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Sample records for health care clinic

  1. Health care clinics in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Wollschlaeger, K

    1995-04-01

    Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care.

  2. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuelian; Gregersen, Hans; Yuan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide potentially huge research opportunities in the future. However, constructing a complete register system at a nationwide level is challenging. In the future, China will demand increased capacity of researchers and data managers, in particular within clinical epidemiology, to explore the rich resources. PMID:28356772

  3. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuelian; Gregersen, Hans; Yuan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide potentially huge research opportunities in the future. However, constructing a complete register system at a nationwide level is challenging. In the future, China will demand increased capacity of researchers and data managers, in particular within clinical epidemiology, to explore the rich resources.

  4. Meeting new health care challenges with a proven innovation: nurse-managed health care clinics.

    PubMed

    Link, Denise G; Perry, Diane; Cesarotti, Evelyn L

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in January 2014, millions of Americans will enroll in health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. Some of these individuals were obtaining health care in safety net health clinics, emergency departments, or urgent care centers; many were going without needed care and will be new to the health care system. In addition to these newly insured, the ranks of older Americans and persons in need of chronic disease management will be on the rise. The way in which health care is delivered will have to change in order for the health care workforce to meet the demand for their services without sacrificing quality or access. Nurse practitioners and registered nurses have the education and skills to provide health promotion, disease prevention, and chronic disease management services that will make up a sizable portion of the demand. Amending state practice acts so that the authority to practice matches the ability to practice and opening provider panels to advanced practice nurses will provide opportunities to establish or expand sustainable nurse-led primary care practices in health care shortage areas. Along with these changes, models of health care delivery that incorporate differentiated practice roles and shared interprofessional responsibility for providing care will maximize the capacity of the system to provide the health care that people need.

  5. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  6. Clinical care ratios: quantifying clinical versus non-clinical care for allied health professionals.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Cherie; Govier, Adam; Semciw, Adam Ivan

    2016-07-04

    Objective Clinical care ratios (CCRs) are a useful tool that can be used to quantify and benchmark the clinical and non-clinical workloads of allied health professionals. The purpose of this study was to determine if CCRs are influenced by level of seniority, type of role or profession. This will provide meaningful information for allied health service managers to better manage service demand and capacity.Method Data was collected from 2036 allied health professionals from five professions across 11 Australian tertiary hospitals. Mean (95% confidence intervals) CCRs were calculated according to profession, seniority and role type. A two-way ANOVA was performed to assess the association of CCRs (dependent variable) with seniority level and profession (independent variables). Post-hoc pairwise comparisons identified where significant main or interaction effects occurred (α = 0.05).Results Significant main effects for seniority level and profession were identified (P < 0.05), but there was no interaction effect. Post-hoc comparisons revealed significant differences between all tier combinations (P < 0.05) with more senior staff having the lowest CCRs.Conclusion The direct and non-direct clinical components of the allied health professional's workload can be quantified and benchmarked with like roles and according to seniority. The benchmarked CCRs for predominantly clinical roles will enable managers to compare and evaluate like roles and modify non-direct clinical components according to seniority and discipline.What is known about the topic? CCRs are a useful tool to quantify, monitor and compare workloads of allied health professionals. They are thought to change with increased seniority of roles. The CCRs for different allied health professional roles has yet to be defined in the literature.What does this paper add? CCRs decrease as level of seniority increases, indicating higher seniority increases non-clinical time. CCRs differ across professions, suggesting

  7. [Clinical bioethics for primary health care].

    PubMed

    González-de Paz, L

    2013-01-01

    The clinical decision making process with ethical implications in the area of primary healthcare differs from other healthcare areas. From the ethical perspective it is important to include these issues in the decision making model. This dissertation explains the need for a process of bioethical deliberation for Primary Healthcare, as well as proposing a method for doing so. The decision process method, adapted to this healthcare area, is flexible and requires a more participative Healthcare System. This proposal involves professionals and the patient population equally, is intended to facilitate the acquisition of responsibility for personal and community health.

  8. Ethical Behaviours in Clinical Practice Among Mexican Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Martínez, Edith; Lavielle, Pilar; Bedolla, Miguel; Squires, Allison

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the cultural domain of ethical behaviours in clinical practice as defined by health care providers in Mexico. Structured interviews were carried out with 500 health professionals employed at the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Mexico City. The Smith Salience Index was used to evaluate the relevance of concepts gathered from the free listings of the interviewees. Cluster analysis and factor analysis facilitated construction of the conceptual categories, which the authors refer to as ‘dimensions of ethical practice’. Six dimensions emerged from the analysis to define the qualities that comprise ethical clinical practice for Mexican health care providers: overall quality of clinical performance; working conditions that favour quality of care; use of ethical considerations as prerequisites for any health care intervention; values favouring teamwork in the health professional–patient relationship; patient satisfaction scores; and communication between health care providers and patients. The findings suggest that improved working conditions and management practices that promote the values identified by the study’s participants would help to improve quality of care. PMID:18849364

  9. Adolescent health care maintenance in a teen-friendly clinic.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Nicole; Shore, William B

    2014-09-01

    Adolescence is marked by complex physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development, which can be stressful for families and adolescents. Before the onset of puberty, providers should clearly lay the groundwork for clinical care and office visits during the adolescent years. This article addresses the guidelines and current legal standards for confidentiality in adolescent care, the most frequently used psychosocial screening tools, and current recommendations for preventive health services and immunizations. Through the creation of teen-friendly clinics, primary care providers are well positioned to offer guidance and support to teens and their parents during this time of transition and growth.

  10. The normativity of clinical health care: perspectives on moral realism.

    PubMed

    Nortvedt, Per

    2012-06-01

    The paper argues that a particular version of moral realism constitutes an important basis for ethics in medicine and health care. Moral realism is the position that moral value is a part of the fabric of relational and interpersonal reality. But even though moral values are subject to human interpretations, they are not themselves the sole product of these interpretations. Moral values are not invented but discovered by the subject. Moral realism argues that values are open to perception and experience and that moral subjectivity must be portrayed in how moral values are discovered and perceived by the human subject. Moral values may exist independent of the particular subject's interpretative evaluations as a part of reality. This epistemological point about normativity is particularly significant in medical care and in health care. The clinician perceives moral value in the clinical encounter in a way that is important for competent clinical understanding. Clinical understanding in medical care and health care bears on the encounter with moral values in the direct and embodied relations to patients, with their experiences of illness and their vulnerabilities. Good clinical care is then partly conditioned upon adequate understanding of such moral realities.

  11. Health Services and Health Care Needs Fulfilled by Structured Clinical Programs for Children with Medical Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Dennis Z.; Berry, Jay G.; Glader, Laurie; Morin, Melinda J.; Johaningsmeir, Sarah; Gordon, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe family-reported health service needs of children with medical complexity, and to assess which needs are more often addressed in a tertiary care center-based structured clinical program for children with medical complexity. Study design Mailed survey to families of children with medical complexity enrolled in a structured-care program providing care coordination and oversight at one of three children’s hospitals. Outcomes included receipt of 14 specific health service needs. Paired t-tests compared unmet health care needs prior to and following program enrollment. Results 441 of 968 (46%) surveys were returned and analyzed. Respondents reported their children had a mean age of 7 (standard deviation 5) years. A majority of respondents reported the child had developmental delay (79%) and feeding difficulties (64%). Of respondents, 56% regarded the primary care provider as the primary point of contact for medical issues. Respondents reported an increase in meeting all fourteen health services needs after enrollment in a tertiary care center-based structured clinical program, including primary care checkups (82% v 96%), therapies (78% v 91%), mental health care (34% v 58%), respite care (56% v 75%), and referrals (51% v 83%) (all p<.001). Conclusions Tertiary care center-based structured clinical care programs for children with medical complexity may address and fulfill a broad range of health service needs that are not met in the primary care setting. PMID:26526361

  12. Communicating Nursing Care Using the Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Care Plan.

    PubMed

    Matney, Susan A; Dolin, Gay; Buhl, Lindy; Sheide, Amy

    2016-03-01

    A care plan provides a patient, family, or community picture and outlines the care to be provided. The Health Level Seven Consolidated Clinical Document Architecture (C-CDA) Release 2 Care Plan Document is used to structure care plan data when sharing the care plan between systems and/or settings. The American Nurses Association has recommended the use of two terminologies, Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LOINC) for assessments and outcomes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) for problems, procedures (interventions), outcomes, and observation findings within the C-CDA. This article describes C-CDA, introduces LOINC and SNOMED CT, discusses how the C-CDA Care Plan aligns with the nursing process, and illustrates how nursing care data can be structured and encoded within a C-CDA Care Plan.

  13. Alzheimer's Disease Clinical and Research Update for Health Care Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    DeFina, Philip A.; Lichtenstein, Jonathan D.; Fellus, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 6.8 million Americans who have been diagnosed with dementia, over 5 million have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Due to the rise in the aging population, these figures are expected to double by 2050. The following paper provides an up-to-date review of clinical issues and relevant research. Research related to the methods of the earliest possible detection of AD is ongoing. Health care professionals should play a critical role in differentially diagnosing AD patients, as well as supporting their families. Novel interventions, including medications, natural supplements, and behavioral techniques, are constantly appearing in the literature. It is necessary for the health practitioner to remain current, regarding AD, as such information will facilitate better care for patients and their families. PMID:24083026

  14. Marketing retail health clinics: challenges and controversies arising from a health care innovation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cheryl-Ann N; Khanfar, Nile M; Harrington, Catherine; Loudon, David

    2011-01-01

    Since their founding in 2000, retail-based health care clinics, also called convenient care clinics, have flourished but continue to generate controversy. This article examines the literature with respect to the industry's background, establishment of industry standards, types of services offered, marketing of retail health clinics, industry growth with new target markets, and patient demographics. It also examines the growing relationship with insurers and third-party payers, quality-of-care concerns by medical associations, and legal regulations and their potential impact on industry growth nationwide.

  15. Introduction to the special issue on advances in clinical and health-care knowledge management.

    PubMed

    Bali, Rajeev K; Feng, David Dagan; Burstein, Frada; Dwivedi, Ashish N

    2005-06-01

    Clinical and health-care knowledge management (KM) as a discipline has attracted increasing worldwide attention in recent years. The approach encompasses a plethora of interrelated themes including aspects of clinical informatics, clinical governance, artificial intelligence, privacy and security, data mining, genomic mining, information management, and organizational behavior. This paper introduces key manuscripts which detail health-care and clinical KM cases and applications.

  16. Role of pharmacogenetics in public health and clinical health care: a SWOT analysis.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Ritika; Tan-Koi, Wei Chuen; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacogenomics has been lauded as an important innovation in clinical medicine as a result of advances in genomic science. As one of the cornerstones in precision medicine, the vision to determine the right medication in the right dosage for the right treatment with the use of genetic information has not exactly materialised, and few genetic tests have been implemented as the standard of care in health systems worldwide. Here we review the findings from a SWOT analysis to examine the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats around the role of pharmacogenetics in public health and clinical health care, at the micro, meso and macro levels corresponding to the perspectives of the individuals (scientists, patients and physicians), the health-care institutions and the health systems, respectively.

  17. Clinical Instructor Characteristics, Behaviors and Skills in Allied Health Care Settings: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Linda S.; Sexton, Patrick; Willeford, K. Sean; Barnum, Mary G.; Guyer, M. Susan; Gardner, Greg; Fincher, A. Louise

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to compare both clinical instructor and student perceptions of helpful and hindering clinical instructor characteristics, behaviors and skills in athletic training and allied health care settings. Clinical education in athletic training is similar to that of other allied health care professions. Clinical…

  18. Perspectives on clinical informatics: integrating large-scale clinical, genomic, and health information for clinical care.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2013-12-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population.

  19. Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K.

    2013-01-01

    The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

  20. What would it take? Stakeholders' views and preferences for implementing a health care manager program in community mental health clinics under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders' recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice.

  1. What Would It Take? Stakeholders’ Views and Preferences for Implementing a Health Care Manager Program in Community Mental Health Clinics Under Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Gomes, Arminda P.; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders’ recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice. PMID:25542194

  2. Adolescents with Special Needs: Clinical Challenges in Reproductive Health Care.

    PubMed

    Quint, Elisabeth H

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents with special needs have unique reproductive health care needs related to their physical and cognitive issues. This review discusses some of the most common concerns that are encountered in clinical practice, as the clinician will partner with the adolescent and her family to guide her through the pubertal transition and to help navigate the risks and rights of reproduction. Families often seek anticipatory guidance before menarche on menstrual hygiene, abuse risk and sexuality and can be reassured that most teens with special needs do very well with menstruation. The clinician needs to evaluate the teenager's reproductive knowledge as well her risk for abuse and coercion and her ability to consent to sexual activity, if she requests contraception. Menstrual management is mostly based on the impact of the menstrual cycles on the teenager's life and activities. The adolescents may have a decreased ability to tolerate menses or pain, or experience changes in seizure pattern or altered mood. Hormonal treatment is often used to assist with menstrual hygiene, cyclical mood changes or dysmenorrhea. The goal of treatment can be complete amenorrhea, alleviate pain or regulate and decrease menstrual flow. The unique risks and benefits of hormonal treatment for this special population are highlighted.

  3. Beyond the limits of clinical governance? The case of mental health in English primary care

    PubMed Central

    Gask, Linda; Rogers, Anne; Campbell, Stephen; Sheaff, Rod

    2008-01-01

    Background Little research attention has been given to attempts to implement organisational initiatives to improve quality of care for mental health care, where there is a high level of indeterminacy and clinical judgements are often contestable. This paper explores recent efforts made at an organisational level in England to improve the quality of primary care for people with mental health problems through the new institutional processes of 'clinical governance'. Methods Framework analysis, based on the Normalisation Process Model (NPM), of attempts over a five year period to develop clinical governance for primary mental health services in Primary Care Trusts (PCTs). The data come from a longitudinal qualitative multiple case-study approach in a purposive sample of 12 PCTs, chosen to reflect a maximum variety of organisational contexts for mental health care provision. Results The constant change within the English NHS provided a difficult context in which to attempt to implement 'clinical governance' or, indeed, to reconstruct primary mental health care. In the absence of clear evidence or direct guidance about what 'primary mental health care' should be, and a lack of actors with the power or skills to set about realising it, the actors in 'clinical governance' had little shared knowledge or understanding of their role in improving the quality of mental health care. There was a lack of ownership of 'mental health' as an integral, normalised part of primary care. Conclusion Despite some achievements in regard to monitoring and standardisation of prescribing practice, mental health care in primary care seems to have so far largely eluded the gaze of 'clinical governance'. Clinical governance in English primary mental health care has not yet become normalised. We make some policy recommendations which we consider would assist in the process normalisation and suggest other contexts to which our findings might apply. PMID:18366779

  4. Serving transgender people: clinical care considerations and service delivery models in transgender health.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Kevan; Knudson, Gail; Khan, Sharful Islam; Bonierbale, Mireille; Watanyusakul, Suporn; Baral, Stefan

    2016-07-23

    The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) standards of care for transsexual, transgender, and gender non-conforming people (version 7) represent international normative standards for clinical care for these populations. Standards for optimal individual clinical care are consistent around the world, although the implementation of services for transgender populations will depend on health system infrastructure and sociocultural contexts. Some clinical services for transgender people, including gender-affirming surgery, are best delivered in the context of more specialised facilities; however, the majority of health-care needs can be delivered by a primary care practitioner. Across high-income and low-income settings alike, there often remains a dearth of educational programming for health-care professionals in transgender health, although the best evidence supports introducing modules on transgender health early during clinical education of clinicians and allied health professionals. While these challenges remain, we review the increasing evidence and examples of the defined roles of the mental health professional in transgender health-care decisions, effective models of health service provision, and available surgical interventions for transgender people.

  5. Rural Health Clinics and Diabetes-Related Primary Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries in Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkbride, Kelly; Wallace, Neal

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study assessed whether Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) were associated with higher rates of recommended primary care services for adult beneficiaries diagnosed with diabetes in Oregon's Medicaid program, the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Methods: OHP claims data from 2002 to 2003 were used to assess quality of diabetic care for…

  6. Physician clinical information technology and health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Ketcham, Jonathan D; Lutfey, Karen E; Gerstenberger, Eric; Link, Carol L; McKinlay, John B

    2009-12-01

    The authors develop a conceptual framework regarding how information technology (IT) can alter within-physician disparities, and they empirically test some of its implications in the context of coronary heart disease. Using a random experiment on 256 primary care physicians, the authors analyze the relationships between three IT functions (feedback and two types of clinical decision support) and five process-of-care measures. Endogeneity is addressed by eliminating unobserved patient characteristics with vignettes and by proxying for omitted physician characteristics. The results indicate that IT has no effects on physicians' diagnostic certainty and treatment of vignette patients overall. The authors find that treatment and certainty differ by patient age, gender, and race. Consistent with the framework, IT's effects on these disparities are complex. Feedback eliminated the gender disparities, but the relationships differed for other IT functions and process measures. Current policies to reduce disparities and increase IT adoption may be in discord.

  7. Promoting oral health practice among patients with diabetes attending primary health care clinics

    PubMed Central

    Aljaber, Abeer; Al-Surimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    The oral public health program for patients with diabetes was initiated by Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health (MoH) based on international quality standard to control the severity of oral disease in patients with diabetes through improving the accessibility of patients to dental clinics in primary health care centers (PHCC). This program intends to deliver oral health care (OHC) for each patient with diabetes at least one visit every six months. However, we found that more than 90% of patients with diabetes that visited prince Mohammed bin Saud PHCC in Riyadh do not get their regular dental check up every six months. We developed a quality improvement project (QIP) using the quality improvement model to activate MoH oral health program for patients with diabetes visiting prince Mohamed bin Saud PHCC. The aim of our QIP was to increase number of patients with diabetes receiving their regular oral health check up during the PHC visit. The quality team tested two simple improvement ideas. The first idea was having the dentist signature on appointment request. The testing of the first idea led to the second idea, that both physician and dentist should sign the referral form. After running several PDSA cycles to test these interventions ideas, we found the number of patients with diabetes seen in dental clinic had increased dramatically compared with the baseline assessment. We conclude that the idea of signing the referral form by both physician and dentist is a practical and simple strategy to be executed and has a direct impact on the patient clinical flow between clinics. PMID:26734427

  8. Vacation health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001937.htm Vacation health care To use the sharing features on this page, ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 to ...

  9. An innovative capstone health care informatics clinical residency: Interprofessional team collaboration.

    PubMed

    Custis, Laura M; Hawkins, Shelley Y; Thomason, Tanna R

    2017-03-01

    Integrated information systems and wireless technology have been increasingly incorporated into health care organizations with the premise that information technology will promote safe, high-quality, cost-effective patient care. With the advancement of technology, the level of expertise necessary to assume health care information technology roles has escalated. The purpose of this article is to describe a clinical residency project whereby students in a graduate degree health care informatics program successfully fulfilled program competencies through a faculty-lead research project focused on the use of home telehealth with a group of heart failure patients. Through the use of Donabedian's framework of structure, process, and outcomes, the health care informatics students completed essential learning activities deemed essential for transition into the role of an informatics specialist. Health care informatics educational leaders are encouraged to adapt this template of applied learning into their practices.

  10. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  11. Structural Vulnerability: Operationalizing the Concept to Address Health Disparities in Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, Philippe; Holmes, Seth M; Sue, Kim; Quesada, James

    2017-03-01

    The authors propose reinvigorating and extending the traditional social history beyond its narrow range of risk behaviors to enable clinicians to address negative health outcomes imposed by social determinants of health. In this Perspective, they outline a novel, practical medical vulnerability assessment questionnaire that operationalizes for clinical practice the social science concept of "structural vulnerability." A structural vulnerability assessment tool designed to highlight the pathways through which specific local hierarchies and broader sets of power relationships exacerbate individual patients' health problems is presented to help clinicians identify patients likely to benefit from additional multidisciplinary health and social services. To illustrate how the tool could be implemented in time- and resource-limited settings (e.g., emergency department), the authors contrast two cases of structurally vulnerable patients with differing outcomes. Operationalizing structural vulnerability in clinical practice and introducing it in medical education can help health care practitioners think more clearly, critically, and practically about the ways social structures make people sick. Use of the assessment tool could promote "structural competency," a potential new medical education priority, to improve understanding of how social conditions and practical logistics undermine the capacities of patients to access health care, adhere to treatment, and modify lifestyles successfully. Adoption of a structural vulnerability framework in health care could also justify the mobilization of resources inside and outside clinical settings to improve a patient's immediate access to care and long-term health outcomes. Ultimately, the concept may orient health care providers toward policy leadership to reduce health disparities and foster health equity.

  12. Unearthing the Theoretical Underpinnings of "Green Care" in Mental Health and Substance Misuse Care: Theoretical Underpinnings and Contemporary Clinical Examples.

    PubMed

    Cutcliffe, John R; Travale, Rodger

    2016-01-01

    The concept of "Green Care" can increasingly be found in mental health and addictions literature and some Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurses are practicing in facilities that base their approach on some or all of the underpinning theoretical elements of Green Care. However, Green Care is not yet widely considered to be part of mainstream psychiatry. Unearthing and articulating its theoretical underpinnings and clinical applications may further advance its legitimacy. Accordingly, this article identifies four principal theoretical elements of Green Care: Connectedness; Contact with Nature; Benefits of Exercise; and Occupation/Work as Therapeutic, each of which is explored and articulated by drawing on relevant literature.

  13. The Swedish National Diabetes Register in clinical practice and evaluation in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Hallgren Elfgren, Ing-Marie; Grodzinsky, Ewa; Törnvall, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Aim The purpose of this project is to describe the use of the Swedish National Diabetes Register (NDR) in clinical practice in a Swedish county and to specifically monitor the diabetes care routines at two separate primary health-care centres (PHCC) with a special focus on older patients.

  14. South Texas Veterans Health Care System Mobile Health Clinic: Business Case Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    has an active ambulatory care program with VA-staffed satellite outpatient clinics and contract Community Based Clinics located throughout San...geriatric evaluation and management, and palliative care to an estimated 16,000 veterans residing in the "Texas Hill Country." The Valley/Coastal...Bend Division (V/CBD) includes primary care outpatient clinics located in Harlingen, McAllen, Corpus Christi, and Laredo. The new Harlingen facility

  15. The new production theory for health care through clinical reengineering: a study of clinical guidelines--Part II.

    PubMed

    Sharp, J R

    1995-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part article, in the December 1994 issue of the journal, the author discussed the manufacturing theories of Peter Drucker in terms of their applicability for the health care field. He concluded that Drucker's four principles and practices of manufacturing--statistical quality control, manufacturing accounting, modular organization, and systems approach--do have application to the health care system. Clinical guidelines, a variation on the Drucker theory, are a specific example of the manufacturing process in health. The performance to date of some guidelines and their implications for the health care reform debate are discussed in Part II of the article.

  16. Transitions clinic: creating a community-based model of health care for recently released California prisoners.

    PubMed

    Wang, Emily A; Hong, Clemens S; Samuels, Liz; Shavit, Shira; Sanders, Ronald; Kushel, Margot

    2010-01-01

    Most California prisoners experience discontinuity of health care upon return to the community. In January 2006, physicians working with community organizations and representatives of the San Francisco Department of Public Health's safety-net health system opened the Transitions Clinic (TC) to provide transitional and primary care as well as case management for prisoners returning to San Francisco. This article provides a complete description of TC, including an illustrative case, and reports information about the recently released individuals who participated in the program. From January 2006 to October 2007, TC saw 185 patients with chronic medical conditions. TC patients are socially and economically disenfranchised; 86% belong to ethnic minority groups and 38% are homeless. Eighty-nine percent of patients did not have a primary care provider prior to their incarceration. Preliminary findings demonstrate that a community-based model of care tailored to this disenfranchised population successfully engages them in seeking health care.

  17. Management Development in Health Care: Exploring the Experiences of Clinical Nurse Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Laura; Milner, Brigid

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this paper is to investigate the dramatic reforms in the health service in recent years. Design/methodology/approach--Examines management development in health care, and explores the experiences of clinical nurse managers. Findings--Duplication of agencies and multiplication of roles have led to tensions in terms of both…

  18. Medication Abortion within a Student Health Care Clinic: A Review of the First 46 Consecutive Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godfrey, Emily M.; Bordoloi, Anita; Moorthie, Mydhili; Pela, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Medication abortion with mifepristone and misoprostol has been available in the United States since 2000. The authors reviewed the first 46 medication abortion cases conducted at a university-based student health care clinic to determine the safety and feasibility of medication abortion in this type of clinical setting. Participants:…

  19. [Conflicts of interests in clinical research in primary health care].

    PubMed

    González-de Paz, L; Navarro-Rubio, M D; Sisó-Almirall, A

    2014-03-01

    Conflicts of interests between professionals and patients in biomedical research, is an ethical problem. None of the laws in Spain mention whether the clinical researcher has to clarify to participants the reasons why it proposes them to participate in a clinical trial. In this article, conflicts of interests in research are discussed in the context of primary healthcare. In this area conflicts of interests might alter the confidence between patients and healthcare professionals. Finally, we suggest some practical strategies that can help participants make the decision to participate in a clinical trial more willingly and freely.

  20. Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care for Everyone | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Volunteering for Clinical Trials Can Help Improve Health Care ... save lives." Photo: Fran Sandridge For Melanie Modlin, volunteering to take part in a clinical trial was ...

  1. Physician Professional Satisfaction and Area of Clinical Practice: Evidence from an Integrated Health Care Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Caloyeras, John P; Kanter, Michael; Ives, Nicole; Kim, Chong Y; Kanzaria, Hemal K; Berry, Sandra H; Brook, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Context: For health care reform to succeed, health care systems need a professionally satisfied primary care workforce. Evidence suggests that primary care physicians are less satisfied than those in other medical specialties. Objective: To assess three domains of physician satisfaction by area of clinical practice among physicians practicing in an established integrated health system. Design: Cross-sectional online survey of all Southern California Permanente Medical Group (SCPMG) partner and associate physicians (N = 1034) who were primarily providing clinic-based care in 1 of 4 geographically and operationally distinct Kaiser Permanente Southern California Medical Centers. Main Outcome Measures: Primary measure was satisfaction with one’s day-to-day professional life as a physician. Secondary measures were satisfaction with quality of care and income. Results: Of the 636 physicians responding to the survey (61.5% response rate), on average, 8 in 10 SCPMG physicians reported satisfaction with their day-to-day professional life as a physician. Primary care physicians were only minimally less likely to report being satisfied (difference of 8.2–9.5 percentage points; p < 0.05) than were other physicians. Nearly all physicians (98.2%) were satisfied with the quality of care they are able to provide. Roughly 8 in 10 physicians reported satisfaction with their income. No differences were found between primary care physicians and those in other clinical practice areas regarding satisfaction with quality of care or income. Conclusion: It is possible to create practice settings, such as SCPMG, in which most physicians, including those in primary care, experience high levels of professional satisfaction. PMID:27057819

  2. Using organizational and clinical performance data to increase the value of mental health care.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Eric M; Krahn, Dean D; McGuire, Marsden H; Tavakoli, Sara; Wright, David M; Solares, Hugo E; Lemke, Sonne; Trafton, Jodie

    2017-02-01

    U.S. health systems, policy makers, and patients increasingly demand high-value care that improves health outcomes at lower cost. This study describes the initial design and analysis of the Mental Health Management System (MHMS), a performance data and quality improvement tool used by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to increase the value of its mental health care. The MHMS evaluates access to and quality of mental health care, organizational structure and efficiency, implementation of innovative treatment options, and, in collaboration with management, resource needs for delivering care. Performance on 31 measures was calculated for all U.S. VHA facilities (N = 139). Pearson correlations revealed that better access to care was significantly associated with fewer mental health provider staffing vacancies (r = -.24) and higher staff-to-patient ratios for psychiatrists (r = .19) and other outpatient mental health providers (r = .27). Higher staff-to-patient ratios were significantly associated with higher performance on a number of patient and provider satisfaction measures (range of r = .18-.51) and continuity of care measures (range of r = .26-.43). Relationships observed between organizational and clinical performance measures suggest that the MHMS is a robust informatics and quality improvement tool that can serve as a model for health systems planning to adopt a value perspective. Future research should expand the MHMS framework to measure patient and health systems costs and psychosocial outcomes, as well as evaluate whether quality improvement solutions implemented as a result of using organizational information leads to higher-value mental health care. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Social determinants of health and retention in HIV care in a clinical cohort in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rachlis, Beth; Burchell, Ann N; Gardner, Sandra; Light, Lucia; Raboud, Janet; Antoniou, Tony; Bacon, Jean; Benoit, Anita; Cooper, Curtis; Kendall, Claire; Loutfy, Mona; Wobeser, Wendy; McGee, Frank; Rachlis, Anita; Rourke, Sean B

    2016-12-27

    Continuous HIV care supports antiretroviral therapy initiation and adherence, and prolongs survival. We investigated the association of social determinants of health (SDH) and subsequent retention in HIV care in a clinical cohort in Ontario, Canada. The Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study is a multi-site cohort of patients at 10 HIV clinics. Data were collected from medical charts, interviews, and via record linkage with the provincial public health laboratory for viral load tests. For participants interviewed in 2009, we used three-category multinomial logistic regression to identify predictors of retention in 2010-2012, defined as (1) continuous care (≥2 viral loads ≥90 days in all years; reference category); (2) discontinuous care (only 1 viral load/year in ≥1 year); and (3) a gap in care (≥1 year in 2010-2012 with no viral load). In total, 1838 participants were included. In 2010-2012, 71.7% had continuous care, 20.9% had discontinuous care, and 7.5% had a gap in care. Discontinuous care in 2009 was predictive (p < .0001) of future retention. SDH associated with discontinuous care were Indigenous ethnicity, being born in Canada, being employed, reporting hazardous drinking, and non-injection drug use. Being a heterosexual male was associated with having a gap in care, and being single and younger were associated with discontinuous care and a gap in care. Various SDH were associated with retention. Care discontinuity was highly predictive of future gaps. Targeted strategic interventions that better engage those at risk of suboptimal retention merit exploration.

  4. Health Care Infrastructure for Financially Sustainable Clinical Genomics.

    PubMed

    Lennerz, Jochen K; McLaughlin, Heather M; Baron, Jason M; Rasmussen, David; Sumbada Shin, Meini; Berners-Lee, Nancy; Miller Batten, Julie; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Gala, Manish K; Winter, Harland S; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Sweetser, David A; Boswell, Marianne; Pacula, Maciej; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Le, Long P; Hynes, William; Rehm, Heidi L; Klibanski, Anne; Black-Schaffer, Stephen W; Golden, Jeffrey A; Louis, David N; Weiss, Scott T; Iafrate, A John

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing has evolved technically and economically into the method of choice for interrogating the genome in cancer and inherited disorders. The introduction of procedural code sets for whole-exome and genome sequencing is a milestone toward financially sustainable clinical implementation; however, achieving reimbursement is currently a major challenge. As part of a prospective quality-improvement initiative to implement the new code sets, we adopted Agile, a development methodology originally devised in software development. We implemented eight functionally distinct modules (request review, cost estimation, preauthorization, accessioning, prebilling, testing, reporting, and reimbursement consultation) and obtained feedback via an anonymous survey. We managed 50 clinical requests (January to June 2015). The fraction of pursued-to-requested cases (n = 15/50; utilization management fraction, 0.3) aimed for a high rate of preauthorizations. In 13 of 15 patients the insurance plan required preauthorization, which we obtained in 70% and ultimately achieved reimbursement in 50%. Interoperability enabled assessment of 12 different combinations of modules that underline the importance of an adaptive workflow and policy tailoring to achieve higher yields of reimbursement. The survey confirmed a positive attitude toward self-organizing teams. We acknowledge the individuals and their interactions and termed the infrastructure: human pipeline. Nontechnical barriers currently are limiting the scope and availability of clinical genomic sequencing. The presented human pipeline is one approach toward long-term financial sustainability of clinical genomics.

  5. Integrating Patient-Generated Health Data Into Clinical Care Settings or Clinical Decision-Making: Lessons Learned From Project HealthDesign

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Sara R; Hayes, Gillian R; Dorr, David A; Ash, Joan S; Sittig, Dean F

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient-generated health data (PGHD) are health-related data created or recorded by patients to inform their self-care and understanding about their own health. PGHD is different from other patient-reported outcome data because the collection of data is patient-driven, not practice- or research-driven. Technical applications for assisting patients to collect PGHD supports self-management activities such as healthy eating and exercise and can be important for preventing and managing disease. Technological innovations (eg, activity trackers) are making it more common for people to collect PGHD, but little is known about how PGHD might be used in outpatient clinics. Objective The objective of our study was to examine the experiences of health care professionals who use PGHD in outpatient clinics. Methods We conducted an evaluation of Project HealthDesign Round 2 to synthesize findings from 5 studies funded to test tools designed to help patients collect PGHD and share these data with members of their health care team. We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 Project HealthDesign study team members and 12 health care professionals that participated in these studies. We used an immersion-crystallization approach to analyze data. Our findings provide important information related to health care professionals’ attitudes toward and experiences with using PGHD in a clinical setting. Results Health care professionals identified 3 main benefits of PGHD accessibility in clinical settings: (1) deeper insight into a patient’s condition; (2) more accurate patient information, particularly when of clinical relevance; and (3) insight into a patient’s health between clinic visits, enabling revision of care plans for improved health goal achievement, while avoiding unnecessary clinic visits. Study participants also identified 3 areas of consideration when implementing collection and use of PGHD data in clinics: (1) developing practice workflows and protocols

  6. Adverse health effects of spousal violence among women attending Saudi Arabian primary health-care clinics.

    PubMed

    Eldoseri, H M; Tufts, K A; Zhang, Q; Fish, J N

    2014-12-17

    This study aimed to investigate the frequency of spousal violence among Saudi women and document the related health effects and injuries, as well as their attitudes to gender and violence. Structured interviews were conducted with 200 ever-married women recruited from primary-care centres in Jeddah. Nearly half of the surveyed women (44.5%) reported ever experiencing physical violence from their spouse. Although 37 women (18.5%) had received violence-related injuries, only 6.5% had reported these injuries to a health-care provider. Victims of spousal violence had poor perceptions of their overall health, and reported pain or discomfort, antidepressant use and suicidal thoughts. Women mostly disagreed with the presented justifications for wife-beating. However, the association between gender attitudes and spousal violence was not significant. The results of this study support calls for integration of education about partner violence into health-care curricula to enhance the access and quality of services.

  7. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. V: Creating Alternatives to Clinical Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollister, William G.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this guide deals with the process of creating alternatives to clinical care in Vance and Franklin counties. Specifically, this booklet details the chronological development of the…

  8. Leadership and organization development in health-care: lessons from the Cleveland Clinic.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Margaret M; O'Neil, Deborah A; FitzSimons, Kathleen; Bailin, Philip L; Stoller, James K

    2011-01-01

    Leaders in health-care today are faced with a wide array of complex issues. This chapter describes an innovative physician leadership development program at the Cleveland Clinic intended to enhance the leadership capacities of individuals and the organization. Propositions regarding the program's impact on organizational innovation, organizational commitment, social capital, and the human element of physician practice are offered for future examination.

  9. Identifying US veterans who access services from health care for the homeless clinics.

    PubMed

    Knopf-Amelung, Sarah M; Jenkins, Darlene M

    2013-12-01

    Research on veterans experiencing homelessness is predominantly focused on the US Department of Veterans Affairs setting, despite the fact that substantial numbers receive services from Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) clinics. We explored how HCH clinics identified veteran patients through a survey of administrators (49% response rate). The majority (98%) identified veterans but used varied language and approaches. Implementing a streamlined, culturally competent identification process is vital to collecting accurate data, connecting veterans with benefits, and informing treatment plans.

  10. Helping Health Care Providers and Clinical Scientists Understand Apparently Irrational Policy Decisions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Health care providers (HCP) and clinical scientists (CS) are generally most comfortable using evidence-based rational decision-making models. They become very frustrated when policymakers make decisions that, on the surface, seem irrational and unreasonable. However, such decisions usually make sense when analysed properly. The goal of this paper to provide a basic theoretical understanding of major policy models, to illustrate which models are most prevalent in publicly funded health care systems, and to propose a policy analysis framework to better understand the elements that drive policy decision-making. The proposed policy framework will also assist HCP and CS achieve greater success with their own proposals. PMID:28123917

  11. [Community resources prescription for self-care improvement in chronic illnesses. Clinical case management in Primary Health Care].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vico-Díaz de Rada, Lucía; González-Suárez, Miriam; Duarte-Clíments, Gonzalo; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of a 52 year-old male seen in a Primary Care nursing clinic for a type 2 diabetes mellitus metabolic control. The frequency of the visits increased due to perceived difficulties caused by changing the medical treatment. A focused interview was conducted under functional health patterns framework. The patient was unable to write or read, had not worked for the last 25 years, and expressed a lack of control over his self-care. An action plan was prepared, prioritizing Ineffective Health Maintenance, Powerlessness, and Impaired Social Interaction NANDA-I nursing diagnoses. The goals were set at improving knowledge and control over his disease and participating in leisure activities. To achieve these, the social health resources in the area were contacted, and agreed that the patient could attend activities that could improve his self-care and his quality of life. An improvement in his diabetes control was observed in the following evaluations, with an increase in his level of knowledge and self-care. The Primary Health care nurse should consider available community resources by using a comprehensive approach to chronic diseases for their therapeutic benefit and management, especially in those patients with adverse sociocultural conditions.

  12. Student specialty plans, clinical decision-making, and health care reform

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Robert L.; Romney, Crystal; Kano, Miria; Wright, Randy; Skipper, Betty; Getrich, Christina; Sussman, Andrew L.; Zyzanski, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Health care reform aims to increase evidence based, cost-conscious, and patient-centered care. Family medicine is seen as central to these aims in part due to evidence of lower cost, comparable quality care compared with other specialties. We sought evidence that senior medical students planning family medicine residency differ from peers entering other fields in decision-making patterns relevant to these health care reform aims. Methods We conducted a national, anonymous, internet-based survey of senior medical students. Students chose one of two equivalent management options for a set of patient vignettes based on preventive care, medication selection or initial chronic disease management scenarios, representing in turn, evidence-based care, cost-conscious care, and patient-centered care. We examined differences in student recommendations, comparing those planning to enter family medicine with all others using bivariate and weighted, multilevel, multivariable analyses. Results Among 4,656 surveys received from seniors at 84 participating medical schools, students entering family medicine were significantly more likely to recommend patient management options that were more cost-conscious (p=.01) and more patient-centered (p<.001). We did not find a significant difference between the student groups in recommendations for evidence-based care vignettes. Conclusions This study provides preliminary evidence suggesting that students planning to enter family practice may already have clinical decision-making patterns that support health care reform goals to a greater extent than their peers. If confirmed by additional studies, this could have implications for medical school admission and training processes. PMID:24915476

  13. [Evaluation of secondary care in oral health: a study of specialty clinics in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Goes, Paulo Sávio Angeiras de; Figueiredo, Nilcema; Neves, Jerlucia Cavalcanti das; Silveira, Fabiana Moura da Motta; Costa, José Felipe Riani; Pucca Júnior, Gilberto Alfredo; Rosales, Maritza Sosa

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the evaluation of secondary care in the area of health surveillance. This was a descriptive and normative/evaluative study. Performance analysis drew on secondary data, based on a historical series of dental procedures conducted at the specialized dental clinics implemented in Brazil and recorded by the Outpatient Information System of the Unified National Health System (SIA/SUS) in 2007, as well as primary data from site visits to the clinics, based on questionnaires completed by clinic staff. Performance of the clinics was poor in most regions of the country, and the North of Brazil had the lowest percentage of specialty services implemented. The indicator "Performance of Secondary Care in Oral Health" was 64.4%. The type 3 specialty clinics showed better results in terms of performance and achievement of targets. The study showed the need to review the legal framework for implementing specialized dental clinics by adjusting the criteria and norms, as well as definition of new standards for achievement of goals in the evaluation and monitoring of these services.

  14. Effective Strategies for Global Health Research, Training and Clinical Care: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Rebekah J.; Campbell, Jennifer A.; Egede, Leonard E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations. PMID:25716404

  15. Effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Walker, Rebekah J; Campbell, Jennifer A; Egede, Leonard E

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this narrative review was to synthesize the evidence on effective strategies for global health research, training and clinical care in order to identify common structures that have been used to guide program development. A Medline search from 2001 to 2011 produced 951 articles, which were reviewed and categorized. Thirty articles met criteria to be included in this review. Eleven articles discussed recommendations for research, 8 discussed training and 11 discussed clinical care. Global health program development should be completed within the framework of a larger institutional commitment or partnership. Support from leadership in the university or NGO, and an engaged local community are both integral to success and sustainability of efforts. It is also important for program development to engage local partners from the onset, jointly exploring issues and developing goals and objectives. Evaluation is a recommended way to determine if goals are being met, and should include considerations of sustainability, partnership building, and capacity. Global health research programs should consider details regarding the research process, context of research, partnerships, and community relationships. Training for global health should involve mentorship, pre-departure preparation of students, and elements developed to increase impact. Clinical care programs should focus on collaboration, sustainability, meeting local needs, and appropriate process considerations.

  16. Information needs of health care professionals in an AIDS outpatient clinic as determined by chart review.

    PubMed Central

    Giuse, N B; Huber, J T; Giuse, D A; Brown, C W; Bankowitz, R A; Hunt, S

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the information needs of health care professionals in HIV-related clinical encounters, and to determine the suitability of existing information sources to address those needs. SETTING: HIV outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Seven health care professionals with diverse training and patient care involvement. METHODS: Based on patient charts describing 120 patient encounters, participants generated 266 clinical questions. Printed and on-line information sources were used to answer questions in two phases: using commonly available sources and using all available medical library sources. MEASUREMENTS: The questions were divided into 16 categories by subject. The number of questions answered, their categories, the information source(s) providing answers, and the time required to answer questions were recorded for each phase. RESULTS: Each participant generated an average of 3.8 clinical questions per chart. Five categories accounted for almost 75% of all questions; the treatment protocols/regimens category was most frequent (24%). A total of 245 questions (92%) were answered, requiring an average of 15 minutes per question. Most (87%) of the questions were answered via electronic sources, even though paper sources were consulted first. CONCLUSIONS: The participating professionals showed considerable information needs. A combination of on-line and paper sources was necessary to provide the answers. The study suggests that present-day information sources are not entirely satisfactory for answering clinical questions generated by examining charts of HIV-infected patients. PMID:7850563

  17. A Population Health Approach to Clinical Social Work with Complex Patients in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Rose, Stephen M; Hatzenbuehler, Stephanie; Gilbert, Erika; Bouchard, Mark P; McGill, Debra

    2016-05-01

    Chronic diseases disproportionately occur among people from disadvantaged backgrounds. These backgrounds correlate with poor health in adulthood. Capacity for patients' to collaborate in their care tends to be lower than among other patients, leading to inefficient uses in medical services and higher risk of adverse events. In the course of this study, social workers engaged patients with increased inpatient and emergency department (ED) use and barriers to self-management, and evaluated them for lifetime exposure to material disadvantage and violence. Intervention focused on creating a primary care team that improved patients' self-efficacy, increased locus of control, and improved capacity for engagement. Results include a 49 percent decrease in admissions and a 5 percent decrease in ED utilization with significant cost savings. Authors recommend further study to analyze social, clinical, and financial risk in a larger sample, which may yield information about a health care provider's most at-risk patients for early targeted intervention.

  18. Well-Child Care Clinical Practice Redesign at a Community Health Center: Provider and Staff Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, Kelly; Moreno, Candice; Chung, Paul J.; Elijah, Jacinta; Coker, Tumaini R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community health centers (CHCs) are a key element of the health care safety net for underserved children. They may be an ideal setting to create well-child care (WCC) clinical practice redesign to drastically improve WCC delivery. Objective To examine the perspectives of clinical and administrative staff at a large, multisite urban CHC on alternative ways to deliver WCC services for low-income children aged 0 to 3 years. Methods Eight semistructured interviews were conducted with 4 pediatric teams (each consisting of 1 pediatrician and 2 medical assistants) and 4 CHC executive/administrative staff (Medical Director, COO, CEO, and Nurse Supervisor). Discussions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method of qualitative analysis. Salient themes included WCC delivery challenges and endorsed WCC clinical practice redesign solutions. Results The 3 main WCC delivery challenges included long wait times due to insurance verification and intake paperwork, lack of time for parent education and sick visits due to WCC visit volume, and absence of a system to encourage physicians to use non–face-to-face communication with parents. To address WCC delivery challenges, CHC providers and administrators endorsed several options for clinical practice redesign in their setting. These included use of a health educator in a team-based model of care, a previsit tool for screening and surveillance, Web site health education, a structured system for non–face-to-face (eg, phone) parent communication, and group visits. Conclusion CHC-specific strategies for WCC clinical practice redesign endorsed by a large, multisite safety net clinic may lead to more efficient, effective, and family-centered WCC for low-income populations. PMID:24327599

  19. Catalog of Completed Studies, US Army Health Care Studies and Clinical Investigation Activity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-10

    Environment Substudy: AD A139001 Effects of Chemical Protective Clothing on the Performance of Basic Medical Tasks (HCSD Report #83-001) 8 DATE TITLE...Contact urticaria to parabens , Arch. Dermatol, 1979, 115:1231-1232. *13 Smith, E. B., Padilla, R. S., McCabe, J. M., Becker, L. E., Benzoyl...Chemical Environment . --3-Report #83-001. Ft. Sam Houston, TX: Health Care Studies and Clinical Investigation Activity, December 1982. 19 Penetar, D. M

  20. Health-Care Hub

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  1. Risk management and clinical governance for complex home-based health care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mary; Noyes, Jane

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare professionals have an obligation to enable children with complex needs to lead 'ordinary lives' at home but the views of professionals and family members often diverge in relation to the management of risks. Nurses are increasingly taking on the clinical responsibility for children with complex needs within a multidisciplinary, multi-agency team, yet have little training or experience in adapting risk management and clinical governance frameworks to home-based settings. Risk management frameworks for home-based care for children with complex health and social care needs are introduced in this article. Best practice guidance and resources for adapting risk management frameworks are presented to meet this identified gap in knowledge and experience. Children, young people and their parents have increasing expectations relating to the type and quality of home-based support they receive. Developing and applying clinical governance and risk management frameworks are part of improving outcomes for children with complex needs and their families.

  2. Building relationships with physicians. Internal marketing efforts help strengthen organizational bonds at a rural health care clinic.

    PubMed

    Peltier, J W; Boyt, T; Westfall, J E

    1997-01-01

    Physician turnover is costly for health care organizations, especially for rural organizations. One approach management can take to reduce turnover is to promote physician loyalty by treating them as an important customer segment. The authors develop an information--oriented framework for generating physician loyalty and illustrate how this framework has helped to eliminate physician turnover at a rural health care clinic. Rural health care organizations must develop a more internal marketing orientation in their approach to establishing strong relationship bonds with physicians.

  3. Community-based free clinics: opportunities for interprofessional collaboration, health promotion, and complex care management

    PubMed Central

    Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle L.; Reinhardt, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Free or outreach clinics offer students the opportunity to work with diverse patient populations. The objective of this study was to describe the demographics and clinical characteristics of a sample of chiropractic patients at a free community-based clinic to assess clinical and educational opportunities for students to work with diverse populations, collaborate with other professions and practice health promotion through patient education. Methods: This was a prospective, descriptive cross-sectional study conducted over 2 months. Data on demographics, health status, and health risks were collected from patients and their interns. Results: Of the 158 patients, 50.6% were women and 50.6% African-American, while only 20.9% were employed full-time. Of the 24.7% tobacco users, 48.7% expressed interest in cessation. Of 80.0% overweight or obese patients, 48.8% expressed interest in weight loss. By self-report, 16.5% were diabetic, 10.1% took hypertension medication, 36.7% used prescription pain medication (9.4% opiate use), 33.5% used nonprescription pain medication, and 9.4% were under the care of a mental health professional. Conclusion: This patient population is demographically diverse. A high proportion of patients who used tobacco, or were overweight or obese expressed interest in information on those topics. A substantial proportion reported being under care with a mental health professional. This clinic provides opportunities for students to work with diverse populations, collaborate with other professions, and practice health promotion. PMID:26241702

  4. Making influenza vaccination mandatory for health care workers: the views of NSW Health administrators and clinical leaders.

    PubMed

    Leask, Julie; Helms, Charles M; Chow, Maria Y; Robbins, Spring C Cooper; McIntyre, Peter B

    2010-01-01

    The challenges of maintaining high influenza vaccination rates in health care workers have focused worldwide attention on mandatory measures. In 2007, NSW Health issued a policy directive requiring health care workers to be screened/vaccinated for certain infectious diseases. Annual influenza vaccine continued to be recommended but not required. This paper describes the views of NSW Health administrators and clinical leaders about adding influenza vaccination to the requirements. Of 55 staff interviewed, 45 provided a direct response. Of these, 23 supported inclusion, 14 did not and eight were undecided. Analysis of interviews indicated that successfully adding influenza vaccination to the current policy directive would require four major issues to be addressed: (1) providing and communicating a solid evidence base supporting the policy directive; (2) addressing the concerns of staff about the vaccine; (3) ensuring staff understand the need to protect patients; and (4) addressing the logistical challenges of enforcing an annual vaccination.

  5. Clinical mentorship to improve pediatric quality of care at the health centers in rural Rwanda: a qualitative study of perceptions and acceptability of health care workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite evidence supporting Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) as a strategy to improve pediatric care in countries with high child mortality, its implementation faces challenges related to lack of or poor post-didactic training supervision and gaps in necessary supporting systems. These constraints lead to health care workers’ inability to consistently translate IMCI knowledge and skills into practice. A program providing mentoring and enhanced supervision at health centers (MESH), focusing on clinical and systems improvement was implemented in rural Rwanda as a strategy to address these issues, with the ultimate goal of improving the quality of pediatric care at rural health centers. We explored perceptions of MESH from the perspective of IMCI clinical mentors, mentees, and district clinical leadership. Methods We conducted focus group discussions with 40 health care workers from 21 MESH-supported health centers. Two FGDs in each district were carried out, including one for nurses and one for director of health centers. District medical directors and clinical mentors had individual in-depth interviews. We performed a hermeneutic analysis using Atlas.ti v5.2. Results Study participants highlighted program components in five key areas that contributed to acceptability and impact, including: 1) Interactive, collaborative capacity-building, 2) active listening and relationships, 3) supporting not policing, 4) systems improvement, and 5) real-time feedback. Staff turn-over, stock-outs, and other facility/systems gaps were identified as barriers to MESH and IMCI implementation. Conclusion Health care workers reported high acceptance and positive perceptions of the MESH model as an effective strategy to build their capacity, bridge the gap between knowledge and practice in pediatric care, and address facility and systems issues. This approach also improved relationships between the district supervisory team and health center-based care

  6. Use of Drop-In Clinic Versus Appointment-Based Care for LGBT Youth: Influences on the Likelihood to Access Different Health-Care Structures.

    PubMed

    Newman, Bernie S; Passidomo, Kim; Gormley, Kate; Manley, Alecia

    2014-06-01

    The structure of health-care service delivery can address barriers that make it difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents to use health services. This study explores the differences among youth who access care in one of two service delivery structures in an LGBT health-care center: the drop-in clinic or the traditional appointment-based model. Analysis of 578 records of LGBT and straight youth (aged 14-24) who accessed health care either through a drop-in clinic or appointment-based care within the first year of offering the drop-in clinic reveals patterns of use when both models are available. We studied demographic variables previously shown to be associated with general health-care access to determine how each correlated with a tendency to use the drop-in structure versus routine appointments. Once the covariates were identified, we conducted a logistic regression analysis to identify its association with likelihood of using the drop-in clinic. Insurance status, housing stability, education, race, and gender identity were most strongly associated with the type of clinic used. Youth who relied on Medicaid, those in unstable housing, and African Americans were most likely to use the drop-in clinic. Transgender youth and those with higher education were more likely to use the appointment-based clinic. Although sexual orientation and HIV status were not related to type of clinic used, youth who were HIV positive used the appointment-based clinic more frequently. Both routes to health care served distinct populations who often experience barriers to accessible, affordable, and knowledgeable care. Further study of the factors related to accessing health care may clarify the extent to which drop-in hours in a youth-friendly context may increase the use of health care by the most socially marginalized youth.

  7. Use of traditional health practices by Southeast Asian refugees in a primary care clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Buchwald, D.; Panwala, S.; Hooton, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of use of traditional health practices among different ethnic groups of Southeast Asian refugees after their arrival in the United States, we conducted a convenience sample of 80 Cambodian, Lao, Mien, and ethnic Chinese patients (20 each) attending the University of Washington Refugee Clinic for a new or follow-up visit. Interpreters administered a questionnaire that dealt with demographics, medical complaints, traditional health practices, health beliefs, and attitudes toward Western practitioners. In all, 46 (58%) patients had used one or more traditional health practices, but the prevalence varied by ethnic group. Coining and massage were used by all groups except the Mien, whereas moxibustion and healing ceremonies were performed almost exclusively by the Mien. Traditional health practices were used for a variety of symptoms and, in 78% of reported uses, patients reported alleviation of symptoms. The use of traditional health practices is common among Southeast Asian refugees. Clinicians who care for this population should be aware of these practices because they may supersede treatments prescribed by physicians or leave cutaneous stigmata that may be confused with disease or physical abuse. Good patient care may necessitate the use or tolerance of both Western and traditional modalities in many Southeast Asian refugees. Images PMID:1595275

  8. Integrated physical and mental health care at a nurse-managed clinic: report from the trenches.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Deena

    2011-07-01

    The Health and Wellness Center (HWC), located in Joliet, Illinois, is a nurse-managed universally accessible primary health care center funded by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. The goals of the HWC are to improve access to quality primary health care services for all patients, including those who are uninsured and underserved, and to develop and implement a model of nurse-managed primary health care that integrates both physical and mental health assessment and treatment. After 5 years of developing and using this model, it is clear that integration requires strategic supports from the financial, political, and professional sectors to be considered a cost-effective model of health care delivery. Recommendations for policy and practice change are offered based on the author's experiences of providing integrated health care at the HWC and the health care industry's responses to uninsured or underinsured patients' needs.

  9. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  10. Diagnosis of paediatric HIV infection in a primary health care setting with a clinical algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, C.; Liebeschuetz, S.; Blaauw, D.; Cassol, S.; Qazi, S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity of an algorithm used by primary care health workers to identify children with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This HIV algorithm is being implemented in South Africa as part of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), a strategy that aims to improve childhood morbidity and mortality by improving care at the primary care level. As AIDS is a leading cause of death in children in southern Africa, diagnosis and management of symptomatic HIV infection was added to the existing IMCI algorithm. METHODS: In total, 690 children who attended the outpatients department in a district hospital in South Africa were assessed with the HIV algorithm and by a paediatrician. All children were then tested for HIV viral load. The validity of the algorithm in detecting symptomatic HIV was compared with clinical diagnosis by a paediatrician and the result of an HIV test. Detailed clinical data were used to improve the algorithm. FINDINGS: Overall, 198 (28.7%) enrolled children were infected with HIV. The paediatrician correctly identified 142 (71.7%) children infected with HIV, whereas the IMCI/HIV algorithm identified 111 (56.1%). Odds ratios were calculated to identify predictors of HIV infection and used to develop an improved HIV algorithm that is 67.2% sensitive and 81.5% specific in clinically detecting HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Children with symptomatic HIV infection can be identified effectively by primary level health workers through the use of an algorithm. The improved HIV algorithm developed in this study could be used by countries with high prevalences of HIV to enable IMCI practitioners to identify and care for HIV-infected children. PMID:14997238

  11. Assessing the Use of Mobile Health Technology by Patients: An Observational Study in Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Emily; Gonzalez, Cesar; Ramirez, Vanessa; Rubino, Barbara; Rossetti, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Background There is significant potential for mobile health technology to improve health outcomes for patients with chronic diseases. However, there is a need for further development of mobile health technology that would help to improve the health of lower-income communities. Objective The study objective was to assess mobile phone and app usage among a culturally diverse patient population, and to determine whether patients would be interested in using mobile health technology to help manage their chronic diseases. Methods An observational study was conducted with patients of the Internal Medicine resident primary care clinics of Los Angeles County and University of Southern California (LAC+USC) Medical Center. Self-reported information regarding demographics, current mobile phone usage, current mobile health app and social media usage, barriers to using mobile phones or mobile health apps, and interest in using a mobile health app was collected. Results Ninety-one percent of patients owned a mobile phone, with 76% (169/223) of these reporting having a mobile phone with Internet capability. Fifty-seven percent of subjects used mobile apps on their mobile phones, and 32% (41/130) of these used mobile apps related to their health. Eighty-six percent (207/241) of respondents voiced interest in using a mobile app to improve their health, and 40% (88/221) stated they would use such an app daily. Patients stated they would find the mobile health app most useful for nutrition, exercise, and obtaining general information on medical conditions. Conclusions Despite the fact that the majority of our primary care patients were of lower socioeconomic status, they utilized mobile phones with Internet and mobile app capabilities to a great extent. There was substantial interest among our patients in using mobile health technology to both manage chronic disease and improve overall health. Given that cultural, educational, and socioeconomic disparities strongly correlate with

  12. International student nurses' experiences of clinical practice in the Finnish health care system.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Pitkäjärvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe international student nurses' experiences of their clinical practice in the Finnish health care system. The data were collected by semi-structured interviews. Fourteen international student nurses of African and Asian origin were interviewed, and the data were then analysed by qualitative content analysis. The results indicated that appreciative orientation, sense of belonging to the team, enhancing independent working, growing towards professionalism and working as a member of the team were descriptions of positive experiences. Descriptions of negative experiences were related to restricted learning and compromised human dignity, which lead to negative feelings of being an outsider, decreased self-esteem, sense of giving up and anticipation of difficulties. Despite the small sample size, the results indicate a need to develop clinical practice arrangements when the language of the learning environment is other than that of the student nurse. As the number of international students has increased in the Finnish health care sector and in nursing education, it is important to recognise the factors related to positive and negative experiences in clinical practice.

  13. Electronic health records based phenotyping in next-generation clinical trials: a perspective from the NIH Health Care Systems Collaboratory.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel L; Hammond, W Ed; Nahm, Meredith; Wixted, Douglas; Simon, Gregory E; Robinson, Jennifer G; Bauck, Alan E; Cifelli, Denise; Smerek, Michelle M; Dickerson, John; Laws, Reesa L; Madigan, Rosemary A; Rusincovitch, Shelley A; Kluchar, Cynthia; Califf, Robert M

    2013-12-01

    Widespread sharing of data from electronic health records and patient-reported outcomes can strengthen the national capacity for conducting cost-effective clinical trials and allow research to be embedded within routine care delivery. While pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) have been performed for decades, they now can draw on rich sources of clinical and operational data that are continuously fed back to inform research and practice. The Health Care Systems Collaboratory program, initiated by the NIH Common Fund in 2012, engages healthcare systems as partners in discussing and promoting activities, tools, and strategies for supporting active participation in PCTs. The NIH Collaboratory consists of seven demonstration projects, and seven problem-specific working group 'Cores', aimed at leveraging the data captured in heterogeneous 'real-world' environments for research, thereby improving the efficiency, relevance, and generalizability of trials. Here, we introduce the Collaboratory, focusing on its Phenotype, Data Standards, and Data Quality Core, and present early observations from researchers implementing PCTs within large healthcare systems. We also identify gaps in knowledge and present an informatics research agenda that includes identifying methods for the definition and appropriate application of phenotypes in diverse healthcare settings, and methods for validating both the definition and execution of electronic health records based phenotypes.

  14. [The health-disease-care process from the perspective of the users of a primary care clinic in Montevideo, Uruguay: An analysis of therapeutic trajectories].

    PubMed

    Evia Bertullo, Victoria

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze, using an ethnographic approach, the health-disease-care experiences of the users of a multi-specialty clinic that forms part of the Metropolitan Primary Health Care Network of Uruguay's Public Health Services. The fieldwork was carried out in the northeast of Montevideo from July 2012 to November 2013, combining participant observation in social and care spaces and interviews with more than 20 users. In our analysis of care trajectories we found that people incorporate different practices and beliefs when facing their health problems. The use of biomedical health care services is predominant in Uruguay; nevertheless, people engage in self-care practices and in some cases, in the use of folk, religious/magical or alternative remedies. Medical pluralism is therefore observed in facing certain common ailments or significant experiences of disease.

  15. Integrating research, clinical care, and education in academic health science centers.

    PubMed

    King, Gillian; Thomson, Nicole; Rothstein, Mitchell; Kingsnorth, Shauna; Parker, Kathryn

    2016-10-10

    Purpose One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational activities to achieve the vision of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) and optimal client care. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach This paper synthesizes literature on organizational learning and collaboration, evidence-informed organizational decision making, and learning-based organizations to derive insights concerning the nature of effective workplace learning in AHSCs. Findings An evidence-informed model of collaborative workplace learning is proposed to aid the alignment of research, clinical, and educational functions in AHSCs. The model articulates relationships among AHSC academic functions and sub-functions, cross-functional activities, and collaborative learning processes, emphasizing the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing collaborative learning processes and optimizing EIDM and client care. Cross-functional activities involving clinicians, researchers, and educators are hypothesized to be a primary vehicle for integration, supported by a learning-oriented workplace culture. These activities are distinct from interprofessional teams, which are clinical in nature. Four collaborative learning processes are specified that are enhanced in cross-functional activities or teamwork: co-constructing meaning, co-learning, co-producing knowledge, and co-using knowledge. Practical implications The model provides an aspirational vision and insight into the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing workplace learning. The paper discusses the conceptual and empirical basis to the model, its contributions and limitations, and implications for AHSCs. Originality/value The model's potential utility for health care is discussed, with implications for organizational culture and the promotion of cross-functional activities.

  16. The impact of a clinical training unit on integrated child health care in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Guiscafré, H.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Villa, S.; Espinosa, P.; Bojalil, R.; Gutiérrez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This study had two aims: to describe the activities of a clinical training unit set up for the integrated management of sick children, and to evaluate the impact of the unit after its first four years of operation. The training unit was set up in the outpatient ward of a government hospital and was staffed by a paediatrician, a family medicine physician, two nurses and a nutritionist. The staff kept a computerized database for all patients seen and they were supervised once a month. During the first three years, the demand for first-time medical consultation increased by 477% for acute respiratory infections (ARI) and 134% for acute diarrhoea (AD), with an average annual increase of demand for medical care of 125%. Eighty-nine per cent of mothers who took their child for consultation and 85% of mothers who lived in the catchment area and had a deceased child received training on how to recognize alarming signs in a sick child. Fifty-eight per cent of these mothers were evaluated as being properly trained. Eighty-five per cent of primary care physicians who worked for government institutions (n = 350) and 45% of private physicians (n = 90) were also trained in the recognition and proper management of AD and ARI. ARI mortality in children under 1 year of age in the catchment area (which included about 25,000 children under 5 years of age) decreased by 43.2% in three years, while mortality in children under 5 years of age decreased by 38.8%. The corresponding figures for AD mortality reduction were 36.3% and 33.6%. In this same period, 11 clinical research protocols were written. In summary, we learned that a clinical training unit for integrated child care management was an excellent way to offer in-service training for primary health care physicians. PMID:11417039

  17. Managing and monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases in a primary health care clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Manjomo, R. C.; Mwagomba, B.; Ade, S.; Ali, E.; Ben-Smith, A.; Khomani, P.; Bondwe, P.; Nkhoma, D.; Douglas, G. P.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Chikosi, L.; Gadabu, O. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Objective: Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. Design: A cross-sectional study. Results: Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged ⩾65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for ⩾1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80–90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60–75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41–51%) and diabetes (15–38%) was poor. Conclusion: It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes. PMID:27358797

  18. Highlights From the Third Annual Mayo Clinic Conference on Systems Engineering and Operations Research in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Janine R. A.; Osborn, John B.; Roger, Véronique L.; Rohleder, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    In August 2010, the Third Annual Mayo Clinic Conference on Systems Engineering and Operations Research in Health Care was held. The continuing mission of the conference is to gather a multidisciplinary group of systems engineers, clinicians, administrators, and academic professors to discuss the translation of systems engineering methods to more effective health care delivery. Education, research, and practice were enhanced via a mix of formal presentations, tutorials, and informal gatherings of participants with diverse backgrounds. Although the conference promotes a diversity of perspectives and methods, participants are united in their desire to find ways in which systems engineering can transform health care, especially in the context of health care reform and other significant changes affecting the delivery of health care. PMID:21803959

  19. Prevalence of outsourcing and perception of clinical nutrition managers on performance of health care dietetics services.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junehee; Yoon, Barbara J H

    2003-08-01

    A nationwide survey of clinical dietitians and clinical nutrition managers was conducted to assess the prevalence of outsourcing in health care dietetics services and to evaluate perceived performance of dietetics services. A questionnaire was developed, validated by an expert panel, and pilot tested prior to data collection. Members of the Clinical Nutrition Management Dietetic Practice Group (N=1,668) were selected as the study sample. Of 431 respondents, 152 (35.3%) indicated that management of both patient and cafeteria foodservices was outsourced. When mean scores of perceived performance ratings were compared using t test, respondents from self-operated facilities rated several items related to patient and cafeteria food quality and material and human resource utilization higher than respondents at contract-managed facilities. No significant differences were found in performance related to decision-making process, buying power, or training programs. Results suggest that careful weighing of advantages and disadvantages of outsourcing is needed before making decisions regarding outsourcing dietetics services.

  20. [Do clinical guidelines and economic restrictions on health care affect the criminal liability of health care professionals?].

    PubMed

    Erlinger, Rainer

    2004-05-01

    Criminal liability in connection with clinical guidelines relates to several different aspects: (1) It refers to the guideline authors' liability under criminal law in the case of faulty guidelines. (2) Guidelines do not constitute legally binding rules. They can only contribute to determining the standard for medical specialists. (3) There can and must not be any reversal in the burden of proof with criminal proceedings. (4) In case of a deviation from guidelines and a related breach of duty, the subjective aspect of negligence (i.e. the recognizability of danger) can often be inferred from the knowledge of the respective guideline that we can reasonably expect of the physician. (5) No physician who has adhered to the guidelines can regularly be accused of (subjective) negligence. (6) Problems may be encountered in cases where the topic in question has not been covered, but only peripherally touched upon by guidelines. For the sake of uniformity in our legal system, the individual physician must not be held criminally responsible for the lack of economic means. Possible solutions include: (1) relating the standard to the practically instead of the theoretically feasible, (2) investigating to what extent criminal liability may be limited by acceptability and possibility. The complete refusal to provide medical care under inadequate conditions may increase the endangerment of legally protected rights and therefore be unacceptable. Attempts to improve structures towards the standard may be regarded as meeting the requirements under criminal law.

  1. Enabling health care decisionmaking through clinical decision support and knowledge management.

    PubMed Central

    Lobach, David; Sanders, Gillian D; Bright, Tiffani J; Wong, Anthony; Dhurjati, Ravi; Bristow, Erin; Bastian, Lori; Coeytaux, Remy; Samsa, Gregory; Hasselblad, Vic; Williams, John W; Wing, Liz; Musty, Michael; Kendrick, Amy S

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To catalogue study designs used to assess the clinical effectiveness of CDSSs and KMSs, to identify features that impact the success of CDSSs/KMSs, to document the impact of CDSSs/KMSs on outcomes, and to identify knowledge types that can be integrated into CDSSs/KMSs. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE(®), CINAHL(®), PsycINFO(®), and Web of Science(®). REVIEW METHODS We included studies published in English from January 1976 through December 2010. After screening titles and abstracts, full-text versions of articles were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Included articles were abstracted to evidence tables by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were performed for seven domains in which sufficient studies with common outcomes were included. RESULTS We identified 15,176 articles, from which 323 articles describing 311 unique studies including 160 reports on 148 randomized control trials (RCTs) were selected for inclusion. RCTs comprised 47.5 percent of the comparative studies on CDSSs/KMSs. Both commercially and locally developed CDSSs effectively improved health care process measures related to performing preventive services (n = 25; OR 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27 to 1.58), ordering clinical studies (n = 20; OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.00), and prescribing therapies (n = 46; OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.82). Fourteen CDSS/KMS features were assessed for correlation with success of CDSSs/KMSs across all endpoints. Meta-analyses identified six new success features: Integration with charting or order entry system. Promotion of action rather than inaction. No need for additional clinician data entry. Justification of decision support via research evidence. Local user involvement. Provision of decision support results to patients as well as providers. Three previously identified success features were confirmed: Automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow. Provision of decision support at time and location of decisionmaking. Provision of a

  2. Silk road: opportunities for foreign-owned health care clinics in China.

    PubMed

    Lee, T K

    1996-01-01

    Hospitals and other health care providers are being squeezed by declining reimbursement and capitated revenues. As this happens they are looking to expand into rapidly developing and newly industrialised countries. This article will focus on the People's Republic of China as a country with opportunities for developing private hospitals and health care facilities.

  3. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old) enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs) in Embu das Artes (SP), from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6%) and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409). After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study. PMID:26316387

  4. Clinical Protocols to Reduce High Risk Drinking in College Students: The College Drinking Prevention Curriculum for Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this curriculum is to help all health care professionals -- physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, social workers, health educators, counselors, psychologists, and others who work with college students -- identify and treat students who are at-risk or are having alcohol-related problems. The clinical methods…

  5. Health care consumers’ perspectives on pharmacist integration into private general practitioner clinics in Malaysia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Pui San; Nissen, Lisa M; Freeman, Christopher; Wong, Pei Se; Mak, Vivienne

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacists are considered medication experts but are underutilized and exist mainly at the periphery of the Malaysian primary health care team. Private general practitioners (GPs) in Malaysia are granted rights under the Poison Act 1952 to prescribe and dispense medications at their primary care clinics. As most consumers obtain their medications from their GPs, community pharmacists’ involvement in ensuring safe use of medicines is limited. The integration of a pharmacist into private GP clinics has the potential to contribute to quality use of medicines. This study aims to explore health care consumers’ views on the integration of pharmacists within private GP clinics in Malaysia. Methods A purposive sample of health care consumers in Selangor and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were invited to participate in focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed using NVivo 10. Results A total of 24 health care consumers participated in two focus groups and six semi-structured interviews. Four major themes were identified: 1) pharmacists’ role viewed mainly as supplying medications, 2) readiness to accept pharmacists in private GP clinics, 3) willingness to pay for pharmacy services, and 4) concerns about GPs’ resistance to pharmacist integration. Consumers felt that a pharmacist integrated into a private GP clinic could offer potential benefits such as to provide trustworthy information on the use and potential side effects of medications and screening for medication misadventure. The potential increase in costs passed on to consumers and GPs’ reluctance were perceived as barriers to integration. Conclusion This study provides insights into consumers’ perspectives on the roles of pharmacists within private GP clinics in Malaysia. Consumers generally supported pharmacist integration into private primary health care clinics. However, for pharmacists to expand their capacity in

  6. Health care technology assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  7. Severity of Mental Health Impairment and Trajectories of Improvement in an Integrated Primary Care Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Craig J.; Corso, Meghan L.; Corso, Kent A.; Morrow, Chad E.; Kanzler, Kathryn E.; Ray-Sannerud, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To model typical trajectories for improvement among patients treated in an integrated primary care behavioral health service, multilevel models were used to explore the relationship between baseline mental health impairment level and eventual mental health functioning across follow-up appointments. Method: Data from 495 primary care…

  8. Clinical informatics in critical care.

    PubMed

    Martich, G Daniel; Waldmann, Carl S; Imhoff, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Health care information systems have the potential to enable better care of patients in much the same manner as the widespread use of the automobile and telephone did in the early 20th century. The car and phone were rapidly accepted and embraced throughout the world when these breakthroughs occurred. However, the automation of health care with use of computerized information systems has not been as widely accepted and implemented as computer technology use in all other sectors of the global economy. In this article, the authors examine the need, risks, and rewards of clinical informatics in health care as well as its specific relationship to critical care medicine.

  9. Use of telemedicine for haemodialysis: perceptions of patients and health-care providers, and clinical effects.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Pamela; Buis, Lorraine

    2008-01-01

    In Michigan, the use of telemedicine for dialysis patients began in three centres in 2005. A total of 747 clinical consultations was conducted in the following 22 months. Telephone surveys were conducted with 34 patients and four providers. The patients and providers all had positive perceptions of the telemedicine system and the care that was delivered. Most of the clinical measures of the patients met or exceeded the recommendations made by Renal Network 11. In addition to the clinical work, the telemedicine equipment was used for educational events. Twenty-six professional educational events were provided with a total audience of 105 individuals, and 35 administrative meetings were provided with 286 staff members in attendance. The study showed that patients and providers could participate in educational events that might not be available locally. Despite the success of dialysis telemedicine, the Marquette General Health System discontinued its use in 2007 when the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services re-affirmed that dialysis centres were not approved sites for telemedicine.

  10. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  11. Clinical Practice Models for the Use of E-Mental Health Resources in Primary Health Care by Health Professionals and Peer Workers: A Conceptual Framework

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Kathleen M; Cunningham, John A; Bennett, Kylie; Bennett, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background Research into e-mental health technologies has developed rapidly in the last 15 years. Applications such as Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy interventions have accumulated considerable evidence of efficacy and some evidence of effectiveness. These programs have achieved similar outcomes to face-to-face therapy, while requiring much less clinician time. There is now burgeoning interest in integrating e-mental health resources with the broader mental health delivery system, particularly in primary care. The Australian government has supported the development and deployment of e-mental health resources, including websites that provide information, peer-to-peer support, automated self-help, and guided interventions. An ambitious national project has been commissioned to promote key resources to clinicians, to provide training in their use, and to evaluate the impact of promotion and training upon clinical practice. Previous initiatives have trained clinicians to use a single e-mental health program or a suite of related programs. In contrast, the current initiative will support community-based service providers to access a diverse array of resources developed and provided by many different groups. Objective The objective of this paper was to develop a conceptual framework to support the use of e-mental health resources in routine primary health care. In particular, models of clinical practice are required to guide the use of the resources by diverse service providers and to inform professional training, promotional, and evaluation activities. Methods Information about service providers’ use of e-mental health resources was synthesized from a nonsystematic overview of published literature and the authors’ experience of training primary care service providers. Results Five emerging clinical practice models are proposed: (1) promotion; (2) case management; (3) coaching; (4) symptom-focused treatment; and (5) comprehensive therapy. We also

  12. A Framework to Support the Sharing and Reuse of Computable Phenotype Definitions Across Health Care Delivery and Clinical Research Applications

    PubMed Central

    Richesson, Rachel L.; Smerek, Michelle M.; Blake Cameron, C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The ability to reproducibly identify clinically equivalent patient populations is critical to the vision of learning health care systems that implement and evaluate evidence-based treatments. The use of common or semantically equivalent phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases will support this aim. Currently, there is no single consolidated repository for computable phenotype definitions, making it difficult to find all definitions that already exist, and also hindering the sharing of definitions between user groups. Method: Drawing from our experience in an academic medical center that supports a number of multisite research projects and quality improvement studies, we articulate a framework that will support the sharing of phenotype definitions across research and health care use cases, and highlight gaps and areas that need attention and collaborative solutions. Framework: An infrastructure for re-using computable phenotype definitions and sharing experience across health care delivery and clinical research applications includes: access to a collection of existing phenotype definitions, information to evaluate their appropriateness for particular applications, a knowledge base of implementation guidance, supporting tools that are user-friendly and intuitive, and a willingness to use them. Next Steps: We encourage prospective researchers and health administrators to re-use existing EHR-based condition definitions where appropriate and share their results with others to support a national culture of learning health care. There are a number of federally funded resources to support these activities, and research sponsors should encourage their use. PMID:27563686

  13. The contribution of traditional healers' clinics to public health care system in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ethiopian people have been using traditional medicine since time immemorial with 80% of its population dependent on traditional medicines. However, the documentation of traditional healers' clinics contribution to modern public health system in cosmopolitan cities is scanty. Studies conducted so far are limited and focused on the perceptions and practices of modern and traditional health practitioners about traditional medicine. Thus, a cross sectional study was conducted from February to May 2010 to assess the contribution of traditional healers' clinics to public health care system in Addis Ababa. Materials and methods Ten traditional healers who were willing to participate in the study and 306 patients who were visiting these traditional healers' clinics were interviewed using two types of semi-structured questionnaires. Data were summarized using percentages, tables and bar chart. Results The diseases mostly treated by traditional healers were wound, inflammation, herpes zoster, hemorrhoids, fracture, paralysis, back-pain, liver diseases, cancer and eczema. This study showed that traditional healers' clinics considerably contribute to public health care in Addis Ababa. Fifty two percent of patients reported that traditional healers' clinics were their first choice when they faced health problems. The reasons for visiting these clinics were 175 (57.2%) efficacy, 109 (35.6%) dissatisfaction with modern medicine, 10 (3.3%) dissatisfaction with modern medicine and efficacy, 6 (2.0%) cost and 6 (2.0%) dissatisfaction and cost. Females (55.2%), young age (20-40 years, 65.0%), never married (56.9%), orthodox (73.9%), Amhara (52.3%), educational status above grade 12 (34.6%) and government employees (29.4%) were frequent visitors. Healers reported that there was no form of cooperation with modern health professionals. The reasons were lack of motivation to collaborate and communicate with modern health service workers. Family based apprenticeship was the

  14. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  15. Health care workers.

    PubMed

    Udasin, I G

    2000-12-01

    More people are employed in the health care sector than in any other industry in the United States. Health care workers are exposed to a wide variety of hazards, including biological, chemical, physical and psychological stressors. Concerns about exposure to contagious diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis have influenced the career choices of many health professionals. Physical hazards, especially ergonomic ones, account for the majority of the disability faced by health care workers. Chemical exposure and psychosocial stresses are also present in health care institutions. The exposure encountered in health care facilities is potentially dangerous to health care workers as well as to their family members and unborn children.

  16. Can clinical use of Social Media improve quality of care in mental Health? A Health Technology Assessment approach in an Italian mental health service.

    PubMed

    Di Napoli, Wilma Angela; Nollo, Giandomenico; Pace, Nicola; Torri, Emanuele

    2015-09-01

    Clinical use of modern Information and Communication Technologies such as Social Media (SM) can easily reach and empower groups of population at risk or affected by chronic diseases, and promote improvement of quality of care. In the paper we present an assessment of SM (i.e. e-mails, websites, on line social networks, apps) in the management of mental disorders, carried out in the Mental Health Service of Trento (Italy) according to Health Technology Assessment criteria. A systematic review of literature was performed to evaluate technical features, safety and effectiveness of SM. To understand usage rate and attitude towards new social technologies of patients and professionals, we performed a context analysis by a survey conducted over a group of 88 psychiatric patients and a group of 35 professionals. At last, we made recommendations for decision makers in order to promote SM for the management of mental disorders in a context of prioritization of investments in health care.

  17. Community reactions to reproductive health care at three school-based clinics in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Zeanah, P D; Morse, E V; Simon, P M; Stock, M; Pratt, J L; Sterne, S

    1996-09-01

    Despite the growing success of school-based health care during the past two decades, the issue of providing reproductive health care at school-based health centers remains controversial. In this article, focus group data from three school-based centers in Louisiana, each in different stages of development, demonstrates how the controversies about reproductive health may frame more general concerns about school-based care. In addition, community readiness to address directly problematic sexual behavior relates not only to the specific needs and priorities of the community but to recognition of the negative effect of the consequences of sexual behavior such as pregnancy, high drop out, and absenteeism rates on a community's educational, rather than social, goals and values.

  18. Out-of-Sync Cancer Care: Health Insurance Companies, Biomedical Practices, and Clinical Time in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Camilo

    2017-04-01

    I discuss the physical wearing out of low-income cancer patients in the aftermath of the neoliberal restructuring of the Colombian health care system in 1993. The settings for this struggle are the hospitals and the health insurance companies; the actors are bodies with cancer, the physicians who diagnose people with cancer, and the relatives who care for them. I show how most low-income patients, instead of accessing complete anticancer treatments in a timely fashion, have to negotiate and confront health insurance companies and profit-making. This results in a wait, where the time needs of the bureaucracy of the health care system and the time needs of patients' bodies are discordant, at a cost to patients.

  19. Health outcomes and retention in care following release from prison for patients of an urban post-incarceration transitions clinic

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Aaron D.; Anderson, Matthew R.; Bartlett, Gary; Valverde, John; Starrels, Joanna L.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic health conditions are overrepresented among prisoners who often face barriers to medical care following release. Transitions clinics seek to provide timely access to medical care following release. This retrospective cohort study investigated care delivery and health outcomes for recently released prisoners receiving care at the Bronx Transitions Clinic. Among 135 recently released prisoners, median time from release to initial medical visit was 10 days (IQ Range: 5–31). Six-month retention in care was high for HIV-infection (86%), but lower for opioid dependence (33%), hypertension (45%) and diabetes (43%). At six months, 54% of HIV-patients had a suppressed viral load, but fewer buprenorphine-treated patients reduced opioid use (19%), and fewer hypertensive and diabetic patients reached respective blood pressure (35%) and hemoglobin A1c (14%) goals. Access to medical care is necessary but not sufficient to control chronic health conditions. Additional interventions are necessary for formerly incarcerated persons to achieve optimal health outcomes. PMID:25130230

  20. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were compared with…

  1. Educating for the 21st-Century Health Care System: An Interdependent Framework of Basic, Clinical, and Systems Sciences.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Haidet, Paul; Papp, Klara K; Wolpaw, Daniel R; Moser, Eileen; Wittenstein, Robin D; Wolpaw, Terry

    2017-01-01

    In the face of a fragmented and poorly performing health care delivery system, medical education in the United States is poised for disruption. Despite broad-based recommendations to better align physician training with societal needs, adaptive change has been slow. Traditionally, medical education has focused on the basic and clinical sciences, largely removed from the newer systems sciences such as population health, policy, financing, health care delivery, and teamwork. In this article, authors examine the current state of medical education with respect to systems sciences and propose a new framework for educating physicians in adapting to and practicing in systems-based environments. Specifically, the authors propose an educational shift from a two-pillar framework to a three-pillar framework where basic, clinical, and systems sciences are interdependent. In this new three-pillar framework, students not only learn the interconnectivity in the basic, clinical, and systems sciences but also uncover relevance and meaning in their education through authentic, value-added, and patient-centered roles as navigators within the health care system. Authors describe the Systems Navigation Curriculum, currently implemented for all students at the Penn State College of Medicine, as an example of this three-pillar educational model. Simple adjustments, such as including occasional systems topics in medical curriculum, will not foster graduates prepared to practice in the 21st-century health care system. Adequate preparation requires an explicit focus on the systems sciences as a vital and equal component of physician education.

  2. The Personal Health Record Paradox: Health Care Professionals’ Perspectives and the Information Ecology of Personal Health Record Systems in Organizational and Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    accounts and analysis of organizational documents revealed a multidimensional dynamic between the trajectory of secure messaging implementation and its impact on organizational actors and their use of technology, influencing workflow, practices, and the flow of information. In effect, secure messaging was the missing element of complex information ecology and its implementation acted as a catalyst for change. Secure messaging was found to have important consequences for access, communication, patient self-report, and patient/provider relationships. Conclusions Study findings have direct implications for the development and implementation of PHR systems to ensure adequate training and support for health care professionals, alignment with clinical workflow, and features that enable information sharing and communication. Study findings highlight the importance of clinician endorsement and engagement, and the need to further examine both intended and unintended consequences of use. This research provides an integral step toward better understanding the social and organizational context and impact of PHR and secure messaging use in clinical practice settings. PMID:23557596

  3. Rationalizing definitions and procedures for optimizing clinical care and public health in fetal death and stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Joseph, K S; Kinniburgh, Brooke; Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Mehrabadi, Azar; Dahlgren, Leanne; Basso, Melanie; Davies, Cheryl; Lee, Lily

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent focus on stillbirth, there remains a profound need to address problems associated with the definitions and procedures related to fetal death and stillbirth. The current definition of fetal death, first proposed in 1950, needs to be updated to distinguish between the timing of fetal death (which has etiologic and prognostic significance) and the timing of stillbirth (ie, the delivery of the dead fetus). Stillbirth registration procedures, modeled after live birth registration and not death registration, also need to be modernized because they can be an unnecessary burden on some grieving families. The problems associated with fetal death definitions and stillbirth-associated procedures are highlighted by selective fetal reduction in multifetal pregnancy; in many countries, the fetus reduced at 10-13 weeks of gestation and delivered at term gestation requires stillbirth registration and a burial permit even if fetal remains cannot be identified. An international consensus is needed to standardize the definition of reportable fetal deaths; ideally this should be based on the timing of fetal death and should address the status of pregnancy terminations. In this article, we list propositions for initiating an international dialogue that will rationalize fetal death definitions, registration criteria, and associated procedures, and thereby improve clinical care and public health.

  4. Competence of health workers in emergency obstetric care: an assessment using clinical vignettes in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Terhi Johanna; Nesbitt, Robin Clark; Manu, Alexander; Vesel, Linda; Okyere, Eunice; Kirkwood, Betty; Gabrysch, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess health worker competence in emergency obstetric care using clinical vignettes, to link competence to availability of infrastructure in facilities, and to average annual delivery workload in facilities. Design Cross-sectional Health Facility Assessment linked to population-based surveillance data. Setting 7 districts in Brong Ahafo region, Ghana. Participants Most experienced delivery care providers in all 64 delivery facilities in the 7 districts. Primary outcome measures Health worker competence in clinical vignette actions by cadre of delivery care provider and by type of facility. Competence was also compared with availability of relevant drugs and equipment, and to average annual workload per skilled birth attendant. Results Vignette scores were moderate overall, and differed significantly by respondent cadre ranging from a median of 70% correct among doctors, via 55% among midwives, to 25% among other cadres such as health assistants and health extension workers (p<0.001). Competence varied significantly by facility type: hospital respondents, who were mainly doctors and midwives, achieved highest scores (70% correct) and clinic respondents scored lowest (45% correct). There was a lack of inexpensive key drugs and equipment to carry out vignette actions, and more often, lack of competence to use available items in clinical situations. The average annual workload was very unevenly distributed among facilities, ranging from 0 to 184 deliveries per skilled birth attendant, with higher workload associated with higher vignette scores. Conclusions Lack of competence might limit clinical practice even more than lack of relevant drugs and equipment. Cadres other than midwives and doctors might not be able to diagnose and manage delivery complications. Checking clinical competence through vignettes in addition to checklist items could contribute to a more comprehensive approach to evaluate quality of care. Trial registration number NCT00623337

  5. Factors associated to clinical learning in nursing students in primary health care: an analytical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Gallardo, Pilar; Martínez-Marcos, Mercedes; Espejo-Matorrales, Flora; Arakawa, Tiemi; Magnabosco, Gabriela Tavares; Pinto, Ione Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the students' perception about the quality of clinical placements and asses the influence of the different tutoring processes in clinical learning. Methods: analytical cross-sectional study on second and third year nursing students (n=122) about clinical learning in primary health care. The Clinical Placement Evaluation Tool and a synthetic index of attitudes and skills were computed to give scores to the clinical learning (scale 0-10). Univariate, bivariate and multivariate (multiple linear regression) analyses were performed. Results: the response rate was 91.8%. The most commonly identified tutoring process was "preceptor-professor" (45.2%). The clinical placement was assessed as "optimal" by 55.1%, relationship with team-preceptor was considered good by 80.4% of the cases and the average grade for clinical learning was 7.89. The multiple linear regression model with more explanatory capacity included the variables "Academic year" (beta coefficient = 1.042 for third-year students), "Primary Health Care Area (PHC)" (beta coefficient = 0.308 for Area B) and "Clinical placement perception" (beta coefficient = - 0.204 for a suboptimal perception). Conclusions: timeframe within the academic program, location and clinical placement perception were associated with students' clinical learning. Students' perceptions of setting quality were positive and a good team-preceptor relationship is a matter of relevance. PMID:27627124

  6. Opportunities for multidisciplinary ASH clinical hypertension specialists in an era of population health and accountable care: ASH leadership message.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brent M

    2014-07-01

    The ASH hypertension specialists and ASH clinical and comprehensive hypertension centers represent a continuum of expertise and capacity positioned to play a major role in advancing the Triple Aim, which includes improving the patient care experience, population health, and value in cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention. The ASH hypertension specialists board is dedicated to testing and designating a broad range of qualified health care professionals as clinical hypertension specialists. A continuing partnership with ASH, recognizing the need for an appropriate firewall between education and testing, is essential in providing the education and training programs required to grow and sustain the specialized workforce required to translate current evidence and future advances in personalized medicine into better care for individuals, better health for populations, and better value for payers. Moreover, growth of the ASH hypertension registry has the potential to accelerate advances in education and patient care as noted previously. The ASH hypertension specialists board is excited about the opportunities available to a well-trained and collaborative multidisciplinary group of clinical hypertension specialists in an era of ACOs pursuing the Triple Aim.

  7. Information technology, health care, and the future: what are the implications for the clinical laboratory?

    PubMed

    Lincoln, T L; Essin, D

    1992-01-01

    As new information systems are offered for the clinical laboratory, advanced applications and improvements in computer hardware continue to dominate marketing presentations and fascinate the decision maker. However, the most important issue for all of our clinical information systems is not the speed of the hardware, the reliability of the systems software, or the ability of applications to carry out routine tasks in some novel or elegant manner. Rather, it is "coping"--the ability of a system to manage new issues that arise as information requirements change over time and to manage all the unexpected events that occur in the course of regular work but that do not follow the usual sequence of procedures. The need for new processing conventions to cope with unexpected situations without creating new problems is not unique to health care. The need is present wherever the real world intrudes directly and significantly into critical operations. Moreover, the pressure to adjust to changing external circumstances continues to grow as the rate of change in our information-based society increases. The lack of general coping procedures, although long ignored, has become such a pervasive handicap that marked improvements in this type of flexibility will be introduced over this decade. New software designs that deal with coping issues are already beginning to appear and to bear fruit. When purchasing any new laboratory computer system today, software that demonstrates an effective coping flexibility should be given more weight than fascinating innovations in hardware or software that are the favorites of vendor marketers. It is now possible to test for such flexibility on a site-specific basis.

  8. Unplanned health care tourism.

    PubMed

    Powell, Suzanne K

    2015-01-01

    Health care tourism is often a preplanned event carefully laying out all the details. Sometimes, when one least expects it, medical care is needed outside of the mainland. This Editorial speaks to an unplanned experience.

  9. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  10. Patient-centred interprofessional collaboration in primary care: challenges for clinical, educational and health services research. An EGPRN keynote paper.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Paul; Rees, Charlotte E; Groenewegen, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The theme 'patient-centred interprofessional collaboration' of the EGPRN conference in October 2012, captures in just three words important challenges for European primary care and its research agenda. Challenges for future research are formulated, in three domains: clinical, educational and health services research. Transferability of research, based upon advanced computational infrastructure, will facilitate a rapid learning health care system. In educational research, this includes the use of observational and reflexivity methods. Outcomes should be defined in terms of improvement of functional status and social participation rather than in terms of disease-specific outcomes. Partnership with all stakeholders, patients, GPs and their health care colleagues and students, can help in reducing avoidable waste in the production and reporting of research evidence.

  11. Creonization of health care.

    PubMed

    Bulger, R J

    1990-01-01

    As prefigured in the Greek tragedy Antigone, one of the primary conflicts in contemporary health care is that between humane concern for the individual and concern for society at large and administrative rules. The computerization of the health care system and development of large data bases will create new forms of this conflict that will challenge the self-definition of health care and health care professionals.

  12. Personal Care in Learning Health Care Systems.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G; Kim, Scott Y H

    2015-12-01

    The idea of a "learning health care system"--one that systematically integrates clinical research with medical care--has received considerable attention recently. Some commentators argue that under certain conditions pragmatic comparative effectiveness randomized trials can be conducted ethically within the context of a learning health care system without the informed consent of patients for research participation. In this article, we challenge this perspective and contend that conducting randomized trials of individual treatment options without consent is neither necessary nor desirable to promote and sustain learning health care systems. Our argument draws on the normative conception of personal care developed by Charles Fried in a landmark 1974 book on the ethics of randomized controlled trials.

  13. Challenges Faced by Preceptors Serving in Dual Roles as Health Care Providers and Clinical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Thomas; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Preceptors play an integral role in training athletic training students (ATSs). Balancing roles as health care providers and educators can often be challenging. Role strain is a documented concern for the preceptor, yet limited information is available regarding other issues faced while supervising ATSs. Objective: To explore preceptor…

  14. Teamwork in health care.

    PubMed

    Landman, Natalie; Aannestad, Liv K; Smoldt, Robert K; Cortese, Denis A

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that maintaining and improving the health of the population, and doing so in a financially sustainable manner, requires the coordination of acute medical care with long-term care, and social support services, that is, team-based care. Despite a growing body of evidence on the benefits of team-based care, the health care ecosystem remains "resistant" to a broader implementation of such care models. This resistance is a function of both system-wide and organizational barriers, which result primarily from fragmentation in reimbursement for health care services, regulatory restrictions, and the siloed nature of health professional education. To promote the broader adoption of team-based care models, the health care system must transition to pay for value reimbursement, as well as break down the educational silos and move toward team-based and value-based education of health professionals.

  15. Improving the Implementation of Evidence-Based Clinical Practices in Adolescent Reproductive Health Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Lisa M.; Middleton, Dawn; Mueller, Trisha; Avellino, Lia; Hallum-Montes, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement. Methods Health center partner baseline data were collected in the first year (2011) and before program implementation of a 5-year community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative. A needs assessment on health center capacity and implementation of evidence-based clinical practices was administered with 51 health centers partners in 10 communities in the United States with high rates of teen pregnancy. Results Health centers reported inconsistent implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in providing reproductive health services to adolescents. Approximately 94.1% offered same-day appointments, 91.1% had infrastructure to reduce cost barriers, 90.2% offered after-school appointments, and 80.4% prescribed hormonal contraception without prerequisite examinations or testing. Approximately three quarters provided visual and audio privacy in examination rooms (76.5%) and counseling areas (74.5%). Fewer offered a wide range of contraceptive methods (67.8%) and took a sexual health history at every visit (54.9%). Only 45.1% reported Quick Start initiation of hormonal contraception, emergency contraception (43.1%), or intrauterine devices (12.5%) were “always” available to adolescents. Conclusions The assessment highlighted opportunities for health center improvement. Strategies to build capacity of health center partners to implement evidence-based clinical practices may lead to accessibility and quality of reproductive health services for adolescents in the funded communities. PMID:26381918

  16. Clinical Features, Outcomes, and Molecular Characteristics of Community- and Health Care-Associated Staphylococcus lugdunensis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chun-Fu; Chang, Shih-Cheng; Cheng, Chun-Wen; Lin, Jung-Fu; Liu, Tsui-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a major cause of aggressive endocarditis, but it is also responsible for a broad spectrum of infections. The differences in clinical and molecular characteristics between community-associated (CA) and health care-associated (HA) S. lugdunensis infections have remained unclear. We performed a retrospective study of S. lugdunensis infections between 2003 and 2014 to compare the clinical and molecular characteristics of CA and HA isolates. We collected 129 S. lugdunensis isolates in total: 81 (62.8%) HA isolates and 48 (37.2%) CA isolates. HA infections were more frequent than CA infections in children (16.0% versus 4.2%, respectively; P = 0.041) and the elderly (38.3% versus 14.6%, respectively; P = 0.004). The CA isolates were more likely to cause skin and soft tissue infections (85.4% versus 19.8%, respectively; P < 0.001). HA isolates were more frequently responsible for bacteremia of unknown origin (34.6% versus 4.2%, respectively; P < 0.001) and for catheter-related bacteremia (12.3% versus 0%, respectively; P = 0.011) than CA isolates. Fourteen-day mortality was higher for HA infections than for CA infections (11.1% versus 0%, respectively). A higher proportion of the HA isolates than of the CA isolates were resistant to penicillin (76.5% versus 52.1%, respectively; P = 0.004) and oxacillin (32.1% versus 2.1%, respectively; P < 0.001). Two major clonal complexes (CC1 and CC3) were identified. Sequence type 41 (ST41) was the most common sequence type identified (29.5%). The proportion of ST38 isolates was higher for HA than for CA infections (33.3% versus 12.5%, respectively; P = 0.009). These isolates were of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec)type IV, V, or Vt. HA and CA S. lugdunensis infections differ in terms of their clinical features, outcome, antibiotic susceptibilities, and molecular characteristics. PMID:27225402

  17. [A survey of demand for medical care in three public health clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M S; D'Orsi, E; Prates, E C; Toschi, W D; Shiraiwa, T; Campos, T P; Ell, E; Garcia, N L; Junqueira, A P; Serrão, S A; Tavares, E L

    1994-01-01

    A sample survey was conducted in three public ambulatory medical care units in Rio de Janeiro in order to show the demographic and nosological aspects of the clientele as well as to evaluate the quality of clinic records. The sample included 2,029 patients registered in the health clinics and 3,980 consultants from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. The diagnoses were coded according to the 9th revision of the International Classification of Dieases. Females accounted for about 60% of the sample, and more than a half were between 15 and 49 years of age. Children under 10 years old made up 28% of the total. About 38% of the patients came from the poor areas of the city: the "favelas". The case files were poorly filled out, frequently lacking useful information. The most frequent cause was classified in the XVIo chapter of the ICD - ill-defined causes, followed by respiratory, infectious, genitourinary and circulatory diseases. External causes predominated in one of the health clinics, which is an emergency service. There was a great demand for preventive measures, such as prenatal care and child care, even at the clinic that was traditionally devoted only to curative medicine. The most frequent specific diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection, hypertension, gynecological problems, prenatal care, and skin diseases. There were no records for referrals to other health services. The poor quality of the medical records causes problems in terms of quality of health care. Use of such record-keeping systems, even while criticizing them, is essential to improve them.

  18. Reducing health care delivery costs using clinical paths: a case study on improving hospital profitability.

    PubMed

    Clare, M; Sargent, D; Moxley, R; Forthman, T

    1995-01-01

    The process of merging and benchmarking clinical and financial data is pivotal to the development of appropriate clinical pathways. Bristol Regional Medical Center (BRMC), facing the challenge of managed care organizations (MCOs), instituted this process and achieved significant cost savings, largely because of the working partnership between the administration and its medical staff. In DRG 89, Simple Pneumonia and Pleurisy, Age Greater than 17 with CC, data adjusted for severity of illness and cost of living were furnished to BRMC by HCIA Inc. Major benchmark or "best practice" variations were incorporated into new clinical pathways, leading to decreased resource use, no compromise in the quality of care, and a beneficial halo effect on other unrelated DRGs.

  19. Clinical problems in community mental health care for patients with severe borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Koekkoek, B; van Meijel, B; Schene, A; Hutschemaekers, G

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the problems that professionals perceive in the community mental health care for patients with severe borderline personality disorder that do not fit into specialized therapy. A group of national experts (n = 8) participated in a four-phase Delphi-procedure to identify and prioritize the problems. A total of 36 problems reflecting five categories was found: patient-related, professional-related, interaction-related, social system-related, and mental health care-related. Problems with attachment and dependency and social issues were important patient problems while a lack of skills was an important professional problem. Support from the patient's social system and the mental health system were identified as limited, which resulted in both the patient and the professional feeling isolated. Patient, professional, and organisational characteristics of community care differ substantially from those of specialized care. The field is thus in need of a more tailored approach that takes these differences into account.

  20. The new production theory for health care through clinical reengineering: a study of clinical guidelines--Part I.

    PubMed

    Sharp, J R

    1994-12-01

    Drucker writes that the emerging theory of manufacturing includes four principles and practices: statistical quality control, manufacturing accounting, modular organization, and systems approach. SQC is a rigorous, scientific method of identifying variation in the quality and productivity of a given production process, with an emphasis on improvement. The new manufacturing economics intends to integrate the production strategy with the business strategy in order to account for the biggest portions of costs that the old methods did not assess: time and automation. Production operations that are both standardized and flexible will allow the organization to keep up with changes in design, technology, and the market. The return on innovation in this environment is predicated on a modular arrangement of flexible steps in the process. Finally, the systems approach sees the entire process as being integrated in converting goods or services into economic satisfaction. There is now a major restructuring of the U.S. health care industry, and the incorporation of these four theories into health care reform would appear to be essential. This two-part article will address two problems: Will Drucker's theories relate to health care (Part I)? Will the "new manufacturing" in health care (practice guidelines) demonstrate cost, quality, and access changes that reform demands (Part II)?

  1. An early oral health care program starting during pregnancy: results of a prospective clinical long-term study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Karen; Geurtsen, Werner; Günay, Hüsamettin

    2010-06-01

    This study covers phase IV of a prospective clinical long-term study. Objective of this clinical investigation was to analyze the effects of a long-term prevention program on dental and oral health of teenagers at the age of 13 to 14 years. The entire study was subdivided into four phases. Phase I comprised an individual preventive care during pregnancy ("primary-primary prevention"); phase II assessed mothers and their young children until the age of 3 years ("primary prevention"); and in phase III, mothers and children at the age of 6 years were investigated. In phase IV of the study, the oral health of 13- to 14-year-old teenagers was examined (13.4 +/- 0.5 years; n = 29). All phases consisted of an examination, education about oral health care, and treatment based on the concept of an early oral health care promotion. The control group consisted of randomly selected adolescents at the same age (n = 30). The following clinical parameters were assessed: decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMF-T)/decayed, missing, and filled surface teeth index, hygiene index, papilla bleeding index, Periodontal Screening Index, and Streptococcus mutans/Lactobacillus concentration in saliva. The teenagers of the "prevention" group of phase IV of our prospective study revealed a share of 89.7% caries-free dentitions (65.5% sound; 24.2% caries-free with fillings). Mean DMF-T was 0.55 +/- 1.0. The control group showed a significantly higher mean DMF-T of 1.5 +/- 1.5 (p < 0.05) and revealed 56.7% of caries-free dentitions (30% sound, 26.7% caries-free with restorations). Our data clearly document that an early oral health care promotion starting during pregnancy may cause a sustained and long-term improvement of the oral health of children.

  2. Quality of care and health-related quality of life of climacteric stage women cared for in family medicine clinics in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives 1) To design and validate indicators to measure the quality of the process of care that climacteric stage women receive in family medicine clinics (FMC). 2) To assess the quality of care that climacteric stage women receive in FMC. 3) To determine the association between quality of care and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) among climacteric stage women. Methods The study had two phases: I. Design and validation of indicators to measure the quality of care process by using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. II. Evaluation of the quality of care and its association with HR-QoL through a cross-sectional study conducted in two FMC located in Mexico City that included 410 climacteric stage women. The quality of care was measured by estimating the percentage of recommended care received (PRCR) by climacteric stage women in three process components: health promotion, screening, and treatment. The HR-QoL was measured using the Cervantes scale (0-155). The association between quality of care and HR-QoL was estimated through multiple linear regression analysis. Results The lowest mean of PRCR was for the health promotion component (24.1%) and the highest for the treatment component (86.6%). The mean of HR-QoL was 50.1 points. The regression analysis showed that in the treatment component, for every 10 additional points of the PRCR, the global HR-QoL improved 2.8 points on the Cervantes scale (coefficient -0.28, P < 0.0001). Conclusion The indicators to measure quality of care for climacteric stage women are applicable and feasible in family medicine settings. There is a positive association between the quality of the treatment component and HR-QoL; this would encourage interventions to improve quality of care for climacteric stage women. PMID:20144238

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Hypoparathyroidism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose hypoparathyroidism? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider will order a blood test to determine ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pheochromocytoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pheochromocytoma? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider uses blood and urine tests that measure ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Endometriosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose endometriosis? Skip sharing on social media ... under a microscope, to confirm the diagnosis. 1 Health care providers may also use imaging methods to produce ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Vaginitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose vaginitis? Skip sharing on social media ... out the cause of a woman's symptoms, her health care provider will Examine the vagina, the vulva, and ...

  7. The use of personal digital assistants in clinical decision making by health care professionals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Divall, Pip; Camosso-Stefinovic, Janette; Baker, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Ownership of personal digital assistants (PDAs) and smartphones by health professionals is increasingly common. Providing the best available evidence at the point of care is important for time-poor clinical staff and may lead to benefits in the processes and outcomes of clinical care. This review was performed to investigate the usefulness of PDAs in the clinical setting. MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from 2000 to March 2010. Randomised controlled trials that evaluated the effects on the processes or outcomes of clinical care of using PDAs compared with not using a PDA were included. Two reviewers independently reviewed citations and abstracts, assessed full text articles and abstracted data from the studies. Seven trials met the review inclusion criteria, of which only three were of satisfactory quality. Studies investigated the use of PDAs either in recording patient information or in decision support for diagnoses or treatment. An increase in data collection quality was reported, and the appropriateness of diagnosis and treatment decisions was improved. PDAs appear to have potential in improving some processes and outcomes of clinical care, but the evidence is limited and reliable conclusions on whether they help, in what circumstances and how they should be used are not possible. Further research is required to assess their value and ensure full benefits from their widespread use, but the pace of technological development creates problems for the timely evaluation of these devices and their applications.

  8. Evaluating the clinical efficacy of a primary care-focused, nurse-led, consultation liaison model for perinatal mental health.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Simone T; Fisher, Lisa J; Green, Vicki M

    2012-02-01

    In Australia, perinatal mental illness is common, although poorly identified and treated. Improved perinatal mental health depends on service provision models that reflect a focus on promotion, prevention, and early intervention, while facilitating improved referral pathways between primary health and specialist mental health services. In 2008, a contemporary community-based model of mental health service provision was developed as an alternative to the pre-existing hospital-based service model. The model is delivered primarily by mental health nurses using a consultation liaison framework. It provides for specialist mental health assessment and brief intervention in collaboration with the general practitioner, who remains the primary health provider. It also aims to raise community awareness and build capacity for the management of perinatal disorders in the primary care sector. Evaluation of the clinical effectiveness of the model, and the improvement in access for primary health providers and women, was conducted at 2 years from its implementation. Clinical effectiveness was evaluated by using comparative data from the Edinburgh Depression Scale and Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale, and the results demonstrated clinical efficacy. Improved attendance rates indicated that women preferred this community-based service model as an alternative to the pre-existing service model.

  9. Indian Health Service: Find Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Forgot Password IHS Home Find Health Care Find Health Care IMPORTANT If you are having a health emergency ... services, continuous nursing services and that provides comprehensive health care including diagnosis and treatment. Health Locations An ambulatory ...

  10. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services exploration of positive patient care synergies fueled by consumer demand: care coordination, advanced clinic access, and patient self-management.

    PubMed

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Yerardi, Ruth; Drake, Audrey C; Parlier, Renee

    2006-01-01

    The consumers who utilize the Veterans Health Administration healthcare system are older, and most are learning to live with chronic diseases. Their desires and needs have driven changes within the Veterans Health Administration. Through patient satisfaction initiatives and other feedback sources, consumers have made it clear that they do not want to wait for their care, they want a say in what care is provided to them, and they want to remain as independent as possible. Two interdisciplinary processes/models of healthcare are being implemented on the national level to address these issues: advanced clinic access and care coordination. These programs have a synergistic relationship and are integrated with patient self-management initiatives. Positive outcomes of these programs also meet the needs of our staff. As these new processes and programs are implemented nationwide, skills of both patients and nursing staff who provide their care need to be enhanced to meet the challenges of providing nursing care now and into the 21st century. Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Services Strategic Planning Work Group is defining and implementing processes/programs to ensure nurses have the knowledge, information, and skills to meet these patient care demands at all levels within the organization.

  11. Service quality in health care.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, J W; Berwick, D M; Shore, M F

    1999-02-17

    Although US health care is described as "the world's largest service industry," the quality of service--that is, the characteristics that shape the experience of care beyond technical competence--is rarely discussed in the medical literature. This article illustrates service quality principles by analyzing a routine encounter in health care from a service quality point of view. This illustration and a review of related literature from both inside and outside health care has led to the following 2 premises: First, if high-quality service had a greater presence in our practices and institutions, it would improve clinical outcomes and patient and physician satisfaction while reducing cost, and it would create competitive advantage for those who are expert in its application. Second, many other industries in the service sector have taken service quality to a high level, their techniques are readily transferable to health care, and physicians caring for patients can learn from them.

  12. The economic model for health care delivery. A business plan to create the virtual clinic.

    PubMed

    Butz, J T; Dilday, D

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews briefly the history of managed care, and then analyzes the economic rationale underlying the present dynamics of the marketplace. With this background, the paper postulates what the ultimate delivery system should be: the virtual clinic. It includes a proposed micro-model that could evolve into a macro-institution driven by the two essential elements of the market: equity and efficiency.

  13. Los Angeles Free Clinic [and]"Adolescent Health Care Programs That Work."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainwater, Mary; De Caprio, Chris

    The first paper describes The Los Angeles Free Clinic and its services, which are specifically designed to respond to the needs of low-income and homeless youth within the community. The paper describes a free-of-charge, free-of-judgment comprehensive response system that exists because of collaboration with other health facilities such as…

  14. Systematic Review of Integrative Health Care Research: Randomized Control Trials, Clinical Controlled Trials, and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khorsan, Raheleh; Coulter, Ian D.; Crawford, Cindy; Hsiao, An-Fu

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to assess the level of evidence for integrative health care research. We searched PubMed, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE, the entire Cochrane Library, MANTIS, Social SciSearch, SciSearch Cited Ref Sci, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and NCCAM grantee publications listings, from database inception to May 2009, as well as searches of the “gray literature.” Available studies published in English language were included. Three independent reviewers rated each article and assessed the methodological quality of studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN 50). Our search yielded 11,891 total citations but 6 clinical studies, including 4 randomized, met our inclusion criteria. There are no available systematic reviews/meta-analyses published that met our inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed independently using quality checklists of the SIGN 50. Only a small number of RCTs and CCTs with a limited number of patients and lack of adequate control groups assessing integrative health care research are available. These studies provide limited evidence of effective integrative health care on some modalities. However, integrative health care regimen appears to be generally safe. PMID:20953383

  15. Evaluation of effectiveness and satisfaction outcomes of a mental health screening and referral clinical pathway for community nursing care.

    PubMed

    Allen, J; Annells, M; Nunn, R; Petrie, E; Clark, E; Lang, L; Robins, A

    2011-06-01

    The study aimed to explore the effectiveness of a mental health screening and referral clinical pathway for generalist community nursing care of war veterans and war widow(er)s in Australia on outcomes of client self-reported mental health, quality of life, and client and carer satisfaction. The pathway was developed by literature review and consultation, then trialled and evaluated. Validated screening tools were embedded within the pathway to support generalist nurses' mental health decision making. Pre- and post-measures were applied. Clients on whom the pathway was trialled were invited to complete an evaluation survey questionnaire, as were their informal carers. Most clients and carers who responded to these questionnaires were highly satisfied or satisfied with care provided through application of the pathway. This study adds understanding about one way that community nurses might identify people with mental health difficulties. The trialled pathway, which was modified and refined following the study, is now available on the Internet as an evidence-based resource for community nurses in Australia to guide practice and maximize holistic care for war veterans and war widow(er)s where that care is funded by Department of Veterans' Affairs.

  16. The Conceptualization of Self-Care and Integration of Self-Care Education in the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs Accredited Clinical Mental Health Counseling Curriculum: A Multiple Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Nicole L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore how CACREP accredited Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs conceptualize self-care and integrate self-care education into counseling curriculum. Counselor educators in CACREP accredited Clinical Mental Health Counseling programs served as representatives to their programs and were invited to share…

  17. Health care in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, A

    1993-01-01

    Brazil has great geopolitical importance because of its size, environmental resources, and potential economic power. The organisation of its health care system reflects the schisms within Brazilian society. High technology private care is available to the rich and inadequate public care to the poor. Limited financial resources have been overconcentrated on health care in the hospital sector and health professionals are generally inappropriately trained to meet the needs of the community. However, recent changes in the organisation of health care are taking power away from federal government to state and local authorities. This should help the process of reform, but many vested interests remain to be overcome. A link programme between Britain and Brazil focusing on primary care has resulted in exchange of ideas and staff between the two countries. If primary care in Brazil can be improved it could help to narrow the health divide between rich and poor. Images p503-a p504-a p505-a PMID:8448465

  18. Next-generation long-term transplant clinics: improving resource utilization and the quality of care through health information technology.

    PubMed

    Rioth, M J; Warner, J; Savani, B N; Jagasia, M

    2016-01-01

    By the year 2020, potentially one-half a million hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients will need long-term follow-up care to address not only chronic GvHD but also multiple other late consequences of transplant. Despite this increase in patients, there will not be a concomitant increase in the HCT workforce. Thus, the future of long-term patient management will require a new 'next-generation' clinical model that utilizes technological solutions to make the care of the HCT patient efficient, safe and cost-effective. Guideline-based decision support will be embedded in clinical workflows. Documentation requirements will be reduced as automated data collection from electronic medical records (EMRs) will populate registries and provide feedback for a rapid learning health system. Interoperable EMRs will disseminate treatment protocols to multiple care providers in a distributed long-term clinic model, such that providers outside of the transplant center can provide services closer to the patient. Patients will increase their participatory role through patient portals and mobile devices. At Vanderbilt, we have responded to some of these future challenges by embedding guideline-based decision support, structuring clinical documentation and being early adopters of communication technology. This manuscript describes the current state of some of these innovations, and a vision for the future of the long-term transplant clinic.

  19. Next generation long term transplant clinics: Improving resource utilization and the quality of care through health information technology

    PubMed Central

    Rioth, Matthew J; Warner, Jeremy; Savani, Bipin N; Jagasia, Madan

    2016-01-01

    By the year 2020, potentially one half million hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients will need long-term follow up care to address not only chronic GvHD but also multiple other late consequences of transplant. Despite this increase in patients, there will not be a concomitant increase in the HCT workforce. Thus the future of long-term patient management will require a new “next-generation” clinical model that utilizes technological solutions to make the care of the HCT patient efficient, safe, and cost-effective. Guideline-based decision support will be embedded in clinical workflows. Documentation requirements will be reduced as automated data collection from electronic medical records (EMRs) will populate registries and provide feedback for a rapid learning health system. Interoperable EMRs will disseminate treatment protocols to multiple care providers in a distributed long-term clinic model, such that providers outside of the transplant center can provide services closer to the patient. Patients will increase their participatory role through patient portals and mobile devices. At Vanderbilt, we have responded so some of these future challenges by embedding guideline-based decision support, structuring clinical documentation, and being early adopters of communication technology. This manuscript describes the current state of some of these innovations, and a vision for the future of the long-term transplant clinic. PMID:26367235

  20. Quality management: patients reflections on health care at outpatient clinic of internal medicine department.

    PubMed

    Ljubičić, Neven; Boban, Marko; Gaćina, Petar; Adzija, Jasminka; Benceković, Zeljka; Rajković, Ana

    2009-06-01

    Middle and older age group relative share in the community permanently grows. Those are commonly burdened with several chronic health conditions or elevated incidence of acute ones and in more frequent need for consulting health services. In the era of modern technical medicine, it is important to increase quality of services particularly patients orientated. Department of Internal Medicine developed questionnaire to assess reflections on medical care from the receiver of medical services point of view. Sample was formed from individuals that visited outpatient triage Unit (OTU) and voluntary enrolled, during period April 1-August 31, 2008 for any medical reason. Study population structure had similarly equally of both genders, socio-economical background, and was in age range 18-87. Questionnaire was developed by team of experienced personnel covering satisfaction on received medical care. There were 279 returned formulary in a sample of 6700 patients (4.18%). Patients visited OTU chiefly on behalf medical condition secondary to address of residency, followed by personal choice, on advice given by general practitioner, by emergency transportation services, or just due to earlier experiences. Regarding provided medical care extent, 4/5 of patients were examined in lesser than 2 hours, while total workup lasted mostly for 2-4, followed by over four. Over half of patients were moderate toward highly satisfied with provided medical information, personnel communication style and general reflection on all services while being in the Department premises. Astonishing proportion of patients (93%) was satisfied with positive personnel communication. Integration of patients' self-perceived reports about medical services in organizing process is inevitable for augmenting content and at the same time valuable for developing overall quality of treatment. Communication excellence is of premier importance and unavoidable for giving additional positive effect to remain health

  1. Primary Care Clinics and Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chiung-Ya; Lin, Yi-Ling; Masri, Maysoun Dimachkie

    2016-01-01

    Background The Accountable Care Organization (ACO) is one of the new models of health care delivery in the U.S. To date, little is known about the characteristics of health care organizations that have joined ACOs. We report on the findings of a survey of primary care clinics, the objective of which was to investigate the opinions of clinic management about participation in ACOs, and the characteristics of clinic organizational structure that may contribute to joining ACOs or be willing to do so. Methods A 27-item survey questionnaire was developed and distributed by mail in 3 annual waves to all Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) in 9 states. Two dependent variables - participation in ACOs and willingness to join ACOs - were created and analyzed using a generalized estimating equation (GEE) approach. Results 257 RHCs responded to the survey. A small percentage (5.2%) of the respondent clinics reported that they were participating in ACOs. RHCs in isolated areas were 78% less likely to be in ACOs (odds= 0.22, p= 0.059). Non-profit RHCs indicated a higher willingness to join an ACO than for-profit RHCs (B= 1.271, p= 0.054). There is a positive relationship between RHC size and willingness to join an ACO (B= 0.402, p=0.010). Conclusions At this early stage of ACO development, many RHC personnel are unfamiliar with the ACO model. Rural providers’ limited technological and human resources, and the lack of ACO development in rural areas, may delay or prevent their participation in ACOs. PMID:26900587

  2. Running nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease in primary care: qualitative study of health professionals' perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Thain, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Background A randomised trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease resulted in improved secondary prevention and significantly lowered all-cause mortality at 4-year follow-up. This qualitative trial was conducted to explore the experience of health professionals that had been involved in running the clinics. Aim To identify the barriers and facilitators to establishing secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease within primary care. Design of study Semi-structured audiotaped telephone interviews with GPs and nurses involved in running clinics. Setting A stratified, random sample of 19 urban, suburban, and rural general practices in north-east Scotland. Method Semi-structured telephone interviews with 19 GPs and 17 practice-based nurses involved in running nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Results Eight practices had run clinics continuously and 11 had stopped, with eight subsequently restarting. Participants accounted for these patterns by referring to advantages and disadvantages of the clinics in four areas: patient care, development of nursing skills, team working, and infrastructure. Most practitioners perceived benefits for patients from attending secondary prevention clinics, but some, from small rural practices, thought they were unnecessary. The extended role for nurses was welcomed, but was dependent on motivated staff, appropriate training and support. Clinics relied on, and could enhance, team working, however, some doctors were wary of delegating. With regard to infrastructure, staff shortages (especially nurses) and accommodation were as problematic as lack of funds. Conclusions Nurse-led secondary prevention clinics were viewed positively by most healthcare professionals that had been involved in running them, but barriers to their implementation had led most to stop running them at some point. Lack of space and staff shortages are likely to remain ongoing problems

  3. Health care's service fanatics.

    PubMed

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life.

  4. Equity in health care.

    PubMed

    La Rosa-Salas, Virginia; Tricas-Sauras, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    It has long been known that a segment of the population enjoys distinctly better health status and higher quality of health care than others. To solve this problem, prioritization is unavoidable, and the question is how priorities should be set. Rational priority setting would seek equity amongst the whole population, the extent to which people receive equal care for equal needs. Equity in health care is an ethical imperative not only because of the intrinsic worth of good health, or the value that society places on good health, but because, without good health, people would be unable to enjoy life's other sources of happiness. This paper also argues the importance of the health care's efficiency, but at the same time, it highlights how any innovation and rationalization undertaken in the provision of the health system should be achieved from the consideration of human dignity, making the person prevail over economic criteria. Therefore, the underlying principles on which this health care equity paper is based are fundamental human rights. The main aim is to ensure the implementation of these essential rights by those carrying out public duties. Viewed from this angle, equity in health care means equality: equality in access to services and treatment, and equality in the quality of care provided. As a result, this paper attempts to address both human dignity and efficiency through the context of equity to reconcile them in the middle ground.

  5. Health Care Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    variety of specialists including chiropractors , optometrists, speech therapists, and mental health specialists (IBISWorld, 2006). Registered nurses... treatment services. These establishments have an organized staff of health care practitioners to provide patient care services and provide other services...Carroll, 2003). Complementary and Alternative Medicine includes a wide variety of treatments and therapies that are generally not supported by scientific

  6. Health Care Delivery Practices in Huntington’s Disease Specialty Clinics: An International Survey

    PubMed Central

    Frich, Jan C.; Rae, Daniela; Roxburgh, Richard; Miedzybrodzka, Zofia H.; Edmondson, Mary; Pope, Erika Bjorklund; Goodman, LaVonne; Haddad, Monica S.; Giuliano, Joe; Nelson, Eugene C.; Guttman, Mark; Nance, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the organization of clinical services for Huntington’s disease (HD). Objective: To describe how health care services are organized and delivered in HD-clinics taking part in or eligible for the Enroll-HD study. Methods: In 2014, a 69-item survey was administered to sites taking part in or eligible for the Enroll-HD study. Results: Of 231 sites surveyed, 121 (52.2%) sites in Europe, North America, Latin America, and Oceania responded. Most sites in the sample serve large populations, with 61.1% serving more than 1.5 million people, and a further 33% serving >500,000. Almost all (86.0%) centers see patients from outside their region. The majority of centers (59.7%) follow 50–199 patients, 21.9% care for more than 200. Most centers provide care in all stages of HD, and nearly all review pre-symptomatic cases. Multidisciplinary case reviews are offered in 54.5% of sites, with outreach clinics offered by 48.1%. Videoconferencing and telemedicine are used by 23.6%. Separate consultations for caregivers are offered in more than half of the centers. Most centers (70.4%) report following published guidelines or local care pathways for HD. Conclusions: Most centers serve a large population and use a multidisciplinary approach. The survey gives insight into factors underpinning HD service delivery globally. There is a need for more in-depth studies of clinical practice to understand how services are organized and how such features may be associated with quality of care. PMID:27372053

  7. An Integrated Model for Patient Care and Clinical Trials (IMPACT) to Support Clinical Research Visit Scheduling Workflow for Future Learning Health Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua; Li, Yu; Berhe, Solomon; Boland, Mary Regina; Gao, Junfeng; Hruby, Gregory W.; Steinman, Richard C.; Lopez-Jimenez, Carlos; Busacca, Linda; Hripcsak, George; Bakken, Suzanne; Bigger, J Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We describe a clinical research visit scheduling system that can potentially coordinate clinical research visits with patient care visits and increase efficiency at clinical sites where clinical and research activities occur simultaneously. Participatory Design methods were applied to support requirements engineering and to create this software called Integrated Model for Patient Care and Clinical Trials (IMPACT). Using a multi-user constraint satisfaction and resource optimization algorithm, IMPACT automatically synthesizes temporal availability of various research resources and recommends the optimal dates and times for pending research visits. We conducted scenario-based evaluations with 10 clinical research coordinators (CRCs) from diverse clinical research settings to assess the usefulness, feasibility, and user acceptance of IMPACT. We obtained qualitative feedback using semi-structured interviews with the CRCs. Most CRCs acknowledged the usefulness of IMPACT features. Support for collaboration within research teams and interoperability with electronic health records and clinical trial management systems were highly requested features. Overall, IMPACT received satisfactory user acceptance and proves to be potentially useful for a variety of clinical research settings. Our future work includes comparing the effectiveness of IMPACT with that of existing scheduling solutions on the market and conducting field tests to formally assess user adoption. PMID:23684593

  8. Progress in Geriatrics: A Clinical Care Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchette, Patricia Lanoie; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This issue includes 18 theme articles that examine clinical care, conditions, and practice as they relate to older adults. It contains articles on the following: men's and women's health, depression, dementia, hypertension, incontinence, bone pain, infections, preventive medicine, geriatric medicine, health care delivery, managed care, long-term…

  9. Master's level in primary health care education - students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of the alteration in the clinical areas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many Western European countries are undergoing reforms with changes in higher education according to the Bologna declaration for Higher European Education Area. In accordance with these changes, the Master's degree was introduced in specialist nurse education in Sweden in 2007, and as a result changed the curriculum and modified theoretical and clinical areas. The aim of this study was to investigate students' and preceptors' perceptions and experiences of Master's level education in primary health care with a focus on the clinical area. Methods A descriptive design and qualitative approach was used. Interviews with ten students and ten preceptors were performed twice, before and after the clinical practice period. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and themes formulated. Results Students perceived alteration in the content of the education at the Master's level such as more independence and additional assignments. The preceptors perceived benefits with the Master's level but were unsure of how to transform theoretical and abstract knowledge into practice. Writing the Master's thesis was seen by students to take time away from clinical practice. For some students and preceptors the content of the Master's level clinical practice area was experienced as vague and indistinct. The students had not expected supervision to be different from earlier experiences, while preceptors felt higher demands and requested more knowledge. Both students and preceptors perceived that education at the Master's level might lead to a higher status for the nurses' profession in primary health care. Conclusions Students and preceptors experienced both advantages and disadvantages concerning the change in specialist nurse education in primary health care at the Master's level. The altered educational content was experienced as a step forward, but they also questioned how the new knowledge could be used in practice. The relevance of the Master's thesis was

  10. Experiences of primary health care nurses in implementing integrated management of childhood illnesses strategy at selected clinics of Limpopo Province.

    PubMed

    Vhuromu, E N; Davhana-Maselesele, M

    2009-09-01

    Treatment of the under five years is a national priority as an attempt in curbing deaths and deformities affecting children. Primary health care was implemented in the clinics in order to help in the treatment of illnesses affecting the community, including children. As a result of childhood illnesses; the World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nation Children's Fund (UNICEF) came up with Integrated Management of Childhood illnesses (IMCI) strategy to enhance treatment of such illnesses in developing countries. Primary health care nurses (PHCNS) in Limpopo Province were also trained to implement the strategy. This study is intended to explore and describe the experiences of PHCNS in implementing the IMCI strategy at selected clinics in Vhembe District in the Limpopo Province. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. In-depth interviews were conducted with PHCNS who are IMCI trained and have implemented the strategy for a period of not less than two years. Data analysis was done through using Tesch 's method of open coding for qualitative analysis. Findings revealed that PHCNS had difficulty in rendering IMCI services due to lack of resources and poor working conditions. Recommendations address the difficulties experienced by PHCNS when implementing the IMCI strategy.

  11. Keep it simple? Predicting primary health care costs with clinical morbidity measures

    PubMed Central

    Brilleman, Samuel L.; Gravelle, Hugh; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Purdy, Sarah; Salisbury, Chris; Windmeijer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Models of the determinants of individuals’ primary care costs can be used to set capitation payments to providers and to test for horizontal equity. We compare the ability of eight measures of patient morbidity and multimorbidity to predict future primary care costs and examine capitation payments based on them. The measures were derived from four morbidity descriptive systems: 17 chronic diseases in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF); 17 chronic diseases in the Charlson scheme; 114 Expanded Diagnosis Clusters (EDCs); and 68 Adjusted Clinical Groups (ACGs). These were applied to patient records of 86,100 individuals in 174 English practices. For a given disease description system, counts of diseases and sets of disease dummy variables had similar explanatory power. The EDC measures performed best followed by the QOF and ACG measures. The Charlson measures had the worst performance but still improved markedly on models containing only age, gender, deprivation and practice effects. Comparisons of predictive power for different morbidity measures were similar for linear and exponential models, but the relative predictive power of the models varied with the morbidity measure. Capitation payments for an individual patient vary considerably with the different morbidity measures included in the cost model. Even for the best fitting model large differences between expected cost and capitation for some types of patient suggest incentives for patient selection. Models with any of the morbidity measures show higher cost for more deprived patients but the positive effect of deprivation on cost was smaller in better fitting models. PMID:24657375

  12. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p < .001) and the importance of receiving dental care (p < .001) were significant factors in relation to self-rated dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts.

  13. Assessment of HIV transmission risks in clinical situations in health care students from Germany, Lithuania and Namibia.

    PubMed

    Klewer, J; Lauschke, H; Raulinaviciute, J; Sasnauskaite, L; Pavilonis, A; Kugler, J

    2001-03-01

    Due to the increasing global HIV prevalence, comprehensive knowledge about clinical HIV transmission risks in health care professionals is essential. Mainly medical and nursing students are at risk, because they are working close to infected patients. By using an anonymous questionnaire, the study analysed the assessments of German medical/dental students (n = 182), Lithuanian medical students (n = 176) and Namibian student nurses (n = 135) on the risk of getting HIV infected in different clinical situations. It became obvious that the Namibian student nurses overestimated the risk of HIV transmission in several situations (eg changing dirty linen, physical examination). In comparison, the Lithuanian students showed the most realistic assessments, while the German students also tended to overestimate the risks of HIV transmission. The results indicate that assessments on the risk of HIV transmission in clinical situations are influenced by the national prevalence and daily contacts with HIV patients. Education of health care students should consider this and focus more on epidemiological aspects and infection control procedures, to avoid endangering students and patients.

  14. Health care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S

    1984-07-01

    This is the third and last article reporting professional exchange tours between American nurses and nurses of other countries. In this article, the health care system of Kenya is discussed and comparisons made between this system and our own. Out of this comparison come several insights into our own way of doing things and possibilities for improving them. "Health Care in the Soviet Union" appeared in the April 1984 issue of The Nurse Practitioner. "Health Care in China" appeared in the May 1984 issue of the journal.

  15. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abati, Paulo Afonso Martins; Segurado, Aluisio Cotrim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002), P2 (2003-2006), and P3 (2007-2010) – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country. PMID:25741647

  16. Impact of an electronic clinical decision support system on workflow in antenatal care: the QUALMAT eCDSS in rural health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Nathan; Sukums, Felix; Awine, Timothy; Meid, Andreas; Williams, John; Akweongo, Patricia; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Haefeli, Walter E; Blank, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Background The implementation of new technology can interrupt established workflows in health care settings. The Quality of Maternal Care (QUALMAT) project has introduced an electronic clinical decision support system (eCDSS) for antenatal care (ANC) and delivery in rural primary health care facilities in Africa. Objective This study was carried out to investigate the influence of the QUALMAT eCDSS on the workflow of health care workers in rural primary health care facilities in Ghana and Tanzania. Design A direct observation, time-and-motion study on ANC processes was conducted using a structured data sheet with predefined major task categories. The duration and sequence of tasks performed during ANC visits were observed, and changes after the implementation of the eCDSS were analyzed. Results In 24 QUALMAT study sites, 214 observations of ANC visits (144 in Ghana, 70 in Tanzania) were carried out at baseline and 148 observations (104 in Ghana, 44 in Tanzania) after the software was implemented in 12 of those sites. The median time spent combined for all centers in both countries to provide ANC at baseline was 6.5 min [interquartile range (IQR) =4.0-10.6]. Although the time spent on ANC increased in Tanzania and Ghana after the eCDSS implementation as compared to baseline, overall there was no significant increase in time used for ANC activities (0.51 min, p=0.06 in Ghana; and 0.54 min, p=0.26 in Tanzania) as compared to the control sites without the eCDSS. The percentage of medical history taking in women who had subsequent examinations increased after eCDSS implementation from 58.2% (39/67) to 95.3% (61/64) p<0.001 in Ghana but not in Tanzania [from 65.4% (17/26) to 71.4% (15/21) p=0.70]. Conclusions The QUALMAT eCDSS does not increase the time needed for ANC but partly streamlined workflow at sites in Ghana, showing the potential of such a system to influence quality of care positively.

  17. [Benchmarking in the clinical arena. A potential answer to the dynamic changes in the health care system].

    PubMed

    Bredl, K; Hüsig, S; Angele, M K; Lüring, C

    2010-08-01

    Current changes in the health system due to economic restrictions leading to increased competition require the introduction of intelligent management tools in the clinical arena. In a world where change and development are the only constants, flexibility and critical judgment of one's own achievements are requirements for success in all parts of society. Benchmarking, a management tool widely used in industry, represents a potential answer to the dynamic changes in the health system. This article deals with the theoretic basis and the clinical implications of benchmarking. The strategic background of benchmarking is the systematic process of comparison and identification with the best (best practice) leading to improved processes and results in one's own department and hospital. It is the aim of benchmarking in the clinical arena to achieve higher quality and patient directed innovation with less financial resources. This might result in better patient care. In summary, the management tool of benchmarking will be introduced into the clinical arena to keep hospitals competitive. Successful benchmarking will result in a leading position of a certain department in a special field.

  18. Day care health risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... This infection causes diarrhea, stomach cramps, and gas. Ear infections, colds, coughs, sore throats, and runny noses ... Head lice and scabies are other common health problems that occur in day care centers. You can ...

  19. Your Health Care Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  20. Innovation sustainability in challenging health-care contexts: embedding clinically led change in routine practice.

    PubMed

    Martin, Graham P; Weaver, Simon; Currie, Graeme; Finn, Rachael; McDonald, Ruth

    2012-11-01

    The need for organizational innovation as a means of improving health-care quality and containing costs is widely recognized, but while a growing body of research has improved knowledge of implementation, very little has considered the challenges involved in sustaining change - especially organizational change led 'bottom-up' by frontline clinicians. This study addresses this lacuna, taking a longitudinal, qualitative case-study approach to understanding the paths to sustainability of four organizational innovations. It highlights the importance of the interaction between organizational context, nature of the innovation and strategies deployed in achieving sustainability. It discusses how positional influence of service leads, complexity of innovation, networks of support, embedding in existing systems, and proactive responses to changing circumstances can interact to sustain change. In the absence of cast-iron evidence of effectiveness, wider notions of value may be successfully invoked to sustain innovation. Sustainability requires continuing effort through time, rather than representing a final state to be achieved. Our study offers new insights into the process of sustainability of organizational change, and elucidates the complement of strategies needed to make bottom-up change last in challenging contexts replete with competing priorities.

  1. Learning curves in health care.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J Deane; Yourstone, Steven A; Smith, Howard L

    2003-01-01

    This article explores the uses of learning curve theory in medicine. Though effective application of learning curve theory in health care can result in higher quality and lower cost, it is seldom methodically applied in clinical practice. Fundamental changes are necessary in the corporate culture of medicine in order to capitalize maximally on the benefits of learning.

  2. Impact of clinical registries on quality of patient care and health outcomes: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Dewan Md Emdadul; Kumari, Varuni; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Romero, Lorena; Evans, Sue M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many developed countries have regional and national clinical registries aimed at improving health outcomes of patients diagnosed with particular diseases or cared for in particular healthcare settings. Clinical quality registries (CQRs) are clinical registries established with the purpose of monitoring quality of care and providing feedback to improve health outcomes. The aim of this systematic review is to understand the impact of CQRs on (1) mortality/survival; (2) measures of outcome that reflect a process or outcome of healthcare; (3) healthcare utilisation and (4) costs. Methods and analysis The PRISMA-P methodology, checklist and standard strategy using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria and structured data abstraction tools will be followed. A search of the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and CINAHL will be undertaken, in addition to Google Scholar and grey literature, to identify studies in English covering the period January 1980 to December 2014. Case–control, cohort, randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials which describe the registry as an intervention will be eligible for inclusion. Narrative synthesis of study findings will be conducted, guided by a conceptual framework developed to analyse the outcome measure of the registry using defined criteria. If sufficient studies are identified with a similar outcome of interest and measure using the same comparator and time of interval, results will be pooled for random-effects meta-analysis. Test for heterogeneity and sensitivity analysis will be conducted. To identify reporting bias, forest plots and funnel plots will be created and, if required, Egger's test will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. Review results will be published as a part of thesis, peer-reviewed journal and conferences. Trial registration number CRD

  3. Primary health care models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Conclusion Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models. PMID:22518904

  4. Positive practice environments influence job satisfaction of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses constitute the majority of the health workforce in South Africa and they play a major role in providing primary health care (PHC) services. Job satisfaction influences nurse retention and successful implementation of health system reforms. This study was conducted in light of renewed government commitment to reforms at the PHC level, and to contribute to the development of solutions to the challenges faced by the South African nursing workforce. The objective of the study was to determine overall job satisfaction of PHC clinic nursing managers and the predictors of their job satisfaction in two South African provinces. Methods During 2012, a cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Stratified random sampling was used to survey a total of 111 nursing managers working in PHC clinics. These managers completed a pre-tested Measure of Job Satisfaction questionnaire with subscales on personal satisfaction, workload, professional support, training, pay, career prospects and standards of care. Mean scores were used to measure overall job satisfaction and various subscales. Predictors of job satisfaction were determined through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 108 nursing managers completed the survey representing a 97% response rate. The mean age of respondents was 49 years (SD = 7.9) and the majority of them (92%) were female. Seventy-six percent had a PHC clinical training qualification. Overall mean job satisfaction scores were 142.80 (SD = 24.3) and 143.41 (SD = 25.6) for Gauteng and Free State provinces respectively out of a maximum possible score of 215. Predictors of job satisfaction were: working in a clinic of choice (RRR = 3.10 (95% CI: 1.11 to 8.62, P = 0.030)), being tired at work (RRR = 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.50, P = 0.001)) and experience of verbal abuse (RRR = 0.18 (95% CI: 0.06 to 0.55, P = 0.001). Conclusion Allowing nurses greater choice of clinic

  5. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  6. Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care using electronic health record information in family medicine clinics of Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the quality of antenatal care (ANC) using indicators should be part of the efforts to improve primary care services in developing countries. The growing use of the electronic health record (EHR) has the potential of making the evaluation more efficient. The objectives of this study were: (a) to develop quality indicators for ANC and (b) to evaluate the quality of ANC using EHR information in family medicine clinics (FMCs) of Mexico City. Methods We used a mixed methods approach including: (a) in-depth interviews with health professionals; (b) development of indicators following the RAND-UCLA method; (c) a retrospective cohort study of quality of care provided to 5342 women aged 12–49 years who had completed their pregnancy in 2009 and attended to at least one ANC visit with their family doctor. The study took place in four FMCs located in Mexico City. The source of information was the EHR. SAS statistical package served for programing and performing the descriptive statistical analysis. Results 14 ANC quality indicators were developed. The evaluation showed that 40.6% of women began ANC in the first trimester; 63.5% with low-risk pregnancy attended four or more ANC visits; 4.4% were referred for routine obstetric ultrasound, and 41.1% with vaginal infection were prescribed metronidazole. On average, the percentage of recommended care that women received was 32.7%. Conclusions It is feasible to develop quality indicators suitable for evaluating the quality of ANC using routine EHR data. The study identified the ANC areas that require improvement; which can guide future strategies aimed at improving ANC quality. PMID:24885103

  7. Establishing and harmonizing ontologies in an interdisciplinary health care clinical research environment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Barry; Brochhausen, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    Ontologies are being ever more commonly used in biomedical informatics. The paper provides a survey of some of these uses, and of the relations between ontologies and other terminology resources. In order for ontologies to become truly useful, two objectives must be met. First, ways must be found for the transparent evaluation of ontologies. Second, existing ontologies need to be harmonized. The authors argue that one key foundation for both ontology evaluation and harmonization is the adoption of a realist paradigm in ontology development. For science-based ontologies of the sort which concern us in the eHealth arena, it is reality that provides the common benchmark against which ontologies can be evaluated and aligned within larger frameworks. Given the current multitude of ontologies in the biomedical domain the need for harmonization is becoming ever more urgent. An example of such harmonization within the ACGT project is described, which draws on ontology-based computing as a basis for sharing clinical and laboratory data on cancer research.

  8. Containing Health Care Costs

    PubMed Central

    Derzon, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    As the federal government shifted from its traditional roles in health to the payment for personal health care, the relationship between public and private sectors has deteriorated. Today federal and state revenue funds and trusts are the largest purchasers of services from a predominantly private health system. This financing or “gap-filling” role is essential; so too is the purchaser's concern for the costs and prices it must meet. The cost per person for personal health care in 1980 is expected to average $950, triple for the aged. Hospital costs vary considerably and inexplicably among states; California residents, for example, spend 50 percent more per year for hospital care than do state of Washington residents. The failure of each sector to understand the other is potentially damaging to the parties and to patients. First, and most important, differences can and must be moderated through definite changes in the attitudes of the protagonists. PMID:6770551

  9. A clinical management system for patient participatory health care support. Assuring the patients' rights and confirming operation of clinical treatment and hospital administration.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyomu; Konishi, Nakao; Tsukuma, Hidehiko; Tsuru, Satoko; Kawamura, Akie; Iwata, Norikazu; Tanaka, Takeshi

    2004-03-31

    We conducted a drastic change in our hospital information system to support patient participatory health care provided in the New Hiroshima University Hospital (HUH). The new information system in HUH (HU-MIND II-Hiroshima University Hospital Medical Intelligence and Notice Delivery system II) is designed as "clinical management system" (CMS). The core of this CMS is the electronic health record (EHR), which aims to assure both the patients' right to know, and the attendants' accountability. It is evident that the team practice including patients requires close communication. Data in the EHR are written not only by physicians, but also by all coworkers, which will enable them to realize the team communication and the ordering in a reliable way and to leave the evidence of conducted practices. Moreover, the bedside information systems were set-up at all 700 beds. Patients can access their anamnesis and future clinical care procedures themselves. Based on the demand outlined above, the new regulations of HUH are composed of 21 requirements, conditions of information collection, accumulation and use. Our focus was how to make patients' right compatible with attendants' accountability. As the data owners, patients have the facility to access their own data at their bedsides. They can view their own health condition and treatment program and can control the data flow.

  10. Genes, Race, and Culture in Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Linda M.; Truesdell, Nicole D.; Kreiner, Meta J.

    2015-01-01

    Race, although an unscientific concept, remains prominent in health research and clinical guidelines, and is routinely invoked in clinical practice. In interviews with 58 primary care clinicians we explored how they understand and apply concepts of racial difference. We found wide agreement that race is important to consider in clinical care. They explained the effect of race on health, drawing on common assumptions about the biological, class, and cultural characteristics of racial minorities. They identified specific race-based clinical strategies for only a handful of conditions and were inconsistent in the details of what they said should be done for minority patients. We conclude that using race in clinical medicine promotes and maintains the illusion of inherent racial differences and may result in minority patients receiving care aimed at presumed racial group characteristics, rather than care selected as specifically appropriate for them as individuals. [race and genetics, primary care, health disparities, racial profiling] PMID:23804331

  11. Electronic Patient Registries Improve Diabetes Care and Clinical Outcomes in Rural Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Cecil; Bailey, Kelly A.; Petitte, Trisha; Baus, Adam; Swim, Mary; Hendryx, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Context: Diabetes care is challenging in rural areas. Research has shown that the utilization of electronic patient registries improves care; however, improvements generally have been described in combination with other ongoing interventions. The level of basic registry utilization sufficient for positive change is unknown. Purpose: The goal of…

  12. Clinical toxicology: clinical science to public health.

    PubMed

    Bateman, D N

    2005-11-01

    1. The aims of the present paper are to: (i) review progress in clinical toxicology over the past 40 years and to place it in the context of modern health care by describing its development; and (ii) illustrate the use of clinical toxicology data from Scotland, in particular, as a tool for informing clinical care and public health policy with respect to drugs. 2. A historical literature review was conducted with amalgamation and comparison of a series of published and unpublished clinical toxicology datasets from NPIS Edinburgh and other sources. 3. Clinical databases within poisons treatment centres offer an important method of collecting data on the clinical effects of drugs in overdose. These data can be used to increase knowledge on drug toxicity mechanisms that inform licensing decisions, contribute to evidence-based care and clinical management. Combination of this material with national morbidity datasets provides another valuable approach that can inform public health prevention strategies. 4. In conclusion, clinical toxicology datasets offer clinical pharmacologists a new study area. Clinical toxicology treatment units and poisons information services offer an important health resource.

  13. Modelling health care processes for eliciting user requirements: a way to link a quality paradigm and clinical information system design.

    PubMed

    Staccini, P; Joubert, M; Quaranta, J F; Fieschi, D; Fieschi, M

    2001-12-01

    Healthcare institutions are looking at ways to increase their efficiency by reducing costs while providing care services with a high level of safety. Thus, hospital information systems have to support quality improvement objectives. The elicitation of the requirements has to meet users' needs in relation to both the quality (efficacy, safety) and the monitoring of all health care activities (traceability). Information analysts need methods to conceptualise clinical information systems that provide actors with individual benefits and guide behavioural changes. A methodology is proposed to elicit and structure users' requirements using a process-oriented analysis, and it is applied to the blood transfusion process. An object-oriented data model of a process has been defined in order to organise the data dictionary. Although some aspects of activity, such as 'where', 'what else', and 'why' are poorly represented by the data model alone, this method of requirement elicitation fits the dynamic of data input for the process to be traced. A hierarchical representation of hospital activities has to be found for the processes to be interrelated, and for their characteristics to be shared, in order to avoid data redundancy and to fit the gathering of data with the provision of care.

  14. Prescribing Patterns and Perceptions of Health Care Professionals About Rational Drug use in a Specialist Hospital Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Igwilo, Cecilia I.; Emedoh, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Irrational drug use is associated with adverse consequences including drug resistance and avoidable adverse drug reactions. Studies of rational drug use in psychiatric facilities are scanty. This study evaluated prescription practices and perception of health care professionals regarding causes of irrational drug use. A retrospective study conducted at the outpatient clinic of Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Yaba, Lagos. Data on drug use indicators were analyzed. A cross-sectional assessment of perception of prescribers and dispensers regarding rational drug use was conducted. A total of 600 prescriptions were analyzed. Mean number of drugs per encounter was 3.5 and percentage generic prescribed was 58.5%. Poly-pharmacy (P=0.024, 95% CI=1.082-1.315) and non-generic prescribing (P=0.032, 95% CI=1.495-1.821) were significantly associated with young prescribers. Factors associated with irrational drug use include demand from patients, patients’ beliefs about injection drugs and influence of pharmaceutical sale representatives. Certain aspect of prescribers indicators are still poor in the hospital studied. Health care professionals identified possible associated factors for irrational drug use. Concerted efforts are required to ensure rational drug use especially in psychiatric facilities in Nigeria. PMID:28299123

  15. Clinical Effectiveness of Integrating Depression Care Management into Medicare Home Health: The Depression CAREPATH Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Reilly, Catherine F.; Greenberg, Rebecca L.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Banerjee, Samprit; Pickett, Yolonda R.; Sheeran, Thomas F.; Ghesquiere, Angela; Zukowski, Diane; Rosas, Vianca H.; McLaughlin, Jeanne; Pledger, Lori; Doyle, Joan; Joachim, Pamela; Leon, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    at any follow-up. Among 208 participants with HDRS≥10, CAREPATH demonstrated effectiveness (P=0.02) with lower HDRS at three (14.1 vs 16.1; P=0.04), six (12.0 vs 14.7; P=0.02) and twelve months (11.8 vs 15.7; P=0.005). Exploratory analyses found no differences in number or length of home visits. Conclusion and Relevance Home health nurses can effectively integrate depression care management into routine practice. However, clinical benefit appears limited to only patients with moderate to severe depression. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01979302 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01979302 PMID:25384017

  16. Application and Feasibility of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Reproductive Health Care Quality Indicators at a Public Urban Rheumatology Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Quinzanos, Itziar; Davis, Lisa; Keniston, Angela; Nash, Alyssa; Yazdany, Jinoos; Fransen, Rebecca; Hirsh, Joel M.; Zell, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    Objective Quality indicators (QIs) are evidence-based processes of care designed to represent the current standard of care. Reproductive health QIs for the care of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have recently been developed, and examine areas such as pregnancy screening for autoantibodies, treatment of pregnancy associated antiphospholipid syndrome, and contraceptive counseling. This study was designed to investigate our performance on these QIs and to explore potential gaps in care and demographic predictors of adherence to the QIs in a safety net hospital. METHODS We performed a retrospective record review of patients with a diagnosis of SLE at Denver Health Medical Center (DH) through an electronic query of existing medical records and via chart review. Data was limited to female patients between the ages of 18–50 who were seen between July 2006 and August 2011. RESULTS One hundred and thirty-seven female patients between the ages of 18–50 were identified by ICD-9 code and confirmed by chart review to have SLE. Of these, 122 patients met the updated 1997 American College of Rheumatology SLE criteria and had an intact reproductive system. Only 15 pregnancies were documented during this 5-year period and adherence to autoantibody screening was 100 percent. We did not have any patients who were pregnant and met criteria for pregnancy associated antiphospholipid syndrome. Sixty-five patients (53%) received potentially teratogenic medications and 30 (46%) had documented discussions about these medications’ potential risk upon their initiation. Predictors of whether patients received appropriate counseling included younger age (OR 0.93, CI 0.87-0.98) and those who did not describe English as their primary language (OR 0.29, CI 0.09-0.96). These remained statistically significant in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS We were able to detect an important gap in care regarding teratogenic medication education to SLE patients of childbearing

  17. Handling anticipated exceptions in clinical care: investigating clinician use of ‘exit strategies’ in an electronic health records system

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A; Padman, Rema; Johnson, Michael P; Hussain, Anwar A; Ye, Wen; Zhou, Xiaomu; Diamond, Herbert S

    2011-01-01

    Unpredictable yet frequently occurring exception situations pervade clinical care. Handling them properly often requires aberrant actions temporarily departing from normal practice. In this study, the authors investigated several exception-handling procedures provided in an electronic health records system for facilitating clinical documentation, which the authors refer to as ‘data entry exit strategies.’ Through a longitudinal analysis of computer-recorded usage data, the authors found that (1) utilization of the exit strategies was not affected by postimplementation system maturity or patient visit volume, suggesting clinicians' needs to ‘exit’ unwanted situations are persistent; and (2) clinician type and gender are strong predictors of exit-strategy usage. Drilldown analyses further revealed that the exit strategies were judiciously used and enabled actions that would be otherwise difficult or impossible. However, many data entries recorded via them could have been ‘properly’ documented, yet were not, and a considerable proportion containing temporary or incomplete information was never subsequently amended. These findings may have significant implications for the design of safer and more user-friendly point-of-care information systems for healthcare. PMID:21676941

  18. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Klinefelter Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Klinefelter syndrome (KS)? Skip sharing on ... karyotype (pronounced care-EE-oh-type ) test. A health care provider will take a small blood or skin ...

  19. Health care reforms.

    PubMed

    Marušič, Dorjan; Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  20. Health care reforms

    PubMed Central

    Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country. PMID:27703543

  1. Development of training-related health care software by a team of clinical educators: their experience, from conception to piloting.

    PubMed

    Ap Dafydd, Derfel; Williamson, Ruth; Blunt, Philip; Blunt, Dominic M

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties of producing useful, bespoke, and affordable information technology systems for large health care organizations are well publicized, following several high-profile endeavors in the UK. This article describes the experience of a small group of clinical radiologists and their collaborators in producing an information technology system - from conception to piloting. This system, called Trainee Tracker, enables automated target date recalculation of trainee milestones, depending on their work patterns and other individual circumstances. It utilizes an automated email alert system to notify the educational supervisors and trainees of approaching and elapsed target dates, in order to identify trainees in difficulty early and address their training needs accordingly. The challenges and advantages, both common to and contrasting with larger-scale projects, are also considered. The benefits of the development team's "agile" approach to software development and the lessons learned will be of interest to medical educators, particularly those with expertise in e-portfolios and other training-related software.

  2. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bojalil, R; Guiscafré, H; Espinosa, P; Viniegra, L; Martínez, H; Palafox, M; Gutiérrez, G

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  3. Burnout and health care utilization.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C N; Manning, M R

    1995-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between burnout and health care utilization of 238 employed adults. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory and health care utilization by insurance company records regarding these employees' health care costs and number of times they accessed health care services over a one year period. ANOVAs were conducted using Golembiewski and Munzenrider's approach to define the burnout phase. Significant differences in health care costs were found.

  4. Correlation of Internet Use for Health Care Engagement Purposes and HIV Clinical Outcomes Among HIV-Positive Individuals Using Online Social Media.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Parya; Johnson, Mallory O

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to describe cell phone and Internet use and assess the correlation of Internet use for health care engagement purposes and HIV clinical outcomes among HIV-positive individuals. The authors conducted a national survey using online social media to examine cell phone and Internet use, self-reported HIV viral load (detectable vs. undetectable), and antiretroviral adherence rating (excellent vs. less than excellent). Participants (N = 1,494) were asked about their Internet use for health care engagement purposes (including e-mailing health care providers, refilling medications online, and making medical appointments online). Approximately 95% of participants accessed the Internet nearly daily or daily in the past month (mean hours on Internet use per day = 5.2) and 55.5% used the Internet for health care engagement purposes. Those who used the Internet for any health care engagement purposes had a 1.52-fold odds of reporting an undetectable viral load (p = .009) and a 1.49-fold odds of reporting excellent adherence (p = .001). Although Internet access and use were similar across racial/ethnic, educational, and socioeconomic groups, disparities existed with the use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes among racial/ethnic minorities, those with low to moderate financial stability, lower education, and history of incarceration. The authors' data reveal that among HIV-positive users of online social media, use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes is associated with better self-reported virologic and adherence outcomes.

  5. An HIT Solution for Clinical Care and Disaster Planning: How One health Center in Joplin, MO Survived a Tornado and Avoided a Health Information Disaster.

    PubMed

    Shin, Peter; Jacobs, Feygele

    2012-01-01

    Since taking office, President Obama has made substantial investments in promoting the diffusion of health information technology (IT). The objective of the national health IT program is, generally, to enable health care providers to better manage patient care through secure use and sharing of health information. Through the use of technologies including electronic health records, providers can better maintain patient care information and facilitate communication, often improving care outcomes. The recent tornado in Joplin, MO highlights the importance of health information technology in the health center context, and illustrates the importance of secure electronic health information systems as a crucial element of disaster and business continuity planning. This article examines the experience of a community health center in the aftermath of the major tornado that swept through the American Midwest in the spring of 2011, and provides insight into the planning for disaster survival and recovery as it relates to patient records and health center data.

  6. Managed consumerism in health care.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  7. Values in health care.

    PubMed

    Gish, O

    1984-01-01

    The first part of the paper is concerned with the health care values of various groups; namely, those which are resource oriented, disease oriented, political decision-makers, organized sellers and purchasers of health care and patients. These groups are further divided according to selected political/ideological and socio-economic characteristics, essentially along capitalist and socialist lines. Some of the ways in which the values held by these groups are determined, formulated and, by implication at least, changed and the political, economic and other bases for some of their practical applications are identified. The second part of the paper focuses upon values in public health education and related practice. It is argued that to become more useful to the 'health of the public' the new public health worker will have to become more activist, assuming an adversarial stance toward the market economy in capitalist countries and oppressive governmental structures everywhere. A wider integration of knowledge concerning the effects of health of all types of economic, social and political practices is required; this, in turn, would contribute to the emergence of alternative forms of public health analysis and practice. The recognition of wider forms of public health leadership should follow, coupled with organizational changes directed at the greater participation of popular groupings in all types of public health activities.

  8. Knowledge Systems, Health Care Teams, and Clinical Practice: A Study of Successful Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Curtis A.; Tooman, Tricia R.; Alvarado, Carla J.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical teams are of growing importance to healthcare delivery, but little is known about how teams learn and change their clinical practice. We examined how teams in three US hospitals succeeded in making significant practice improvements in the area of antimicrobial resistance. This was a qualitative cross-case study employing Soft Knowledge…

  9. The effect of relational continuity of care in maternity and child health clinics on parenting self-efficacy of mothers and fathers with loneliness and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Miia; Junttila, Niina; Ahonen, Pia; Rautava, Päivi

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the parenting self-efficacy of the parents of 18-month-old children in the context of Finnish maternity and child health clinics. This parenting self-efficacy was observed in relation with the relational continuity of care and parents' experienced loneliness and depressive symptoms. The relational continuity of care was provided by a public health nurse in maternity and child health clinics. The participating parents were drawn from the STEPS study that is being carried out by the Institute for Child and Youth Research at the University of Turku. The results showed that relational continuity of care provided by the same public health nurse in the maternity and child health clinics was associated with mothers' higher emotional loneliness and with lower scores on three dimensions of parents' parenting self-efficacy. Loneliness and depressive symptoms negatively influenced parents' parenting self-efficacy - however, in the case where the family had experienced relational continuity of care, the parents' higher levels of depressive symptoms had not weakened their parenting self-efficacy beliefs. These results are discussed in terms of organizing maternity and child health clinic services.

  10. An evaluation of the competencies of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    Munyewende, Pascalia O.; Levin, Jonathan; Rispel, Laetitia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Managerial competencies to enhance individual and organisational performance have gained currency in global efforts to strengthen health systems. Competent managers are essential in the implementation of primary health care (PHC) reforms that aim to achieve universal health coverage. Objective To evaluate the competencies of PHC clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Using stratified random sampling, 111 PHC clinic nursing managers were selected. All supervisors (n=104) and subordinate nurses (n=383) were invited to participate in the survey on the day of data collection. Following informed consent, the nursing managers, their supervisors, and subordinate nurses completed a 40-item, 360-degree competency assessment questionnaire, with six domains: communication, leadership and management, staff management, financial management, planning and priority setting, and problem-solving. Standard deviations, medians, and inter-quartile ranges (IQRs) were computed separately for PHC nursing managers, supervisors, and subordinate nurses for competencies in the six domains. The Tinsley and Weiss index was used to assess agreement between each of the three possible pairs of raters. Results A 95.4% response rate was obtained, with 105 nursing managers in Gauteng and Free State completing the questionnaires. There was a lack of agreement about nursing managers’ competencies among the three groups of raters. Overall, clinic nursing managers rated themselves high on the five domains of communication (8.6), leadership and management (8.67), staff management (8.75), planning and priority setting (8.6), and problem-solving (8.83). The exception was financial management with a median score of 7.94 (IQR 6.33–9.11). Compared to the PHC clinic managers, the supervisors and subordinate nurses gave PHC nursing managers lower ratings on all six competency domains, with the lowest

  11. An evaluation of the competencies of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces.

    PubMed

    Munyewende, Pascalia O; Levin, Jonathan; Rispel, Laetitia C

    2016-01-01

    Background Managerial competencies to enhance individual and organisational performance have gained currency in global efforts to strengthen health systems. Competent managers are essential in the implementation of primary health care (PHC) reforms that aim to achieve universal health coverage. Objective To evaluate the competencies of PHC clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Using stratified random sampling, 111 PHC clinic nursing managers were selected. All supervisors (n=104) and subordinate nurses (n=383) were invited to participate in the survey on the day of data collection. Following informed consent, the nursing managers, their supervisors, and subordinate nurses completed a 40-item, 360-degree competency assessment questionnaire, with six domains: communication, leadership and management, staff management, financial management, planning and priority setting, and problem-solving. Standard deviations, medians, and inter-quartile ranges (IQRs) were computed separately for PHC nursing managers, supervisors, and subordinate nurses for competencies in the six domains. The Tinsley and Weiss index was used to assess agreement between each of the three possible pairs of raters. Results A 95.4% response rate was obtained, with 105 nursing managers in Gauteng and Free State completing the questionnaires. There was a lack of agreement about nursing managers' competencies among the three groups of raters. Overall, clinic nursing managers rated themselves high on the five domains of communication (8.6), leadership and management (8.67), staff management (8.75), planning and priority setting (8.6), and problem-solving (8.83). The exception was financial management with a median score of 7.94 (IQR 6.33-9.11). Compared to the PHC clinic managers, the supervisors and subordinate nurses gave PHC nursing managers lower ratings on all six competency domains, with the lowest rating

  12. Perceptions and acceptability of mHealth interventions for improving patient care at a community-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Larry W; Njie-Carr, Veronica; Kalenge, Sheila; Kelly, Jack F; Bollinger, Robert C; Alamo-Talisuna, Stella

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies for health (mHealth) represents a growing array of tools being applied in diverse health care settings. mHealth interventions for improving HIV/AIDS care is a promising strategy, but its evidence base is limited. We conducted a formative research evaluation to inform the development of novel mHealth HIV/AIDS care interventions to be used by community health workers (CHWs) in Kampala, Uganda. A mixed methods formative research approach was utilized. Qualitative methods included 20 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and six focus groups with CHWs, clinic staff, and patients. Thematic analysis was performed and selected quotations used to illustrate themes. Quantitative methods consisted of a survey administered to CHWs and clinic staff, using categorical and Likert scale questions regarding current mobile phone and internet access and perceptions on the potential use of smartphones by CHWs. Qualitative results included themes on significant current care challenges, multiple perceived mHealth benefits, and general intervention acceptability. Key mHealth features desired included tools to verify CHWs' task completions, clinical decision support tools, and simple access to voice calling. Inhibiting factors identified included concerns about CHWs' job security and unrealistic expectations of mHealth capabilities. Quantitative results from 27 staff participants found that 26 (96%) did not have internet access at home, yet only 2 (7.4%) did not own a mobile phone. Likert scale survey responses (1-5, 1 = Strongly Disagree, 5 = Strongly Agree) indicated general agreement that smartphones would improve efficiency (Mean = 4.35) and patient care (4.31) but might be harmful to patient confidentiality (3.88) and training was needed (4.63). Qualitative and quantitative results were generally consistent, and, overall, there was enthusiasm for mHealth technology. However, a number of potential inhibiting factors were also discovered. Findings from this study may help

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Birth Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose birth defects? Skip sharing on social ... to begin before health problems occur. Prenatal Screening Health care providers recommend that certain pregnant women, including those ...

  14. The Role of the Clinical Laboratory in the Future of Health Care: Lean Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Linoj

    2014-01-01

    This commentary will introduce lean concepts into the clinical microbiology laboratory. The practice of lean in the clinical microbiology laboratory can remove waste, increase efficiency, and reduce costs. Lean, Six Sigma, and other such management initiatives are useful tools and can provide dividends but must be accompanied by organizational leadership commitment to sustaining the lean culture in the laboratory setting and providing resources and time to work through the process. PMID:24574289

  15. Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension in Primary Health Care and Secondary Referral Medical Outpatient Clinic Settings at Enugu, Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chijioke, Chioli; Okolo, Teddy; Ekwe, Esther; Eze, Chukwuemeka; Agunyenwa, Charles; Amah, Christopher; Nwadike, Kenneth; Chijioke, Udunma

    2016-01-01

    Essential hypertension is the most common noncommunicable disease (NCD), affecting more than half the adult population in many countries and being the major NCD contributor to the double burden of disease in developing countries. We undertook a survey of the hypertension awareness, treatment, and control in primary and secondary referral health care clinics in Enugu, Nigeria, and compared these data with those obtained in local community surveys. The prevalence of hypertension in the primary care clinic (9.2%) was lower than in a previously reported community survey (42.2%), while, in the referral clinic, 70.3% of patients attending were hypertensive. Hypertension awareness rates were 91.9%, 29.4%, and 93.2% in these respective health care settings. Treatment and control rates (89.9% and 72.9%) were better in the secondary care clinic than in the primary care centre (87.7% and 46.0%). (Chi-square analysis confirmed statistically significant differences between these rates (p < 0.05).) These data may form a useful index of health care system effectiveness in Nigeria. Possible reasons for the differences observed and effective strategies to address the waxing pandemic of hypertension are discussed. PMID:28050277

  16. Controversies in faith and health care.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; Duff, Jean; Fitzgibbon, Atallah; Karam, Azza; Mills, Edward J; Munnings, Keith; Smith, Sally; Seshadri, Shreelata Rao; Steinberg, Avraham; Vitillo, Robert; Yugi, Philemon

    2015-10-31

    Differences in religious faith-based viewpoints (controversies) on the sanctity of human life, acceptable behaviour, health-care technologies and health-care services contribute to the widespread variations in health care worldwide. Faith-linked controversies include family planning, child protection (especially child marriage, female genital mutilation, and immunisation), stigma and harm reduction, violence against women, sexual and reproductive health and HIV, gender, end-of-life issues, and faith activities including prayer. Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and traditional beliefs have similarities and differences in their viewpoints. Improved understanding by health-care providers of the heterogeneity of viewpoints, both within and between faiths, and their effect on health care is important for clinical medicine, public-health programmes, and health-care policy. Increased appreciation in faith leaders of the effect of their teachings on health care is also crucial. This Series paper outlines some faith-related controversies, describes how they influence health-care provision and uptake, and identifies opportunities for research and increased interaction between faith leaders and health-care providers to improve health care.

  17. Health advance directives, policy and clinical practice: a perspective on the synergy of an effective advance care planning framework.

    PubMed

    Seal, Marion

    2010-03-01

    The delivery of quality care at the end of life should be seamless across all health care settings and independent from variables such as institutional largeness, charismatic leadership, funding sources and blind luck ... People have come to fear the prospect of a technologically protracted death or abandonment with untreated emotional and physical stress.

  18. Under the radar: how unexamined biases in decision-making processes in clinical interactions can contribute to health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Dovidio, John F; Fiske, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    Several aspects of social psychological science shed light on how unexamined racial/ethnic biases contribute to health care disparities. Biases are complex but systematic, differing by racial/ethnic group and not limited to love-hate polarities. Group images on the universal social cognitive dimensions of competence and warmth determine the content of each group's overall stereotype, distinct emotional prejudices (pity, envy, disgust, pride), and discriminatory tendencies. These biases are often unconscious and occur despite the best intentions. Such ambivalent and automatic biases can influence medical decisions and interactions, systematically producing discrimination in health care and ultimately disparities in health. Understanding how these processes may contribute to bias in health care can help guide interventions to address racial and ethnic disparities in health.

  19. Yoga for Health Care in Korea: A Protocol for Systematic Review of Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiae; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Ju Ah; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2016-08-01

    This systematic review aims to evaluate the therapeutic effects of yoga therapy using an evidence-based approach and investigates the relationship between yoga and the meridian energies based on all available clinical studies in Korea. Sixteen electronic databases will be searched from the inception of the study until January 2016. All clinical evidences that evaluate any type of yoga and any type of control in individuals with any type of condition will be eligible. The methodological quality will be assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool for randomized clinical trials and the Newcastle-Ottawa scale for nonrandomized studies. Two authors will independently assess each study for eligibility and the risk of bias, and then they will extract the data. With its extensive, unbiased search of the Korean literature from various databases without any language restrictions, this systematic review will be useful for both practitioners in the field of yoga research as well as for patients.

  20. Managing Conflicts of Interest in the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Clinical Guidelines Programme: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Tanya; Alderson, Phil; Stokes, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Background There is international concern that conflicts of interest (COI) may bias clinical guideline development and render it untrustworthy. Guideline COI policies exist with the aim of reducing this bias but it is not known how such policies are interpreted and used by guideline producing organisations. This study sought to determine how conflicts of interest (COIs) are disclosed and managed by a national clinical guideline developer (NICE: the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence). Methods Qualitative study using semi-structured telephone interviews with 14 key informants: 8 senior staff of NICE’s guideline development centres and 6 chairs of guideline development groups (GDGs). We conducted a thematic analysis. Results Participants regard the NICE COI policy as comprehensive leading to transparent and independent guidance. The application of the NICE COI policy is, however, not straightforward and clarity could be improved. Disclosure of COI relies on self reporting and guideline developers have to take “on trust” the information they receive, certain types of COI (non-financial) are difficult to categorise and manage and disclosed COI can impact on the ability to recruit clinical experts to GDGs. Participants considered it both disruptive and stressful to exclude members from GDG meetings when required by the COI policy. Nonetheless the impact of this disruption can be minimised with good group chairing skills. Conclusions We consider that the successful implementation of a COI policy in clinical guideline development requires clear policies and procedures, appropriate training of GDG chairs and an evaluation of how the policy is used in practice. PMID:25811754

  1. Using the Constructivist Tridimensional Design Model for Online Continuing Education for Health Care Clinical Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seo, Kay Kyeong-Ju; Engelhard, Chalee

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new paradigm for continuing education of Clinical Instructors (CIs): the Constructivist Tridimensional (CTD) model for the design of an online curriculum. Based on problem-based learning, self-regulated learning, and adult learning theory, the CTD model was designed to facilitate interactive, collaborative, and authentic…

  2. Psychological needs, service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health clinic for young refugees: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Michelson, Daniel; Sclare, Irene

    2009-04-01

    This study addressed psychological needs, patterns of service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health service for young refugees and asylum seekers in London. Comparisons were made between two groups with different levels of postulated mental health need: unaccompanied minors (UAMs; n = 49) and children accompanied to the UK by one or more primary caregivers (n = 29). Significant differences were observed in referral pathways, with UAMs more likely to be referred by social services and less likely to be referred from medical agencies. UAMs also attended fewer sessions during treatment, and missed a greater proportion of scheduled appointments. Contrary to prediction, group comparisons revealed similar levels of post-migration stress and overall psychological morbidity. However, UAMs experienced significantly more traumatic events prior to resettlement, and were more likely to exhibit symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than their accompanied peers. Despite their elevated risk of PTSD, UAMs were less likely than accompanied children to have received trauma-focused interventions. UAMs were also significantly less likely to have been treated using cognitive therapy, anxiety management and parent/carer training, as well as receiving fewer types of practical assistance with basic social needs. The clinical and service implications of these findings are discussed.

  3. Women's health and behavioral health issues in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jean Lau; Yee, Barbara W K; Banks, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    As health care reform promises to change the landscape of health care delivery, its potential impact on women's health looms large. Whereas health and mental health systems have historically been fragmented, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates integrated health care as the strategy for reform. Current systems fragment women's health not only in their primary care, mental health, obstetrical, and gynecological needs, but also in their roles as the primary caregivers for parents, spouses, and children. Changes in reimbursement, and in restructuring financing and care coordination systems through accountable care organizations and medical homes, will potentially improve women's health care.

  4. Business models for health care decision support.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Phil

    2003-01-01

    CareScience, Inc. is a public company (NASDAQ: CARE) that originated ten years ago to commercialize risk adjustment and complication predictions developed by the Wharton School of Business and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Over the past decade, the company has grown to approximately 200 clients and 150 employees. Among the "firsts" recorded by the company, CareScience was the first to offer a clinical decision support system as an Application Service Provider (ASP), the first to offer peer-to-peer clinical data sharing among health care provider organizations and practitioners (Santa Barbara Care Data Exchange), and the first to provide a care management outsourcing arrangement.

  5. Value as the key concept in the health care system: how it has influenced medical practice and clinical decision-making processes

    PubMed Central

    Marzorati, Chiara; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    In the last 10 years, value has played a key role in the health care system. In this concept, innovations in medical practice and the increasing importance of patient centeredness have contributed to draw the attention of the medical community. Nonetheless, a large consensus on the meaning of “value” is still lacking: patients, physicians, policy makers, and other health care professionals have different ideas on which component of value may play a prominent role. Yet, shared clinical decision-making and patient empowerment have been recognized as fundamental features of the concept of value. Different paradigms of health care system embrace different meanings of value, and the absence of common and widely accepted definition does not help to identify a unique model of care in health care system. Our aim is to provide an overview of those paradigms that have considered value as a key theoretical concept and to investigate how the presence of value can influence the medical practice. This article may contribute to draw attention toward patients and propose a possible link between health care system based on “value” and new paradigms such as patient-centered system (PCS), patient empowerment, and P5 medicine, in order to create a predictive, personalized, preventive, participatory, and psycho-cognitive model to treat patients. Indeed, patient empowerment, value-based system, and P5 medicine seem to shed light on different aspects of a PCS, and this allows a better understanding of people under care. PMID:28356752

  6. Value as the key concept in the health care system: how it has influenced medical practice and clinical decision-making processes.

    PubMed

    Marzorati, Chiara; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    In the last 10 years, value has played a key role in the health care system. In this concept, innovations in medical practice and the increasing importance of patient centeredness have contributed to draw the attention of the medical community. Nonetheless, a large consensus on the meaning of "value" is still lacking: patients, physicians, policy makers, and other health care professionals have different ideas on which component of value may play a prominent role. Yet, shared clinical decision-making and patient empowerment have been recognized as fundamental features of the concept of value. Different paradigms of health care system embrace different meanings of value, and the absence of common and widely accepted definition does not help to identify a unique model of care in health care system. Our aim is to provide an overview of those paradigms that have considered value as a key theoretical concept and to investigate how the presence of value can influence the medical practice. This article may contribute to draw attention toward patients and propose a possible link between health care system based on "value" and new paradigms such as patient-centered system (PCS), patient empowerment, and P5 medicine, in order to create a predictive, personalized, preventive, participatory, and psycho-cognitive model to treat patients. Indeed, patient empowerment, value-based system, and P5 medicine seem to shed light on different aspects of a PCS, and this allows a better understanding of people under care.

  7. Clinical trial on the efficacy of exhaled carbon monoxide measurement in smoking cessation in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Smoking cessation is beneficial for our health at any point in life, both in healthy people and in people already suffering from a smoking-related disease. Any help to quit smoking can produce considerable benefits for Public Health. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of the CO-oximetry technique together with brief advice in smoking cessation, in terms of reduction of the number of cigarettes or in the variation of the motivation to quit smoking at month 12 compared with brief advice alone. Methods/Design Randomised, parallel, single-blind clinical trial in a primary health care setting in Majorca (Spain). Smokers in contemplation or pre-contemplation phase will be included in the study. Exclusion criteria: Smokers in preparation phase, subjects with a terminal illness or whose health status does not allow them to understand the study or complete the informed consent, and pregnant or breastfeeding women. The subjects will be randomly assigned to the control group (CG) or the intervention group (IG). The CG will receive brief advice, and the IG will receive brief advice together with a measurement of exhaled CO. There will be follow-up evaluations at 6 and 12 months after inclusion. 471 subjects will be needed per group in order to detect a difference between groups ≥ 5%. Primary outcome: sustained smoking cessation (at 6 and 12 months) confirmed by urine cotinine test. Secondary outcomes: point smoking cessation at 6 and 12 months both confirmed by urine cotinine analysis and self-reported, reduction in cigarette consumption, and variation in phase of smoking cessation. Discussion CO-oximetry is an inexpensive, non-invasive, fast technique that requires little technical training; making it a technique for risk assessment in smokers that can be easily applied in primary care and, if proven effective, could serve as a reinforcement aid in smoking cessation intervention activities. Trial Registration Current Controlled

  8. [Active clinical surveillance for detection of Legionnaires' disease: implications for health care structures].

    PubMed

    Marchesi, I; Bargellini, A; Cencetti, S; Concetti, S; Marchegiano, P; Cauteruccio, L; Casolari, C; Borella, P

    2007-01-01

    In an university hospital of about 900 beds, a clinical surveillance was activated to detect cases of Legionnaires' disease in patients affected by community and/or nosocomial-acquired pneumonia. In the hospital Legionella spp was detected in the hot water distribution system and various disinfecting and control procedures were adopted to reduce contamination. Contemporary, the clinical surveillance began with the systematic detection of Legionella urinary antigen among recovered pneumonia, seroconversion as confirmation test and the collection of respiratory secretions or other biological materials to isolate the microorganism in patients positive to the urinary antigen. From September 2003 to May 2005, 486 pneumonia were followed, 98 of which considered of nosocomial origin. In total, 15 cases of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease were detected by the urinary test, whereas no cases of nosocomial origin were found. The characteristics of the detected cases are described in comparison with the other pneumonia and the surveillance cost was evaluated. The systematic clinical surveillance for Legionella infections is feasible with limit costs, allows to detect community-acquired cases otherwise unknown and to ascertain the absence/presence of nosocomial-acquired pneumonia, irrespective of the environment contamination.

  9. Role of technology in the cost of health care: a new parameter in research and clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devey, Gilbert B.

    1994-12-01

    In 1993 the National Science Foundation and The Whitaker Foundation jointly supported an experimental initiative entitled `Cost Effective Health Care Technologies'. The broad goal of the 1993 program was to `promote innovative multidisciplinary research that can contribute to the containment or reduction of health costs without compromising the quality, effectiveness or accessibility of the health care system'. Proposals were required to contain a section which `describes as quantitatively as possible' the expected impact of the research results on the cost- effectiveness goal of the program--a new parameter for research methodologies. Twelve projects in the categories of Information and Systems, Medical Devices, and Biomaterials were funded. A modified program, `Cost Reducing Health Care Technologies', is planned for Fiscal Year 1995. Insights gained in the planning, conduct, and follow-up review of the 1993 experimental biomedical engineering research grant program provide useful background information on `The Role of Technology in the Cost of Health Care'. The desirability is indicated for engineers to participate in the development of a credible and robust technology assessment process at the basic and applied research stages of health care technology development.

  10. Knowledge systems, health care teams, and clinical practice: a study of successful change.

    PubMed

    Olson, Curtis A; Tooman, Tricia R; Alvarado, Carla J

    2010-10-01

    Clinical teams are of growing importance to healthcare delivery, but little is known about how teams learn and change their clinical practice. We examined how teams in three US hospitals succeeded in making significant practice improvements in the area of antimicrobial resistance. This was a qualitative cross-case study employing Soft Knowledge Systems as a conceptual framework. The purpose was to describe how teams produced, obtained, and used knowledge and information to bring about successful change. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to maximize variation between cases. Data were collected through interviews, archival document review, and direct observation. Individual case data were analyzed through a two-phase coding process followed by the cross-case analysis. Project teams varied in size and were multidisciplinary. Each project had more than one champion, only some of whom were physicians. Team members obtained relevant knowledge and information from multiple sources including the scientific literature, experts, external organizations, and their own experience. The success of these projects hinged on the teams' ability to blend scientific evidence, practical knowledge, and clinical data. Practice change was a longitudinal, iterative learning process during which teams continued to acquire, produce, and synthesize relevant knowledge and information and test different strategies until they found a workable solution to their problem. This study adds to our understanding of how teams learn and change, showing that innovation can take the form of an iterative, ongoing process in which bits of K&I are assembled from multiple sources into potential solutions that are then tested. It suggests that existing approaches to assessing the impact of continuing education activities may overlook significant contributions and more attention should be given to the role that practical knowledge plays in the change process in addition to scientific knowledge.

  11. Knowledge systems, health care teams, and clinical practice: a study of successful change

    PubMed Central

    Tooman, Tricia R.; Alvarado, Carla J.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical teams are of growing importance to healthcare delivery, but little is known about how teams learn and change their clinical practice. We examined how teams in three US hospitals succeeded in making significant practice improvements in the area of antimicrobial resistance. This was a qualitative cross-case study employing Soft Knowledge Systems as a conceptual framework. The purpose was to describe how teams produced, obtained, and used knowledge and information to bring about successful change. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to maximize variation between cases. Data were collected through interviews, archival document review, and direct observation. Individual case data were analyzed through a two-phase coding process followed by the cross-case analysis. Project teams varied in size and were multidisciplinary. Each project had more than one champion, only some of whom were physicians. Team members obtained relevant knowledge and information from multiple sources including the scientific literature, experts, external organizations, and their own experience. The success of these projects hinged on the teams' ability to blend scientific evidence, practical knowledge, and clinical data. Practice change was a longitudinal, iterative learning process during which teams continued to acquire, produce, and synthesize relevant knowledge and information and test different strategies until they found a workable solution to their problem. This study adds to our understanding of how teams learn and change, showing that innovation can take the form of an iterative, ongoing process in which bits of K&I are assembled from multiple sources into potential solutions that are then tested. It suggests that existing approaches to assessing the impact of continuing education activities may overlook significant contributions and more attention should be given to the role that practical knowledge plays in the change process in addition to scientific knowledge. PMID

  12. VA Health Care: Improved Monitoring Needed for Effective Oversight of Care for Women Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    of community providers of specialty care, mental health care, limited emergency care, and maternity and limited newborn care when such care is not...and Percentage of VA Community -Based Outpatient Clinics that Provide Primary Care Lacking a Women’s Health Primary Care Provider and Women Veteran... Community Care TPA third party administrator VA Department of Veterans Affairs VAMC Veterans Affairs medical center VHA Veterans Health

  13. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  14. Strategic planning for clinical services: St. Joseph Hospital and Health Care Center.

    PubMed

    Linggi, A; Pelham, L D

    1986-09-01

    A pharmacy department at a 340-bed community hospital based its strategic plan for developing patient-oriented services on a sound drug distribution system, a credible work-measurement program, and fiscal responsibility. In 1982 the department of pharmacy and i.v. therapy implemented a strategic plan for improving pharmaceutical services. The plan involved developing goals and objectives for the department; marketing the department's services and fiscal management to hospital administrators, medical staff, and nursing staff; building teamwork among the pharmacy staff; and improving the drug distribution system before instituting clinical services. Hiring of additional pharmacy staff was justified on the basis of work-measurement data. By adjusting staffing levels every two weeks based on work-measurement data, the department increased the efficiency of drug distribution activities; the pharmacy also implemented cost-saving programs like selection of therapeutic alternates and formulary restrictions. The savings were then reinvested in labor-intensive patient-oriented pharmaceutical services. A staff development program using staff pharmacists as preceptors expanded the breadth and depth of pharmacists' clinical skills. The planning efforts were successful because the needs of hospital administrators, the pharmacy department, and staff members were addressed.

  15. Improving Clinical Workflow in Ambulatory Care: Implemented Recommendations in an Innovation Prototype for the Veteran’s Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Emily S.; Lowry, Svetlana Z.; Ramaiah, Mala; Gibbons, Michael C.; Brick, David; Calco, Robert; Matton, Greg; Miller, Anne; Makar, Ellen; Ferrer, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Human factors workflow analyses in healthcare settings prior to technology implemented are recommended to improve workflow in ambulatory care settings. In this paper we describe how insights from a workflow analysis conducted by NIST were implemented in a software prototype developed for a Veteran’s Health Administration (VHA) VAi2 innovation project and associated lessons learned. Methods: We organize the original recommendations and associated stages and steps visualized in process maps from NIST and the VA’s lessons learned from implementing the recommendations in the VAi2 prototype according to four stages: 1) before the patient visit, 2) during the visit, 3) discharge, and 4) visit documentation. NIST recommendations to improve workflow in ambulatory care (outpatient) settings and process map representations were based on reflective statements collected during one-hour discussions with three physicians. The development of the VAi2 prototype was conducted initially independently from the NIST recommendations, but at a midpoint in the process development, all of the implementation elements were compared with the NIST recommendations and lessons learned were documented. Findings: Story-based displays and templates with default preliminary order sets were used to support scheduling, time-critical notifications, drafting medication orders, and supporting a diagnosis-based workflow. These templates enabled customization to the level of diagnostic uncertainty. Functionality was designed to support cooperative work across interdisciplinary team members, including shared documentation sessions with tracking of text modifications, medication lists, and patient education features. Displays were customized to the role and included access for consultants and site-defined educator teams. Discussion: Workflow, usability, and patient safety can be enhanced through clinician-centered design of electronic health records. The lessons learned from implementing

  16. A clinical training unit for diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections: an intervention for primary health care physicians in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Bojalil, R.; Guiscafré, H.; Espinosa, P.; Viniegra, L.; Martínez, H.; Palafox, M.; Gutiérrez, G.

    1999-01-01

    In Tlaxcala State, Mexico, we determined that 80% of children who died from diarrhoea or acute respiratory infections (ARI) received medical care before death; in more than 70% of the cases this care was provided by a private physician. Several strategies have been developed to improve physicians' primary health care practices but private practitioners have only rarely been included. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of in-service training on the case management of diarrhoea and ARI among under-5-year-olds provided by private and public primary physicians. The training consisted of a five-day course of in-service practice during which physicians diagnosed and treated sick children attending a centre and conducted clinical discussions of cases under guidance. Each training course was limited to six physicians. Clinical performance was evaluated by observation before and after the courses. The evaluation of diarrhoea case management covered assessment of dehydration, hydration therapy, prescription of antimicrobial and other drugs, advice on diet, and counselling for mothers; that of ARI case management covered diagnosis, decisions on antimicrobial therapy, use of symptomatic drugs, and counselling for mothers. In general the performance of public physicians both before and after the intervention was better than that of private doctors. Most aspects of the case management of children with diarrhoea improved among both groups of physicians after the course; the proportion of private physicians who had five or six correct elements out of six increased from 14% to 37%: for public physicians the corresponding increase was from 53% to 73%. In ARI case management, decisions taken on antimicrobial therapy and symptomatic drug use improved in both groups; the proportion of private physicians with at least three correct elements out of four increased from 13% to 42%, while among public doctors the corresponding increase was from 43% to 78%. Hands

  17. Care for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Sharon Brown; Kanze, David Mitchell

    2016-03-01

    Pretravel care for the health care provider begins with an inventory, including the destination, length of stay, logistical arrangements, type of lodging, food and water supply, team members, personal medical needs, and the needs of the community to be treated. This inventory should be created and processed well in advance of the planned medical excursion. The key thing to remember in one's planning is to be a health care provider during one's global health care travel and not to become a patient oneself. This article will help demonstrate the medical requirements and recommendations for such planning.

  18. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000878.htm Understanding your health care costs To use the sharing features on this ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ...

  19. [Pain and depression; strategies to improve primary health care, based on a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Arboledas Bellón, Josefa

    2009-06-01

    The author describes a case related to pain and depression. A community aid nurse, in conjunction with the nurse responsible to manage all cases, discovered both of these aspects and worked to ensure this patient's well-being in his/her family ambience. This nurse used the Virginia Henderson model, supplementing it with evaluating instruments such as questionnaires, tests, and indexes proposed by the Andalucían Health Service. For this specific case, a series of diagnoses were proposed; these permitted a human resource response aimed at the objectives and interventions derived from these diagnoses, employing as tools "NANDA, NIC and NOC". The author selected result criteria considered most adequate according to most common related factors in this case.

  20. Intraprofessional, team-based treatment planning for oral health students in the comprehensive care clinic.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, Nikos; Storrs, Mark; Foster, Lea; Oberholzer, Theunis

    2012-12-01

    In 2009, Griffith University School of Dentistry and Oral Health, in Queensland, Australia, introduced into its various curricula the concept of team-based treatment planning (TBTP), aiming to facilitate intraprofessional, interdisciplinary training and peer learning among its students. Fifty student teams were organized, each of which included students from three programs (Dental Science, Oral Health Therapy, and Dental Technology) and three years of study (third-, fourth-, and fifth-year students). This study prospectively evaluated the impact of TBTP on students' perceptions and attitudes towards teamwork and their role in a team of peers. A total of 202 students who participated in fifty TBTP teams were prospectively surveyed at baseline and at six and twelve months after introduction of TBTP. "Reliable" and "responsible" were reported to be the most important qualities of both an effective team leader and member. Fifth-year students identified "hard-working" as an important quality of the ideal leader as opposed to the fourth-year students who ranked "supportive" higher. Attitudes of the fifth-year students towards TBTP appeared to have declined significantly from the previous years, while fourth-year students remained consistently more positive. In addition, fourth-year students appeared more likely to enjoy working in a team and considered themselves more effective in a team. No gender differences were observed, other than female students' appearing less confident to lead a team. It was concluded that the function of student-directed interdisciplinary, intraprofessional treatment planning teams might pose disproportionate strain on fifth-year students, impacting their attitudes to such modes of work.

  1. Computers, Health Care, and Medical Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Thomas L.; Korpman, Ralph A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the new discipline of medical information science (MIS) and examines some problem-solving approaches used in its application in the clinical laboratory, emphasizing automation by computer technology. The health care field is viewed as one having overlapping domains of clinical medicine, health management and statistics, and fundamental…

  2. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  3. Why Uninsured Free Clinic Patients Don't Apply for Affordable Care Act Health Insurance in a Non-expanding Medicaid State.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Tabler, Jennifer; Chernenko, Alla; Aguilera, Guadalupe; Nourian, Maziar M; Prudencio, Liana; Ashby, Jeanie

    2016-02-01

    Even after the introduction of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), uninsured visits remain high, especially in states that opted out of Medicaid expansion. Since the ACA does not provide universal coverage, free clinics serve as safety nets for the un- or under-insured, and will likely continue serving underserved populations. The purpose of this study is to examine factors influencing intentions to not apply for health insurance via the ACA among uninsured free clinic patients in a state not expanding Medicaid. Uninsured primary care patients utilizing a free clinic (N = 551) completed a self-administered survey in May and June 2015. Difficulty obtaining information, lack of instruction to apply, and cost, are major factors influencing intention not to apply for health insurance through the ACA. US born English speakers, non-US born English speakers, and Spanish speakers reported different kinds of perceived barriers to applying for health insurance through the ACA. Age is an important factor impacting individuals' intentions not to apply for health insurance through the ACA, as older patients in particular need assistance to obtain relevant information about the ACA and other resources. A number of unchangeable factors limit the free clinics' ability to promote enrollment of health insurance through the ACA. Yet free clinics could be able to provide some educational programs or the information of resources to patients. In particular, non-US born English speakers, Spanish speakers, and older adults need specific assistance to better understand health insurance options available to them.

  4. System light-loading technology for mHealth: Manifold-learning-based medical data cleansing and clinical trials in WE-CARE Project.

    PubMed

    Huang, Anpeng; Xu, Wenyao; Li, Zhinan; Xie, Linzhen; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Li, Xiaoming; Cong, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major issue to public health. It contributes 41% to the Chinese death rate each year. This huge loss encouraged us to develop a Wearable Efficient teleCARdiology systEm (WE-CARE) for early warning and prevention of CVD risks in real time. WE-CARE is expected to work 24/7 online for mobile health (mHealth) applications. Unfortunately, this purpose is often disrupted in system experiments and clinical trials, even if related enabling technologies work properly. This phenomenon is rooted in the overload issue of complex Electrocardiogram (ECG) data in terms of system integration. In this study, our main objective is to get a system light-loading technology to enable mHealth with a benchmarked ECG anomaly recognition rate. To achieve this objective, we propose an approach to purify clinical features from ECG raw data based on manifold learning, called the Manifold-based ECG-feature Purification algorithm. Our clinical trials verify that our proposal can detect anomalies with a recognition rate of up to 94% which is highly valuable in daily public health-risk alert applications based on clinical criteria. Most importantly, the experiment results demonstrate that the WE-CARE system enabled by our proposal can enhance system reliability by at least two times and reduce false negative rates to 0.76%, and extend the battery life by 40.54%, in the system integration level.

  5. Child Care Health Connections, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Oku, Cheryl, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2002 issues of a bimonthly newsletter on children's health for California's child care professionals. The newsletter provides information on current and emerging health and safety issues relevant to child care providers and links the health, safety, and child care communities. Regular features include columns…

  6. Preventing HIV among U.S. women of color with severe mental illness: perceptions of mental health care providers working in urban community clinics.

    PubMed

    Agénor, Madina; Collins, Pamela Y

    2013-01-01

    Given their knowledge of the behavioral issues related to psychiatric illness, mental health care providers are in a unique position to help prevent HIV among women with severe mental illness (SMI). We conducted in-depth interviews with providers at two New York City community clinics. We identified three major, interrelated themes pertaining to HIV prevention among women of color with SMI. Interventions that address the barriers that clinicians face in discussing sex, sexuality, and HIV with patients and train providers in the cultural considerations of cross-cultural mental health care are needed to help prevent HIV among women of color with SMI.

  7. Development of training-related health care software by a team of clinical educators: their experience, from conception to piloting

    PubMed Central

    ap Dafydd, Derfel; Williamson, Ruth; Blunt, Philip; Blunt, Dominic M

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties of producing useful, bespoke, and affordable information technology systems for large health care organizations are well publicized, following several high-profile endeavors in the UK. This article describes the experience of a small group of clinical radiologists and their collaborators in producing an information technology system – from conception to piloting. This system, called Trainee Tracker, enables automated target date recalculation of trainee milestones, depending on their work patterns and other individual circumstances. It utilizes an automated email alert system to notify the educational supervisors and trainees of approaching and elapsed target dates, in order to identify trainees in difficulty early and address their training needs accordingly. The challenges and advantages, both common to and contrasting with larger-scale projects, are also considered. The benefits of the development team’s “agile” approach to software development and the lessons learned will be of interest to medical educators, particularly those with expertise in e-portfolios and other training-related software. PMID:27853396

  8. Nurses’ and patients’ communication in smoking cessation at nurse-led COPD clinics in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Efraimsson, Eva Österlund; Klang, Birgitta; Ehrenberg, Anna; Larsson, Kjell; Fossum, Bjöörn; Olai, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background Smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have high nicotine dependence making it difficult to quit smoking. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a method that is used in stimulating motivation and behavioral changes. Objective To describe smoking cessation communication between patients and registered nurses trained in MI in COPD nurse-led clinics in Swedish primary health care. Methods A prospective observational study with structured quantitative content analyses of the communication between six nurses with basic education in MI and 13 patients in non-smoking consultations. Results Only to a small extent did nurses’ evoke patients’ reasons for change, stimulate collaboration, and support patients’ autonomy. Nurses provided information, asked closed questions, and made simple reflections. Patients’ communication was mainly neutral and focusing on reasons for and against smoking. It was uncommon for patients to be committed and take steps toward smoking cessation. Conclusion The nurses did not adhere to the principles of MI in smoking cessation, and the patients focused to a limited extent on how to quit smoking. Practice implications To make patients more active, the nurses need more education and continuous training in motivational communication. PMID:26672958

  9. [Ethical problems in health care].

    PubMed

    Zácek, A

    1994-02-28

    Changes in the scale of values associated with society entering plural democracy caused as regards conceptual problems of health care some ethical doubts and objections. In the author's opinion the most important ones are: problems on the essence of health and mission of health policy, responsibility for health care, nature of health services under conditions of market economy, problems of the interpretation of right to health, health requirements and the importance of equity in advanced cultural societies.

  10. Pre-exposure prophylaxis prescribing and retention in care among heterosexual women at a community-based comprehensive sexual health clinic.

    PubMed

    Blackstock, Oni J; Patel, Viraj V; Felsen, Uriel; Park, Connie; Jain, Sachin

    2017-02-01

    In the United States, heterosexual women account for 20% of new HIV infections. As a user-controlled HIV prevention method, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has substantial potential to reduce new infections among women. However, among women, PrEP is vastly underutilized. To guide efforts to increase women-at-risk's PrEP use, we sought to describe the characteristics of women prescribed PrEP as well as their retention in PrEP care. We conducted a chart review of women who received care at a comprehensive sexual health clinic within a large urban health care system. Referral sources included the health care system's clinics and HIV testing program, as well as local community-based organizations. From 1 December 2014 to 5 August 2016, 554 women received care at the clinic. During this period, 21 heterosexual women (3.8%) received at least one prescription for daily oral PrEP. For women prescribed PrEP, median age was 35 years old (range: 20-52). The majority (66.7%) were either Latina or non-Latina Black and most (81.2%) had public health insurance. The most common PrEP indication was being in a known sero-discordant partnership (85.7%). Of women in such partnerships, 83.3% reported their male partner was currently taking antiretroviral medications (ARVs) and 16.7% reported trying to conceive with their partner (not mutually exclusive). Of women with ARV-using partners, 66.7% reported that their partners were virally suppressed. Retention in PrEP care at three months was 61.1% and, at six months, 37.5%. Further study is necessary to expand PrEP to women whose risk factors extend beyond being in a known sero-discordant partnership, and to understand the reasons for the observed drop-off in PrEP care visits in real-world settings.

  11. Telementoring Primary Care Clinicians to Improve Geriatric Mental Health Care.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Elisa; Hasselberg, Michael; Conwell, Yeates; Weiss, Linda; Padrón, Norma A; Tiernan, Erin; Karuza, Jurgis; Donath, Jeremy; Pagán, José A

    2017-01-20

    Health care delivery and payment systems are moving rapidly toward value-based care. To be successful in this new environment, providers must consistently deliver high-quality, evidence-based, and coordinated care to patients. This study assesses whether Project ECHO(®) (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) GEMH (geriatric mental health)-a remote learning and mentoring program-is an effective strategy to address geriatric mental health challenges in rural and underserved communities. Thirty-three teleECHO clinic sessions connecting a team of specialists to 54 primary care and case management spoke sites (approximately 154 participants) were conducted in 10 New York counties from late 2014 to early 2016. The curriculum consisted of case presentations and didactic lessons on best practices related to geriatric mental health care. Twenty-six interviews with program participants were conducted to explore changes in geriatric mental health care knowledge and treatment practices. Health insurance claims data were analyzed to assess changes in health care utilization and costs before and after program implementation. Findings from interviews suggest that the program led to improvements in clinician geriatric mental health care knowledge and treatment practices. Claims data analysis suggests that emergency room costs decreased for patients with mental health diagnoses. Patients without a mental health diagnosis had more outpatient visits and higher prescription and outpatient costs. Telementoring programs such as Project ECHO GEMH may effectively build the capacity of frontline clinicians to deliver high-quality, evidence-based care to older adults with mental health conditions and may contribute to the transformation of health care delivery systems from volume to value.

  12. Community health workers and primary health care in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Quillian, J P

    1993-01-01

    Community participation and utilization of community health workers (CHWs) are essential components of the primary health care model. The success of CHWs is dependent on their training and subsequent community support. Community-prepared nurses are ideal CHW educators. A training program for CHWs was implemented in Honduras emphasizing the principles of adult learning and problem-based learning. Following a 4-month program of training a primary health care clinic was opened and managed by CHWs for a population over 10,000. Approximately 80% of local health problems were managed by the CHWs proving that well-trained CHWs can have a significant impact on the delivery of health care.

  13. International health care spending.

    PubMed

    Schieber, G J; Puollier, J P

    1986-01-01

    Trends in health are reviewed for the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) covering the following: the basic difficulties inherent in international comparative studies; the absolute levels of health expenditures in 1984; the levels and rates of growth of the health share in the gross domestic product (GDP) and the public share of total health expenditures; the elasticities of real health expenditures to real GDP for the 1960-75, 1975-84, and 1960-84 time periods; growth in health expenditures for the largest 7 OECD countries in terms of growth in population, health prices, health care prices in excess of overall prices, and utilization/intensity of services per person. International comparisons are a problem due to differences in defining the boundaries of the health sector, the heterogeneity of data, and methodological problems arising from comparing different economic, demographic, cultural, and institutional structures. The most difficult problem in international comparisons of health expenditures is lack of appropriate measures of health outcome. Exhibit 1 contains per capita health expenditures denominated in US dollars based on GDP purchasing power parities for 21 OECD countries for 1984. Per capita health expenditures ranged from less than $500 in Greece, Portugal, and Spain to over $1400 in Sweden and the US, with an OECD average of $871. After adjusting for price level differences, there still appears to be a greater than 3-fold difference in the "volume" of services consumed across the OECD countries. To determine if per capita health expenditures are related to a country's wealth as measured by its per capita GDP, the relationship between per capita health expenditures and per capita GDP for the 21 countries were examined for 1984. The data points and the "best fitting" trend line indicate a statistically significant relationship in which each $100 difference in per capita GDP is associated with a $10

  14. Attending unintended transformations of health care infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Wentzer, Helle; Bygholm, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Western health care is under pressure from growing demands on quality and efficiency. The development and implementation of information technology, IT is a key mean of health care authorities to improve on health care infrastructure. Theory and methods Against a background of theories on human-computer interaction and IT-mediated communication, different empirical studies of IT implementation in health care are analyzed. The outcome is an analytical discernment between different relations of communication and levels of interaction with IT in health care infrastructure. These relations and levels are synthesized into a framework for identifying tensions and potential problems in the mediation of health care with the IT system. These problems are also known as unexpected adverse consequences, UACs, from IT implementation into clinical health care practices. Results This paper develops a conceptual framework for addressing transformations of communication and workflow in health care as a result of implementing IT. Conclusion and discussion The purpose of the conceptual framework is to support the attention to and continuous screening for errors and unintended consequences of IT implementation into health care practices and outcomes. PMID:18043725

  15. Evaluating process and clinical outcomes of a primary care mental health integration project in rural Rwanda: a prospective mixed-methods protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie L; Misago, Claire Nancy; Osrow, Robyn A; Franke, Molly F; Iyamuremye, Jean Damascene; Dusabeyezu, Jeanne D'Arc; Mohand, Achour A; Anatole, Manzi; Kayiteshonga, Yvonne; Raviola, Giuseppe J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Integrating mental healthcare into primary care can reduce the global burden of mental disorders. Yet data on the effective implementation of real-world task-shared mental health programmes are limited. In 2012, the Rwandan Ministry of Health and the international healthcare organisation Partners in Health collaboratively adapted the Mentoring and Enhanced Supervision at Health Centers (MESH) programme, a successful programme of supported supervision based on task-sharing for HIV/AIDS care, to include care of neuropsychiatric disorders within primary care settings (MESH Mental Health). We propose 1 of the first studies in a rural low-income country to assess the implementation and clinical outcomes of a programme integrating neuropsychiatric care into a public primary care system. Methods and analysis A mixed-methods evaluation will be conducted. First, we will conduct a quantitative outcomes evaluation using a pretest and post-test design at 4 purposively selected MESH MH participating health centres. At least 112 consecutive adults with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression or epilepsy will be enrolled. Primary outcomes are symptoms and functioning measured at baseline, 8 weeks and 6 months using clinician-administered scales: the General Health Questionnaire and the brief WHO Disability Assessment Scale. We hypothesise that service users will experience at least a 25% improvement in symptoms and functioning from baseline after MESH MH programme participation. To understand any outcome improvements under the intervention, we will evaluate programme processes using (1) quantitative analyses of routine service utilisation data and supervision checklist data and (2) qualitative semistructured interviews with primary care nurses, service users and family members. Ethics and dissemination This evaluation was approved by the Rwanda National Ethics Committee (Protocol #736/RNEC/2016) and deemed exempt by the Harvard University Institutional Review

  16. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  17. Integrating Behavioral Health into Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Amy M.; Collins, Laura; Dugdale, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Depression is one of the more common diagnoses encountered in primary care, and primary care in turn provides the majority of care for patients with depression. Many approaches have been tried in efforts to improve the outcomes of depression management. This article outlines the partnership between the University of Washington (UW) Neighborhood Clinics and the UW Department of Psychiatry in implementing a collaborative care approach to integrating the management of anxiety and depression in the ambulatory primary care setting. This program was built on the chronic care model, which utilizes a team approach to caring for the patient. In addition to the patient and the primary care provider (PCP), the team included a medical social worker (MSW) as care manager and a psychiatrist as team consultant. The MSW would manage a registry of patients with depression at a clinic with several PCPs, contacting the patients on a regular basis to assess their status, and consulting with the psychiatrist on a weekly basis to discuss patients who were not achieving the goals of care. Any recommendation (eg, a change in medication dose or class) made by the psychiatrist was communicated to the PCP, who in turn would work with the patient on the new recommendation. This collaborative care approach resulted in a significant improvement in the number of patients who achieved care plan goals. The authors believe this is an effective method for health systems to integrate mental health services into primary care. (Population Health Management 2016;19:81–87) PMID:26348355

  18. Transforming care delivery through health information technology.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The slow but progressive adoption of health information technology (IT) nationwide promises to usher in a new era in health care. Electronic health record systems provide a complete patient record at the point of care and can help to alleviate some of the challenges of a fragmented delivery system, such as drug-drug interactions. Moreover, health IT promotes evidence-based practice by identifying gaps in recommended treatment and providing clinical decision-support tools. In addition, the data collected through digital records can be used to monitor patient outcomes and identify potential improvements in care protocols. Kaiser Permanente continues to advance its capability in each of these areas.

  19. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Prader-Willi Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)? Skip sharing ... a "floppy" body and weak muscle tone, a health care provider may conduct genetic testing for Prader-Willi ...

  20. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Rett syndrome? Skip sharing on social ... Rett syndrome may not always be present, so health care providers also need to evaluate the child's symptoms ...

  1. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Fragile X Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Fragile X syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers often use a blood sample to diagnose ...

  2. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Osteogenesis Imperfecta?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)? Skip sharing on ... Page Content If OI is moderate or severe, health care providers usually diagnose it during prenatal ultrasound at ...

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers can check for Down syndrome during pregnancy ...

  4. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Phenylketonuria (PKU)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose phenylketonuria (PKU)? Skip sharing on social ... disabilities. 2 How are newborns tested for PKU? Health care providers conduct a PKU screening test using a ...

  5. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Turner Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose Turner syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Health care providers use a combination of physical symptoms and ...

  6. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities (IDDs)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose IDDs? Skip sharing on social media ... 1 This type of test will help the health care provider examine the ability of a person to ...

  7. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose PCOS? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Your health care provider may suspect PCOS if you have eight ...

  8. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose bacterial vaginosis (BV)? Skip sharing on ... BV requires a vaginal exam by a qualified health care provider and the laboratory testing of fluid collected ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose POI? Skip sharing on social media ... having periods for 4 months or longer, her health care provider may take these steps to diagnose the ...

  10. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Neural Tube Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose neural tube defects? Skip sharing on ... AFP, as well as high levels of acetylcholinesterase; health care providers might conduct this test to confirm high ...

  11. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Pregnancy Loss or Miscarriage?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose pregnancy loss or miscarriage? Skip sharing ... light spotting, or bleeding, she should contact her health care provider immediately. For diagnosis, the woman may need ...

  12. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI)? Skip sharing ... links Share this: Page Content To diagnose TBI, health care providers may use one or more tests that ...

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Menstrual Irregularities?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose menstrual irregularities? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider diagnoses menstrual irregularities using a combination of ...

  14. Achieving appropriate design for developing world heath care: the case of a low-cost autoclave for primary health clinics.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hallie S; Tao, Gregory D; Winter, Amos

    2012-01-01

    In developing world health clinics, incidence of surgical site infection is 2 to 10 times higher than in developed world hospitals. This paper identifies lack of availability of appropriately designed, low-cost autoclaves in developing world health clinics as a major contributing factor to the dramatic gap in surgical site infection rates. The paper describes the process of developing a low-cost autoclave that addresses the unique challenges faced by developing world primary health clinics and discusses how appropriateness of design was determined. The resulting pressure cooker-based autoclave design was fabricated and tested against the CDC specifications. Twelve partnering clinics in Nepal trialed these autoclaves from July until December 2012.

  15. Can health care teams improve primary care practice?

    PubMed

    Grumbach, Kevin; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2004-03-10

    In health care settings, individuals from different disciplines come together to care for patients. Although these groups of health care personnel are generally called teams, they need to earn true team status by demonstrating teamwork. Developing health care teams requires attention to 2 central questions: who is on the team and how do team members work together? This article chiefly focuses on the second question. Cohesive health care teams have 5 key characteristics: clear goals with measurable outcomes, clinical and administrative systems, division of labor, training of all team members, and effective communication. Two organizations are described that demonstrate these components: a private primary care practice in Bangor, Me, and Kaiser Permanente's Georgia region primary care sites. Research on patient care teams suggests that teams with greater cohesiveness are associated with better clinical outcome measures and higher patient satisfaction. In addition, medical settings in which physicians and nonphysician professionals work together as teams can demonstrate improved patient outcomes. A number of barriers to team formation exist, chiefly related to the challenges of human relationships and personalities. Taking small steps toward team development may improve the work environment in primary care practices.

  16. The digital transformation of health care.

    PubMed

    Coile, R C

    2000-01-01

    The arrival of the Internet offers the opportunity to fundamentally reinvent medicine and health care delivery. The "e-health" era is nothing less than the digital transformation of the practice of medicine, as well as the business side of the health industry. Health care is only now arriving in the "Information Economy." The Internet is the next frontier of health care. Health care consumers are flooding into cyberspace, and an Internet-based industry of health information providers is springing up to serve them. Internet technology may rank with antibiotics, genetics, and computers as among the most important changes for medical care delivery. Utilizing e-health strategies will expand exponentially in the next five years, as America's health care executives shift to applying IS/IT (information systems/information technology) to the fundamental business and clinical processes of the health care enterprise. Internet-savvy physician executives will provide a bridge between medicine and management in the adoption of e-health technology.

  17. A fully automated health-care monitoring at home without attachment of any biological sensors and its clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Motoi, Kosuke; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Ueno, Hiroshi; Kuwae, Yutaka; Ikarashi, Akira; Yuji, Tadahiko; Higashi, Yuji; Tanaka, Shinobu; Fujimoto, Toshiro; Asanoi, Hidetsugu; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Daily monitoring of health condition is important for an effective scheme for early diagnosis, treatment and prevention of lifestyle-related diseases such as adiposis, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and other diseases. Commercially available devices for health care monitoring at home are cumbersome in terms of self-attachment of biological sensors and self-operation of the devices. From this viewpoint, we have been developing a non-conscious physiological monitor installed in a bath, a lavatory, and a bed for home health care and evaluated its measurement accuracy by simultaneous recordings of a biological sensors directly attached to the body surface. In order to investigate its applicability to health condition monitoring, we have further developed a new monitoring system which can automatically monitor and store the health condition data. In this study, by evaluation on 3 patients with cardiac infarct or sleep apnea syndrome, patients' health condition such as body and excretion weight in the toilet and apnea and hypopnea during sleeping were successfully monitored, indicating that the system appears useful for monitoring the health condition during daily living.

  18. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care » Program Overview » Outreach Materials » FAQs Women Veterans Health Care Menu Menu Womens Health Women Veterans Health Care ... Who can I call for more help? What health care services are available to women Veterans? A full ...

  19. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    PubMed

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  20. Achieving Population Health in Accountable Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Deborah Klein

    2013-01-01

    Although “population health” is one of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Triple Aim goals, its relationship to accountable care organizations (ACOs) remains ill-defined and lacks clarity as to how the clinical delivery system intersects with the public health system. Although defining population health as “panel” management seems to be the default definition, we called for a broader “community health” definition that could improve relationships between clinical delivery and public health systems and health outcomes for communities. We discussed this broader definition and offered recommendations for linking ACOs with the public health system toward improving health for patients and their communities. PMID:23678910

  1. Integrating Community Health Workers (CHWs) into Health Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Payne, Julianne; Razi, Sima; Emery, Kyle; Quattrone, Westleigh; Tardif-Douglin, Miriam

    2017-04-08

    Health care organizations increasingly employ community health workers (CHWs) to help address growing provider shortages, improve patient outcomes, and increase access to culturally sensitive care among traditionally inaccessible or disenfranchised patient populations. Scholarly interest in CHWs has grown in recent decades, but researchers tend to focus on how CHWs affect patient outcomes rather than whether and how CHWs fit into the existing health care workforce. This paper focuses on the factors that facilitate and impede the integration of the CHWs into health care organizations, and strategies that organizations and their staff develop to overcome barriers to CHW integration. We use qualitative evaluation data from 13 awardees that received Health Care Innovation Awards from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to enhance the quality of health care, improve health outcomes, and reduce the cost of care using programs involving CHWs. We find that organizational capacity, support for CHWs, clarity about health care roles, and clinical workflow drive CHW integration. We conclude with practical recommendations for health care organizations interested in employing CHWs.

  2. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education, Okemos, MI.

    This document presents the National Health Care Skill Standards, which were developed by the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology and West Ed Regional Research Laboratory, in partnership with educators and health care employers. The document begins with an overview of the purpose and benefits of skill standards. Presented next are…

  3. The German health care system and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Kamke, K

    1998-02-01

    This article presents a structured survey of the German health care and health insurance system, and analyzes major developments of current German health policy. The German statutory health insurance system has been known as a system that provides all citizens with ready access to comprehensive high quality medical care at a cost the country considered socially acceptable. However, an increasing concern for rapidly rising health care expenditure led to a number of cost-containment measures since 1977. The aim was to bring the growth of health care expenditure in line with the growth of wages and salaries of the sickness fund members. The recent health care reforms of 1989 and 1993 yielded only short-term reductions of health care expenditure, with increases in the subsequent years. 'Stability of the contribution rate' is the uppermost political objective of current health care reform initiatives. Options under discussion include reductions in the benefit package and increases of patients' co-payments. The article concludes with the possible consequences of the 1997 health care reform of which the major part became effective 1 July 1997.

  4. Clinical governance in pre-hospital care.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson-Steel, I; Edwards, S; Gough, M

    2001-01-01

    This article seeks to discover and recognize the importance of clinical governance within a new and emerging quality National Health Service (NHS) system. It evaluates the present state of prehospital care and recommends how change, via clinical governance, can ensure a paradigm shift from its currently fragmented state to a seamless ongoing patient care episode. Furthermore, it identifies the drivers of a quality revolution, examines the monitoring and supervision of quality care, and evaluates the role of evidence-based practice. A frank and open view of immediate care doctors is presented, with recommendations to improve the quality of skill delivery and reduce the disparity that exists. Finally, it reviews the current problems with pre-hospital care and projects a future course for quality and patient care excellence. PMID:11383428

  5. Profiles and service utilization for children accessing a mental health walk-in clinic versus usual care.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Melanie; Urajnik, Diana; Sumner, Linda; Cohen, Sharna; Reid, Graham; Engel, Karen; Moore, Julie E

    2013-01-01

    Many children and adolescents with mental health problems do not receive the treatment they need. Unmet need raises questions about specific barriers that may prevent service use, and/or the characteristics of children and families who are less likely to receive care. Brief interventions or single-session psychotherapy delivered in a highly accessible manner are methods of addressing the problems associated with waitlists and limited access to care. In the current study the authors offer an exploratory evaluation of the West End Walk-In Counseling Centre for children and youth with psychosocial problems. Children 4 to 18 years of age who accessed the Walk-In Counseling Centre and a comparison group of clients who accessed usual care were assessed at intake, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up on demographic characteristics, behavioral/emotional adjustment and functioning, client satisfaction, and service use. Children in the walk-in group had more severe behavioral/emotional adjustment and functioning than usual care clients at baseline. At post-treatment, walk-in clients had lower scores on Total Mental Health Problems and Internalizing Behaviors, and exhibited fewer problems across all scales at follow-up. Walk-in clients found the wait time for service more reasonable and at follow-up, felt the service addressed concerns and had higher regard for counselor availability and cultural sensitivity of the service than usual care clients. Service utilization, assessed at post-treatment and 3-month follow-up, showed that both groups were more likely to access mental health and education services rather than health or child welfare services, and were more likely to have used services in the 12 months prior to service than the 3 months following service completion. Walk-in clients had steeper rates of improvement compared to usual care clients despite equivalence in psychosocial functioning at baseline. The walk-in model may be an effective alternative to usual care

  6. Significance of Staphylococcus epidermidis in Health Care-Associated Infections, from Contaminant to Clinically Relevant Pathogen: This Is a Wake-Up Call!

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, have been recognized as an important cause of health care-associated infections. Concurrently, S. epidermidis is a common contaminant in clinical cultures, which poses a diagnostic challenge. An article in this issue of Journal of Clinical Microbiology (I. Tolo, J. C. Thomas, R. S. B. Fischer, E. L. Brown, B. M. Gray, and D. A. Robinson, J Clin Microbiol 54:1711–1719, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.03345-15) describes a rapid single nucleotide polymorphism-based assay for distinguishing between S. epidermidis isolates from hospital and nonhospital sources, which represents an important contribution to the characterization and understanding of S. epidermidis health care-associated infections. PMID:27170016

  7. Information Technology Outside Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-health-care uses of information technology (IT) provide important lessons for health care informatics that are often overlooked because of the focus on the ways in which health care is different from other domains. Eight examples of IT use outside health care provide a context in which to examine the content and potential relevance of these lessons. Drawn from personal experience, five books, and two interviews, the examples deal with the role of leadership, academia, the private sector, the government, and individuals working in large organizations. The interviews focus on the need to manage technologic change. The lessons shed light on how to manage complexity, create and deploy standards, empower individuals, and overcome the occasional “wrongness” of conventional wisdom. One conclusion is that any health care informatics self-examination should be outward-looking and focus on the role of health care IT in the larger context of the evolving uses of IT in all domains. PMID:10495095

  8. Evaluation of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): Information and health education feedback for improving clinical monitoring and quality-of-life

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a health problem that is becoming increasingly attended-to in Primary Care (PC). However, there is a scarcity of health-care programs and studies exploring the implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG). The principal objective of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a combined strategy directed towards health-care professionals and patients to improve the grade of clinical control and the quality-of-life (QoL) of the patients via a feedback on their state-of-health. A training plan for the health-care professionals is based on CPG and health education. Method/Design Multi-centred, before-after, quasi experimental, prospective study involving an intervention group and a control group of individuals followed-up for 12 months. The patients receive attention from urban and semi-urban Primary Care Centres (PCC) within the administrative area of the Costa de Ponent (near Barcelona). All the pacients corresponding to the PCC of one sub-area were assigned to the intervention group and patients from the rest of sub-areas to the group control. The intervention includes providing data to the health-care professionals (clinician/nurse) derived from a clinical history and an interview. A course of training focused on aspects of CPG, motivational interview and health education (tobacco, inhalers, diet, physical exercise, physiotherapy). The sample random includes a total of 801 patients (≥ 40 years of age), recorded as having COPD, receiving attention in the PCC or at home, who have had at least one clinical visit, and who provided written informed consent to participation in the study. Data collected include socio-demographic characteristics, drug treatment, exacerbations and hospital admissions, evaluation of inhaler use, tobacco consumption and life-style and health-care resources consumed. The main endpoints are dyspnoea, according to the modified scale of the Medical Research Council

  9. Gypsies and health care.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, A

    1992-01-01

    Gypsies in the United States are not a healthy group. They have a high incidence of heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. When they seek medical care, Gypsies often come into conflict with medical personnel who find their behavior confusing, demanding, and chaotic. For their part, Gypsies are often suspicious of non-Gypsy people and institutions, viewing them as a source of disease and uncleanliness. Gypsy ideas about health and illness are closely related to notions of good and bad fortune, purity and impurity, and inclusion and exclusion from the group. These basic concepts affect everyday life, including the way Gypsies deal with eating and washing, physicians and hospitals, the diagnosis of illness, shopping around for cures, and coping with birth and death. PMID:1413769

  10. "Cloud" health-care workers.

    PubMed Central

    Sherertz, R. J.; Bassetti, S.; Bassetti-Wyss, B.

    2001-01-01

    Certain bacteria dispersed by health-care workers can cause hospital infections. Asymptomatic health-care workers colonized rectally, vaginally, or on the skin with group A streptococci have caused outbreaks of surgical site infection by airborne dispersal. Outbreaks have been associated with skin colonization or viral upper respiratory tract infection in a phenomenon of airborne dispersal of Staphylococcus aureus called the "cloud" phenomenon. This review summarizes the data supporting the existence of cloud health-care workers. PMID:11294715

  11. Health Care and Distributive Justice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    staggering cost of hospitalization and health care in general. Vast insurance pools that pay the bills encourage both the provider and consumer to utilize...incentives built into the system for either the consumer or the provider to encourage medical services cost control. 6 Massive, expensive and seemingly...1991.11 Ethical Considerations in Health Care Bioethical questions will prevail during any discussion of how to resolve America’s health care crisis. The

  12. Unlearning in health care

    PubMed Central

    Rushmer, R; Davies, H

    2004-01-01

    Learning in health care is essential if healthcare organisations are to tackle a challenging quality of care agenda. Yet while we know a reasonable amount about the nature of learning, how learning occurs, the forms it can take, and the routines that encourage it to happen within organisations, we know very little about the nature and processes of unlearning. We review the literature addressing issues pivotal to unlearning (what it is, why it is important, and why it is often neglected), and go further to explore the conditions under which unlearning is likely to be encouraged. There is a difference between routine unlearning (and subsequent re-learning) and deep unlearning—unlearning that requires a substantive break with previous modes of understanding, doing, and being. We argue that routine unlearning merely requires the establishment of new habits, whereas deep unlearning is a sudden, potentially painful, confrontation of the inadequacy in our substantive view of the world and our capacity to cope with that world competently. PMID:15576685

  13. Flourishing in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Andrew; Pattison, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer an account of 'flourishing' that is relevant to health care provision, both in terms of the flourishing of the individual patient and carer, and in terms of the flourishing of the caring institution. It is argued that, unlike related concepts such as 'happiness', 'well-being' or 'quality of life', 'flourishing' uniquely has the power to capture the importance of the vulnerability of human being. Drawing on the likes of Heidegger and Nussbaum, it is argued that humans are at once beings who are autonomous and thereby capable of making sense of their lives, but also subject to the contingencies of their bodies and environments. To flourish requires that one engages, imaginatively and creatively, with those contingencies. The experience of illness, highlighting the vulnerability of the human being, thereby becomes an important experience, stimulating reflection in order to make sense of one's life as a narrative. To flourish, it is argued, is to tell a story of one's life, realistically engaging with vulnerability and suffering, and thus creating a framework through which one can meaningful and constructively go on with one's life.

  14. Protocol investigating the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of cognitive–behavioural therapy delivered remotely for unscheduled care users with health anxiety: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shireen; Malins, Sam; Guo, Boliang; James, Marilyn; Kai, Joe; Kaylor-Hughes, Catherine; Rowley, Emma; Simpson, Jayne; Smart, David; Stubley, Michelle; Tyrer, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background Health anxiety and medically unexplained symptoms cost the National Health Service (NHS) an estimated £3 billion per year in unnecessary costs with little evidence of patient benefit. Effective treatment is rarely taken up due to issues such as stigma or previous negative experiences with mental health services. An approach to overcome this might be to offer remotely delivered psychological therapy, which can be just as effective as face-to-face therapy and may be more accessible and suitable. Aims To investigate the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of remotely delivered cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) to people with high health anxiety repeatedly accessing unscheduled care (trial registration: NCT02298036). Method A multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be undertaken in primary and secondary care providers of unscheduled care across the East Midlands. One hundred and forty-four eligible participants will be equally randomised to receive either remote CBT (6–12 sessions) or treatment as usual (TAU). Two doctoral research studies will investigate the barriers and facilitators to delivering the intervention and the factors contributing to the optimisation of therapeutic outcome. Results This trial will be the first to test the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of remotely delivered CBT for the treatment of high health anxiety. Conclusions The findings will enable an understanding as to how this intervention might fit into a wider care pathway to enhance patient experience of care. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703758

  15. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  16. Impact of Direct-to-Consumer Predictive Genomic Testing on Risk Perception and Worry Among Patients Receiving Routine Care in a Preventive Health Clinic

    PubMed Central

    James, Katherine M.; Cowl, Clayton T.; Tilburt, Jon C.; Sinicrope, Pamela S.; Robinson, Marguerite E.; Frimannsdottir, Katrin R.; Tiedje, Kristina; Koenig, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of direct-to-consumer (DTC) predictive genomic risk information on perceived risk and worry in the context of routine clinical care. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients attending a preventive medicine clinic between June 1 and December 18, 2009, were randomly assigned to receive either genomic risk information from a DTC product plus usual care (n=74) or usual care alone (n=76). At intervals of 1 week and 1 year after their clinic visit, participants completed surveys containing validated measures of risk perception and levels of worry associated with the 12 conditions assessed by the DTC product. RESULTS: Of 345 patients approached, 150 (43%) agreed to participate, 64 (19%) refused, and 131 (38%) did not respond. Compared with those receiving usual care, participants who received genomic risk information initially rated their risk as higher for 4 conditions (abdominal aneurysm [P=.001], Graves disease [P=.04], obesity [P=.01], and osteoarthritis [P=.04]) and lower for one (prostate cancer [P=.02]). Although differences were not significant, they also reported higher levels of worry for 7 conditions and lower levels for 5 others. At 1 year, there were no significant differences between groups. CONCLUSION: Predictive genomic risk information modestly influences risk perception and worry. The extent and direction of this influence may depend on the condition being tested and its baseline prominence in preventive health care and may attenuate with time. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00782366 PMID:21964170

  17. Considering retail health clinics.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Kathy

    2009-12-01

    By gaining increasing acceptance from consumers and traditional providers, retail-based convenient care clinics have moved from the innovative fringe into the mainstream of healthcare delivery. Nationwide, resourceful administrators are experimenting with retail-based delivery systems, using the clinic's unique attributes to promote wellness, expand accessibility, reduce delivery costs, and enhance brand recognition. This article takes an in-depth look at the convenient care business model, pertinent regulatory issues, and some of the associated benefits and concerns.

  18. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  19. Prospects for Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

  20. Pharmacists' Role in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maronde, Robert F.

    1977-01-01

    Pharmacists' contribution to the health care of the future in the future in the U.S. may have to be in the context of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of health-care delivery. It is from the area of drug therapy, now poorly administered, that the pharmacist will have to justify his role in a cost-effective manner. (Author/LBH)

  1. Contagious Ideas from Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Financial problems plague both higher education and health care, two sectors that struggle to meet public expectations for quality services at affordable rates. Both higher education and health care also have a complex bottom line, heavy reliance on relatively autonomous professionals, and clients who share personal responsibility for achieving…

  2. VA Health Care Facilities Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loan Guaranty Medical Care Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Health Care Benefits: 1-877-222-8387 Additional Numbers and Websites Resource Phone Number Website Bereavement Counseling 1-202-461-6530 Children of Women ... Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA) 1-800-733-8387 ...

  3. Diaspora, disease, and health care.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y; Zanni, Guido R

    2007-03-01

    When groups of people relocate from their homelands to other nations, especially if the movement is involuntary, minority populations are created in the countries that receive them. The issues related to these diaspora and diasporic communities--any groups that have been dispersed outside their traditional homelands--are financial, social, historical, political, or religious. In health care, issues include heritable diseases, cultural barriers, patients' health care beliefs, and unique disease presentations. In long-term care, many residents and health care providers have relocated to the United States from other countries.

  4. Foster Care and Child Health.

    PubMed

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care.

  5. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Program Overview » Outreach Materials » FAQs Women Veterans Health Care Menu Menu Womens Health Women Veterans Health Care ... can I call for more help? What health care services are available to women Veterans? A full ...

  6. Transition Care for Children With Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alaina M.; Brown, Rebekah F.; Taylor, Julie Lounds; Epstein, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 750 000 children in the United States with special health care needs will transition from pediatric to adult care annually. Fewer than half receive adequate transition care. METHODS: We had conversations with key informants representing clinicians who provide transition care, pediatric and adult providers of services for individuals with special health care needs, policy experts, and researchers; searched online sources for information about currently available programs and resources; and conducted a literature search to identify research on the effectiveness of transition programs. RESULTS: We identified 25 studies evaluating transition care programs. Most (n = 8) were conducted in populations with diabetes, with a smaller literature (n = 5) on transplant patients. We identified an additional 12 studies on a range of conditions, with no more than 2 studies on the same condition. Common components of care included use of a transition coordinator, a special clinic for young adults in transition, and provision of educational materials. CONCLUSIONS: The issue of how to provide transition care for children with special health care needs warrants further attention. Research needs are wide ranging, including both substantive and methodologic concerns. Although there is widespread agreement on the need for adequate transition programs, there is no accepted way to measure transition success. It will be essential to establish consistent goals to build an adequate body of literature to affect practice. PMID:25287460

  7. The national health care imperative.

    PubMed

    Halamandaris, V J

    1990-03-01

    In summary, the nation's health care system is in serious need of reform. It is expensive and woefully inefficient. Millions of people are excluded from coverage, while others receive limited or second-class care. For those millions who suffer serious chronic problems that require long-term care, there is virtually no help. There is no help for the family whose loved one suffers from Alzheimer's disease. There is no help for the family whose child is born with cerebral palsy or epilepsy. There is no help for the middle-aged father, disabled in an automobile accident. Providing good care to all Americans is not a matter of money. America currently spends some 13% of its gross national product on health care, and yet the health statistics of Americans are the worst in the industrialized world. What America needs is a comprehensive system of health care that includes both acute and long-term care. Congress must take action to restore health care as a basic constitutional right of all Americans. Coverage for long-term care must be included within the context of any new national health care program. Funding for such a program should come from the most progressive tax that the Congress can fashion, which to this point is the federal income tax. Although there is an appropriate role for private insurance, it should function as a supplement to rather than as a substitute for a new national program. There are several other elements that are key to a national health care program: Home care must be the first line of any national long-term care program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Anal Health Care Basics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason; McLemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy. The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate. Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area. Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases. In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists. PMID:27723447

  9. Anal Health Care Basics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason; Mclemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy.The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate.Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area.Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases.In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists.

  10. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  11. Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

  12. Teens, technology, and health care.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Francesco; Hauser, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Teens are avid users of new technologies and social media. Nearly 95% of US adolescents are online at least occasionally. Health care professionals and organizations that work with teens should identify online health information that is both accurate and teen friendly. Early studies indicate that some of the new health technology tools are acceptable to teens, particularly texting, computer-based psychosocial screening, and online interventions. Technology is being used to provide sexual health education, medication reminders for contraception, and information on locally available health care services. This article reviews early and emerging studies of technology use to promote teen health.

  13. Sexual health care for women with dyspareunia.

    PubMed

    Sung, Su-Ching; Jeng, Cherng-Jye; Lin, Yen-Chin

    2011-09-01

    Female dyspareunia is a serious impairment with a prevalence of up to 39.5%, imposing a significant burden on women's health, relationship, and quality of life. Because the causes of female dyspareunia are associated with multiple biological, medical, psychological, sociocultural, and interpersonal dimensions, all members of the health team should help fill this gap in the total care of the patient. The nurse is an ideal member of the health team to counsel patients in the sensitive and highly charged area of human sexuality. The purpose of this article was to explore the essential components of female dyspareunia from nursing care perspective to help women suffering from dyspareunia. The article provides a set of tools, including description and clinical presentation, obtaining a history and clinical data for the evaluation of dyspareunia, and a counseling tool of the Permission, Limited Information, Specific Suggestions, and Intensive Therapy model; suggestions are also provided for health care professionals during the treatment process.

  14. Integrating sustainability and health care.

    PubMed

    Podein, Rian J; Hernke, Michael T

    2010-03-01

    Unsustainable development around the world has contributed to ecological degradation and human suffering while compromising the ability of ecosystems and social institutions to support human life. The United States health care system and its institutions are significant contributors to unsustainable development, but leaders of change are emerging from the health care arena. Health professionals, including primary care providers, are poised to serve as models for sustainability and to facilitate the necessary transformation toward more sustainable practices. Health professionals must, within a practical framework, embrace an objective definition of sustainability and then act to achieve it.

  15. Improving Health Care by Understanding Patient Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Strombom, Indiana

    1998-01-01

    If nurses, physicians, and health care planners knew more about patients' health-related preferences, care would most likely be cheaper, more effective, and closer to the individuals' desires. In order for patient preferences to be effectively used in the delivery of health care, it is important that patients be able to formulate and express preferences, that these judgments be made known to the clinician at the time of care, and that these statements meaningfully inform care activities. Decision theory and health informatics offer promising strategies for eliciting subjective values and making them accessible in a clinical encounter in a manner that drives health choices. Computer-based elicitation and reporting tools are proving acceptable to patients and clinicians alike. It is time for the informatics community to turn their attention toward building computer-based applications that support clinicians in the complex cognitive process of integrating patient preferences with scientific knowledge, clinical practice guidelines, and the realities of contemporary health care. PMID:9609495

  16. Information Technology for Children's Health and Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Richard N.; Spooner, S. Andrew; Kwiatkowski, Kelly; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2001-01-01

    In September 2000, the Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research and the American Academy of Pediatrics Center for Child Health Research sponsored a meeting of experts and knowledgeable stakeholders to identify 1) the special information needs of pediatric care and 2) health service research questions related to the use of information technology in children's health care. Technologies that support the care of children must address issues related to growth and development, children's changing physiology, and the unique diseases of children and interventions of pediatric care. Connectivity and data integration are particular concerns for child health care workers. Consumer health information needs for this population extend beyond the needs of one individual to the needs of the family. Recommendations of the attendees include rapid implementation of features in electronic health information systems that support pediatric care and involvement of child health experts in policy making, standards setting, education, and advocacy. A proposed research agenda should address both effectiveness and costs of information technology, with special consideration for the needs of children, the development and evaluation of clinical decision support in pediatric settings, understanding of the epidemiology of iatrogenic injury in childhood, supplementation of vocabulary standards with pediatrics-specific terminology, and improvement in health care access for children, using telemedicine. PMID:11687562

  17. The Employer-Led Health Care Revolution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Patricia A; Mecklenburg, Robert S; Martin, Lindsay A

    2015-01-01

    To tame its soaring health care costs, intel tried many popular approaches: "consumer-driven health care" offerings such as high-deductible/low-premium plans, on-site clinics and employee wellness programs. But by 2009 intel realized that those programs alone would not enable the company to solve the problem, because they didn't affect its root cause: the steadily rising cost of the care employees and their families were receiving. Intel projected that its health care expenditures would hit a whopping $1 billion by 2012. So the company decided to try a novel approach. As a large purchaser of health services and with expertise in quality improvement and supplier management, intel was uniquely positioned to drive transformation in its local health care market. The company decided that it would manage the quality and cost of its health care suppliers with the same rigor it applied to its equipment suppliers by monitoring quality and cost. It spearheaded a collaborative effort in Portland, Oregon, that included two health systems, a plan administrator, and a major government employer. So far the Portland collaborative has reduced treatment costs for certain medical conditions by 24% to 49%, improved patient satisfaction, and eliminated over 10,000 hours worth of waste in the two health systems' business processes.

  18. Soviet health care and perestroika.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, D S; Rafferty, M P

    1990-01-01

    Health and health care in the Soviet Union are drawing special attention during these first years of perestroika, Mikhail Gorbachev's reform of Soviet political and economic life. This report briefly describes the current state of Soviet health and medical care, Gorbachev's plans for reform, and the prospects for success. In recent years the Soviet Union has experienced a rising infant mortality rate and declining life expectancy. The health care system has been increasingly criticized for its uncaring providers, low quality of care, and unequal access. The proposed measures will increase by 50 percent the state's contribution to health care financing, encourage private medicine on a small scale, and begin experimentation with capitation financing. It seems unlikely that the government will be able to finance its share of planned health improvements, or that private medicine, constrained by the government's tight control, will contribute much in the near term. Recovery of the Soviet economy in general as well as the ability of health care institutions to gain access to Western materials will largely determine the success of reform of the Soviet health care system. PMID:2297064

  19. Mental health care in Italy: organisational structure, routine clinical activity and costs of a community psychiatric service in Lombardy region.

    PubMed

    Fattore, G; Percudani, M; Pugnoli, C; Contini, A; Beecham, J

    2000-01-01

    The Magenta Community Mental Health Centre (CMHC) is the public agency responsible for providing adult psychiatric care to about 85,000 adult residents. In 1995, it had 1,145 clients and incurred costs of Euro 1.9 millions. Average cost per patient and per adult resident were Euro 1,661 and Euro 22.2, respectively. These values mask large variation across diagnosis: while patients with schizophrenia and related disorders had an average cost of Euro 3,771, those with neurotic and related disorders had an average cost of Euro 439. Patients with schizophrenia and related disorders (28% of the patients) absorbed about 60% of total costs and made extensive use of several types of services (hospital, outpatient, domiciliary, social and rehabilitative care). Since integrating different types of services is the key element of Italian psychiatric care, the new fee-for-service system adopted by the NHS to fund providers does not appear appropriate, particularly for schizophrenic patients.

  20. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  1. Hope for health and health care.

    PubMed

    Stempsey, William E

    2015-02-01

    Virtually all activities of health care are motivated at some level by hope. Patients hope for a cure; for relief from pain; for a return home. Physicians hope to prevent illness in their patients; to make the correct diagnosis when illness presents itself; that their prescribed treatments will be effective. Researchers hope to learn more about the causes of illness; to discover new and more effective treatments; to understand how treatments work. Ultimately, all who work in health care hope to offer their patients hope. In this paper, I offer a brief analysis of hope, considering the definitions of Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Thomas Aquinas. I then differentiate shallow and deep hope and show how hope in health care can remain shallow. Next, I explore what a philosophy of deep hope in health care might look like, drawing important points from Ernst Bloch and Gabriel Marcel. Finally, I suggest some implications of this philosophy of hope for patients, physicians, and researchers.

  2. Health and Oral Health Care Needs and Health Care-Seeking Behavior Among Homeless Injection Drug Users in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Lynn; Lorvick, Jennifer; Shiboski, Caroline; Kral, Alex H.

    2010-01-01

    Few existing studies have examined health and oral health needs and treatment-seeking behavior among the homeless and injection drug users (IDUs). This paper describes the prevalence and correlates of health and oral health care needs and treatment-seeking behaviors in homeless IDUs recruited in San Francisco, California, from 2003 to 2005 (N = 340). We examined sociodemographic characteristics, drug use patterns, HIV status via oral fluid testing, physical health using the Short Form 12 Physical Component Score, self-reported needs for physical and oral health care, and the self-reported frequency of seeking medical and oral health care. The sample had a lower health status as compared to the general population and reported a frequent need for physical and oral health care. In bivariate analysis, being in methadone treatment was associated with care-seeking behavior. In addition, being enrolled in Medi-Cal, California’s state Medicaid program, was associated with greater odds of seeking physical and oral health care. Methamphetamine use was not associated with higher odds of needing oral health care as compared to people who reported using other illicit drugs. Homeless IDUs in San Francisco have a large burden of unmet health and oral health needs. Recent cuts in Medi-Cal’s adult dental coverage may result in a greater burden of oral health care which will need to be provided by emergency departments and neighborhood dental clinics. PMID:20945108

  3. Misalignment between Medicare Policies and Depression Care in Home Health Care: Home health provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley; Richardson, Joshua; Bruce, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Objective Depression affects one in four older adults receiving home health care. Medicare policies are influential in shaping home health practice. This study aims to identify Medicare policy areas that are aligned or misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care. Methods Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with nurses and administrators from five home health agencies in five states (n=20). Digitally recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory method. A multi-disciplinary team iteratively developed a codebook from interview data to identify themes. Results Several important Medicare policies are largely misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care: Medicare eligibility requirements for patients to remain homebound and to demonstrate a need for skilled care restrict nurses’ abilities to follow up with depressed patients for sufficient length of time; the lack of explicit recognition of nursing time and quality of care in the home health Prospective Payment System (PPS) provides misaligned incentives for depression care; incorporation of a two-item depression screening tool in Medicare-mandated comprehensive patient assessment raised clinician awareness of depression; however, inclusion of the tool at Start-of-Care only but not any other follow-up points limits its potential in assisting nurses with depression care management; under-development of clinical decision support for depression care in vendor-developed electronic health records constitutes an important barrier to depression quality improvement in home health care. Conclusions Several influential Medicare policies and regulations for home health practice may be misaligned with evidence-based depression care for home health patients. PMID:24632686

  4. Telehealth: When Technology Meets Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... m-health (mobile health), includes a variety of health care services, including but not limited to: Online support ... self-management tools Email and online communication with health care providers Electronic health records Remote monitoring of vital ...

  5. Finding Health Care Services

    Cancer.gov

    If you have been diagnosed with cancer, finding a doctor and treatment facility for your cancer care is an important step to getting the best treatment possible. Learn tips for choosing a doctor and treatment facility to manage your cancer care.

  6. Preventive Care in Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Anita K; Goodall, Perpetua

    2016-06-01

    Specialists in general obstetrics and gynecology are key providers of primary care in women. They diagnose and provide the initial management of many medical conditions unrelated to reproductive health. Most importantly they can impact the overall health of patients through incorporating preventive approaches in the annual well-woman visit. This article defines preventive care and identifies leading causes of mortality in women. A framework for identifying key elements of the well-woman examination is summarized. Examples of prevention are provided, which focus on major health care issues that affect adult women.

  7. Psychology as a health care profession.

    PubMed

    Puente, Antonio E

    2011-11-01

    This article reviews the concept that professional psychology is synonymous with mental health. The acceptance of this concept results in limiting the potential impact that psychology has for both individuals and society. Historical antecedents of both psychology and professional psychology are considered as laying a foundation for a necessary paradigm shift from primarily mental health to health. Clinical neuropsychology, health psychology, and prescriptive authority are considered as three examples that may assist in guiding professional psychology toward inclusiveness into a broader health care arena. Limitations of the proposed paradigm and directions for its future are considered. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Physician Satisfaction With Integrated Behavioral Health in Pediatric Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hine, Jeffrey F; Grennan, Allison Q; Menousek, Kathryn M; Robertson, Gail; Valleley, Rachel J; Evans, Joseph H

    2017-04-01

    As the benefits of integrated behavioral health care services are becoming more widely recognized, this study investigated physician satisfaction with ongoing integrated psychology services in pediatric primary care clinics. Data were collected across 5 urban and 6 rural clinics and demonstrated the specific factors that physicians view as assets to having efficient access to a pediatric behavioral health practitioner. Results indicated significant satisfaction related to quality and continuity of care and improved access to services. Such models of care may increase access to care and reduce other service barriers encountered by individuals and their families with behavioral health concerns (ie, those who otherwise would seek services through referrals to traditional tertiary care facilities).

  9. Accidental exposures to blood and body fluids among health care workers in dental teaching clinics: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Gomez, F; Ellison, J; Greenspan, D; Bird, W; Lowe, S; Gerberding, J L

    1997-09-01

    The authors evaluated accidental exposures to blood and body fluids reported to a hotline or to health officials at four dental teaching clinics. The authors used a standard questionnaire to solicit and record data regarding each exposure. During a 63-month period, 428 parenteral exposures to blood or body fluids were documented. Dental students and dental assistants had the highest rates of exposure. Syringe needle injuries were the most common type of exposure, while giving injections, cleaning instruments after procedures and drilling were the activities most frequently associated with exposures.

  10. Effect of a primary care management intervention on mental-health-related quality of life among survivors of sepsis: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Konrad; Worrack, Susanne; Von Korff, Michael; Davydow, Dimitry; Brunkhorst, Frank; Ehlert, Ulrike; Pausch, Christine; Mehlhorn, Juliane; Schneider, Nico; Scherag, André; Freytag, Antje; Reinhart, Konrad; Wensing, Michel; Gensichen, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Importance Sepsis survivors face long-term sequelae which diminish health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and result in increased care needs in the primary care setting as medication, physiotherapy or mental health care. Objective To examine if a primary care-based intervention improves mental HRQoL Design, Setting and Participants A randomized clinical trial was conducted between February 2011 and December 2014. 291 patients ≥18 years who survived sepsis (including septic shock) were recruited from nine intensive care units (ICU) across Germany. Intervention Participants were randomized to usual care (n=143) or to a 12-month intervention (n=148). Usual care was provided by their primary care physician (PCP) and included periodic contacts, referrals to specialists and prescription of medication and/or other treatment. The intervention additionally included PCP and patient training, case management provided by trained nurses and clinical decision support for PCPs by consulting physicians. Main outcome The primary outcome was change in mental HRQoL between ICU discharge and six months post-ICU using the Mental Component Summary (MCS) of the Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36; range 0-100; higher ratings indicating lower impairment, minimal clinically important difference five score points). Results The mean age of the 291 patients was 61.6 years (SD 14.4), 66.2% (n=192) were male, and 84.4% (n=244) required mechanical ventilation during their ICU stay (median 12 days, range 0-134). At six and 12 months post-ICU, 75.3% (n=219, 112 intervention, 107 control) and 69.4% (n=202, 107 intervention, 95 control) completed follow-up, respectively. Overall mortality was 13.7% at six months (40 deaths, 21 intervention, 19 control) and 18.2% at 12 months (53 deaths, 27 intervention, 26 control). Among intervention group patients, 104 (70.3%) received the intervention at high levels of integrity. There was neither a significant difference in change of MCS scores (intervention

  11. Healthy Aging: Paying for Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... This information in Spanish ( en español ) Paying for health care More information on paying for health care Better ... Coping without insurance More information on paying for health care Explore other publications and websites Age Page: Choosing ...

  12. Will Boeing Change Health Care?

    PubMed

    Stempniak, Marty

    2015-12-01

    Big employers like Boeing and Intel are directly contracting with hospitals in an effort to control health care prices. Some hospital CEOs see direct contracting as the future, while others wonder how they can participate.

  13. [Corruption and health care system].

    PubMed

    Marasović Šušnjara, Ivana

    2014-06-01

    Corruption is a global problem that takes special place in health care system. A large number of participants in the health care system and numerous interactions among them provide an opportunity for various forms of corruption, be it bribery, theft, bureaucratic corruption or incorrect information. Even though it is difficult to measure the amount of corruption in medicine, there are tools that allow forming of the frames for possible interventions.

  14. Model Child Care Health Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan; Smith, Herberta

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, the model health policies presented in this report are intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the report presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following…

  15. Clinical documentation and data transfer from Ebola and Marburg virus disease wards in outbreak settings: health care workers' experiences and preferences.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias

    2014-02-19

    Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions.

  16. Primary health care use and health care accessibility among adolescents in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Barakat-Haddad, C; Siddiqua, A

    2015-05-19

    This study examined primary health care use and accessibility among adolescents living in the United Arab Emirates. In a cross-sectional study, we collected health care use, sociodemographic and residential data for a sample of 6363 adolescents. Logistic regression modelling was used to examine predictors of health care use. The most-consulted health professionals were dentists or orthodontists, family doctors and eye specialists. Local adolescents were more likely to attend public clinics/hospitals than private facilities, while the opposite was true for expatriates. In the previous 12 months 22.6% of the participants had not obtained the health care they needed and 19.5% had not had a routine health check-up. Common reasons for not obtaining care were busy schedules, dislike/fear of doctors and long waiting times. Predictors of not obtaining needed care included nationality and income, while those for having a routine check-up were mother's education and car ownership. Improvements to the health care sector may increase health care accessibility among adolescents.

  17. Delivery of molecular genetic services within a health care system: time analysis of the clinical workload. The Molecular Genetic Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Surh, L C; Wright, P G; Cappelli, M; Kasaboski, A; Hastings, V A; Hunter, A G

    1995-01-01

    The most recent discoveries in molecular genetics today are rapidly incorporated into clinical practice and have resulted in an unprecedented expansion of medical options. Despite this, the impact of molecular genetics on health care services has yet to be evaluated. In order to begin this assessment, clinical genetic workload was prospectively collected from cases where molecular genetic testing was considered. Participation involved all 16 urban and outreach genetic centers regionalized to service the entire population of 10 million within the Canadian province of Ontario. Molecular genetic testing has been clinically available for > 5 years, as part of a publicly supported genetic network in which there are no direct costs to residents. Cross-sectional data were collected on 1,101 clients from 544 families involving 1,742 clinical actions relating to diseases in which molecular (DNA) tests were considered. Median times per clinical genetic action were as follows: formal counseling (60 min), case review (15 min), phone call (10 min), letter (15 min), specimen arrangement (15 min), and interpretation of molecular test results (10 min). Times varied significantly with the inheritance pattern of the disease, topics involved, and location. For any given genetic case, multiple clinical actions resulted in substantial time spent by the genetic professional. Clerical and administrative times were not captured. Workload unit measurements similar to those currently employed in hospital laboratories may be helpful for predicting the clinical resources and personnel that will be required as the use of molecular genetics by other medical specialties increases. PMID:7887432

  18. Delivering Health Care and Mental Health Care Services to Children in Family Foster Care after Welfare and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Mark D.; Freundlich, Madelyn; Battistelli, Ellen S.; Kaufman, Neal D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the essential features of a health care system that can meet the special needs of children in out-of-home care. Discusses some of the major recent changes brought about by welfare and health care reform. Notes that it remains to be seen whether the quality of services will improve as a result of these reforms. (Author)

  19. Health care's most wired. A wired exchange.

    PubMed

    Solovy, Alden

    2004-08-01

    There was a time when innovation in health care information technology meant being at the cutting edge of managerial systems. Hospitals made significant investments in financially oriented technology. In the past five years, the investment in clinical IT appears to have outstripped the investment in managerial systems, including enterprise resource planning aimed at improving the supply chain.

  20. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

  1. Knowledge of diabetes among type 2 diabetes patients attending a primary health care clinic in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Perera, D P; De Silva, R E E; Perera, W L S P

    2013-07-01

    Patients' knowledge about their illness is considered important in controlling diabetes and preventing complications. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted among patients attending the diabetes clinic of a primary care level hospital in Moratuwa, Sri Lanka. During a 1-month period in 2009 all consenting patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who had been attending the clinic for more than 3 months were included in the study. Using an interviewer administered, structured questionnaire 150 patients (135 females, 15 males) answered 25 questions about diabetes knowledge (scored x4 to give score range 0-100). A majority of patients (70.0%) had a good score (> 65) on the knowledge test but critical gaps in knowledge were revealed, especially regarding knowledge about symptoms of poor control and importance of regular follow-up. Although patients with longer duration of diabetes had higher mean knowledge scores, they also had higher fasting blood glucose levels. Education programmes are needed to address critical gaps in patients' knowledge.

  2. American Health Care Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... preferred... Read More Executive Director | Dogwood Village of Orange County US - VA - Orange, Executive Director Dogwood Village of Orange County Health and Rehabilitation and Senior Living, a ...

  3. A Principal Calling: Professionalism and Health Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornett, Becky Sutherland

    2006-01-01

    As health care professionals, our ''product'' is clinical service. We demonstrate professionalism by attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors that reflect a multi-faceted approach to the standards, regulations, and principles underlying successful clinical practices. The issues facing practitioners who work in health care environments are complex,…

  4. Health care entrepreneurship: financing innovation.

    PubMed

    Grazier, Kyle L; Metzler, Bridget

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is often described as the ability to create new ventures from new or existing concepts, ideas and visions. There has been significant entrepreneurial response to the changes in the scientific and social underpinnings of health care services delivery. However, a growing portion of the economic development driving health care industry expansion is threatened further by longstanding use of financing models that are suboptimal for health care ventures. The delayed pace of entrepreneurial activity in this industry is in part a response to the general economy and markets, but also due to the lack of capital for new health care ventures. The recent dearth of entrepreneurial activities in the health services sector may also due to failure to consider new approaches to partnerships and strategic ventures, despite their mutually beneficial organizational and financing potential. As capital becomes more scarce for innovators, it is imperative that those with new and creative ideas for health and health care improvement consider techniques for capital acquisition that have been successful in other industries and at similar stages of development. The capital and added expertise can allow entrepreneurs to leverage resources, dampen business fluctuations, and strengthen long term prospects.

  5. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  6. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Managing Home Health Care KidsHealth > For Parents > Managing Home Health Care A ... español La atención médica en el hogar Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care ...

  7. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , editorial process and privacy policy . A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  8. Evaluating the Effect of Web-Based Iranian Diabetic Personal Health Record App on Self-Care Status and Clinical Indicators: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background There are 4 main types of chronic or noncommunicable diseases. Of these, diabetes is one of the major therapeutic concerns globally. Moreover, Iran is among the countries with the highest incidence of diabetic patients. Furthermore, library-based studies by researchers have shown that thus far no study has been carried out to evaluate the relationship between Web-based diabetic personal health records (DPHR) and self-care indicators in Iran. Objective The objective of this study is to examine the effect of Web-based DPHR on self-care status of diabetic patients in an intervention group as compared with a control group. Methods The effect of DPHR on self-care was assessed by using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) protocol for a 2-arm parallel group with a 1:1 allocation ratio. During a 4-month trial period, the control group benefited from the routine care; the intervention group additionally had access to the Web-based DPHR app besides routine care. During the trial, 2 time points at baseline and postintervention were used to evaluate the impact of the DPHR app. A sample size of 72 people was randomly and equally assigned to both the control and intervention groups. The primary outcome measure was the self-care status of the participants. Results Test results showed that the self-care status in the intervention group in comparison with the control group had a significant difference. In addition, the dimensions of self-care, including normal values, changes trend, the last measured value, and the last time measured values had a significant difference while other dimensions had no significant difference. Furthermore, we found no correlation between Web-based DPHR system and covariates, including scores of weight, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), serum creatinine, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol, and planned visit adherence, as well as the change trend of mean for blood glucose and blood pressure. Conclusions

  9. Health Care Becomes an Industry

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Darius A.

    2004-01-01

    The delivery of health care is in the process of “industrialization” in that it is undergoing changes in the organization of work which mirror those that began in other industries a century ago. This process is characterized by an increasing division of labor, standardization of roles and tasks, the rise of a managerial superstructure, and the degradation (or de-skilling) of work. The consolidation of the health care industry, the fragmentation of physician roles, and the increasing numbers of nonphysician clinicians will likely accelerate this process. Although these changes hold the promise of more efficient and effective health care, physicians should be concerned about the resultant loss of autonomy, disruption of continuity of care, and the potential erosion of professional values. PMID:15053287

  10. Health care's 100 most wired.

    PubMed

    Solovy, A; Serb, C

    1999-02-01

    They're wired all right, and America's 100 most techno-savvy hospitals and health systems share one more thing: a commitment to using technology to link with employees, patients, suppliers, and insurers. "We want to be a health care travel agency for our community," says one chief information officer. "And we see Internet technology as a key."

  11. Help Yourself to Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Sarah

    A booklet on health care for limited English speakers provides information on choosing the right doctor, buying medicine, paying the bill, and the individual's role in maintaining his or her health. Cartoons, questions and puzzles concerning the message in cartoons and narrative passages, checklists about an individual's personal habits related to…

  12. Big Data and Predictive Analytics in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Vasant

    2014-09-01

    Predictive analytics show great promise in health care but face some serious hurdles for widespread adoption. I discuss the state of the art of predictive health-care analytics using the clinical arena as an example and discuss how the outputs of predictive systems could be made actionable through differentiated processes that encourage prevention. Such systems have the potential to minimize health risk at the population and individual levels through more personalized health-care delivery.

  13. Ergonomics and Health Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    h t, a rt icle p rot videe a brief h i ctory’ ol the field of ers,’onomfnicc and explorete the interrelationship beta ee health (tare andi ergjonomic...prq/fric ionsi. Health tare Practitioners contri bute a unique Perspective to an ergonomic reiearch and intervention team. ’lhiý %ingular perspective...is based on lnozvlcdge of health issues, disease and injury etwiol(gy and prognosi s, and the psychosocial inpuct of illneAs. Topic.$ for c

  14. Health care fraud and abuse.

    PubMed

    Kalb, P E

    In recent years, health care fraud and abuse have become major issues, in part because of the rising cost of health care, industry consolidation, the emergence of private "whistle-blowers," and a change in the concept of fraud to include an emerging concern about quality of care. The 3 types of conduct that are generally prohibited by health care fraud laws are false claims, kickbacks, and self-referrals. False claims are subject to several criminal, civil, and administrative prohibitions, notably the federal civil False Claims Act. Kickbacks, or inducements with the intent to influence the purchase or sale of health care-related goods or services, are prohibited under the federal Anti-Kickback statute as well as by state laws. Finally, self-referrals-the referral of patients to an entity with which the referring physician has a financial relationship-are outlawed by the Ethics in Patient Referral Act as well as numerous state statutes. Consequences of violations of these laws can include, in addition to imprisonment and fines, civil monetary penalties, loss of licensure, loss of staff privileges, and exclusion from participation in federal health care programs. Federal criminal and civil statutes are enforced by the US Department of Justice; administrative actions are pursued by the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General; and all state actions are pursued by the individual states. In addition, private whistle-blowers may, acting in the name of the United States, file suit against an entity under the False Claims Act. Enforcement of health care fraud and abuse laws has become increasingly commonplace and now affects many mainstream providers. This trend is likely to continue.

  15. Review of Developments in Electronic, Clinical Data Collection, and Documentation Systems over the Last Decade - Are We Ready for Big Data in Routine Health Care?

    PubMed

    Kessel, Kerstin A; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-01-01

    Recently, information availability has become more elaborate and widespread, and treatment decisions are based on a multitude of factors, including imaging, molecular or pathological markers, surgical results, and patient's preference. In this context, the term "Big Data" evolved also in health care. The "hype" is heavily discussed in literature. In interdisciplinary medical specialties, such as radiation oncology, not only heterogeneous and voluminous amount of data must be evaluated but also spread in different styles across various information systems. Exactly this problem is also referred to in many ongoing discussions about Big Data - the "three V's": volume, velocity, and variety. We reviewed 895 articles extracted from the NCBI databases about current developments in electronic clinical data management systems and their further analysis or postprocessing procedures. Few articles show first ideas and ways to immediately make use of collected data, particularly imaging data. Many developments can be noticed in the field of clinical trial or analysis documentation, mobile devices for documentation, and genomics research. Using Big Data to advance medical research is definitely on the rise. Health care is perhaps the most comprehensive, important, and economically viable field of application.

  16. Review of Developments in Electronic, Clinical Data Collection, and Documentation Systems over the Last Decade – Are We Ready for Big Data in Routine Health Care?

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, information availability has become more elaborate and widespread, and treatment decisions are based on a multitude of factors, including imaging, molecular or pathological markers, surgical results, and patient’s preference. In this context, the term “Big Data” evolved also in health care. The “hype” is heavily discussed in literature. In interdisciplinary medical specialties, such as radiation oncology, not only heterogeneous and voluminous amount of data must be evaluated but also spread in different styles across various information systems. Exactly this problem is also referred to in many ongoing discussions about Big Data – the “three V’s”: volume, velocity, and variety. We reviewed 895 articles extracted from the NCBI databases about current developments in electronic clinical data management systems and their further analysis or postprocessing procedures. Few articles show first ideas and ways to immediately make use of collected data, particularly imaging data. Many developments can be noticed in the field of clinical trial or analysis documentation, mobile devices for documentation, and genomics research. Using Big Data to advance medical research is definitely on the rise. Health care is perhaps the most comprehensive, important, and economically viable field of application. PMID:27066456

  17. Caregivers' Level of Trust in Their Children's Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Huey Jen; Boothroyd, Roger A.

    2006-01-01

    Trust in healthcare providers is associated with clinical outcomes among adult patients. Children with disabilities have complex health needs that place stress on caregivers. Consequently, they are increasingly likely to rely on their children's health care providers to ensure children's health care needs are met. However, no studies have explored…

  18. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  19. The Diverse Landscape of Palliative Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Julie N.; Bakitas, Marie A.; Meier, Diane E.; Spragens, Lynn H.; Temel, Jennifer S.; Weissman, David E.; Rabow, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Many health care organizations are interested in instituting a palliative care clinic. However, there are insufficient published data regarding existing practices to inform the development of new programs. Objective Our objective was to obtain in-depth information about palliative care clinics. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 20 outpatient palliative care practices in diverse care settings. The survey included both closed- and open-ended questions regarding practice size, utilization of services, staffing, referrals, services offered, funding, impetus for starting, and challenges. Results Twenty of 21 (95%) practices responded. Practices self-identified as: hospital-based (n=7), within an oncology division/cancer center (n=5), part of an integrated health system (n=6), and hospice-based (n=2). The majority of referred patients had a cancer diagnosis. Additional common diagnoses included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, neurologic disorders, and congestive heart failure. All practices ranked “pain management” and “determining goals of care” as the most common reasons for referrals. Twelve practices staffed fewer than 5 half-days of clinic per week, with 7 operating only one half-day per week. Practices were staffed by a mixture of physicians, advanced practice nurses or nurse practitioners, nurses, or social workers. Eighteen practices expected their practice to grow within the next year. Eleven practices noted a staffing shortage and 8 had a wait time of a week or more for a new patient appointment. Only 12 practices provide 24/7 coverage. Billing and institutional support were the most common funding sources. Most practices described starting because inpatient palliative providers perceived poor quality outpatient care in the outpatient setting. The most common challenges included: funding for staffing (11) and being overwhelmed with referrals (8). Conclusions Once established, outpatient palliative care practices

  20. National Health Care Reform, Medicaid, and Children in Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfon, Neal; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outlines access to health care for children in out-of-home care under current law, reviews how health care access for these children would be affected by President Clinton's health care reform initiative, and proposes additional measures that could be considered to improve access and service coordination for children in the child welfare system.…

  1. ERP implementation in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Kenneth J; Pumphrey, Lela D; Wiggins, Carla

    2002-01-01

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems provide organizations with the opportunity to integrate individual, functionally-oriented information systems. Although much of the focus in the popular press has been placed on ERP systems in large for-profit organizations, small hospitals and clinics are candidates for ERP systems. Focusing information systems on critical success factors (CSFs) allows the organization to address a limited number of areas associated with performance. This limited number of factors can provide management with an insight into dimensions of information that must be addressed by a system. Focuses on CSFs for small health-care organizations. In addition, also considers factors critical to the implementation of health-care information systems. Presents two cases. The results indicate support for the continuing use of CSFs to help focus on the benefits of ERPs. Focusing on groups of tangible and intangible benefits can also assist the rural health-care organization in the use of ERPs.

  2. Study protocol for a randomized, controlled, superiority trial comparing the clinical and cost- effectiveness of integrated online mental health assessment-referral-care in pregnancy to usual prenatal care on prenatal and postnatal mental health and infant health and development: the Integrated Maternal Psychosocial Assessment to Care Trial (IMPACT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Stress, depression, and anxiety affect 15 to 25% of pregnant women. However, fewer than 20% of prenatal care providers assess and treat mental health problems and fewer than 20% of pregnant women seek mental healthcare. For those who seek treatment, the lack of health system integration and existing barriers frequently prevent treatment access. Without treatment, poor prenatal mental health can persist for years and impact future maternal, child, and family well-being. Methods/Design The purpose of this randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of an integrated process of online psychosocial assessment, referral, and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for pregnant women compared to usual prenatal care (no formal screening or specialized care). The primary outcome is self-reported prenatal depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms at 6 to 8 weeks postrandomization. Secondary outcomes are postpartum depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms; self-efficacy; mastery; self-esteem; sleep; relationship quality; coping; resilience; Apgar score; gestational age; birth weight; maternal-infant attachment; infant behavior and development; parenting stress/competence; and intervention cost-effectiveness, efficiency, feasibility, and acceptability. Pregnant women are eligible if they: 1) are <28 weeks gestation; 2) speak/read English; 3) are willing to complete email questionnaires; 4) have no, low, or moderate psychosocial risk on screening at recruitment; and 5) are eligible for CBT. A sample of 816 women will be recruited from large, urban primary care clinics and allocation is by computer-generated randomization. Women in the intervention group will complete an online psychosocial assessment, and those with mild or moderate depression, anxiety, or stress symptoms then complete six interactive cognitive behavior therapy modules. All women will complete email questionnaires at 6 to 8 weeks postrandomization and at 3, 6, and 12 months postpartum

  3. Engaging doctors in the health care revolution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas H; Cosgrove, Toby

    2014-06-01

    A health care revolution is under way, and doctors must be part of it. But many are deeply anxious and angry about the transformation, fearing loss of autonomy, respect, and income. Given their resistance, how can health system Leaders engage them in redesigning care? In this article, Dr. Thomas H. Lee, Press Ganey's chief medical officer, and Dr. Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, describe a framework they've developed for encouraging buy-in. Adapting Max Weber's "typology of motives," and applying behavioral economics and other motivational principles, they describe four tactics leadership must apply in concert: engaging doctors in a noble shared purpose; addressing their economic self-interest; leveraging their desire for respect; and appealing to their sense of tradition. Drawing from experiences at the Mayo Clinic, Geisinger Health System, Partners HealthCare, the Cleveland Clinic, Ascension Health, and others, the authors show how the four motivational levers work together to bring this critical group of stakeholders on board.

  4. Health promotion and primary health care: examining the discourse.

    PubMed

    Ashcroft, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    The health promotion discourse is comprised of assumptions about health and health care that are compatible with primary health care. An examination of the health promotion discourse illustrates how assumptions of health can help to inform primary health care. Despite health promotion being a good fit for primary health care, this analysis demonstrates that the scope in which it is being implemented in primary health care settings is limited. The health promotion discourse appears largely compatible with primary health care-in theory and in the health care practices that follow. The aim of this article is to contribute to the advancement of theoretical understanding of the health promotion discourse, and the relevance of health promotion to primary health care.

  5. Teledermatology Consultations Provide Specialty Care for Farmworkers in Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Feldman, Steven R.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Brooks, Thanh; Cabral, Gonzalo; Heck, Judy; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Whalley, Lara E.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Rural patients have limited access to dermatologic care. Farmworkers have high rates of skin disease and limited access to care. Purpose: This exploratory study assessed whether teledermatology consultations could help meet the needs of health care providers for farmworkers in rural clinics. Methods: Dermatologists provided 79…

  6. Providing care to transgender persons: a clinical approach to primary care, hormones, and HIV management.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Transgender (TG) persons have had historically difficult interactions with health care providers, leading to limited care and risks for a broad spectrum of health problems. This is of particular concern for TG persons with or at risk for HIV infection. This article discusses care providers' roles in establishing TG-friendly clinical care sites; conducting appropriate and thorough physical examinations for TG patients; managing hormones, especially in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy; and engaging TG persons in education about prevention and treatment of HIV.

  7. Implementing health research through academic and clinical partnerships: a realistic evaluation of the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The English National Health Service has made a major investment in nine partnerships between higher education institutions and local health services called Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC). They have been funded to increase capacity and capability to produce and implement research through sustained interactions between academics and health services. CLAHRCs provide a natural 'test bed' for exploring questions about research implementation within a partnership model of delivery. This protocol describes an externally funded evaluation that focuses on implementation mechanisms and processes within three CLAHRCs. It seeks to uncover what works, for whom, how, and in what circumstances. Design and methods This study is a longitudinal three-phase, multi-method realistic evaluation, which deliberately aims to explore the boundaries around knowledge use in context. The evaluation funder wishes to see it conducted for the process of learning, not for judging performance. The study is underpinned by a conceptual framework that combines the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services and Knowledge to Action frameworks to reflect the complexities of implementation. Three participating CLARHCS will provide in-depth comparative case studies of research implementation using multiple data collection methods including interviews, observation, documents, and publicly available data to test and refine hypotheses over four rounds of data collection. We will test the wider applicability of emerging findings with a wider community using an interpretative forum. Discussion The idea that collaboration between academics and services might lead to more applicable health research that is actually used in practice is theoretically and intuitively appealing; however the evidence for it is limited. Our evaluation is designed to capture the processes and impacts of collaborative approaches for implementing research, and

  8. A right to health care.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to say that there is a right to health care? Health care is part of a cooperative project that organizes finite resources. How are these resources to be distributed? This essay discusses three rival theories. The first two, a utilitarian theory and an interst theory, are both instrumental, in that they collapse rights to good states of affairs. A third theory, offered by Thomas Pogge, locates the question within an institutional legal context and distinguishes between a right to health care that results in claimable duties and other dimensions of health policy that do not. Pogge's argument relies on a list of "basic needs," which itself, however, relies on some kind of instrumental reasoning. The essay offers a reconstruction of Pogge's argument to bring it in line with a political conception of a right to health care. Health is a matter of equal liberty and equal citizenship, given our common human vulnerability. If we are to live as equal members in a political community, then our institutions need to create processes by which we are protected from the kinds of suffering that would make it impossible for us to live as equal members.

  9. An Introductory Clinical Course--Orientation to Patient Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bober, Kenneth F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A second-year clinical course composed of weekly observation sessions of interactions between patients and health care professionals in a variety of health care settings within a hospital is described. Weekly discussion sessions summarize the observations and introduce such topics as communication skills, patients' rights, patient relationships,…

  10. ClinicalKey: a point-of-care search engine.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2013-01-01

    ClinicalKey is a new point-of-care resource for health care professionals. Through controlled vocabulary, ClinicalKey offers a cross section of resources on diseases and procedures, from journals to e-books and practice guidelines to patient education. A sample search was conducted to demonstrate the features of the database, and a comparison with similar tools is presented.

  11. Telecommunications and rural health care.

    PubMed

    Connors, H R

    1998-06-01

    Telehealth has many applications, including the education and training of health professionals. This article describes the use of advanced telecommunications technology to educate family nurse practitioners in rural areas of Kansas. Four Kansas universities use compressed video technology (an interactive audio and video system) to offer five common core courses in primary care to students enrolled in FNP programs at the respective institutions. Using technology to educate FNPs in rural communities has resulted in a greater percentage of graduates (approximately 67% of 258 graduates) going to work in rural underserved communities. In addition to learning the course content, students learn to use technology as a tool to access telehealth information and services Knowing how to use these technologies provides greater opportunities to rural health care providers, as well as the recipients of health care.

  12. Shaping dental contract reform: a clinical and cost-effective analysis of incentive-driven commissioning for improved oral health in primary dental care

    PubMed Central

    Hulme, C; Robinson, P G; Saloniki, E C; Vinall-Collier, K; Baxter, P D; Douglas, G; Gibson, B; Godson, J H; Meads, D; Pavitt, S H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a new blended dental contract incentivising improved oral health compared with a traditional dental contract based on units of dental activity (UDAs). Design Non-randomised controlled study. Setting Six UK primary care dental practices, three working under a new blended dental contract; three matched practices under a traditional contract. Participants 550 new adult patients. Interventions A new blended/incentive-driven primary care dentistry contract and service delivery model versus the traditional contract based on UDAs. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was as follows: percentage of sites with gingival bleeding on probing. Secondary outcomes were as follows: extracted and filled teeth (%), caries (International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS)), oral health-related quality of life (Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14)). Incremental cost-effective ratios used OHIP-14 and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) derived from the EQ-5D-3L. Results At 24 months, 291/550 (53%) patients returned for final assessment; those lost to follow-up attended 6.46 appointments on average (SD 4.80). The primary outcome favoured patients in the blended contract group. Extractions and fillings were more frequent in this group. Blended contracts were financially attractive for the dental provider but carried a higher cost for the service commissioner. Differences in generic health-related quality of life were negligible. Positive changes over time in oral health-related quality of life in both groups were statistically significant. Conclusions This is the first UK study to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of a blended contract in primary care dentistry. Although the primary outcome favoured the blended contract, the results are limited because 47% patients did not attend at 24 months. This is consistent with 39% of adults not being regular attenders and 27% only visiting their dentist when

  13. Clinical questionnaire study of oral health care and symptoms in diabetic vs. non-diabetic predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vesterinen, Maarit; Ruokonen, Hellevi; Furuholm, Jussi; Honkanen, Eero; Meurman, Jukka H

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to study oral symptoms (burning mouth sensation, xerostomia, dysphagia, and dysgeusia) and background characteristics among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. The hypothesis was that patients experience oral discomfort and show interest towards dental care differently depending on the origin of their kidney disease. One hundred thirty-eight CKD patients at predialysis stage (94 men, 44 women, mean age 54 years) at the Helsinki University Central Hospital participated in the study. The patients were divided into a diabetic nephropathy group and a group of patients with other kidney diseases. The patients had a clinical oral examination and filled in a structured questionnaire. The data were analyzed and compared between the groups (SPSS for Windows version 15.0). T test was used for parameters normally distributed while binomial data were analyzed with cross-tabulations and chi-square test. Contrary to our study hypothesis, no statistically significant differences were seen in the questionnaire study between the diabetic vs. non-diabetic CKD patients in any other study parameter except in the use of medication (10 ± 2.3 vs. 8 ± 3.1 drugs daily, p < 0.05), and working status (23.5% vs. 50% working full time, p < 0.01). No difference was seen in the frequency of oral discomfort among the different groups. Xerostomia, however, was frequently observed among the predialysis patients investigated (41.7% in diabetic, 48.2% in non-diabetic patients). No difference was seen in the frequency of oral discomfort among the different groups of predialysis patients investigated. Clinicians should be aware of nephropathy patients who frequently suffer from oral discomfort, particularly xerostomia.

  14. Brentwood Community Health Care Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Melody S.; Gonzalez, Maria; Gil, Sandra; Si, Xuemei; Pashoukos, Judith L.; Stafford, Jewel D.; Ford, Elsa; Pashoukos, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Community Alliance for Research Empowering Social Change (CARES) is an academic–community research partnership designed to train community members on research methods and develop the infrastructure for community-based participatory research (CBPR) to examine and address racial/ethnic health disparities. The Brentwood Community Health Assessment (BCHA) was developed through a CBPR pilot project grant from CARES. Objectives The purpose of the BCHA is to assess health care utilization and identify existing barriers to health care access among a multi-ethnic community in the Hamlet of Brentwood, New York. Methods Using CBPR approaches, the community–academic research partnership develop the study design and survey instrument. Trained Bilingual (English/Spanish) data collectors verbally administered surveys door-to-door to residents of Brentwood from October 2010 to May 2011. Inclusion criteria required participants to be at least 18 years of age and speak either English or Spanish. Results Overall, 232 residents completed the BCHA; 49% were male, 66% Hispanic, 13% non-Hispanic White, 13% non-Hispanic Black, 29% had less than a high school education, and 33% were born in United States. The assessment results revealed that most residents are able to access health care when needed and the most significant barriers to health care access are insurance and cost. Conclusions We describe the community–academic partnered process used to develop and implement the BCHA and report assessment findings; the community-partnered approach improved data collection and allowed access into one of Suffolk County’s most vulnerable communities. PMID:24859100

  15. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  16. Impact of biomedical and biopsychosocial training sessions on the attitudes, beliefs, and recommendations of health care providers about low back pain: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Domenech, J; Sánchez-Zuriaga, D; Segura-Ortí, E; Espejo-Tort, B; Lisón, J F

    2011-11-01

    The beliefs and attitudes of health care providers may contribute to chronic low back pain (LBP) disability, influencing the recommendations that they provide to their patients. An excessively biomedical style of undergraduate training can increase negative beliefs and attitudes about LBP, whereas instruction following a biopsychosocial model could possibly lessen these negative beliefs in health care professionals. The objectives of this study were to determine the effectiveness of 2 brief educational modules with different orientations (biomedical or biopsychosocial) on changing the beliefs and attitudes of physical therapy students and the recommendations that they give to patients. The intervention in the experimental group was based on the general biopsychosocial model, whereas the sessions in the control group dealt with the basics of the biomechanics of back pain. The participants completed the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), Health Care Providers' Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale (HC-PAIRS), and Rainville et al. Clinical Cases questionnaire before and after the interventions. The participants attending the biopsychosocial session displayed a reduction in fear-avoidance beliefs (P<.001) and Pain-Impairement beliefs (P<.001), which was strongly correlated with an improvement in clinicians' activity and work recommendations. However, the students assigned to the biomechanics sessions increased their fear-avoidance scores (P<.01), and their recommendations for activity levels worsened significantly (P<.001). Our results confirm the possibility of modifying the behaviour of students through the modification of their beliefs and attitudes. We also conclude that a strictly biomedical education exacerbates maladaptive beliefs, and consequently results in inadequate activity recommendations. The implications of this study are important for both the development of continuing medical education and the design of the training curriculum for

  17. Health Care Procedure Considerations and Individualized Health Care Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Teachers need to maintain a safe, healthy environment for all their students in order to promote learning. However, there are additional considerations when students require health care procedures, such as tube feeding or clean intermittent catheterization. Teachers must effectively monitor their students and understand their roles and…

  18. Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-02-01

    As reimbursement transitions from a volume-based to a value-based system, innovation in health care delivery will be needed. The process of innovation begins with framing the problem that needs to be solved along with the strategic vision that has to be achieved. Similar to scientific testing, a hypothesis is generated for a new solution to a problem. Innovation requires conducting a disciplined form of experimentation and then learning from the process. This manuscript will discuss the different types of innovation, and the key steps necessary for successful innovation in the health care field.

  19. Health Care Reform: A Values Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popko, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the crisis in health care, considering costs, lack of access, and system ineffectiveness. Reviews "Setting Relationships Right," the Catholic Health Association's proposal for health care reform. Advocates educators' awareness of children's health needs and health care reform issues and support for the Every Fifth Child Act of…

  20. Health disparities among health care workers.

    PubMed

    Mawn, Barbara; Siqueira, Eduardo; Koren, Ainat; Slatin, Craig; Devereaux Melillo, Karen; Pearce, Carole; Hoff, Lee Ann

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe the process of an interdisciplinary case study that examined the social contexts of occupational and general health disparities among health care workers in two sets of New England hospitals and nursing homes. A political economy of the work environment framework guided the study, which incorporated dimensions related to market dynamics, technology, and political and economic power. The purpose of this article is to relate the challenges encountered in occupational health care settings and how these could have impacted the study results. An innovative data collection matrix that guided small-group analysis provided a firm foundation from which to make design modifications to address these challenges. Implications for policy and research include the use of a political and economic framework from which to frame future studies, and the need to maintain rigor while allowing flexibility in design to adapt to challenges in the field.

  1. Conceptual models for Mental Distress among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals: A contribution to clinical practice and research in primary-health-care centers in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mental distress is common in primary care and overrepresented among Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, but access to effective treatment is limited, particularly in developing countries. Explanatory models (EM) are contextualised explanations of illnesses and treatments framed within a given society and are important in understanding an individual's perspective on the illness. Although individual variations are important in determining help-seeking and treatment behaviour patterns, the ability to cope with an illness and quality of life, the role of explanatory models in shaping treatment preferences is undervalued. The aim was to identify explanatory models employed by HIV-infected and uninfected individuals and to compare them with those employed by local health care providers. Furthermore, we aimed to build a theoretical model linking the perception of mental distress to treatment preferences and coping mechanisms. Methods Qualitative investigation nested in a cross-sectional validation study of 28 (male and female) attendees at four primary care clinics in Lusaka, Zambia, between December 2008 and May 2009. Consecutive clinic attendees were sampled on random days and conceptual models of mental distress were examined, using semi-structured interviews, in order to develop a taxonomic model in which each category was associated with a unique pattern of symptoms, treatment preferences and coping strategies. Results Mental distress was expressed primarily as somatic complaints including headaches, perturbed sleep and autonomic symptoms. Economic difficulties and interpersonal relationship problems were the most common causal models among uninfected individuals. Newly diagnosed HIV patients presented with a high degree of hopelessness and did not value seeking help for their symptoms. Patients not receiving anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) questioned their effectiveness and were equivocal about seeking help. Individuals receiving ARV were

  2. Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate ... Patients About ACOG Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care Home For Patients Search FAQs Good Health Before ...

  3. Can health care organizations improve health behavior and treatment adherence?

    PubMed

    Bender, Bruce G

    2014-04-01

    Many Americans are failing to engage in both the behaviors that prevent and those that effectively manage chronic health conditions, including pulmonary disorders, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, and cancer. Expectations that health care providers are responsible for changing patients' health behaviors often do not stand up against the realities of clinical care that include large patient loads, limited time, increasing co-pays, and restricted access. Organizations and systems that might share a stake in changing health behavior include employers, insurance payers, health care delivery systems, and public sector programs. However, although the costs of unhealthy behaviors are evident, financial resources to address the problem are not readily available. For most health care organizations, the return on investment for developing behavior change programs appears highest when addressing treatment adherence and disease self-management, and lowest when promoting healthy lifestyles. Organizational strategies to improve adherence are identified in 4 categories: patient access, provider training and support, incentives, and information technology. Strategies in all 4 categories are currently under investigation in ongoing studies and have the potential to improve self-management of many chronic health conditions.

  4. Health Care in the United States [and] Health Care Issues: A Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, John; Dempsey, Joanne R.

    1984-01-01

    An article on American health care which focuses on health care costs and benefits is combined with a lesson plan on health care issues to enable students to consider both issues of cost effectiveness and morality in decisions about the allocation of health care. The article covers the history of interest in health care, the reasons for the…

  5. Success of an International Learning Health Care System in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Clinical Case Forum.

    PubMed

    Barba, Pere; Burns, Linda J; Litzow, Mark R; Juckett, Mark B; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lee, Stephanie J; Devlin, Sean M; Costa, Luciano J; Khan, Shakila; King, Andrea; Klein, Andreas; Krishnan, Amrita; Malone, Adriana; Mir, Muhammad A; Moravec, Carina; Selby, George; Roy, Vivek; Cochran, Melissa; Stricherz, Melisa K; Westmoreland, Michael D; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Wood, William A

    2016-03-01

    The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) Clinical Case Forum (CCF) was launched in 2014 as an online secure tool to enhance interaction and communication among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) professionals worldwide through the discussion of challenging clinical care issues. After 14 months, we reviewed clinical and demographical data of cases posted in the CCF from January 29, 2014 to March 18, 2015. A total of 137 cases were posted during the study period. Ninety-two cases (67%) were allogeneic HCT, 29 (21%) were autologous HCT, and in 16 (12%), the type of transplantation (autologous versus allogeneic) was still under consideration. The diseases most frequently discussed included non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; n = 30, 22%), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 23, 17%), and multiple myeloma (MM; n = 20, 15%). When compared with the US transplantation activity reported by the US Department of Health and Human Services, NHL and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases were over-represented in the CCF, whereas MM was under-represented (P < .001). A total of 259 topics were addressed in the CCF with a median of 2 topics/case (range, 1 to 6). Particularly common topics included whether transplantation was indicated (n = 57, 41%), conditioning regimen choice (n = 44, 32%), and post-HCT complications after day 100 (n = 43, 31%). The ASBMT CCF is a successful tool for collaborative discussion of complex cases in the HCT community worldwide and may allow identification of areas of controversy or unmet need from clinical, educational and research perspectives.

  6. Primary health care is viable.

    PubMed

    Segall, M

    1987-01-01

    'Selective primary health care' and other recent vertical health strategies have been justified on the grounds that the broad primary health care (PHC) approach cannot be afforded by developing countries in the present constrained economic circumstances. This judgement is too sweeping. A simulated case example is presented, starting with baseline health expenditure data that are representative of the situation in many developing countries. It is assumed that real economic growth occurs and that government funding of health care is allowed to grow in parallel. Two annual growth rates are considered: 2 and 5 per cent. Two restrictive conditions are applied: none of the main health services is subjected to absolute cuts; and, additional funds from existing or new sources of finance are not considered. It is shown that, even with slow growth rates, substantial increases in the funding of priority (rural and PHC) services can be achieved if the growth in expenditures of lower-priority services is curtailed. Also, savings from improved health service efficiency can be channelled to priority services. The message is that the PHC approach is viable even with slow economic growth. What is required is the technical capacity to identify and plan resource flows in the health sector, and the political will to effect resource allocations according to PHC priorities. A strategic policy like PHC should not be 'adjusted' out of effective existence because of reversible economic problems. Rather, actions should be taken to reverse the adverse economic environment. International health-related agencies should continue to support countries to develop national health systems based on PHC, and should campaign for reforms in the world economy to create at least the minimum economic conditions necessary for PHC implementation.

  7. Mental Health Care: Who's Who

    MedlinePlus

    ... degree in social work (M.S.W.); Licensed Clinical Social Workers (L.C.S.W.) have additional supervised training and clinical work experience. Licensed Professional Counselor: Master’s degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: ...

  8. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  9. Barriers and Facilitators for the Implementation of an Online Clinical Health Community in Addition to Usual Fertility Care: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Faber, Marjan J; den Boogert, Anne G; Cohlen, Ben J; van der Linden, Paul JQ; Kremer, Jan AM; Nelen, Willianne LDM

    2013-01-01

    Background Online health communities are becoming more popular in health care. Patients and professionals can communicate with one another online, patients can find peer support, and professionals can use it as an additional information channel to their patients. However, the implementation of online health communities into daily practice is challenging. These challenges relate to the fact that patients need to be activated to (1) become a member (ie, subscription) and (2) participate actively within the community before any effect can be expected. Therefore, we aimed at answering 2 research questions: (1) what factors are associated with subscription to an online health community, and (2) which are associated with becoming an active participant within an online health community. Objective To identify barriers and facilitators as perceived by patients for the implementation of an online health community. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study. Three Dutch fertility clinics (2 IVF-licensed) offered their patients a secure online clinical health community through which clinicians can provide online information and patients can ask questions to the medical team or share experiences and find support from peers. We randomly selected and invited 278 men and women suffering from infertility and attending 1 of the participating clinics. Participants filled out a questionnaire about their background characteristics and current use of the online community. Possible barriers and facilitators were divided into 2 parts: (1) those for subscription to the community, and (2) those for active participation in the community. We performed 2 multivariate logistic regression analyses to calculate determinants for both subscription and active participation. Results Subscription appeared to be associated with patients’ background characteristics (eg, gender, treatment phase), intervention-related facilitators (odds ratio [OR] 2.45, 95% CI 1.14-5.27), and patient-related barriers

  10. Health promotion: theoretical perspectives and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Frenn, M; Malin, S

    1998-01-01

    The article addresses the realities of health promotion practice in a managed care environment, synthesizing the most important findings from the midrange theories currently guiding wellness-oriented research. Factors that have been shown to predict engagement in a number of health behaviors are identified and are formulated into a guide for clinical assessment, intervention, and outcome evaluation for clients across the life span.

  11. Hedging opportunities in health care.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J A

    1990-03-01

    Medical care futures contracts offer new hedging opportunities to increase protection against unexpected price changes. Commodity futures contracts can be designed explicitly to hedge volatile group health insurance premiums and capitated hospital and physician prices. This article describes one way to design and use these hedging instruments.

  12. [Integrated health care at Nuremberg].

    PubMed

    Männl, V

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports in detail on a project of Integrated Health Care in cardiology at Nuremberg, Germany. Information on the structure of the contract, the participants, the agreed claiming of benefits and provision of services are provided as well as relevant figures and contact data.

  13. The health care cost "problem".

    PubMed

    Arnould, R J; Finifter, D H; Schifrin, L G

    1990-01-01

    This serves as an introduction to this special issue devoted to a selection of papers chosen and revised from a conference on public policy entitled "Health Care Policy: Where Is the Revolution Headed?" sponsored by the Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, November 12-14, 1987.

  14. Relationship marketing in health care.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H C; Fleming, D; Mangold, W G; LaForge, R W

    1994-01-01

    Building relationships with patients is critical to the success of many health care organizations. The authors profile the relationship marketing program for a hospital's cardiac center and discuss the key strategic aspects that account for its success: a focus on a specific hospital service, an integrated marketing communication strategy, a specially designed database, and the continuous tracking of results.

  15. Mental health care in Cambodia.

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, D. J.; van de Put, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    An effort is being made in Cambodia to involve grass-roots personnel in the integration of the care of the mentally ill into a broad framework of health services. This undertaking is examined with particular reference to the work of the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization. PMID:10212521

  16. Understanding Adoption of a Personal Health Record in Rural Health Care Clinics: Revealing Barriers and Facilitators of Adoption including Attributions about Potential Patient Portal Users and Self-reported Characteristics of Early Adopting Users

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jorie M.; Carter, Marjorie; Hayden, Candace; Gibson, Bryan; Weir, Charlene; Snow, Laverne; Morales, Jose; Smith, Anne; Bateman, Kim; Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) are important for improving patient care. An important prerequisite to realize benefits of PHR use is patient recruitment. To understand clinic barriers to adoption, we used Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations theory to frame an examination of clinic staff perceptions of a new PHR and perceptions of likely patient portal users. Clinic staff reported many relative advantages and observable benefits of the PHR but also some distinct problems. Attributions about potential patient users included demographic, computer use, and personality characteristics staff expected in likely users. Analysis of patient survey data of early adopters compared to non-users revealed discrepancies between clinic staff expectations and early adopters’ self-reports. Implications for improving adoption of PHRs include ensuring compatibility with existing systems and avoiding recruitment biases. PMID:24551328

  17. Understanding adoption of a personal health record in rural health care clinics: revealing barriers and facilitators of adoption including attributions about potential patient portal users and self-reported characteristics of early adopting users.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jorie M; Carter, Marjorie; Hayden, Candace; Gibson, Bryan; Weir, Charlene; Snow, Laverne; Morales, Jose; Smith, Anne; Bateman, Kim; Gundlapalli, Adi V; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) are important for improving patient care. An important prerequisite to realize benefits of PHR use is patient recruitment. To understand clinic barriers to adoption, we used Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations theory to frame an examination of clinic staff perceptions of a new PHR and perceptions of likely patient portal users. Clinic staff reported many relative advantages and observable benefits of the PHR but also some distinct problems. Attributions about potential patient users included demographic, computer use, and personality characteristics staff expected in likely users. Analysis of patient survey data of early adopters compared to non-users revealed discrepancies between clinic staff expectations and early adopters' self-reports. Implications for improving adoption of PHRs include ensuring compatibility with existing systems and avoiding recruitment biases.

  18. Rural health clinics infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses programs which were directed at the installation of photovoltaic power systems in rural health clinics. The objectives included: vaccine refrigeration; ice pack freezing; lighting; communications; medical appliances; sterilization; water purification; and income generation. The paper discusses two case histories, one in the Dominican Republic and one in Colombia. The author summarizes the results of the programs, both successes and failures, and offers an array of conclusions with regard to the implementation of future programs of this general nature.

  19. Delayed or forgone care and dissatisfaction with care for children with special health care needs: the role of perceived cultural competency of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Kerfeld, Cheryl I; Hoffman, Jeanne M; Ciol, Marcia A; Kartin, Deborah

    2011-05-01

    To better understand if reported delayed/forgone care and dissatisfaction with care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) are associated with the parent's perception of health care providers' cultural competency. National survey. Fifty United States and the District of Columbia yielding 750 families per state and District of Columbia with CSHCN ≤ 18 years participated in the 2005-06 National Survey of CSHCN. Outcome measures were delayed/forgone care in the past 12 months (yes or no) and dissatisfaction (very dissatisfied to very satisfied). Demographic/clinical characteristics and the parent's perception of health care providers' cultural competency were examined. Perception of cultural competency was defined by questions related to time spent with child, respect for family values, listening to the family, sense of partnership, and information provided. Delayed/forgone care and dissatisfaction with care were associated with perceived health care provider cultural competency. Parents whose children were older, whose children's condition affected their ability to do things, whose interviews were not conducted in English, and were from certain racial and ethnic groups reported more delayed or forgone care and were more dissatisfied with their children's health care. Delayed/forgone care and dissatisfaction with care were associated with perceived cultural competency of health care providers. This did not appear to differ consistently by racial or ethnic group. Further research using more refined instruments and longitudinal designs is needed to assess the effects of health care providers' cultural competency and other cultural factors on the delayed/forgone care for CSHCN and on the dissatisfaction with care of parents with CSHCN.

  20. Reducing barriers to mental health care for student-athletes: An integrated care model.

    PubMed

    Sudano, Laura E; Collins, Greg; Miles, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    Research suggests that National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I student-athletes have higher levels of stress and other behavioral health issues, including substance use, than nonathletes. For several reasons, student-athletes may be less likely to admit to behavioral health issues and seek mental health care. Integrated care is a model of care that integrates behavioral health into a medical practice. This article explores the newly released NCAA Best Mental Health Practice guidelines and the application of integrated care to a Division I athletic training room setting using the three-worldview framework for successful integration, incorporating clinical outcomes, operational reliability, and financial stability. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Spirituality, religion, and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2009-06-01

    Interest in the relationship between spirituality, religion, and clinical care has increased in the last 15 years, but clinicians need more concrete guidance about this topic. This article defines spirituality and religion, identifies the fundamental spiritual issues that serious illness raises for patients, and argues that physicians have a moral obligation to address patients' spiritual concerns. Religions often provide patients with specific moral guidance about a variety of medical issues and prescribe rituals that are important to patients. Religious coping can be both positive and negative, and it can impact patient care. This article provides concrete advice about taking a spiritual history, ethical boundaries, whether to pray with patients, and when to refer patients to chaplains or to their own personal clergy.

  2. Physical activity program for patients with dementia and their relative caregivers: randomized clinical trial in Primary Health Care (AFISDEMyF study)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aging of the population has led to the increase of chronic diseases, especially dementia and cardiovascular diseases, and it has become necessary for their relatives to dedicate more time in caregiving. The objective in the first phase of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a Primary Health Care procedure to increase the physical activity of people with dementia and their relative caregivers. Also the effect on the cognitive state and cardiovascular risk will be assessed. Methods/Design Design: Clinical, multicentric and randomized trial. A simple random sampling to select 134 patients diagnosed with dementia will be carried out. After contacting their relatives, his/her participation in the trial will be requested. A basal assessment will be made and the participants will be asigned to control or intervention group (1:1). Variables: The main measure will be the assessment of physical activity (podometer and 7-PAR) in patients and caregivers. In patients with dementia: ADAS-cog, functional degree and cardiovascular risk. In caregivers: cardiovascular risk, general health and quality of life. Intervention: For 3 months, participants will receive instructions to do physical activity with an adapted program. This program will be designed and applied by Primary Health Care professionals in patients with dementia and their caregivers. The control group will receive regular care. Analysis: An intention-to-treat analysis will be carried out by comparing the observed differences between basal, 6 and 12 months measures. Change in the mean of daily steps assessed with the podometer and 7-PAR will be the main result. Discussion If the main hypothesis is confirmed, it could be useful to improve the cognitive state of patients with dementia, as well as the cardiovascular risk of all of them. The results can be good to improve technical features of the devices that register the physical activity in the patients with dementia, and it could facilitate

  3. Clients’ Satisfaction with Primary Health Care in Muscat

    PubMed Central

    Albalushi, Rima M; Sohrabi, Mohammad-Reza; Kolahi, Ali-Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Background: To measure clients’ satisfaction with primary health care in the capital of Oman, Muscat, and also to identify the factors affecting their satisfaction. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study in health centers, 400 participants during the period from November 2009 to February 2010 were interviewed about their satisfaction degree with the primary health care services and setting. Four urban primary health care clinics from Muscat were selected randomly. Six domains of satisfaction including accessibility to services, continuity of care, humaneness of staff, comprehensiveness of care, provision of health education, and effectiveness of services were calculated from selected variables. The mean score of each area were calculated and then divided by the number of items in each area. Finally satisfaction areas were ranked based on recent criteria. Results: Mean age was 29.5 years (SD = 9.37) for male and 26.01 years (SD = 7.12) for female participants. All the areas were suitable and only continuity of care had negative score. The ranked areas of satisfaction were as humanness of staff, effectiveness of services, access to services, provision of health educational materials, comprehensiveness of care, continuity of care. Conclusions: Primary health care were accepted as a suitable strategy for providing health care among clients of urban health centers of Muscat. It can be recommended to other countries to use this as a choice for health care provision. PMID:23112898

  4. Implementing a teenage health service in primary care.

    PubMed

    Green, Elizabeth; Larcombe, J; Horbury, I

    The health of teenagers is currently a priority of the NHS, with many schemes and projects being developed. There are documented difficulties for teenagers in accessing health care, especially within general practice. This article describes the development and evaluation of a tailor-made clinic in the primary care setting.

  5. Management of Teenage Pregnancies in Three Different Health Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatelbaum, Robert

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports a retrospective study undertaken to determine if differences existed in obstetric outcome, contraceptive usage, and repeat pregnancy rates of teenage patients cared for in three different health care settings: the Rochester Adolescent Maternity Project (RAMP), a traditional obstetric clinic, and a neighborhood health center.…

  6. [Managing diversity in Swiss Health care].

    PubMed

    Bodenmann, P; Bossart, R; Di Bernardo, N; Dominice Dao, M; Durieux, S; Faucherre, F; Hudelson, P; Keller, M; Schuster, S; Zellweger, E; Houmard, S

    2014-11-19

    The development of Migrant Friendly Hospitals is an important first step towards eliminating health care disparities in Switzerland and an important reminder to health policy makers and practitioners across the health care system of their responsibility to provide non-discriminatory quality health care to all patients.

  7. How to strengthen primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratyush

    2016-01-01

    Realization of health care as primary objective is necessary to strengthen primary health care (PHC). There is a need to build financial viable and sustainable PHC based on rational principles to fulfill the goals of providing quality health services on an affordable and equitable basis and also ensuring fiscal prudence. Health-care leadership, innovations in primary care, family medicine specialists, and effective and accountable health governance are the key steps toward our goal. PMID:28217580

  8. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  9. ARTEMIS: a collaborative framework for health care.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R; Jagannathan, V; Srinivas, K; Karinthi, R; Reddy, S M; Gollapudy, C; Friedman, S

    1993-01-01

    Patient centered healthcare delivery is an inherently collaborative process. This involves a wide range of individuals and organizations with diverse perspectives: primary care physicians, hospital administrators, labs, clinics, and insurance. The key to cost reduction and quality improvement in health care is effective management of this collaborative process. The use of multi-media collaboration technology can facilitate timely delivery of patient care and reduce cost at the same time. During the last five years, the Concurrent Engineering Research Center (CERC), under the sponsorship of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, recently renamed ARPA) developed a number of generic key subsystems of a comprehensive collaboration environment. These subsystems are intended to overcome the barriers that inhibit the collaborative process. Three subsystems developed under this program include: MONET (Meeting On the Net)--to provide consultation over a computer network, ISS (Information Sharing Server)--to provide access to multi-media information, and PCB (Project Coordination Board)--to better coordinate focussed activities. These systems have been integrated into an open environment to enable collaborative processes. This environment is being used to create a wide-area (geographically distributed) research testbed under DARPA sponsorship, ARTEMIS (Advance Research Testbed for Medical Informatics) to explore the collaborative health care processes. We believe this technology will play a key role in the current national thrust to reengineer the present health-care delivery system.

  10. Primary Care-Based Memory Clinics: Expanding Capacity for Dementia Care.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda; Hillier, Loretta M; Heckman, George; Gagnon, Micheline; Borrie, Michael J; Stolee, Paul; Harvey, David

    2014-09-01

    The implementation in Ontario of 15 primary-care-based interprofessional memory clinics represented a unique model of team-based case management aimed at increasing capacity for dementia care at the primary-care level. Each clinic tracked referrals; in a subset of clinics, charts were audited by geriatricians, clinic members were interviewed, and patients, caregivers, and referring physicians completed satisfaction surveys. Across all clinics, 582 patients were assessed, and 8.9 per cent were referred to a specialist. Patients and caregivers were very satisfied with the care received, as were referring family physicians, who reported increased capacity to manage dementia. Geriatricians' chart audits revealed a high level of agreement with diagnosis and management. This study demonstrated acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary effectiveness of the primary-care memory clinic model. Led by specially trained family physicians, it provided timely access to high-quality collaborative dementia care, impacting health service utilization by more-efficient use of scarce geriatric specialist resources.

  11. Using the National Provider Identifier for health care workforce evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bindman, Andrew B

    2013-01-01

    The establishment in recent years of a National Provider Identifier (NPI) offers a new method for counting and categorizing physicians and other health care professionals involved in clinical care. In this paper, I describe how the NPI is assigned, the information collected in association with assigning the NPI, potential ways to enhance information on health professionals through data linkages using the NPI, and how the assessment of the health care workforce could be improved by requiring health care professionals to update their information as a part of maintaining their NPI.

  12. The role of reengineering in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Boland, P

    1996-01-01

    Health care reengineering is a powerful methodology that helps organizations reorder priorities, provide more cost-effective care, and increase value to customers. It should be driven by what the customer wants and what the market needs. Systemwide reengineering integrates three levels of activity: managing community and health plan partnerships; consolidating overlapping delivery system functions among participating providers and vendors; and redesigning administrative functions, clinical services, and caregiving programs to improve health status. Reengineering is not a panacea; it is a critical core competency and requisite skill for health care organizations if they are to succeed under managed care in the future.

  13. Factors influencing consumer satisfaction with health care.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Satish P; Deshpande, Samir S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that impact consumer satisfaction with health care. This is a secondary analysis of the Center for Studying Health System Change's 2010 Health Tracking Household Survey. Regression analysis was used to examine the impact of treatment issues, financial issues, family-related issues, sources of health care information, location, and demographics-related factors on satisfaction with health care. The study involved 12280 subjects, 56% of whom were very satisfied with their health care, whereas 66% were very satisfied with their primary care physician. Fourteen percent of the subjects had no health insurance; 34% of the subjects got their health care information from the Web. Satisfaction with primary care physician, general health status, promptness of visit to doctor, insurance type, medical cost per family, annual income, persons in family, health care information from friends, and age significantly impacted satisfaction with health care. The regression models accounted for 23% of the variance in health care satisfaction. Satisfaction with primary care physicians, health insurance, and general health status are the 3 most significant indicators of an individual's satisfaction with health care.

  14. Violence against women and reproductive health: toward defining a role for reproductive health care services.

    PubMed

    Parsons, L; Goodwin, M M; Petersen, R

    2000-06-01

    Since a large proportion of U.S. women receive reproductive health care services each year, reproductive health care settings offer an important opportunity to reach women who may be at risk of or experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). Although screening women for IPV in clinical health care settings has been endorsed by national professional associations and organizations, scientific evidence suggests that opportunities for screening in reproductive health care settings are often missed. This commentary outlines what is known about screening and intervention for IPV in clinical health care settings, and points out areas that need greater attention. The ultimate goal of these recommendations is to increase the involvement of reproductive health care services in sensitive, appropriate, and effective care for women who may be at risk of or affected by IPV.

  15. Health care delivery in the future.

    PubMed

    Harnar, R

    1983-01-01

    India's health care system, despite several significant achievements, suffers from some weaknesses and deficiencies. There has been a preoccupation with the promotion of curative and clinical services through city based hospitals which have essentially catered to certain sections of the urban population. The concept of health in its totality, with preventive and promotive health care services in addition to the curative, has yet to be made operational. There has been an overdependence on the states for health care measures and voluntary and local effort has not been able to accept responsibility in any significant way. The involvement of the people in solving their health problems has been almost nonexistent. Health needs to be viewed as part of the strategy of human resources development. Horizontal and vertical linkages must be obtained among all the interrelated programs--protected water supply environmental sanitation and hygiene, nutrition, education, family planning, and maternal and child welfare. Only with such linkages can the benefits of the various programs be optimized. An attack on the problems of diseases cannot be completely successful unless it is accompanied by an attack on poverty. For this reason the 6th plan assigns a high priority to programs of promotion, or gainful employment, eradication of poverty, population control, and meeting the basic human needs of the population. The Alma Alta Declaration of 1977 has become the accepted health policy of India, simplified into the slogan "health for all by 2000." To realize this goaL, the Planning Commission recommends in the 6th 5-Year Plan a restructing and reorientation of the country's health services. The proposed alternative scheme is more decentralized and provides for many more people to be trained at the grassroots level. People would be involved in tackling their health problems and community participation would be encouraged. Finally, the alternative strongly urges the screening of patients

  16. How safe is our "place of safety"? Clinical guidance promoting safer medical care of patients detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act.

    PubMed

    Mouko, Josie; Goddard, Aurielle; Nimmo-Smith, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    A new four-bed unit was opened in Bristol, UK, in 2014, for people detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act. Police bring individuals posing a risk to themselves or others to a Place of Safety (PoS) in order to receive a mental health assessment. Individuals may be held for up to 72 hours, but cannot receive treatment against their will, unless assessed as lacking the capacity to refuse treatment. Issues requiring medical input arose in more than a third of patients, yet there was little guidance for trainees around the PoS. We conducted a survey which confirmed that robust clinical guidance was needed for junior doctors around medical assistance in this unique environment. We identified specific concerns around patient safety in relation to alcohol withdrawal, uncertainties around legislation and lack of clarity of who to call out of hours. Trainees felt they were working outside of their expertise. We collaborated with a variety of professionals to produce clinical guidance in line with best evidence, and made this easily accessible. We also gained a consensus that more experienced core trainees (SHOs) in Psychiatry should be the first point of contact. We then conducted a survey in June 2015, and found that doctors covering the PoS now felt there was sufficient guidance on most clinical scenarios, 100% consensus on who to contact and improved confidence in their ability to manage issues arising. In August 2015 we held an informal training session for the new intake of trainees on the rota. A subsequent survey revealed similarly positive results. Through this project, we were able to identify defects in a system, provide needed guidance to enable safer and more equitable care to a vulnerable group, and foster closer collaboration between junior doctors and managers in the design and use of services.

  17. Quality of prescribing of antipsychotic medication for people with intellectual disability under the care of UK mental health services: a cross-sectional audit of clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Paton, Carol; Bhatti, Sumera; Purandare, Kiran; Roy, Ashok; Barnes, TRE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence and quality of antipsychotic prescribing for people with intellectual disability (ID). Design A clinical audit of prescribing practice in the context of a quality improvement programme. Practice standards for audit were derived from relevant, evidence-based guidelines, including NICE. Data were mainly collected from the clinical records, but to determine the clinical rationale for using antipsychotic medication in individual cases, prescribers could also be directly questioned. Settings 54 mental health services in the UK, which were predominantly NHS Trusts. Participants Information on prescribing was collected for 5654 people with ID. Results Almost two-thirds (64%) of the total sample was prescribed antipsychotic medication, of whom almost half (49%) had a schizophrenia spectrum or affective disorder diagnosis, while a further third (36%) exhibited behaviours recognised by NICE as potentially legitimate targets for such treatment such as violence, aggression or self-injury. With respect to screening for potential side effects within the past year, 41% had a documented measure of body weight (range across participating services 18–100%), 32% blood pressure (0–100%) and 37% blood glucose and blood lipids (0–100%). Conclusions These data from mental health services across the UK suggest that antipsychotic medications are not widely used outside of licensed and/or evidence-based indications in people with ID. However, screening for side effects in those patients on continuing antipsychotic medication was inconsistent across the participating services and the possibility that a small number of these services failed to meet basic standards of care cannot be excluded. PMID:27920085

  18. Original research paper. Public health care system, a quasi-experimental study: Acceptance and attitude to implicate clinical services.

    PubMed

    Gillani, Syed Wasif; Abdul, Mohi Iqbal Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    A six-month longitudinal intervention arm study with a pre-post cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey was performed. A 3-phase objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) design was utilized for evaluation of acceptance and attitude of pharmacy students towards clinical pharmacy services. The pre-OSCE survey showed increased disagreement with the role of clinical pharmacists, compared to a significant positive shift in attitude towards their services in the healthcare team after 6 months of the trial. Responses improved for awareness (the current healthcare system could be improved by involving pharmacists, p < 0.02) and positive attitude categories (doctors and nurses would be happy to welcome the services of competent clinical pharmacists as part of their team, p < 0.01) in addition to competency (pharmacists have sufficient clinical training to advise doctors and nurses, p < 0.01). The predictive model suggested a strong positive effect on patient interaction, medical information tasks, clinical decisions on drug-related problems (DRPs), and communication with healthcare professionals (R2 = 0.41, F = 1.51, p < 0.001).

  19. The relationship between type 2 diabetic patients' early medical care-seeking consistency to the same clinician and health care system and their clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pei-Ju; Lin, Zu-Yu; Huang, Jui-Chu; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2015-02-01

    The literature has demonstrated that the continuity of diabetes care can lower medical service utilization and expenses. However, few studies have examined the effects of patients' medical care-seeking behaviors in the early stage after the diagnosis of diabetes on their long-term prognoses. This study aimed to examine the association of medical care-seeking behavior in the first year following diabetes diagnosis on the occurrence of diabetes-related complications among patients in Taiwan. This is a retrospective data collection with follow-up analysis and a nationwide population-based dataset in Taiwan. A total of 89,428 newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients during the period from 2000 to 2006 were followed up until 2010. The patients' medical care-seeking behaviors were classified as follows: high consistency to a physician, high consistency to a medical setting, medium consistency to providers, and low consistency to providers. The occurrence of diabetes-related complications and all-cause mortality were the primary outcomes of this study. Chi-square tests, ANOVAs, and Cox proportional hazard models were applied to examine the relationships between the predictors and medical outcomes. Compared to the patients with high medical care-seeking consistency to a physician, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios of diabetes-related complications occurrence among patients in the high consistency to a medical setting, medium consistency, and low consistency categories were 1.112 (95% CI 1.089-1.136, P < 0.001), 1.226 (95% CI 1.205-1.248, P < 0.001), and 1.536 (95% CI 1.504-1.567, P < 0.001) in outpatient visits and 1.032 (95% CI 0.992-1.074, P = 0.121), 1.056 (95% CI 1.022-1.092, P = 0.001), and 1.208 (95% CI 1.164-1.254, P < 0.001) in complication-incurred hospitalizations, respectively. The monotonic trend was sustained across different strata of age, gender, and disease complexity. The findings of this study suggest that the incentives of continuity of

  20. Sampling considerations for health care improvement.

    PubMed

    Perla, Rocco J; Provost, Lloyd P; Murray, Sandra K

    2014-01-01

    Sampling in improvement work can pose challenges. How is it different from the sampling strategies many use with research, clinical trials, or regulatory programs? What should improvement teams consider when determining a useful approach to sampling and a useful sample size? The aim of this article is to introduce some of the concepts related to sampling for improvement. We give specific guidance related to determining a useful sample size to a wider health care audience so that it can be applied to improvement projects in hospitals and health systems.

  1. Sampling considerations for health care improvement.

    PubMed

    Perla, Rocco J; Provost, Lloyd P; Murray, Sandra K

    2013-01-01

    Sampling in improvement work can pose challenges. How is it different from the sampling strategies many use with research, clinical trials, or regulatory programs? What should improvement teams consider when determining a useful approach to sampling and a useful sample size? The aim of this article is to introduce some of the concepts related to sampling for improvement. We give specific guidance related to determining a useful sample size to a wider health care audience so that it can be applied to improvement projects in hospitals and health systems.

  2. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  3. Primary care in Cuba: a public health approach.

    PubMed

    Swanson, K A; Swanson, J M; Gill, A E; Walter, C

    1995-01-01

    Cuba's primary health care model is presented. Unlike ambulatory care services, which are but one component of primary care, Cuba's model is a comprehensive public health approach that meets the World Health Organization's definition of primary care. The history of the development of Cuba's model is presented, including an update on the innovative neighborhood/home clinics. Achievements in health outcomes as a result of Cuba's model and the consequences for women's health care are discussed. Examples are presented of the effects on health care delivery of the economic hardship that Cuba has experienced since 1991 as a result of the loss of 85% of its trade with the former Soviet Union and the intensified U.S. embargo. A critique of Cuba's model concludes the article.

  4. Health care organization drug testing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J P; Dempsey, J

    1992-09-01

    Health care managers are being required to respond to the growing concerns of the public about alcohol and drug use in the health care workplace. To this end, the following recommendations are offered. A drug testing policy should be developed with input from and support of employees and unions. "For cause" testing should be used because it results in more definitive results and better employee acceptance. Unless there are compelling reasons for random testing, "for cause" testing is the preferable method. All levels of employees and the medical staff should be subject to the drug-testing policy. Rehabilitation rather than punishment should be emphasized in dealing with employees with alcohol and drug problems.

  5. Consumer Attitudes toward Health and Health Care: A Differential Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    Questionnaires returned by 343 out of 350 subjects measured health attitudes and health status. Results suggest that some consumers take a more scientific approach to health care and prevention. Demographic factors, health status, and health consciousness are partial predictors of consumer attitudes and approach to health care. (SK)

  6. Non-specific low back pain in primary care in the Spanish National Health Service: a prospective study on clinical outcomes and determinants of management

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Francisco M; Fernández, Carmen; Cordero, Antonio; Muriel, Alfonso; González-Luján, Luis; Gil del Real, María Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Background The Spanish National Health Service is a universal and free health care system. Non-specific low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent disorder, generating large health and social costs. The objectives of this study were to describe its management in primary care, to assess patient characteristics that influence physicians' decisions, and to describe clinical outcome at 2 months. Methods A cross-sectional sample of 648 patients with non-specific low back pain was recruited by 75 physicians (out of 361 – 20.8%) working in 40 primary care centers in 10 of the 17 administrative regions in Spain, covering 693,026 out of the 40,499,792 inhabitants. Patients were assessed on the day they were recruited, and prospectively followed-up 14 and 60 days later. The principal patient characteristics that were analyzed were: sex, duration of the episode, history of LBP, working status, severity of LBP, leg pain and disability, and results of straight leg raising test. Descriptors of management were: performance of the straight leg raising test, ordering of diagnostic procedures, prescription of drug treatment, referral to physical therapy, rehabilitation or surgery, and granting of sick leave. Regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between patients' baseline characteristics and physicians' management decisions. Only workers were included in the models on sick leave. Results Mean age (SD) of included patients was 46.5 (15.5) years, 367 (56.6%) were workers, and 338 (52.5%) were females. Median (25th–75th interquartile range) duration of pain when entering the study was 4 (2–10) days and only 28 patients (4.3%) had chronic low back pain. Diagnostic studies included plain radiographs in 43.1% of patients and CT or MRI scans in 18.8%. Drug medication was prescribed to 91.7% of patients, 19.1% were sent to physical therapy or rehabilitation, and 9.6% were referred to surgery. The main determinants of the clinical management were duration of the episode and

  7. Multipurpose Health Care Telemedicine System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    place to the base unit (consultation site). The transmission is performed through GSM, Satellite links or POTS . Using this device a specialist...standardized medical protocol. Keywords – Emergency Health Care Telemedicine, GSM, Satellite, POTS I. INTRODUCTION The availability of prompt and expert...of communication means (Satellite, GSM and Plain Old Telephony System - POTS ). The base unit is comprised of a set of user-friendly software

  8. Kant, health care and justification.

    PubMed

    Loewy, E H

    1995-06-01

    An argument based on Kant for access to health-care for all is a most helpful addition to prior discussions. My paper argues that while such a point of view is helpful it fails to be persuasive. What is needed, in addition to a notion of the legislative will, is a viewpoint of community which sees justice as originating not merely from considerations of reason alone but from a notion of community and from a framework of common human experiences and capabilities.

  9. Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Archives learn more » For Patients Your health care choices matter. Whether you're anticipating a surgical procedure, ... 853.9028 E: info@aaahc.org About Us Careers News & Resources Surveyors Find a Health Care Organization ...

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer

    MedlinePlus

    ... safety efforts happening across the state. Health care facility CEOs/administrators can: Implement systems to alert receiving ... Germs spread between patients and across health care facilities. Antibiotic resistance is a threat. Nightmare germs called ...

  11. Savings account for health care costs

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000864.htm Savings account for health care costs To use the sharing features on this ... can set aside tax-exempt money for your health care expenses. This means you will pay no or ...

  12. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an ... 6332) or visit www.fda.gov . Consult your health care provider for more information. September 2013 Share Alternate ...

  13. 8 ways to cut health care costs

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000870.htm Eight ways to cut your health care costs To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The cost of health care continues to rise. That is why it helps ...

  14. Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Press Release Archives learn more » For Patients Your health care choices matter. Whether you're anticipating a surgical ... certificate of accreditation is a sign that a health care organization meets or exceeds nationally-recognized Standards. Learn ...

  15. Nurse Care Coordination and Technology Effects on Health Status of Frail Elderly via Enhanced Self-management of Medication: Randomized Clinical Trial to Test Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Karen Dorman; Stetzer, Frank; Ryan, Polly A.; Bub, Linda Denison; Adams, Scott J.; Schlidt, Andrea; Lancaster, Rachelle; O’Brien, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-management of complex medication regimens for chronic illness is challenging for many older adults. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate health status outcomes of frail older adults receiving a home-based support program that emphasized self-management of medications using both care coordination and technology. Design Randomized controlled trial with three arms and longitudinal outcome measurement. Setting Older adults having difficulty self-managing medications (N = 414) were recruited at discharge from three Medicare-certified home health care agencies in a Midwestern urban area. Methods All participants received baseline pharmacy screens. The control group received no further intervention. A team of advanced practice nurses and registered nurses coordinated care for 12 months to two intervention groups who also received either an MD.2 medication-dispensing machine or a medplanner. Health status outcomes (Geriatric Depression Scale, Mini-Mental Status Examination, Physical Performance Test, and the SF-36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary) were measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Results After covariate and baseline health status adjustment, time by group interactions for the MD.2 and medplanner groups on health status outcomes were not significant; time by group interactions were significant for medplanner and control group comparisons. Discussion Participants with care coordination had significantly better health status outcomes over time than those in the control group, but addition of the MD.2 machine to nurse care coordination did not result in better health status outcomes. PMID:23817284

  16. Commissioning through competition and cooperation in the English NHS under the Health and Social Care Act 2012: evidence from a qualitative study of four clinical commissioning groups

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Pauline; Osipovič, Dorota; Shepherd, Elizabeth; Coleman, Anna; Perkins, Neil; Garnett, Emma; Williams, Lorraine

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Health and Social Care Act 2012 (‘HSCA 2012’) introduced a new, statutory, form of regulation of competition into the National Health Service (NHS), while at the same time recognising that cooperation was necessary. NHS England's policy document, The Five Year Forward View (‘5YFV’) of 2014 placed less emphasis on competition without altering the legislation. We explored how commissioners and providers understand the complex regulatory framework, and how they behave in relation to competition and cooperation. Design We carried out detailed case studies in four clinical commissioning groups, using interviews and documentary analysis to explore the commissioners’ and providers’ understanding and experience of competition and cooperation. Setting/participants We conducted 42 interviews with senior managers in commissioning organisations and senior managers in NHS and independent provider organisations (acute and community services). Results Neither commissioners nor providers fully understand the regulatory regime in respect of competition in the NHS, and have not found that the regulatory authorities have provided adequate guidance. Despite the HSCA 2012 promoting competition, commissioners chose mainly to use collaborative strategies to effect major service reconfigurations, which is endorsed as a suitable approach by providers. Nevertheless, commissioners are using competitive tendering in respect of more peripheral services in order to improve quality of care and value for money. Conclusions Commissioners regard the use of competition and cooperation as appropriate in the NHS currently, although collaborative strategies appear more helpful in respect of large-scale changes. However, the current regulatory framework contained in the HSCA 2012, particularly since the publication of the 5YFV, is not clear. Better guidance should be issued by the regulatory authorities. PMID:28183806

  17. Microenterprise in health care and health education.

    PubMed

    Edler, A A

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, development aid has increasingly used a more collaborative model, with donors and recipients both contributing ideas, methods and goals. Though many examples of collateral aid projects exist in agriculture, business administration and banking, few have found their way into health care and health education, a typically donor-dominated model. The following case report describes a collateral project in health care education. This case report analyzes data-inducing project proposals, personal interviews and project reports obtained through standard archival research methods. The setting for this joint project was the collaboration between international nongovernmental (NGO) aid foundations and the faculty of a major sub-Saharan African Medical School's Department of Anesthesia. The initial goal of this project was to improve record keeping for all anesthetic records, both in the operating theatres and outside. Analysis of the data was performed using ethnographic methods of constant comparative analysis. The purpose of the analysis was to critically evaluate both the goals and their results in the Department of Anesthesiology. The findings of this analysis suggested that results included not only quality assurance and improvement programs in the department but also advances in the use of critical incidents as teaching tools, hospital-wide drug and equipment utilization information and the initiation of an outreach program to district hospitals throughout the country for similar projects.

  18. The evolution of trauma surgery at a high-volume Canadian centre: implications for public health, prevention, clinical care, education and recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Chad G.; Das, Debanjana; Roberts, Derek J.; Vis, Christine; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Kortbeek, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trauma centres continue to evolve with respect to clinical care and their impact on public health. Despite improvements in patient outcomes, operative volumes, and therefore maintenance of surgical skills, has become a challenging issue. We sought to determine whether injury demographics and treatments at a high- volume centre changed over time. Methods We used the Alberta Trauma Registry to analyze all severely injured (injury severity score [ISS] ≥ 12) patient admissions over a 16-year period (1995–2011). Results Of the 12 879 severely injured patients requiring admission, there was a 1.5-fold increase in the annual admission rate despite population normalization (p = 0.001). Over the 16-year interval, patients were older with a subsequent lower mortality (p = 0.001) and length of hospital stay (p = 0.007). In patients with the most severe ISS (≥ 48), there was no change in mortality (27%, p = 0.26). In 2011, falls were the most common mechanism compared with motor vehicle crashes (41% v. 23%; p < 0.001); this was a complete reversal compared with 1995 (25% v. 41%). Motorized recreational vehicle and motorcycle injuries also increased (p < 0.001). The mean number of operations performed by trauma surgeons decreased (laparotomies: 67 [17%] in 1995 v. 47 [5%] in 2011, p < 0.001). Thoracotomies and tracheostomies remained unchanged (p = 0.19). Conclusion Clinical care has improved despite an increasing overall volume of severely injured patient admissions. The number of operative interventions performed by trauma surgeons continues to decrease concurrent to a change in injury mechanisms. Despite these improvements, maintenance of technical skills among trauma surgeons has become an important issue. PMID:25427332

  19. mHealth in Cardiovascular Health Care.

    PubMed

    Chow, Clara K; Ariyarathna, Nilshan; Islam, Sheikh Mohammed Shariful; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Redfern, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) has been defined as medical and public health practice supported by mobile devices, such as mobile phones, patient monitoring devices and personal digital assistants. Cardiovascular mHealth is, arguably, leading the mHealth space, through innovation, research and implementation, and especially in the areas of prevention, cardiac rehabilitation and education. mHealth includes simple strategies, such as the use of short message service (SMS) or text messages in successful short-term smoking-cessation, weight loss and diabetes management programs. The recent Australian Tobacco, Exercise and Diet Messages (TEXT ME) randomised clinical trial addressed multiple cardiovascular risk factors. mHealth can also involve more complex strategies, such as smart phone applications (apps), global positioning systems (GPS) and Bluetooth technologies. Although many apps could be considered suitable for primary prevention, they are largely unregulated and most are not evidence-based. Some have been well-developed, such as the Food Switch app and an iPhone electrocardiogram (ECG) system. The "explosion" of apps has driven initiatives such as the Mobile Applications Rating Scale (MARS). More recently, the use of sensors to monitor and provide feedback to patients and healthcare providers is being explored. With almost two billion people currently owning a Smartphone, and 50% of adults (globally) predicted to own one by 2018, mHealth provides the prospect of delivering efficient, affordable healthcare services to widespread populations both locally and globally. In particular, it has the potential to reduce socioeconomic disparity and alleviate the burden of cardiovascular disease. There is now a need to rethink traditional health service structures and bioengineering capacity, to ensure mHealth systems are also safe, secure and robust.

  20. Correlates for Utilization of Preventive Medicine Through the Use of Clinical Reminders at the Central Texas Veterans Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    diabetics, depression screening, alcohol screening, and tobacco use screening. VHA established benchmarks ranging from 75 percent to 90 percent...1S-3S. Intro to The VHA Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Persons with COPD or Asthma Retrieved on the World Wide Web on August 23

  1. Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

  2. Nursing Titles and Health Care Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erceg, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Recommends choosing appropriate health care providers for camp, and referring to them by the title their credentials warrant. Explains distinctions among nursing titles and that they vary by state. Discusses developing a health care plan suited to camp's population, program, and location. Presents guidelines required of a health care plan by…

  3. Planning Campus Health Care Services 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Bruce L.

    1975-01-01

    In a context of forecasts of major changes for America's entire health care system, colleges and universities are exploring the implications of new trends in campus health care delivery. On January 30-31, 1975, the Society for College and University Planning sponsored a workshop on "Campus Health Care Services" in Chicago to discuss such issues as…

  4. Communicating in Multicultural Health Care Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreps, Gary L.; Kunimoto, Elizabeth

    This paper investigates the multicultural demands of health care delivery by examining the role of organizational communication in promoting effective multicultural relations in modern health care systems. The paper describes the multicultural make-up of modern health care systems--noting, for example that providers from different professional…

  5. Who needs evidence-based health care?

    PubMed Central

    Tsafrir, J; Grinberg, M

    1998-01-01

    The vast amount of published material in clinical and biomedical sciences, and conflicting results on diagnostic and therapeutic procedures may introduce doubts in decision-making for patient care. Information retrieving skills and the critical appraisal of published literature, together with elaboration of practice guidelines based on epidemiological methodology, form the basis of the trend towards evidence-based health care, which aims to overcome these problems. A survey conducted by questionnaire at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center analyzed which types of information sources are considered most relevant and useful for patient care by a cross-section of physicians with varying degrees of experience. They considered review articles and meta-analyses extremely reliable for information purposes, while for practical patient-care purposes they tended to rely more on the opinions of peers and experts. As the requirements of evidence-based health care may influence the attitudes of clinicians to the published literature and its evaluation, they have implications for medical libraries and information centers. Specifically, information specialists will be called upon more and more to impart information-retrieval and critical appraisal skills to clinicians. The involvement of information specialists in information gathering and selection will provide added value to the expertise and knowledge of in-house experts for decision-making. PMID:9549011

  6. Clinical Implications of Family-Centered Care in Stroke Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Creasy, Kerry Rae; Lutz, Barbara J.; Young, Mary Ellen; Stacciarini, Jeanne-Marie R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Most stroke survivors will be cared for at home by family caregivers with limited training. Families actively involved in rehabilitation feel more prepared for the new responsibilities of caring for the stroke survivor. The focus of this article is to highlight the relevant concepts of a family-centered model of care and provide general guidance on how integrating a family-centered mindset may be clinically applicable. Family-Centered Care Family-centered care is a model of healthcare that encourages collaboration and partnership among patients, families, and providers with respect to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care. Care provided within such a model can expand providers’ knowledge of the impact of illness and any issues that may affect eventual transition back home. Clinical Relevance and Conclusion Rehabilitation nurses should view stroke patients and family caregivers as a unit. Using family-centered strategies can help nurses provide appropriate, individualized care during rehabilitation. PMID:25648522

  7. Empowered Consumers and the Health Care Team: A Dynamic Model of Health Informatics.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Peggy J; Myneni, Sahiti

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a dynamic new model of health informatics. Within the model, the focus of health informatics changes from the provider to the consumer and incorporates the dynamic relationship of technological change to health care. Bioinformatics is the scientific discipline that is translated into care through the practice of health informatics. The loci of health informatics practices are the consumer (consumer informatics), the patient (clinical informatics), and the community (public health informatics). The continuum from individual to community interacts with and contributes to health care technology, which is represented as a constantly changing progressive wave.

  8. The role of the nurse executive in health care philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Donell

    2014-01-01

    As the health care landscape continues to change with reform, obtaining funding for clinical initiatives is becoming increasingly difficult. At Catholic Health Initiatives, a number of nurse executives have recognized the need for creative philanthropy to advance specific projects. They have embraced opportunities for partnerships with their hospital foundation chief development officers to leverage philanthropy toward clinical innovations and to improve quality of care. Following are their discussions which reveal just how important nurse and employee involvement is to attracting and using philanthropy dollars in the next era of health care.

  9. e-Health in pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice

    2010-02-01

    e-Health has the potential to improve pediatric palliative care. e-Health initiatives use the Internet or health information technology to improve quality of care and have the potential to decrease costs by reducing medical errors, reducing duplication of services, improving access to diagnostic and laboratory results, and improving communication between providers and patients, and so on. The majority of e-health initiatives are for adults and only a limited amount of evidence exists in the literature on e-health interventions in palliative care that are focused on pediatrics. To explore what role e-health could play in pediatric palliative care programs, this article aims to describe the Internet use in general in the United States and in palliative care, describe the use of health information technology in general in the United States and in palliative care, and suggest areas in pediatric palliative care that might benefit from e-health interventions.

  10. Health care employee perceptions of patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Turcios, Stephanie; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-03-01

    Given the importance of health care employees in the delivery of patient-centered care, understanding their unique perspectives is essential for quality improvement. The purpose of this study was to use photovoice to evaluate perceptions and experiences around patient-centered care among U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) health care employees. We asked participants to take photographs of salient features in their environment related to patient-centered care. We used the photographs to facilitate dialogue during follow-up interviews. Twelve VA health care employees across two VA sites participated in the project. Although most participants felt satisfied with their work environment and experiences at the VA, they identified several areas for improvement. These included a need for more employee health and wellness initiatives and a need for enhanced opportunities for training and professional growth. Application of photovoice enabled us to learn about employees' unique perspectives around patient-centered care while engaging them in an evaluation of care delivery.

  11. Wholistic Health Care: Evolutionary Conceptual Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, Deborah Jean

    2016-10-01

    While performing a data search to define "wholistic health care", it was evident that a definite gap existed in published literature. In addition, there are different definitions and several similar terms (whole person care, wholistic health, whole person health, wholism, etc.), which may cause confusion. The purpose of this paper was to present the analysis of "wholistic health care" using Rodgers' Evolutionary Method. The method allows for the historical and social nature of "wholistic health care" and how it changes over time. Attributes, antecedents, and consequences of wholistic health care were reduced using a descriptive matrix. In addition, attributes that consistently occurred in wholistic health care were presented as essential attributes. Definitions of Wholistic Health Care Provider(s), Wholistic Health, Wholistic Illness, Wholistic Healing, and Patient were created from the analysis of the literature review of attributes, antecedents, and consequences of wholistic health care. Wholistic Health Care is defined as the assessment, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of wholistic illness in human beings to maintain wholistic health or enhance wholistic healing. Identified wholistic health needs are addressed simultaneously by one or a team of allied health professionals in the provision of primary care, secondary care, and tertiary care. Wholistic health care is patient centered and considers the totality of the person (e.g., human development at a given age, genetic endowments, disease processes, environment, culture, experiences, relationships, communication, assets, attitudes, beliefs, and lifestyle behaviors). Patient centered refers to the patient as active participant in deciding the course of care. Essential attributes of wholistic health care are faith (spiritual) integrating, health promoting, disease managing, coordinating, empowering, and accessing health care. Wholistic health care may occur in collaboration with a faith-based organization to

  12. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health and Health Care.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Sarahn M; Bryant, Allison S

    2017-03-01

    A health disparity is defined as an increased burden of an adverse health outcome or health determinant within a specific subset of the population. There are well-documented racial and ethnic disparities throughout health care at the patient, provider, and health care system levels. As the minority populations within the United States grow to record numbers, it is increasingly important to invest in efforts to characterize, understand, and end racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Inequities in health outcomes and care pose real threats to the entire nation's well-being. Eliminating health disparities is fundamental to the well-being, productivity, and viability of the entire nation.

  13. Health Care Reform and the Academic Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmey, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the implications of health care reform for academic health centers (a complex of institutions which educate health professionals) looks at problems in the current system, the role of academic health centers in the current system, financial pressures, revenue sources other than patient care, impact on health research, and human…

  14. Health Care Marketing: Role Evolution of the Community Health Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syre, Thomas R.; Wilson, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses role delineation in the health education profession, defines and presents principles of health care marketing, describes marketing plan development, and examines major ethical issues associated with health care marketing when utilized by community health educators. A marketing plan format for community health education is…

  15. Horizontal equity and mental health care: a study of priority ratings by clinicians and teams at outpatient clinics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Norway, admission teams at Community Mental Health Centres (CMHCs) assess referrals from General Practitioners (GPs), and classify the referrals into priority groups according to treatment needs, as defined in the Act of Patient Rights. In this study, we analyzed classification of similar referrals to determine the reliability of classification into priority groups (i.e., horizontal equity). Methods Twenty anonymous case vignettes based on representative referrals were classified by 42 admission team members at 16 CMHCs in the South-East Health Region of Norway. All clinicians were experienced, and were responsible for priority setting at their centres. The classifications were first performed independently by the 42 clinicians (i.e., individual rating), and then evaluated utilizing team consensus within each CMHC (i.e., team rating). Interrater reliability was estimated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) while the reliability of rating across raters and units (generalizability) were estimated using generalizability analysis. Results The ICCs (2.1 single measure, absolute agreement) varied between 0.40 and 0.51 using individual ratings and between 0.39 and 0.58 using team ratings. Our findings suggest a fair (low) degree of interrater reliability, and no improvement of team ratings was observed when compared to individual ratings. The generalizability analysis, for one rater within each unit, yields a generalizability coefficient of 0.50 and a dependability coefficient of 0.53 (D study). These findings confirm that the reliability of ratings across raters and across units is low. Finally, the degree of inconsistency, for an average measurement, appears to be higher within units than between units (G study). Conclusion The low interrater reliability and generalizability found in our study suggests that horizontal equity to mental health services is not ensured with respect to priority. Priority -setting in teams provides no significant

  16. Hurdles to health: immigrant and refugee health care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Murray, Sally B; Skull, Sue A

    2005-02-01

    Refugees and asylum seekers face a number of barriers to accessing health care and improved health status. These include language difficulties, financial need and unemployment, cultural differences, legal barriers and a health workforce with generally low awareness of issues specific to refugees. Importantly, current Australian government migration and settlement policy also impacts on access to health and health status. An adequate understanding of these 'hurdles to health' is a prerequisite for health providers and health service managers if they are to tailor health care and services appropriately. We include tables of available resources and entitlements to health care according to visa category to assist providers and managers.

  17. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Cancer.gov

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  18. Physical Health Problems and Barriers to Optimal Health Care Among Children in Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stephanie Anne; Fortin, Kristine

    2015-10-01

    Children and adolescents in foster care placement represent a unique population with special health care needs, often resulting from pre-placement early adversity and neglected, unaddressed health care needs. High rates of all health problems, including acute and/or chronic physical, mental, and developmental issues prevail. Disparities in health status and access to health care are observed. This article summarizes the physical health problems of children in foster care, who are predisposed to poor health outcomes when complex care needs are unaddressed. Despite recognition of the significant burden of health care need among this unique population, barriers to effective and optimal health care delivery remain. Legislative solutions to overcome obstacles to health care delivery for children in foster care are discussed.

  19. [The mobile medical clinic: a role of mobile physician crews in the provision of health care for rural populations].

    PubMed

    Kucher, G Iu; Ziniukov, V V; Terliuk, O G; Maksimets, A V; Zalesskiĭ, V N

    2012-01-01

    Medical mobile clinics (MMK) have several advantages: autonomous functioning, rapid reacting, mobility and universality, availability and also possibility of providing of medicare even in the most difficult of access and remote districts. For 2 the movable medical brigade of MMK is do more than 30 departures in 25 districts of six areas of Ukraine (Chernovithky, Nicolajevsky, Zhitomirsky and other regions), more than 6000 ultrasonic studies are undertaken, is carried out on nosologies with providing of consultative help narrow specialists. High efficiency of echography is confirmed as the first instrumental method of research at the inspection of wide layers of villagers resident in remote settlements. For a population development of pharm services appeared a comfortable help in the points of work of departure brigade of medicare, and also programs of humanitarian help.

  20. Health of Children in Day Care: Public Health Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Health and Environment, Topeka.

    Profiles are provided for innovative public health activities that focus on the health of children in day care. All are considered to be models worthy of replication. Profiles depict (1) child care in Arizona; (2) child day care licensing in Connecticut; (3) safeguarding children in day care in Kansas; (4) paired state and local inspection in…

  1. Establishment of primary health care in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Birt, C A

    1990-08-01

    Basic demographic and epidemiological data relevant to health problems in Vietnam are described in this paper. Existing health service arrangements are referred to, with particular emphasis on the strategy for development of primary health care. The establishment of the paediatric centre in Ho Chi Minh City is reported, and examples of its valuable work in primary health care development are described.

  2. Outcomes research in evaluating the benefit of health care technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendrick, A. Mark

    1995-10-01

    Although medical innovation can reduce morbidity and mortality associated with diseases or their treatments, in most instances new interventions tend to increase the amount of resources expended on health care services. In this era of increasing cost consciousness, there is a perceived tension between the desire to improve health outcomes and the necessity to control the growth of health care costs. The dramatic changes in the organization, financing, and delivery of health care services, make it no longer acceptable to provide any and all services to every individual with only a remote probability of clinical benefit. An incentive structure which rewards the practice of cost-effective medical care is rapidly replacing the 'technological imperative' of decades past. As the expansion towards managed care continues, increasing scrutiny will be paid to the clinical and cost implications of our medical interventions.

  3. Let's put "care" back into health care.

    PubMed

    Wesolowski, C E

    1990-01-01

    Organizations that clearly demonstrate they care about their people reap the benefits of a positive self-image, higher productivity and financial gains. Consider the effects that a demoralized, unappreciated staff have on productivity, recruitment and retention, public relations, marketing, customer satisfaction and the resulting financial repercussions. Can we afford not to care?

  4. Health Care Reform: Opportunities for Improving Adolescent Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Charles E., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    Health care reform represents a major step toward achieving the goal of improved preventive and primary care services for all Americans, including children and adolescents. Adolescence is a unique developmental age district from both childhood and adulthood with special vulnerabilities, health concerns, and barriers to accessing health care. It is…

  5. The changing face of health care consumers.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Caring for a diverse pool of patients is an ongoing challenge for health care practitioners and marketers. Communication difficulties and cultural misunderstandings still stand in the way and keep members of some minority populations from getting the health care they need. To better serve these groups, it's crucial to learn more about patients' values, needs, and expectations. Fortunately, opportunities abound for health care marketers to learn about and effectively target these still largely underserved populations.

  6. The Obama health care plan: what it means for mental health care of older adults.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2009-01-01

    Health care was an important issue for both the Obama and McCain election campaigns. Now that Barack Obama is poised to serve as the 44th President of the United States, many health care providers are focused on what Obama's administration will mean for new health care initiatives. This article focuses specifically on aspects of the Obama and Biden health care plan that affects mental health care for older adults.

  7. Health as a clinic-epidemiological concept.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Marco Antonio

    2015-06-01

    I propose a clinic-epidemiological concept of health as the best description of what physicians actually think about health within medical practice. Its aim is to be an alternative to the best approach in the philosophy of medicine about health, Christopher Boorse's biostatistical theory. Contrary to Boorse's 'theoretical' approach, I propose to take health as a practical clinical concept. In the first two parts of the paper, I will present my complaints against Boorse's view that health is a theoretical concept, a 'species normal functional ability'. I will claim that Boorse's view is actually a view on normal physiology. My claim is that health is best described as the state of absence of chronic diseases or disabilities (clinic-epidemiologically associated with a morbimortality index higher than the risk of death, disease and disabilities for individuals of the same population group or reference class free of that chronic clinical conditions). Health, therefore, is not the mere absence of disease. Diseases that do not increase patients' morbimortality and disability indexes are not incompatible with health; after all, clinical health is compatible with appropriate health care and medical treatments.

  8. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Precocious Puberty and Delayed Puberty?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose precocious puberty & delayed puberty? Skip sharing ... and analyzing his or her medical history, a health care provider may perform tests to diagnose precocious puberty, ...

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Preeclampsia, Eclampsia, and HELLP Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How do health care providers diagnose preeclampsia, eclampsia, and HELLP syndrome? Skip ... social media links Share this: Page Content A health care provider should check a pregnant woman's blood pressure ...

  10. Goal-Directed Health Care: Redefining Health and Health Care in the Era of Value-Based Care

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Health care reform efforts have increasingly emphasized payment models that reward value (quality/cost). It seems appropriate, therefore, to examine what we value in health care, and that will require that we examine our definition of health. In spite of admonitions from the World Health Organization and others, our current health care system operates under the assumption that health represents the absence of health problems. While that perspective has led to incredible advances in medical science, it now may be adversely affecting value. Problem-oriented care is clearly one of the drivers of rising costs and it could be adversely affecting the quality of care, depending upon how quality is defined.  If we redefined health in terms of patient-centered goals, health care could be focused more directly on meaningful outcomes, reducing the number of irrelevant tests and treatments. Greater emphasis would be placed on prevention, meaningful activities, advance directives and personal growth and development. The role of patients within clinician-patient relationships would be elevated, strengthening therapeutic relationships. Reframing health in terms of health-related goals and directing the health care system to help people achieve them, could both improve quality and reduce costs. In the process, it could also make health care less mechanical and more humane. PMID:28367382

  11. Development of a hospital-based care coordination program for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Petitgout, Janine M; Pelzer, Daniel E; McConkey, Stacy A; Hanrahan, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    A hospital-based Continuity of Care program for children with special health care needs is described. A family-centered team approach provides care coordination and a medical home. The program has grown during the past 10 years to include inpatients and outpatients from multiple services and outreach clinics. Improved outcomes, including decreased length of stay, decreased cost, and high family satisfaction, are demonstrated by participants in the program. Pediatric nurse practitioners play an important role in the medical home, collaborating with primary care providers, hospital-based specialists, community services, and social workers to provide services to children with special health care needs.

  12. Point-of-Care Technologies for Precision Cardiovascular Care and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    King, Kevin; Grazette, Luanda P.; Paltoo, Dina N.; McDevitt, John T.; Sia, Samuel K.; Barrett, Paddy M.; Apple, Fred S.; Gurbel, Paul A.; Weissleder, Ralph; Leeds, Hilary; Iturriaga, Erin J.; Rao, Anupama; Adhikari, Bishow; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Galis, Zorina S.; Libby, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care technologies (POC or POCT) are enabling innovative cardiovascular diagnostics that promise to improve patient care across diverse clinical settings. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group to discuss POCT in cardiovascular medicine. The multidisciplinary working group, which included clinicians, scientists, engineers, device manufacturers, regulatory officials, and program staff, reviewed the state of the POCT field; discussed opportunities for POCT to improve cardiovascular care, realize the promise of precision medicine, and advance the clinical research enterprise; and identified barriers facing translation and integration of POCT with existing clinical systems. A POCT development roadmap emerged to guide multidisciplinary teams of biomarker scientists, technologists, health care providers, and clinical trialists as they: 1) formulate needs assessments; 2) define device design specifications; 3) develop component technologies and integrated systems; 4) perform iterative pilot testing; and 5) conduct rigorous prospective clinical testing to ensure that POCT solutions have substantial effects on cardiovascular care. PMID:26977455

  13. Teaching primary health care: a comprehensive approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Mehra, S; Devereaux, M O; Rich, J

    1988-01-01

    The MEDEX Primary Health Care Series, an integrated training system for everyone in primary care (PHC), was published in 1983. It is now used in over 70 countries and has demonstrated its value in the developing world. The Series lays considerable emphasis on the crucial link between the performance of health workers and the management support with which they are provided. It was the result of 10 years of development and field testing. The Series is so widely employed because its development involved health centers and health workers associated in PHC programs in Guyana, Lesotho, Micronesia, Pakistan, and Thailand. It also addresses everyday problems and provides pragmatic solutions which PHC programs can apply. Attention is given to the development of skills in health workers, using a competency-based methodology, in contrast to the concentration on knowledge acquition found in more conventional training programs. Training activities are detailed for as little as 15 minutes at a time in courses lasting 6-15 months. Dialogic methods are used for the more peripheral workers who may not be literate. Management is given systematic, practical treatment. The Series advocates disease prevention and health promotion and helps to train health workers to diagnose an treat the most common clinical problems. It can be used to strengthen existing programs or to start new ones. It has a consistent formant, facilitating local adaption. Any part of the Series can be copied or reproduced for noncommercial purposes without persmission from the publisher. The Series is based on the realistic and pragmatic organization of health care delivery systems found in most countries and places great importance on the use of health center presonnel to orientate and link resources at the center to needs at the periphery. Nurses, the health center person at the middle level of the PHC, often fulfills the role of trainer and supervisor of the community health worker. The diagnostic, curative and

  14. Equity in health care utilization in Chile

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    One of the most extensive Chilean health care reforms occurred in July 2005, when the Regime of Explicit Health Guarantees (AUGE) became effective. This reform guarantees coverage for a specific set of health conditions. Thus, the purpose of this study is to provide timely evidence for policy makers to understand the current distribution and equity of health care utilization in Chile. The authors analyzed secondary data from the National Socioeconomic Survey (CASEN) for the years 1992–2009 and the 2006 Satisfaction and Out-of-Pocket Payment Survey to assess equity in health care utilization using two different approaches. First, we used a two-part model to estimate factors associated with the utilization of health care. Second, we decomposed income-related inequalities in medical care use into contributions of need and non-need factors and estimated a horizontal inequity index. Findings of this empirical study include evidence of inequities in the Chilean health care system that are beneficial to the better-off. We also identified some key factors, including education and health care payment, which affect the utilization of health care services. Results of this study could help researchers and policy makers identify targets for improving equity in health care utilization and strengthening availability of health care services accordingly. PMID:23937894

  15. Equity in health care utilization in Chile.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Alicia; Chi, Chunhuei

    2013-08-12

    One of the most extensive Chilean health care reforms occurred in July 2005, when the Regime of Explicit Health Guarantees (AUGE) became effective. This reform guarantees coverage for a specific set of health conditions. Thus, the purpose of this study is to provide timely evidence for policy makers to understand the current distribution and equity of health care utilization in Chile.The authors analyzed secondary data from the National Socioeconomic Survey (CASEN) for the years 1992-2009 and the 2006 Satisfaction and Out-of-Pocket Payment Survey to assess equity in health care utilization using two different approaches. First, we used a two-part model to estimate factors associated with the utilization of health care. Second, we decomposed income-related inequalities in medical care use into contributions of need and non-need factors and estimated a horizontal inequity index.Findings of this empirical study include evidence of inequities in the Chilean health care system that are beneficial to the better-off. We also identified some key factors, including education and health care payment, which affect the utilization of health care services. Results of this study could help researchers and policy makers identify targets for improving equity in health care utilization and strengthening availability of health care services accordingly.

  16. Global Health Education in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Siddharthan, Trishul; North, Crystal M; Attia, Engi F; Christiani, David C; Checkley, William; West, T Eoin

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship programs in the United States offer global health training opportunities. Formal, integrated global health programs within pulmonary and critical care fellowships are relatively new but are built on principles and ideals of global health that focus on the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and social justice. Although core competencies consistent with these overarching themes in global health education have not been formalized for pulmonary and critical care trainees, relevant competency areas include clinical knowledge, international research training, cultural competency, and clinical and research capacity building. Existing global health education in U.S. pulmonary and critical care medicine training programs can generally be classified as one of three different models: integrated global health tracks, global health electives, and additional research years. Successful global health education programs foster partnerships and collaborations with international sites that emphasize bidirectional exchange. This bidirectional exchange includes ongoing, equitable commitments to mutual opportunities for training and professional development, including a focus on the particular knowledge and skill sets critical for addressing the unique priorities of individual countries. However, barriers related to the availability of mentorship, funding, and dedicated time exist to expanding global health education in pulmonary and critical care medicine. The implementation of global health training within pulmonary and critical care medicine programs requires continued optimization, but this training is essential to prepare the next generation of physicians to address the global aspects of respiratory disease and critical illness.

  17. Familism and Health Care Provision to Hispanic Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Savage, Brittany; Foli, Karen J; Edwards, Nancy E; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic older adult population's rapid growth calls for an awareness of values that can affect the rendering and receipt of care. Familism, or familismo, a traditional Hispanic value, places importance of family over the self and can potentially affect health care perceptions and practices for Hispanic older adults. The current article discusses familism, which is upheld by some Hispanic older adults, and the potential for underuse of health care services. The traditional feminine role, marianismo, and masculine role, machismo, are considered, as well as implications for how decision making may be made by family members rather than the patient. Clinical implications for the provision of health care to Hispanic older adults are provided, along with the importance of considering acculturation and ethnic heterogeneity. Health care management strategies that reflect recognition and respect of familism, yet emphasize optimization of adherence and self-care, are described.

  18. Electronic health records to facilitate clinical research.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Martin R; Blomster, Juuso I; Curtis, Lesley H; Duclaux, Sylvie; Ford, Ian; Fritz, Fleur; Goldman, Samantha; Janmohamed, Salim; Kreuzer, Jörg; Leenay, Mark; Michel, Alexander; Ong, Seleen; Pell, Jill P; Southworth, Mary Ross; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Thoenes, Martin; Zannad, Faiez; Zalewski, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide opportunities to enhance patient care, embed performance measures in clinical practice, and facilitate clinical research. Concerns have been raised about the increasing recruitment challenges in trials, burdensome and obtrusive data collection, and uncertain generalizability of the results. Leveraging electronic health records to counterbalance these trends is an area of intense interest. The initial applications of electronic health records, as the primary data source is envisioned for observational studies, embedded pragmatic or post-marketing registry-based randomized studies, or comparative effectiveness studies. Advancing this approach to randomized clinical trials, electronic health records may potentially be used to assess study feasibility, to facilitate patient recruitment, and streamline data collection at baseline and follow-up. Ensuring data security and privacy, overcoming the challenges associated with linking diverse systems and maintaining infrastructure for repeat use of high quality data, are some of the challenges associated with using electronic health records in clinical research. Collaboration between academia, industry, regulatory bodies, policy makers, patients, and electronic health record vendors is critical for the greater use of electronic health records in clinical research. This manuscript identifies the key steps required to advance the role of electronic health records in cardiovascular clinical research.

  19. Building HR capability in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Naresh

    2006-01-01

    The current human resource (HR) management practices in health care are consistent with the industrial model of management. However, health care organizations are not factories. They are highly knowledge-intensive and service-oriented entities and thus require a different set of HR practices and systems to support them. Drawing from the resource-based theory, I argue that HRs are a potent weapon of competitive advantage for health care organizations and propose a five-dimensional conception of HR capability for harnessing HRs in health care organizations. The significant complementarities that exist between HRs and information technologies for delivering safer and better quality of patient care are also discussed.

  20. Financing of Pediatric Home Health Care.

    PubMed

    Simpser, Edwin; Hudak, Mark L

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric home health care is an effective and holistic venue of treatment of children with medical complexity or developmental disabilities who otherwise may experience frequent and/or prolonged hospitalizations or who may enter chronic institutional care. Demand for pediatric home health care is increasing while the provider base is eroding, primarily because of inadequate payment or restrictions on benefits. As a result, home care responsibilities assumed by family caregivers have increased and imposed financial, physical, and psychological burdens on the family. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act set forth 10 mandated essential health benefits. Home care should be considered as an integral component of the habilitative and rehabilitative services and devices benefit, even though it is not explicitly recognized as a specific category of service. Pediatric-specific home health care services should be defined clearly as components of pediatric services, the 10th essential benefit, and recognized by all payers. Payments for home health care services should be sufficient to maintain an adequate provider work force with the pediatric-specific expertise and skills to care for children with medical complexity or developmental disability. Furthermore, coordination of care among various providers and the necessary direct patient care from which these care coordination plans are developed should be required and enabled by adequate payment. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for high-quality care by calling for development of pediatric-specific home health regulations and the licensure and certification of pediatric home health providers.

  1. Primary Mental Health Care in the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lima, Bruno R.

    This paper outlines selected differences between the United States and Latin America health care systems as they relate to primary mental health care. It notes that historically both the United States and Latin America have relied on custodial psychiatric hospitals. The alternative of community care for psychiatric patients is described as it is…

  2. [Health needs and masculinities: primary health care services for men].

    PubMed

    Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Figueiredo, Wagner dos Santos; Gomes, Romeu; Couto, Márcia Thereza; Pinheiro, Thiago Félix; Machin, Rosana; Silva, Geórgia Sibele Nogueira da; Valença, Otávio

    2010-05-01

    This study deals with the relations between masculinities and health care, approaching the recognition of health needs among male users of primary health care and the responses by the services. The study is part of a larger research project in four Brazilian States, with a convenience sample of eight health services. Ethnographic observation was compared with semi-structured interviews with 182 health care users from 15 to 65 years of age and 72 health professionals. Thematic analysis of the ethnographic records and interviews was based on gender references and studies on health work. The findings show how medicalization of health needs affects users, professionals, and services, disguising issues related to masculinity. Primary care focuses mainly on women, thereby reproducing gender inequalities in health services operations and professional performance, with women receiving disciplined care and men receiving insufficient attention and care.

  3. Interfaith Health Care Ministries, Providence, Rhode Island.

    PubMed

    Parker, D

    1999-01-01

    We enjoy considerable freedom in the creation of programs that meet the spiritual needs of people in the community. We minister in diverse settings--a university medical school, hospital, hospice, eldercare center, mental health center, state hospital, and parish/congregation. We are guided by our deep commitment to make sure that individuals and families whose life journey is hard receive quality spiritual care. We are equally committed to preparing caregivers, whether clergy, physicians, nurses, or laypersons so that they are both clinically competent and spiritually informed. Our ambitions are high and our resources are limited.

  4. Does health care associated pneumonia really exist?

    PubMed

    Lopez, Alejandra; Amaro, Rosanel; Polverino, Eva

    2012-07-01

    The most recent ATS guidelines for nosocomial pneumonia of 2005 describe a new clinical category of patients, Health Care-Associated Pneumonia which includes a number of very heterogeneous conditions possibly associated with a high risk of multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections and of mortality. This paper aims at reviewing the current literature on HCAP and examines the controversial issues of HCAP etiology and outcomes, underlining the need of a profound revision of the HCAP concept in the face of the poor and contrasting scientific evidence supporting its basis.

  5. Reducing health care's carbon footprint--the power of nursing.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Aliria

    2012-11-01

    Global warming and environmentalism continue to be national and international issues as their complexities and implications become better understood. One ironic contributor to the degradation of the environment is the health care system. Serving as clinical laboratories, hotels, restaurants, and offices that never close, U.S. hospitals produce more than 2 million tons of waste annually. Although the consequences and significance of health care's carbon footprint are undeniable, strategies to reduce this impact are challenging. This article discusses how the role, traits, and knowledge of nurses combined with their positions in the health care system make them key players in creating an environmentally sustainable health care industry. With an analysis of environmental action versus inaction, this article explores how nurses at the forefront of health care are equipped to change practice that will reach far beyond the bedside.

  6. Primary Health Care and Narrative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, John W

    2015-01-01

    Primary health care has received a lot of attention since the Alma Ata Conference, convened by the World Health Organization in 1978. Key to the strategy to improve health care outlined at the Alma Ata conference is citizen participation in every phase of service delivery. Although the goals of primary health care have not been achieved, the addition of narrative medicine may facilitate these ends. But a new epistemology is necessary, one that is compatible with narrative medicine, so that local knowledge is elevated in importance and incorporated into the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health programs. In this way, relevant, sustainable, and affordable care can be provided. The aim of this article is to discuss how primary health care might be improved through the introduction of narrative medicine into planning primary health care delivery. PMID:26222094

  7. Dual Loyalty in Prison Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Heino; Wolff, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Despite the dissemination of principles of medical ethics in prisons, formulated and advocated by numerous international organizations, health care professionals in prisons all over the world continue to infringe these principles because of perceived or real dual loyalty to patients and prison authorities. Health care professionals and nonmedical prison staff need greater awareness of and training in medical ethics and prisoner human rights. All parties should accept integration of prison health services with public health services. Health care workers in prison should act exclusively as caregivers, and medical tasks required by the prosecution, court, or security system should be carried out by medical professionals not involved in the care of prisoners. PMID:22390510

  8. Dual loyalty in prison health care.

    PubMed

    Pont, Jörg; Stöver, Heino; Wolff, Hans

    2012-03-01

    Despite the dissemination of principles of medical ethics in prisons, formulated and advocated by numerous international organizations, health care professionals in prisons all over the world continue to infringe these principles because of perceived or real dual loyalty to patients and prison authorities. Health care professionals and nonmedical prison staff need greater awareness of and training in medical ethics and prisoner human rights. All parties should accept integration of prison health services with public health services. Health care workers in prison should act exclusively as caregivers, and medical tasks required by the prosecution, court, or security system should be carried out by medical professionals not involved in the care of prisoners.

  9. Well child clinics and mass vaccination campaigns: an evaluation of strategies for improving the coverage of primary health care in a developing country.

    PubMed Central

    Loevinsohn, B P; Loevinsohn, M E

    1987-01-01

    Millions of children in developing countries are dying from diseases that could be prevented or treated by simple interventions. To examine ways to improve the delivery of these basic services, we evaluated well child clinics and mass vaccination campaigns under operational conditions in a rural area of Nicaragua. We found that mass vaccination campaigns using volunteers reached 77.1 per cent of the population under age six. At stationary well child clinics in which villages were invited to a health center and a small food ration was used as an incentive, attendance improved to 94.1 per cent. Similar attendance levels (99.2 per cent) were attained by mobile well child clinics also using a food incentive. Attendance at stationary clinics decreased with the distance of the village from the health center. However, stationary clinics took up only half as much health workers' time as mobile clinics. Our results suggest that stationary clinics employing food as an incentive could be used for villages or neighborhoods close to a health center while mobile clinics offering food should be reserved for more isolated villages. PMID:3661793

  10. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  11. "Race" and Community Care. "Race," Health and Social Care Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Waqar I. U., Ed.; Atkin, Karl, Ed.

    This collection offers a wide-ranging introduction to contemporary issues surrounding the health care needs of members of minority ethnic communities within the framework of community care in Britain. The following chapters consider state welfare, minority communities, family structures, and social change: (1) "'Race' and Community Care: An…

  12. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care.

  13. Forecasting the health care future. Futurescan 2001 and its implications for health care marketing.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    In his new book, futurist Russell C. Coile Jr. presents predictions about seven aspects of health care for the next five years. Aided by a panel of health care experts, he analyzes likely developments in health care consumerism, technology, managed care, and other areas that raise a number of issues for health care marketers. Even if only a few of these predictions come true, marketers will be forced to rethink some of their techniques to adapt to this rapidly changing environment.

  14. Evolution of US Health Care Reform.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Helm Ii, Standiford; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-03-01

    Major health policy creation or changes, including governmental and private policies affecting health care delivery are based on health care reform(s). Health care reform has been a global issue over the years and the United States has seen proposals for multiple reforms over the years. A successful, health care proposal in the United States with involvement of the federal government was the short-lived establishment of the first system of national medical care in the South. In the 20th century, the United States was influenced by progressivism leading to the initiation of efforts to achieve universal coverage, supported by a Republican presidential candidate, Theodore Roosevelt. In 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt, a Democrat, included a publicly funded health care program while drafting provisions to Social Security legislation, which was eliminated from the final legislation. Subsequently, multiple proposals were introduced, starting in 1949 with President Harry S Truman who proposed universal health care; the proposal by Lyndon B. Johnson with Social Security Act in 1965 which created Medicare and Medicaid; proposals by Ted Kennedy and President Richard Nixon that promoted variations of universal health care. presidential candidate Jimmy Carter also proposed universal health care. This was followed by an effort by President Bill Clinton and headed by first lady Hillary Clinton in 1993, but was not enacted into law. Finally, the election of President Barack Obama and control of both houses of Congress by the Democrats led to the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), often referred to as "ObamaCare" was signed into law in March 2010. Since then, the ACA, or Obamacare, has become a centerpiece of political campaigning. The Republicans now control the presidency and both houses of Congress and are attempting to repeal and replace the ACA. Key words: Health care reform, Affordable Care Act (ACA), Obamacare, Medicare, Medicaid, American Health Care Act.

  15. Health care of youth aging out of foster care.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care face significant medical and mental health care needs. Unfortunately, these youth rarely receive the services they need because of lack of health insurance. Through many policies and programs, the federal government has taken steps to support older youth in foster care and those aging out. The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 (Pub L No. 110-354) requires states to work with youth to develop a transition plan that addresses issues such as health insurance. In addition, beginning in 2014, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Pub L No. 111-148) makes youth aging out of foster care eligible for Medicaid coverage until age 26 years, regardless of income. Pediatricians can support youth aging out of foster care by working collaboratively with the child welfare agency in their state to ensure that the ongoing health needs of transitioning youth are met.

  16. Incorporating Patient-Reported Outcomes Into Health Care To Engage Patients And Enhance Care.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Danielle C; Chenok, Kate E; Love, Rebecca M; Petersen, Carolyn; Holve, Erin; Segal, Courtney D; Franklin, Patricia D

    2016-04-01

    The provision of patient-centered care requires a health care environment that fosters engagement between patients and their health care team. One way to encourage patient-centered care is to incorporate patient-reported outcomes into clinical settings. Collecting these outcomes in routine care ensures that important information only the patient can provide is captured. This provides insights into patients' experiences of symptoms, quality of life, and functioning; values and preferences; and goals for health care. Previously embraced in the research realm, patient-reported outcomes have started to play a role in successful shared decision making, which can enhance the safe and effective delivery of health care. We examine the opportunities for using patient-reported outcomes to enhance care delivery and outcomes as health care information needs and technology platforms change. We highlight emerging practices in which patient-reported outcomes provide value to patients and clinicians and improve care delivery. Finally, we examine present and future challenges to maximizing the use of patient-reported outcomes in the clinic.

  17. The new architects of health care reform.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Leonard D

    2007-01-01

    Rising health care costs have been an issue for decades, yet federal-level health care reform hasn't happened. Support for reform, however, has changed. Purchasers fear that health care cost growth is becoming unaffordable. Research on costs and quality is questioning value. International comparisons rank the United States low on important health system performance measures. Yet it is not these factors but the unsustainable costs of Medicare and Medicaid that will narrow the window for health care stakeholders to shape policy. Unless the health care system is effectively reformed, sometime after the 2008 election, budget hawks and national security experts will eventually combine forces to cut health spending, ultimately determining health policy for the nation.

  18. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  19. Special Issue: The Family and Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, William J., Ed.; McCubbin, Hamilton I., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses research and interventions related to family health care. Topics include health promotion; risk behaviors; vulnerability and illness onset; choosing health care systems; stress; caregiving and coping; family counseling; and family responses to Alzheimer's Disease, pediatric cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, and obesity. (JAC)

  20. Mental Health in Long Term Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Herbert

    1978-01-01

    There are many ways in which long-term care facilities attempt to cope with the mental health problems of the elderly. The author reviews five factors crucial to effective care for the aged in these facilities. (Author/RK)

  1. Health care law versus constitutional law.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, the Supreme Court's ruling on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, is a landmark decision - both for constitutional law and for health care law and policy. Others will study its implications for constitutional limits on a range of federal powers beyond health care. This article considers to what extent the decision is also about health care law, properly conceived. Under one view, health care law is the subdiscipline that inquires how courts and government actors take account of the special features of medicine that make legal or policy issues especially problematic - rather than regarding health care delivery and finance more generically, like most any other economic or social enterprise. Viewed this way, the opinions from the Court's conservative justices are mainly about general constitutional law principles. In contrast, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's dissenting opinion for the four more liberal justices is just as much about health care law as it is about constitutional law. Her opinion gives detailed attention to the unique features of health care finance and delivery in order to inform her analysis of constitutional precedents and principles. Thus, the Court's multiple opinions give a vivid depiction of the compelling contrasts between communal versus individualistic conceptions of caring for those in need, and between health care and health insurance as ordinary commodities versus ones that merit special economic, social, and legal status.

  2. School Based Health Clinics: A Guide to Implementing Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Elaine M.; And Others

    Extensive guidelines for the development of a comprehensive school-based health clinic at the middle, junior, or senior high school levels are presented. School-based clinics usually provide the primary health care services needed by adolescents: health maintenance examinations and assessments; diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic…

  3. Primary and managed care. Ingredients for health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Bindman, A B

    1994-01-01

    The use of primary and managed care is likely to increase under proposed federal health care reform. I review the definition of primary care and primary care physicians and show that this delivery model can affect access to medical care, the cost of treatment, and the quality of services. Because the use of primary care is often greater in managed care than in fee-for-service, I compare the two insurance systems to further understand the delivery of primary care. Research suggests that primary care can help meet the goal of providing accessible, cost-effective, and high-quality care, but that changes in medical education and marketplace incentives will be needed to encourage students and trained physicians to enter this field. PMID:7941522

  4. Health care infrastructure post-Katrina: disaster planning to return health care workers to their home communities.

    PubMed

    Griffies, W Scott

    2010-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges of restoring the New Orleans health care infrastructure since the post-Katrina disaster has been shortages of health care providers. Many providers had prolonged displacements or did not return to their practices, depleting the city of valuable resources. This Open Forum chronicles the displacement of Louisiana State University's Department of Psychiatry and discusses barriers to returning health care providers to their communities expeditiously. Predisaster planning and policy changes are proposed to facilitate a quicker return and decrease the attrition of health care providers after future disasters. A community's predisaster plans should include a mechanism to allow funds to follow patients instead of hospitals, to provide bridge funding that pays local health care providers to work as first responders and serve uninsured patients while these providers rebuild their practices, and to provide funds to quickly expand services and usable space in undamaged clinics and hospitals and to shore up reparable structures.

  5. Primary Health Care: care coordinator in regionalized networks?

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Patty Fidelis; dos Santos, Adriano Maia

    2016-01-01

    RESUMO OBJECTIVE To analyze the breadth of care coordination by Primary Health Care in three health regions. METHODS This is a quantitative and qualitative case study. Thirty-one semi-structured interviews with municipal, regional and state managers were carried out, besides a cross-sectional survey with the administration of questionnaires to physicians (74), nurses (127), and a representative sample of users (1,590) of Estratégia Saúde da Família (Family Health Strategy) in three municipal centers of health regions in the state of Bahia. RESULTS Primary Health Care as first contact of preference faced strong competition from hospital outpatient and emergency services outside the network. Issues related to access to and provision of specialized care were aggravated by dependence on the private sector in the regions, despite progress observed in institutionalizing flows starting out from Primary Health Care. The counter-referral system was deficient and interprofessional communication was scarce, especially concerning services provided by the contracted network. CONCLUSIONS Coordination capacity is affected both by the fragmentation of the regional network and intrinsic problems in Primary Health Care, which poorly supported in its essential attributes. Although the health regions have common problems, Primary Health Care remains a subject confined to municipal boundaries. PMID:28099663

  6. Health care reform: informing difficult choices.

    PubMed

    Maynard, A; Bloor, K

    1995-01-01

    During the last decade, policy makers in a large number of countries have attempted various reforms of their health care systems. Health care reform has been described as a 'global epidemic' (Klein, 1993). All health care reforms consist of very complex policy choices, some of which are examined in this article. After an introductory exploration of ideological issues, the objectives of health care reformers are considered. Three major policy objectives of health care reform are examined: cost containment; efficiency; and, equity. Three types of reform which have been advocated are also considered: public planning; market regulation; and provider-advocated reforms such as a 'basic package' with copayments and alternative means of finance. Finally, appropriate features of efficient health care reform are suggested, addressing explicit policy goals.

  7. Using Electronic Health Records to Help Coordinate Care

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Lynda C; Anderson, Gerard F; Kues, Irvin W

    2004-01-01

    The use of electronic health records that can securely transmit patient data among physicians will help coordinate the care of 60 million Americans with multiple chronic conditions. This article summarizes the different organizations in the United States that are developing this technology. It discusses some of the problems encountered and the current initiatives to resolve them. The article concludes with three recommendations for enhancing care coordination: (1) a common health record, such as the Continuity of Care Record, to facilitate the exchange of clinical information among health providers; (2) regional governance structures to encourage the exchange of clinical data; and (3) payment by purchasers of care, both public and private, to physicians for using electronic health records. PMID:15330973

  8. Evaluation of a Medical and Mental Health Unit compared with standard care for older people whose emergency admission to an acute general hospital is complicated by concurrent 'confusion': a controlled clinical trial. Acronym: TEAM: Trial of an Elderly Acute care Medical and mental health unit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with delirium and dementia admitted to general hospitals have poor outcomes, and their carers report poor experiences. We developed an acute geriatric medical ward into a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit over an eighteen month period. Additional specialist mental health staff were employed, other staff were trained in the 'person-centred' dementia care approach, a programme of meaningful activity was devised, the environment adapted to the needs of people with cognitive impairment, and attention given to communication with family carers. We hypothesise that patients managed on this ward will have better outcomes than those receiving standard care, and that such care will be cost-effective. Methods/design We will perform a controlled clinical trial comparing in-patient management on a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit with standard care. Study participants are patients over the age of 65, admitted as an emergency to a single general hospital, and identified on the Acute Medical Admissions Unit as being 'confused'. Sample size is 300 per group. The evaluation design has been adapted to accommodate pressures on bed management and patient flows. If beds are available on the specialist Unit, the clinical service allocates patients at random between the Unit and standard care on general or geriatric medical wards. Once admitted, randomised patients and their carers are invited to take part in a follow up study, and baseline data are collected. Quality of care and patient experience are assessed in a non-participant observer study. Outcomes are ascertained at a follow up home visit 90 days after randomisation, by a researcher blind to allocation. The primary outcome is days spent at home (for those admitted from home), or days spent in the same care home (if admitted from a care home). Secondary outcomes include mortality, institutionalisation, resource use, and scaled outcome measures, including quality of life, cognitive function

  9. Caring Practices of Clinical CRNA Instructors in Clinical Student Instruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-09

    Halldorsdottir (1990) investigated students’ perspective of a caring student- teacher encounter. Students described a caring teacher as being professionally...Nursing. Gaut, D. (1986). Evaluating caring nursing competencies in nursing practice. Topics in Clinical Nursing. 8(2), 77-83. Halldorsdottir , S. (1990

  10. Health care experiences among women diagnosed with gestational breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hammarberg, K; Sullivan, E; Javid, N; Duncombe, G; Halliday, L; Boyle, F; Saunders, C; Ives, A; Dickinson, J E; Fisher, J

    2017-03-24

    Gestational breast cancer (GBC) presents many challenges for women and the clinicians who care for them. The aim of this study was to explore the health care experiences of women diagnosed with GBC to inform and improve clinical care of women in this predicament. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 women who had been diagnosed with GBC in the previous 5 years. The overarching themes for perceived quality of care were "communication" and "comprehensive care." "Communication" had two sub themes: "interdisciplinary communication" (the way health professionals from different disciplines communicated with each other about the management of the woman's care) and "patient communication" (how they communicated this to the woman). The "comprehensive care" theme incorporated three sub themes: "the spirit" (psychological care); "the mind" (information provision); and "the body" (management of treatment side effects). Women's own accounts of positive and negative experiences of GBC care provide unique and specific insights which improve understanding of their concerns and needs. The findings can inform advances in quality and efficacy of clinical care; offer guidance for obstetricians, oncologists and allied health professionals about the needs of women diagnosed with GBC and how care can be optimised; and inform the development of resources to assist women and their families.

  11. Spirulina in health care management.

    PubMed

    Kulshreshtha, Archana; Zacharia, Anish J; Jarouliya, Urmila; Bhadauriya, Pratiksha; Prasad, G B K S; Bisen, P S

    2008-10-01

    Spirulina is a photosynthetic, filamentous, spiral-shaped and multicellular edible microbe. It is the nature's richest and most complete source of nutrition. Spirulina has a unique blend of nutrients that no single source can offer. The alga contains a wide spectrum of prophylactic and therapeutic nutrients that include B-complex vitamins, minerals, proteins, gamma-linolenic acid and the super anti-oxidants such as beta-carotene, vitamin E, trace elements and a number of unexplored bioactive compounds. Because of its apparent ability to stimulate whole human physiology, Spirulina exhibits therapeutic functions such as antioxidant, anti-bacterial, antiviral, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-diabetic and plethora of beneficial functions. Spirulina consumption appears to promote the growth of intestinal micro flora as well. The review discusses the potential of Spirulina in health care management.

  12. Transforming health care: an approach to system-wide implementation

    PubMed Central

    Bengoa, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    There are enormous financial, demographic, epidemiological and clinical safety pressures on health care systems around the world. These pressures are well known and are increasing every day. This perspective paper describes one possible way forward to meeting these pressures undertaken through the system-wide transformation of the health care system in the Basque Country to a population of over 2.3 million people. The overall goal has been to turn the health care system to become more proactive than reactive and more collaborative than fragmented. This ambitious plan started in 2009. PMID:24179458

  13. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    PubMed

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health.

  14. The Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program: A Public Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Sarah C.; Judge, Christine M.; Taube, Robert L.; Blanchfield, Bonnie B.; Swain, Stacy E.; Koh, Howard K.

    2010-01-01

    During the past 25 years, the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program has evolved into a service model embodying the core functions and essential services of public health. Each year the program provides integrated medical, behavioral, and oral health care, as well as preventive services, to more than 11 000 homeless people. Services are delivered in clinics located in 2 teaching hospitals, 80 shelters and soup kitchens, and an innovative 104-bed medical respite unit. We explain the program's principles of care, describe the public health framework that undergirds the program, and offer lessons for the elimination of health disparities suffered by this vulnerable population. PMID:20558804

  15. Mercy health promoter: A paradigm for just health care

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter A.; Schadt, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The foreign-born population in the United States, according to the “Current Populations Report” published in 2010, is estimated to exceed 39.9 million, or “12.9 percent of the U.S. population.” The increase in foreign-born peoples and their need for health care is a complicated issue facing many cities, health systems and hospitals. Over the course of the past few years Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia has treated increasing numbers of foreign-born African patients. The majority have been presenting in the late stages of disease. The increase of foreign-born documented and undocumented African patients seen by Mercy Hospitals seems to reflect a foreign-born population “boom” in Philadelphia over the past decade. To meet the needs of this growing population, the Mercy Hospital Task Force on African Immigration and the Institute of Catholic Bioethics at Saint Joseph’s University designed a program that centers on the third world concept of “Health Promoters.” This program is intended to serve as one possible solution for hospitals to cost-effectively manage the care of this growing percentage of foreign-born individuals in the population. This notion of a “Health Promoter” program in Philadelphia is unique as one of those rare occasions when a third world concept is being utilized in a first world environment. It is also unique in that it can serve as a paradigm for other hospitals in the United States to meet the growing need of health care for the undocumented population. As of November 2012 the Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia clinic became operative for patients who were referred from the Health Promoter clinics. To date, a total of forty-two patients have actively participated in the screenings, sixteen of which have been referred to Mercy Hospital of Philadelphia clinic for further evaluation. More than 75% of patient referrals were a result of high blood pressure. According to the American Medical Association, readings of 140–159 mmHg and

  16. Value-based partnering in health care.

    PubMed

    Young, D W; Pinakiewicz, D C; McCarthy, S M; Barrett, D; Kenagy, J

    2001-01-01

    Many companies are beginning to focus on value in their health care purchasing decisions, and some are going beyond value-based purchasing to value-based partnering. Value-based partnering recognizes the interdependencies among stakeholder groups in the health care system and creates a strategic reason for them to exchange information and create long-term strategic alliances. This article discusses the principles of value-based partnering, impediments to practicing it and its future role in the health care system.

  17. Boomers give health care failing grade.

    PubMed

    1998-05-01

    In 13 more years, the first of the baby boom generation will turn 65, becoming the heaviest users of the health care system. Do you know what the boomer patients will want? And are you ready to satisfy them? In this first part of a series on boomers and health care, we'll find out why boomers aren't happy about the current health care system.

  18. Nosocomial (Health Care-Associated) Legionnaire's Disease.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shanu; Abell, Virginia; File, Thomas M

    2017-03-01

    Nosocomial Legionnaire's disease is most frequently associated with presence of the organism in hospital water systems. Patients are often susceptible as a result of age, underlying comorbidities, or immunosuppression. Prevention focuses on reducing the reservoir within water systems and includes super heating, ultraviolent light, chlorination, silver-copper ionization, and distal filtration. This article reviews the epidemiology of health care-associated Legionnaire's disease, reviews characteristics of several health care-associated outbreaks, and discusses strategies to prevent health care-associated infection.

  19. Excellence within the Navy Health Care System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    RD-RI54 682 EXCELLENCE WiTHIN THE NAVY HEALTH CARE SYSTEM (U) NAVAL I. POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA J A NORTON DEC 84 UNCLRSSIFIED F/G 6/12...STANDAROS-1963-A -J% * .NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California DTIC THESIS EXCELLENCE WITHIN THE NAVY HEALTH CARE SYSTEM by JAMES ALFRED NORTON...Within the Navy Health Care December 1984 System S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) I. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(@) James Alfred Norton S

  20. [Consumer health-care information technology].

    PubMed

    Sunyaev, A

    2013-06-01

    Consumer health-care information technology is intended to improve patients' opportunities to gather information about their own health. Ideally, this will be achieved through an improved involvement of existing data bases and an improved communication of information to patients and to care providers, if desired by patients. Additionally, further interconnection of existing and new systems and pervasive system design may be used. All consumer health-care information technology services are optional and leave patients in control of their medical data at all times. This article reflects the current status of consumer health-care information technology research and suggests further research areas that should be addressed.