for Americans. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a lifestyle enhancement program on factors related to the development of heart disease. The Wabash Valley Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a community-based lifestyle change program with…

  17. Effectiveness of the Complete Health Improvement Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Mathew; Melancon, Jim; Sneed, Demarcus; Nunning, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Currently, heart disease and diabetes dominate society as the leading cause of death for Americans. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of a lifestyle enhancement program on factors related to the development of heart disease. The Wabash Valley Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) is a community-based lifestyle change program with…

  18. Environmental health program in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrazzo, R. M.

    1969-01-01

    The NASA policy on environmental health uses medical and environmental concepts to: (1) Determine the health status of employees; (2) prevent illness and promote good health among employees; and (3) identify and control factors that affect the health of personnel and quality of environment. Evaluation and control of physical, chemical, radiological and biological factors surrounding personnel and which represent physiological and psychological stresses and impairment are considered.

  19. Kennedy Space Center environmental health program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmaro, G. M.; Cardinale, M. A.; Summerfield, B. R.; Tipton, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center's environmental health organization is responsible for programs which assure its employees a healthful workplace under diverse and varied working conditions. These programs encompass the disciplines of industrial hygiene, radiation protection (health physics), and environmental sanitation/pollution control. Activities range from the routine, such as normal office work, to the highly specialized, such as the processing of highly toxic and hazardous materials.

  20. Mental Health Program Reports - 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Julius, Ed.

    The volume is reported to reflect the broad range of National Institute of Mental Health activities in areas of research, development of mental health manpower, and delivery of mental health services. Twenty papers examine, respectively, relationship of life histories and biochemistry of siblings and twins to schizophrenia, training of Navaho…

  1. Attributions for Successful and Unsuccessful Health Behavior Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoeneman, Thomas J.; Curry, Susan

    Changing a health behavior and maintaining a positive change can be very difficult. This study examined attributions for health behavior change by using retrospective reports to elicit college students' (N=466) current views of successes and failures at adopting health promoting behaviors. In completing the Health Behavior Questionnaire, 229…

  2. Applying the Health Belief Model to college students' health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Seon; Ahn, Joo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate how university students' nutrition beliefs influence their health behavioral intention. This study used an online survey engine (Qulatrics.com) to collect data from college students. Out of 253 questionnaires collected, 251 questionnaires (99.2%) were used for the statistical analysis. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) revealed that six dimensions, "Nutrition Confidence," "Susceptibility," "Severity," "Barrier," "Benefit," "Behavioral Intention to Eat Healthy Food," and "Behavioral Intention to do Physical Activity," had construct validity; Cronbach's alpha coefficient and composite reliabilities were tested for item reliability. The results validate that objective nutrition knowledge was a good predictor of college students' nutrition confidence. The results also clearly showed that two direct measures were significant predictors of behavioral intentions as hypothesized. Perceived benefit of eating healthy food and perceived barrier for eat healthy food to had significant effects on Behavioral Intentions and was a valid measurement to use to determine Behavioral Intentions. These findings can enhance the extant literature on the universal applicability of the model and serve as useful references for further investigations of the validity of the model within other health care or foodservice settings and for other health behavioral categories. PMID:23346306

  3. A comprehensive refugee health screening program.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, J; Seymour, D J; Hummel, B J

    1999-01-01

    Nationally and internationally, there is a struggle to provide adequate health screening and assessment programs for refugees. The Department of Family Medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in partnership with the Colorado Refugee Services Program has developed a comprehensive refugee health screening and assessment program. The program was designed to ensure access to screening and to provide better care for this vulnerable population. Key features of the program include a single point of access for all family members, full availability of appropriate interpreting services, comprehensive health assessments that include a thorough mental health screening, data collection and evaluation, and education of health care providers to deliver culturally responsive care. During the first 30 months of this program, comprehensive assessments were provided for more than 1600 refugees. Future directions include improving the efficiency of daily systems, seeking alternative sources of funding, improving follow-up and vaccination rates, expanding mental health services, and tracking health outcomes and refugees' utilization of health care services through longitudinal research. PMID:10590769

  4. A Health Education Program That Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albino, Joseph; Davis, Roy

    1975-01-01

    Recounts a successful implementation of the School Health Curriculum Project in an elementary school. Development of the program has been supported by the federal Bureau of Health Education, Center for Disease Control, and the National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health. (Author/IRT)

  5. MIGRANT HEALTH PROGRAM, NEW JERSEY 1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DOUGHERTY, WILLIAM; AND OTHERS

    A MAJOR EFFORT WAS MOUNTED TO INCREASE, EXTEND, AND IMPROVE HEALTH SERVICES FOR MIGRANT AGRICULTURAL WORKERS IN NEW JERSEY DURING THE SECOND YEAR OF OPERATION, 1964. THE MIGRANT HEALTH PROGRAM PROVIDED--(1) SERVICE TO 453 CAMPS, (2) OPPORTUNITY FOR 5,000 PERSONS TO COMMUNICATE WITH THE NURSE OR OTHER HEALTH WORKER WHO VISITED THE CAMP, AND (3)…

  6. Developing Health Education Programs in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colle, Royal D.

    If primary medical care is to be provided to remote rural populations in developing countries, alternative and innovative delivery systems emphasizing community participation, use of paraprofessionals, and health education programs must be considered. A recent American Public Health Association study of 180 health projects in developing countries…

  7. Impulsive Youthful Offenders: A Multimodal Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Philip C.; Auerbach, Stephen M.

    1982-01-01

    Compared results of a cognitive-behavioral program employing relaxation training, cognitive training in problem solving, self-statement modification, and behavior rehearsal techniques to results from a control group in a program modifying impulsive behavior in adolescent youthful offenders. The program successfully modified overt antisocial…

  8. The Nexus of Knowledge and Behavior for School-Aged Children: Implementation of Health Education Programs and a Nutritional Symbol System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Graham, Lorraine; Pennington, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Health-related knowledge has been assumed to inform lifestyle choices for school-aged students. A "health-promoting school" provides the conceptual framework for this intervention. A large boarding school developed, implemented and refined a Nutritional Symbol System for their dining hall. The effectiveness of this social marketing…

  9. The Nexus of Knowledge and Behavior for School-Aged Children: Implementation of Health Education Programs and a Nutritional Symbol System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Judith; Graham, Lorraine; Pennington, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Health-related knowledge has been assumed to inform lifestyle choices for school-aged students. A "health-promoting school" provides the conceptual framework for this intervention. A large boarding school developed, implemented and refined a Nutritional Symbol System for their dining hall. The effectiveness of this social marketing…

  10. Incarceration, maternal hardship, and perinatal health behaviors.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Dora M; Wildeman, Christopher; Lee, Hedwig; Gjelsvik, Annie; Valera, Pamela; Clarke, Jennifer G

    2014-11-01

    Parental incarceration is associated with mental and physical health problems in children, yet little research directly tests mechanisms through which parental incarceration could imperil child health. We hypothesized that the incarceration of a woman or her romantic partner in the year before birth constituted an additional hardship for already-disadvantaged women, and that these additionally vulnerable women were less likely to engage in positive perinatal health behaviors important to infant and early childhood development. We analyzed 2006-2010 data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System to assess the association between incarceration in the year prior to the birth of a child and perinatal maternal hardships and behaviors. Women reporting incarceration of themselves or their partners in the year before birth of a child had .86 the odds (95 % CI .78-.95) of beginning prenatal care in the first trimester compared to women not reporting incarceration. They were nearly twice as likely to report partner abuse and were significantly more likely to rely on WIC and/or Medicaid for assistance during pregnancy. These associations persist after controlling for socioeconomic measures and other stressors, including homelessness and job loss. Incarceration of a woman or her partner in the year before birth is associated with higher odds of maternal hardship and poorer perinatal health behaviors. The unprecedented scale of incarceration in the US simultaneously presents an underutilized public health opportunity and constitutes a social determinant of health that may contribute to disparities in early childhood development.

  11. Analysis of a worksite health promotion program's impact on job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M; Dunnagan, T

    1998-11-01

    This study assessed the impact of participation in a health promotion program and engagement in healthy behaviors on job satisfaction. A survey response rate of 70% (n = 1,283) was obtained at a northern state university with an established worksite health promotion program. Significant differences in job satisfaction were obtained by education level, job classification, marital status, dependents, and regular exercise behaviors. No differences in job satisfaction were obtained by health promotion program involvement or any other health behavior other than regular exercise. Results suggest that health promotion programs do not significantly impact job satisfaction. Rather, job design and the psychosocial aspects of the work environment may be more influential in improving job satisfaction. Based on the results of this study, organizations attempting to improve employee health should provide health promotion programs and address the job itself. To improve job satisfaction, attention to the job itself is required.

  12. The NASA-USPHS Health Evaluation and Enhancement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbeck, D. C.; Heinzelmann, F.; Moxley, R. T., III; Schacther, J.; Payne, G. H.; Limoncelli, D. D.; Fox, S. M., III; Arnoldi, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    An exercise program was initiated to assess the feasibility of an on the job health evaluation and enhancement program, as well as to identify the factors which influenced volunteering, adherence, and effectiveness of the program. The program was utilized by 237 of the 998 eligible Federal employees, with a mean attendance of 1.3 days per week. Those who volunteered perceived a need for increased physical activity, felt they had sufficient time to participate, and derived subjective as well as objective benefits. Significant improvements were found in heart rate response to the standard exercise test, body weight, skinfold measurements, and triglycerides. A consistent relationship was found between subjectively reported effects of the program on work, health habits, and behavior, and improvement in cardiovascular function, based on treadmill performance. Numerous personal and programmatic factors influencing volunteering and participation were identified.

  13. The NASA-USPHS Health Evaluation and Enhancement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbeck, D. C.; Heinzelmann, F.; Moxley, R. T., III; Schacther, J.; Payne, G. H.; Limoncelli, D. D.; Fox, S. M., III; Arnoldi, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    An exercise program was initiated to assess the feasibility of an on the job health evaluation and enhancement program, as well as to identify the factors which influenced volunteering, adherence, and effectiveness of the program. The program was utilized by 237 of the 998 eligible Federal employees, with a mean attendance of 1.3 days per week. Those who volunteered perceived a need for increased physical activity, felt they had sufficient time to participate, and derived subjective as well as objective benefits. Significant improvements were found in heart rate response to the standard exercise test, body weight, skinfold measurements, and triglycerides. A consistent relationship was found between subjectively reported effects of the program on work, health habits, and behavior, and improvement in cardiovascular function, based on treadmill performance. Numerous personal and programmatic factors influencing volunteering and participation were identified.

  14. School-based programs to reduce sexual risk behaviors: a review of effectiveness.

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, D; Short, L; Collins, J; Rugg, D; Kolbe, L; Howard, M; Miller, B; Sonenstein, F; Zabin, L S

    1994-01-01

    This review was undertaken in recognition of the mounting public health and social problems associated with adolescent sexual behavior and the importance of basing school-affiliated programs designed to reduce sexual risk-taking behavior on sound research. The authors were commissioned by the Division of Adolescent and School Health within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Service, to review carefully the research on these programs and to assess their impact on behavior. The authors identified 23 studies of school-based programs that were published in professional journals and measured program impact on behavior. They then summarized the results of those studies, identifying the distinguishing characteristics of effective programs, and citing important research questions to be addressed in the future. Not all sex and AIDS education programs had significant effects on adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior, but specific programs did delay the initiation of intercourse, reduce the frequency of intercourse, reduce the number of sexual partners, or increase the use of condoms or other contraceptives. These effective programs have the potential to reduce exposure to unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease, including HIV infection. These programs should be replicated widely in U.S. schools. Additional research is needed to improve the effectiveness of programs and to clarify the most important characteristics of effective programs. PMID:8190857

  15. Relationship between healthy lifestyle behaviors and health locus of control and health-specific self-efficacy in university students.

    PubMed

    Açıkgöz Çepni, Serap; Kitiş, Yeter

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between the healthy lifestyle behaviors and the health locus of control and health-specific self-efficacy in university students. The study included 572 undergraduate students of a university in the central Anatolia region of Turkey. The data were collected with the General Characteristics Form, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Health Competence Scale and investigated with the structural equation model. Health-specific self-efficacy was an important predictor of healthy lifestyle behaviors. The Internal health locus of control influenced the healthy lifestyle behaviors through health-specific self-efficacy. The other dimension was the Powerful Others health locus of control that affected healthy lifestyle behaviors, both directly and indirectly, through health-specific self-efficacy. There was a chance that the health locus of control had a negative effect on healthy lifestyle behaviors through self-efficacy. Health-specific self-efficacy is an important prerequisite for changes in healthy lifestyle behaviors, which supports Pender's model. The subscales of the health locus of control vary in their effects on healthy lifestyle behaviors, which partly supports Pender's model. Nurses, by using this model, can examine ways of improving these cognitive-perceptual factors and implement health education programs that are directed towards improving them in young persons. © 2016 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  16. The effects of workplace flexibility on health behaviors: a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Grzywacz, Joseph G; Casey, Patrick R; Jones, Fiona A

    2007-12-01

    To examine the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between workplace flexibility and health behaviors, and estimate the potential importance of flexibility for effective worksite health promotion programs. Cross-sectional and longitudinal health risk appraisal data were obtained from US based employees of a multinational pharmaceutical company (n = 3193). Examined health behaviors were hours of sleep, physical activity frequency, health education seminar attendance, frequency of practicing personal resilience techniques, and self-appraised lifestyle. Self-reported flexibility in the workplace was the primary independent variable. Each health behavior, except regular attendance in health education seminars, was positively related to perceived flexibility in cross-sectional analyses. Sleep and self-appraised lifestyle were significantly related to changes in perceived flexibility over time. Workplace flexibility may contribute to positive lifestyle behaviors, and may play an important role in effective worksite health promotion programs.

  17. The Impact of Behavioral Health Issues on Soldiers Returning from Deployment -- Assessing the Programs for Reintegration of South Carolina National Guard Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-23

    home to begin a 30, 60, and 90-day cycle similar to the current system to ensure success in reintegration . Providing decompression immediately...and leads to a more successful transition into reintegration back into civilian life. A second recommendation is for the SCNG Family Programs to...RETURNING FROM DEPLOYMENT – ASSESSING THE PROGRAMS FOR REINTEGRATION OF SOUTH CAROLINA NATIONAL GUARD SOLDIERS BY COLONEL R. VAN MCCARTY United

  18. The NASA Space Radiation Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Sulzman, F. M.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Health Program is a part of the Life Sciences Division in the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA). The goal of the Space Radiation Health Program is development of scientific bases for assuring adequate radiation protection in space. A proposed research program will determine long-term health risks from exposure to cosmic rays and other radiation. Ground-based animal models will be used to predict risk of exposures at varying levels from various sources and the safe levels for manned space flight.

  19. The NASA Space Radiation Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Sulzman, F. M.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Health Program is a part of the Life Sciences Division in the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA). The goal of the Space Radiation Health Program is development of scientific bases for assuring adequate radiation protection in space. A proposed research program will determine long-term health risks from exposure to cosmic rays and other radiation. Ground-based animal models will be used to predict risk of exposures at varying levels from various sources and the safe levels for manned space flight.

  20. High School Health Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This curriculum guide contains units of study for high school health science courses in Iowa. The first section is a competency outline for three topics: introduction to health care; nurse aide/orderly; and rehabilitation aide. For each competency, the following information is provided: objectives; suggested learning activities; resources; and…

  1. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true May behavioral health professional(s) provide services... CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Staffing § 36.82 May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at least...

  2. 25 CFR 36.82 - May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May behavioral health professional(s) provide services... CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Homeliving Programs Staffing § 36.82 May behavioral health professional(s) provide services during the academic school day? Behavioral health professional(s) must average at least...

  3. Intergenerational health disparities: socioeconomic status, women's health conditions, and child behavior problems.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Robert S.; Wilson, Kathryn; Wise, Paul H.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Relatively little is known about the intergenerational mechanisms that lead to social disparities in child health. We examined whether the association between low socioeconomic status (SES) and child behavior problems is mediated by maternal health conditions and behavior. METHODS: Prospective cohort data (1979-1998) on 2,677 children and their mothers were obtained from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. SES, the Child Behavior Problems Index (BPI), and maternal smoking, depressive symptoms, and alcohol use before, during, and after pregnancy were examined. RESULTS: Lower income and lower maternal education were associated with increased child BPI scores. Adjustment for maternal smoking, depressive symptoms, and alcohol use attenuated the associations between SES and child BPI by 26% to 49%. These maternal health conditions often occurred together, persisted over time, and were associated with the mother's own childhood SES and pre-pregnancy health. CONCLUSIONS: Social disparities in women's health conditions may help shape the likelihood of behavior problems in the subsequent generation. Improved public health programs and services for disadvantaged women across the lifecourse may not only address their own urgent health needs, but reduce social disparities in the health and well-being of their children. PMID:16025720

  4. Misleading tests of health behavior theories.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Neil D

    2007-02-01

    Most tests of cognitively oriented theories of health behavior are based on correlational data. Unfortunately, such tests are often biased, overestimating the accuracy of the theories they seek to evaluate. These biases are especially strong when studies examine health behaviors that need to be performed repeatedly, such as medication adherence, diet, exercise, and condom use. Several misleading data analysis procedures further exaggerate the theories' predictive accuracy. Because correlational designs are not adequate for deciding whether a particular construct affects behavior or for testing one theory against another, most of the literature aiming to test these theories tells us little about their validity or completeness. Neither does the existing empirical literature support decisions to use these theories to design interventions. In addition to discussing problems with correlational data, this article offers ideas for alternative testing strategies.

  5. Assessing Students with Serious Mental Health and Behavioral Problems: Clinical Assessment for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida C.; Conlon, Amy L.

    The current intervention trend for many of the mental health and behavioral problems faced by today's youth is an integrative approach that involves the community, families, and schools. Clinical assessment for serious mental health and behavioral problems can be an important component in the development of school-based screening programs. The…

  6. Promoting Health Behaviors Using Peer Education: A Demonstration Project between International and American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zi; Finn, Kevin; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Bent, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peer education has the potential to promote health behaviors and cultural competence for both international and domestic college students. Purpose: The present study examined a peer education program aimed at promoting cultural competence and health behaviors among international and American students in a university setting. Methods:…

  7. Promoting Health Behaviors Using Peer Education: A Demonstration Project between International and American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Zi; Finn, Kevin; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Bent, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peer education has the potential to promote health behaviors and cultural competence for both international and domestic college students. Purpose: The present study examined a peer education program aimed at promoting cultural competence and health behaviors among international and American students in a university setting. Methods:…

  8. Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 1999 and Alaska School Health Education Profile, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Tammy; Schumacher, Catherine; Middaugh, John; Asay, Elvin; Campbell, Terri; Shober, Beth

    This report describes the methods and results of the 1999 Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and the 1998 School Health Education Profile (SHEP). Each survey is intended to provide a better understanding of health and related programs within school settings. The YRBS asks students to report their behaviors in the six major areas of health…

  9. Challenges in evaluating rural health programs.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Joyce; Webb, John

    2002-01-01

    Complex community-based prevention programs are being held to scientific evidence of their effectiveness and rural public health departments that implement such programs often are not equipped to evaluate them. Rural public health departments are fettered by small budgets, small staffs, and less access to evaluation experts and similar resources. Community-based health promotion programs can include complex designs that may work differently in rural areas and evaluation of rural programs can be hampered by lack of control groups and the instability of results from small populations. The University of Kentucky has entered into a contract with the state Department for Public Health to implement an internal, participatory model of evaluation. In this model, the university evaluation expert trains local public health department staff in technical skills for program evaluation and acts as mentor and technical consultant to local public health departments on an ongoing basis. Through training and site visits, this model is one approach to addressing the challenges of evaluating rural health promotion programs.

  10. Preliminary Investigation of an Early Mental Health Intervention for Head Start Programs: Effects of Child Teacher Relationship Training on Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Mary O.; Bratton, Sue C.

    2010-01-01

    Head Start teachers and their aides (n = 24) were assigned to either the experimental or active control treatment in this preliminary investigation on the effects of Child Teacher Relationship Training (CTRT) on 52 disadvantaged preschool children identified with behavioral problems. CTRT is based on the principles and procedures of Child Parent…

  11. Preliminary Investigation of an Early Mental Health Intervention for Head Start Programs: Effects of Child Teacher Relationship Training on Children's Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Mary O.; Bratton, Sue C.

    2010-01-01

    Head Start teachers and their aides (n = 24) were assigned to either the experimental or active control treatment in this preliminary investigation on the effects of Child Teacher Relationship Training (CTRT) on 52 disadvantaged preschool children identified with behavioral problems. CTRT is based on the principles and procedures of Child Parent…

  12. IMIA Accreditation of Health Informatics Programs.

    PubMed

    Hasman, A

    2012-01-01

    To develop a procedure for accrediting health informatics programs. Development of a procedure for accreditation. Test of the accreditation procedure via a trial including four or five health informatics programs. A site visit committee consisting of three members evaluates the program based on a self-assessment report written by the program and the experiences and observations of the site visit committee during the site visit. A procedure for accreditation has been developed. The instructions for health informatics programs have been written and a checklist for the site visit committee members is available. In total six subjects are considered, each one consisting of one or more facets. Each facet is judged using its corresponding criterion. Five health informatics programs volunteered. One health informatics program in Finland has already been visited and a report has been produced by the site visit committee. The next site visits are in June and July 2012. The site visit in Finland showed that English summaries of master theses are not enough to get a first impression of the methods used in the thesis. A table of contents is also needed. This information then can be used to select theses written in a language other than English for discussion. The accreditation procedure document with instructions about writing the self-assessment report was very well structured and the instructions were clear according to the Finnish program. The site visit team could work well with the checklist. Self-assessment report model was very well structured and the instructions were clear.

  13. Army Occupational Health Program, 1978.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-01

    conjunctivitis 3 Fungal infection 3 Infection of skin and subcutaneous tissue 3 Code 22: Dust Diseases of the Lungs (Pneumononioses) 2 Includes: Asbestosis 2...f - - - 5-- — -5-- ——5-- - --- -~~~~~~~~~~--5 Army Occupational Heal th Program , 1978 TABLE 16. CANCER SCREENING...oyee education program with much emphasis on Pulmonary Function Testing, Asbestos, Smoking and Lung Disease. A smok i ng withdrawal clini c was held

  14. Genetically programmed superparamagnetic behavior of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeuk; Moore, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-12-31

    Although magnetic fields and paramagnetic inorganic materials were abundant on planet earth during the entire evolution of living species the interaction of organisms with these physical forces remains a little-understood phenomenon. Interestingly, rather than being genetically encoded, organisms seem to accumulate and take advantage of inorganic nanoparticles to sense or react to magnetic fields. Using a synthetic biology-inspired approach we have genetically programmed mammalian cells to show superparamagnetic behavior. The combination of ectopic production of the human ferritin heavy chain 1 (hFTH1), engineering the cells for expression of an iron importer, the divalent metal ion transferase 1 (DMT1) and the design of an iron-loading culture medium to maximize cellular iron uptake enabled efficient iron mineralization in intracellular ferritin particles and conferred superparamagnetic behavior to the entire cell. When captured by a magnetic field the superparamagnetic cells reached attraction velocities of up to 30 μm/s and could be efficiently separated from complex cell mixtures using standard magnetic cell separation equipment. Technology that enables magnetic separation of genetically programmed superparamagnetic cells in the absence of inorganic particles could foster novel opportunities in diagnostics and cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The social significance of routine health behavior in Tamang daily life.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J C; Jackson-Carroll, L

    1994-04-01

    Programs to promote behavioral change among non-Western people sometimes emphasize individual cognitive processes at the expense of social practices. While health beliefs are important, it is equally important to understand the language and the pattern of relationships that affect routine health behaviors. In rural central Nepal we conducted a health survey of 265 Tamang people, followed by a series of 22 in-depth interviews focused on diarrhea and related illnesses. This paper describes the nomenclature used and automatic health behaviors enacted, in response to diarrheal illnesses in Tamang villages. We draw on the work of Anthony Giddens to show that routine health behavior is embedded in specific social relationships that in turn help to structure many aspects of Tamang daily life. We discuss the significance of routine Tamang health behavior in light of oral rehydration therapy programs.

  16. Crisis Reliability Indicators Supporting Emergency Services (CRISES): A Framework for Developing Performance Measures for Behavioral Health Crisis and Psychiatric Emergency Programs.

    PubMed

    Balfour, Margaret E; Tanner, Kathleen; Jurica, Paul J; Rhoads, Richard; Carson, Chris A

    2016-01-01

    Crisis and emergency psychiatric services are an integral part of the healthcare system, yet there are no standardized measures for programs providing these services. We developed the Crisis Reliability Indicators Supporting Emergency Services (CRISES) framework to create measures that inform internal performance improvement initiatives and allow comparison across programs. The framework consists of two components-the CRISES domains (timely, safe, accessible, least-restrictive, effective, consumer/family centered, and partnership) and the measures supporting each domain. The CRISES framework provides a foundation for development of standardized measures for the crisis field. This will become increasingly important as pay-for-performance initiatives expand with healthcare reform.

  17. Designing a behavioral program for a barrio in Tegucigalpa, Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Harold L.

    1994-01-01

    Health in Housing initiated a behavioral program of education and skills training for children and adults in a community of 30,000 persons living in substandard conditions in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. To measure achievement in the long-range project, 21 families of Flor del Campo participated in a preliminary three-part survey of their (a) health, (b) housing and the environment, and (c) family history. Doctors, designers, and educators worked with Honduran personnel in the first survey. Following functional analyses of the home and surrounding environment and the physical status of the individuals living there, procedures provide the family with treatment and training for home and environment improvement. Graphic, verbal, and numerical data, incorporated into a master computerized system, record events of each family member: training programs experienced, health care delivery courses taken, medical treatments, growth of children, literacy changes, educational courses completed, kinds and amounts of foods eaten, household and building materials purchased. Ongoing functional analysis and a long-range evaluation are made of the progress of each participating individual in a family. Teams revisit each house to observe and record any changes in the physical and environmental facility and the health and life-styles, and to report any indications of new health problems or recurrences. PMID:16812727

  18. Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP). Section 787 (Public Health Service Act). Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC.

    This document summarizes the requirements and guidelines for the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP). This program is authorized by Section 787 of the Public Health Service Act to make grants to and contracts with postsecondary institutions to carry out programs which assist individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds to enter and graduate…

  19. Reduction in Sexual Risk Behaviors among College Students Following a Comprehensive Health Education Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Researchers studied college students' sexual behavior and the association of a comprehensive health education program with subsequent sexual risk behavior modifications. Pre- and postintervention surveys indicated the intervention created short-term reduction in sexual risk behaviors, but the reduction varied according to gender. (SM)

  20. Reduction in Sexual Risk Behaviors among College Students Following a Comprehensive Health Education Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, James C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Researchers studied college students' sexual behavior and the association of a comprehensive health education program with subsequent sexual risk behavior modifications. Pre- and postintervention surveys indicated the intervention created short-term reduction in sexual risk behaviors, but the reduction varied according to gender. (SM)

  1. Worksite health promotion programs in college settings

    PubMed Central

    Hill-Mey, Patricia E.; Kumpfer, Karol L.; Merrill, Ray M.; Reel, Justine; Hyatt-Neville, Beverly; Richardson, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the multifaceted nature and benefits of worksite health promotion programs (WHPPs), with emphasis on the college setting. An assessment of the peer-reviewed literature was conducted of articles published since 2000. Several search engines were accessed and selected key words were used. Most studies examining WHPPs have focused on return on investment and productivity. Research that targets the softer side-benefits of health promotion programs in the workplace is less available. Although the college setting offers some advantages for implementing health promotion programs. They may also have unique challenges due to their large and diverse employee population. There is little research to show the effectiveness and unique challenges of college-based health promotion programs. PMID:25861657

  2. Using mHealth to Deliver Behavior Change Interventions Within Prenatal Care at Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Mauriello, Leanne M; Van Marter, Deborah F; Umanzor, Cindy D; Castle, Patricia H; de Aguiar, Emma L

    2016-09-01

    To test an iPad-delivered multiple behavior tailored intervention (Healthy Pregnancy: Step by Step) for pregnant women that addresses smoking cessation, stress management, and fruit and vegetable consumption. A randomized 2 × 5 factorial repeated measures design was employed with randomization on the individual level stratified on behavior risk. Women completed three sessions during pregnancy and two postpartum at postdelivery months 1 and 4. Women were recruited from six locations of federally funded health centers across three states. Participants (N = 335) were English- and Spanish-speaking women at up to 18 weeks gestation. The treatment group received three interactive sessions focused on two priority health behavior risks. The sessions offered individually tailored and stage-matched change strategies based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. The usual care group received March of Dimes brochures. The primary outcome was the number of behavior risks. Stage of change and continuous measures for all behaviors also were assessed. Data were analyzed across all time points using generalized estimating equations examining repeated measures effects. Women in the treatment group reported significantly fewer risks than those in usual care at 1 month (.85 vs. 1.20, odds ratio [OR] = .70) and 4 months postpartum (.72 vs. .91, OR = .81). Healthy Pregnancy is an evidence-based and personalized program that assists pregnant women with reducing behavior risks and sustaining healthy lifestyle behaviors. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  3. Feasibility and Preliminary Outcomes From a Pilot Study of an Integrated Health-Mental Health Promotion Program in School Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    George, Melissa W.; Trumpeter, Nevelyn N.; Wilson, Dawn K.; McDaniel, Heather L.; Schiele, Bryn; Prinz, Ron; Weist, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of unmet health and mental health needs among youth has spurred the growing consensus to develop strategies that integrate services to promote overall well-being. This pilot study reports on the feasibility and outcomes of a theory-driven, family-focused, integrated health-mental health promotion program for underserved adolescents receiving school mental health services. Parent and adolescent assessments conducted prior to and following the brief, 6-session promotion program showed significant improvements in family support, youth self-efficacy, health behaviors, and mental health outcomes. Clinician reports contributed to a characterization of the feasibility, acceptability, and future recommendations for the integrated program. PMID:24297005

  4. Feasibility and preliminary outcomes from a pilot study of an integrated health-mental health promotion program in school mental health services.

    PubMed

    George, Melissa W; Trumpeter, Nevelyn N; Wilson, Dawn K; McDaniel, Heather L; Schiele, Bryn; Prinz, Ron; Weist, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of unmet health and mental health needs among youth has spurred the growing consensus to develop strategies that integrate services to promote overall well-being. This pilot study reports on the feasibility and outcomes of a theory-driven, family-focused, integrated health-mental health promotion program for underserved adolescents receiving school mental health services. Parent and adolescent assessments conducted prior to and following the brief, 6-session promotion program showed significant improvements in family support, youth self-efficacy, health behaviors, and mental health outcomes. Clinician reports contributed to a characterization of the feasibility, acceptability, and future recommendations for the integrated program.

  5. Pilot of a Computer-Based Brief Multiple-Health Behavior Intervention for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Michele J.; Werch, Chudley E.; Bian, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Given the documented multiple health risks college students engage in, and the dearth of effective programs addressing them, the authors developed a computer-based brief multiple-health behavior intervention. This study reports immediate outcomes and feasibility of a pilot of this program. Participants: Two hundred students attending a…

  6. Pilot of a Computer-Based Brief Multiple-Health Behavior Intervention for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Michele J.; Werch, Chudley E.; Bian, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Given the documented multiple health risks college students engage in, and the dearth of effective programs addressing them, the authors developed a computer-based brief multiple-health behavior intervention. This study reports immediate outcomes and feasibility of a pilot of this program. Participants: Two hundred students attending a…

  7. An adaptation of family-based behavioral pediatric obesity treatment for a primary care setting: group health family wellness program pilot.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Karin R; Lozano, Paula; Mohelnitzky, Amy; Rudnick, Sarah; Richards, Julie

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of family-based group pediatric obesity treatment in a primary care setting, to obtain an estimate of its effectiveness, and to describe participating parents' experiences of social support for healthy lifestyle changes. We adapted an evidence-based intervention to a group format and completed six 12- to 16-week groups over 3 years. We assessed program attendance and completion, changes in child and parent body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), and changes in child quality of life in a single-arm before-and-after trial. Qualitative interviews explored social support for implementing healthy lifestyle changes. Thirty-eight parent-child pairs enrolled (28% of the 134 pairs invited). Of those, 24 (63%) completed the program and another 6 (16%) attended at least 4 sessions but did not complete the program. Children who completed the program achieved a mean change in BMI Z-scores (Z-BMI) of -0.1 (0.1) (p < 0.001) and significant improvement in parent-reported child quality of life (mean change = 8.5; p = 0.002). Mean BMI of parents changed by -0.9 (p = 0.003). Parents reported receiving a wide range of social support for healthy lifestyle changes and placed importance on the absence or presence of support. A pilot group program for family-based treatment of pediatric obesity is feasible and acceptable in a primary care setting. Change in child and parent BMI outcomes and child quality of life among completers were promising despite the pilot's low intensity. Parent experiences with lack of social support suggest possible ways to improve retention and adherence.

  8. H.E.A.L.T.H.: Efficacy of an Internet/Population-Based Behavioral Weight Management Program for the U.S. Army

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Tiffany; Han, Hongmei; Allen, H. Raymond; Bathalon, COL Gaston; Ryan, Donna H.; Newton, Robert L.; Williamson, Donald A.

    2011-01-01

    Background A significant number of soldiers exceed the maximum allowable weight standards or have body weights approaching the maximum allowable weight standards. This mandates development of scalable approaches to improve compliance with military weight standards. Methods We developed an intervention that included two components: (1) an Internet-based weight management program (Web site) and (2) a promotion program designed to promote and sustain usage of the Web site. The Web site remained online for 37 months, with the Web site promotion program ending after 25 months. Results Soldiers’ demographics were as follows: mean age, 32 years; body mass index (BMI), 28 kg/m2; 31% female; and 58% Caucasian. Civilian demographics were as follows: mean age, 38 years; BMI, 30 kg/m2; 84% female; and 55% Caucasian. Results indicated that 2417 soldiers and 2147 civilians (N = 4564) registered on the Web site. In the first 25 months (phase 1) of the study, new participants enrolled on the Web site at a rate of 88 (soldiers) and 80 (civilians) per month. After the promotion program was removed (phase 2), new participants enrolled at a rate of 18 (soldiers) and 13 (civilians) per month. Utilization of the Web site was associated with self-reported weight loss (p < .0001). Participants who utilized the Web site more frequently lost more weight (p < .0001). Participants reported satisfaction with the Web site. Conclusions The Web site and accompanying promotion program, when implemented at a military base, received satisfactory ratings and benefited a subset of participants in promoting weight loss. This justifies further examination of effectiveness in a randomized trial setting. PMID:21303642

  9. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  10. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  11. Experiences of beginning health educators and changes in their high school students' health behaviors and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Sandra

    2007-04-01

    This study explored the instructional experiences of beginning health educators and changes in their high school students' health-related behaviors and attitudes. Qualitative data were collected through observations and personal interviews from five novice health teachers two times per week over an 8-week period. Quantitative data were collected from 92 high school student participants using a 60-item survey with a pretest/posttest administration. Dependent t tests were calculated to detect mean differences between total sample pretest and posttest scores with a significance level, where p < .05. Mean raw scores were calculated in 12 health categories to detect differences between pretest and posttest scores for each of the five individual health classes. A deeper understanding of beginning health teachers' practices, thoughts, and potential effectiveness offered insight into the interplay between teaching, learning, and health. The contribution to the enhancement of professional teacher preparation programs is provided.

  12. SOURCE REDUCTION BEHAVIOR AS AN INDEPENDENT MEASUREMENT OF THE IMPACT OF A PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION CAMPAIGN IN AN INTEGRATED VECTOR MANAGEMENT PROGRAM FOR THE ASIAN TIGER MOSQUITO

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a public health educational campaign to reduce backyard mosquito-larval habitats. Three communities each, within two New Jersey counties, were randomly selected to receive (1) both education and mosquito control, (2) education only, and (3)...

  13. Behavior change, health, and health disparities: An introduction

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    This Special Issue of Preventive Medicine (PM) focuses on behavior change, health, and health disparities, topics of fundamental importance to improving population health in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. While the U.S. health care system and those of other industrialized countries were developed to manage infectious disease and acute illnesses, it is chronic health conditions that most need to be understood and managed in the 21st century. The evidence is clear that personal behavior patterns like cigarette smoking and physical inactivity/obesity are critically important proximal causes of chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, site-specific cancers, type-2 diabetes) and as such behavior change will need to be a key component of their management. As the outstanding contributions to this Special Issue illustrate, substantial headway is being made in advancing knowledge including developing effective prevention and treatment strategies, with cigarette smoking being an excellent example that change is possible. That said, cigarette smoking continues to be responsible for approximately 480,000 premature deaths annually in the U.S. alone and 5 million globally. So more needs to be done, especially in economically disadvantaged populations. The same certainly applies to the challenges of the obesity epidemic, which of course is a more recent problem and understandably efforts to curtail it are in earlier stages of development. PMID:25456804

  14. Behavior change, health, and health disparities: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Stephen T

    2014-11-01

    This Special Issue of Preventive Medicine (PM) focuses on behavior change, health, and health disparities, topics of fundamental importance to improving population health in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. While the U.S. health care system and those of other industrialized countries were developed to manage infectious disease and acute illnesses, it is chronic health conditions that most need to be understood and managed in the 21st century. The evidence is clear that personal behavior patterns like cigarette smoking and physical inactivity/obesity are critically important proximal causes of chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, site-specific cancers, type-2 diabetes) and as such behavior change will need to be a key component of their management. As the outstanding contributions to this Special Issue illustrate, substantial headway is being made in advancing knowledge including developing effective prevention and treatment strategies, with cigarette smoking being an excellent example that change is possible. That said, cigarette smoking continues to be responsible for approximately 480,000 premature deaths annually in the U.S. alone and 5 million globally. So more needs to be done, especially in economically disadvantaged populations. The same certainly applies to the challenges of the obesity epidemic, which of course is a more recent problem and understandably efforts to curtail it are in earlier stages of development.

  15. How health plans promote health IT to improve behavioral health care.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Amity E; Reif, Sharon; Evans, Brooke; Creedon, Timothy B; Stewart, Maureen T; Garnick, Deborah W; Horgan, Constance M

    2016-12-01

    Given the large numbers of providers and enrollees with which they interact, health plans can encourage the use of health information technology (IT) to advance behavioral health care. The manner and extent to which commercial health plans promote health IT to improve behavioral health care is unknown. This study aims to address that gap. Cross-sectional study. Data are from a nationally representative survey of commercial health plans regarding administrative and clinical dimensions of behavioral health services in 2010. Data are weighted to be representative of commercial managed care products in the United States (n = 8427; 88% response rate). Approaches within the domains of provider support, access to care, and assessment and treatment were investigated as examples of how health plans can promote health IT to improve behavioral health care delivery. Health plans were using health IT approaches in each domain. About a quarter of products offered financial support for electronic health records, but technical assistance was rare. Primary care providers could bill for e-mail contact with patients for behavioral health in about a quarter of products. Few products offered member-provider e-mail, and none offered online appointment scheduling. However, online referral systems and online provider directories were common, and nearly all offered an online self-assessment tool; most offered online counseling and online personalized responses to questions or problems. In 2010, commercial health plans encouraged the use of health IT strategies for behavioral health care. Health plans have an important role to play for increasing health IT as a tool for behavioral health care.

  16. Patient costs as a barrier to intensive health behavior counseling.

    PubMed

    Krist, Alex H; Woolf, Steven H; Johnson, Robert E; Rothemich, Stephen F; Cunningham, Tina D; Jones, Resa M; Wilson, Diane B; Devers, Kelly J

    2010-03-01

    Although intensive health behavior counseling has been demonstrated to help patients lose weight and quit smoking, many payers offer limited coverage for such counseling. This mixed-methods case study examined how coverage affected utilization of an electronic linkage system (eLinkS) to help adult patients obtain intensive health behavior counseling, provided through a collaboration of primary care practices and community programs. Grant support enabled patients to obtain counseling at no cost, but funds were exhausted within 5 weeks as a result of an overwhelming response. To study the influence of cost as a barrier, referrals were resumed for an additional 3 weeks, but patients were required to pay for them. Use of eLinkS, level of clinician counseling and referrals, and patient interest in referrals were measured using electronic medical record data and patient and clinician interviews. When counseling was free, approximately one in five patients with an unhealthy behavior and an eLinkS prompt was referred for intensive counseling. However, when patient charges were instituted, referrals decreased by 97% (from 21.8% to 0.7%, p<0.001); clinicians asked fewer patients about health behaviors (37% vs 29%, p<0.001); clinicians offered fewer patients referrals (29% vs 6%, p<0.001); and patients were less interested in accepting referrals (76% vs 14%, p<0.001). In interviews, patients and clinicians cited cost as a major barrier. Coverage for intensive health behavior counseling is important to utilization, particularly for interventions that involve clinician-community partnerships. The potential public health benefits of such collaborations to reduce unhealthy behaviors justify the elimination of financial barriers (e.g., copayments) by payers. Copyright (c) 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. HEALTH C.H.I.P.s: Opportunistic Community Use of Computerized Health Information Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radvan, Deborah; Wiggers, John; Hazell, Trevor

    2004-01-01

    Computerized health information programs have been shown to have potential to improve knowledge, attitudes and behavior. However, relatively little is known regarding their capacity to engage the public for opportunistic, spontaneous use in community settings. Two studies were undertaken to provide insight to this practical issue. An intercept…

  18. HEALTH C.H.I.P.s: Opportunistic Community Use of Computerized Health Information Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radvan, Deborah; Wiggers, John; Hazell, Trevor

    2004-01-01

    Computerized health information programs have been shown to have potential to improve knowledge, attitudes and behavior. However, relatively little is known regarding their capacity to engage the public for opportunistic, spontaneous use in community settings. Two studies were undertaken to provide insight to this practical issue. An intercept…

  19. An Operational Safety and Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhorchak, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes safety/health program activities at Research Triangle Institute (North Carolina). These include: radioisotope/radiation and hazardous chemical/carcinogen use, training, monitoring, disposal; chemical waste management; air monitoring and analysis; medical program; fire safety/training, including emergency planning; Occupational Safety and…

  20. Coordinated School Health Programs. Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that all children should have the right to coordinated school health programs. NASN supports continued research to document the outcomes of these programs. School nurses should use their professional education and skills to assist their schools and communities in the…

  1. Health Indicators: A Tool for Program Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abou-Sayf, Frank K.

    2006-01-01

    A visual tool used to evaluate instructional program performance has been designed by the University of Hawaii Community College system. The tool combines features from traffic lights, blood-chemistry test reports, and industry production control charts, and is labeled the Program Health-Indicator Chart. The tool was designed to minimize the labor…

  2. Educational Programs in the Health Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospitals, 1971

    1971-01-01

    This document lists by location educational programs in the health field in the United States and Canada. Areas covered include Certified Laboratory Assistant Programs, Cytotechnology, Dental Hygiene, Dentistry, Dietetics, Hospital Administration, Inhalation Therapy, Library Science, Medical Illustration, Medical Records, Medical Technology,…

  3. Health Indicators: A Tool for Program Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abou-Sayf, Frank K.

    2006-01-01

    A visual tool used to evaluate instructional program performance has been designed by the University of Hawaii Community College system. The tool combines features from traffic lights, blood-chemistry test reports, and industry production control charts, and is labeled the Program Health-Indicator Chart. The tool was designed to minimize the labor…

  4. Overview of the Forest Health Monitoring Program

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Mangold

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Forest Health Monitoring Program (FHM), a partnership among the USDA Forest Service, State Foresters, universities, and the USDI Bureau of Land Management. The purpose of FHM is to annually assess the condition of the Nation's forested ecosystems in a standardized way. There are four components of the program-Detection...

  5. Overview of the forest health monitoring program

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Mangold

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Forest Health Monitoring Program (FHM), a partnership among the USDA Forest Service, State Foresters, universities, and the USDI Bureau of Land Management. The purpose of FHM is to annually assess the condition of the nation's forested ecosystems in a standardized way. There are four components of the program - Detection...

  6. Diversifying the Health Professions: A Model Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Penny A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe a university-based mentoring program in the food and nutritional sciences that addresses the need for multicultural professionals in allied health fields. Methods: The conceptual model for the program includes inputs (goals, resources), transformational process (professional development, social support and recognition) and…

  7. An Operational Safety and Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhorchak, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes safety/health program activities at Research Triangle Institute (North Carolina). These include: radioisotope/radiation and hazardous chemical/carcinogen use, training, monitoring, disposal; chemical waste management; air monitoring and analysis; medical program; fire safety/training, including emergency planning; Occupational Safety and…

  8. Educational Programs in the Health Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospitals, 1971

    1971-01-01

    This document lists by location educational programs in the health field in the United States and Canada. Areas covered include Certified Laboratory Assistant Programs, Cytotechnology, Dental Hygiene, Dentistry, Dietetics, Hospital Administration, Inhalation Therapy, Library Science, Medical Illustration, Medical Records, Medical Technology,…

  9. Health care reform, behavioral health, and the criminal justice population.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Alison Evans; Cheema, Jehanzeb

    2014-10-01

    The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has a number of important features for individuals who are involved with the criminal justice system. Among the most important changes is the expansion of Medicaid to more adults. The current study estimates that 10% of the total Medicaid expansion could include individuals who have experienced recent incarceration. The ACA also emphasizes the importance of mental health and substance abuse benefits, potentially changing the landscape of behavioral health treatment providers willing to serve criminal justice populations. Finally, it seeks to promote coordinated care delivery. New care delivery and appropriate funding models are needed to address the behavioral health and other chronic conditions experienced by those in criminal justice and to coordinate care within the complex structure of the justice system itself.

  10. Factors Associated with Physician Discussion of Health Behaviors with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Won S.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Kaur, Harsohena; Nazir, Niaman; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2006-01-01

    Behaviors developed in adolescence influence health later in life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of health care provider's discussion of health behaviors with overweight and non-overweight adolescents and identify demographic and health behaviors related to exercise, hours of television viewing, and weight issues…

  11. Factors Associated with Physician Discussion of Health Behaviors with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Won S.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Kaur, Harsohena; Nazir, Niaman; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2006-01-01

    Behaviors developed in adolescence influence health later in life. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of health care provider's discussion of health behaviors with overweight and non-overweight adolescents and identify demographic and health behaviors related to exercise, hours of television viewing, and weight issues…

  12. Manitoba Health Assessment Program 1982. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    Test results and interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are presented from the Health Assessment Program conducted in the Manitoba public schools in 1982. Chapter I provides an overview and highlights the health assessment and major findings of fifth and tenth grade student assessments. Major findings of the teacher and administrator…

  13. The Environmental Science and Health Effects Program

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Gurevich; Doug Lawson; Joe Mauderly

    2000-04-10

    The goal of the Environmental Science and Health Effect Program is to conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

  14. THE SCHOOL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1963

    INVOLVING INDIVIDUALS AS WELL AS ORGANIZATIONS, THE PROGRAM AIMED AT THE OPTIMUM HEALTH OF ALL CHILDREN, AND IMPROVEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. EACH OF THE CHILDREN WAS URGED TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION FOR SMALL POX, THE DPT SERIES AND BOOSTER, THE POLIO SERIES, AND CORRECTIONS OF ALL DENTAL DEFECTS AND…

  15. A Health Promotion Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Duke University School of Medicine conducts a health testing and promotion program to increase its students' awareness of their own health. The long-term goal is to prevent them from becoming impaired, as physicians, by emotional problems or addiction to alcohol or other drugs. (Author/MSE)

  16. Building Support for Coordinated School Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Randi J.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2005-01-01

    This study sought to identify successful strategies for garnering stakeholder support for coordinated school health programs (CSHP) - an interactive, multi-component approach to health promotion among students and school staff. In the late 1990's several states were awarded federal funding to build infrastructure for CSHP. Directors from these…

  17. THE SCHOOL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1963

    INVOLVING INDIVIDUALS AS WELL AS ORGANIZATIONS, THE PROGRAM AIMED AT THE OPTIMUM HEALTH OF ALL CHILDREN, AND IMPROVEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. EACH OF THE CHILDREN WAS URGED TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION FOR SMALL POX, THE DPT SERIES AND BOOSTER, THE POLIO SERIES, AND CORRECTIONS OF ALL DENTAL DEFECTS AND…

  18. Migrant Health Program, 1969 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Health, Trenton.

    The New Jersey State Department of Health has placed increasing emphasis on high-quality health care since the first hospital-based Migrant Family Clinic replaced field clinics in 1965. Statistics show that medical services provided by the program reached 38% of all migrant workers in New Jersey at the peak of the 1969 crop season; however,…

  19. Health Care Seeking Behavior in Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Begashaw, Bayu; Tessema, Fasil; Gesesew, Hailay Abrha

    2016-01-01

    Background Rural and urban populations have disparate socio-demographic and economic characteristics, which have an influence on equity and their health seeking behavior. We examined and compared the health care seeking behavior for perceived morbidity between urban and rural households in Southwest Ethiopia. Methods Analytic cross-sectional study was conducted among urban and rural households living in Esera district of Southwest Ethiopia. A random sample of 388 head of households (126 urban and 262 rural) were selected. A pretested and structured questionnaire was used for data collection with face-to-face interview. In addition to descriptive methods, binary logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with health seeking behavior at p value of less than 0.05. Results Of the sample household heads, 377 (97.2%) (119 urban and 258 rural) were successfully interviewed. Among these, 58.4% (95% CI, 53.3–63.3%) of the households sought care from modern health care that was lower among rural (48.1%) than urban (80.7%) households. The prevalence of self-treatment was 35.3% in urban and 46.1% in rural households. Among the factors considered for modern health care utilization, higher monthly income (AOR, 5.6; 95% CI, 2.04–15.4), perceived severity of disease (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1–5.8), acute duration of disease (AOR, 8.9; 95% CI, 2.4–33.3) and short distance from health facilities (AOR, 3; 95% CI, 1.2–8.4) among rural and being married (AOR, 11.3; 95% CI, 1.2–110.2) and perceived severity of disease (AOR, 6.6; 95% CI, 1.1–10.9) among urban households showed statistically significant association. Conclusions The general health seeking behavior of households on perceived morbidity was satisfactory but lower in rural compared to urban households. Self-medication was also widely practiced in the study area. The findings signal the need to work more on accessibility and promotion of healthcare seeking behavior especially among rural households

  20. Health Care Seeking Behavior in Southwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Begashaw, Bayu; Tessema, Fasil; Gesesew, Hailay Abrha

    2016-01-01

    Rural and urban populations have disparate socio-demographic and economic characteristics, which have an influence on equity and their health seeking behavior. We examined and compared the health care seeking behavior for perceived morbidity between urban and rural households in Southwest Ethiopia. Analytic cross-sectional study was conducted among urban and rural households living in Esera district of Southwest Ethiopia. A random sample of 388 head of households (126 urban and 262 rural) were selected. A pretested and structured questionnaire was used for data collection with face-to-face interview. In addition to descriptive methods, binary logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with health seeking behavior at p value of less than 0.05. Of the sample household heads, 377 (97.2%) (119 urban and 258 rural) were successfully interviewed. Among these, 58.4% (95% CI, 53.3-63.3%) of the households sought care from modern health care that was lower among rural (48.1%) than urban (80.7%) households. The prevalence of self-treatment was 35.3% in urban and 46.1% in rural households. Among the factors considered for modern health care utilization, higher monthly income (AOR, 5.6; 95% CI, 2.04-15.4), perceived severity of disease (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.8), acute duration of disease (AOR, 8.9; 95% CI, 2.4-33.3) and short distance from health facilities (AOR, 3; 95% CI, 1.2-8.4) among rural and being married (AOR, 11.3; 95% CI, 1.2-110.2) and perceived severity of disease (AOR, 6.6; 95% CI, 1.1-10.9) among urban households showed statistically significant association. The general health seeking behavior of households on perceived morbidity was satisfactory but lower in rural compared to urban households. Self-medication was also widely practiced in the study area. The findings signal the need to work more on accessibility and promotion of healthcare seeking behavior especially among rural households.

  1. Worksite health promotion program participation: a study to examine the determinants of participation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael Edward; Bergman, Randall J; Nivens, Samantha

    2014-09-01

    This study explores the relationship between organizational health climate and worksite health promotion program participation, specifically engaging individuals who are unlikely to make positive health behavior choices on their own. Participants consisted of employees at three separate furniture-manufacturing facilities completing a voluntary survey. Using responses (n = 349) from the health climate instrument, which is a measure of the collective attitudes, beliefs, and readiness to change a health behavior, this study identified two factors that were significant contributors to worksite health promotion program participation. Health norms, the collective attitudes regarding healthy lifestyle, as measured by the subscales-health scale and intention to make a behavior change-and "optimistic bias," the overassessment of one's personal health, were found to be predictors of participation. Additionally, significant (p < .05) predictors of self-assessed health, included perceived control to initiate, competence to carry out, and the organizational support of the health behavior change. The findings suggest that the organization's health norms and self-assessed health are associated with the worker's motivation to become involved with health promotion interventions. Offering worksite health screenings and advanced programming and creating a culture of health at work can help address program participation.

  2. Behaviors and Knowledge of HealthCorps New York City High School Students: Nutrition, Mental Health, and Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Heo, Moonseong; Irvin, Erica; Ostrovsky, Natania; Isasi, Carmen; Blank, Arthur E; Lounsbury, David W; Fredericks, Lynn; Yom, Tiana; Ginsberg, Mindy; Hayes, Shawn; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2016-02-01

    HealthCorps provides school wellness programming using curricula to promote changes in nutrition, mental health, and physical activity behaviors. The research objective was to evaluate effects of implementing its curricula on nutrition, mental health, and physical activity knowledge and behavior. Pre- and postsurvey data were collected (N = 2255) during the 2012-2013 academic year from 14 New York City public high schools. An 18-item knowledge questionnaire addressed 3 domains; 26 behavioral items were analyzed by factor analysis to identify 6 behavior domains, breakfast being a seventh 1-item domain. We examined the effects stratified by sex, applying mixed-effects models to take into account clustering effects of schools and participants adjusted for age. The HealthCorps program significantly increased all 3 knowledge domains (p < .05), and significantly changed several key behavioral domains. Boys significantly increased fruits/vegetables intake (p = .03). Girls increased acceptance of new fruits/vegetables (p = .03) and breakfast consumption (p = .04), and decreased sugar-sweetened beverages and energy dense food intake (p = .03). The associations between knowledge and behavior were stronger in boys than girls. The HealthCorps program significantly increased participants' knowledge on nutrition, mental health, and physical activity. It also improved several key behavioral domains, which are targets of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to address obesity in youth. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  3. Panel V: Adaptive Health Behaviors Among Ethnic Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Shirley P.; Angel, Ronald; Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye; Liu, William; Schinke, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Race, ethnicity, and cultural attitudes and practices are among the variables that influence health behaviors, including adaptive health behaviors. The following discussions highlight the important role of social conditions in shaping health behaviors and the central role of family in promoting health across the Asian, Hispanic, Native American, and African American ethnic groups. Factors that may lead to health-damaging behaviors are also discussed. The need for additional research that identifies correlations among physiological, social, and behavioral factors and health behaviors, as well as underlying mechanisms, is called for. PMID:8654341

  4. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System: Selected 2011 National Health Risk Behaviors and Health Outcomes by Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors priority health risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death, disability, and social problems among youth and adults in the United States. The national YRBS is conducted every two years during the spring semester and provides data representative of 9th through 12th grade…

  5. The UAW-GM health promotion program. Successful outcomes.

    PubMed

    Edington, Marilyn; Karjalainen, Terry; Hirschland, David; Edington, Dee W

    2002-01-01

    1. The success of the LifeSteps program may rest in the UAW and GM leadership's vision to use a high level joint steering committee, a day to day working committee, third party program providers, support of confidentiality throughout the entire program, and a comprehensive data driven decision making system. 2. The program design is a multiplatform method of program delivery to a diverse and nationwide population of the active and retired employees and dependents (more than 1 million individuals older than age 18). They receive an annual health risk appraisal, telephone access to a registered nurse 24 hours a day. LifeSteps website, a quarterly health information newsletter and a health care book sent to each of the households, and access to a telephonic audiotape library. 3. A pilot program has a more intense design of low risk maintenance and high risk reduction programs specifically for all active employees who work in the pilot locations. A telephonic program for behavior change is available only to high risk individuals in the total pilot population of active and retired employees and dependents. 4. The major success criterion for the LifeSteps program is helping workers, former employees, and their families maintain or achieve low risk status. The increased number of employees at low risk status (4% gain the second year and a 2% gain from the second to the third year) documents the improved health status of the population. Moreover, of surveyed participants and nonparticipants, 85% supported program continuation and 74% said they had an improved opinion of the UAW and GM due to the program.

  6. Incarceration, Maternal Hardship, and Perinatal Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Dora M.; Wildeman, Christopher; Lee, Hedwig; Gjelsvik, Annie; Valera, Pamela A.; Clarke, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parental incarceration is associated with mental and physical health problems in children, yet little research directly tests mechanisms through which parental incarceration could imperil child health. We hypothesized that the incarceration of a woman or her romantic partner in the year before birth constituted an additional hardship for already-disadvantaged women, and that these additionally vulnerable women were less likely to engage in positive perinatal health behaviors important to infant and early childhood development. Methods We analyzed 2006-2010 data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS) to assess the association between incarceration in the year prior to the birth of a child and perinatal maternal hardships and behaviors. Results Women reporting incarceration of themselves or their partners in the year before birth of a child had 0.86 the odds (95% CI .78-.95) of beginning prenatal care in the first trimester compared to women not reporting incarceration. They were nearly twice as likely to report partner abuse and were significantly more likely to rely on WIC and/or Medicaid for assistance during pregnancy. These associations persist after controlling for socioeconomic measures and other stressors, including homelessness and job loss. Conclusions Incarceration of a woman or her partner in the year before birth is associated with higher odds of maternal hardship and poorer perinatal health behaviors. The unprecedented scale of incarceration in the U.S. simultaneously presents an underutilized public health opportunity and constitutes a social determinant of health that may contribute to disparities in early childhood development. PMID:24615355

  7. A Review of Similarities between Domain-Specific Determinants of Four Health Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Louk W. H.; Wiefferink, Carin H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Buijs, Goof J.; ten Dam, Geert T. M.; Paulussen, Theo G. W. M.

    2009-01-01

    Schools are overloaded with health promotion programs that, altogether, focus on a broad array of behavioral domains, including substance abuse, sexuality and nutrition. Although the specific content of programs varies according to the domain focus, programs usually address similar concepts: knowledge, attitudinal beliefs, social influences and…

  8. A Review of Similarities between Domain-Specific Determinants of Four Health Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Louk W. H.; Wiefferink, Carin H.; Hoekstra, Femke; Buijs, Goof J.; ten Dam, Geert T. M.; Paulussen, Theo G. W. M.

    2009-01-01

    Schools are overloaded with health promotion programs that, altogether, focus on a broad array of behavioral domains, including substance abuse, sexuality and nutrition. Although the specific content of programs varies according to the domain focus, programs usually address similar concepts: knowledge, attitudinal beliefs, social influences and…

  9. Integrating knowledge across domains to advance the science of health behavior: overcoming challenges and facilitating success.

    PubMed

    Klein, William M P; Grenen, Emily G; O'Connell, Mary; Blanch-Hartigan, Danielle; Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Hall, Kara L; Taber, Jennifer M; Vogel, Amanda L

    2017-03-01

    Health behaviors often co-occur and have common determinants at multiple levels (e.g., individual, relational, environmental). Nevertheless, research programs often examine single health behaviors without a systematic attempt to integrate knowledge across behaviors. This paper highlights the significant potential of cross-cutting behavioral research to advance our understanding of the mechanisms and causal factors that shape health behaviors. It also offers suggestions for how researchers could develop more effective interventions. We highlight barriers to such an integrative science along with potential steps that can be taken to address these barriers. With a more nuanced understanding of health behavior, redundancies in research can be minimized, and a stronger evidence base for the development of health behavior interventions can be realized.

  10. Understanding Differences in Health Behaviors by Education

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, David M.; Lleras-Muney, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Using a variety of data sets from two countries, we examine possible explanations for the relationship between education and health behaviors, known as the education gradient. We show that income, health insurance, and family background can account for about 30 percent of the gradient. Knowledge and measures of cognitive ability explain an additional 30 percent. Social networks account for another 10 percent. Our proxies for discounting, risk aversion, or the value of future do not account for any of the education gradient, and neither do personality factors such as a sense of control of oneself or over one’s life. PMID:19963292

  11. Working toward financial sustainability of integrated behavioral health services in a public health care system.

    PubMed

    Monson, Samantha Pelican; Sheldon, J Christopher; Ivey, Laurie C; Kinman, Carissa R; Beacham, Abbie O

    2012-06-01

    The need, benefit, and desirability of behavioral health integration in primary care is generally accepted and has acquired widespread positive regard. However, in many health care settings the economics, business aspects, and financial sustainability of practice in integrated care settings remains an unsolved puzzle. Organizational administrators may be reluctant to expand behavioral health services without evidence that such programs offer clear financial benefits and financial sustainability. The tendency among mental health professionals is to consider positive clinical outcomes (e.g., reduced depression) as being globally valued indicators of program success. Although such outcomes may be highly valued by primary care providers and patients, administrative decision makers may require demonstration of more tangible financial outcomes. These differing views require program developers and evaluators to consider multiple outcome domains including clinical/psychological symptom reduction, potential cost benefit, and cost offset. The authors describe a process by which a pilot demonstration project is being implemented to demonstrate programmatic outcomes with a focus on the following: 1) clinician efficiency, 2) improved health outcomes, and 3) direct revenue generation associated with the inclusion of integrated primary care in a public health care system. The authors subsequently offer specific future directions and commentary regarding financial evaluation in each of these domains.

  12. 77 FR 62243 - Rural Health Network Development Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... Administration Rural Health Network Development Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration...-competitive replacement award under the Rural Health Network Development Program to the Siloam Springs... health information technology and perform network development activities to ensure the sustainability and...

  13. [School Health Program implementation in Fortaleza-CE: performance of the Family Health Strategy staff].

    PubMed

    de Santiago, Lindelvania Matias; Rodrigues, Malvina Thaís Pacheco; de Oliveira Junior, Aldivan Dias; Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães

    2012-01-01

    This work reports the experience of implementation of the School Health Program (PSE) by a team from the Family Health Strategy (FHS) in a public school in Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. The activities included conference about the deployment of the PSE with teachers and members of the FHS, workshops with students, clinical and dental assessment for adolescents and delivery of Booklets of Adolescent Health. The implementation of the PSE allowed health professionals to perceive their social role as educators and provided adolescents a greater contact with the staff from FHS. The rapprochement between the school and the FHS is crucial to help teenagers to transform scientific knowledge into healthy behaviors.

  14. [Development of reproductive health program and identification of effect for married women immigrants].

    PubMed

    Park, Myeong Nam; Choi, So Young

    2014-06-01

    This study was done to develop a reproductive health program to improve reproductive health of women immigrants. The participants in the study were 58 immigrant women who lived in Vietnam, China, Philippines, or Cambodia before marriage. They were assigned to the experiment group (n=29) or the control group (n=29). The reproductive health program for this study consisted of reproductive health education, health counseling, phone monitoring, and emotional support based on Cox (1982)'s Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior and was implemented for four weeks. There were significant differences in reproductive health knowledge (t=9.78, p<.001), reproductive health attitude (t=6.59, p<.001), and reproductive health behavior (t=5.11, p<.001) within and between groups after the reproductive health program. But there were no significant differences in clinical indicators between the two groups. The results of this study indicate the that reproductive health program for the women immigrants is effective in terms of reproductive health knowledge, reproductive health attitude and reproductive health behaviors. Therefore, nurses in public and private facilities, such as multicultural centers and public health centers in each community, should develop strategies to expand and provide reproductive health programs for women immigrants.

  15. Enhancing a public health nursing shelter program.

    PubMed

    Minnich, Margo; Shirley, Nancy

    2017-09-11

    The Shelter Nurse Program offers important nursing care and resources that help meet the health needs of the homeless population and improve the health of homeless individuals and families. However, formalized program goals and objectives, along with an evaluation plan that demonstrates population outcomes, had never been developed even as the program has evolved over time. Thus, the agency sought our assistance as public health nursing consultants to enhance the overall program to improve the health of the homeless population. To accomplish this, we worked with the agency and the shelter nurses throughout each step of the process to assess the needs of the program, develop appropriate goals and objectives, and develop an effective outcome evaluation plan for the existing Shelter Nurse Program. Lessons learned included the value and applicability of the selected program development model, the importance of agency ownership and active participation by front-line workers, and the value of educating the workers and introducing resources throughout the process. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Workforce competencies in behavioral health: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hoge, Michael A; Paris, Manuel; Adger, Hoover; Collins, Frank L; Finn, Cherry V; Fricks, Larry; Gill, Kenneth J; Haber, Judith; Hansen, Marsali; Ida, D J; Kaplan, Linda; Northey, William F; O'Connell, Maria J; Rosen, Anita L; Taintor, Zebulon; Tondora, Janis; Young, Alexander S

    2005-01-01

    Competency-based training approaches are being used more in healthcare to guide curriculum content and ensure accountability and outcomes in the educational process. This article provides an overview of the state of competency development in the field of behavioral health. Specifically, it identifies the groups and organizations that have conducted and supported this work, summarizes their progress in defining and assessing competencies, and discusses both the obstacles and future directions for such initiatives. A major purpose of this article is to provide a compendium of current competency efforts so that these might inform and enhance ongoing competency development in the varied behavioral health disciplines and specialties. These varied resources may also be useful in identifying the core competencies that are common to the multiple disciplines and specialties.

  17. Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Training: Systematic Development and Implementation in a Large Medical System.

    PubMed

    Dobmeyer, Anne C; Hunter, Christopher L; Corso, Meghan L; Nielsen, Matthew K; Corso, Kent A; Polizzi, Nicholas C; Earles, Jay E

    2016-09-01

    The expansion of integrated, collaborative, behavioral health services in primary care requires a trained behavioral health workforce with specific competencies to deliver effective, evidence-informed, team-based care. Most behavioral health providers do not have training or experience working as primary care behavioral health consultants (BHCs), and require structured training to function effectively in this role. This article discusses one such training program developed to meet the needs of a large healthcare system initiating widespread implementation of the primary care behavioral health model of service delivery. It details the Department of Defense's experience in developing its extensive BHC training program, including challenges of addressing personnel selection and hiring issues, selecting a model for training, developing and implementing a phased training curriculum, and improving the training over time to address identified gaps. Future directions for training improvements and lessons learned in a large healthcare system are discussed.

  18. Oral health: locus of control, health behavior, self-rated oral health and socio-demographic factors in Istanbul adults.

    PubMed

    Peker, Kadriye; Bermek, Gulcin

    2011-01-01

    To determine oral health control beliefs of Istanbul adults using the Multidimensional Oral Health Locus of Control Scale (MOHLCS) after confirming its factorial validity and to examine the relationships between these beliefs, self-rated oral health, oral health behaviors and socio-demographic factors. The MOHLCS was administered to a sample of 1200 subjects aged ≥18 years in Istanbul chosen using a quota-sampling method (response 88%). The relationship between the MOHLCS and oral health behaviors, self-rated oral health and socio-demographic factors was assessed after confirming the factorial validity of the MOHLCS. The MOHLCS demonstrated satisfactory internal reliability. Factor analysis results showed a new four-factor solution, namely Internal, Dentist, Chance, and Socialization agents. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender, younger age, higher socioeconomic status, more frequent daily toothbrushing, and regular dental check-ups were associated with higher Internal beliefs, while older age, lower educational level, lower socioeconomic status, low toothbrushing frequency, and symptom-orientated dental attendance were associated with higher Chance beliefs. Being unmarried and low toothbrushing frequency were associated with lower Dentist beliefs. Males and older subjects had lower Socialization agents beliefs. Internal, Dentist and Chance beliefs were significantly associated with self-rated oral health. Compared with the original factor structure, the new factor structure had better goodness of fit for this sample. Self-rated oral health, socio-demographic factors, and oral health behaviors were significantly associated with oral health control beliefs. These beliefs may be useful for planning oral health promotion programs and for formulating advice given by oral health professionals about their patients' oral health behaviors.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Tele-behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory A. Gahm, Ph.D...Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0118 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...based psychosocial treatments for depression . This is a necessary step prior to the large scale dissemination of home‐based telemental healthcare

  20. Cost-effectiveness analysis for health communication programs.

    PubMed

    Guilkey, David K; Hutchinson, Paul; Lance, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article describes methods for analyzing the cost-effectiveness of health communication programs, focusing in particular on estimating program effectiveness with econometric methods that address experimental and quasi-experimental designs (and their absence), national or subnational program coverage, and endogenously targeting of programs. Experimental designs provide a gold standard for assessing effectiveness but are seldom feasible for large-scale health communication programs. Even in the absence of such designs, however, fairly simple methods can be used to examine intermediate objectives, such as program reach, which in turn can be linked to program costs to estimate cost effectiveness. When moving beyond program reach to behavioral or other outcome measures, such as contraceptive use or fertility, or when faced with full-coverage national programs, more elaborate data and methods are required. We discuss data requirements and assumptions necessary in each case, focusing on single-equation multiple regression models, structural equations models, and fixed effects estimators for use with longitudinal data, and then describing how cost information can be incorporated into econometric models so as to get measures of the cost-effectiveness of communication interventions.

  1. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: Comparison of conventional and integrated training models

    PubMed Central

    Garfunkel, Lynn C.; Pisani, Anthony R.; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare former pediatric residents’ perceptions of their training in behavioral health care and collaboration from two separate continuity clinic sites within one training program that used either conventional or integrated models of behavioral health care. METHODS Residents of a single pediatric residency were assigned to one of two continuity clinic sites at the beginning of training. At one site, psychology fellows and faculty were integrated into the pediatric continuity clinic teams. At the other site, conventional patterns of behavioral health referral (that is, referral to outside specialists) and consultation continued. We surveyed fifteen years of graduates (N=245) from both clinic settings using a mailed 34-item instrument that queried alumni about their experiences during training and their comfort after training with behavioral health care and collaboration. RESULTS A total of 174 alumni (71%) returned completed questionnaires. Overall, there were significant differences between graduates in the two groups. Residents who trained and practiced alongside behavioral health fellows and faculty were significantly more likely to have reported consulting with, meeting with, and planning treatment with a behavioral health provider during residency, and more often reported that their continuity clinic experience prepared them for collaborating with behavioral health providers, yet only somewhat more often believed that the overall residency training prepared them for handling behavioral health issues in their current practice. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that an integrated training milieu can enhance pediatric education in the management of behavioral health problems and collaboration with behavioral health specialists. PMID:21169773

  2. Outdoor Behavioral Healthcare: Definitions, Common Practice, Expected Outcomes, and a Nationwide Survey of Programs. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Keith C.; Hendee, John C.

    Outdoor behavioral healthcare (OBH) is an emerging mental health intervention/treatment to help adolescents overcome emotional, psychological, and addiction problems. Currently, over 100 OBH programs in the United States use elements of wilderness therapy to address adolescents' problem behaviors and foster responsibility and personal growth.…

  3. Improving the fit: adolescents' needs and future programs for sexual and reproductive health in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J; McCauley, A P

    1998-06-01

    Demand is growing in developing countries for sexual and reproductive health programs for young people. However, little scientifically based evidence exists about which program approaches are most effective in shaping healthy behaviors. Careful evaluation and research must be increased, but meanwhile, planners need guidance as they expand programming. Research indicates that current programs often do not match the needs and health-seeking behaviors of young people. Behavioral theories and expert opinion agree that adolescents must be taught generic and health-specific skills necessary for adopting healthy behaviors. Constraints on financial and human resources, coupled with the great size of the youth population, highlight the need to find less costly ways to reach young people. These observations generate six programming principles to help planners and communities experiment with a wide variety of programming approaching.

  4. Managed behavioral health care: a key component of integrated regional delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Nauert, R C

    1997-01-01

    Managed behavioral health care is a key component of integrated regional delivery systems. Mental health and chemical dependency services are of growing importance in developing insurance programs and establishing health systems. Primary features include full involvement of the medical community, development of a free-standing organization, joint ventures with existing entities, and effective contract negotiations.

  5. Health-risk behaviors in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Rew, Lynn; Horner, Sharon D; Brown, Adama

    2011-01-01

    The major morbidities and mortalities of adolescents are related to preventable risky behaviors, but how, when, and in whom these behaviors develop in early adolescence is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine which set of risk factors and protective resources of school-age children were best predictors of health-risk behaviors in early adolescence. A longitudinal, cohort sequential design was used with a diverse sample of 1,934 children in grades 4 through 8. Parents provided demographic and neighborhood data for children through a mailed survey. Children completed valid scales annually at schools, using audio-computer-assisted self-interviewing (A-CASI) technology. Significant gender and racial/ethnic differences were found in carrying a weapon and using alcohol. Higher perceived levels of stress increased the risk for alcohol use as did riding in a car with a driver who was drinking. Health behaviors exhibited while in 4th through 6th grades protected early adolescents from alcohol use and riding in a car with a driver who was drinking. A parent's education and perceived safety in neighborhood protected against carrying a weapon and smoking. Many findings are similar to those of national samples, but others show positive differences in this localized sample, over 50% of whom were Latino. Protective resources suggest numerous nursing interventions to promote healthy adolescent development.

  6. Estimates of Preventability and Their Relation to Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Gary D.

    It was hypothesized that a person's estimates of the preventability of health problems would be related to health behaviors such that a person who engages in healthful behavior should make higher estimates of preventability. A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between causal attribution of health problems and health-related…

  7. Health care reform and care at the behavioral health--primary care interface.

    PubMed

    Druss, Benjamin G; Mauer, Barbara J

    2010-11-01

    The historic passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March 2010 offers the potential to address long-standing deficits in quality and integration of services at the interface between behavioral health and primary care. Many of the efforts to reform the care delivery system will come in the form of demonstration projects, which, if successful, will become models for the broader health system. This article reviews two of the programs that might have a particular impact on care on the two sides of that interface: Medicaid and Medicare patient-centered medical home demonstration projects and expansion of a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration program that colocates primary care services in community mental health settings. The authors provide an overview of key supporting factors, including new financing mechanisms, quality assessment metrics, information technology infrastructure, and technical support, that will be important for ensuring that initiatives achieve their potential for improving care.

  8. Preparing the Workforce for Behavioral Health and Primary Care Integration.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer; Cohen, Deborah J; Davis, Melinda; Gunn, Rose; Blount, Alexander; Pollack, David A; Miller, William L; Smith, Corey; Valentine, Nancy; Miller, Benjamin F

    2015-01-01

    To identify how organizations prepare clinicians to work together to integrate behavioral health and primary care. Observational cross-case comparison study of 19 U.S. practices, 11 participating in Advancing Care Together, and 8 from the Integration Workforce Study. Practices varied in size, ownership, geographic location, and experience delivering integrated care. Multidisciplinary teams collected data (field notes from direct practice observations, semistructured interviews, and online diaries as reported by practice leaders) and then analyzed the data using a grounded theory approach. Organizations had difficulty finding clinicians possessing the skills and experience necessary for working in an integrated practice. Practices newer to integration underestimated the time and resources needed to train and organizationally socialize (onboard) new clinicians. Through trial and error, practices learned that clinicians needed relevant training to work effectively as integrated care teams. Training efforts exclusively targeting behavioral health clinicians (BHCs) and new employees were incomplete if primary care clinicians (PCCs) and others in the practice also lacked experience working with BHCs and delivering integrated care. Organizations' methods for addressing employees' need for additional preparation included hiring a consultant to provide training, sending employees to external training programs, hosting residency or practicum training programs, or creating their own internal training program. Onboarding new employees through the development of training manuals; extensive shadowing processes; and protecting time for ongoing education, mentoring, and support opportunities for new and established clinicians and staff were featured in these internal training programs. Insufficient training capacity and practical experience opportunities continue to be major barriers to supplying the workforce needed for effective behavioral health and primary care integration

  9. How Arizona Medicaid Accelerated the Integration of Physical and Behavioral Health Services.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Deborah; Boozang, Patricia M; Davis, Hailey E

    2017-05-01

    ISSUE: In most states, one agency has responsibility for Medicaid enrollees' physical health services and at least one other agency has responsibility for their behavioral health services. Apportioning responsibility for the physical and behavioral health of Medicaid beneficiaries into different agencies inevitably leads to different--and sometimes misaligned--policy goals, program priorities, and purchasing strategies, thereby impeding the delivery of integrated care. GOAL: To describe the rationale, process, and impact of Arizona's 2015 consolidation of its physical and behavioral health services agencies into its Medicaid agency. METHOD: The study is based on published research, Arizona Medicaid agency materials, and interviews with 34 individuals, including representatives from the current Medicaid agency and previous behavioral health services agency, health plans, primary care and behavioral health providers, consumers, the justice system, and the health information exchange. FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS: Consolidation has led to increased attention to behavioral health services and behavioral and physical health integration, enabled more strategic purchasing and streamlined regulatory processes, and enhanced communication, collaboration, and mutual trust across sectors. Arizona’s experience offers lessons to policymakers as they consider how best to integrate physical and behavioral health services and ensure that Medicaid is an efficient and effective purchaser of health care services.

  10. Factor structure of health and oral health-related behaviors among adolescents in Arusha, northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Astrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; Mbawalla, Hawa

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the factor structure of health and oral health-related behaviors and it's invariance across gender and to identify factors associated with behavioral patterns. A cross-sectional study included 2412 students attending 20 secondary schools in Arusha. Self-administered questionnaires were completed at school. Principal component analysis of seven single health and oral health-related behaviors (tooth brushing, hand wash after latrine, hand wash before eating, using soap, intake of sugared mineral water, intake of fast foods and intake of sweets) suggested two factors labeled hygiene behavior and snacking. Confirmatory factor analyses, CFA, provided acceptable fit for the hypothesized two-factor model; CFI = 0.97. Multiple group CFA across gender showed no statistically significant difference in fit between unconstrained and constrained models (p = 0.203). Logistic regression revealed ORs for hygiene behaviors of 1.5, 0.5, 1.5, 1.5 and 0.6 if being a girl, current smoker, reporting good relationship with school, access to hygiene facilities and bad life satisfaction, respectively. ORs for snacking were 1.3, 1.4, 0.4 and 0.5 if female, in the least poor household quartile, low family socio-economic status and high perceived control, respectively. The two factors suggest that behaviors within each might be approached jointly in health promoting programs. A positive relationship with school and access to hygiene facilities might play a role in health promotion. Provision of healthy snacks and improved perceived behavioral control regarding sugar avoidance might restrict snacking during school hours.

  11. Posttraumatic stress disorder and health: a preliminary study of group differences in health and health behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are more likely to undertake harmful health behaviors like substance use. Less is known about the association of PTSD with healthful behaviors such as healthy diet and exercise. The purpose of this study was to examine differences across physical health indicators and health behaviors in individuals with and without PTSD. Methods A cross-sectional, case–control study of health indicators and self-reported health behaviors in a community and military veteran sample was used. Results Based on a structured psychiatric interview, 25 participants had PTSD, and the remaining 55 without PTSD served as the comparison group. Participants were 40 years old on average and 45% were female. Multivariate analysis of variance analyses revealed that participants with PTSD had significantly higher body mass index (p = 0.004), had more alcohol use (p = 0.007), and reported fewer minutes of vigorous exercise (p = 0.020) than those without PTSD. Chi-square analysis of diet content and eating behavior constructs found that individuals with PTSD ate fewer fruits (p = 0.035) and had more guilt after overeating (p = 0.006). Conclusions These findings replicate prior research on the link between PTSD and negative health outcomes and engagement in harmful health behaviors and highlight the need for further examination of the association between PTSD and other health behaviors like diet content, eating behaviors, and exercise. PMID:24070007

  12. Integrating Universal Behavioral Screening within Program-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mack D.; Rispoli, Mandy; Clemens, Nathan H.; Lee, Yuan-Hsuan; Sanchez, Lisa; Hatton, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Universal behavioral screening is a major part of positive behavioral support and response to intervention systems. Program-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) focuses on establishing social, emotional, and behavioral competence through promotion of a small set of behavioral expectations that are agreed upon, taught, and…

  13. Integrating Universal Behavioral Screening within Program-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mack D.; Rispoli, Mandy; Clemens, Nathan H.; Lee, Yuan-Hsuan; Sanchez, Lisa; Hatton, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Universal behavioral screening is a major part of positive behavioral support and response to intervention systems. Program-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) focuses on establishing social, emotional, and behavioral competence through promotion of a small set of behavioral expectations that are agreed upon, taught, and…

  14. Behaviors and Knowledge of HealthCorps New York City High School Students: Nutrition, Mental Health and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Moonseong, Heo; Erica, Irvin; Natania, Ostrovsky; Carmen, Isasi; Shawn, Hayes; Judith, Wylie-Rosett

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND HealthCorps provides school wellness programming using curricula to promote changes in nutrition, mental health and physical activity behaviors. The research objective was to evaluate effects of implementing its curricula on nutrition, mental health and physical activity knowledge and behavior. METHODS Pre- and post-survey data were collected (N = 2255) during the 2012-13 academic year from 14 New York City public high schools. An 18-item knowledge questionnaire addressed 3 domains; 26 behavioral items were analyzed by factor analysis to identify 6 behavior domains, breakfast being a seventh one-item domain. We examined the effects stratified by sex, applying mixed-effects models to take into account clustering effects of schools and participants adjusted for age. RESULTS The HealthCorps program significantly increased all 3 knowledge domains (p < .05), and significantly changed several key behavioral domains. Boys significantly increased fruits/vegetables intake (p = .03). Girls increased acceptance of new fruits/vegetables (p = .03) and breakfast consumption (p = .04), and decreased sugar-sweetened beverages and energy dense food intake (p = .03). The associations between knowledge and behavior were stronger in boys than girls. CONCLUSION The HealthCorps program significantly increased participants’ knowledge on nutrition, mental health and physical activity. It also improved several key behavioral domains, which are targets of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to address obesity in youth. PMID:26762819

  15. Preventive adolescent health care in family practice: a program summary.

    PubMed

    Knishkowy, Barry; Schein, Moshe; Kiderman, Alexander; Velber, Aliza; Edman, Richard; Yaphe, John

    2006-06-07

    The AMA Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) has been the cornerstone of preventive care for teenagers since its publication in 1994. Despite this, there has been little documentation of their implementation in the family medicine literature. This article gives an overview of a family practice-based adolescent preventive health program based on GAPS recommendations, and reports on compliance, feasibility and health issues. A Community-Oriented Primary Care (COPC) program targeted all adolescent patients aged 12-18 years in two Israeli family practices. 321 teenagers were invited to participate. Every 7th and 10th grader was invited for a preventive health visit with the family physician and nurse. The visits included a medical evaluation, screening and counseling regarding health issues recommended by GAPS, and counseling regarding personal health concerns. Parents were also invited to meet with the staff. 184 (57%) of the adolescents invited for health visits attended. The overall visit time was 47 minutes, including 12 minutes for a questionnaire and 35 minutes with providers. Common biomedical problems included overweight, acne and dysmenorrhea. Health risk behaviors and psychosocial problems included cigarette or alcohol use, dieting, infrequent/never seat belt use, and feeling depressed. 78% wanted to discuss at least one personal health issue. 27% were invited for follow-up visits. Only 3% of the parents came for visits. A community-oriented approach facilitates bringing adolescents for preventive health visits. Many previously undetected health issues, particularly psychosocial and behavioral, are revealed during these visits. A concerns checklist aids in addressing personal health concerns.

  16. Heart rate, health, and hurtful behavior.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J Richard; Pardini, Dustin A; Matthews, Karen A

    2017-03-01

    Hostility is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. When challenged, individuals high on hostility exhibit a hyperreactive psychophysiological response to stressors, thereby increasing risk for developing cardiovascular disease. However, low resting heart rate (HR) is associated with physical aggression and hostility in children, adolescents, and adults. Based on a community sample of 296 men (mean age = 32.0), we (a) address whether aggression/hostility relates to physical health through relationships with cardiovascular levels at rest and in response to stressors, and (b) determine how relations between aggression and health are altered by including psychophysiological indices in statistical models. The Cook-Medley cynical/hostile attitudes and the Buss-Perry physical aggression and hostility measures assessed aggression. Health was assessed as systolic blood pressure (SBP), report of medical conditions, and a metabolic composite. Reactivity to stressors was assessed with HR, SBP, and diastolic blood pressure. Aggression was negatively related to both resting HR and reactivity. High resting HR and reactivity were, however, positively related to poor health. Thus, the relationship between aggression and HR and reactivity suppressed an overall relationship between high aggression/hostility and poor health. In the presence of covariates for socioeconomic status, race, health behaviors, and medications, the relationship between aggression and health was significantly strengthened when HR level and reactivity were included in models. In sum, at early midlife, low HR among aggressive and hostile individuals is related to less health risk. Aggression and hostility have a deleterious influence on health, but primarily among individuals with higher HR and possibly greater cardiovascular reactivity.

  17. Reaching Graduate Students at Risk for Suicidal Behavior through the Interactive Screening Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffitt, Lauren B.; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Berg, John P.; Calderon, Michelle E.; Haas, Ann P.; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a significant concern among graduate students. Because many suicidal graduate students do not access mental health services, programs to connect them to resources are essential. This article describes the Interactive Screening Program (ISP), an anonymous, Web-based tool for screening and engaging at-risk graduate school…

  18. Reaching Graduate Students at Risk for Suicidal Behavior through the Interactive Screening Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffitt, Lauren B.; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Berg, John P.; Calderon, Michelle E.; Haas, Ann P.; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a significant concern among graduate students. Because many suicidal graduate students do not access mental health services, programs to connect them to resources are essential. This article describes the Interactive Screening Program (ISP), an anonymous, Web-based tool for screening and engaging at-risk graduate school…

  19. Integrating Behavioral Psychology Services into Adult Day Programming for Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    Many individuals with dementia and problem behavior are served in nursing home settings long before health issues necessitate constant medical care. Alternative community-based adult day health care programs allow individuals with dementia to remain in their home with their families at a substantially reduced cost; however, many adult day programs…

  20. Integrating Behavioral Psychology Services into Adult Day Programming for Individuals with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    Many individuals with dementia and problem behavior are served in nursing home settings long before health issues necessitate constant medical care. Alternative community-based adult day health care programs allow individuals with dementia to remain in their home with their families at a substantially reduced cost; however, many adult day programs…