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Sample records for health care system

  1. [Polish health care system].

    PubMed

    Piontkovski, V; Novakovska, L; Pasternak, V

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the discussion is to evaluate certain aspects of the Polish health care system - its ability to respond to contemporary dynamic social, economic and epidemiological changes (including the spread of chronic diseases, aging population or family crisis - its possibilities for providing care of the sick). The analysis of such a problem was based on a critically-oriented perspective that is developed in the field of the sociology of health and illness. The text pays particular attention to the problem of deepening social inequalities, which can be considered as one of the major factors that hinder access to health care and influence poorer health condition: In this context the mechanism of "saving health" and borrowing in order to satisfy the health needs in the face of financial difficulties was mentioned. Moreover, the text includes the attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of health promo- tion programs in our country as potentially the most effective way of raising the level of public health. There is also the issue of public confidence in health care institutions and the approval of attempts towards reforming the medical system in our country. A separate part of the discussion was devoted to criticism of the idea of reducing the role of the state in the health care sector.

  2. Personal Care in Learning Health Care Systems.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G; Kim, Scott Y H

    2015-12-01

    The idea of a "learning health care system"--one that systematically integrates clinical research with medical care--has received considerable attention recently. Some commentators argue that under certain conditions pragmatic comparative effectiveness randomized trials can be conducted ethically within the context of a learning health care system without the informed consent of patients for research participation. In this article, we challenge this perspective and contend that conducting randomized trials of individual treatment options without consent is neither necessary nor desirable to promote and sustain learning health care systems. Our argument draws on the normative conception of personal care developed by Charles Fried in a landmark 1974 book on the ethics of randomized controlled trials.

  3. [Corruption and health care system].

    PubMed

    Marasović Šušnjara, Ivana

    2014-06-01

    Corruption is a global problem that takes special place in health care system. A large number of participants in the health care system and numerous interactions among them provide an opportunity for various forms of corruption, be it bribery, theft, bureaucratic corruption or incorrect information. Even though it is difficult to measure the amount of corruption in medicine, there are tools that allow forming of the frames for possible interventions.

  4. The German health care system and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Kamke, K

    1998-02-01

    This article presents a structured survey of the German health care and health insurance system, and analyzes major developments of current German health policy. The German statutory health insurance system has been known as a system that provides all citizens with ready access to comprehensive high quality medical care at a cost the country considered socially acceptable. However, an increasing concern for rapidly rising health care expenditure led to a number of cost-containment measures since 1977. The aim was to bring the growth of health care expenditure in line with the growth of wages and salaries of the sickness fund members. The recent health care reforms of 1989 and 1993 yielded only short-term reductions of health care expenditure, with increases in the subsequent years. 'Stability of the contribution rate' is the uppermost political objective of current health care reform initiatives. Options under discussion include reductions in the benefit package and increases of patients' co-payments. The article concludes with the possible consequences of the 1997 health care reform of which the major part became effective 1 July 1997.

  5. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    PubMed

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  6. Multipurpose Health Care Telemedicine System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    place to the base unit (consultation site). The transmission is performed through GSM, Satellite links or POTS . Using this device a specialist...standardized medical protocol. Keywords – Emergency Health Care Telemedicine, GSM, Satellite, POTS I. INTRODUCTION The availability of prompt and expert...of communication means (Satellite, GSM and Plain Old Telephony System - POTS ). The base unit is comprised of a set of user-friendly software

  7. [A Maternal Health Care System Based on Mobile Health Care].

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Zeng, Weijie; Li, Chengwei; Xue, Junwei; Wu, Xiuyong; Liu, Yinjia; Wan, Yuxin; Zhang, Yiru; Ji, Yurong; Wu, Lei; Yang, Yongzhe; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Yueshan; Wu, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Wearable devices are used in the new design of the maternal health care system to detect electrocardiogram and oxygen saturation signal while smart terminals are used to achieve assessments and input maternal clinical information. All the results combined with biochemical analysis from hospital are uploaded to cloud server by mobile Internet. Machine learning algorithms are used for data mining of all information of subjects. This system can achieve the assessment and care of maternal physical health as well as mental health. Moreover, the system can send the results and health guidance to smart terminals.

  8. [Health care systems and aspects of health care economics. Sector ophthalmology - part 1: development of the German health care system].

    PubMed

    Kern, T; Kohnen, T

    2010-11-01

    Although many health care reforms have been enacted in the last few years in Germany, many of the key points in the current social health care system have been retained from former times. All those introductions for an effective health care system from the last 150 years beginning with mandatory guild membership via Bismarck's social laws to the modern health care systems in Germany with the current problems of financing the heavy burden in the German budget are reported. Data and facts on the current health care system are provided. In the following two articles of this series ambulatory and inpatient treatment in the light of economic aspects of health care are reported.

  9. Excellence within the Navy Health Care System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    RD-RI54 682 EXCELLENCE WiTHIN THE NAVY HEALTH CARE SYSTEM (U) NAVAL I. POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA J A NORTON DEC 84 UNCLRSSIFIED F/G 6/12...STANDAROS-1963-A -J% * .NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California DTIC THESIS EXCELLENCE WITHIN THE NAVY HEALTH CARE SYSTEM by JAMES ALFRED NORTON...Within the Navy Health Care December 1984 System S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) I. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(@) James Alfred Norton S

  10. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuelian; Gregersen, Hans; Yuan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide potentially huge research opportunities in the future. However, constructing a complete register system at a nationwide level is challenging. In the future, China will demand increased capacity of researchers and data managers, in particular within clinical epidemiology, to explore the rich resources.

  11. Chinese health care system and clinical epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuelian; Gregersen, Hans; Yuan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    China has gone through a comprehensive health care insurance reform since 2003 and achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. The new health care insurance system provides China with a huge opportunity for the development of health care and medical research when its rich medical resources are fully unfolded. In this study, we review the Chinese health care system and its implication for medical research, especially within clinical epidemiology. First, we briefly review the population register system, the distribution of the urban and rural population in China, and the development of the Chinese health care system after 1949. In the following sections, we describe the current Chinese health care delivery system and the current health insurance system. We then focus on the construction of the Chinese health information system as well as several existing registers and research projects on health data. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of the health care system in regard to clinical epidemiology research. China now has three main insurance schemes. The Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) covers urban employees and retired employees. The Urban Residence Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) covers urban residents, including children, students, elderly people without previous employment, and unemployed people. The New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NRCMS) covers rural residents. The Chinese Government has made efforts to build up health information data, including electronic medical records. The establishment of universal health care insurance with linkage to medical records will provide potentially huge research opportunities in the future. However, constructing a complete register system at a nationwide level is challenging. In the future, China will demand increased capacity of researchers and data managers, in particular within clinical epidemiology, to explore the rich resources. PMID:28356772

  12. Health care services, information systems & sustainability.

    PubMed

    Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * many competing characteristics within national health systems * national primary information and knowledge flows between health care entities * the role of information technologies in assisting health organizations become sustainable enterprises * the business of maintaining healthy populations for any nation * desirable e-health strategy objectives.

  13. Research Challenges in Future Health Care Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatunga, Harini

    Future health care systems will involve a network of heterogeneous resources providing different levels of service and will comprise of a physical and a virtual decision and control layer. The initial results presented here will lead to health care delivery with on-line decision making in order to meet QoS requirements and management targets.

  14. Financial management in leading health care systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    To understand better the financial management practices and strategies of modern health care organizations, we conducted interviews with chief financial officers (CFOs) of several leading health care systems. In this introduction, we present an overview of the project and summary responses on corporate financial structures and strategic challenges facing CFOs.

  15. [Transforming health systems based on primary care].

    PubMed

    Durán-Arenas, Luis; Salinas-Escudero, Guillermo; Granados-García, Víctor; Martínez-Valverde, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Access to health services is a social basic determinant of health in Mexico unlike what happens in developed countries. The demand for health services is focused on primary care, but the design meets only the supply of hospital care services. So it generates a dissonance between the needs and the effective design of health services. In addition, the term affiliation refers to population contributing or in the recruitment process, that has been counted as members of these social security institutions (SS) and Popular Insurance (SP). In the case of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) three of four contributors are in contact with health services; while in the SP, this indicator does not exist. Moreover, the access gap between health services is found in the health care packages so that members of the SS and SP do not have same type of coverage. The question is: which model of health care system want the Mexicans? Primary care represents the first choice for increasing the health systems performance, as well as to fulfill their function of social protection: universal access and coverage based on needs, regardless whether it is a public or private health insurance. A central aspect for development of this component is the definition of the first contact with the health system through the creation of a primary health care team, led by a general practitioner as the responsible of a multidisciplinary health team. The process addresses the concepts of primary care nursing, consumption of inputs (mainly medical drugs), maintenance and general services. Adopting a comprehensive strategy that will benefit all Mexicans equally and without discrimination, this primary care system could be financed with a total operating cost of approximately $ 22,809 million by year.

  16. [Informatics in the Croatian health care system].

    PubMed

    Kern, Josipa; Strnad, Marija

    2005-01-01

    Informatization process of the Croatian health care system started relatively early. Computer processing of data of persons not covered by health insurance started in 1968 in Zagreb. Remetinec Health Center served as a model of computer data processing (CDP) in primary health care and Sveti Duh General Hospital in inpatient CDP, whereas hospital administration and health service were first introduced to Zagreb University Hospital Center and Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital. At Varazdin Medical Center CDP for health care services started in 1970. Several registries of chronic diseases have been established: cancer, psychosis, alcoholism, and hospital registries as well as pilot registries of lung tuberculosis patients and diabetics. Health statistics reports on healthcare services, work accidents and sick-leaves as well as on hospital mortality started to be produced by CDP in 1977. Besides alphanumeric data, the modern information technology (IT) can give digital images and signals. Communication in health care system demands a standardized format of all information, especially for telemedicine. In 2000, Technical Committee for Standardization in Medical Informatics was founded in Croatia, in order to monitor the activities of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and Comite Européen de Normalisation (CEN), and to implement their international standards in the Croatian standardization procedure. The HL7 Croatia has also been founded to monitor developments in the communication standard HL7. So far, the Republic of Croatia has a number of acts regulating informatization in general and consequently the informatization of the health care system (Act on Personal Data Confidentiality, Act on Digital Signature, Act of Standardization) enacted. The ethical aspect of data security and data protection has been covered by the Code of Ethics for medical informaticians. It has been established by the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA

  17. Justice and health care systems: what would an ideal health care system look like?

    PubMed

    Loewy, E H

    1998-09-01

    An 'ideal' health care system would be unencumbered by economic considerations and provide an ample supply of well-paid health care professionals who would supply culturally appropriate optimal health care to the level desired by patients. An 'ideal' health care system presupposes an 'ideal' society in which resources for all social goods are unlimited. Changes within health care systems occur both because of changes within the system and because of changes or demands in and by the 'exterior environment'. Social systems must be in a homeostatic balance. If one component fails to accommodate itself to other forces, needs and interests within the system, the system is imperiled. It is difficult to create a just health care system in an unjust society, just as it is difficult to practise truly ethical medicine in an ethically corrupt system.

  18. Developing a Health Care System for Children in Foster Care.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Mary V; Beal, Sarah J

    2017-09-01

    In 2012, the Comprehensive Health Evaluations for Cincinnati's Kids (CHECK) Center was launched at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center to provide health care for over 1,000 children placed into foster care each year in the Cincinnati community. This consultation model clinical program was developed because children in foster care have been difficult to manage in the traditional health care setting due to unmet health needs, missing medical records, cumbersome state mandates, and transient and impoverished social settings. This case study describes the history and creation of the CHECK Center, demonstrating the development of a successful foster care health delivery system that is inclusive of all community partners, tailored for the needs and resources of the community, and able to adapt and respond to new information and changing systems.

  19. Integrated health care systems: the key characteristics.

    PubMed

    Coddington, D C; Moore, K D; Fischer, E A

    1993-01-01

    Cooperation among the traditionally adversarial factions of physicians and hospitals has arisen in the early 1990s to develop the integrated health care system. Authors Dean C. Coddington, Keith D. Moore and Elizabeth A. Fischer explain how these two groups have been joined in the integration by an unlikely participant: health plans.

  20. The Russian Child Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Alexander; Namazova-Baranova, Leyla; Albitskiy, Valeriy; Ustinova, Natalia; Terletskaya, Rimma; Komarova, Olga

    2016-10-01

    We present a historical and analytical overview of the Russian child health care system describing strengths and challenges of the system. Main indicators of social environment and children's health, general demographics, and socioeconomic factors of Russia are described. The Russian health care system has preserved positive elements of the former Soviet model of pediatric care. However, beginning in 1991, it has been altered greatly in its funding and management. The child health care system is composed of a special network of outpatient and inpatient facilities. The key element of pediatric community care is the pediatric polyclinic, staffed by district pediatricians and nurses. Undergraduate pediatric training is separate from adult medical training. From day one onward, future pediatricians are trained at separate pediatric faculties of universities. Thus, they qualify as general pediatricians after only 2 years of postgraduate training. It should be emphasized that the gap between the health status of children in developed countries and the Russian Federation is largely due to the influence of socioeconomic determinants, such as traffic accidents, poverty, pollution, and hazardous life styles, including binge drinking. Further improvements of children's health require protective measures by the state to address the underlying socioeconomic determinants.

  1. Prevention in Poland: health care system reform.

    PubMed Central

    Sheahan, M D

    1995-01-01

    Despite the political and economic reforms that have swept Eastern Europe in the past 5 years, there has been little change in Poland's health care system. The Ministry of Health and Social Welfare has targeted preventive care as a priority, yet the enactment of legislation to meet this goal has been slow. The process of reform has been hindered by political stagnation, economic crisis, and a lack of delineation of responsibility for implementing the reforms. Despite the delays in reform, recent developments indicate that a realistic, sustainable restructuring of the health care system is possible, with a focus on preventive services. Recent proposals for change have centered on applying national goals to limited geographic areas, with both local and international support. Regional pilot projects to restructure health care delivery at a community level, local health education and disease prevention initiatives, and a national training program for primary care and family physicians and nurses are being planned. Through regionalization, an increase in responsibility for both the physician and the patient, and redefinition of primary health care and the role of family physicians, isolated local movements and pilot projects have shown promise in achieving these goals, even under the current budgetary constraints. PMID:7610217

  2. Child Poverty and the Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Racine, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    The persistence of child poverty in the United States and the pervasive health consequences it engenders present unique challenges to the health care system. Human capital theory and empirical observation suggest that the increased disease burden experienced by poor children originates from social conditions that provide suboptimal educational, nutritional, environmental, and parental inputs to good health. Faced with the resultant excess rates of pediatric morbidity, the US health care system has developed a variety of compensatory strategies. In the first instance, Medicaid, the federal-state governmental finance system designed to assure health insurance coverage for poor children, has increased its eligibility thresholds and expanded its benefits to allow greater access to health services for this vulnerable population. A second arm of response involves a gradual reengineering of health care delivery at the practice level, including the dissemination of patient-centered medical homes, the use of team-based approaches to care, and the expansion of care management beyond the practice to reach deep into the community. Third is a series of recent experiments involving the federal government and state Medicaid programs that includes payment reforms of various kinds, enhanced reporting, concentration on high-risk populations, and intensive case management. Fourth, pediatric practices have begun to make use of specific tools that permit the identification and referral of children facing social stresses arising from poverty. Finally, constituencies within the health care system participate in enhanced advocacy efforts to raise awareness of poverty as a distinct threat to child health and to press for public policy responses such as minimum wage increases, expansion of tax credits, paid family leave, universal preschool education, and other priorities focused on child poverty.

  3. [Professional health cards (CPS): informatic health care system in France].

    PubMed

    Fortuit, P

    2005-09-01

    The Professional Health Card Public interest group (Groupement d'Intérêt Public-Carte de professionnel de Santé (GIP-CPS)) was founded in 1993 as a joint initiative by the different parties involved in health care in France: the state, the representatives of the health care professions and the compulsory and complementary health insurance organizations. The CPS system enables safe exchange and electronic sharing of medical data. Via Intranet connections and Extranet hosting of medical files, databases, the CPS system enables health care professionals who access servers to be identified with certainty. For email exhanges, the CPS systems guarantees the sender's identity and capacity. The electronic signature gives legal value to the email. The system also enables confidential email. The health card system (CPS) contributes to making the health service efficient. Shared medical files, health care networks, health warning systems or electronic requests for reimbursement of health insurance expenses all use the CPS system. More than 300,000 health care professionals use it regularly. The freedom of movement of patients throughout Europe has led to the growth of exchanges and information sharing between health professionals in the States of the Union. More and more health professionals will be leaving their own countries to work in foreign countries in the future. It is essential that their freedom of movement is accompanied by the ability to prove their rights to practice.

  4. HIV: challenging the health care delivery system.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, J; Kates, J

    2000-01-01

    HIV offers a lens through which the underlying problems of the US health care system can be examined. New treatments offer the potential of prolonged quality of life for people living with HIV if they have adequate access to health care. However, increasing numbers of new cases of HIV occur among individuals with poor access to health care. Restrictions on eligibility for Medicaid (and state-by-state variability) contribute to uneven access to the most important safety net source of HIV care financing, while relatively modest discretionary programs attempt to fill in the gap with an ever-increasing caseload. Many poor people with HIV are going without care, even though aggregate public spending on HIV-related care will total $7.7 billion in fiscal year 2000, an amount sufficient to cover the care costs of one half of those living with HIV. But inefficiencies and inequities in the system (both structural and geographic) require assessment of the steps that can be taken to create a more rational model of care financing for people living with HIV that could become a model for all chronic diseases. PMID:10897178

  5. A telemedicine health care delivery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Jay H.

    1991-01-01

    The Interactive Telemedicine Systems (ITS) system was specifically developed to address the ever widening gap between our medical care expertise and our medical care delivery system. The frustrating reality is that as our knowledge of how to diagnose and treat medical conditions has continued to advance, the system to deliver that care has remained in an embryonic stage. This has resulted in millions of people being denied their most basic health care needs. Telemedicine utilizes an interactive video system integrated with biomedical telemetry that allows a physician at a base station specialty medical complex or teaching hospital to examine and treat a patient at multiple satellite locations, such as rural hospitals, ambulatory health centers, correctional institutions, facilities caring for the elderly, community hospital emergency departments, or international health facilities. Based on the interactive nature of the system design, the consulting physician at the base station can do a complete history and physical examination, as if the patient at the satellite site was sitting in the physician's office. This system is described.

  6. Challenges for the German Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Riemer-Hommel, P

    2012-06-01

    The German Health Care System (GHCS) faces many challenges among which an aging population and economic problems are just a few. The GHCS traditionally emphasised equity, universal coverage, ready access, free choice, high numbers of providers and technological equipment; however, real competition among health-care providers and insurance companies is lacking. Mainly in response to demographic changes and economic challenges, health-care reforms have focused on cost containment and to a lesser degree also quality issues. In contrast, generational accounting, priorisation and rationing issues have thus far been completely neglected. The paper discusses three important areas of health care in Germany, namely the funding process, hospital management and ambulatory care, with a focus on cost control mechanisms and quality improving measures as the variables of interest. Health Information Technology (HIT) has been identified as an important quality improvement tool. Health Indicators have been introduced as possible instruments for the priorisation debate. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. [Prenatal care within Brazil's Unified Health System].

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Maria; Guilhem, Dirce; Walter, Maria Inêz Machado Telles

    2005-10-01

    To assess antenatal care in health care units, so as to obtain a baseline for future evaluation studies. A self-applied inquiry was conducted among municipal health managers within a probabilistic stratified random sample of 627 municipalities which, through expansion technique, extended the analysis to 5,507 municipalities. Data was collected from October 2003 to April 2004. The survey appraised information about the priority granted by the managers to each modality of care, as well as data concerning characteristics of the assistance provided and the declared estimate of the demand being covered. The Chi-square test and Student's t-test were performed in order to verify independence among the qualitative variables and mean differences, respectively. Almost half (43.8%; n=2,317) of the municipalities did not attend gestational risk; 81% (n=4,277) and 30.1% (n=1,592) reported that they attend over 75% of the demand for low and high risk antenatal respectively; 30.1% (n=1,592) attend over 75% of the demand for high risk care. Care for low risk (chi2=282,080; P<0.001 n=4,277) and for high risk pregnancies (chi2=267.924; P<0.001 n=5,280) were associated to geographic region, municipality's size and management modality within the Unified Health System. The guarantee of vacancy for labour and birth was also associated to management modality. There were gaps related to the provision and the quality of antenatal care within the Unified Health System. Municipal based health care extends the provision of antenatal care, but there are inequalities among regions and among municipalities according to demographic size.

  8. Explaining health care system change: problem pressure and the emergence of "hybrid" health care systems.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Achim; Cacace, Mirella; Götze, Ralf; Rothgang, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    In this article, we will further the explanation of the state's changing role in health care systems belonging to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). We build on our analysis of twenty-three OECD countries, which reveals broad trends regarding governments' role in financing, service provision, and regulation. In particular, we identified increasing similarities between the three system types we delineate as National Health Service (NHS), social health insurance, and private health insurance systems. We argue that the specific health care system type is an essential contributor to these changes. We highlight that health care systems tend to feature specific, type-related deficiencies, which cannot be solved by routine mechanisms. As a consequence, non-system-specific elements and innovative policies are implemented, which leads to the emergence of "hybrid" systems and indicates a trend toward convergence, or increasing similarities. We elaborate this hypothesis in two steps. First, we describe system-specific deficits of each health care system type and provide an overview of major adaptive responses to these deficits. The adaptive responses can be considered as non-system-specific interventions that broaden the portfolio of regulatory policies. Second, we examine diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) as a common approach for financing hospitals efficiently, which are nevertheless shaped by type-specific deficiencies and reform requirements. In the United States' private insurance system, DRGs are mainly used as a means of hierarchical cost control, while their implementation in the English NHS system is to increase productivity of hospital services. In the German social health insurance system, DRGs support competition as a means to control self-regulated providers. Thus, DRGs contribute to the hybridization of health care systems because they tend to strengthen coordination mechanisms that were less developed in the existing health care

  9. The US health care system: Part 1: Our current system.

    PubMed

    Nuwer, M R; Esper, G J; Donofrio, P D; Szaflarski, J P; Barkley, G L; Swift, T R

    2008-12-02

    The US health care crisis is of great concern to American neurologists. The United States has the world's most expensive health care system yet one-sixth of Americans are uninsured. The cost and volume of procedures is expanding, while reimbursement for office visits is declining. Pharmaceutical costs, durable goods, and home health care are growing disproportionately to other services. Carriers spend more for their own administration and profit than on payments to physicians. This first article on the US health care system identifies problems and proposes solutions, many of which are championed by the American Academy of Neurology through its legislative and regulatory committees.

  10. Budget-makers and health care systems.

    PubMed

    White, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Health programs are shaped by the decisions made in budget processes, so how budget-makers view health programs is an important part of making health policy. Budgeting in any country involves its own policy community, with key players including budgeting professionals and political authorities. This article reviews the typical pressures on and attitudes of these actors when they address health policy choices. The worldview of budget professionals includes attitudes that are congenial to particular policy perspectives, such as the desire to select packages of programs that maximize population health. The pressures on political authorities, however, are very different: most importantly, public demand for health care services is stronger than for virtually any other government activity. The norms and procedures of budgeting also tend to discourage adoption of some of the more enthusiastically promoted health policy reforms. Therefore talk about rationalizing systems is not matched by action; and action is better explained by the need to minimize blame. The budget-maker's perspective provides insight about key controversies in healthcare policy such as decentralization, competition, health service systems as opposed to health insurance systems, and dedicated vs. general revenue finance. It also explains the frequency of various "gaming" behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Health Care System Reforms in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a critical but non-systematic review of recent health care system reforms in developing countries. The literature reports mixed results as to whether reforms improve the financial protection of the poor or not. We discuss the reasons for these differences by comparing three representative countries: Mexico, Vietnam, and China. First, the design of the health care system reform, as well as the summary of its evaluation, is briefly described for each country. Then, the discussion is developed along two lines: policy design and evaluation methodology. The review suggests that i) background differences, such as social development, poverty level, and population health should be considered when taking other countries as a model; ii) although demand-side reforms can be improved, more attention should be paid to supply-side reforms; and iii) the findings of empirical evaluation might be biased due to the evaluation design, the choice of outcome, data quality, and evaluation methodology, which should be borne in mind when designing health care system reforms. PMID:25170464

  12. The influence of health care organisations on health system performance.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Katharina; Rice, Nigel; Smith, Peter

    2003-04-01

    The governments of many countries are undertaking initiatives to assess the extent to which health care organisations fulfil important objectives of health care, such as health improvement, fair access and efficiency. However, the extent to which these health care organisations can influence these objectives is unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the potential influence of English National Health Service territorial health authorities on 14 indicators of system performance. The study uses performance data relating to approximately 5000 small geographical areas with average populations of 10,000. Multi-level statistical models are used to attribute variation in the indicators to three hierarchical levels--small areas, district health authorities and regional health authorities--after controlling for socio-demographic characteristics. Variations in indicators attributable to district or regional level give an indication of the extent to which health authorities may influence performance. After adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, the proportion of variation in performance attributable to district health authorities varies from about 8% (for standardised mortality ratios) to about 76% (for waiting time for elective surgery). Variation at the regional level is smaller than at the district level. There appear to be very large variations between indicators in the extent to which health care organisations can influence health system performance. Choice of performance indicators and the managerial incentive regime based on the indicators should recognise this variability, as it is highly dysfunctional to hold managers accountable for measures of performance that are beyond their control.

  13. Capital investment strategies in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Reiter, K L; Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L

    2000-01-01

    Capital investment decisions are among the most important decisions made by firms. They determine the firm's capacity for providing services and commit the firm's cash for an extended period of time. Interviews with chief financial officers of leading health care systems reveal capital investment strategies that generally follow the recommendations of modern finance theory. Still, there is substantial variation in capital budgeting techniques, methods of risk adjustment, and the importance of qualitative considerations in investment decision making. There is also variation in delegation of investment decision making to operating units and methods of performance evaluation. Health care systems face the same challenges as other organizations in developing and implementing capital investment strategies that use consistent methods for evaluation of projects that have inconsistent aims and outcomes.

  14. The French health care system: liberal universalism.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Monika

    2010-06-01

    This article analyzes the reforms introduced over the last quarter century into the French health care system. A particular public-private combination, rooted in French history and institutionalized through a specific division of the policy field between private doctors and public hospitals, explains the system's core characteristics: universal access, free choice, high quality, and a weak capacity for regulation. The dual architecture of this unique system leads to different reform strategies and outcomes in its two main parts. While the state has leverage in the hospital sector, it has failed repeatedly in attempts to regulate the ambulatory care sector. The first section of this article sets out the main characteristics and historical landmarks that continue to affect policy framing and implementation. Section 2 focuses on the evolution in financing and access, section 3 on management and governance in the (private) ambulatory care sector, and section 4 on the (mainly public) hospital sector. The conclusion compares the French model with those developed in the comparative literature and sets out the terms of the dilemma: a state-run social health insurance that lacks both the legitimacy of Bismarckian systems and the leverages of state-run systems. The French system therefore pursues contradictory policy goals, simultaneously developing universalism and liberalism, which explains both the direct state intervention and its limits.

  15. Changes in corporate organization of the health care system.

    PubMed

    Brown, M

    1984-01-01

    Health care financing has undergone numerous structural changes over the years. Change continues while extreme growth seriously affects the health care focus. The author examines the multiclass system and health financing trends. Restructuring techniques are also discussed.

  16. Health care financing and the sustainability of health systems.

    PubMed

    Liaropoulos, Lycourgos; Goranitis, Ilias

    2015-09-15

    The economic crisis brought an unprecedented attention to the issue of health system sustainability in the developed world. The discussion, however, has been mainly limited to "traditional" issues of cost-effectiveness, quality of care, and, lately, patient involvement. Not enough attention has yet been paid to the issue of who pays and, more importantly, to the sustainability of financing. This fundamental concept in the economics of health policy needs to be reconsidered carefully. In a globalized economy, as the share of labor decreases relative to that of capital, wage income is increasingly insufficient to cover the rising cost of care. At the same time, as the cost of Social Health Insurance through employment contributions rises with medical costs, it imperils the competitiveness of the economy. These reasons explain why spreading health care cost to all factors of production through comprehensive National Health Insurance financed by progressive taxation of income from all sources, instead of employer-employee contributions, protects health system objectives, especially during economic recessions, and ensures health system sustainability.

  17. [Justice in health care systems from an economic perspective].

    PubMed

    Schreyögg, J

    2004-01-01

    Due to rising health care expenditures international comparisons of health care systems are recently gaining more importance. These benchmarks can provide interesting information for improving health care systems. Many of these comparisons implicitly assume that countries have a universal understanding of justice. But this assumption is rather questionable. With regard to the existing cultural differences in the understanding of justice the transferability of elements of health care systems is not always assured. A transfer usually requires a thorough examination of the judicial systems in each country. This article analyses the influence of different judicial systems applying to health care. In this context theories of justice by Rawls, Nozick and Confucius representing the possible understanding of justice in different cultures are described and analysed with regards to their influence on health care systems. The example of financing health care shows that the three theories of justice have very different consequences for designing health care systems especially concerning the role of governments.

  18. Reengineering health care: management systems for survivors.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J R

    1994-01-01

    To survive in the coming era, health care organizations must support the powerful concepts of continuous quality improvement with better internal management systems that include: (1) new processes for making decisions from mission to clinical guidelines; (2) hoshin planning, which emphasizes strong financial management and innovation to meet customer needs; (3) new organizations that make cross-disciplinary teams as important as traditional clinical support services; and (4) expanded information covering several new dimensions, including enhanced analytic capability, and supporting both traditional organization and cross-disciplinary teams.

  19. Health systems organization for emergency care.

    PubMed

    Pedroto, Isabel; Amaro, Pedro; Romãozinho, José Manuel

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of acute and severe digestive diseases presenting to hospital emergency departments, mainly related with an ageing population, demands an appropriate answer from health systems organization, taking into account the escalating pressure on cost reduction. However, patients expect and deserve a response that is appropriate, effective, efficient and safe. The huge variety of variables which can influence the evolution of such cases warranting intensive monitoring, and the coordination and optimization of a range of human and technical resources involved in the care of these high-risk patients, requires their admission in hospital units with conveniently equipped facilities, as is done for heart attack and stroke patients. Little information of gastroenterology emergencies as a function of structure, processes and outcome is available at the organizational level. Surveys that have been conducted in different countries just assess local treatment outcome and question the organizational structure and existing resources but its impact on the outcome is not clear. Most studies address the problem of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and the out-of-hours endoscopy services in the hospital setting. The demands placed on emergency (part of the overall continuum of care) are obvious, as are the needs for the efficient use of resources and processes to improve the quality of care, meaning data must cover the full care cycle. Gastrointestinal emergencies, namely gastrointestinal bleeding, must be incorporated into the overall emergency response as is done for heart attack and stroke. This chapter aims to provide a review of current literature/evidence on organizational health system models towards a better management of gastroenterology emergencies and proposes a research agenda. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  1. Guidelines for Psychological Practice in Health Care Delivery Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychologists practice in an increasingly diverse range of health care delivery systems. The following guidelines are intended to assist psychologists, other health care providers, administrators in health care delivery systems, and the public to conceptualize the roles and responsibilities of psychologists in these diverse contexts. These…

  2. Formularies in integrated health systems: Sharp HealthCare.

    PubMed

    Rizos, A L; Levy, E; Furnier, J; Crowley, K

    1996-09-01

    Formulary management implications are described for a California health system comprising 7 hospitals, 4 skilled-nursing centers, 22 medical clinics, 8 urgent care facilities, and a health maintenance organization. Sharp HealthCare serves nearly one million people in the San Diego area. A single institutional care division (ICD) pharmacy service has been created under the guidance of a steering committee comprising a pharmacy operations coordinator and a staff pharmacist from each site, the system pharmacy director, the system senior pharmacy information systems specialist, and the system senior clinical pharmacy specialist. Operations at each site are overseen by an operations coordinator instead of a pharmacy director. Functional teams reporting to the steering committee are standardized pharmacy processes, including formulary management; this is particularly important because the ICD has pharmacists and nurse per diem pools. Until 1995, formularies were independently managed at each site. Now, one system formulary is being developed. Standard policies and procedures, a nonformulary drug request form, and a monograph format have been completed. The hospitals' autonomous medical staffs have thus far elected to retain individual pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committees but approved a revamped formulary review process and system-wide P&T subcommittees. The computer system is being enhanced so that pharmacists will have access to applicable P&T committee-approved guidelines for drug use. Since vendors were advised that the system is establishing one formulary, Sharp has been able in some cases to achieve better pricing than it previously could through its purchasing group.

  3. Health care time of crisis, crises in health care--current reality in B&H Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Salihovic, H; Kulenovic, F; Tanovic-Mikulec, E

    2001-01-01

    In the period from 1945 till 1992 the health protection had constant growth of coverage, availability and quality of protection in the promotion of health care of the inhabitants, and the health care activity noticed spreading of the network of health care institutions, evidently staff improving of all profiles of health care workers, and supplying of equipment so said in the accordance with the movements in for developed countries. The detaching for health care in 1990 amounted 6.9 per cent of that time BDP. The period from 1991 till 1955 is difficulty to analyze, because of the disturbances which appear in all sphere of life and work, and the period from 1996 till 1999 can be analyzed, from the already known reasons, only for the area of the Federation. The correct amount of the means of payment spent for health care in the postwar period is impossible incorrectly to confirm, except detaching from BDP (1999 3.7 per cent) arrived the donations in equipment, drugs, sanitary material, training of staff, free of charge experts, means for the reconstruction of objects, to this in the future cannot be considered. Besides that the rate of detaching for the health care from BDP is less than before the war, BDP by it self is far lesser what means that the means of payment detached are far lesser. It is necessary the URGENT reform of health care financing system, evaluation strategy of the reform of health care which up-to-now did not show shifts, the bringing of instruments of planning in the health care, instruments of quality control, the legislator must define clearly the relations between the private practice, patients and state funds.

  4. Evidence for integrating eye health into primary health care in Africa: a health systems strengthening approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of unmet eye care needs in sub-Saharan Africa is compounded by barriers to accessing eye care, limited engagement with communities, a shortage of appropriately skilled health personnel, and inadequate support from health systems. The renewed focus on primary health care has led to support for greater integration of eye health into national health systems. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate available evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care in sub-Saharan Africa from a health systems strengthening perspective. Methods A scoping review method was used to gather and assess information from published literature, reviews, WHO policy documents and examples of eye and health care interventions in sub-Saharan Africa. Findings were compiled using a health systems strengthening framework. Results Limited information is available about eye health from a health systems strengthening approach. Particular components of the health systems framework lacking evidence are service delivery, equipment and supplies, financing, leadership and governance. There is some information to support interventions to strengthen human resources at all levels, partnerships and community participation; but little evidence showing their successful application to improve quality of care and access to comprehensive eye health services at the primary health level, and referral to other levels for specialist eye care. Conclusion Evidence of integration of eye health into primary health care is currently weak, particularly when applying a health systems framework. A realignment of eye health in the primary health care agenda will require context specific planning and a holistic approach, with careful attention to each of the health system components and to the public health system as a whole. Documentation and evaluation of existing projects are required, as are pilot projects of systematic approaches to interventions and application of best practices

  5. Health, Health Care, and Systems Science: Emerging Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Health is a continuum of an optimized state of a biologic system, an outcome of positive relationships with the self and others. A healthy system follows the principles of systems science derived from observations of nature, highlighting the character of relationships as the key determinant. Relationships evolve from our decisions, which are consequential to the function of our own biologic system on all levels, including the genome, where epigenetics impact our morphology. In healthy systems, decisions emanate from the reciprocal collaboration of hippocampal memory and the executive prefrontal cortex. We can decide to change relationships through choices. What is selected, however, only represents the cognitive interpretation of our limited sensory perception; it strongly reflects inherent biases toward either optimizing state, making a biologic system healthy, or not. Health or its absence is then the outcome; there is no inconsequential choice. Public health effort should not focus on punitive steps (e.g. taxation of unhealthy products or behaviors) in order to achieve a higher level of public’s health. It should teach people the process of making healthy decisions; otherwise, people will just migrate/shift from one unhealthy product/behavior to another, and well-intended punitive steps will not make much difference. Physical activity, accompanied by nutrition and stress management, have the greatest impact on fashioning health and simultaneously are the most cost-effective measures. Moderate-to-vigorous exercise not only improves aerobic fitness but also positively influences cognition, including memory and senses. Collective, rational societal decisions can then be anticipated. Health care is a business system principally governed by self-maximizing decisions of its components; uneven and contradictory outcomes are the consequences within such a non-optimized system. Health is not health care. We are biologic systems subject to the laws of biology in spite

  6. Building health care system capacity: training health care professionals in disaster preparedness health care coalitions.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lauren; Craddock, Hillary; Gulley, Kelly; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth W

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to learn from the experiences of well-established, disaster preparedness-focused health care coalition (HCC) leaders for the purpose of identifying opportunities for improved delivery of disaster-health principles to health professionals involved in HCCs. This report describes current HCC education and training needs, challenges, and promising practices. A semi-structured interview was conducted with a sample of leaders of nine preparedness-focused HCCs identified through a 3-stage purposive strategy. Transcripts were analyzed qualitatively. Training needs included: stakeholder engagement; economic sustainability; communication; coroner and mortuary services; chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE); mass-casualty incidents; and exercise design. Of these identified training needs, stakeholder engagement, economic sustainability, and exercise design were relevant to leaders within HCCs, as opposed to general HCC membership. Challenges to education and training included a lack of time, little-to-no staff devoted to training, and difficulty getting coalition members to prioritize training. Promising practices to these challenges are also presented. The success of mature coalitions in improving situational awareness, promoting planning, and enabling staff- and resource-sharing suggest the strengths and opportunities that are inherent within these organizations. However, offering effective education and training opportunities is a challenge in the absence of ubiquitous support, incentives, or requirements among health care professions. Notably, an online resource repository would help reduce the burden on individual coalitions by eliminating the need to continually develop learning opportunities.

  7. The Mexican-American in the Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    Mexican Americans differ from Anglo Americans in their types of health problems, relation to the American health care system, and responses to health care. Mexican Americans tend to underutilize available health resources because of fear of discrimination, perception of health workers as government representatives, and language and cultural…

  8. The Mexican-American in the Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    Mexican Americans differ from Anglo Americans in their types of health problems, relation to the American health care system, and responses to health care. Mexican Americans tend to underutilize available health resources because of fear of discrimination, perception of health workers as government representatives, and language and cultural…

  9. Rebuilding a health care system: war, reconstruction and health care reforms in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Buwa, Dragudi; Vuori, Hannu

    2007-04-01

    This article explores the complexity of a health care system reforms in a post-conflict situation. It describes how the health care system was revamped immediately after the war, and then reorganized with Primary Health Care (PHC) as the fulcrum for change. It highlights the coordination problems, typical of a post-war situation when un-coordinated humanitarian assistance pours in. From the vantage points of Ministry of Health officials, the article details how the change process has gone over the years, the directions it has taken and the lessons learnt. It notes that reforms are often so fast that they outstrip the absorption capacity of the potential change agents because of their inadequate preparation for the new roles and responsibilities. This in turn threatens to undermine and weaken the very system that the reforms seek to strengthen. Several options adopted for change in Kosovo's health care system are at varying levels of implementation today. Some commentators have questioned if the policy for the new health care system has failed. We contend that there have been major organizational successes. But there are also shortcomings. There is also a potential danger that the health care system could partly revert to the old system. While some of the successes and shortcomings may be specific to Kosovo, many lessons learnt from Kosovo apply to health care reforms elsewhere.

  10. Integrated Crew Health Care System for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Dr. Davis' presentation includes a brief overview of space flight and the lessons learned for health care in microgravity. He will describe the development of policy for health care for international crews. He will conclude his remarks with a discussion of an integrated health care system.

  11. Integrated Crew Health Care System for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Dr. Davis' presentation includes a brief overview of space flight and the lessons learned for health care in microgravity. He will describe the development of policy for health care for international crews. He will conclude his remarks with a discussion of an integrated health care system.

  12. Seamless health care for chronic diseases in a dual health care system: managed care and the role of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Lee, A

    1998-01-01

    Neither private nor state run health care systems are perfect. Although there is increasing evidence that Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs) provide comparable care at lower cost, HMOs tend to select healthy patients. The dual health care system in Hong Kong spends about 3.9 per cent of GDP, with health indices among the best in the world. Hong Kong still faces the problem of escalating health care expenditure. One should take advantage of the dual health care system to evolve a new paradigm for a primary-led seamless health care service. The Diabetes Centre of a university teaching hospital together with the University of Community and Family Medicine has started a structured shared care programme in diabetes mellitus, involving general practitioners in both the private and public sectors integrating the primary and secondary care, and the private and public sectors. This programme starts to develop an infrastructure for providing quality care at an affordable cost for a large pool of patients with chronic disease. Unlike other "managed care schemes", this one is not run by profit-oriented companies, but by health professionals with an interest in providing best possible care at an affordable cost. The "disease management" approach needs a care delivery system without traditional boundaries; and a continuous improvement process which develops and refines the knowledge base, guidelines and delivery system.

  13. Advancing LGBT Health Care Policies and Clinical Care Within a Large Academic Health Care System: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ruben, Mollie A; Shipherd, Jillian C; Topor, David; AhnAllen, Christopher G; Sloan, Colleen A; Walton, Heather M; Matza, Alexis R; Trezza, Glenn R

    2017-01-01

    Culturally competent health care is especially important among sexual and gender minority patients because poor cultural competence contributes to health disparities. There is a need to understand how to improve health care quality and delivery for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) veterans in particular, because they have unique physical and mental health needs as both LGBT individuals and veterans. The following article is a case study that focuses on the policy and clinical care practices related to LGBT clinical competency, professional training, and ethical provision of care for veteran patients in the VA Boston Healthcare System. We apply Betancourt et al.'s (2003) cultural competence framework to outline the steps that VA Boston Healthcare System took to increase cultural competency at the organizational, structural, and clinical level. By sharing our experiences, we aim to provide a model and steps for other health care systems and programs, including other VA health care systems, large academic health care systems, community health care systems, and mental health care systems, interested in developing LGBT health initiatives.

  14. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care.

  15. The American Cancer Society and the American Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is in critical condition. Costs are rising to the point that the high price of health care is a threat to the U.S. economy. In 2010, health care was more than 17% of the gross domestic product, and if it continues to rise at current rates, health care will become more than 25% of the overall U.S. economy. This growth rate is not sustainable. While U.S. per capita costs are the highest of any country worldwide, quality is varied. Indeed, American health care outcomes for cancer and other diseases are inferior to several European countries with far lower per capita costs. The truth is many Americans cannot afford adequate health care, and health care is rationed in the U.S. While many do not get the health care they need, some are actually harmed by overconsumption of unnecessary health care. These Americans are treated outside of established guidelines and get unnecessary procedures and take unnecessary medications. A substantial number of Americans are supportive of health care reform with the goal of getting needed, high-quality health care to those Americans who currently do not get it. The American Cancer Society is committed to using the established scientific methods of epidemiology to define the problems and identify possible solutions. We are committed proponents of the rational, evidence-based use of health care to avoid the wasteful and inefficient rationing of health care. PMID:21804069

  16. Cash management in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Rivenson, H L; Wheeler, J R; Smith, D G; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    Cash is one of the most precious assets held by health systems. This article presents results of discussions on cash management and investment policies at a dozen major not-for-profit health systems. Health system data indicate that cash holdings have increased dramatically since 1993, mostly due to investment earnings. Discussions with chief financial officers of these health systems reveal that cash holdings are significant, that decisions about cash balances are strategic, and that most systems aim to increase cash balances to levels that permit access to capital markets on more favorable terms.

  17. Formularies in integrated health systems: Sharp HealthCare.

    PubMed

    Rizos, A L; Levy, E; Furnier, J; Crowley, K

    1996-02-01

    Formulary management implications are described for a California health system consisting of 7 hospitals, 4 skilled-nursing centers, 22 medical clinics, 8 urgent care facilities, and a health maintenance organization. Sharp HealthCare serves nearly 1 million people in the San Diego area. A single institutional care division (ICD) pharmacy service has been created under the guidance of a steering committee consisting of a pharmacy operations coordinator and a staff pharmacist from each site, the system pharmacy director, the system senior pharmacy information systems specialists, and the system senior clinical pharmacy specialist. Operations at each site are overseen by an operations coordinator instead of a pharmacy director. Functional teams reporting to the steering committee are standardizing pharmacy processes, including formulary management; this is particularly important because the ICD has pharmacist and nurse per diem pools. Until 1995, formularies were independently managed at each site. Now, one system formulary is being developed. Standard policies and procedures, a nonformulary drug request form, and a monograph format have been completed. The hospitals' autonomous medical staffs have thus far elected to retain individual pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) committees but approved a revamped formulary review process and systemwide P&T subcommittees. The computer system is being enhanced so that pharmacists anywhere in one of the hospitals will have access to applicable P&T committee-approved guidelines for drug use. Since vendors were advised that the system is establishing one formulary, Sharp has been able in some cases to achieve better pricing than it previously could through its purchasing group. Drug use is influenced by each site's pharmacy and therapeutics committee. The ideal, however, is to have this responsibility consolidated in a single systemwide committee.

  18. Integrating Public Health and Personal Care in a Reformed US Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Chernichovsky, Dov

    2010-01-01

    Compared with other developed countries, the United States has an inefficient and expensive health care system with poor outcomes and many citizens who are denied access. Inefficiency is increased by the lack of an integrated system that could promote an optimal mix of personal medical care and population health measures. We advocate a health trust system to provide core medical benefits to every American, while improving efficiency and reducing redundancy. The major innovation of this plan would be to incorporate existing private health insurance plans in a national system that rebalances health care spending between personal and population health services and directs spending to investments with the greatest long-run returns. PMID:20019310

  19. A decision technology system for health care electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Forgionne, G A; Gangopadhyay, A; Klein, J A; Eckhardt, R

    1999-08-01

    Mounting costs have escalated the pressure on health care providers and payers to improve decision making and control expenses. Transactions to form the needed decision data will routinely flow, often electronically, between the affected parties. Conventional health care information systems facilitate flow, process transactions, and generate useful decision information. Typically, such support is offered through a series of stand-alone systems that lose much useful decision knowledge and wisdom during health care electronic commerce (e-commerce). Integrating the stand-alone functions can enhance the quality and efficiency of the segmented support, create synergistic effects, and augment decision-making performance and value for both providers and payers. This article presents an information system that can provide complete and integrated support for e-commerce-based health care decision making. The article describes health care e-commerce, presents the system, examines the system's potential use and benefits, and draws implications for health care management and practice.

  20. [Comprehensive primary care and segmented health systems in South America].

    PubMed

    Giovanella, Ligia; Almeida, Patty Fidelis de

    2017-10-02

    The article analyzes recent reforms in primary health care in the South American countries, discussing the scope and challenges for establishing comprehensive primary health care in the region's health systems. The data sources were case studies conducted in 12 countries, and the analytical lines were the strategic components in the design and implementation of primary health care: national policy approaches, characteristics of financing, organization and provision, and the workforce in primary health care. The crosscutting analysis from a comparative perspective provides an overview of primary health care in the region's countries and highlights convergences and asymmetries. A common trait is the recovery of the expanded definition of primary health care with family and community components, a territorial base, multidisciplinary team, incorporation of community health workers, and social participation. Implementation revealed heterogeneities in the advances and contradictions in the models. Insufficient supply of physicians, difficulties in provision and physician retention in remote and peripheral areas, as well as in primary health care itself, precarious employment relations, and absence of career plans are common problems, and there have been recent initiatives in government intervention to direct the workforce to the public system. Segmentation of the supply of primary health care converges with the segmentation of social protection in the various countries, through maintenance of social insurance or selective and targeted insurance or coverage by private health insurance, and persistent exclusion of populations from the right to health. The article argues that implementation of comprehensive primary health care is conditioned by the prevailing modalities of social protection in health.

  1. New Directions in Education for Changing Health Care Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    The summary report focuses on postsecondary education for the health professions in the context of evolving health care systems within Organizations for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries. An assessment of health care practices in these countries led to the conclusions and recommendations presented in part one of the…

  2. Variation in tonsillectomy rates by health care system type.

    PubMed

    Crowson, Matthew G; Ryan, Marisa A; Rocke, Daniel J; Raynor, Eileen M; Puscas, Liana

    2017-03-01

    To analyze variation in tonsillectomy procedure rates between health care system types around the world. International database analysis. The 2015 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Health Statistics surgical procedures database was used to ascertain tonsillectomy procedure volumes for 31 countries. Each country's health system type and structure were classified by overall system type, and by health care regulation, financing, and provision methods. Each system type and structure variable were compared using the rate of tonsillectomy procedures per 100,000 citizens. 10.5 million tonsillectomy procedures completed between 1993 and 2014 were analyzed. Overall, social health insurance system types had higher total tonsillectomy rates versus other health care system types (p < 0.05 for each comparison). Health systems with private care provision had a higher procedure rate versus state provided care (159.1 vs. 131.1 per 100,000 citizens; p = 0.002). Health care systems with societal regulation and financing had a higher procedure count versus state regulated or financed care (regulation 193.3 vs. 139.7 per 100,000 citizens, p < 0.0001; financing 168.2 vs. 135.0 per 100,000 citizens, p = 0.0004). The volume of tonsillectomy procedures is associated with a health care system's overall structure, regulation, financing, and provision methods. International health care systems with state mediated provision, regulation, and financing had lower tonsillectomy rates versus systems with private provision, and societal regulation or financing. Further study is needed to determine differences in indications for tonsillectomy between countries, but these results underscore potential variation in health care delivery in different systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Open source, open standards, and health care information systems.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Carl J; Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2011-02-17

    Recognition of the improvements in patient safety, quality of patient care, and efficiency that health care information systems have the potential to bring has led to significant investment. Globally the sale of health care information systems now represents a multibillion dollar industry. As policy makers, health care professionals, and patients, we have a responsibility to maximize the return on this investment. To this end we analyze alternative licensing and software development models, as well as the role of standards. We describe how licensing affects development. We argue for the superiority of open source licensing to promote safer, more effective health care information systems. We claim that open source licensing in health care information systems is essential to rational procurement strategy.

  4. Open Source, Open Standards, and Health Care Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the improvements in patient safety, quality of patient care, and efficiency that health care information systems have the potential to bring has led to significant investment. Globally the sale of health care information systems now represents a multibillion dollar industry. As policy makers, health care professionals, and patients, we have a responsibility to maximize the return on this investment. To this end we analyze alternative licensing and software development models, as well as the role of standards. We describe how licensing affects development. We argue for the superiority of open source licensing to promote safer, more effective health care information systems. We claim that open source licensing in health care information systems is essential to rational procurement strategy. PMID:21447469

  5. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was…

  6. Social Workers' Role in the Canadian Mental Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towns, Ashley M.; Schwartz, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using Canadian survey data this research provides social workers in Canada with a better understanding of their role in the Canadian mental health care system. Methods: By analyzing data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 1.2 Mental Health and Well-being, the role of social workers in the Canadian mental health system was…

  7. Convergence Creates Opportunities Across Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Brent I.; Felkey, Bill G.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial design students at Auburn do a creativity exercise where they are asked to combine a common household appliance with an animal. Have you seen a snake light? In health technology, we have a similar opportunity. In the connection between jewelry and vital sign monitoring technology or household security and health status monitoring, we are witnessing active convergence that will benefit patients, providers, and health systems. PMID:24958948

  8. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients.

  9. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  10. Reforming the Health Care System for Children and the Elderly to Balance Cure and Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Issues in balancing health services and costs in a changing society, where groups have differential access to health care, are discussed, including need for a universal health care system, growing cost of health care for the elderly, prolongation of life among older adults, and the claims of children on services. (MSE)

  11. Priorities in the Polish health care system.

    PubMed

    Nieszporska, Sylwia

    2017-01-01

    Since 1999, Polish health policy has changed, the quality of services has increased, and also the level of financing, mainly from public benefits. Despite constant growth of indexes reflecting the health status of Polish society, such as life expectancy, quality of life, or decreasing index of deaths at birth, just as in the majority of European countries, in Poland the society is growing older, which implies the necessity to reorganize the system. In this paper, the author has described the most important factors that determine the operation of the health system in Poland, as well as presents the ways it was restructured over the last few years, taking into consideration the structural, legislative, financial, organizational, and quantitative aspects. Also, the latest trends in Polish health policy, which take into account new goals of the system, have been presented within.

  12. The Canadian health care system. An analytical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kluge, E H

    1999-01-01

    The Canadian health care system is a publicly funded system based on the philosophy that health is a right, not a commodity. The implementation of this perspective is hampered by the fact that the Canadian Constitution makes health care a matter of provincial jurisdiction, while most taxing powers lie in the hands of the federal government. Further problems arise because of Canada's geographic nature and a move to regionalization of provincial health care administration. The issue is compounded by recent developments in reproductive technologies, aboriginal health, changes in consent law, etc.

  13. Primary Health Care in Canada: Systems in Motion

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Brian; Levesque, Jean-Frederic; Strumpf, Erin; Coyle, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Context: During the 1980s and 1990s, innovations in the organization, funding, and delivery of primary health care in Canada were at the periphery of the system rather than at its core. In the early 2000s, a new policy environment emerged. Methods: This policy analysis examines primary health care reform efforts in Canada during the last decade, drawing on descriptive information from published and gray literature and from a series of semistructured interviews with informed observers of primary health care in Canada. Findings: Primary health care in Canada has entered a period of potentially transformative change. Key initiatives include support for interprofessional primary health care teams, group practices and networks, patient enrollment with a primary care provider, financial incentives and blended-payment schemes, development of primary health care governance mechanisms, expansion of the primary health care provider pool, implementation of electronic medical records, and quality improvement training and support. Conclusions: Canada's experience suggests that primary health care transformation can be achieved voluntarily in a pluralistic system of private health care delivery, given strong government and professional leadership working in concert. PMID:21676023

  14. China's public health-care system: facing the challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanli

    2004-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) crisis in China revealed not only the failures of the Chinese health-care system but also some fundamental structural deficiencies. A decentralized and fragmented health system, such as the one found in China, is not well-suited to making a rapid and coordinated response to public health emergencies. The commercial orientation of the health sector on the supply-side and lack of health insurance coverage on the demand-side further exacerbate the problems of the under-provision of public services, such as health surveillance and preventive care. For the past 25 years, the Chinese Government has kept economic development at the top of the policy agenda at the expense of public health, especially in terms of access to health care for the 800 million people living in rural areas. A significant increase in government investment in the public health infrastructure, though long overdue, is not sufficient to solve the problems of the health-care system. China needs to reorganize its public health system by strengthening both the vertical and horizontal connections between its various public health organizations. China's recent policy of establishing a matching-fund financed rural health insurance system presents an exciting opportunity to improve people's access to health care. PMID:15500285

  15. Study tour examines health care systems in Germany, Holland--Part I: A comparison of three health care systems.

    PubMed

    Hofreuter, D H; Mendoza, E M

    1993-01-01

    In October 1992, the American College of Physician Executives sponsored a study tour to Berlin, Germany, and Amsterdam, Holland. Meetings were held with government officials, third-party payers, and providers, and onsite visits were made at hospitals, clinics, and academic centers. The purpose was to study the health care delivery system in those countries and to share some insights with the countries' hosts on the U.S. system. Beginning in this issue of the journal, 5 of the 10 study tour participants describe their impressions of the tour and of the health care systems in the countries that were visited. This first report compares the health care delivery systems of the United States, Germany, and Holland. In subsequent reports, the German and Dutch health care systems will be described in greater detail and the ability of the United States to adopt European health care systems will be assessed.

  16. Efficiency performance of China's health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luyu; Cheng, Gang; Song, Suhang; Yuan, Beibei; Zhu, Weiming; He, Li; Ma, Xiaochen; Meng, Qingyue

    2017-07-01

    Improving efficiency performance of the health care delivery system has been on the agenda for the health system reform that China initiated in 2009. This study examines the changes in efficiency performance and determinants of efficiency after the reform to provide evidence to assess the progress of the reform from the perspective of efficiency. Descriptive analysis, Data Envelopment Analysis, the Malmquist Index, and multilevel regressions are used with data from multiple sources, including the World Bank, the China Health Statistical Yearbook, and routine reports. The results indicate that over the last decade, health outcomes compared with health investment were relatively higher in China than in most other countries worldwide, and the trend was stable. The overall efficiency and total factor productivity increased after the reform, indicating that the reform was likely to have had a positive impact on the efficiency performance of the health care delivery system. However, the health care delivery structure showed low system efficiency, mainly attributed to the weakened primary health care system. Strengthening the primary health care system is central to enhancing the future performance of China's health care delivery system. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Economic development and the health care system in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chu, D K

    1994-06-01

    This article describes parallel developments of the Hong Kong economy and its health care system. The purpose is to illustrate how the Hong Kong health system evolved in response to external and internal pressures generated by economic prosperity. The Hong Kong system illustrates the importance of clear policy making in the face of these pressures. In particular, issues of investment, financing and distribution of health services are examined in relation to hospital cost control and service accessibility. In the past, health care costs in Hong Kong have been controlled at the expense of limited accessibility of health services. At present, Hong Kong policy-makers are faced with the challenge of maintaining a sharp focus on cost control as they face pressure to expand and improve health care coverage for the citizens. So far they have responded by emphasizing management efficiency through reorganization. It remains to be seen whether this strategy can be successful without passing increased health care costs to the consumers.

  18. Behavioral Health Integration in Health Care Settings: Lessons Learned from a Pediatric Hospital Primary Care System.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Leandra; Long, Melissa; Marschall, Donna; Hodgkinson, Stacy; Bokor, Brooke; Rhodes, Hope; Crumpton, Howard; Weissman, Mark; Beers, Lee

    2017-09-19

    Behavioral health integration within primary care has been evolving, but literature traditionally focuses on smaller scale efforts. We detail how behavioral health has been integrated across a large, urban pediatric hospital system's six primary care clinics (serving over 35,000 children annually and insured predominately through Medicaid) and discuss strategies for success in sustaining and expanding efforts to achieve effective integration of behavioral health into primary care. In a time span of 3 years, the clinics have implemented routine, universal behavioral health screening at well child visits, participated in a 15-month behavioral health screening quality improvement learning collaborative, and integrated the work of psychologists and psychiatrists. Additional work remains to be done in improving family engagement, further expanding services, and ensuring sustainability.

  19. Sources of project financing in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Smith, D G; Wheeler, J R; Rivenson, H L; Reiter, K L

    2000-01-01

    Through discussions with chief financial officers of leading health care systems, insights are offered on preferences for project financing and development efforts. Data from these same systems provide at least anecdotal evidence in support of pecking-order theory.

  20. Information Systems; Modern Health Care and Medical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandejs, J. F., And Others

    1975-01-01

    To effectively handle changes in health policy and health information, new designs and applications of automation are explored. Increased use of computer-based information systems in health care could serve as a means of control over the costs of developing more comprehensive health service, with applications increasing not only the automation of…

  1. The proposal of philosophical basis of the health care system.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, Andrzej; Nieszporska, Sylwia

    2017-03-01

    The studies of health care systems are conducted intensively on various levels. They are important because the systems suffer from numerous pathologies. The health care is analyzed, first of all, in economic aspects but their functionality in the framework of systems theory is studied, as well. There are also attempts to work out some general values on which health care systems should be based. Nevertheless, the aforementioned studies, however, are fragmentary ones. In this paper holistic approach to the philosophical basis of health care is presented. The levels on which the problem can be considered are specified explicitly and relations between them are analyzed, as well. The philosophical basis on which the national health care systems could be based is proposed. Personalism is the basis for the proposal. First of all, the values, that are derived from the personalistic philosophy, are specified as the basic ones for health care systems. Then, general organizational and functional properties of the system are derived from the assumed values. The possibility of adaptation of solutions from other fields of social experiences are also mentioned. The existing health care systems are analyzed within the frame of the introduced proposal.

  2. Transforming health care: an approach to system-wide implementation

    PubMed Central

    Bengoa, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    There are enormous financial, demographic, epidemiological and clinical safety pressures on health care systems around the world. These pressures are well known and are increasing every day. This perspective paper describes one possible way forward to meeting these pressures undertaken through the system-wide transformation of the health care system in the Basque Country to a population of over 2.3 million people. The overall goal has been to turn the health care system to become more proactive than reactive and more collaborative than fragmented. This ambitious plan started in 2009. PMID:24179458

  3. Health care systems in Western Europe: an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    de Gooijer, Winfried J

    2002-01-01

    Health care in the countries of Western Europe can be defined as a complex process of continuous innovation, i.e. of constantly implementing new combinations of science, technology, organisation, economics, politics, philosophy, opinions and fashion. Any element of this definition can influence the course of the health care process, whether or not combined with one or more of the other elements. This definition implies that health care systems as well as health care policy of the countries of Western Europe differ considerably. If we define a health care system as the legal and organisational framework, directed at producing, distributing, managing, regulating, supervising, co-ordinating and controlling health care activities in order to realise defined social health care values, no country can narrowly be compared to any other country. Such a comparison produces a huge basket of facts from which one can draw one conclusion only: each country acts to its own liking. The same applies for the concept of health care policy, i.e. a chosen course to achieve pre-set strategic objectives. Here too, every country acts to its own liking, where nobody is right and nobody is wrong. Consequently, the universal health care system does not exist. Consequently also, the analyst who takes a closer look at the health care systems of the countries of Western Europe, trying to map the differences, will discover a rather messy picture. All this being said, how do we deal with two burning questions? The first is: how can it be that, relatively speaking, the people of Western Europe are so healthy? Secondly: how do we clean up the mess or, in other words, how do we reform health care?

  4. Constructing the health care system in Greece: responsibility and powerlessness.

    PubMed

    Lentza, Vassiliki; Montgomery, Anthony J; Georganta, Katerina; Panagopoulou, Efharis

    2014-02-01

    Based on health care professionals' (HPs) and patients' interviews about work demands and quality of care in hospitals, the study explores the way that patients and HPs constructed their identities to describe and construct the health care system in Greece. This is a qualitative study using a focus group (FG) design. Seven FGs discussions were conducted: three FGs discussions were conducted for the assessment of job stressors (1 for doctors, 1 for nurses and 1 for residents) and four FGs discussions for the assessment of quality of care (1 for doctors, 1 for nurses, 1 for residents and 1 for patients). The sample consisted of health care professionals working in a teaching hospital in the region of Thessaloniki, Greece, and patients who had at least one experience of any kind in the same hospital. Transcripts of the FGs discussions underwent discourse analysis. The results showed that both HPs and patients construct the health care system based on bipolar constructions of responsibility and powerlessness. In particular, participants use these constructions to allocate the responsibility to different levels of the health care system hierarchy or to the system per se constructing, at the same time, themselves as the 'viewers' of this system. The study allowed a deeper understanding of issues related to quality of care in hospitals providing context-specific information. Identity in health care organizations was inextricably linked to power and responsibility. The need to deconstruct this responsibility/powerlessness ideology is discussed. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Health care rationing: doing it better in public and private health care systems.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Alan

    2013-12-01

    All public and private health care systems ration patient access to care. The private sector rations access to consumers who are willing and able to pay. The poor and disadvantaged have limited access to care and inadequate income protection. In public health systems, care is provided on the basis of "need," that is, the comparative cost-effectiveness of competing treatments. This results in patients being deprived of care if treatments are clinically effective but not cost-effective. Rationing health care is ubiquitous. In both types of systems physicians have discretion to deviate from these rationing principles. This has created inefficient variations in clinical practice. These are difficult to resolve because of the lack of transparency of costs and patient outcomes and perverse incentives. The failure to remove universal inefficiency in a period of economic austerity sharpens awareness of rationing. Hopes of greater efficiency are largely faith based. Competing ideologues from the left and the right continue to offer evidence for free solutions to long-established problems. Inefficiency is unethical, as it deprives potential patients of care from which they could benefit. Reducing inefficiency is essential but difficult. The universal challenge is to decide who shall live when all will die in a world of scarce resources.

  6. [Public health care system in the Italia regions.].

    PubMed

    Burgio, Alessandra; Solipaca, Alessandro; Milazzo, Rosario

    2007-01-01

    The National Health Plan 2006-2008 underlines the need to overcome the differences that exist in the health care services of the Italian regions. Because the health care systems are organised differently on the territory, the Regions provide different answers to the health needs of their residents. Therefore, the purpose of this document is that of analysing the characteristics of the Italian public health care system in 2003. While in the first part, the health system is described region by region, in the second part, a cluster analysis is used to describe the local health authorities. The results show that while both the first and second level assistance have become stronger, the centrality of the hospital system has decreased, even though it still occupies a dominant position.

  7. The US health care system: On a road to nowhere?

    PubMed Central

    Oberlander, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    THIS ARTICLE REVIEWS THE CURRENT STATE AND FUTURE PROSPECTS of the health care system in the United States. The 1990s were a decade of reform and change in US medical care, with the debate over the Clinton plan for universal insurance and, after its defeat, the spread of managed care. In particular, managed care had a profound impact on the delivery of medical services, transforming traditional insurance arrangements. However, after all of the changes, the United States appears to be no closer to solving the problems that have characterized its health care system for the past 3 decades. Over 40 million Americans lack health insurance, universal coverage is nowhere in sight, and medical care costs are rising again after a period of moderation. It is doubtful that incremental health reforms will significantly ameliorate these problems. PMID:12160126

  8. Strategic management of health care information systems: nurse managers' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Kivinen, Tuula; Saranto, Kaija; Kinnunen, Juha

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the strategic management of information systems in health care. Lack of strategic thinking is a typical feature in health care and this may also concern information systems. The data for this study was collected by eight focus group interviews including altogether 48 nurse managers from primary and specialised health care. Five main categories described the strategic management of information systems in health care; IT as an emphasis of strategy; lack of strategic management of information systems; the importance of management; problems in privacy protection; and costs of IT. Although IT was emphasised in the strategies of many health care organisations, a typical feature was a lack of strategic management of information systems. This was seen both as an underutilisation of IT opportunities in health care organisations and as increased workload from nurse managers' perspective. Furthermore, the nurse managers reported that implementation of IT strengthened their managerial roles but also required stronger management. In conclusion, strategic management of information systems needs to be strengthened in health care and nurse managers should be more involved in this process.

  9. Burnout among workers in a pediatric health care system.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Linda M; Nawaz, Muhammad K; Hood, Joyce L; Bae, Sejong

    2012-08-01

    Burnout among health care workers is recognized as an organizational risk contributing to absenteeism, presenteeism, excessive turnover, or illness, and may also manifest as decreased patient satisfaction. Pediatric health care may add stressors including worried parents of ill or dying children, child custody issues, child abuse, and workplace violence. The purpose of this study was to measure burnout among workers in a regional pediatric health care system and report whether burnout in a pediatric health care system is different from previously published data on human service workers. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI) were used to measure burnout. Pediatric health care workers expressed significantly less burnout as compared to published MBI-HSS scores and client-related CBI scores. Personal burnout CBI scores were not different, but work-related CBI scores were significantly higher than normative scores. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. The use of relational databases in health care information systems.

    PubMed

    Borok, L S

    1995-01-01

    The relational database is especially well suited to be the cornerstone of the next generation of health care information systems. Health care organizations can take advantage of the lessons learned from major corporations that have built entire information infrastructures using it. The relational model's strength in handling the analysis of transaction data makes it ideal for fulfilling complex utilization review requirements and providing a solid foundation for the increasing operational demands of large physician-managed managed care networks.

  11. Health care for youth in the juvenile justice system.

    PubMed

    2011-12-01

    Youth in the juvenile correctional system are a high-risk population who, in many cases, have unmet physical, developmental, and mental health needs. Multiple studies have found that some of these health issues occur at higher rates than in the general adolescent population. Although some youth in the juvenile justice system have interfaced with health care providers in their community on a regular basis, others have had inconsistent or nonexistent care. The health needs of these youth are commonly identified when they are admitted to a juvenile custodial facility. Pediatricians and other health care providers play an important role in the care of these youth, and continuity between the community and the correctional facility is crucial. This policy statement provides an overview of the health needs of youth in the juvenile correctional system, including existing resources and standards for care, financing of health care within correctional facilities, and evidence-based interventions. Recommendations are provided for the provision of health care services to youth in the juvenile correctional system as well as specific areas for advocacy efforts.

  12. Managed care in the public mental health system.

    PubMed

    Cuffel, B J; Snowden, L; Masland, M; Piccagli, G

    1996-04-01

    The movement towards managed care in the public mental health system has surpassed efforts to develop a systematic literature concerning its theory, practice, and outcome. In particular little has been written about potential challenges and difficulties in translating managed care systems from their origins in the private sector to the delivery of public sector mental health services. This paper provides an overview of managed care definitions, organizational arrangements, administrative techniques, and roles and responsibilities using a theoretical framework adopted from economics referred to as principal-agent theory. Consistent with this theory, we assert that the primary function of the managed care organization is to act as agent for the payor and to manage the relationships between payors, providers, and consumers. From this perspective, managed care organizations in the public mental health system will be forced to manage an extremely complex set of relationships between multiple government payors, communities, mental health providers, and consumers. In each relationship, we have identified many challenges for managed care including the complexity of public financing, the vulnerable nature of the population served, and the importance of synchronization between managed care performance and community expectations for the public mental health system. In our view, policy regarding the role of managed care in the public mental health system must evolve from an understanding of the dynamics of government-community-provider-consumer "agency relationships".

  13. [Better adaptation of the Tunisian adolescent health care system].

    PubMed

    Ben Mahmoud, A

    2002-03-01

    Classical health indicators are insufficient to account for adolescent health. With the majority of young people's health problems being linked to social and behavioural factors, the compartmentalised and biomedical approaches to their health are inept. Can the totality of adolescents' health needs receive an appropriate response in a health care system which articulates itself based upon a parceled vision of health? Health professionals seem to experience difficulties in situating themselves above the expressed symptom, and therefore become aware of the real needs linked to the emotional, familial and educational contexts and integrate a global, multi-disciplinary approach to adolescent and young adult health into their everyday practice. Their reduced consumption of care is not only linked to the fact that adolescents in general enjoy good health, but it is also linked to the difficulties of the health care system to recognise their true health needs. It thus emphasises the need to develop competencies in the field of adolescent health and organise the work in a multi-disciplinary network. In order to accomplish this, it is essential that the medical schools and public health schools offer a multi-disciplinary approach to adolescent health allowing for future health professionals to be able to address fields which are not uniquely bio-medically dependent. Furthermore, the regional medical study and university centres must evolve to become welcome centers and care centers for adolescents, adopting a multi-disciplinary approach going beyond the simple juxtaposition of diverse disciplines.

  14. Transformational change in health care systems: an organizational model.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Carol VanDeusen; Holmes, Sally K; Cohen, Alan B; Restuccia, Joseph; Cramer, Irene E; Shwartz, Michael; Charns, Martin P

    2007-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm argued for fundamental redesign of the U.S. health care system. Six years later, many health care organizations have embraced the report's goals, but few have succeeded in making the substantial transformations needed to achieve those aims. This article offers a model for moving organizations from short-term, isolated performance improvements to sustained, reliable, organization-wide, and evidence-based improvements in patient care. Longitudinal comparative case studies were conducted in 12 health care systems using a mixed-methods evaluation design based on semistructured interviews and document review. Participating health care systems included seven systems funded through the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Pursuing Perfection Program and five systems with long-standing commitments to improvement and high-quality care. Five interactive elements appear critical to successful transformation of patient care: (1) Impetus to transform; (2) Leadership commitment to quality; (3) Improvement initiatives that actively engage staff in meaningful problem solving; (4) Alignment to achieve consistency of organization goals with resource allocation and actions at all levels of the organization; and (5) Integration to bridge traditional intra-organizational boundaries among individual components. These elements drive change by affecting the components of the complex health care organization in which they operate: (1) Mission, vision, and strategies that set its direction and priorities; (2) Culture that reflects its informal values and norms; (3) Operational functions and processes that embody the work done in patient care; and (4) Infrastructure such as information technology and human resources that support the delivery of patient care. Transformation occurs over time with iterative changes being sustained and spread across the organization. The conceptual model holds promise for guiding health care

  15. Primary health care and public health: foundations of universal health systems.

    PubMed

    White, Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to advocate for more integrated and universally accessible health systems, built on a foundation of primary health care and public health. The perspective outlined identified health systems as the frame of reference, clarified terminology and examined complementary perspectives on health. It explored the prospects for universal and integrated health systems from a global perspective, the role of healthy public policy in achieving population health and the value of the social-ecological model in guiding how best to align the components of an integrated health service. The importance of an ethical private sector in partnership with the public sector is recognized. Most health systems around the world, still heavily focused on illness, are doing relatively little to optimize health and minimize illness burdens, especially for vulnerable groups. This failure to improve the underlying conditions for health is compounded by insufficient allocation of resources to address priority needs with equity (universality, accessibility and affordability). Finally, public health and primary health care are the cornerstones of sustainable health systems, and this should be reflected in the health policies and professional education systems of all nations wishing to achieve a health system that is effective, equitable, efficient and affordable.

  16. The Canadian health care system: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Stolberg, Harald O

    2004-09-01

    This review offers American radiologists the information required to understand the Canadian health care system. It includes a brief history of the Canadian system and describes the relationship between health care and the Canadian constitution. A comprehensive appraisal of current conditions addresses the performance of the Canadian system and provides an overview of policy and planning responsibilities for health care across Canada. It includes not only the roles and responsibilities of the federal government and of the provincial and territorial governments in health care, but also those of professional organizations. In this context, significant differences between Canada and the United States are discussed, including: the development of professional fees; billing mechanisms and audits; and medicolegal and turf issues, such as self-referral and imaging by nonradiologists. A description of professional organizations includes the central responsibility of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada for professional training and development, and of national and provincial medical organizations. There are descriptions of medical schools and research organizations as well as federal organizations responsible for health information and technology assessment. Problems encountered in recent years because of the curtailment of health care spending are addressed. The future of Canadian health care is considered in light of a recent report titled Building on Values: The Future of Health Care in Canada. Issues of particular interest to radiologists are emphasized.

  17. Assuring the affordability of Canada's health care system.

    PubMed

    Rowand, R S; Scully, H E

    1994-08-01

    Canada's health care system is challenged by a crisis of affordability. A sluggish economy and substantial federal, provincial, and territorial debt have caused health care spending, in spite of a good record of cost control, to consume nearly 10% of Canada's gross domestic product, largely due to a denominator effect. Issues identified as warranting further investigation as potential approaches to further reducing cost in order to match available resources include therapeutic effectiveness, drug use, hospital utilization, manpower planning, consumer access, and population approaches to improving health status. An important role exists for clinical investigators to contribute to health care reform.

  18. Reproductive health and reproductive freedom: maternal health care and family planning in the Swedish health system.

    PubMed

    Sundström-Feigenberg, K

    1988-01-01

    Health care for mothers and children has been a cornerstone of the Swedish system of health care for many years, starting in the 1930s, when a national network of maternal health centers offered a variety of free prenatal services. This paper describes modern maternal health services whose primary goal is preventive care. Instruments for attaining this goal are regular check-ups for early detection of problems and for maintenance of good health; social and psychological support to expectant parents; information and training to prepare parents for delivery and parenting; information and education about risk factors in the parents' local environment and in society in general. Details of how these programs were developed, delivered and evaluated are provided by the author, a former Senior Medical Officer at the National Board of Health and Welfare, responsible for maternal health care and family planning on a national level.

  19. Systemic racism and U.S. health care.

    PubMed

    Feagin, Joe; Bennefield, Zinobia

    2014-02-01

    This article draws upon a major social science theoretical approach-systemic racism theory-to assess decades of empirical research on racial dimensions of U.S. health care and public health institutions. From the 1600s, the oppression of Americans of color has been systemic and rationalized using a white racial framing-with its constituent racist stereotypes, ideologies, images, narratives, and emotions. We review historical literature on racially exploitative medical and public health practices that helped generate and sustain this racial framing and related structural discrimination targeting Americans of color. We examine contemporary research on racial differentials in medical practices, white clinicians' racial framing, and views of patients and physicians of color to demonstrate the continuing reality of systemic racism throughout health care and public health institutions. We conclude from research that institutionalized white socioeconomic resources, discrimination, and racialized framing from centuries of slavery, segregation, and contemporary white oppression severely limit and restrict access of many Americans of color to adequate socioeconomic resources-and to adequate health care and health outcomes. Dealing justly with continuing racial "disparities" in health and health care requires a conceptual paradigm that realistically assesses U.S. society's white-racist roots and contemporary racist realities. We conclude briefly with examples of successful public policies that have brought structural changes in racial and class differentials in health care and public health in the U.S. and other countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Distributed health care imaging information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Mary R.; Johnston, William E.; Guojun, Jin; Lee, Jason; Tierney, Brian; Terdiman, Joseph F.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed an ATM network-based system to collect and catalogue cardio-angiogram videos from the source at a Kaiser central facility and make them available for viewing by doctors at primary care Kaiser facilities. This an example of the general problem of diagnostic data being generated at tertiary facilities, while the images, or other large data objects they produce, need to be used from a variety of other locations such as doctor's offices or local hospitals. We describe the use of a highly distributed computing and storage architecture to provide all aspects of collecting, storing, analyzing, and accessing such large data-objects in a metropolitan area ATM network. Our large data-object management system provides network interface between the object sources, the data management system and the user of the data. As the data is being stored, a cataloguing system automatically creates and stores condensed versions of the data, textural metadata and pointers to the original data. The catalogue system provides a Web-based graphical interface to the data. The user is able the view the low-resolution data with a standard Internet connection and Web browser. If high-resolution is required, a high-speed connection and special application programs can be used to view the high-resolution original data.

  1. Assessing & Developing Primary Care for Children: Reforms in Health Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grason, Holly Allen, Ed.; Guyer, Bernard, Ed.

    This publication is a compilation of papers presented at an April 1994 workshop sponsored by the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and the Bureau-funded Johns Hopkins Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center (CAHPC). The papers are as follows: (1) "Defining the Issues and Planning for Change: Health Care Systems,…

  2. Fuzzy modelling and efficiency in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Ozok, Ahmet F

    2012-01-01

    American Medical Institute reports that each year, because of the medical error, minimum fifty thousand people are dead. For a safety and quality medical system, it is important that information systems are used in health care systems. Health information applications help us to reduce the human error and to support patient care systems. Recently, it is reported that medical information systems applications have also some negative effect on all medical integral elements. The cost of health care information systems is about 4.6% of the total cost. In this paper, it is tried a risk determination model according to principles of fuzzy logic. The improvement of health care systems has become a very popular topic in Turkey recent years. Using necessary information system; it became possible to care patients in a safer way. However, using the necessary HIS tools to manage of administrative and clinical processes at hospitals became more important than before. For example; clinical work flows and communication among pharmacists, nurses and physicians are still not enough investigated. We use fuzzy modeling as a research strategy and developed sum fuzzy membership functions to minimize human error. In application in Turkey the results are significantly related with each other. Besides, the sign differences in health care information systems strongly effects of risk magnitude. The obtained results are discussed and some comments are added.

  3. MEDICARE PAYMENTS AND SYSTEM-LEVEL HEALTH-CARE USE

    PubMed Central

    ROBBINS, JACOB A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of Medicare managed care over the past decade has the potential to increase the efficiency of health-care delivery. Improvements in care management for some may improve efficiency system-wide, with implications for optimal payment policy in public insurance programs. These system-level effects may depend on local health-care market structure and vary based on patient characteristics. We use exogenous variation in the Medicare payment schedule to isolate the effects of market-level managed care enrollment on the quantity and quality of care delivered. We find that in areas with greater enrollment of Medicare beneficiaries in managed care, the non–managed care beneficiaries have fewer days in the hospital but more outpatient visits, consistent with a substitution of less expensive outpatient care for more expensive inpatient care, particularly at high levels of managed care. We find no evidence that care is of lower quality. Optimal payment policies for Medicare managed care enrollees that account for system-level spillovers may thus be higher than those that do not. PMID:27042687

  4. Intermountain Health Care, Inc.: Standard Costing System Methodology and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Rosqvist, W.V.

    1984-01-01

    Intermountain Health Care, Inc. (IHC) a notfor-profit hospital chain with 22 hospitals in the intermountain area and corporate offices located in Salt Lake City, Utah, has developed a Standard Costing System to provide hospital management with a tool for confronting increased cost pressures in the health care environment. This document serves as a description of methodology used in developing the standard costing system and outlines the implementation process.

  5. Can better care for complex patients transform the health system?

    PubMed

    Angus, Helen; Greenberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The idea that a health system can recover significant value by focusing on better care management for a relatively small cohort of high needs patients has taken flight. Given a poor fiscal outlook, and anticipating the growing number of people who will come to rely on the healthcare delivery system, health system leaders are keen to seize opportunities to find greater value within the existing health system investment. This paper discusses what it means to be a so-called "high cost user," and how health systems have approached improving care and services for this population. It also describes Ontario's particular experience in launching the Health Links initiative as a "ground game" for health system transformation.

  6. Integrating Social impacts on Health and Health-Care Systems in Systemic Seismic Vulnerability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz-Plapp, T.; Khazai, B.; Daniell, J. E.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a new method for modeling health impacts caused by earthquake damage which allows for integrating key social impacts on individual health and health-care systems and for implementing these impacts in quantitative systemic seismic vulnerability analysis. In current earthquake casualty estimation models, demand on health-care systems is estimated by quantifying the number of fatalities and severity of injuries based on empirical data correlating building damage with casualties. The expected number of injured people (sorted by priorities of emergency treatment) is combined together with post-earthquake reduction of functionality of health-care facilities such as hospitals to estimate the impact on healthcare systems. The aim here is to extend these models by developing a combined engineering and social science approach. Although social vulnerability is recognized as a key component for the consequences of disasters, social vulnerability as such, is seldom linked to common formal and quantitative seismic loss estimates of injured people which provide direct impact on emergency health care services. Yet, there is a consensus that factors which affect vulnerability and post-earthquake health of at-risk populations include demographic characteristics such as age, education, occupation and employment and that these factors can aggravate health impacts further. Similarly, there are different social influences on the performance of health care systems after an earthquake both on an individual as well as on an institutional level. To link social impacts of health and health-care services to a systemic seismic vulnerability analysis, a conceptual model of social impacts of earthquakes on health and the health care systems has been developed. We identified and tested appropriate social indicators for individual health impacts and for health care impacts based on literature research, using available European statistical data. The results will be used to

  7. The basic health care system for the lunar base crew.

    PubMed

    Terai, M; Nitta, K

    1991-04-01

    A plan of the health care system for the crew on the lunar base is described in this study. The health care system consists of two subsystems. The first is the daily health care system. The system contains health care menus, similar to those on Earth, and some biochemical and ordinary medical examinations. The second system is a periodic medical inspection for the crew's bones and the determination of natural radioisotopes in the body. These care systems are automatically treated with the examination and data filing. Usually these examinations are carried out without the presence of a medical doctor. Examinations and files of the whole results are controlled by a computer. The daily results of examinations are compared with data in the file. If any abnormal values are found in the results, an appropriate message is sent advising whether he must receive an in-depth examination by a medical doctor, or be reexamined by the same submenu. The automatic health care system also records transactions with the life support monitoring system.

  8. Ophthalmology and information technology in tuzla canton health care system.

    PubMed

    Zvornicanin, Jasmin; Zvornicanin, Edita; Sabanovic, Zekerijah

    2012-06-01

    To analyze organization of ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton and use of information technologies(IT). IT in ophthalmology is the technology required for the data processing and other information important for patient and essential for building an electronic health record(EHR). IT in ophthalmology should include the study, science, and solution sets for all aspects of data, information and knowledge management in health information processing. We have analyzed organization of ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton. Data relevant for this research were acquired from annual reports of Tuzla Canton health ministry. All institutions and ambulances were visited and all health care professionals interviewed. A questionnaire was made which included questions for health care professionals about knowledge and use of computers, internet and information technology. Ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton has paper based medical record. There is no information system with any possibility to exchange data electronically. None of the medical devices is directly connected to the Internet and all data are typed, printed and delivered directly to the patient. All interviewed health care professionals agree that implementation of IT and EHR would contribute and improve work quality. Computer use and easy information access will make a qualitative difference in eye-care delivery in Tuzla canton. Implementation phase will be difficult because it will likely impact present style of practice. Strategy for implementation of IT in medicine in general must be made at the country level.

  9. OPHTHALMOLOGY AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN TUZLA CANTON HEALTH CARE SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Zvornicanin, Jasmin; Zvornicanin, Edita; Sabanovic, Zekerijah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze organization of ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton and use of information technologies(IT). Introduction: IT in ophthalmology is the technology required for the data processing and other information important for patient and essential for building an electronic health record(EHR). IT in ophthalmology should include the study, science, and solution sets for all aspects of data, information and knowledge management in health information processing. Material and methods: We have analyzed organization of ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton. Data relevant for this research were acquired from annual reports of Tuzla Canton health ministry. All institutions and ambulances were visited and all health care professionals interviewed. A questionnaire was made which included questions for health care professionals about knowledge and use of computers, internet and information technology. Results: Ophthalmology health care in Tuzla canton has paper based medical record. There is no information system with any possibility to exchange data electronically. None of the medical devices is directly connected to the Internet and all data are typed, printed and delivered directly to the patient. All interviewed health care professionals agree that implementation of IT and EHR would contribute and improve work quality. Conclusion: Computer use and easy information access will make a qualitative difference in eye-care delivery in Tuzla canton. Implementation phase will be difficult because it will likely impact present style of practice. Strategy for implementation of IT in medicine in general must be made at the country level. PMID:23322959

  10. Inequality and the health-care system in the USA.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Samuel L; Himmelstein, David U; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2017-04-08

    Widening economic inequality in the USA has been accompanied by increasing disparities in health outcomes. The life expectancy of the wealthiest Americans now exceeds that of the poorest by 10-15 years. This report, part of a Series on health and inequality in the USA, focuses on how the health-care system, which could reduce income-based disparities in health, instead often exacerbates them. Other articles in this Series address population health inequalities, and the health effects of racism, mass incarceration, and the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Poor Americans have worse access to care than do wealthy Americans, partly because many remain uninsured despite coverage expansions since 2010 due to the ACA. For individuals with private insurance, rising premiums and cost sharing have undermined wage gains and driven many households into debt and even bankruptcy. Meanwhile, the share of health-care resources devoted to care of the wealthy has risen. Additional reforms that move forward, rather than backward, from the ACA are sorely needed to mitigate health and health-care inequalities and reduce the financial burdens of medical care borne by non-wealthy Americans.

  11. System impact research - increasing public health and health care system performance.

    PubMed

    Malmivaara, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Interventions directed to system features of public health and health care should increase health and welfare of patients and population. To build a new framework for studies aiming to assess the impact of public health or health care system, and to consider the role of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) and of Benchmarking Controlled Trials (BCTs). The new concept is partly based on the author's previous paper on the Benchmarking Controlled Trial. The validity and generalizability considerations were based on previous methodological studies on RCTs and BCTs. The new concept System Impact Research (SIR) covers all the studies which aim to assess the impact of the public health system or of the health care system on patients or on population. There are two kinds of studies in System Impact Research: Benchmarking Controlled Trials (observational) and Randomized Controlled Trials (experimental). The term impact covers in particular accessibility, quality, effectiveness, safety, efficiency, and equality. System Impact Research - creating the scientific basis for policy decision making - should be given a high priority in medical, public health and health economic research, and should also be used for improving performance. Leaders at all levels of health and social care can use the evidence from System Impact Research for the benefit of patients and population. Key messages The new concept of SIR is defined as a research field aiming at assessing the impacts on patients and on populations of features of public health and health and social care systems or of interventions trying to change these features. SIR covers all features of public health and health and social care system, and actions upon these features. The term impact refers to all effects caused by the public health and health and social care system or parts of it, with particular emphasis on accessibility, quality, effectiveness, adverse effects, efficiency, and equality of services. SIR creates the

  12. Envisioning a New Health Care System for America.

    PubMed

    Puffer, James C; Borkan, Jeffrey; DeVoe, Jennifer E; Davis, Ardis; Phillips, Robert L; Green, Larry A; Saultz, John W

    2015-09-01

    Between August 2013 and April 2014, eight family medicine organizations convened to develop a strategic plan and communication strategy for how our discipline might partner with patients and communities to build a new foundation for American health care. An outline of this initiative, Family Medicine for America's Health (FMAHealth), was formally announced to the public in October 2014. The purpose of this paper and the five papers to follow is to describe the guiding principles of FMAHealth in greater detail. FMAHealth is taking place at a pivotal point in the history of American health care, when the deficiencies of our overly expensive, underperforming health care delivery system are becoming more apparent than ever. By forming strategic partnerships to implement this initiative, family medicine seeks to define a new approach to health system leadership, care delivery, education, and research. This will require substantial reorientation of existing priorities and reimbursement systems, which are focused on delivering services, instead of on improving health. Family medicine is committed to engaging and empowering patients, their families and communities, and other health care professionals to establish a more equitable, effective, and efficient delivery system--a system in which health is the primary design element and the "Triple Aim" is the guiding principle.

  13. The Cuban health care system and factors currently undermining it.

    PubMed

    Nayeri, K

    1995-08-01

    This paper explores the dynamics of health and health care in Cuba during a period of severe crisis by placing it within its economic, social, and political context using a comparative historical approach. It outlines Cuban achievements in health care as a consequence of the socialist transformations since 1959, noting the full commitment by the Cuban state, the planned economy, mass participation, and a self-critical, working class perspective as crucial factors. The roles of two external factors, the U.S. economic embargo and the Council of Mutual Economic Cooperation (CMEA), are explored in shaping the Cuban society and economy, including its health care system. It is argued that the former has hindered health efforts in Cuba. The role of the latter is more complex. While the CMEA was an important source for economic growth, Cuban relations with the Soviet bloc had a damaging effect on the development of socialism in Cuba. The adoption of the Soviet model of economic development fostered bureaucracy and demoralization of Cuban workers. As such, it contributed to two internal factors that have undermined further social progress including in health care: low productivity of labor and the growth of bureaucracy. While the health care system is still consistently supported by public policy and its structure is sound, economic crisis undermines its material and moral foundations and threatens its achievements. The future of the current Cuban health care system is intertwined with the potentials for its socialist development.

  14. Supporting Active Patient and Health Care Collaboration: A Prototype for Future Health Care Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Persson, Anne; Rexhepi, Hanife; Wåhlander, Kalle

    2016-12-01

    This article presents and illustrates the main features of a proposed process-oriented approach for patient information distribution in future health care information systems, by using a prototype of a process support system. The development of the prototype was based on the Visuera method, which includes five defined steps. The results indicate that a visualized prototype is a suitable tool for illustrating both the opportunities and constraints of future ideas and solutions in e-Health. The main challenges for developing and implementing a fully functional process support system concern both technical and organizational/management aspects.

  15. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  16. Evaluation of Ambulatory Care Classification Systems for the Military Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-31

    base and/or a large health care system, this manual tool was not tested. A system that appeared promising but was not available at the time of the...singular payment technique that could respond to the variety of conditions in these diverse settings. The primary savings gained from the use of DRGs are...frequently with the primary care and non-surgical specialties because of the nature of the CPT-4 manual . It contains more codes for surgical procedures

  17. Outlining a preventive oral health care system for China.

    PubMed

    Saekel, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The most recent Chinese health care reform, scheduled to run until 2020, has been underway for a number of years. Oral health care has not been explicitly mentioned in the context of this reform. However, oral health is an integral part of general health and the under-servicing of the Chinese population in the area of dental care is particularly high. The article describes how this problem could be addressed. Based on present scientific knowledge,specifically on evidence-based strategies and long-term empirical experience from Western industrialised countries, as well as findings from Chinese pilot studies, the author outlines a preventive oral health care system tailored specifically to the conditions prevailing in China. He describes the background and rationale for a clearly structured, preventive system and summarises the scientific cornerstones on which this concept is founded. The single steps of this model, that are adapted specifically to China, are presented so as to facilitate a critical discussion on the pros and cons of the approach. The author concludes that, by implementing preventive oral care, China could gradually reduce the under-servicing of great parts of the population with dental care that largely avoids dental disease and preserves teeth at a price that is affordable to both public health and patients. This approach would minimise the danger of starting a cycle of re-restorations, owing to outdated treatment methods. The proposal would both fit in well with and add to the current blueprint for Chinese health care reform.

  18. Western impressions of the Hong Kong health care system.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C L; Pei, G K; Ultmann, J E

    1996-01-01

    Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, and Malaysia are initiating health care reform to meet the changing demands of populations with improved socioeconomic status and access to modern technologies and who are living longer than in previous generations. Hong Kong, in particular, is facing a unique set of circumstances as its people prepare for the transition in 1997 from a British colony to a Special Administrative Region of China. While spending only 4% of its gross domestic product on health care, it has a large and regulated public hospital system for most inpatient medical care and a separate, loosely regulated private health care system for most outpatient medical care. In 1993 the Secretary for Health and Welfare of Hong Kong initiated a year-long process to debate the pros and cons of 5 fundamental programs for health care reform. After a year of open consultation, options were chosen. We describe the Hong Kong health care system, the fundamental changes that have been adopted, and lessons for reformers in the United States.

  19. Civil rights in a changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, S; Serrano, R; Magar, M; Stern, G

    1997-01-01

    Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibits discriminatory conduct by recipients of federal financial assistance. The law has been used in the past to challenge discrimination in health care. The evolution of the health care system from fee-for-service to managed care holds much promise for minority persons, who historically have faced serious, extensively documented barriers to health care access. However, managed care providers, like their fee-for-service counterparts, may perpetuate past discriminatory practices in new ways. Understanding new forms of discrimination is important at this stage of the development of managed care, when program design and policy action can most effectively prevent the occurrence of such practices.

  20. The health care system of Kuwait: the social paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Meleis, A I

    1979-11-01

    Because of its oil resources, Kuwait today has one of the highest per capita incomes in the world. In the last 6 years, its population has increased by 25%, including immigrants and temporary workers. More than 1/2 of the population is non-Kuwaiti, leading to rigid segregation and extreme nationalism. 60% of the population is under 20 years of age. With the achievement of independence and the great increase in wealth from oil, the Kuwaiti government embarked on a plan to distribute the wealth among its citizens in various ways. A substantial amount has been spent on health, education, and public works, with the health ministries accounting for about 20% of the budget. The health care system has been organized around provision of primary health care, and the primary health care clinic is the main point of entry into the health care system, designed to reach all sectors of the population. Combined clinics offer primary care and specialty clinics. The number of hospitals has increased more than 2-fold over the last 10 years. The emphasis is on curative care. Western medicine is much valued, and campaigns for immunization and vaccination were highly successful. The concept of the "evil eye" is widespread, causing difficulties in interviewing patients, but also creating a demand for curative medicine when the effects of the "eye" reach the body. Injections are especially desirable, preferred over oral medications. The large percentage of health professionals from foreign countries has created communications problems, even within the health profession itself. The interplay between certain social qualities in the country and the health care system has created a series of paradoxes which must be recognized if they are to be dealt with, a necessary step to improve the quality of health care in Kuwait.

  1. Coordinating Systems of Care Using Health Information Technology: Development of the ADHD Care Assistant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Thomas J.; Michel, Jeremy; Mayne, Stephanie; Miller, Jeffrey; Blum, Nathan J.; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Guevara, James P.; Fiks, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Perhaps the two principal venues for the delivery of mental health services are schools and primary care practices. Unfortunately, these systems of care are poorly connected, which may result in care that is fragmented and suboptimal. This article describes the development and implementation of an electronic health record portal, known as the ADHD…

  2. Coordinating Systems of Care Using Health Information Technology: Development of the ADHD Care Assistant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Thomas J.; Michel, Jeremy; Mayne, Stephanie; Miller, Jeffrey; Blum, Nathan J.; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Guevara, James P.; Fiks, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Perhaps the two principal venues for the delivery of mental health services are schools and primary care practices. Unfortunately, these systems of care are poorly connected, which may result in care that is fragmented and suboptimal. This article describes the development and implementation of an electronic health record portal, known as the ADHD…

  3. Enhancing Health-Care Services with Mixed Reality Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantchev, Vladimir

    This work presents a development approach for mixed reality systems in health care. Although health-care service costs account for 5-15% of GDP in developed countries the sector has been remarkably resistant to the introduction of technology-supported optimizations. Digitalization of data storing and processing in the form of electronic patient records (EPR) and hospital information systems (HIS) is a first necessary step. Contrary to typical business functions (e.g., accounting or CRM) a health-care service is characterized by a knowledge intensive decision process and usage of specialized devices ranging from stethoscopes to complex surgical systems. Mixed reality systems can help fill the gap between highly patient-specific health-care services that need a variety of technical resources on the one side and the streamlined process flow that typical process supporting information systems expect on the other side. To achieve this task, we present a development approach that includes an evaluation of existing tasks and processes within the health-care service and the information systems that currently support the service, as well as identification of decision paths and actions that can benefit from mixed reality systems. The result is a mixed reality system that allows a clinician to monitor the elements of the physical world and to blend them with virtual information provided by the systems. He or she can also plan and schedule treatments and operations in the digital world depending on status information from this mixed reality.

  4. CHINs in the context of an evolving health care system.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    Community Health Information Network (CHIN) developments have slowed, due to the chaotic change in the health care system and stakeholders' attendant short-sighted focus. CHINs are a long-term investment that is necessary for the health care system's evolution to maturity. Several arenas of essential CHIN activity are given that would be characteristic of a mature, goal-directed health care system Lack of enterprise-wide computer-based patient record systems is a major barrier. Even in the short term, however, trends and incentives exist that are likely to push stakeholders toward CHIN development. Some of these trends include changes in organizational structure and political pressures. Practical incentives include the need for stakeholder cooperation to achieve healthy communities, the prospects for telemedicine, and the demand for greater quality assurance. PMID:8947737

  5. Negotiating the new health system: purchasing publicly accountable managed care.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, S

    1998-04-01

    The transformation to managed care is one of the most important and complex changes ever to take place in the American health system. One key aspect of this transformation is its implications for public health policy and practice. Both public and private buyers purchase managed care; increasingly, public programs that used to act as their own insurers (i.e., Medicare, Medicaid and CHAMPUS) are purchasing large quantities of managed care insurance from private companies. The transformation to managed care is altering the manner in which public health policy makers conceive of and carry out public health activities (particularly activities that involve the provision of personal health services). The degree to which managed care changes public health and in turn is altered by public health will depend in great measure on the extent to which public and private policy makers understand the implications of their choices for various aspects of public health and take steps to address them. Because both publicly and privately managed care arrangements are relatively deregulated, much of the dialogue between public health and managed care purchasers can be expected to take place within the context of the large service agreements that are negotiated between buyers and sellers of managed care products. This is particularly true for Medicaid because of the importance of Medicaid coverage, payment and access policies to public health policy makers, and because of the public nature of the Medicaid contracting process. A nationwide study of Medicaid managed care contracts offers the first detailed analysis of the content and structure of managed care service agreements and the public health issues they raise. Four major findings emerge from a review of the contracts. First, most of the agreements fail to address key issues regarding which Medicaid-covered services and benefits are the contractor's responsibility and which remain the residual responsibility of the state agency

  6. Slovene national insurance card system: connecting patient and health care.

    PubMed

    Suselj, Marjan

    2004-01-01

    The paper outlines a case of an implemented modern IT solution in the health care, that is, the Slovene health insurance card system. The system is in full operation nation-wide and covers all the aspects of health care and health insurance operations. The system allows reliable identification of patients and service providers and, with its design open to enhancements, is a major breakthrough in the process of transition to e-health. The paper addresses both the national and international perspective of such IT solutions, with the main issues and goals being the quality of services to the citizen, the health care system economics and management, and the free movement of people and services in the internal market. Special consideration is devoted to the compatibility and interoperability of national systems with the emerging European health insurance card. Furthermore, the paper outlines the main financial dimensions of the development to date and the changes achieved through the intensive development in terms of quality and accessibility of health care services.

  7. Health system challenges to integration of mental health delivery in primary care in Kenya- perspectives of primary care health workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health system weaknesses in Africa are broadly well known, constraining progress on reducing the burden of both communicable and non-communicable disease (Afr Health Monitor, Special issue, 2011, 14-24), and the key challenges in leadership, governance, health workforce, medical products, vaccines and technologies, information, finance and service delivery have been well described (Int Arch Med, 2008, 1:27). This paper uses focus group methodology to explore health worker perspectives on the challenges posed to integration of mental health into primary care by generic health system weakness. Methods Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 20 health workers drawn from a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a mental health training programme for primary care, 10 from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 health workers from the control group where staff had not received the training). Results These focus group discussions suggested that there are a number of generic health system weaknesses in Kenya which impact on the ability of health workers to care for clients with mental health problems and to implement new skills acquired during a mental health continuing professional development training programmes. These weaknesses include the medicine supply, health management information system, district level supervision to primary care clinics, the lack of attention to mental health in the national health sector targets, and especially its absence in district level targets, which results in the exclusion of mental health from such district level supervision as exists, and the lack of awareness in the district management team about mental health. The lack of mental health coverage included in HIV training courses experienced by the health workers was also striking, as was the intensive focus during district supervision on HIV to

  8. Information system interoperability in a regional health care system infrastructure: a pilot study using health care information standards.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, Stergiani S; Berler, Alexander A; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2003-01-01

    The 1st and 2nd Regional Health Care System Authority of Central Macedonia (1st and 2nd PeSY) are two of the seventeen Regional Healthcare System Authorities in Greece. Every single PeSY aims to improve the level of quality that health care organisations offer as well as to control the expenditure of health care services provided by the health care organisations, Hospitals and Primary Care Health units. There is currently an urgent need for Regional Health Authorities to deploy integrated healthcare information system, based on secure networks. The limited interoperability of current hospital information systems (HIS) poses a risk for the management of patient related information since there is a difficulty to transform processed data into useful information and knowledge. Thus, a pilot system was developed to achieve data integration record synchronisation using the Health Level 7 protocol between the existing HIS of two Hospitals of Thessaloniki and the central Offices of the PeSY. The pilot was funded by the Third Community Support Framework (jointly funded by EU and Greece) funds in order to prepare the forthcoming major healthcare IT projects in Greece. It is shown that such a system is pragmatic, achieves data integration and provides acceptable integration costs.

  9. The new organization of the health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Shortell, S M; Hull, K E

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is restructuring at a dizzying pace. In many parts of the country, managed care has moved into third-generation models emphasizing capitated payment for enrolled lives and, in the process, turning most providers and institutions into cost centers to be managed rather than generators of revenue. While the full impact of the new managed care models remains to be seen, most evidence to date suggests that it tends to reduce inpatient use, may be associated with greater use of physician services and preventive care, and appears to result in no net differences either positive or negative with regard to quality or outcomes of care in comparison with fee-for-service plans. Some patients, however, tend to be somewhat less satisfied with scheduling of appointments and the amount of time spent with providers. There is no persuasive evidence that managed care lowers the rate of growth in overall health care costs within a given market. Further, managed care performance varies considerably across the country, and the factors influencing managed care performance are not well understood. Organized delivery systems are a somewhat more recent phenomenon representing various forms of ownership and strategic alliances among hospitals, physicians, and insurers designed to provide more cost-effective care to defined populations by achieving desired levels of functional, physician-system, and clinical integration. Early evidence suggests that organized delivery systems that are more integrated have the potential to provide more accessible coordinated care across the continuum, and appear to be associated with higher levels of inpatient productivity, greater total system revenue, greater total system cash flow, and greater total system operating margin than less integrated delivery forms. Some key success factors for developing organized delivery systems have been identified. Important roles are played by organizational culture, information systems, internal

  10. Systems Health Care: daily measurement and lifestyle change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Naoki; Shiga, Toshikazu; Hata, Yutaka

    2012-06-01

    Health is quite important to be realized in our daily life. However, its idea covers wide area and has individual dependency. Activities in health care have been widely developed by medical, drag, insurance, food, and other types of industries mainly centering diseases. In this article, systems approach named Systems Health Care is introduced and discussed to generate new and precious values based on measurements in daily life to change lifestyle habits for realizing each health. Firstly, issues related to health such as its definitions are introduced and discussed by centering health rather than disease. In response to the discussions on health, Home and Medical Care is continuously introduced to point out the important role causality between life style and vital signal such as exercise and blood pressure based on detailed sampling time. Systems approaches of Systems Health Care are discussed from various points of views. Real applications of devices and services are used to make the studies and discussions deeper on the subjects of the article.

  11. Audit Trail Management System in Community Health Care Information Network.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Naoki; Nakayama, Masaharu; Nakaya, Jun; Tominaga, Teiji; Suganuma, Takuo; Shiratori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake we constructed a community health care information network system. Focusing on the authentication server and portal server capable of SAML&ID-WSF, we proposed an audit trail management system to look over audit events in a comprehensive manner. Through implementation and experimentation, we verified the effectiveness of our proposed audit trail management system.

  12. Coordinating Care Across Health Care Systems for Veterans With Gynecologic Malignancies: A Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zuchowski, Jessica L; Chrystal, Joya G; Hamilton, Alison B; Patton, Elizabeth W; Zephyrin, Laurie C; Yano, Elizabeth M; Cordasco, Kristina M

    2017-07-01

    Veterans concurrently using both Veterans Affairs (VA) and community providers and facilities have increased coordination needs related to bridging their care across health care settings. Women Veterans commonly require a combination of VA and community care if they have women-specific specialty care needs, such as gynecologic malignancies. We assessed VA women's health providers' and administrators' perceptions of coordination challenges for Veterans' gynecologic cancer care, and potential approaches for addressing these challenges. We carried out semistructured qualitative interviews with field-based key informants (VA gynecologists, women's health medical directors, and other staff directly involved in women's health care coordination) at 15 VA facilities. Transcripts were summarized in a template to capture key points. Themes were identified and iteratively revised (inductively/deductively) via a collaborative decision-making process utilizing matrices to compare content across interviews. Key informants (n=23) noted that services for patients with gynecologic cancers are provided through a combination of VA and community care with wide variation in care arrangements by facility. Care coordination challenges included care fragmentation, lack of role clarity and care tracking, and difficulties associated with VA and community provider communication, patient communication, patient records exchange, and authorizations. Care coordination roles suggested for addressing challenges included: care tracker, provider point-of-contact, patient liaison, and records administrator. Experiences in coordinating care for women Veterans with gynecologic malignancies receiving concurrent VA and community cancer care reveal challenges inherent in delivering care across health care systems, as well as potential approaches for addressing them.

  13. Assessing the role of GPs in Nordic health care systems.

    PubMed

    Quaye, Randolph K

    2016-05-03

    Purpose This paper examines the changing role of general practitioners (GPs) in Nordic countries of Sweden, Norway and Denmark. It aims to explore the "gate keeping" role of GPs in the face of current changes in the health care delivery systems in these countries. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from existing literature, interviews with GPs, hospital specialists and representatives of Danish regions and Norwegian Medical Association. Findings The paper contends that in all these changes, the position of the GPs in the medical division of labor has been strengthened, and patients now have increased and broadened access to choice. Research limitations/implications Health care cost and high cancer mortality rates have forced Nordic countries of Sweden, Norway and Denmark to rethink their health care systems. Several attempts have been made to reduce health care cost through market reform and by strenghtening the position of GPs. The evidence suggests that in Norway and Denmark, right incentives are in place to achieve this goal. Sweden is not far behind. The paper has limitations of a small sample size and an exclusive focus on GPs. Practical implications Anecdotal evidence suggests that physicians are becoming extremely unhappy. Understanding the changing status of primary care physicians will yield valuable information for assessing the effectiveness of Nordic health care delivery systems. Social implications This study has wider implications of how GPs see their role as potential gatekeepers in the Nordic health care systems. The role of GPs is changing as a result of recent health care reforms. Originality/value This paper contends that in Norway and Denmark, right incentives are in place to strengthen the position of GPs.

  14. Innovation within a national health care system.

    PubMed

    Young, Antony

    2017-05-01

    Tony is a practicing frontline National Health Service surgeon and director of medical innovation at Anglia Ruskin University and has founded 4 medical-technology start-ups. He has also cofounded the £500 million Anglia Ruskin MedTech Campus, which will become one of the world's largest health innovation spaces. In 2014, he was appointed as national clinical director for innovation at National Health Service England and in February 2016 became the first national clinical lead for innovation. In this role, he provides clinical leadership and support in delivering improved health outcomes in England, drives the uptake of proven innovations across the National Health Service, promotes economic growth through innovation, and helps make the National Health Service the go-to place on the planet for medical innovation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Managed care in four managed competition OECD health systems.

    PubMed

    Shmueli, Amir; Stam, Piet; Wasem, Jürgen; Trottmann, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Managed care emerged in the American health system in the 1980s as a way to manage suppliers' induced demand and to contain insurers' costs. While in Israel the health insurers have always been managed care organizations, owning health care facilities, employing medical personnel or contracting selectively with independent providers, European insurers have been much more passive, submitting themselves to collective agreements between insurers' and providers' associations, accompanied by extensive government regulation of prices, quantities, and budgets. With the 1990s reforms, and the introduction of risk-adjusted "managed competition", a growing pressure to allow the European insurers to manage their own care - including selective contracting with providers - has emerged, with varying speed of the introduction of policy changes across the individual countries. This paper compares experiences with managed care in Israel, The Netherlands, Germany and Switzerland since the 1990s. After a brief description of the health insurance markets in the four countries, we focus comparatively on the emergence of managed care in the markets for ambulatory care and inpatient market care. We conclude with an evaluation of the current situation and a discussion of selected health policy issues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Security in health-care information systems--current trends.

    PubMed

    Smith, E; Eloff, J H

    1999-04-01

    Ever since health-care information systems have been implemented, their security is being considered an important issue, especially in the light of the fact that their data are deemed to comprise extremely sensitive information. The prospect of storing health information in electronic form raises concerns about patient privacy and data security. Any attempt to introduce computerised health-care information systems should, therefore, guarantee adequate protection of the confidentiality and integrity of patient information. At the same time, the patient information also needs to be readily available to all authorised health-care providers, in order to ensure the proper treatment of the patient. The principal aim of the present paper is, however, not to make a new contribution to the subject of security per se, but rather to give an overview of current trends in the security aspects of health-care information systems. The final section of the paper will be devoted to a number of proposals for further research possibilities in the domain of health-care information systems security.

  17. International comparison of health care systems using resource profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Anell, A.; Willis, M.

    2000-01-01

    The most frequently used bases for comparing international health care resources are health care expenditures, measured either as a fraction of gross domestic product (GDP) or per capita. There are several possible reasons for this, including the widespread availability of historic expenditure figures; the attractiveness of collapsing resource data into a common unit of measurement; and the present focus among OECD member countries and other governments on containing health care costs. Despite important criticisms of this method, relatively few alternatives have been used in practice. A simple framework for comparing data underlying health care systems is presented in this article. It distinguishes measures of real resources, for example human resources, medicines and medical equipment, from measures of financial resources such as expenditures. Measures of real resources are further subdivided according to whether their factor prices are determined primarily in national or global markets. The approach is illustrated using a simple analysis of health care resource profiles for Denmark, France, Germany, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the USA. Comparisons based on measures of both real resources and expenditures can be more useful than conventional comparisons of expenditures alone and can lead to important insights for the future management of health care systems. PMID:10916914

  18. Four proposals for market-based health care system reform.

    PubMed

    Sumner, W

    1994-08-01

    A perfectly free, competitive medical market would not meet many social goals, such as universal access to health care. Micromanagement of interactions between patients and providers does not guarantee quality care and frequently undermines that relationship, to the frustration of all involved. Furthermore, while some North American health care plans are less expensive than others, none have reduced the medical inflation rate to equal the general inflation rate. Markets have always fixed uneven inflation rates in other domains. The suggested reforms could make elective interactions between patients and providers work more like a free market than did any preceding system. The health and life insurance plan creates cost-sensitive consumers, informed by a corporation with significant research incentives and abilities. The FFEB proposal encourages context-sensitive pricing, established by negotiation processes that weigh labor and benefit. Publication of providers' expected outcomes further enriches the information available to consumers and may reduce defensive medicine incentives. A medical career ladder would ease entry and exit from medical professions. These and complementary reforms do not specifically cap spending yet could have a deflationary impact on elective health care prices, while providing incentives to maintain quality. They accomplish these ends by giving more responsibility, information, incentives, and choice to citizens. We could provide most health care in a marketlike environment. We can incorporate these reforms in any convenient order and allow them to compete with alternative schemes. Our next challenge is to design, implement, and evaluate marketlike health care systems.

  19. A Framework for Describing Health Care Delivery Organizations and Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Perry D.; Larson, David B.; Marion, Lucy N.; Sills, Marion R.; Solberg, Leif I.; Zerzan, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Describing, evaluating, and conducting research on the questions raised by comparative effectiveness research and characterizing care delivery organizations of all kinds, from independent individual provider units to large integrated health systems, has become imperative. Recognizing this challenge, the Delivery Systems Committee, a subgroup of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Effective Health Care Stakeholders Group, which represents a wide diversity of perspectives on health care, created a draft framework with domains and elements that may be useful in characterizing various sizes and types of care delivery organizations and may contribute to key outcomes of interest. The framework may serve as the door to further studies in areas in which clear definitions and descriptions are lacking. PMID:24922130

  20. A framework for describing health care delivery organizations and systems.

    PubMed

    Piña, Ileana L; Cohen, Perry D; Larson, David B; Marion, Lucy N; Sills, Marion R; Solberg, Leif I; Zerzan, Judy

    2015-04-01

    Describing, evaluating, and conducting research on the questions raised by comparative effectiveness research and characterizing care delivery organizations of all kinds, from independent individual provider units to large integrated health systems, has become imperative. Recognizing this challenge, the Delivery Systems Committee, a subgroup of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Effective Health Care Stakeholders Group, which represents a wide diversity of perspectives on health care, created a draft framework with domains and elements that may be useful in characterizing various sizes and types of care delivery organizations and may contribute to key outcomes of interest. The framework may serve as the door to further studies in areas in which clear definitions and descriptions are lacking.

  1. [A theoretical analysis of coordination in the field of health care: application to coordinated care systems].

    PubMed

    Sebai, Jihane

    2016-01-01

    Various organizational, functional or structural issues have led to a review of the foundations of the former health care system based on a traditional market segmentation between general practice and hospital medicine, and between health and social sectors and marked by competition between private and public sectors. The current reconfiguration of the health care system has resulted in “new” levers explained by the development of a new organizational reconfiguration of the primary health care model. Coordinated care structures (SSC) have been developed in this context by making coordination the cornerstone of relations between professionals to ensure global, continuous and quality health care. This article highlights the contributions of various theoretical approaches to the understanding of the concept of coordination in the analysis of the current specificity of health care.

  2. Using systems science for population health management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Kong, Nan; Lawley, Mark A; Pagán, José A

    2014-10-01

    Population health management is becoming increasingly important to organizations managing and providing primary care services given ongoing changes in health care delivery and payment systems. The objective of this study is to show how systems science methodologies could be incorporated into population health management to compare different interventions and improve health outcomes. The New York Academy of Medicine Cardiovascular Health Simulation model (an agent-based model) and data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to evaluate a lifestyle program that could be implemented in primary care practice settings. The program targeted Medicare-age adults and focused on improving diet and exercise and reducing weight. The simulation results suggest that there would be significant reductions projected in the proportion of the Medicare-age population with diabetes after the implementation of the proposed lifestyle program for a relatively long term (3 and 5 years). Similar results were found for the subpopulations with high cholesterol, but the proposed intervention would not have a significant effect in the proportion of the population with hypertension over a time period of <5 years. Systems science methodologies can be useful to compare the health outcomes of different interventions. These tools can become an important component of population health management because they can help managers and other decision makers evaluate alternative programs in primary care settings. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Community assessment in a vertically integrated health care system.

    PubMed Central

    Plescia, M; Koontz, S; Laurent, S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this report, the authors present a representative case of the implementation of community assessment and the subsequent application of findings by a large, vertically integrated health care system. METHODS: Geographic information systems technology was used to access and analyze secondary data for a geographically defined community. Primary data included a community survey and asset maps. RESULTS: In this case presentation, information has been collected on demographics, prevalent health problems, access to health care, citizens' perceptions, and community assets. The assessment has been used to plan services for a new health center and to engage community members in health promotion interventions. CONCLUSIONS: Geographically focused assessments help target specific community needs and promote community participation. This project provides a practical application for integrating aspects of medicine and public health. PMID:11344895

  4. Migration of health workers: a challenge for health care system.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Shaista; Masroor, Imrana; Shafqat, Gulnaz

    2012-09-01

    The migration of health workers has resulted in a growing apprehension universally because of its impact on health system of the developing countries. Although the choice to migrate is basically a personal one, however, the overall social and economic circumstances have important impact on the decision to migrate. The "push and pull" factors for migration are disparity in working conditions, pay, lack of promotion opportunities, poor living conditions, desire to gain experience, professional development, family background and family wealth. A strategic approach by the government and other agencies is mandatory for regulating the flow of health workers between countries. A range of policies and interventions are needed to deal with the broader health system issue and problems of health workers that influence their recruitment, retention, deployment and progress.

  5. UK budgetary systems and new health-care technologies.

    PubMed

    McGuire, A; Litt, M

    2003-01-01

    This article outlines the budgetary setting within the UK health-care system. It is argued that while prospective budgets can give rise to efficient resource allocation outcomes, this relies on the budget being set at an appropriate level and the accompanying incentive structures being efficient. The organizational structures and the interrelationships are critical. The recent history of UK National Health Service reforms and expenditure is outlined. It is suggested that until recently, although the budget system has the potential to promote efficiency, the aggregate budget allocated to the NHS has probably been too low given public expectations, technology advances, and preferences for health care. The aggregate budget is due to rise considerably over the next 5 years. While some incentive and regulatory provisions will move the budget toward an efficient allocation many microlevel incentive issues remain. Whether efficient patterns of health-care allocation emerge remains open to debate, however, because the existing incentive mechanisms are not optimal.

  6. Applying Systems Engineering Principles in Improving Health Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kopach-Konrad, Renata; Criswell, Mike; Hasan, Imran; Chakraborty, Santanu; Pekny, Joseph; Doebbeling, Bradley N.

    2007-01-01

    Background In a highly publicized joint report, the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine recently recommended the systematic application of systems engineering approaches for reforming our health care delivery system. For this to happen, medical professionals and managers need to understand and appreciate the power that systems engineering concepts and tools can bring to redesigning and improving health care environments and practices. Objective To present and discuss fundamental concepts and tools of systems engineering and important parallels between systems engineering, health services, and implementation research as it pertains to the care of complex patients. Design An exploratory, qualitative review of systems engineering concepts and overview of ongoing applications of these concepts in the areas of hemodialysis, radiation therapy, and patient flow modeling. Results In this paper, we describe systems engineering as the process of identifying the system of interest, choosing appropriate performance measures, selecting the best modeling tool, studying model properties and behavior under a variety of scenarios, and making design and operational decisions for implementation. Conclusions We discuss challenges and opportunities for bringing people with systems engineering skills into health care. PMID:18026813

  7. [The Chilean Health Care System: the task ahead].

    PubMed

    Goic, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    The most important event in Chilean public health in the XXth Century was the creation of the National Health Service (NHS), in 1952. Systematic public policies for the promotion of health, disease prevention, medical care, and rehabilitation were implemented, while a number of more specific programs were introduced, such as those on infant malnutrition, complementary infant feeding, medical control of pregnant women and healthy infants, infant and adult vaccination, and essential sanitation services. In 1981, a parallel private health care system was introduced in the form of medical care financial institutions, which today cover 15% of the population, as contrasted with the public system, which covers about 80%. From 1952 to 2014, public health care policies made possible a remarkable improvement in Chile's health indexes: downward trends in infant mortality rate (from 117.8 to 7.2 x 1,000 live births), maternal mortality (from 276 to 18.5 x 100,000), undernourished children < 5 years old (from 63% to 0.5%); and upward trends in life expectancy at birth (from 50 to 79,8 years), professional hospital care of births (from 35% to 99.8%), access to drinking water (from 52% to 99%), and access to sanitary sewer (from 21% to 98.9%). This went hand in hand with an improvement in economic and social indexes: per capita income at purchasing power parity increased from US$ 3,827 to US$ 20,894 and poverty decreased from 60% to 14.4% of the population. Related indexes such as illiteracy, average schooling, and years of primary school education, were significantly improved as well. Nevertheless, compared with OECD countries, Chile has a relatively low public investment in health (45.7% of total national investment), a deficit in the number of physicians (1.7 x 1,000 inhabitants) and nurses (4.8 x 1,000), in the number of hospital beds (2.1 x 1,000), and in the availability of generic drugs in the market (30%). Chile and the USA are the two OECD countries with the lowest

  8. The next pandemic: anticipating an overwhelmed health care system.

    PubMed

    Duley, Mary Grace Keating

    2005-10-01

    In September 2005, an overview of current health care system planning efforts was presented to the audience at the Yale University Ethics Symposium on Avian and Pandemic Influenza. The speaker, also the author of this article, provided the audience with a summary of what was being undertaken with the use of federal preparedness funds to improve the overall infrastructure of the health care system. All of Connecticut's 31 acute care hospitals, the Veteran's Administration Hospital in West Haven, Hospital for Special Care, Gaylord Rehabilitation Hospital, Natchaug Psychiatric Hospital, and the state's 13 Community Health Centers are currently recipients of federal preparedness funds. Federal funding for this planning comes from Health Resources and Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Service's National Bioterrorism Hospital Preparedness Program. This article outlines the planning activities around pandemic influenza that the state's health care system partners started in 2004-2005 and also those they are currently participating in or will be participating in the next 12 to 15 months. The article highlights the key objectives and strategies that health care facilities will be using in this planning. There are four major objectives that each health care facility's Emergency Operations Plan must address. They are: increasing bed availability, developing strategies to deal with the potential staffing shortages, developing strategies for dealing with potential critical equipment and pharmaceutical shortages, and, lastly, the implementation of education, training and communication strategies for their health care workers and the public they serve. These plans, and all the activities needed to operationalize the plans, such as education, training, drills, and exercises, will include their key partners, i.e., local health departments, local emergency management, police, fire, and Emergency Medical Services. This article will describe this work plan in

  9. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it.

  10. Mandatory influenza vaccination of health care workers: a first-year success implementation by a community health care system.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Sheila; Poduska, Paul; Mallozzi, Terri; Culler, Frances

    2012-10-01

    Poudre Valley Health System is a private, not-for-profit health care system of more than 5,300 employees. Poudre Valley Health System increased its influenza vaccination coverage rate among health care workers from 68% in 2009 to 95.5% in 2010 after implementing a mandatory influenza vaccination program. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical Dominance and Resistance in Nigeria's Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Alubo, Ogoh; Hunduh, Vitalis

    2016-10-28

    The health care system in Nigeria remains topical because of concerns over unremitting health outcomes, such as maternal and infant mortalities and frequent epidemic outbreaks, and more recently because of regular strikes by health workers. The strikes arise mostly from disputes between medical doctors and other health workers over a range of issues, including salary levels and emoluments, leadership of teaching hospitals, and appointment of the Minister of Health. Other health workers, who allege that doctors are favored in the system, have formed Joint Health Sector Unions to confront the doctors. Both groups have frequently engaged in strikes such that, within the past decade, there has always been a strike or the threat of a strike, a situation that causes disruption of health care services. Two presidential commissions have been instituted, to no avail. With the allegations of favoritism, only government even-handedness in more carefully delineating the areas of inclusion and exclusion in accordance with available legislations may stem the rising tide. Until solutions agreeable to both parties are found, the health system and the Nigerian people will continue to suffer frustrations of avoidable disruption of services.

  12. An integrated comprehensive occupational surveillance system for health care workers.

    PubMed

    Dement, John M; Pompeii, Lisa A; Østbye, Truls; Epling, Carol; Lipscomb, Hester J; James, Tamara; Jacobs, Michael J; Jackson, George; Thomann, Wayne

    2004-06-01

    Workers in the health care industry may be exposed to a variety of work-related stressors including infectious, chemical, and physical agents; ergonomic hazards; psychological hazards; and workplace violence. Many of these hazards lack surveillance systems to evaluate exposures and health outcomes. The development and implementation of a comprehensive surveillance system within the Duke University Health System (DUHS) that tracks occupational exposures and stressors as well as injuries and illnesses among a defined population of health care workers (HCWs) is presented. Human resources job and work location data were used to define the DUHS population at risk. Outcomes and exposure data from existing occupational health and safety programs, health promotion programs, and employee health insurance claims, were linked with human resources data and de-identified to create the Duke Health and Safety Surveillance System (DHSSS). The surveillance system is described and four examples are presented demonstrating how the system has successfully been used to study consequences of work-related stress, hearing conservation program evaluation, risk factors for back pain and inflammation, and exposures to blood and body fluids (BBF). Utilization of existing data, often collected for other purposes, can be successfully integrated and used for occupational health surveillance monitoring of HCWs. Use of the DHSSS for etiologic studies, benchmarking, and intervention program evaluation are discussed. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. A Primary Care System to Improve Health Care Efficiency: Lessons from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Aldulaimi, Sommer; Mora, Francisco E

    2017-01-01

    Ecuador is a country with few resources to spend on health care. Historically, Ecuador has struggled to find a model for health care that is efficient, effective, and available to all people in the country, even those in underserved and rural communities. In 2000, the Ecuador Ministry of Public Health implemented a new system of health care that used primary care as its platform. Since then, Ecuador has been able to increase its health care efficiency, increasing its ranking from 111 of 211 countries worldwide in 2000, to 20 of 211 countries in 2014. This article briefly reviews the new components of the system implemented in Ecuador and examines the tools used to accomplish this. The discussion also compares and contrasts the Ecuador and US systems, and identifies concepts and policies from Ecuador that could improve the US system. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  14. Benefits and Systems of Care for Maternal and Child Health under Health Care Reform: Workshop Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Cynthia H., Ed.

    This report discusses the health care needs of and benefits for women, children, and adolescents in light of national health care reform proposals put forth in 1994, and is based on presentations and discussions at an invitational workshop on maternal and child health. The report asserts that since women and children are disproportionately…

  15. Nine Proposals to Improve Our Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatthorn, Allan A.

    1983-01-01

    This ironic indictment of a health care system that continues to allow people to get sick recommends reforms ranging from a merit pay system for doctors to getting tough on uncooperative patients. Parallels with recent proposals for educational improvement are implicit. (MJL)

  16. Health System Consolidation and Diabetes Care Performance at Ambulatory Clinics.

    PubMed

    Crespin, Daniel J; Christianson, Jon B; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Finch, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    We addressed two questions regarding health system consolidation through the acquisition of ambulatory clinics: (1) Was increasing health system size associated with improved diabetes care performance and (2) Did the diabetes care performance of acquired clinics improve postacquisition? Six hundred sixty-one ambulatory clinics in Minnesota and bordering states that reported performance data from 2007 to 2013. We employed fixed effects regression to determine if increased health system size and being acquired improved clinics' performance. Using our regression results, we estimated the average effect of consolidation on the performance of clinics that were acquired during our study. Publicly reported performance data obtained from Minnesota Community Measurement. Acquired clinics experienced performance improvements starting in their third year postacquisition. By their fifth year postacquisition, acquired clinics had 3.6 percentage points (95 percent confidence interval: 2.0, 5.1) higher performance than if they had never been acquired. Increasing health system size was associated with slight performance improvements at the end of the study. Health systems modestly improved the diabetes care performance of their acquired clinics; however, we found little evidence that systems experienced large, system-wide performance gains by increasing their size. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  17. Evaluation of health care system reform in Hubei Province, China.

    PubMed

    Sang, Shuping; Wang, Zhenkun; Yu, Chuanhua

    2014-02-21

    This study established a set of indicators for and evaluated the effects of health care system reform in Hubei Province (China) from 2009 to 2011 with the purpose of providing guidance to policy-makers regarding health care system reform. The resulting indicators are based on the "Result Chain" logic model and include the following four domains: Inputs and Processes, Outputs, Outcomes and Impact. Health care system reform was evaluated using the weighted TOPSIS and weighted Rank Sum Ratio methods. Ultimately, the study established a set of indicators including four grade-1 indicators, 16 grade-2 indicators and 76 grade-3 indicators. The effects of the reforms increased year by year from 2009 to 2011 in Hubei Province. The health status of urban and rural populations and the accessibility, equity and quality of health services in Hubei Province were improved after the reforms. This sub-national case can be considered an example of a useful approach to the evaluation of the effects of health care system reform, one that could potentially be applied in other provinces or nationally.

  18. Evaluation of Health Care System Reform in Hubei Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Shuping; Wang, Zhenkun; Yu, Chuanhua

    2014-01-01

    This study established a set of indicators for and evaluated the effects of health care system reform in Hubei Province (China) from 2009 to 2011 with the purpose of providing guidance to policy-makers regarding health care system reform. The resulting indicators are based on the “Result Chain” logic model and include the following four domains: Inputs and Processes, Outputs, Outcomes and Impact. Health care system reform was evaluated using the weighted TOPSIS and weighted Rank Sum Ratio methods. Ultimately, the study established a set of indicators including four grade-1 indicators, 16 grade-2 indicators and 76 grade-3 indicators. The effects of the reforms increased year by year from 2009 to 2011 in Hubei Province. The health status of urban and rural populations and the accessibility, equity and quality of health services in Hubei Province were improved after the reforms. This sub-national case can be considered an example of a useful approach to the evaluation of the effects of health care system reform, one that could potentially be applied in other provinces or nationally. PMID:24566052

  19. Rapid Business Transformations in Health Care: A Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulaiba, Refaat A.

    2011-01-01

    The top two priorities of health care business leaders are to constantly improve the quality of health care while striving to contain and reduce the high cost of health care. The Health Care industry, similar to all businesses, is motivated to deliver innovative solutions that accelerate business transformation and increase business capabilities. …

  20. Rapid Business Transformations in Health Care: A Systems Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulaiba, Refaat A.

    2011-01-01

    The top two priorities of health care business leaders are to constantly improve the quality of health care while striving to contain and reduce the high cost of health care. The Health Care industry, similar to all businesses, is motivated to deliver innovative solutions that accelerate business transformation and increase business capabilities. …

  1. Another health care system is possible.

    PubMed

    Benos, Alexis

    2003-01-01

    A statement prepared by groups at the European Social Forum held in Florence in 2002 declares health to be a fundamental and universal right, a right that is being denied by current neoliberal policies. The statement presents some essential principles for maintaining or restoring this right through a European network.

  2. The Nigerian health care system: Need for integrating adequate medical intelligence and surveillance systems

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Menizibeya Osain

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: As an important element of national security, public health not only functions to provide adequate and timely medical care but also track, monitor, and control disease outbreak. The Nigerian health care had suffered several infectious disease outbreaks year after year. Hence, there is need to tackle the problem. This study aims to review the state of the Nigerian health care system and to provide possible recommendations to the worsening state of health care in the country. To give up-to-date recommendations for the Nigerian health care system, this study also aims at reviewing the dynamics of health care in the United States, Britain, and Europe with regards to methods of medical intelligence/surveillance. Materials and Methods: Databases were searched for relevant literatures using the following keywords: Nigerian health care, Nigerian health care system, and Nigerian primary health care system. Additional keywords used in the search were as follows: United States (OR Europe) health care dynamics, Medical Intelligence, Medical Intelligence systems, Public health surveillance systems, Nigerian medical intelligence, Nigerian surveillance systems, and Nigerian health information system. Literatures were searched in scientific databases Pubmed and African Journals OnLine. Internet searches were based on Google and Search Nigeria. Results: Medical intelligence and surveillance represent a very useful component in the health care system and control diseases outbreak, bioattack, etc. There is increasing role of automated-based medical intelligence and surveillance systems, in addition to the traditional manual pattern of document retrieval in advanced medical setting such as those in western and European countries. Conclusion: The Nigerian health care system is poorly developed. No adequate and functional surveillance systems are developed. To achieve success in health care in this modern era, a system well grounded in routine surveillance and medical

  3. Role of consumer information in today's health care system.

    PubMed

    Sangl, J A; Wolf, L F

    1996-01-01

    This overview discusses articles published in this issue of the Health Care Financing Review, entitled "Consumer Information in a Changing Health Care System." The overview describes several trends promoting more active consumer participation in health decisions and how consumer information facilitates that role. Major issues in developing consumer information are presented, stressing how orientation to consumer needs and use of social marketing techniques can yield improvement. The majority of the articles published in this issue of the Review discuss different aspects of information for choice of health plan, ranging from consumer perspectives on their information needs and their comprehension of quality indicators, to methods used for providing such information, such as direct counseling and comparative health plan performance data. The article concludes with thoughts on how we will know if we succeed in developing effective consumer health information.

  4. Patient-centered primary health care: synergy potential for health systems strengthening.

    PubMed

    Stender, S C; Christensen, A

    2013-10-01

    The ultimate goal of government health systems is to provide highly effective equitable services that save lives and reduce morbidity and mortality. The pressure to conform to duplicative global and donor initiatives compounds existing challenges to health systems strengthening such as shortages of human resources for health, weak supply chains, inadequate laboratory services and parallel data management systems. This article illustrates how primary health care, as the point of entry into the health care system for the majority of individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, should be strengthened to ensure that individuals and their communities receive essential, holistic care.

  5. Are performance measurement systems useful? Perceptions from health care.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Chiara; Trucco, Sara

    2017-01-31

    Prior literature identified the use of Performance Measurement Systems (PMS) as crucial in addressing improved processes of care. Moreover, a strategic use of PMS has been found to enhance quality, compared to non-strategic use, although a clear understanding of this linkage is still to be achieved. This paper deals with the test of direct and indirect models related to the link between the strategic use of PMS and the level of improved processes in health care organizations. Indirect models were mediated by the degree of perceived managerial discretion. A PLS analysis on a survey of 97 Italian managers working for health care organizations in the Lombardy region was conducted. The response rate was 77.6%. The strategic use of PMS in health care organizations directly and significantly (p < 0.001) enhances performance in terms of improved processes. Perceived managerial discretion is positively and significantly (p < 0.001) affected by the strategic use of PMS, whereas the mediation effect is non-significant. This study contributes to the literature investigating the design and implementation of a non-financial measurement tool, such as the non-financial information included into a balanced scorecard (BSC), in health care organizations. Managers in health care organizations can benefit from the strategic use of PMS to effectively allocate their time to strategic opportunities and threats, which might arise and affect organizational, output-related performance, such as improving processes.

  6. The French Health Care System; What can We Learn?

    PubMed Central

    El Taguri, A; Nasef, A

    2008-01-01

    All public systems look for the best organizational structure to funnel part of their national income into healthcare services. Appropriate policies may differ widely across country settings. Most healthcare systems fall under one of two broad categories, either Bismark or Beveridge systems. There is no simple ideal model for the organization of health services, but most healthcare systems that follow the Beveridge healthcare model are poor performers. The Libyan Health system is a low responsive, inefficient and underperforming system that lacks goals and/or SMART. (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, Time specific) objectives. A look at different organization models in the world would reinforce efforts to reorganize and improve the performance of the Libyan National Healthcare services. The French Health Care System (FHCS) ranked first according to the WHO and the European Health Consumer Powerhouse. The FHCS was described to have a technically efficient, generous healthcare system that provides the best overall health care. This makes the FHCS a practical model of organization having many of the essential aspects of a modern national health service. In this review, we describe the main features of the FHCS, current challenges and future trends with particular attention paid to aspects that could be of importance to the Libyan Healthcare System. PMID:21499472

  7. Integration of Oral Health into Primary Health Care System: Views of Primary Health Care Workers in Lagos State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogunbodede, Eyitope; Adeniyi, Abiola

    2014-01-01

    The limited access to oral health care in developing countries can be greatly improved by integrating oral health into the Primary Health Care (PHC) system. This study was designed to assess the views of PHC workers on integrating oral health care into the PHC system. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted in two selected local government areas of Lagos State. The instrument contained three sections assessing sociodemographic features, knowledge of common oral diseases and views on integration of oral health into PHC respectively. The mean knowledge score was 7.75 (SD=±1.81), while 60.4% of the respondents had average knowledge scores. Educational status (P=0.018) and designation (P=0.033) were significantly related to the mean knowledge scores. There was no significant difference in the oral health knowledge of the various cadres (P=0.393). Majority (85.4%) of the respondents were willing to include oral health education in their job schedule and 82% believed they needed more training on oral health. The knowledge of the respondents on the causes of the common oral diseases was deficient. Oral health education should be included in the future curriculum of these personnel. PMID:28299117

  8. [The public health care system and rehabilitation actions in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Carla Trevisan Martins; Ribeiro, Marcia Gonçalves; Araújo, Alexandra Prufer; Mello, Lívia Rodrigues; Rubim, Luciana da Cruz; Ferreira, Joyce Espírito Santo

    2010-07-01

    To produce a historical account of rehabilitation actions in the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System (SUS). Search of SciELO, LILACS, and MEDLINE databases for literature published between 1980 and 2009. The following Portuguese search terms were used: Sistema Unico de Saúde, reabilitação, políticas de saúde, assistência médica, história. The English terms "rehabilitation" and "public health" were also used. Federal laws and Ministry of Health manuals available at the city of Rio de Janeiro Coordinating Office for Rehabilitation Programs, Fundação Instituto Oswaldo Cruz library, and in BIREME database were also surveyed. Only a small number of publications were recovered (four books, three Health Ministry manuals, four articles published in Brazil, one master's thesis, and one doctoral dissertation). Nevertheless, analysis of these materials revealed that since many municipalities are still incapable of ensuring the right to universal and comprehensive health care, rehabilitation actions are often carried out in a precarious manner, unsupported by an adequate and comprehensive policy. On the other hand, there have been real improvements in terms of expanding care to the population with special needs. There still are factors hindering the achievement of optimal results in the care to people with special needs. The challenge of action planning must be undertaken especially by municipal governments to ensure an adequate supply of services and thus equity of access and comprehensive health care.

  9. Ecology of medical care in a publicly funded health care system: a registry study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Alberto; Kristiansson, Per M D

    2011-09-01

    To explore the influence of sociodemographic factors on access to appointments with physicians in primary, secondary, and tertiary health care in a publicly funded health care system. A population-based registry study. Different health care settings in Västernorrland county, Sweden. All residents in the county at the end of 2006. The number of people per 1000 residents who had at least one appointment with a physician in an average month in different health care settings. A total of 87 people had appointments with a physician in primary health care, 44 in outpatient clinics at a regional hospital, 20 in an emergency department, 14 in home care, and two in a university hospital outpatient clinic. Twelve were hospitalized at a regional hospital and <1 at the university hospital. Being young or elderly, female, divorced, widowed, and having a contractor as usual source of care were all independently associated with higher odds of receiving primary care. The physician's office in primary care is the setting that has the potential to affect the largest number of people. The extent of the use of health care was independently influenced by all sociodemographic characteristics studied, which highlights the importance of individual factors in future resource allocation. Regarding availability the ecology model provides superior information as compared with the absolute number of physicians' appointments. The prerequisites in Sweden of high-quality registries and unique personal identification numbers encourage future research on the ecology model to optimize accessibility of health care.

  10. Trends Affecting the U.S. Health Care System. Health Planning Information Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerf, Carol

    This integrated review of national trends affecting the health care system is primarily intended to facilitate the planning efforts of health care providers and consumers, Government agencies, medical school administrators, health insurers, and companies in the medical market. It may also be useful to educators as a textbook to give their students…

  11. Interdisciplinary Shared Governance in Ambulatory Care: One Health System's Journey.

    PubMed

    Powers, Sharon; Bacon, Cynthia Thornton

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of shared governance structures in acute care has illustrated the positive relationship between shared decision making and nurse empowerment and positive nurse and patient outcomes. Little is known, however, about interdisciplinary shared governance, and even less is known about shared governance in ambulatory care. This article details one health system's experience with the implementation of an interdisciplinary shared governance structure in ambulatory care over a 4-year period. The authors report lessons learned, positive health system outcomes that resulted including improved communication, better preparedness for accreditation visits, improved assessment of fall risk, and a streamlined documentation system. Also discussed are mechanisms to enhance sustainability of the structure and discussion of future opportunities and challenges.

  12. Mental health in humanitarian settings: shifting focus to care systems.

    PubMed

    Jordans, Mark J D; Tol, Wietse A

    2013-03-01

    Mental health in low- and middle income countries has received increasing attention. This attention has shifted focus, roughly moving from demonstrating the burden of mental health problems, to establishing an evidence base for interventions, to thinking about care delivery frameworks. This paper reviews these trends specifically for humanitarian settings and discusses lessons learned. Notably, that mental health assessments need to go beyond measuring the impact of traumatic events on circumscribed psychiatric disorders; that evidence for effectiveness of interventions is still too weak and its focus too limited; and that development of service delivery in the context of instable community and health systems should be an area of key priority.

  13. [Priority setting, public opinion and health care system in Spain].

    PubMed

    Costa Font, J

    2001-01-01

    To examine the determinants of attitudes towards some "general criteria" guiding the financing, provision and satisfaction of the Spanish health system. First we examine the degree of acceptance of a publicly funded health system such as the use of an intergenerational equity criteria for health care rationing based on patient's age. Second, employing the same sample we analyse the determinants of citizen's satisfaction with the health system in order to identify the profile that defines attitudes of Spanish population to their health system. We undertake a quantitative analysis of the public opinion survey Eurobarometer 49.1 (1998) for a subsample of the Spanish population. The Eurobarometer is a periodical public opinion survey representative of European Union (EU) citizens. Due to the categorical nature of individual responses to public opinion surveys, the model estimated is an ordered probit. The explanatory variables used refer to socio-economic status and political attitudes. There appears to be a consensus on the criteria that public sector should go a way forward from what the public envisages as "essential health care". 73.5% of the populations rejects a libertarian criteria that sustains that individuals are self responsible for funding non-essential health care. This attitude is especially supported by male with leftists political tendencies and high education achievement. The use of age-related criteria to ration health care (fair innings) is rejected by a 81.5% of the population. However, we find that self interest is the main criteria guiding this attitude since elderly and middle and high income individuals tend reject the use of this criteria more than other groups. Satisfaction with the Spanish health system is higher than other southern EU countries, as Italy and Greece but still far from the levels achieved by Scandinavian and northern EU countries. Political attitudes, age and socio-economic status are positively associated with a higher

  14. Assessing health information technology in a national health care system--an example from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chunhuei; Lee, Jwo-Leun; Schoon, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate one core research question: How can health information technology (HIT) be assessed in a national health care system context? We examine this question by taking a systematic approach within a national care system, in which the purpose of HIT is to contribute to a common national health care system's goal. to promote population health in an efficient way. Based on this approach we first develop a framework and our criteria of assessment, and then using Taiwan as a case study, demonstrate how one can apply this framework to assess a national system's HIT. The five criteria we developed are how well does the HIT (1) provide accessible and accurate public health and health care information to the population; (2) collect and provide population health and health care data for government and researchers to analyze population health and processes and outcomes of health care services, (3) provide accessible and timely information that helps to improve provision of cost-effective health care at an institutional level and promotes system-wide efficiency; (4) minimize transaction and administrative costs of the health care system; and (5) establish channels for population participation in governance while also protecting individual privacy. The results indicate that Taiwan has high levels of achievement in two criteria while falling short in the other three. Major lessons we learned from this study are that HIT exists to serve a health care system, and the national health care system context dictates how one assesses its HIT. There is a large body of literature published on the implementation of HIT and its impact on the quality and cost of health care delivery. The vast majority of the literature, however, is focused on a micro institutional level such as a hospital or a bit higher up, on an HMO or health insurance firm. Few have gone further to evaluate the implementation of HIT and its impact on a national health care system

  15. Using patient reports to measure health care system performance.

    PubMed

    Hargraves, J L; Palmer, R H; Zapka, J; Nerenz, D; Frazier, H; Orav, E J; Warner, C; Ingard, J; Neisuler, R

    1993-01-01

    We developed a self-administered patient questionnaire that asks for data concerning the time to receive services (access to care), communication between providers (coordination of care), and follow up after tests and treatment (continuity of care). From these data, we construct rates of performance about the clinical management systems that support provision of these services. Rates of system performance are calculated for indicators using patients' responses to survey questions. These indicators add the number of patients reporting a problem of those patients who have encountered a particular clinical management system. Information derived from 3000 patient questionnaires is matched with data abstracted from health care medical records. The sensitivity and specificity of patient reports are being evaluated for all indicators classified as gold standards for medical records. Indicators considered gold standard items for patient reports are matched for agreement with any information contained in the medical record. Also, patient characteristics associated with accurate reporting is to be assessed using multivariate logistic regression models.

  16. Multiple chronic disorders - health care system’s modern challenge in the Maccabi Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the major challenges health care systems face in modern time is treating chronic disorders. In recent years, the increasing occurrence of multiple chronic disorders (MCC) in single individuals has compounded the complexity of health care. In 2008, it was estimated that worldwide as many as one quarter of the population between the ages of sixty five to sixty nine suffered from two or more chronic conditions and this prevalence rose with age. Clinical guidelines provide guidance for management of single disorders, but not for MCC. The aim of the present study was the study of the prevalence, distribution and impact of MCC in a large Israeli health system. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of MCC in the Maccabi Healthcare System (MHS), Israel’s second largest healthcare service, providing care for approximately two million people. Data regarding chronic conditions was collected through electronic medical records and organizational records, as was demographic and socioeconomic data. Age and sex specific data were compared with previously published data from Scotland. Results Two thirds of the population had two or more chronic disorders. This is significantly higher than previously published rates. A correlation between patient age and number of chronic disorders was found, as was a correlation between number of chronic disorders and low socioeconomic status, with the exception of children due to a high prevalence of learning disabilities, asthma, and visual disturbances. Discussion MCC is very prevalent in the MHS population, increases with age, and except for children is more prevalent in lower socioeconomic classes, possibly due to the a combination of the structure of the Israeli universal insurance and requirements of the ministry of education for exemptions and benefits. A higher than previously reported prevalence of MCC may be due to the longtime use of use of integrated electronic medical records. Conclusions To effectively deal

  17. Evolving Health Care System: Academic Implications for Content and Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzema, Abraham G.

    1987-01-01

    The impact of changing health care systems on the content of pharmaceutical education is examined, including the relationship between basic and applied sciences and between the applied sciences and skill and attitude formation, in both academic and clinical education. The role of pharmacy administration in the curriculum is discussed. (MSE)

  18. Evolving Health Care System: Academic Implications for Content and Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzema, Abraham G.

    1987-01-01

    The impact of changing health care systems on the content of pharmaceutical education is examined, including the relationship between basic and applied sciences and between the applied sciences and skill and attitude formation, in both academic and clinical education. The role of pharmacy administration in the curriculum is discussed. (MSE)

  19. Strategic business planning and development for competitive health care systems.

    PubMed

    Nauert, Roger C

    2005-01-01

    The health care industry has undergone enormous evolutionary changes in recent years. Competitive transitions have accelerated the compelling need for aggressive strategic business planning and dynamic system development. Success is driven by organizational commitments to farsighted market analyses, timely action, and effective management.

  20. Physician density in a two-tiered health care system

    PubMed Central

    Gächter, Martin; Schwazer, Peter; Theurl, Engelbert; Winner, Hannes

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the density of non-contract (private) physicians in a two-tiered health care system, i.e., one with co-existing public and private health care providers. In particular, we analyze how the densities of private and public suppliers of outpatient health care (general practitioners and specialists) are related to each other. Using a panel of 121 Austrian districts between 2002 and 2008, we apply a Hausman–Taylor estimator, which allows to treat each of these densities as endogenous. We find that the density of non-contract specialists is positively associated with the density of non-contract general practitioners, but not significantly related to the density of contract general practitioners. We also observe a negative relationship between the densities of non-contract and contract general practitioners and the ones of non-contract and contract specialists, indicating competitive forces between the private and the public sector of the outpatient health care provision in Austria. Our results contribute to the ongoing debate on the role of non-contract physicians for health care provision in Austria. PMID:22609084

  1. HealthStyles: a new psychographic segmentation system for health care marketers.

    PubMed

    Endresen, K W; Wintz, J C

    1988-01-01

    HealthStyles is a new psychographic segmentation system specifically designed for the health care industry. This segmentation system goes beyond traditional geographic and demographic analysis and examines health-related consumer attitudes and behaviors. Four statistically distinct "styles" of consumer health care preferences have been identified. The profiles of the four groups have substantial marketing implications in terms of design and promotion of products and services. Each segment of consumers also has differing expectations of physician behavior.

  2. Viewpoint: Re-instating a 'public health' system under universal health care in India.

    PubMed

    George, Mathew

    2015-02-01

    I examine possibilities for strengthening essential public health functions in the context of India's drive to implement universal health care. In a country where population health outcomes are rooted in social, political, economic, cultural, and ecological conditions, it is important to have a state mediated public health system that can modify the causes of the major public health problems. This calls for strengthening the social epidemiological approach in public health by demarcating public health functions distinct from medical care. This will be a prerequisite for the growth of the public health profession in the country, because it can offer avenues for newly trained professionals within the country to work in 'core' public health.

  3. Mental health care delivery system in Greece: a critical overview.

    PubMed

    Stefanis, C N; Madianos, M G

    1981-01-01

    The organizational profile of the mental health care delivery system in Greece is mainly characterized by centralization which is reflected in various functional parts of the system (uneven distribution of psychiatric beds and manpower, absence of psychiatric units in general hospitals serving a certain catchment area, lack of community-based psychiatric services, etc.) As a result of this centralized structure there is a centrifugal flow of the mentally ill patients toward Athens and Thessaloniki and consequently the existing possibilities for community-based care as an alternative to inpatient treatment are rather limited. Future immediate objectives of the national social policy planning should be based on decentralization and reorganization of the psychiatric services in order for the mental health delivery system to respond more effectively to the mental health needs of the Greek population.

  4. Demands for religious care in the Taiwanese health system.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2006-03-01

    In order to care ethically nurses need to care holistically; holistic care includes religious/spiritual care. This research attempted to answer the question: Do nurses have the resources to offer religious care? This article discusses only one aspect--the provision of religious care within the Taiwanese health care system. It is assumed that, if hospitals do not provide enough religious services, nurses working in these hospitals cannot be fully ethical beings or cannot respect patients' religious needs. The relevant literature was reviewed, followed by a survey study on the provision of religious facilities and services. Aspects considered are: the religions influences in and on Taiwanese society; the religious needs of patients and their families; strategies that patients use to enable them to cope with their health care problems; professional motives for attuning to patients' religious needs; and hospital provision for meeting the religious and spiritual needs of patients. A survey of nursing executives showed differences between religious service provision in hospitals with and without a hospice ward. The practical implications for hospital management and nursing practice are discussed.

  5. [Time based management in health care system: the chosen aspects].

    PubMed

    Kobza, Joanna; Syrkiewicz-Świtała, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Time-based management (TBM) is the key element of the whole management process. For many years in health care systems of highly developed countries modern and effective methods of time-based management have been implemented in both primary health care and hospitals (emergency departments and operating rooms). Over the past two decades a systematic review of Polish literature (since 1990) and peer reviewed articles published in international journals based on PubMed/Medline (2001-2011) have been carried out. The collected results indicate that the demographic and health changes in the populations are one of the main challenges facing general practitioners in the nearest future. Time-based management needs new and effective tools and skills, i.e., identification of priorities, well designed planning, delegation of the tasks, proper coordination, and creation of primary care teams that include additional members and human resources management. Proper reimbursement of health services, development of IT in health care system, better collection, storage, processing, analysis and exchange of information and research findings will also be needed. The use of innovative technologies, like telemedicine consultations, provides the possibility of reducing waiting time for diagnosis and treatment and in some cases could be applied in terms of secondary care. To improve the efficiency of operating rooms it is necessary to introduce different solutions, such as operating room coordinator involvement, application of automation to guide decision-making or use of robotic tools to assist surgical procedures. Overcrowded emergency departments have a major detrimental effect on the quality of hospital functions, therefore, efforts should be made to reduce them. Time-based management training among physicians and health care management in Poland, as well as the implementation of practice-based solutions still applied in highly developed countries seem to be necessary.

  6. Open architecture for health care systems: the European RICHE experience.

    PubMed

    Frandji, B

    1997-01-01

    Groupe RICHE is bringing to the market of health IT the Open Systems approach allowing a new generation of health information systems to arise with benefit for patients, health care professionals, hospital managers, agencies and citizens. Groupe RICHE is a forum for exchanging information, expertise around open systems in health care. It is open to any organisation interested by open systems in health care and wanting to participate and influence the work done by its user, marketing and technical committees. The Technical Committee is in charge of the maintenance of the architecture and impact the results of industrial experiences on new releases. Any Groupe RICHE member is entitled to participate to this process. This unique approach in Europe allows health care professionals to benefit from applications supporting their business processes, including providing a cooperative working environment, a shared electronic record, in an integrated system where the information is entered only once, customised according to the user needs and available to the administrative applications. This allows Hospital managers to satisfy their health care professionals, to smoothly migrate from their existing environment (protecting their investment), to choose products in a competitive environment, being able to mix and match system components and services from different suppliers, being free to change suppliers without having to replace their existing system (minimising risk), in line with national and regional strategies. For suppliers, this means being able to commercialise products well fitted to their field of competence in a large market, reducing investments and increasing returns. The RICHE approach also allows agencies to define a strategy, allowing to create a supporting infrastructure, organising the market leaving enough freedom to health care organisations and suppliers. Such an approach is based on the definition of an open standard architecture. The RICHE esprit project

  7. Oral health care systems in developing and developed countries.

    PubMed

    Kandelman, Daniel; Arpin, Sophie; Baez, Ramon J; Baehni, Pierre C; Petersen, Poul E

    2012-10-01

    Health care systems are essential for promoting, improving and maintaining health of the population. Through an efficient health service, patients can be advised of disease that may be present and so facilitate treatment; risks factors whose modification could reduce the incidence of disease and illness in the future can be identified, and further, how controlling such factors can contribute to maintain a good quality of life. In developed countries, clinics or hospitals may be supported by health professionals from various specialties that allow their cooperation to benefit the patient; these institutions or clinics may be equipped with the latest technical facilities. In developing countries, health services are mostly directed to provide emergency care only or interventions towards certain age group population. The most common diseases are dental caries and periodontal disease and frequently intervention procedures aim, at treating existing problems and restore teeth and related structure to normal function. It is unfortunate that the low priority given to oral health hinders acquisition of data and establishment of effective periodontal care programmes in developing countries but also in some developed countries where the periodontal profile is also less than satisfactory. Despite the fact that in several developed countries there are advanced programmes oriented to periodontal disease treatments, the concern is related to the lack of preventive oriented treatments. According to data available on periodontal status of populations from developed countries, despite the number of dentists and trained specialists, dental health professionals do not presently meet adequately the need for prevention, focusing mainly on curative care. The need for strengthening disease prevention and health promotion programmes in order to improve oral health conditions and particularly periodontal status in the majority of countries around the world is evident. Unfortunately, in many

  8. Health system strategies supporting transition to adult care

    PubMed Central

    Hepburn, Charlotte Moore; Cohen, Eyal; Bhawra, Jasmin; Weiser, Natalie; Hayeems, Robin Z; Guttmann, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Background The transition from paediatric to adult care is associated with poor clinical outcomes, increased costs and low patient and family satisfaction. However, little is known about health system strategies to streamline and safeguard care for youth transitioning to adult services. Moreover, the needs of children and youth are often excluded from broader health system reform discussions, leaving this population especially vulnerable to system ‘disintegration’. Objectives (1) To explore the international policy profile of paediatric-to-adult care transitions, and (2) to document policy objectives, initiatives and outcomes for jurisdictions publicly committed to addressing transition issues. Methods An international policy scoping review of all publicly available government documents detailing transition-related strategies was completed using a web-based search. Our analysis included a comparable cohort of nine wealthy Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) jurisdictions with Beveridge-style healthcare systems (deemed those most likely to benefit from system-level transition strategies). Results Few jurisdictions address transition of care issues in either health or broader social policy documents. While many jurisdictions refer to standardised practice guidelines, a few report the intention to use powerful policy levers (including physician remuneration and non-physician investments) to facilitate the uptake of best practice. Most jurisdictions do not address the policy infrastructure required to support successful transitions, and rigorous evaluations of transition strategies are rare. Conclusions Despite the well-documented risks and costs associated with a poor transition from paediatric to adult care, little policy attention has been paid to this issue. We recommend that healthcare providers engage health system planners in the design and evaluation of system-level, policy-sensitive transition strategies. PMID:25688098

  9. Race and trust in the health care system.

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, L. Ebony; Cooper, Lisa A.; Ratner, Lloyd E.; LaVeist, Thomas A.; Powe, Neil R.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A legacy of racial discrimination in medical research and the health care system has been linked to a low level of trust in medical research and medical care among African Americans. While racial differences in trust in physicians have been demonstrated, little is known about racial variation in trust of health insurance plans and hospitals. For the present study, the authors analyzed responses to a cross-sectional telephone survey to assess the independent relationship of self-reported race (non-Hispanic black or non-Hispanic white) with trust in physicians, hospitals, and health insurance plans. METHODS: Respondents ages 18-75 years were asked to rate their level of trust in physicians, health insurance plans, and hospitals. Items from the Medical Mistrust Index were used to assess fear and suspicion of hospitals. RESULTS: Responses were analyzed for 49 (42%) non-Hispanic black and 69 (58%) non-Hispanic white respondents (N=118; 94% of total survey population). A majority of respondents trusted physicians (71%) and hospitals (70%), but fewer trusted their health insurance plans (28%). After adjustment for potential confounders, non-Hispanic black respondents were less likely to trust their physicians than non-Hispanic white respondents (adjusted absolute difference 37%; p=0.01) and more likely to trust their health insurance plans (adjusted absolute difference 28%; p=0.04). The difference in trust of hospitals (adjusted absolute difference 13%) was not statistically significant. Non-Hispanic black respondents were more likely than non-Hispanic white respondents to be concerned about personal privacy and the potential for harmful experimentation in hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Patterns of trust in components of our health care system differ by race. Differences in trust may reflect divergent cultural experiences of blacks and whites as well as differences in expectations for care. Improved understanding of these factors is needed if efforts to enhance

  10. The determinants of efficiency in the Canadian health care system.

    PubMed

    Allin, Sara; Grignon, Michel; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the vast number of studies measuring economic efficiency in health care, there has been little take-up of this evidence by policy-makers to date. This study provides an illustration of how a system-level study drawing on best practice in empirical measurement of efficiency may be of practical use to health system decision makers and managers. We make use of the rich data available in Canada to undertake a robust two-stage data envelopment analysis to calculate efficiency at the regional (sub-provincial) level. Decisions about what the health system produces (the outcome to measure efficiency against) and what are the resources it has to produce that outcome were based on interviews and consultation with health system decision makers. Overall, we find large inefficiencies in the Canadian health care system, which could improve outcomes (here, measured as a reduction in treatable causes of death) by between 18 and 35% across our analyses. Also, we find that inefficiencies are the result of three main sets of factors that policy makers could pay attention to: management factors, such as hospital re-admissions; public health factors, such as obesity and smoking rates; and environmental factors such as the population's average income.

  11. Improving the quality of care for children in health systems.

    PubMed Central

    Homer, C J; Kleinman, L C; Goldman, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the state of the art in quality improvement, review its application to care for children, and define the information that will be needed so that care for children can be further improved. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Health services for children exhibit numerous deficiencies in quality of care. The deficiencies cross all major domains of pediatric care--preventive services, acute care, and chronic care--and provide the opportunity for creative application of improvement strategies with a potential to benefit the health and well-being of children. Approaches to quality improvement have changed over the past two decades from those emphasizing the inspection of structural aspects of care and the imposition of sanctions to more dynamic strategies that emphasize measurement and comparison to motivate change; the use of evidence to specify aims for improvement; and the adoption of a variety of management strategies adapted from business and the social sciences to achieve these aims. These modern approaches to quality improvement have rarely been subjected to rigorous testing of their effectiveness. Moreover, their application in pediatrics has been less widespread than in adult healthcare. For children, several aspects about health services, such as the relative rarity of chronic illness, the important effects of social factors on health, and the limited cost, make some of these approaches even more challenging and may require new approaches or meaningful modifications. RECOMMENDATIONS: Research to understand better the general process of improvement will benefit improvement efforts for children. Research that builds the base of knowledge about best practices for children--effectiveness research--will also result in an enhanced capacity for improvement of those systems that care for children's health. Quality of care for children would be enhanced by targeted research examining ways both to foster improvement across segments of society, and to make

  12. Health with equality: a proposal for the incorporation of the gender perspective in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Panisello, Maria Luisa; Pastor, Inma

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the incorporation of the gender perspective in health care-related policies. Based on the recommendations of international organizations, the importance of the incorporation of the gender concept in the health field is analyzed, in order to design health policies that seeking to redress existing inequalities by virtue of sex/gender. This paper presents an analysis of the published guidelines in order to facilitate the incorporation of the gender perspective in health care systems. The article concludes with a proposal of gender-sensitive health indicators that can ensure the gender perspective in health care policies.

  13. [Collective participation and the elicitation of preferences for health care programs: a health system perspective].

    PubMed

    Costa-Font, Joan

    2005-01-01

    The need to increase collective participation in health care decision-making is one of the main health reform issues in publicly financed health systems. The present article examines the arguments for collective participation, the means for improving it and the methods available to elicit collective preferences concerning health programs to be financed by the health system. We review the various collective participation tools, as well as the preference elicitation methods assist priority setting in collectively funded health care systems. Finally, the paper suggests some policy implications for policy making design in Spain.

  14. Electronic Health Object: Transforming Health Care Systems From Static to Interactive and Extensible.

    PubMed

    Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil; Anshari, Muhammad; Younis, Mustafa Z; Kisa, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) store health-related patient information in an electronic format, improving the quality of health care management and increasing efficiency of health care processes. However, in existing information systems, health-related records are generated, managed, and controlled by health care organizations. Patients are perceived as recipients of care and normally cannot directly interact with the system that stores their health-related records; their participation in enriching this information is not possible. Many businesses now allow customers to participate in generating information for their systems, strengthening customer relationships. This trend is supported by Web 2.0, which enables interactivity through various means, including social networks. Health care systems should be able to take advantage of this development. This article proposes a novel framework in addressing the emerging need for interactivity while preserving and extending existing electronic medical data. The framework has 3 dimensions of patient health record: personal, social, and medical dimensions. The framework is designed to empower patients, changing their roles from static recipient of health care services to dynamic and active partners in health care processes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Preparing a health care delivery system for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, J. S.; Stewart, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Space Station is viewed as the beginning of man's permanent presence in space. This paper presents the guidelines being developed by NASA's medical community in preparing a quality, permanent health care delivery system for Space Station. The guidelines will be driven by unique Space Station requirements such as mission duration, crew size, orbit altitude and inclination, EVA frequency and rescue capability. The approach will emphasize developing a health care system that is modular and flexible. It will also incorporate NASA's requirements for growth capability, commonality, maintainability, and advanced technology development. Goals include preventing unnecessary rescue attempts, as well as maintaining the health and safety of the crew. Proper planning will determine the levels of prevention, diagnosis, and treatment necessary to achieve these goals.

  16. [Evidence based medicine (EBM) in health care system and individual patients treatment. Part I. EBM in health care system].

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Włodzimierz; Mielniczuk, Hanna

    2008-01-01

    The cooperation of activities of quality management in health care as HTA, QA, EBM has been considered. It was shown that EBM is independent information system for formulating guidelines and decision making placed between HTA and QA. Althought EBM is based on epidemiological knowledge and inspired epidemiological research is not by itself a part of epidemiology.

  17. Leveraging the military health system as a laboratory for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Dorrance, Kevin A; Ramchandani, Suneil; Neil, Nancy; Fisher, Harry

    2013-02-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act recently passed into law is poised to profoundly affect the provision of medical care in the United States. In today's environment, the foundation for most ongoing comparative effectiveness research is financial claims data. However, there is an alternative that possesses much richer data. That alternative, uniquely positioned to serve as a test system for national health reform efforts, is the Department of Defense Military Health System. This article describes how to leverage the Military Health System and provide effective solutions to current health care reform challenges in the United States.

  18. The ethical self-fashioning of physicians and health care systems in culturally appropriate health care.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie

    2011-06-01

    Diverse advocacy groups have pushed for the recognition of cultural differences in health care as a means to redress inequalities in the U.S., elaborating a form of biocitizenship that draws on evidence of racial and ethnic health disparities to make claims on both the state and health care providers. These efforts led to federal regulations developed by the U.S. Office of Minority Health requiring health care organizations to provide Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services. Based on ethnographic research at workshops and conferences, in-depth interviews with cultural competence trainers, and an analysis of postings to a moderated listserv with 2,000 members, we explore cultural competence trainings as a new type of social technology in which health care providers and institutions are urged to engage in ethical self-fashioning to eliminate prejudice and embody the values of cultural relativism. Health care providers are called on to re-orient their practice (such as habits of gaze, touch, and decision-making) and to act on their own subjectivities to develop an orientation toward Others that is "culturally competent." We explore the diverse methods that cultural competence trainings use to foster a health care provider's ability to be self-reflexive, including face-to-face workshops and classes and self-guided on-line modules. We argue that the hybrid formation of culturally appropriate health care is becoming detached from its social justice origins as it becomes rationalized by and more firmly embedded in the operations of the health care marketplace.

  19. Health-care process improvement decisions: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Walley, Paul; Silvester, Kate; Mountford, Shaun

    2006-01-01

    The paper seeks to investigate decision-making processes within hospital improvement activity, to understand how performance measurement systems influence decisions and potentially lead to unsuccessful or unsustainable process changes. A longitudinal study over a 33-month period investigates key events, decisions and outcomes at one medium-sized hospital in the UK. Process improvement events are monitored using process control methods and by direct observation. The authors took a systems perspective of the health-care processes, ensuring that the impacts of decisions across the health-care supply chain were appropriately interpreted. The research uncovers the ways in which measurement systems disguise failed decisions and encourage managers to take a low-risk approach of "symptomatic relief" when trying to improve performance metrics. This prevents many managers from trying higher risk, sustainable process improvement changes. The behaviour of the health-care system is not understood by many managers and this leads to poor analysis of problem situations. Measurement using time-series methodologies, such as statistical process control are vital for a better understanding of the systems impact of changes. Senior managers must also be aware of the behavioural influence of similar performance measurement systems that discourage sustainable improvement. There is a risk that such experiences will tarnish the reputation of performance management as a discipline. Recommends process control measures as a way of creating an organization memory of how decisions affect performance--something that is currently lacking.

  20. The Oral Health Care Delivery System in 2040: Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Bailit, Howard L

    2017-09-01

    This executive summary for Section 4 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century" project examines the projected oral health care delivery system in 2040 and the likely impact of system changes on dental education. Dental care is at an early stage of major changes with the decline in solo practice and increase in large group practices. These groups are not consolidated at the state level, but further consolidation is expected as they try to increase their negotiating leverage with dental insurers. At this time, there is limited integration of medical and dental care in terms of financing, regulation, education, and delivery. This pattern may change as health maintenance organizations and integrated medical systems begin to offer dental care to their members. By 2040, it is expected that many dentists will be employed in large group practices and working with allied dental staff with expanded duties and other health professionals, and more dental graduates will seek formal postdoctoral training to obtain better positions in group practices.

  1. Mental Health of the Rural Elderly Outreach Program: A Unique Health Care Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckwalter, Kathleen C.; And Others

    This article describes a unique health care delivery system, the Mental Health of the Rural Elderly Outreach Program. The project in designed to identify and provide mental health services to an underserved population, the rural elderly, who are suffering from severe and disabling mental illness. Delivery of mental health services to the rural…

  2. Health system governance to support scale up of mental health care in Ethiopia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Charlotte; Eshetu, Tigist; Alemayehu, Daniel; Fekadu, Abebaw; Semrau, Maya; Thornicroft, Graham; Kigozi, Fred; Marais, Debra Leigh; Petersen, Inge; Alem, Atalay

    2017-01-01

    Ethiopia is embarking upon a ground-breaking plan to address the high levels of unmet need for mental health care by scaling up mental health care integrated within primary care. Health system governance is expected to impact critically upon the success or otherwise of this important initiative. The objective of the study was to explore the barriers, facilitators and potential strategies to promote good health system governance in relation to scale-up of mental health care in Ethiopia. A qualitative study was conducted using in-depth interviews. Key informants were selected purposively from national and regional level policy-makers, planners and service developers (n = 7) and district health office administrators and facility heads (n = 10) from a district in southern Ethiopia where a demonstration project to integrate mental health into primary care is underway. Topic guide development and analysis of transcripts were guided by an established framework for assessing health system governance, adapted for the Ethiopian context. From the perspective of respondents, particular strengths of health system governance in Ethiopia included the presence of high level government support, the existence of a National Mental Health Strategy and the focus on integration of mental health care into primary care to improve the responsiveness of the health system. However, both national and district level respondents expressed concerns about low baseline awareness about mental health care planning, the presence of stigmatising attitudes, the level of transparency about planning decisions, limited leadership for mental health, lack of co-ordination of mental health planning, unreliable supplies of medication, inadequate health management information system indicators for monitoring implementation, unsustainable models for specialist mental health professional involvement in supervision and mentoring of primary care staff, lack of community mobilisation for mental health and low

  3. Technology architecture guidelines for a health care system.

    PubMed

    Jones, D T; Duncan, R; Langberg, M L; Shabot, M M

    2000-01-01

    Although the demand for use of information technology within the healthcare industry is intensifying, relatively little has been written about guidelines to optimize IT investments. A technology architecture is a set of guidelines for technology integration within an enterprise. The architecture is a critical tool in the effort to control information technology (IT) operating costs by constraining the number of technologies supported. A well-designed architecture is also an important aid to integrating disparate applications, data stores and networks. The authors led the development of a thorough, carefully designed technology architecture for a large and rapidly growing health care system. The purpose and design criteria are described, as well as the process for gaining consensus and disseminating the architecture. In addition, the processes for using, maintaining, and handling exceptions are described. The technology architecture is extremely valuable to health care organizations both in controlling costs and promoting integration.

  4. Evaluation of the Arizona health care cost-containment system

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Nelda; Henton, Douglas; Crane, Michael; Haber, Susan; Freund, Deborah; Wrightson, William

    1985-01-01

    This article evaluates Arizona's alternative to the acute portion of Medicaid, the Arizona Health Care Cost-Containment System (AHCCCS), during its first 18 months of operation from October 1982 through March 1984. It focuses on the program's implementation and describes and evaluates the program's innovative features. The features of the program outlined in the original AHCCCS legislation included: Competitive bidding, prepaid capitation of providers, capitation of the State by the Health Care Financing Administration, assignment of gatekeepers, beneficiary copayment, private administration, inclusion of private and public employees and county financed long-term care. An assessment of implementation during the second 18 months of the program reporting on more recent developments and is now being prepared by SRI International. PMID:10311438

  5. Technology architecture guidelines for a health care system.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D. T.; Duncan, R.; Langberg, M. L.; Shabot, M. M.

    2000-01-01

    Although the demand for use of information technology within the healthcare industry is intensifying, relatively little has been written about guidelines to optimize IT investments. A technology architecture is a set of guidelines for technology integration within an enterprise. The architecture is a critical tool in the effort to control information technology (IT) operating costs by constraining the number of technologies supported. A well-designed architecture is also an important aid to integrating disparate applications, data stores and networks. The authors led the development of a thorough, carefully designed technology architecture for a large and rapidly growing health care system. The purpose and design criteria are described, as well as the process for gaining consensus and disseminating the architecture. In addition, the processes for using, maintaining, and handling exceptions are described. The technology architecture is extremely valuable to health care organizations both in controlling costs and promoting integration. PMID:11079913

  6. The electronic medical record system: health care marvel or morass?

    PubMed

    Silverman, D C

    1998-01-01

    The author considers the potential advantages and disadvantages, as well as possible unintended consequences, of introducing electronic medical record systems in health care organizations. Special consideration is given to the issues such information systems raise concerning privacy, confidentiality, and quality of care from both patient and provider perspectives. The potential gains from computerizing medical records include the benefit of instantaneous availability of patients' medical history, treatment regimes, and current health status in routine and emergency clinical situations. Ease of access to this information should reduce adverse outcomes. The added value of a complete and up-to-date medical record immediately available to medical caregivers seems undeniable. The potential disadvantages include issues around patient confidentiality and unauthorized access to records, the enormous capital investment for computer hardware, and system maintenance.

  7. Creating standard cost measures across integrated health care delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ritzwoller, Debra P; Goodman, Michael J; Maciosek, Michael V; Elston Lafata, Jennifer; Meenan, Richard; Hornbrook, Mark C; Fishman, Paul A

    2005-01-01

    Economic analyses are increasingly important in medical research. Accuracy often requires that they include large, diverse populations, which requires data from multiple sources. The difficulty is in making the data comparable across different settings. This article focuses on how to create comparable measures of health care resource use and cost using data from seven health plans and delivery systems participating in the Cancer Research Network's HMOs Investigating Tobacco study. We used a data inventory to identify variation in data capture across sites and used data dictionaries to develop algorithms for assigning standardized cost to the three major components of health care use: outpatient, inpatient, and pharmacy. The plans included in this study varied from fully integrated, closed-panel models to plans and delivery systems that include network or independent physician association components. Information derived from the data inventory and data dictionary instruments demonstrated a substantial variation in both the content and capture of data across all sites and across all components of usage. The methods we employed for cost allocation varied by usage component and were based on our ability to leverage the data points available to best reflect actual resource use. The importance of this article is the method of ascertaining, cataloging, and addressing the within- and between-plan differences in health care resource use. Second, the decisions we made to address the differences between health plans provide other researchers a starting point when creating a cost algorithm for multisite retrospective research.

  8. Decision support system for health care resources allocation

    PubMed Central

    Sebaa, Abderrazak; Nouicer, Amina; Tari, AbdelKamel; Tarik, Ramtani; Abdellah, Ouhab

    2017-01-01

    Background A study about healthcare resources can improve decisions regarding the allotment and mobilization of medical resources and to better guide future investment in the health sector. Aim The aim of this work was to design and implement a decision support system to improve medical resources allocation of Bejaia region. Methods To achieve the retrospective cohort study, we integrated existing clinical databases from different Bejaia department health sector institutions (an Algerian department) to collect information about patients from January 2015 through December 2015. Data integration was performed in a data warehouse using the multi-dimensional model and OLAP cube. During implementation, we used Microsoft SQL server 2012 and Microsoft Excel 2010. Results A medical decision support platform was introduced, and was implemented during the planning stages allowing the management of different medical orientations, it provides better apportionment and allotment of medical resources, and ensures that the allocation of health care resources has optimal effects on improving health. Conclusion In this study, we designed and implemented a decision support system which would improve health care in Bejaia department to especially assist in the selection of the optimum location of health center and hospital, the specialty of the health center, the medical equipment and the medical staff. PMID:28848645

  9. Decision support system for health care resources allocation.

    PubMed

    Sebaa, Abderrazak; Nouicer, Amina; Tari, AbdelKamel; Tarik, Ramtani; Abdellah, Ouhab

    2017-06-01

    A study about healthcare resources can improve decisions regarding the allotment and mobilization of medical resources and to better guide future investment in the health sector. The aim of this work was to design and implement a decision support system to improve medical resources allocation of Bejaia region. To achieve the retrospective cohort study, we integrated existing clinical databases from different Bejaia department health sector institutions (an Algerian department) to collect information about patients from January 2015 through December 2015. Data integration was performed in a data warehouse using the multi-dimensional model and OLAP cube. During implementation, we used Microsoft SQL server 2012 and Microsoft Excel 2010. A medical decision support platform was introduced, and was implemented during the planning stages allowing the management of different medical orientations, it provides better apportionment and allotment of medical resources, and ensures that the allocation of health care resources has optimal effects on improving health. In this study, we designed and implemented a decision support system which would improve health care in Bejaia department to especially assist in the selection of the optimum location of health center and hospital, the specialty of the health center, the medical equipment and the medical staff.

  10. Veterans Affairs Health System Enrollment and Health Care Utilization After the Affordable Care Act: Initial Insights.

    PubMed

    Silva, Abigail; Tarlov, Elizabeth; French, Dustin D; Huo, Zhiping; Martinez, Rachael N; Stroupe, Kevin T

    2016-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law in 2010 and its individual mandate and expanded health care coverage options were implemented in 2014. These provisions may affect Veterans Affairs (VA) enrollment and health care utilization. Using data from two VA regional networks, we examined recent patterns in the number of new VA enrollees and their primary care use. Trends were assessed by enrollment priority group (based on the veteran's severity of service-connected disabilities, exposures, and income level) and a state's Medicaid expansion status. Compared to the same time period in the previous year, the number of new enrollees from low-income priority groups was higher during the open enrollment period and the increase was sharper in Medicaid non-expansion states (25-42%) than in expansion states (20-32%). In addition, low-income patients with a copay requirement who enrolled in the VA during the ACA open enrollment had a lower average number of primary care visits than counterparts who had enrolled in prior time periods (1.73 versus 1.87, p < 0.0001). Although this study is an initial step, more research is required to better understand veterans' decision making and behavior in regard to health care coverage through the ACA and related impacts on VA and non-VA health care utilization and care coordination. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  11. New systems of care for substance use disorders: treatment, finance, and technology under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Pating, David R; Miller, Michael M; Goplerud, Eric; Martin, Judith; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2012-06-01

    This article outlined ways in which persons with addiction are currently underserved by our current health care system. However, with the coming broad scale reforms to our health care system, the access to and availability of high-quality care for substance use disorders will increase. Addiction treatments will continue to be offered through traditional substance abuse care systems, but these will be more integrated with primary care, and less separated as treatment facilities leverage opportunities to blend services, financing mechanisms, and health information systems under federally driven incentive programs. To further these reforms, vigilance will be needed by consumers, clinicians, and policy makers to assure that the unmet treatment needs of individuals with addiction are addressed. Embedded in this article are essential recommendations to facilitate the improvement of care for substance use disorders under health care reform. Ultimately, as addiction care acquires more of the “look and feel” of mainstream medicine, it is important to be mindful of preexisting trends in health care delivery overall that are reflected in recent health reform legislation. Within the world of addiction care, clinicians must move beyond their self-imposed “stigmatization” and sequestration of specialty addiction treatment. The problem for addiction care, as it becomes more “mainstream,” is to not comfortably feel that general slogans like “Treatment Works,” as promoted by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment during its annual Recovery Month celebrations, will meet the expectations of stakeholders outside the specialty addiction treatment community. Rather, the problem is to show exactly how addiction treatment works, and to what extent it works-there have to be metrics showing changes in symptom level or functional outcome, changes in health care utilization, improvements in workplace attendance and

  12. The Spanish health care system: lessons for newly industrialized countries.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, E; Gallo de Puelles, P; Jovell, A J

    1999-06-01

    This article summarizes the organization, financing, and delivery of health care services in Spain, and discusses the elements that made it possible to maintain high levels of health among the population, while spending comparatively fewer resources on the health care system than most industrialized countries. The case of Spain is of particular interest for newly industrialized countries, because of the fast evolution that it has undergone in recent years. Considered, by United Nations' economic standards, a developing country until 1964, Spain became in a few years the fastest growing economy in the world after Japan. By the early 1970s the infant mortality rate was already lower than in Britain or the United States.

  13. Health care system and policy factors influencing engagement in HIV medical care: piecing together the fragments of a fractured health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mugavero, Michael J; Norton, Wynne E; Saag, Michael S

    2011-01-15

    Grounded in a socio-ecological framework, we describe salient health care system and policy factors that influence engagement in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinical care. The discussion emphasizes successful programs and models of service delivery and highlights the limitations of current, fragmented health care system components in supporting effective, efficient, and sustained patient engagement across a continuum of care. A fundamental need exists for improved synergies between funding and service agencies that provide HIV testing, prevention, treatment, and supportive services. We propose a feedback loop whereby actionable, patient-level surveillance of HIV testing and engagement in care activities inform educational outreach and resource allocation to support integrated "testing and linkage to care plus" service delivery. Ongoing surveillance of programmatic performance in achieving defined benchmarks for linkage of patients who have newly diagnosed HIV infection and retention of those patients in care is imperative to iteratively inform further educational efforts, resource allocation, and refinement of service delivery.

  14. Use of information systems as management tools in health care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Fidel

    1995-10-01

    Information systems that can be used as effective management tools in healthcare do not exist. This is because current information systems do not accurately reflect reality and because they do not provide information to important end-users, i.e., clinicians. To reflect reality, healthcare information systems must assess total health care costs. These not only include the direct economic costs (dollars paid) but also the indirect economic costs (dollars lost, spent, or saved) from having a person ill. These systems must also accurately assess the adjusted, qualitative costs of human life and human pain and suffering resulting from the illness and healthcare provided. Once information systems reflect reality, they can be used to manage healthcare by profiling utilization, projecting need, modeling programs, assessing quality of care and establishing guidelines.

  15. Developing Tomorrow's Integrated Community Health Systems: A Leadership Challenge for Public Health and Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Welton, William E.; Kantner, Theodore A.; Katz, Sheila Moriber

    1997-01-01

    As the nation's health system moves away from earlier models to one grounded in population health and market-based systems of care, new challenges arise for public health professionals, primary care practitioners, health plan and institutional managers, and community leaders. Among the challenges are the need to develop creative concepts of organization and accountability and to assure that dynamic, system-oriented structures support the new kind of leadership that is required. Developing tomorrow's integrated community health systems will challenge the leadership skills and integrative abilities of public health professionals, primary care practitioners, and managers. These leaders and their new organizations must, in turn, assume increased accountability for improving community health. PMID:9184684

  16. [Home care for the chronically ill: a self-care health system].

    PubMed

    Silva, Leticia Robles

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on home care for chronically ill adults and seniors. According to our thesis, home care should be understood as a self-care system, and its aim is to guarantee the individual's social and bodily survival. Home care consists of three areas, related to illness, the home, and to life history. Caregiving, usually under women's responsibility, is present throughout the history of the illness and the health-seeking process. The article analyzes these issues in light of the ageing process, the epidemiological changes occurring worldwide, and the urgency to incorporate this analysis into the heath care research agenda.

  17. Princeton HealthCare System name reflects comprehensive services. New brand identity focuses on 'Redefining Care'.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2004-01-01

    The Medical Center at Princeton, Princeton, N.J., introduced its new name last June, both to its community and its internal stakeholders. It is now known as Princeton HealthCare System, a name chosen to reflect its growth and diversity. It's being branded as a unique institution that combines the sensitive, caring serice of a community hospital with the sophisticated care of a teaching hospital.

  18. Reflections on demand-oriented and demand-driven care within the current health care system.

    PubMed

    Rijckmans, Madeleine; Garretsen, Henk; Rijckmans, Jean-François; Janssen, Richard

    2007-12-01

    The authors describe models for the approach to demand-orientated and demand-driven health care as experienced in the Netherlands. The practical operation of the scheme is discussed including implications for financing and other aspects of regulation. The paper concludes that at present a demand-orientated system is feasible, but changes of a fundamental nature would be necessary to institute a successful operation of demand-driven health care, at least in the country the subject of this study.

  19. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  20. The pragmatic clinical trial in a learning health care system.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Roger J

    2016-10-01

    A learning health care system ideally incorporates the ability to adapt to the pace of change, the incorporation of new clinical research paradigms, and leverages electronic health record systems and clinical decision support systems to narrow the divide between research and clinical practice. An adaptive clinical trial can be embedded into the sites and practice of clinical care in a highly pragmatic way to simultaneously generate high-quality data on treatment efficacy and improve the care of patients. This approach can be expanded into a pragmatic platform trial, meaning a trial that is intended to evaluate multiple treatments for a disease or diseases, possibly in combination, and with the available treatments potentially changing over time. This strategy is illustrated using a trial currently being implemented in Europe and funded by the European Union, evaluating three different "domains" of treatments for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia requiring intensive care. Simulation studies demonstrate that this approach has the potential to save lives while identifying the best treatment strategies for this critically ill population. Patients are likely to benefit if we can merge clinical trials and decision support into a single continuous learning process. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. The Australian experiment: how primary health care organizations supported the evolution of a primary health care system.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Caroline; Jackson, Claire L; Marley, John E; Wells, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Primary health care in Australia has undergone 2 decades of change. Starting with a vision for a national health strategy with general practice at its core, Australia established local meso-level primary health care organizations--Divisions of General Practice--moving from focus on individual practitioners to a professional collective local voice. The article identifies how these meso-level organizations have helped the Australian primary health care system evolve by supporting the roll-out of initiatives including national practice accreditation, a focus on quality improvement, expansion of multidisciplinary teams into general practice, regional integration, information technology adoption, and improved access to care. Nevertheless, there are still challenges to ensuring equitable access and the supply and distribution of a primary care workforce, addressing the increasing rates of chronic disease and obesity, and overcoming the fragmentation of funding and accountability in the Australian system.

  2. The Colombian health insurance system and its effect on access to health care.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luz Stella; Salmon, J Warren; Swartzman, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In 1993, the Colombian government sought to reform its health care system under the guidance of international financial institutions (the World Bank and International Monetary Fund). These institutions maintain that individual private health insurance systems are more appropriate than previously established national public health structures for overcoming inequities in health care in developing countries. The reforms carried out following international financial institution guidelines are known as "neoliberal reforms." This qualitative study explores consumer health choices and associated factors, based on interviews with citizens living in Medellin, Colombia, in 2005-2006. The results show that most study participants belonging to low-income and middle-income strata, even with medical expense subsidies, faced significant barriers to accessing health care. Only upper-income participants reported a selection of different options without barriers, such as complementary and alternative medicines, along with private Western biomedicine. This study is unique in that the informal health system is linked to overall neo-liberal policy change.

  3. A Model for Evaluation of Data in Health Care Systems

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the representation of data is discussed which incorporates information and decision theoretic aspects. Several computerized medical systems are used as examples for components of the model. Implications of each component are discussed with reference to empirical research and relevant material in the medical literature. The consequences of this model for health care are primarily in two areas: 1) future design of computerized medical information systems and diagnostic or consultation systems; and 2) optimal utilization of clinical resources, i.e., allocation of decision-making and manpower.

  4. A vision for child health information systems: developing child health information systems to meet medical care and public health needs.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Alan R; Saarlas, Kristin N; Ross, David A

    2004-11-01

    In both the medical care and public health arenas, a variety of information systems have been developed to serve providers and program managers. In general, these systems have not been designed to share information with other information systems and provide comprehensive information about a child's health status to the information user. A number of initiatives are underway to develop integrated information systems. In December 2003, All Kids Count hosted an invitational conference "Developing Child Health Information Systems to Meet Medical Care and Public Health Needs." Through a series of plenary presentations and breakout discussion groups, participants developed a series of recommendations about governance, economic issues, information infrastructure, and uses of information from integrated child health information systems (CHIS). Common threads in the recommendations were: (1) development of a national coalition of stakeholders to promote integration of separate child health information systems within the context of ongoing national initiatives such as the National Health Information Infrastructure and the Public Health Information Network, (2) the need to develop the business and policy cases for integrated CHIS, (3) the need to develop agreement on standards for collecting and transferring information, and (4) the need to get the word out about the importance of integrating separate CHIS to improve health and health services.

  5. [Private health insurance systems, constitution and the right to receive an equitable health care].

    PubMed

    Zúñiga F, Alejandra

    2013-04-01

    This paper analyzes the constitutional problems that the private health system has faced as a result of the recent decisions of the Constitutional Court and the Supreme Court of Chile in defense of the right to health care and nondiscrimination. It also reviews the comparative literature on health systems that have been successful in the task of reconciling the demands of equity and efficiency in the delivery of health care in the private health sector, in accordance with the constitutional principles of equality and nondiscrimination.

  6. Coordinating Systems of Care Using Health Information Technology: Development of the ADHD Care Assistant

    PubMed Central

    Power, Thomas J.; Michel, Jeremy; Mayne, Stephanie; Miller, Jeffrey; Blum, Nathan J.; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Guevara, James P.; Fiks, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Perhaps the two principal venues for the delivery of mental health services are schools and primary care practices. Unfortunately, these systems of care are poorly connected, which may result in care that is fragmented and suboptimal. This article describes the development and implementation of an electronic health record portal, known as the ADHD Care Assistant, to facilitate the sharing of information between schools and primary care offices to promote the use of evidence-based practices for managing children with behavioral health conditions. A feasibility study was conducted across 19 diverse primary care practices with 105 participating providers. Across the practices, 67% of providers activated the system for at least one patient and 32% activated it for five or more cases. Care Assistant use was lower in practices with a relatively high percentage of Medicaid patients (≥ 25%). The article discusses challenges that have arisen among primary care providers, parents, and schools in using the Care Assistant, potential strategies for addressing the challenges, and directions for future research and practice. PMID:28377792

  7. [Prospects of the German Academic Health Science and Health Care System].

    PubMed

    Robra, Bernt-Peter

    2017-01-01

    The German Council of Science and Humanities (Wissenschaftsrat) wants to strengthen the university health system at the interface of the science and the health care systems. Its recent future-proofing recommendations are 2-fold: a) integrated academic structures, called "profile centers", designed to support joint clinical and research opportunities as well as to offer sustainable career tracks to junior scientists (clinician as well as medical scientists) and b) better financing and negotiating power of university health centers and their respective outpatient departments as agents of innovation and providers in the health care system [1]. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. The Unsustainable US Health Care System: A Blueprint for Change

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    As a family physician, I have become increasingly uncomfortable being associated with the US health care system. While shiny, new buildings go up each day, there is still little movement toward a model that will shore up the crumbling foundation. The current delivery system and financing structures are unsustainable. Inequitable distribution of resources continues, and an increasing number of American families do not have access to adequate care. In this essay, patient stories are woven into a narrative that highlights the magnitude of the problem at multiple levels of the system. My intent is not to compare stories, because we all have patients, friends, and family members who have been affected. The purpose of this essay is to encourage each reader to reflect on his or her own experiences and to present an imperative to lead change. PMID:18474890

  9. Indonesia: an assessment of the health state, health care delivery system, and nursing education.

    PubMed

    Strength, D; Cagle, C S

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the exploratory, descriptive study was fourfold: 1) to study the nursing education system in Indonesia, 2) to study the health state and health care delivery system, 3) to present various professional issues to nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals, and 4) to develop additional exchange programs between nursing faculty and students of Indonesia and the United States. Baccalaureate education in Indonesia is in the beginning stages of development. The type of hospital is dependent on the number of specialists and options for care. There is a high IMR and MMR, and a high incidence of infectious diseases. Educational exchange programs for faculty and students have been slow to develop.

  10. Perceived role of primary care physicians in Nova Scotia's reformed health care system. Qualitative study.

    PubMed Central

    Sangster, L. M.; McGuire, D. P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine primary care physicians' perceptions of their role in a reformed health system. DESIGN: Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. SETTING: Province of Nova Scotia. PARTICIPANTS: Purposefully selected sample of 14 practising primary care physicians. MAIN OUTCOME FINDINGS: Participants identified seven aspects of their role: primarily, diagnosis and treatment of patient's medical problems; then coordination, counseling, education, advocacy, disease prevention, and gatekeeping. The range of activities and degree of responsibility assumed by participants, however, varied. Factors affecting role perception fell into three categories: philosophical view of health and medicine, willingness to collaborate, and practical realities. Participants differed in their understanding of primary health care and their overall vision of the health system. Remuneration policies and concerns about sharing accountability were factors preventing an integrated, collaborative approach to care. Personal, patient, and structural realities also limited physicians' roles. CONCLUSIONS: This sample of primary care physicians had diverse perceptions of their role. Results of this study could provide information for identifying issues that need to be addressed to facilitate changes taking place in the health care system. PMID:10889862

  11. [Differences and similarities of primary care in the German and Spanish health care systems].

    PubMed

    Salvador Comino, María Rosa; Krane, Sibylla; Schelling, Jörg; Regife García, Víctor

    2016-02-01

    An efficient primary care is of particular importance for any countries' health care system. Many differences exist on how distinctive countries try to obtain the goal of an efficient, cost-effective primary care for its population. In this article we conducted a selective literature review, which includes both scientific and socio-political publications. The findings are complemented with the experience of a Spanish physician from Seville in her last year of training in family medicine, who completed a four months long rotation in the German health care system. We highlighted different features by comparing both countries, including their health care expenditure, the relation between primary and secondary care, the organization in the academic field and the training of future primary care physicians. It is clear that primary care in both countries plays a central role, have to deal with shortcomings, and in some points one system can learn from the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Measuring system of care core values in a behavioral health system of care.

    PubMed

    Wald, Holly P; Zubritsky, Cynthia D; Jaquette, Nancy

    2014-04-01

    The Comprehensive Services for Children and Their Families or System of Care (SOC) is the largest mental health project ever conducted by the US federal government. These programs are based on a value-driven framework that includes: child/youth centered and family driven practice, community-based practice, and culturally competent practice (Stroul and Friedman in A system of care for children and youth with severe emotional disturbances, Georgetown University Child Development Center, CASSP Technical Assistance Center, Washington, DC, 1986). The aim of this study is to determine the extent of the adoption of SOC values by families, system partners, providers and community organizations in a countywide SOC. Using a retrospective design, data was collected through a system-wide survey and focus groups, which asked respondents to rate the presence of SOC core values prior to and four years following its creation. Results suggest that system partners, provider staff, and families are aware of the changes that have occurred within the system as a result of the SOC.

  13. Accelerating Research Impact in a Learning Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Elwy, A. Rani; Sales, Anne E.; Atkins, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Since 1998, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) has supported more rapid implementation of research into clinical practice. Objectives: With the passage of the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014 (Choice Act), QUERI further evolved to support VHA’s transformation into a Learning Health Care System by aligning science with clinical priority goals based on a strategic planning process and alignment of funding priorities with updated VHA priority goals in response to the Choice Act. Design: QUERI updated its strategic goals in response to independent assessments mandated by the Choice Act that recommended VHA reduce variation in care by providing a clear path to implement best practices. Specifically, QUERI updated its application process to ensure its centers (Programs) focus on cross-cutting VHA priorities and specify roadmaps for implementation of research-informed practices across different settings. QUERI also increased funding for scientific evaluations of the Choice Act and other policies in response to Commission on Care recommendations. Results: QUERI’s national network of Programs deploys effective practices using implementation strategies across different settings. QUERI Choice Act evaluations informed the law’s further implementation, setting the stage for additional rigorous national evaluations of other VHA programs and policies including community provider networks. Conclusions: Grounded in implementation science and evidence-based policy, QUERI serves as an example of how to operationalize core components of a Learning Health Care System, notably through rigorous evaluation and scientific testing of implementation strategies to ultimately reduce variation in quality and improve overall population health. PMID:27997456

  14. Social inequalities in the organization of pregnancy care in a universally funded public health care system.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Georgina; Yelland, Jane; Brown, Stephanie

    2012-02-01

    To examine the social organization of pregnancy care and the extent to which socioeconomic factors affect women's experience of care. We consider these data in the global discussion on taking action to reduce health inequalities. This study draws on cross-sectional data from a large population-based survey of Australian women 6 months after giving birth. Only those women reporting to attend publically-funded models of antenatal care (i.e., public clinic, midwife clinic, shared care, primary medical care, primary midwife care) were included in analyses. Results showed a social patterning in the organization and experience of care with clear links between model of care attended in pregnancy and a number of individual-level indicators of social disadvantage. Our findings show model of care is a salient feature in how women view their care. How women from socially disadvantaged backgrounds navigate available care options are important considerations. Pregnancy care is recognized as an opportunity to intervene to give children 'the best start in life.' Our data show the current system of universally accessible pregnancy care in Australia is failing to support the most vulnerable women and families. This information can inform actions to reduce social disparities during this critical period.

  15. In place of fear: aligning health care planning with system objectives to achieve financial sustainability.

    PubMed

    Birch, Stephen; Murphy, Gail Tomblin; MacKenzie, Adrian; Cumming, Jackie

    2015-04-01

    The financial sustainability of publicly funded health care systems is a challenge to policymakers in many countries as health care absorbs an ever increasing share of both national wealth and government spending. New technology, aging populations and increasing public expectations of the health care system are often cited as reasons why health care systems need ever increasing funding as well as reasons why universal and comprehensive public systems are unsustainable. However, increases in health care spending are not usually linked to corresponding increases in need for care within populations. Attempts to promote financial sustainability of systems such as limiting the range of services is covered or the groups of population covered may compromise their political sustainability as some groups are left to seek private cover for some or all services. In this paper, an alternative view of financial sustainability is presented which identifies the failure of planning and management of health care to reflect needs for care in populations and to integrate planning and management functions for health care expenditure, health care services and the health care workforce. We present a Health Care Sustainability Framework based on disaggregating the health care expenditure into separate planning components. Unlike other approaches to planning health care expenditure, this framework explicitly incorporates population health needs as a determinant of health care requirements, and provides a diagnostic tool for understanding the sources of expenditure increase.

  16. Organisational culture matters for system integration in health care.

    PubMed

    Munir, Samina K; Kay, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of organisational culture for Clinical Information Systems (CIS) integration. The study is based on data collected in intensive care units in the UK and Denmark. Data were collected using qualitative methods, i.e., observations, interviews and shadowing of health care providers, together with a questionnaire at each site. The data are analysed to extract salient variables for CIS integration, and it is shown that these variables can be separated into two categories that describe the 'Actual Usefulness' of the system and the 'Organisational Culture'. This model is then extended to show that CIS integration directly affects the work processes of the organisation, forming an iterative process of change as a CIS is introduced and integrated.

  17. Organisational Culture Matters for System Integration in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Samina K.; Kay, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of organisational culture for Clinical Information Systems (CIS) integration. The study is based on data collected in intensive care units in the UK and Denmark. Data were collected using qualitative methods, i.e., observations, interviews and shadowing of health care providers, together with a questionnaire at each site. The data are analysed to extract salient variables for CIS integration, and it is shown that these variables can be separated into two categories that describe the ‘Actual Usefulness’ of the system and the ‘Organisational Culture’. This model is then extended to show that CIS integration directly affects the work processes of the organisation, forming an iterative process of change as a CIS is introduced and integrated. PMID:14728220

  18. [Improvement of the health care delivery system in war-time: monitoring of servicemen's health status].

    PubMed

    tiurin, M V; sokhranov, M V; Ivchenko, E V; Tsygan, V N; golitsyn, V M; Sil'nitskiĭ, A N; Sokolov, V P; Barsukov, A B

    2014-01-01

    Authors came to conclusion that the constant monitoring of servicemen's health status allows the commanding officer to receive detailed information about combat effectiveness. In case of battle injury or trauma the information used by the medical service will be the base for early health care delivery and organization of evacuation. The information about health status of injured may be used as a base for diagnosis at all stages of evacuation. Authors came to conclusion that individual monitoring of health status will help to further health care delivery system and first stages of medical evacuation.

  19. Accountability for health care: a white paper on leadership and management for the U.S. health care system.

    PubMed

    Schneller, E S

    1997-01-01

    Advancing and managing individual organizational priorities and favorably positioning the organization within the wider system, while remaining within the system's vision, values, mission and strategic plan, constitutes the great the paradox of modern health care management. A new cohort of managers, skilled as change agents for linking-pin organizations, will be necessary to assure accountable management in an environment where no one unit, department, organization, and perhaps no system possesses all of the competencies necessary for provision of care.

  20. Rapid assessment of infrastructure of primary health care facilities - a relevant instrument for health care systems management.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Stefan; Ngoli, Baltazar; Flessa, Steffen

    2015-05-01

    Health care infrastructure constitutes a major component of the structural quality of a health system. Infrastructural deficiencies of health services are reported in literature and research. A number of instruments exist for the assessment of infrastructure. However, no easy-to-use instruments to assess health facility infrastructure in developing countries are available. Present tools are not applicable for a rapid assessment by health facility staff. Therefore, health information systems lack data on facility infrastructure. A rapid assessment tool for the infrastructure of primary health care facilities was developed by the authors and pilot-tested in Tanzania. The tool measures the quality of all infrastructural components comprehensively and with high standardization. Ratings use a 2-1-0 scheme which is frequently used in Tanzanian health care services. Infrastructural indicators and indices are obtained from the assessment and serve for reporting and tracing of interventions. The tool was pilot-tested in Tanga Region (Tanzania). The pilot test covered seven primary care facilities in the range between dispensary and district hospital. The assessment encompassed the facilities as entities as well as 42 facility buildings and 80 pieces of technical medical equipment. A full assessment of facility infrastructure was undertaken by health care professionals while the rapid assessment was performed by facility staff. Serious infrastructural deficiencies were revealed. The rapid assessment tool proved a reliable instrument of routine data collection by health facility staff. The authors recommend integrating the rapid assessment tool in the health information systems of developing countries. Health authorities in a decentralized health system are thus enabled to detect infrastructural deficiencies and trace the effects of interventions. The tool can lay the data foundation for district facility infrastructure management.

  1. Envisioning a Learning Health Care System: The Electronic Primary Care Research Network, A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Brendan C.; Peterson, Kevin A.; Speedie, Stuart; Taweel, Adel; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Hobbs, F. D. Richard

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The learning health care system refers to the cycle of turning health care data into knowledge, translating that knowledge into practice, and creating new data by means of advanced information technology. The electronic Primary Care Research Network (ePCRN) was a project, funded by the US National Institutes of Health, with the aim to facilitate clinical research using primary care electronic health records (EHRs). METHODS We identified the requirements necessary to deliver clinical studies via a distributed electronic network linked to EHRs. After we explored a variety of informatics solutions, we constructed a functional prototype of the software. We then explored the barriers to adoption of the prototype software within US practice-based research networks. RESULTS We developed a system to assist in the identification of eligible cohorts from EHR data. To preserve privacy, counts and flagging were performed remotely, and no data were transferred out of the EHR. A lack of batch export facilities from EHR systems and ambiguities in the coding of clinical data, such as blood pressure, have so far prevented a full-scale deployment. We created an international consortium and a model for sharing further ePCRN development across a variety of ongoing projects in the United States and Europe. CONCLUSIONS A means of accessing health care data for research is not sufficient in itself to deliver a learning health care system. EHR systems need to use sophisticated tools to capture and preserve rich clinical context in coded data, and business models need to be developed that incentivize all stakeholders from clinicians to vendors to participate in the system. PMID:22230831

  2. Large-System Transformation in Health Care: A Realist Review

    PubMed Central

    Best, Allan; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Lewis, Steven; Saul, Jessie E; Carroll, Simon; Bitz, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Context An evidence base that addresses issues of complexity and context is urgently needed for large-system transformation (LST) and health care reform. Fundamental conceptual and methodological challenges also must be addressed. The Saskatchewan Ministry of Health in Canada requested a six-month synthesis project to guide four major policy development and strategy initiatives focused on patient- and family-centered care, primary health care renewal, quality improvement, and surgical wait lists. The aims of the review were to analyze examples of successful and less successful transformation initiatives, to synthesize knowledge of the underlying mechanisms, to clarify the role of government, and to outline options for evaluation. Methods We used realist review, whose working assumption is that a particular intervention triggers particular mechanisms of change. Mechanisms may be more or less effective in producing their intended outcomes, depending on their interaction with various contextual factors. We explain the variations in outcome as the interplay between context and mechanisms. We nested this analytic approach in a macro framing of complex adaptive systems (CAS). Findings Our rapid realist review identified five “simple rules” of LST that were likely to enhance the success of the target initiatives: (1) blend designated leadership with distributed leadership; (2) establish feedback loops; (3) attend to history; (4) engage physicians; and (5) include patients and families. These principles play out differently in different contexts affecting human behavior (and thereby contributing to change) through a wide range of different mechanisms. Conclusions Realist review methodology can be applied in combination with a complex system lens on published literature to produce a knowledge synthesis that informs a prospective change effort in large-system transformation. A collaborative process engaging both research producers and research users contributes to local

  3. [Perceptions of primary care physicians in Madrid on the austerity measures in the health care system].

    PubMed

    Heras-Mosteiro, Julio; Otero-García, Laura; Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Aranaz-Andrés, Jesús María

    2016-01-01

    To address the current economic crisis, governments have promoted austerity measures that have affected the taxpayer-funded health system. We report the findings of a study exploring the perceptions of primary care physicians in Madrid (Spain) on measures implemented in the Spanish health system. We carried out a qualitative study in two primary health care centres located in two neighbourhoods with unemployment and migrant population rates above the average of those in Madrid. Interviews were conducted with 12 primary health care physicians. Interview data were analysed by using thematic analysis and by adopting some elements of the grounded theory approach. Two categories were identified: evaluation of austerity measures and evaluation of decision-making in this process. Respondents believed there was a need to promote measures to improve the taxpayer-funded health system, but expressed their disagreement with the measures implemented. They considered that the measures were not evidence-based and responded to the need to decrease public health care expenditure in the short term. Respondents believed that they had not been properly informed about the measures and that there was adequate professional participation in the prioritization, selection and implementation of measures. They considered physician participation to be essential in the decision-making process because physicians have a more patient-centred view and have first-hand knowledge of areas requiring improvement in the system. It is essential that public authorities actively involve health care professionals in decision-making processes to ensure the implementation of evidence-based measures with strong professional support, thus maintaining the quality of care. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Remodeling of legacy systems in health care using UML.

    PubMed

    Garde, Sebastian; Knaup, Petra; Herold, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Research projects in the field of Medical Informatics often involve the development of application systems. Usually they are developed over a longer period of time, so that at a certain point of time a systematically planned reimplementation is necessary. The first step of reimplementation should be a systematic and comprehensive remodeling. When using UML for this task a systematic approach for remodeling activities is missing. Therefore, we developed a method for remodeling of legacy systems (Qumquad) and applied it to DOSPO, a documentation and therapy planning system for pediatric oncology. Qumquad helps to systematically carry out three steps: the modeling of the current actual state of the application system, the systematic identification of weak points and the development of a target concept for reimplementation considering the identified weak points. Results show that this approach is valuable and feasible and could be applied to various application systems in health care.

  5. 76 FR 63356 - Proposed Information Collection (Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Collection (Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY... forms of information technology. Title: Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel... third party industry surveys to determine locality pay system for certain health care personnel. VA...

  6. 76 FR 78738 - Agency Information Collection (Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel... INFORMATION: Title: Locality Pay System for Nurses and Other Health Care Personnel. OMB Control Number: 2900... determine locality pay system for certain health care personnel. VA medical facility Directors will use the...

  7. Physicians' interactions with health care teams and systems in the care of dying patients: perspectives of dying patients, family members, and health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Carline, Jan D; Curtis, J Randall; Wenrich, Marjorie D; Shannon, Sarah E; Ambrozy, Donna M; Ramsey, Paul G

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the specific physician skills required to interact with health care systems in order to provide high quality care at the end of life. We used focus groups of patients with terminal diseases, family members, nurses and social workers from hospice or acute care settings, and physicians. We performed content analysis based on grounded theory. Groups were interviewed. Two domains were found related to physician interactions with health care systems: 1) access and continuity, and 2) team communication and coordination. Components of these domains most frequently mentioned included taking as much time as needed with the patient, accessibility, and respect shown in working with health team members. This study highlights the need for both physicians and health care systems to improve accessibility for patients and families and increase coordination of efforts between health care team members when working with dying patients and their families.

  8. An innovative national health care waste management system in Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Toktobaev, Nurjan; Emmanuel, Jorge; Djumalieva, Gulmira; Kravtsov, Alexei; Schüth, Tobias

    2015-02-01

    A novel low-cost health care waste management system was implemented in all rural hospitals in Kyrgyzstan. The components of the Kyrgyz model include mechanical needle removers, segregation using autoclavable containers, safe transport and storage, autoclave treatment, documentation, recycling of sterilized plastic and metal parts, cement pits for anatomical waste, composting of garden wastes, training, equipment maintenance, and management by safety and quality committees. The gravity-displacement autoclaves were fitted with filters to remove pathogens from the air exhaust. Operating parameters for the autoclaves were determined by thermal and biological tests. A hospital survey showed an average 33% annual cost savings compared to previous costs for waste management. All general hospitals with >25 beds except in the capital Bishkek use the new system, corresponding to 67.3% of all hospital beds. The investment amounted to US$0.61 per capita covered. Acceptance of the new system by the staff, cost savings, revenues from recycled materials, documented improvements in occupational safety, capacity building, and institutionalization enhance the sustainability of the Kyrgyz health care waste management system.

  9. Health care seeking behaviour and utilisation in a multiple health insurance system: does insurance affiliation matter?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many countries striving to achieve universal health insurance coverage have done so by means of multiple health insurance funds covering different population groups. However, existence of multiple health insurance funds may also cause variation in access to health care, due to the differential revenue raising capacities and benefit packages offered by the various funds resulting in inequity and inefficiency within the health system. This paper examines how the existence of multiple health insurance funds affects health care seeking behaviour and utilisation among members of the Community Health Fund, the National Health Insurance Fund and non-members in two districts in Tanzania. Methods Using household survey data collected in 2011 with a sample of 3290 individuals, the study uses a multinomial logit model to examine the influence of predisposing, enabling and need characteristics on the probability of seeking care and choice of provider. Results Generally, health insurance is found to increase the probability of seeking care and reduce delays. However, the probability, timing of seeking care and choice of provider varies across the CHF and NHIF members. Conclusions Reducing fragmentation is necessary to provide opportunities for redistribution and to promote equity in utilisation of health services. Improvement in the delivery of services is crucial for achievement of improved access and financial protection and for increased enrolment into the CHF, which is essential for broadening redistribution and cross-subsidisation to promote equity. PMID:24645876

  10. Health care seeking behaviour and utilisation in a multiple health insurance system: does insurance affiliation matter?

    PubMed

    Chomi, Eunice Nahyuha; Mujinja, Phares G M; Enemark, Ulrika; Hansen, Kristian; Kiwara, Angwara Dennis

    2014-03-19

    Many countries striving to achieve universal health insurance coverage have done so by means of multiple health insurance funds covering different population groups. However, existence of multiple health insurance funds may also cause variation in access to health care, due to the differential revenue raising capacities and benefit packages offered by the various funds resulting in inequity and inefficiency within the health system. This paper examines how the existence of multiple health insurance funds affects health care seeking behaviour and utilisation among members of the Community Health Fund, the National Health Insurance Fund and non-members in two districts in Tanzania. Using household survey data collected in 2011 with a sample of 3290 individuals, the study uses a multinomial logit model to examine the influence of predisposing, enabling and need characteristics on the probability of seeking care and choice of provider. Generally, health insurance is found to increase the probability of seeking care and reduce delays. However, the probability, timing of seeking care and choice of provider varies across the CHF and NHIF members. Reducing fragmentation is necessary to provide opportunities for redistribution and to promote equity in utilisation of health services. Improvement in the delivery of services is crucial for achievement of improved access and financial protection and for increased enrolment into the CHF, which is essential for broadening redistribution and cross-subsidisation to promote equity.

  11. Impact Of Health Care Delivery System Innovations On Total Cost Of Care.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin W; Bir, Anupa; Freeman, Nikki L B; Koethe, Benjamin C; Cohen, Julia; Day, Timothy J

    2017-03-01

    Using delivery system innovations to advance health care reform continues to be of widespread interest. However, it is difficult to generalize about the success of specific types of innovations, since they have been examined in only a few studies. To gain a broader perspective, we analyzed the results of forty-three ambulatory care programs funded by the first round of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation's Health Care Innovations Awards. The innovations' impacts on total cost of care were estimated by independent evaluators using multivariable difference-in-differences models. Through the first two years, most of the innovations did not show a significant effect on total cost of care. Using meta-regression, we assessed the effects on costs of five common components of these innovations. Innovations that used health information technology or community health workers achieved the greatest cost savings. Savings were also relatively large in programs that targeted clinically fragile patients-clinically complex populations at risk for disease progression. While the magnitude of these effects was often substantial, none achieved conventional levels of significance in our analyses. Meta-analyses of a larger number of delivery system innovations are needed to more clearly establish their potential for patient care cost savings.

  12. Navigating an Educational Program through the Treacherous 90s: Dynamics of the Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ostenburg, Paul

    1991-01-01

    Health care system changes since 1965 are reviewed. Areas in which hospital dental care can contribute to improved dental services are discussed, including the promotion of dentistry as primary care, progress in obtaining adequate reimbursement for oral health care, integration with other health professions, and improvement of credentialing and…

  13. Is U.S. health care an appropriate system? A strategic perspective from systems science

    PubMed Central

    Janecka, Ivo P

    2009-01-01

    Context Systems science provides organizational principles supported by biologic findings that can be applied to any organization; any incongruence indicates an incomplete or an already failing system. U.S. health care is commonly referred to as a system that consumes an ever- increasing percentage of the gross domestic product and delivers seemingly diminishing value. Objective To perform a comparative study of U.S. health care with the principles of systems science and, if feasible, propose solutions. Design General systems theory provides the theoretical foundation for this observational research. Main Outcome Measures A degree of compliance of U.S. health care with systems principles and its space-time functional location within the dynamic systems model. Results of comparative analysis U.S. health care is an incomplete system further threatened by the fact that it functions in the zone of chaos within the dynamic systems model. Conclusion Complying with systems science principles and the congruence of pertinent cycles, U.S. health care would likely dramatically improve its value creation for all of society as well as its resiliency and long-term sustainability. Immediate corrective steps could be taken: Prioritize and incentivize health over care; restore fiscal soundness by combining health and life insurance for the benefit of the insured and the payer; rebalance horizontal/providers and vertical/government hierarchies. PMID:19121210

  14. Applications of the INTELSAT system to remote health care

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleter, Andrea

    1991-01-01

    INTELSAT, the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization, is a not-for-profit commercial cooperate of 124 member nations, created on 20 August 1964. It owns and operates a global system of communications satellites that provides international telecommunications services to 180 countries, territories, and dependencies, and domestic telecommunications services to 40 nations. INTELSAT has actively encouraged the use of satellites for both telemedicine and disaster relief. Topics discussed include: INTELSAT domestic/regional services; use of transportable antennas; INTELNET; using the existing telecommunications infrastructure for remote health care applications: Project Access; INTELSAT's role in disaster telecommunications efforts; and how INTELSAT's existing infrastructure can be used for disaster telecommunications.

  15. South Texas Veterans Health Care System Mobile Health Clinic: Business Case Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    diabetes, HIV/AIDs, and cancer treatment and therapy. The system has a National Institute of Health (NIH) funded General Clinical Research Center, a...Bend Division (V/ CBD ) includes primary care outpatient clinics located in Harlingen, McAllen, Corpus Christi, and Laredo. The new Harlingen facility...care expansion into rural areas. In FY11, the V/ CBD will be designated as its own healthcare system, making it the fourth healthcare system in VISN 17

  16. Information integration in health care organizations: The case of a European health system.

    PubMed

    Calciolari, Stefano; Buccoliero, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Information system integration is an important dimension of a company's information system maturity and plays a relevant role in meeting information needs and accountability targets. However, no generalizable evidence exists about whether and how the main integrating technologies influence information system integration in health care organizations. This study examined how integrating technologies are adopted in public health care organizations and chief information officers' (CIOs) perceptions about their influence on information system integration. We used primary data on integrating technologies' adoption and CIOs' perception regarding information system integration in public health care organizations. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multinomial logistic regression were used to examine the relationship between CIOs' perception about information system integration and the adopted technologies. Data from 90 health care organizations were available for analyses. Integrating technologies are relatively diffused in public health care organizations, and CIOs seem to shape information system toward integrated architectures. There is a significant positive (although modest, .3) correlation between the number of integrating technologies adopted and the CIO's satisfaction with them. However, regression analysis suggests that organizations covering a broader spectrum of these technologies are less likely to have their CIO reporting main problems concerning integration in the administrative area of the information system compared with the clinical area and where the two areas overlap. Integrating technologies are associated with less perceived problems in the information system administrative area rather than in other areas. Because CIOs play the role of information resource allocators, by influencing information system toward integrated architecture, health care organization leaders should foster cooperation between CIOs and medical staff to enhance information system

  17. Report of a Resident Health-Medical Care Survey. Southwest New Mexico Community Health Education Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulsen, Roger L.

    This survey was conducted to provide informational inputs for planning and establishing a community health education system in southwest New Mexico. Information was gathered concerning the opinions of typical area residents regarding needed health-medical care facilities, personnel training needs, services, personnel requisite to their well-being,…

  18. Health system challenges to integration of mental health delivery in primary care in Kenya--perspectives of primary care health workers.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Rachel; Othieno, Caleb; Okeyo, Stephen; Aruwa, Julyan; Kingora, James; Jenkins, Ben

    2013-09-30

    Health system weaknesses in Africa are broadly well known, constraining progress on reducing the burden of both communicable and non-communicable disease (Afr Health Monitor, Special issue, 2011, 14-24), and the key challenges in leadership, governance, health workforce, medical products, vaccines and technologies, information, finance and service delivery have been well described (Int Arch Med, 2008, 1:27). This paper uses focus group methodology to explore health worker perspectives on the challenges posed to integration of mental health into primary care by generic health system weakness. Two ninety minute focus groups were conducted in Nyanza province, a poor agricultural region of Kenya, with 20 health workers drawn from a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a mental health training programme for primary care, 10 from the intervention group clinics where staff had received the training programme, and 10 health workers from the control group where staff had not received the training). These focus group discussions suggested that there are a number of generic health system weaknesses in Kenya which impact on the ability of health workers to care for clients with mental health problems and to implement new skills acquired during a mental health continuing professional development training programmes. These weaknesses include the medicine supply, health management information system, district level supervision to primary care clinics, the lack of attention to mental health in the national health sector targets, and especially its absence in district level targets, which results in the exclusion of mental health from such district level supervision as exists, and the lack of awareness in the district management team about mental health. The lack of mental health coverage included in HIV training courses experienced by the health workers was also striking, as was the intensive focus during district supervision on HIV to the detriment of other

  19. Health system support for childbirth care in Southern Tanzania: results from a health facility census.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Claudia; Ronsmans, Carine; Penfold, Suzanne; Maokola, Werner; Manzi, Fatuma; Jaribu, Jenny; Mbaruku, Godfrey; Mshinda, Hassan; Tanner, Marcel; Schellenberg, Joanna

    2013-10-30

    Progress towards reaching Millennium Development Goals four (child health) and five (maternal health) is lagging behind, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, despite increasing efforts to scale up high impact interventions. Increasing the proportion of birth attended by a skilled attendant is a main indicator of progress, but not much is known about the quality of childbirth care delivered by these skilled attendants. With a view to reducing maternal mortality through health systems improvement we describe the care routinely offered in childbirth at dispensaries, health centres and hospitals in five districts in rural Southern Tanzania. We use data from a health facility census assessing 159 facilities in five districts in early 2009. A structural and operational assessment was undertaken based on staff reports using a modular questionnaire assessing staffing, work load, equipment and supplies as well as interventions routinely implemented during childbirth. Health centres and dispensaries attended a median of eight and four deliveries every month respectively. Dispensaries had a median of 2.5 (IQR 2-3) health workers including auxiliary staff instead of the recommended four clinical officer and certified nurses. Only 28% of first-line facilities (dispensaries and health centres) reported offering active management in the third stage of labour (AMTSL). Essential childbirth care comprising eight interventions including AMTSL, infection prevention, partograph use including foetal monitoring and newborn care including early breastfeeding, thermal care at birth and prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum was offered by 5% of dispensaries, 38% of health centres and 50% of hospitals consistently. No first-line facility had provided all signal functions for emergency obstetric complications in the previous six months. Essential interventions for childbirth care are not routinely implemented in first-line facilities or hospitals. Dispensaries have both low staffing and low

  20. [Military medical and health care system in the Song Dynasty].

    PubMed

    DU, J

    2016-05-01

    The military medical and health care system in the Song Dynasty manifested as two aspects, namely disease prevention and medical treatment. Disease prevention included ensuring food and drink safety, avoiding dangerous stations and enjoying regular vacations, etc. Medical treatment included sending medical officials to patrol, stationing military physicians to follow up, applying emergency programs, establishing military medical and pharmacy centers, dispensing required medicines, and accommodating and nursing sick and injured personnel, etc. Meanwhile, the imperial court also supervised the implementation of military medical mechanism, in order to check the soldiers' foods, check and restrict the military physicians' responsibilities, etc., which did play a positive role in protecting soldier's health, guaranteeing the military combat effectiveness, and maintaining national security.

  1. The Care management Information system for the home Care Network (SI GESCAD): support for care coordination and continuity of care in the Brazilian Unified health system (SUS).

    PubMed

    Pires, Maria Raquel Gomes Maia; Gottems, Leila Bernarda Donato; Vasconcelos Filho, José Eurico; Silva, Kênia Lara; Gamarski, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The present article describes the development of the initial version of the Brazilian Care Management Information System for the Home Care Network (SI GESCAD). This system was created to enhance comprehensive care, care coordination and the continuity of care provided to the patients, family and caretakers of the Home Care (HC) program. We also present a reflection on the contributions, limitations and possibilities of the SI GESCAD within the scope of the Home Care Network of the Brazilian Unified Health System (RAS-AD). This was a study on technology production based on a multi-method protocol. It discussed software engineering and human-computer interaction (HCI) based on user-centered design, as well as evolutionary and interactive software process (prototyping and spiral). A functional prototype of the GESCAD was finalized, which allowed for the management of HC to take into consideration the patient's social context, family and caretakers. The system also proved to help in the management of activities of daily living (ADLs), clinical care and the monitoring of variables associated with type 2 HC. The SI GESCAD allowed for a more horizontal work process for HC teams at the RAS-AD/SUS level of care, with positive repercussions on care coordination and continuity of care.

  2. Chronic disease management systems registries in rural health care.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Anne; Fraser-Maginn, Roslyn; Mueller, Keith J

    2006-05-01

    Health care quality is being addressed from a variety of policy perspectives. The 2001 Institute of Medicine report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, calls for sweeping action involving a five-part strategy for change in the U.S. health care system. This agenda for change includes use of evidence-based approaches to address common conditions, the majority of which are chronic. A Chronic Disease Management System (CDMS), or registry, is a tool that helps providers efficiently collect and analyze patient information to promote quality care for the rural population. CDMSs can provide a technological entry point for the impending use of Electronic Medical Records. A CDMS is a patient-centered electronic database tool that helps providers diagnose, treat, and manage chronic diseases. The purpose of this brief is to discuss the different types of CDMSs used by a sample of 14 state organizations and 19 local rural clinics in Maine, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Carolina, Washington, and Wisconsin. As part of a larger study examining the challenges and innovations in implementing disease management programs in rural areas, we conducted interviews with national, state, and local contacts. During interviews, respondents helped us understand the usefulness and functionalities of commonly used CDMSs in rural facilities. Our focus was on the use of CDMSs in the management of diabetes, a disease prevalent in rural populations. (1) CDMSs are readily available to rural clinics and are being implemented and maintained by clinic staff with minimal expenditures for technology. (2) Use of a standardized system in a collaborative helps provide data comparisons and share costs involved with technical assistance services across the group.

  3. Usefulness of a Regional Health Care Information System in primary care: a case study.

    PubMed

    Maass, Marianne C; Asikainen, Paula; Mäenpää, Tiina; Wanne, Olli; Suominen, Tarja

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe some benefits and possible cost consequences of computer based access to specialised health care information. A before-after activity analysis regarding 20 diabetic patients' clinical appointments was performed in a Health Centre in Satakunta region in Finland. Cost data, an interview, time-and-motion studies, and flow charts based on modelling were applied. Access to up-to-date diagnostic information reduced redundant clinical re-appointments, repeated tests, and mail orders for missing data. Timely access to diagnostic information brought about several benefits regarding workflow, patient care, and disease management. These benefits resulted in theoretical net cost savings. The study results indicated that Regional Information Systems may be useful tools to support performance and improve efficiency. However, further studies are required in order to verify how the monetary savings would impact the performance of Health Care Units.

  4. Organization of ambulatory care provision: a critical determinant of health system performance in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Berman, P

    2000-01-01

    Success in the provision of ambulatory personal health services, i.e. providing individuals with treatment for acute illness and preventive health care on an ambulatory basis, is the most significant contributor to the health care system's performance in most developing countries. Ambulatory personal health care has the potential to contribute the largest immediate gains in health status in populations, especially for the poor. At present, such health care accounts for the largest share of the total health expenditure in most lower income countries. It frequently comprises the largest share of the financial burden on households associated with health care consumption, which is typically regressively distributed. The "organization" of ambulatory personal health services is a critical determinant of the health system's performance which, at present, is poorly understood and insufficiently considered in policies and programmes for reforming health care systems. This article begins with a brief analysis of the importance of ambulatory care in the overall health system performance and this is followed by a summary of the inadequate global data on ambulatory care organization. It then defines the concept of "macro organization of health care" at a system level. Outlined also is a framework for analysing the organization of health care services and the major pathways through which the organization of ambulatory personal health care services can affect system performance. Examples of recent policy interventions to influence primary care organization--both government and nongovernmental providers and market structure--are reviewed. It is argued that the characteristics of health care markets in developing countries and of most primary care goods result in relatively diverse and competitive environments for ambulatory care services, compared with other types of health care. Therefore, governments will be required to use a variety of approaches beyond direct public provision

  5. Organization of ambulatory care provision: a critical determinant of health system performance in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P.

    2000-01-01

    Success in the provision of ambulatory personal health services, i.e. providing individuals with treatment for acute illness and preventive health care on an ambulatory basis, is the most significant contributor to the health care system's performance in most developing countries. Ambulatory personal health care has the potential to contribute the largest immediate gains in health status in populations, especially for the poor. At present, such health care accounts for the largest share of the total health expenditure in most lower income countries. It frequently comprises the largest share of the financial burden on households associated with health care consumption, which is typically regressively distributed. The "organization" of ambulatory personal health services is a critical determinant of the health system's performance which, at present, is poorly understood and insufficiently considered in policies and programmes for reforming health care systems. This article begins with a brief analysis of the importance of ambulatory care in the overall health system performance and this is followed by a summary of the inadequate global data on ambulatory care organization. It then defines the concept of "macro organization of health care" at a system level. Outlined also is a framework for analysing the organization of health care services and the major pathways through which the organization of ambulatory personal health care services can affect system performance. Examples of recent policy interventions to influence primary care organization--both government and nongovernmental providers and market structure--are reviewed. It is argued that the characteristics of health care markets in developing countries and of most primary care goods result in relatively diverse and competitive environments for ambulatory care services, compared with other types of health care. Therefore, governments will be required to use a variety of approaches beyond direct public provision

  6. Examining the complexity and variation of health care system distrust across neighborhoods: Implications for preventive health care1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tse-Chuan; Chen, I-Chien; Noah, Aggie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently, the institutional performance model has been used to explain the increased distrust of health care system by arguing that distrust is a function of individuals’ perceptions on the quality of life in neighborhood and social institutions. We examined (1) whether individuals assess two dimensions of distrust consistently, (2) if the multilevel institutional performance model explains the variation of distrust, and (3) how distrust patterns affect preventive health care behaviors. Methodology Using data from 9,497 respondents in 914 census tracts (neighborhoods) in Philadelphia, we examined the patterns of how individuals evaluate the competence and values distrust using the Multilevel Latent Class Analysis (MLCA), and then investigated how neighborhood environment factors are associated with distrust patterns. Finally, we used regression to examine the relationships between distrust patterns and preventive health care. Findings The MLCA identified four distrust patterns: Believers, Doubters, Competence Skeptics, and Values Skeptics. We found that 55 % of the individuals evaluated competence and values distrust coherently, with Believers reporting low levels and Doubters having high levels of distrust. Competence and Values Skeptics assessed distrust inconsistently. Believers were the least likely to reside in socioeconomically disadvantaged and racially segregated neighborhoods than other patterns. In contrast to Doubters, Believers were more likely to use preventive health care, even after controlling for other socioeconomic factors including insurance coverage. Practical implications Our findings suggest that distrust patterns are function of neighborhood conditions and distrust patterns are associated with preventive health care. This study provides important policy implications for health care and future interventions. PMID:26435564

  7. Lesbian parents negotiating the health care system in Australia.

    PubMed

    McNair, Ruth; Brown, Rhonda; Perlesz, Amaryll; Lindsay, Jo; De Vaus, David; Pitts, Marian

    2008-02-01

    Twenty Australian lesbian-parented families were interviewed in multigenerational family groups about the interface between their public and private worlds. Experiences of the health care bureaucracy were difficult, whereas many participants found individual providers to be approachable and caring. Three strategies were used for disclosure of their sexual orientation to health care providers: private, proud, and passive. Influences on the strategy used included family formation, role of the non-birth parent, geographic location, and expected continuity of care. Parents displayed a high degree of thoughtful planning in utilizing their preferred disclosure strategy in order to optimize safety, particularly for their children.

  8. Care for technology dependent children and their relationship with the health care systems.

    PubMed

    Okido, Aline Cristiane Cavicchioli; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2015-01-01

    to understand the experience of care delivery to technology dependent children based on the mothers' experience. exploratory study with qualitative approach, based on the theoretical framework of medical anthropology and the narrative method. Twelve mothers participated and, as the technique to obtain the narratives, open interviews were held at the participants' homes. the narratives were organized into three thematic categories: the family system, identifying the care forms, the association between popular and scientific knowledge and the participation of the social network; the professional system, which discusses the relations between professionals and family, the hegemony of the biomedical model and the role of nursing; and the popular system, presenting popular care practices like spirituality and religiosity. the study provided support for a health care project that takes into account the families' moral and symbolic values and beliefs in view of the illness of a technology-dependent child. The results found can contribute towards changes in the health work process, so that its foundation is guided not only by the biomedical model, allowing the integration of the sociocultural dimensions into the health care movement.

  9. Care for technology dependent children and their relationship with the health care systems1

    PubMed Central

    Okido, Aline Cristiane Cavicchioli; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the experience of care delivery to technology dependent children based on the mothers' experience. METHOD: exploratory study with qualitative approach, based on the theoretical framework of medical anthropology and the narrative method. Twelve mothers participated and, as the technique to obtain the narratives, open interviews were held at the participants' homes. RESULTS: the narratives were organized into three thematic categories: the family system, identifying the care forms, the association between popular and scientific knowledge and the participation of the social network; the professional system, which discusses the relations between professionals and family, the hegemony of the biomedical model and the role of nursing; and the popular system, presenting popular care practices like spirituality and religiosity. CONCLUSION: the study provided support for a health care project that takes into account the families' moral and symbolic values and beliefs in view of the illness of a technology-dependent child. The results found can contribute towards changes in the health work process, so that its foundation is guided not only by the biomedical model, allowing the integration of the sociocultural dimensions into the health care movement. PMID:26039300

  10. Work stress of primary care physicians in the US, UK and German health care systems.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Johannes; Shackelton, Rebecca; Link, Carol; Marceau, Lisa; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf; McKinlay, John

    2010-07-01

    Work-related stress among physicians has been an issue of growing concern in recent years. How and why this may vary between different health care systems remains poorly understood. Using an established theoretical model (effort-reward imbalance), this study analyses levels of work stress among primary care physicians (PCPs) in three different health care systems, the United States, the United Kingdom and Germany. Whether professional autonomy and specific features of the work environment are associated with work stress and account for possible country differences are examined. Data are derived from self-administered questionnaires obtained from 640 randomly sampled physicians recruited for an international comparative study of medical decision making conducted from 2005 to 2007. Results demonstrate country-specific differences in work stress with the highest level in Germany, intermediate level in the US and lowest level among UK physicians. A negative correlation between professional autonomy and work stress is observed in all three countries, but neither this association nor features of the work environment account for the observed country differences. Whether there will be adequate numbers of PCPs, or even a field of primary care in the future, is of increasing concern in several countries. To the extent that work-related stress contributes to this, identification of its organizational correlates in different health care systems may offer opportunities for remedial interventions.

  11. Physical activity promotion in the health care system.

    PubMed

    Vuori, Ilkka M; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) have great potential in the prevention, management, and rehabilitation of a variety of diseases, but this potential has not been fully realized in clinical practice. The health care system (HCS) could do much more to support patients in increasing their PA and ET. However, counseling on ET is not used widely by the HCS owing partly to attitudes but mainly to practical obstacles. Extensive searches of MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and ScienceDirect for literature published between January 1, 2000, and January 31, 2013, provided data to assess the critical characteristics of ET counseling. The evidence reveals that especially brief ET counseling is an efficient, effective, and cost-effective means to increase PA and ET and to bring considerable clinical benefits to various patient groups. Furthermore, it can be practiced as part of the routine work of the HCS. However, there is a need and feasible means to increase the use and improve the quality of ET counseling. To include PA and ET promotion as important means of comprehensive health care and disease management, a fundamental change is needed. Because exercise is medicine, it should be seen and dealt with in the same ways as pharmaceuticals and other medical interventions regarding the basic and continuing education and training of health care personnel and processes to assess its needs and to prescribe and deliver it, to reimburse the services related to it, and to fund research on its efficacy, effectiveness, feasibility, and interactions and comparability with other preventive, therapeutic, and rehabilitative modalities. This change requires credible, strong, and skillful advocacy inside the medical community and the HCS.

  12. Creonization of health care.

    PubMed

    Bulger, R J

    1990-01-01

    As prefigured in the Greek tragedy Antigone, one of the primary conflicts in contemporary health care is that between humane concern for the individual and concern for society at large and administrative rules. The computerization of the health care system and development of large data bases will create new forms of this conflict that will challenge the self-definition of health care and health care professionals.

  13. Coaches. A missing link in the health care system.

    PubMed

    Brown, B R; Butterfield, S A

    1992-02-01

    The number of children and adolescents who participate in interscholastic athletics demands attention to the quality of the coaching they receive and to the opportunities that the athlete-coach relationship provides for modification of high-risk behaviors, social skills training, and character formation. Although the need for coaches has increased due to the advent of girls' athletic programs, which was mandated by Title IX legislation, only a minority of states require certification for coaches who work in school systems. Four coaching curricula are summarized and contrasted: the American Coaching Effectiveness Program, the curriculum of the National Youth Sports Coaches Association, the Athletic Health Care System, and the Coach Effectiveness Training Program. Recommendations for coach certification by states, physician advocacy for coaching standards, and improved sports medicine services are discussed.

  14. A situational analysis of ocular health promotion in the South African primary health-care system.

    PubMed

    Sithole, Hlupheka Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    South Africa has a serious burden of avoidable blindness and visual impairment, which may be due to poor ocular health promotional policies and programs or implementation. Therefore, this paper sought to critically analyse the South African primary health-care policies and programs, to identify the components of ocular health promotional policies and programs as well as how they are currently being implemented and to suggest areas that can be improved in order to minimise the burden of blindness and visual impairment. Triangulated quantitative and qualitative research methods were used in the study. Questionnaire and interviews were used to solicit data from national and provincial managers of different health directorates. Eye-care managers from each province also completed the questionnaire. Furthermore, relevant health policy and program documents from national and provincial departments of health were studied to identify areas relating to ocular health promotion. The study found varying degrees of implementation of various ocular health promotional activities in the provinces with the majority of respondents (62 per cent) indicating that ocular health promotion was not part of their responsibility and another 81 per cent revealing that vision screening does not form part of their health promotional programs. It further revealed a lack of a dedicated directorate for ocular health-care issues and the absence of an integrated ocular health promotional policy. Ocular health promotional activities were absent in other provinces. This may be a major contributing factor to poor ocular health promotion in South Africa and hence, the high prevalence of blindness and visual impairment. Therefore, it is recommended that an integrated ocular health promotional model (directorate and policies) be developed and be part of the South African primary health-care system. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  15. Measuring geographic inequities in the Portuguese health care system: an estimation of hospital care needs.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Monica Duarte; Bevan, Gwyn

    2003-12-01

    Portugal created a NHS to achieve greater equity of access to health care. Successive governments continued to assert the importance of equity in the face of evidence of inequities in supply of hospital resources, but lacked methods to provide sound information on the degree of inequities in Portugal and hence how to achieve greater equity. Capitation formulae have been increasingly used in other countries with a NHS to measure geographical inequities and allocate resources to reduce them. The main objective of this paper was to develop a capitation formula to measure need for hospital care for the Portuguese system by transferring this technology from methods used in other countries, and, in particular, in England. We find, however, problems with the common use of standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) as a measure of need and found age-specific mortality ratios to offer more soundly-based estimates. We also raise questions on the use of empirical estimates of utilisation of health care by age and sex as they appear to reflect inadequacies of health care in Portugal. We also believe it is important to improve knowledge of health insurance and care outside the NHS. Our results show that there are considerable inequities on the distribution of hospital resources in Portugal.

  16. Workforce requirements for a primary oral health care system.

    PubMed

    van Palenstein Helderman, W; Mikx, F; Truin, G J; Hoang, T H; Pham, H L

    2000-12-01

    To present the case for a primary health care (PHC) approach for dental care in Vietnam, and thereby contribute to a better understanding of the oral health problems that exist in many developing countries. Information was obtained in Vietnam through discussions with dental and medical authorities of provincial health offices, educational institutions, hospitals, health centres and schools and by collecting data from record books and reports. Dentistry lacks a PHC strategy and consequently urgent oral care and oral disease prevention and control are not available for the majority of the population in Vietnam. The curriculum of dental students and dental auxiliaries is not adequately directed to the oral health needs of the population. The present number of dental personnel is too low. A basic oral health care package (BOHCP) advocated by the WHO which could be incorporated into primary health services at sub-district level and in the school dental service would be most suitable to meet the oral health needs of the population in Vietnam. The oral health education component of the BOHCP may have more impact when it is conducted in close collaboration with non-dental health personnel and lay persons. The curriculum of dental personnel should be adjusted to meet the requirements of their future tasks. Dental auxiliaries, provided they are well trained can carry out the BOHCP. Consequently, there is a large need for this type of dental personnel in Vietnam.

  17. Registered nurse turnover and the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Jones, C B

    1996-01-01

    Changes in health care delivery and cyclic fluctuations in the registered nurse (RN) labor market affect health care costs, access, and quality. This study provides insight into one factor central to these issues, the job-change behavior of RNs. The theory of human capital provides the foundation to guide investigation, and econometric modeling is used to explore relationships among study variables. Model results show clear differences in job change behavior of nurses employed in hospital and nonhospital settings. These differences are a reflection, not only of individual nurse preferences, but also of wages, working conditions, and opportunities associated with various health care settings. Understanding these relationships is essential to leaders in the nursing profession as they plan for and respond to changes in health care delivery.

  18. Ethnic segregation in Kosovo's post-war health care system.

    PubMed

    Bloom, J D; Hoxha, I; Sambunjak, D; Sondorp, E

    2007-10-01

    Seven years after the end of war in Kosovo, Final Status Negotiations have begun to determine the long-term political future of the province. This article provides an overview of the present situation regarding ethnic groups and their relations in Kosovo's health care system that might be helpful in preparing for the array of potential ramifications and repercussions that could arise at the conclusion of the negotiations. A review of the literature (including grey) was performed, and 16 interviews and two focus groups with key informants were conducted in Kosovo during October and November 2004. In addition, six informal discussions were held in-person or by telephone in London. Information collected in 2004 was re-confirmed and partially updated in October and November 2005, when three additional interviews were conducted in Kosovo. Ongoing ethnic tensions in Kosovo, mainly between the Albanian and Serb populations, perpetuate a rigidly segregated health care system. Some other minority communities, such as the Roma, Ashkali and Egyptians, are afflicted by the double burden of getting caught up in the middle of these ethnic disputes and at the same time suffering from poverty and discrimination. While efforts have been put forward to promote peace-building within Kosovo's post-war health sector, very little progress has been achieved in fostering ethnic integration, reconciliation, cooperation or even co-existence. This failure reflects Kosovo's broader unresolved inter-ethnic problems. Final Status Negotiations are one of the last opportunities for the international community to address the problems of ethnic segregation in the province.

  19. Teamwork in health care.

    PubMed

    Landman, Natalie; Aannestad, Liv K; Smoldt, Robert K; Cortese, Denis A

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that maintaining and improving the health of the population, and doing so in a financially sustainable manner, requires the coordination of acute medical care with long-term care, and social support services, that is, team-based care. Despite a growing body of evidence on the benefits of team-based care, the health care ecosystem remains "resistant" to a broader implementation of such care models. This resistance is a function of both system-wide and organizational barriers, which result primarily from fragmentation in reimbursement for health care services, regulatory restrictions, and the siloed nature of health professional education. To promote the broader adoption of team-based care models, the health care system must transition to pay for value reimbursement, as well as break down the educational silos and move toward team-based and value-based education of health professionals.

  20. Working toward financial sustainability of integrated behavioral health services in a public health care system.

    PubMed

    Monson, Samantha Pelican; Sheldon, J Christopher; Ivey, Laurie C; Kinman, Carissa R; Beacham, Abbie O

    2012-06-01

    The need, benefit, and desirability of behavioral health integration in primary care is generally accepted and has acquired widespread positive regard. However, in many health care settings the economics, business aspects, and financial sustainability of practice in integrated care settings remains an unsolved puzzle. Organizational administrators may be reluctant to expand behavioral health services without evidence that such programs offer clear financial benefits and financial sustainability. The tendency among mental health professionals is to consider positive clinical outcomes (e.g., reduced depression) as being globally valued indicators of program success. Although such outcomes may be highly valued by primary care providers and patients, administrative decision makers may require demonstration of more tangible financial outcomes. These differing views require program developers and evaluators to consider multiple outcome domains including clinical/psychological symptom reduction, potential cost benefit, and cost offset. The authors describe a process by which a pilot demonstration project is being implemented to demonstrate programmatic outcomes with a focus on the following: 1) clinician efficiency, 2) improved health outcomes, and 3) direct revenue generation associated with the inclusion of integrated primary care in a public health care system. The authors subsequently offer specific future directions and commentary regarding financial evaluation in each of these domains.

  1. Personal health systems and value creation mechanisms in occupational health care.

    PubMed

    Auvinen, Ari-Matti

    2007-01-01

    Personal Health Systems are believed to have great business potential among citizens, but they might reach also an important market in occupational health care. However, in reaching the occupational health care market, it is important to understand the value creation and value configuration mechanisms of this particular market. This paper also claims that in such a business-to-business market service integrators are needed to compose for the various customers specific offerings combing a tailored variety of products and services to suit their specific needs.

  2. "More Universal for Some than Others": Canada's Health Care System and the Role of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, B. Allan; Coady, Maureen; Gregoire, Helene; Folinsbee, Sue; Kraglund-Gauthier, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Health and health care in Canada is a story of high ideals, complex policy agreements, moments of raging public controversy, and the creation of a national health system that is the envy of many other nations. Despite its many health care achievements, evidence is mounting that good health is far from being universally accessible to all Canadians.…

  3. "More Universal for Some than Others": Canada's Health Care System and the Role of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, B. Allan; Coady, Maureen; Gregoire, Helene; Folinsbee, Sue; Kraglund-Gauthier, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Health and health care in Canada is a story of high ideals, complex policy agreements, moments of raging public controversy, and the creation of a national health system that is the envy of many other nations. Despite its many health care achievements, evidence is mounting that good health is far from being universally accessible to all Canadians.…

  4. Economic aspect of health care systems. Advantage and disadvantage incentives in different systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, G J; Feldman, S R

    2000-04-01

    European health care delivery systems illustrate the effect of economic incentives on health care delivery. Each country faces the issue of trying to balance the desire for economic efficiency with comprehensive, quality medical care. Without careful use of economic incentives achievable with central control, one gets to pick only two of the three desired goods--high quality, low cost, and comprehensive coverage. In the United States, payment approaches for health care have been undergoing tremendous changes since the early 1980s. These changes have escalated during the 1990s. The basic approach for reimbursing hospital care has been completely restructured by many payers for care, and payment approaches for physicians and long-term care providers also are being restructured. Financing approaches vary from provider to provider and payer to payer, and financing approaches will continue to evolve over time. In the traditional fee-for-service reimbursement system, the incentive to physicians is to do more because more services lead to more revenue. The use of incentives to influence health care practitioners' behavior is common. Incentives are generally financial in nature and expose health care providers to some risk or reward for certain patterns of behavior. Some common incentives used in managed care include capitation payment, in which a physician is paid a fixed fee, regardless of the number of services administered; bonus distribution; and withhold accounts, through which a practitioner stands to gain or lose some amount of money for overuse or underuse of medical resources against budget. In many countries, a strengthening of the position of primary care providers can be observed: Finland, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and now the United States. General practitioners are assumed to function as a gatekeeper to second-line care, such as specialist care, prescription drugs, and hospital care. A further step is to

  5. Assessing the contribution of the dental care delivery system to oral health care disparities.

    PubMed

    Pourat, Nadereh; Andersen, Ronald M; Marcus, Marvin

    2015-01-01

    Existing studies of disparities in access to oral health care for underserved populations often focus on supply measures such as number of dentists. This approach overlooks the importance of other aspects of the dental care delivery system, such as personal and practice characteristics of dentists, that determine the capacity to provide care. This study aims to assess the role of such characteristics in access to care of underserved populations. We merged data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey and a 2003 survey of California dentists in their Medical Study Service Areas (MSSAs). We examined the role of overall supply and other characteristics of dentists in income and racial/ethnic disparities in access, which was measured by annual dental visits and unmet need for dental care due to costs. We found that some characteristics of MSSAs, including higher proportions of dentists who were older, white, busy or overworked, and did not accept public insurance or discounted fees, inhibited access for low-income and minority populations. These findings highlight the importance of monitoring characteristics of dentists in addition to traditional measures of supply such as licensed-dentist-to-population ratios. The findings identify specific aspects of the delivery system such as dentists' participation in Medicaid, provision of discounted care, busyness, age, race/ethnicity, and gender that should be regularly monitored. These data will provide a better understanding of how the dental care delivery system is organized and how this knowledge can be used to develop more narrowly targeted policies to alleviate disparities. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Effect of Integrated Personalized Health Care System on Middle-Aged and Elderly Women's Health

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hiye-Ja; Park, Seung-Hun; Ju, Se-Jin; Jin, Mi-Hwa; Park, Boc-Nam

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Body weight, body mass index (BMI), body fat, and blood pressure are important indicators of a person's health. In this experimental study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an integrated personalized health care system, Health Improvement and Management System (HIMS)-everyday, which instantly provides subjects with biofeedback on their measured body weight, BMI, body fat and blood pressure using a database that stores subjects-customized information. Methods The subjects of this study used the system once or twice a week for 8 weeks. We analyzed the changes in their body weight, BMI, body fat, and blood pressure according to their respective usage of the system, and analyzed the changes in their perceived health status and health promoting behavior accordingly. Results Subjects' body weight, BMI, and blood pressure decreased significantly with respect to their individual usage of the system. Subjects who used the system more frequently showed significant improvement in their body weight, BMI, and body fat. However, subjects' perceived health status and health promoting behavior did not improve significantly. Conclusions The study showed that the biofeedback-based personalized health care system was effective in controlling middle-aged and elderly women' body weight, BMI, body fat, and blood pressure. PMID:23115743

  7. When Health Systems Are Barriers to Health Care: Challenges Faced by Uninsured Mexican Kidney Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kierans, Ciara; Padilla-Altamira, Cesar; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Ibarra-Hernandez, Margarita; Mercado, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Kidney Disease disproportionately affects the poor in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). Mexico exemplifies the difficulties faced in supporting Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) and providing equitable patient care, despite recent attempts at health reform. The objective of this study is to document the challenges faced by uninsured, poor Mexican families when attempting to access RRT. Methods The article takes an ethnographic approach, using interviewing and observation to generate detailed accounts of the problems that accompany attempts to secure care. The study, based in the state of Jalisco, comprised interviews with patients, their caregivers, health and social care professionals, among others. Observations were carried out in both clinical and social settings. Results In the absence of organised health information and stable pathways to renal care, patients and their families work extraordinarily hard and at great expense to secure care in a mixed public-private healthcare system. As part of this work, they must navigate challenging health and social care environments, negotiate treatments and costs, resource and finance healthcare and manage a wide range of formal and informal health information. Conclusions Examining commonalities across pathways to adequate healthcare reveals major failings in the Mexican system. These systemic problems serve to reproduce and deepen health inequalities. A system, in which the costs of renal care are disproportionately borne by those who can least afford them, faces major difficulties around the sustainability and resourcing of RRTs. Attempts to increase access to renal therapies, therefore, need to take into account the complex social and economic demands this places on those who need access most. This paper further shows that ethnographic studies of the concrete ways in which healthcare is accessed in practice provide important insights into the plight of CKD patients and so constitute an

  8. When health systems are barriers to health care: challenges faced by uninsured Mexican kidney patients.

    PubMed

    Kierans, Ciara; Padilla-Altamira, Cesar; Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Ibarra-Hernandez, Margarita; Mercado, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease disproportionately affects the poor in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). Mexico exemplifies the difficulties faced in supporting Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT) and providing equitable patient care, despite recent attempts at health reform. The objective of this study is to document the challenges faced by uninsured, poor Mexican families when attempting to access RRT. The article takes an ethnographic approach, using interviewing and observation to generate detailed accounts of the problems that accompany attempts to secure care. The study, based in the state of Jalisco, comprised interviews with patients, their caregivers, health and social care professionals, among others. Observations were carried out in both clinical and social settings. In the absence of organised health information and stable pathways to renal care, patients and their families work extraordinarily hard and at great expense to secure care in a mixed public-private healthcare system. As part of this work, they must navigate challenging health and social care environments, negotiate treatments and costs, resource and finance healthcare and manage a wide range of formal and informal health information. Examining commonalities across pathways to adequate healthcare reveals major failings in the Mexican system. These systemic problems serve to reproduce and deepen health inequalities. A system, in which the costs of renal care are disproportionately borne by those who can least afford them, faces major difficulties around the sustainability and resourcing of RRTs. Attempts to increase access to renal therapies, therefore, need to take into account the complex social and economic demands this places on those who need access most. This paper further shows that ethnographic studies of the concrete ways in which healthcare is accessed in practice provide important insights into the plight of CKD patients and so constitute an important source of evidence in that effort.

  9. Local health systems in 21st century: who cares?-An exploratory study on health system governance in Amsterdam.

    PubMed

    Plochg, T; Delnoij, D M J; Hogervorst, W V G; van Dijk, P; Belleman, S; Klazinga, N S

    2006-10-01

    There is a growing awareness that there should be a public health perspective to health system governance. Its intrinsic population health orientation provides the ultimate ground for determining the health needs and governing collaborative care arrangements within which these needs can be met. Notwithstanding differences across countries, population health concerns are not central to European health reforms. Governments currently withdraw leaving governance roles to care providers and/or financiers. Thereby, incentives that trigger the uptake of a public health perspective are often ignored. In this study we addressed this issue in the city of Amsterdam. Using a qualitative study design, we explored whether there is a public health perspective to the governance practices of the municipality and the major sickness fund in Amsterdam. And if so, what the scope of this perspective is. And if not, why not. Findings indicate that the municipality has a public health perspective to local health system governance, but its scope is limited. The municipality facilitates rather than governs health care provision in Amsterdam. Furthermore, the sickness fund runs major financial risks when adapting a public health perspective. It covers an insured population that partly overlaps the Amsterdam population. Returns on investments in population health are therefore uncertain, as competitors would also profit from the sickness fund's investments. The local health system in Amsterdam is not consistently aligned to the health needs of the Amsterdam population. The Amsterdam case is not unique and general consequences for local health system governance are discussed.

  10. Creating an effective and efficient publicly sponsored health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zweifler, John; Prado, Kris; Metchnikoff, Chris

    2011-02-01

    An effective and efficient publicly sponsored health care delivery system can increase access to care, improve health care outcomes, and reduce spending. A publicly sponsored health care delivery system can be created by integrating services that are already federally subsidized: community health centers (CHCs), public and safety-net hospitals, and residency training programs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act includes measures that support primary care generally and CHCs in particular. A publicly sponsored health care delivery system combining primary care based in CHCs with safety-net hospitals and the specialists that serve them could also benefit from incentives in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act for the creation of accountable care organizations, and reimbursement based on quality and cost control.

  11. Progress Monitoring in an Integrated Health Care System: Tracking Behavioral Health Vital Signs.

    PubMed

    Steinfeld, Bradley; Franklin, Allie; Mercer, Brian; Fraynt, Rebecca; Simon, Greg

    2016-05-01

    Progress monitoring implementation in an integrated health care system is a complex process that must address factors such as measurement, technology, delivery system care processes, patient needs and provider requirements. This article will describe how one organization faced these challenges by identifying the key decision points (choice of measure, process for completing rating scale, interface with electronic medical record and clinician engagement) critical to implementation. Qualitative and quantitative data will be presented describing customer and stakeholder satisfaction with the mental health progress monitoring tool (MHPMT) as well as organizational performance with key measurement targets.

  12. Environmental Impacts of the U.S. Health Care System and Effects on Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Eckelman, Matthew J.; Sherman, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. health care sector is highly interconnected with industrial activities that emit much of the nation’s pollution to air, water, and soils. We estimate emissions directly and indirectly attributable to the health care sector, and potential harmful effects on public health. Negative environmental and public health outcomes were estimated through economic input-output life cycle assessment (EIOLCA) modeling using National Health Expenditures (NHE) for the decade 2003–2013 and compared to national totals. In 2013, the health care sector was also responsible for significant fractions of national air pollution emissions and impacts, including acid rain (12%), greenhouse gas emissions (10%), smog formation (10%) criteria air pollutants (9%), stratospheric ozone depletion (1%), and carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic air toxics (1–2%). The largest contributors to impacts are discussed from both the supply side (EIOLCA economic sectors) and demand side (NHE categories), as are trends over the study period. Health damages from these pollutants are estimated at 470,000 DALYs lost from pollution-related disease, or 405,000 DALYs when adjusted for recent shifts in power generation sector emissions. These indirect health burdens are commensurate with the 44,000–98,000 people who die in hospitals each year in the U.S. as a result of preventable medical errors, but are currently not attributed to our health system. Concerted efforts to improve environmental performance of health care could reduce expenditures directly through waste reduction and energy savings, and indirectly through reducing pollution burden on public health, and ought to be included in efforts to improve health care quality and safety. PMID:27280706

  13. Environmental Impacts of the U.S. Health Care System and Effects on Public Health.

    PubMed

    Eckelman, Matthew J; Sherman, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. health care sector is highly interconnected with industrial activities that emit much of the nation's pollution to air, water, and soils. We estimate emissions directly and indirectly attributable to the health care sector, and potential harmful effects on public health. Negative environmental and public health outcomes were estimated through economic input-output life cycle assessment (EIOLCA) modeling using National Health Expenditures (NHE) for the decade 2003-2013 and compared to national totals. In 2013, the health care sector was also responsible for significant fractions of national air pollution emissions and impacts, including acid rain (12%), greenhouse gas emissions (10%), smog formation (10%) criteria air pollutants (9%), stratospheric ozone depletion (1%), and carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic air toxics (1-2%). The largest contributors to impacts are discussed from both the supply side (EIOLCA economic sectors) and demand side (NHE categories), as are trends over the study period. Health damages from these pollutants are estimated at 470,000 DALYs lost from pollution-related disease, or 405,000 DALYs when adjusted for recent shifts in power generation sector emissions. These indirect health burdens are commensurate with the 44,000-98,000 people who die in hospitals each year in the U.S. as a result of preventable medical errors, but are currently not attributed to our health system. Concerted efforts to improve environmental performance of health care could reduce expenditures directly through waste reduction and energy savings, and indirectly through reducing pollution burden on public health, and ought to be included in efforts to improve health care quality and safety.

  14. Health Care in China.

    PubMed

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    China has recently emerged as an important global partner. However, like other developing nations, China has experienced dramatic demographic and epidemiologic changes in the past few decades. Population discontent with the health care system has led to major reforms. China's distinctive health care system, including its unique history, vast infrastructure, the speed of health reform, and economic capacity to make important advances in health care, nonetheless, has incomplete insurance coverage for urban and rural dwellers, uneven access, mixed quality of health care, increasing costs, and risk of catastrophic health expenditures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Foot health needs in people with systemic sclerosis: an audit of foot health care provision.

    PubMed

    Alcacer-Pitarch, Begonya; Siddle, Heidi J; Buch, Maya H; Emery, Paul; Hashmi, Farina; Redmond, Anthony C

    2011-12-01

    The vascular and cutaneous alterations evident in systemic sclerosis/scleroderma (SSc) place the foot at risk of ulceration. The UK Podiatry Rheumatic Care Association (PRCA)/Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Alliance standards of care recommend that all people with SSc should receive at least basic information about their foot health, and that those with foot problems should have access to self-management advice and care where needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate foot health services offered in Leeds (UK) for people with SSc, against nationally agreed standards of care. Ninety-one consecutive patients with SSc were selected from either the connective tissue disease outpatient clinic (n = 70) or the specialist rheumatology foot health clinic (n = 21) at Chapel Allerton Hospital, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust. All the patients completed a disease-specific audit tool developed by the UK PRCA that evaluates provision of foot health care for patients with SSc. Sixty-one patients (67%) reported having had foot problems at some point in time and 54 (59%) had current foot problems. Of these 54 patients, 17 (32%) had not received any foot care. Only 36 (39%) of the 91 patients had received any foot health information. This audit demonstrates that patients with SSc have a relatively high prevalence of self-reported foot problems. Foot health care and information are inadequate for people with SSc and foot problems, and preventative information is almost non-existent. Improved foot health information will better empower patients to self-manage low risk problems, and help identify high risk problems which require specialist care.

  16. [Household care for ill and disabled persons: challenges for the Mexican health care system].

    PubMed

    Nigenda, Gustavo; López-Ortega, Mariana; Matarazzo, Cecilia; Juárez-Ramírez, Clara

    2007-01-01

    To identify the pattern of time devoted by members of Mexican households to providing care to ill and disabled family members. To analyze the mechanisms used by families to provide care to an ill or disabled member. The database of the 2002 National Survey of Time Use was explored to accomplish the first objective. The second objective was accomplished by collecting primary data through in-depth interviews and focal groups in Coahuila, Sinaloa, Zacatecas, Jalisco, Oaxaca and Yucatán from June to December 2004. It was estimated that 1,738,756 persons spent time providing care to ill persons and 1,496,616 to disabled persons, over the reference period of the survey. There are important differences in the dedication of hours by gender and education level. Moreover, households tend to reorganize their structure to provide care to ill and disabled members. Women tend to have more responsibilities in the process. There are important differences in the care of ill and of the disabled in terms of the physical and emotional stress produced in the caregiver. The implications of results in the care of ill and disabled populations are highly relevant for the future of the Mexican health care system. Population aging and the increase of chronic diseases call for a reinforced relationship between institutional and household care so as to complement capacities, a situation already taking place in other countries.

  17. An e-health trend plan for the Jordanian health care system: a review.

    PubMed

    Rawabdeh, Ali Ahamd Awad

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the potential of e-health by focusing explicitly on the delivery of health care products and services. The examination of e-health activity is guided by one broad research question, "What is the potential for constructing e-health strategy as an innovative health technology?". A great amount of attention has been given to e-health activity in the present day. However important this form of e-health is, this type of service simply does not face the same constraints that must be addressed by those actually delivering health care services. The researchers employed a qualitative data collection technique to formulate more examples and cases to derive lessons for Jordan. Phone interviews in a random sample were conducted with corporate officers in Jordan in order to reveal the internal organizational structure and business trends, interface issues, marketing strategies, as well as comparing and contrasting the online health world to the traditional health care realm. Internet-related projects is a top priority for health care information technology executives in the present day, with a cautious approach toward "e-health", as many products have yet to mature, and that the "click and mortar" model may perhaps be the optimal strategy for e-health in Jordan. This paper reviews the e-health trends to demonstrate the tremendous potential for health-related commercial activity on the internet. However, the researcher examining the barriers facing e-health to the Jordanian health system also pointed out almost insurmountable challenges. Despite the apparent promise of e-health, its instability is measured by its failure so far to systematically penetrate the organization of health care. Beyond the pragmatic negotiation of e-health in the immediate context of clinical practice, there are wider issues about how the development/implementation of e-health is funded, about its organization and management at the policy level; and about its

  18. Reducing Risky Alcohol Use: What Health Care Systems Can Do.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Amity E; Brolin, Mary; Stewart, Maureen T; Evans, Brooke; Horgan, Constance

    2016-04-27

    Risky, non-dependent alcohol use is prevalent in the United States, affecting 25% of adults (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014b). Massachusetts has higher rates of alcohol use and binge drinking than most states (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2015). Serious physical, social, and economic consequences result. Excessive alcohol use contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease, sleep disorders, birth defects, motor vehicle injuries, and suicide, and it complicates management of chronic illnesses (Green, McKnight-Eily, Tan, Mejia, & Denny, 2016; Laramee et al., 2015; Mokdad, Marks, Stroup, & Gerberding, 2004; Rehm et al., 2009). Excessive alcohol use is one of the top causes of death, and over 240 alcohol-related deaths occur daily in the US (Mokdad et al., 2004; Stahre, Roeber, Kanny, Brewer, & Zhang, 2014). In comparison, 78 people die from an opioid overdose each day (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016). Excessive drinking is estimated to cost over $249 billion annually in the US and $5.6 billion in the Commonwealth (Sacks, Gonzales, Bouchery, Tomedi, & Brewer, 2015). This issue brief describes the scope of the risky drinking problem in the US and associated costs and consequences. The brief then examines the evidence base for tools to address risky drinking and outlines policy strategies that health care system stakeholders may employ to address further this critical public health issue. Screening and brief intervention (SBI) is an evidence-based, cost-effective practice to address risky alcohol use, typically using a short validated screening tool followed by a brief counseling session if a patient screens positive. Research shows SBI conducted in primary care outpatient settings significantly reduces alcohol use (Bertholet, Daeppen, Wietlisbach, Fleming, & Burnand, 2005b; Bien, Miller, & Tonigan, 1993; Kaner et al., 2009; Saitz, 2010a), hospitalizations (Fleming, Barry, Manwell, Johnson, & London, 1997b

  19. Systems Thinking and the Leadership Conundrum in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchildon, Gregory P.; Fletcher, Amber J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to think in terms of a system is critical to achieving common direction, alignment, and commitment in highly distributed health systems. In Canada, provincial and territorial ministries of health provide leadership on the direction of health reform while leadership to align system levels is determined by a far more distributed group of…

  20. Systems Thinking and the Leadership Conundrum in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchildon, Gregory P.; Fletcher, Amber J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to think in terms of a system is critical to achieving common direction, alignment, and commitment in highly distributed health systems. In Canada, provincial and territorial ministries of health provide leadership on the direction of health reform while leadership to align system levels is determined by a far more distributed group of…

  1. Routinisation of informed consent in online health care systems.

    PubMed

    Ploug, Thomas; Holm, Søren

    2015-04-01

    To investigate (1) the extent to which informed consent is routinised, i.e., given habitually and without reflection, in relation to the use of web-portals containing personal health information, and (2) the reasons given by users for routinised and non-routinised consent behaviour. Anonymous web-questionnaire among users of the official Danish health information web-portal, Sundhed.dk. Sundhed.dk allows Danish residents access to their electronic patient records and other personal health information and allows them to update some of this information. Use of the portal requires explicit consent to the terms and conditions of use and the data protection policies of the site. Degree to which information materials are read before use of the portal. Reasons given for reading or not reading materials. Seventy-nine percent of respondents read half or less of the information materials before using the portal. The main reasons given for not reading (all) of the materials relate to the length of the materials, the frequency of having to read such things, and the perception that use of the portal is 'low risk'. The reasons given for reading and not reading indicate that the consent process is routinised. Most users of Sundhed.dk do not provide informed consent before using the portal, since most do not read the information fully. The reasons given for not reading strongly supports the idea that consent has become a routinised behaviour in this context. This finding is important because web-portals offering access to personal health information held by the health care system are becoming ever more frequent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Incorporation of the health care system in the west.

    PubMed

    Gomez Pineda, Floro Hermes

    2015-09-30

    A reflection is made, from an interpretative perspective, on the historical evolution of health care in the West. It starts from the moment that this became a way to intervene the sick and an instrument for healing diseases, focusing on original documents and written sources which account for results of historical research, which range from XV century until today. To do this, it tries to understand the health care as an ideographic body of knowledge consisting of five pieces of a puzzle composed by: the state policy of hospitals accumulation implemented in Spain, the accumulation of medical practices in what is currently Germany, the hospital wards in England, the nosological rationality in France, and the US sanitizing machine; all these movements as producers of closely linked health care developments, that are nothing more than collective actions regulated by social norms around health.

  3. Incorporation of the health care system in the west

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A reflection is made, from an interpretative perspective, on the historical evolution of health care in the West. It starts from the moment that this became a way to intervene the sick and an instrument for healing diseases, focusing on original documents and written sources which account for results of historical research, which range from XV century until today. To do this, it tries to understand the health care as an ideographic body of knowledge consisting of five pieces of a puzzle composed by: the state policy of hospitals accumulation implemented in Spain, the accumulation of medical practices in what is currently Germany, the hospital wards in England, the nosological rationality in France, and the US sanitizing machine; all these movements as producers of closely linked health care developments, that are nothing more than collective actions regulated by social norms around health. PMID:26600630

  4. Population preferences for health care in liberia: insights for rebuilding a health system.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Margaret E; Rockers, Peter C; Tornorlah Varpilah, S; Macauley, Rose

    2011-12-01

    OBJECTIVE. To quantify the influence of health system attributes, particularly quality of care, on preferences for health clinics in Liberia, a country with a high burden of disease that is rebuilding its health system after 14 years of civil war. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. Informed by focus group discussions, a discrete choice experiment (DCE) was designed to assess preferences for structure and process of care at health clinics. The DCE was fielded in rural, northern Liberia as part of a 2008 population-based survey on health care utilization. DATA COLLECTION. The survey response rate was 98 percent with DCE data available for 1,431 respondents. Mixed logit models were used to estimate the influence of six attributes on choice of hypothetical clinics for a future illness. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Participants' choice of clinic was most influenced by provision of a thorough physical exam and consistent availability of medicines. Respectful treatment and government (versus NGO) management marginally increased utility, whereas waiting time was not significant. CONCLUSIONS. Liberians value technical quality of care over convenience, courtesy, and public management in selecting clinics for curative care. This suggests that investments in improved competence of providers and availability of medicines may increase population utilization of essential services as well as promote better clinical outcomes.

  5. Population Preferences for Health Care in Liberia: Insights for Rebuilding a Health System

    PubMed Central

    Kruk, Margaret E; Rockers, Peter C; Tornorlah Varpilah, S; Macauley, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify the influence of health system attributes, particularly quality of care, on preferences for health clinics in Liberia, a country with a high burden of disease that is rebuilding its health system after 14 years of civil war. Data Sources/Study Setting Informed by focus group discussions, a discrete choice experiment (DCE) was designed to assess preferences for structure and process of care at health clinics. The DCE was fielded in rural, northern Liberia as part of a 2008 population-based survey on health care utilization. Data Collection The survey response rate was 98 percent with DCE data available for 1,431 respondents. Mixed logit models were used to estimate the influence of six attributes on choice of hypothetical clinics for a future illness. Principal Findings Participants' choice of clinic was most influenced by provision of a thorough physical exam and consistent availability of medicines. Respectful treatment and government (versus NGO) management marginally increased utility, whereas waiting time was not significant. Conclusions Liberians value technical quality of care over convenience, courtesy, and public management in selecting clinics for curative care. This suggests that investments in improved competence of providers and availability of medicines may increase population utilization of essential services as well as promote better clinical outcomes. PMID:21517835

  6. On Robust Methodologies for Managing Public Health Care Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nimmagadda, Shastri L.; Dreher, Heinz V.

    2014-01-01

    Authors focus on ontology-based multidimensional data warehousing and mining methodologies, addressing various issues on organizing, reporting and documenting diabetic cases and their associated ailments, including causalities. Map and other diagnostic data views, depicting similarity and comparison of attributes, extracted from warehouses, are used for understanding the ailments, based on gender, age, geography, food-habits and other hereditary event attributes. In addition to rigor on data mining and visualization, an added focus is on values of interpretation of data views, from processed full-bodied diagnosis, subsequent prescription and appropriate medications. The proposed methodology, is a robust back-end application, for web-based patient-doctor consultations and e-Health care management systems through which, billions of dollars spent on medical services, can be saved, in addition to improving quality of life and average life span of a person. Government health departments and agencies, private and government medical practitioners including social welfare organizations are typical users of these systems. PMID:24445953

  7. On robust methodologies for managing public health care systems.

    PubMed

    Nimmagadda, Shastri L; Dreher, Heinz V

    2014-01-17

    Authors focus on ontology-based multidimensional data warehousing and mining methodologies, addressing various issues on organizing, reporting and documenting diabetic cases and their associated ailments, including causalities. Map and other diagnostic data views, depicting similarity and comparison of attributes, extracted from warehouses, are used for understanding the ailments, based on gender, age, geography, food-habits and other hereditary event attributes. In addition to rigor on data mining and visualization, an added focus is on values of interpretation of data views, from processed full-bodied diagnosis, subsequent prescription and appropriate medications. The proposed methodology, is a robust back-end application, for web-based patient-doctor consultations and e-Health care management systems through which, billions of dollars spent on medical services, can be saved, in addition to improving quality of life and average life span of a person. Government health departments and agencies, private and government medical practitioners including social welfare organizations are typical users of these systems.

  8. [The organization of system of information support of regional health care].

    PubMed

    Konovalov, A A

    2014-01-01

    The comparative analysis was implemented concerning versions of architecture of segment of unified public information system of health care within the framework of the regional program of modernization of Nizhniy Novgorod health care system. The author proposed means of increasing effectiveness of public investments on the basis of analysis of aggregate value of ownership of information system. The evaluation is given concerning running up to target program indicators and dynamics of basic indicators of informatization of institutions of oblast health care system.

  9. Why public trust in health care systems matters and deserves greater research attention.

    PubMed

    Gille, Felix; Smith, Sarah; Mays, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Considering the underlying importance of trust, there is too little research into the understanding, protection and recovery of trust in health care systems, not only for the effective functioning of health care systems but also for society in general. Several researchers have pointed towards a contemporary crisis of trust in health care systems and there have been many examples that show the severe effects of mistrust. More research into public trust in health care systems could contribute to improving efficiency while protecting the health of the public. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Prospects for regulated competition in the health care system: what can China learn from Russia's experience?

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiwei; Sheiman, Igor; van de Ven, Wynand P M M; Zhang, Wei

    2011-05-01

    As China explores new directions to reform its health care system, regulated competition among both insurers and providers of care might be one potential model. The Russian Federation in 1993 implemented legislation intended to stimulate such regulated competition in the health care sector. The subsequent progress and lessons learned over these 17 years can shed light on and inform the future evolution of the Chinese system. In this paper, we list the necessary pre-conditions for reaping the benefits of regulated competition in the health care sector. We indicate to what extent these conditions are being fulfilled in the post-reform Russian and current Chinese health care systems. We draw lessons from the Russian experience for the Chinese health care system, which shares a similar economic and political background with the pre-reform Russian health care system in terms of the starting point of the reform, and analyse the prospects for regulated competition in China.

  11. Insights on a New Era Under a Reforming Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, James E.

    1995-01-01

    Economic and social trends that will affect the health care system are examined, including federal health care reform efforts, federal budget trimming through managed care and cost-cutting, declines in state spending, adoption of single-payer systems, growing competition in the private sector (mergers, alliances, acquisitions), dominance of health…

  12. Insights on a New Era Under a Reforming Health Care System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvihill, James E.

    1995-01-01

    Economic and social trends that will affect the health care system are examined, including federal health care reform efforts, federal budget trimming through managed care and cost-cutting, declines in state spending, adoption of single-payer systems, growing competition in the private sector (mergers, alliances, acquisitions), dominance of health…

  13. Health and health-care systems in southeast Asia: diversity and transitions.

    PubMed

    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Phua, Kai Hong; Yap, Mui Teng; Pocock, Nicola S; Hashim, Jamal H; Chhem, Rethy; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus; Lopez, Alan D

    2011-01-29

    Southeast Asia is a region of enormous social, economic, and political diversity, both across and within countries, shaped by its history, geography, and position as a major crossroad of trade and the movement of goods and services. These factors have not only contributed to the disparate health status of the region's diverse populations, but also to the diverse nature of its health systems, which are at varying stages of evolution. Rapid but inequitable socioeconomic development, coupled with differing rates of demographic and epidemiological transitions, have accentuated health disparities and posed great public health challenges for national health systems, particularly the control of emerging infectious diseases and the rise of non-communicable diseases within ageing populations. While novel forms of health care are evolving in the region, such as corporatised public health-care systems (government owned, but operating according to corporate principles and with private-sector participation) and financing mechanisms to achieve universal coverage, there are key lessons for health reforms and decentralisation. New challenges have emerged with rising trade in health services, migration of the health workforce, and medical tourism. Juxtaposed between the emerging giant economies of China and India, countries of the region are attempting to forge a common regional identity, despite their diversity, to seek mutually acceptable and effective solutions to key regional health challenges. In this first paper in the Lancet Series on health in southeast Asia, we present an overview of key demographic and epidemiological changes in the region, explore challenges facing health systems, and draw attention to the potential for regional collaboration in health.

  14. Master indenture: capital financing for health care systems.

    PubMed

    Fisher, B; Zimmerman, R J

    1984-04-01

    The master indenture enables members of multiinstitutional health care systems to finance capital programs and expansions by borrowing on the basis of systemwide revenues and assets. Participation in a master indenture financing may be structured in two ways. In a restricted group, only the parent organization issues notes, and only the parent is directly liable for the debt. To ensure that each member's revenues flow to the parent, the latter must have sole member status and be permitted to approve subsidiaries' debts, budgets, amendments to articles and bylaws of incorporation, and selection of trustees. Each entity's articles and bylaws must permit it to support the system members' common charitable purpose. In contrast, members of an obligated group have direct joint and several liability for master indenture notes. If one subsidiary misses a payment, the parent can call for payment from other obligated group members. Limitations on a member's obligation to support system debt in case of insolvency or bankruptcy may be included in the master indenture provisions. Whichever structure is selected, the amount of debt that can be incurred is based on the institutions' combined financial statements. The master indenture thus allows financially weak institutions to benefit from the credit strengths of stranger system members and permits the parent organization to control members' access to capital markets.

  15. Improving Disaster Response Efforts Through the Development of a Disaster Health Care Response System.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jonathan A; McKenzie, L Kendall; McLeod, W Terry; Darsey, Damon A; Craig, Jim

    2017-03-17

    We review the development of a disaster health care response system in Mississippi aimed at improving disaster response efforts. Large-scale disasters generate many injured and ill patients, which causes a significant utilization of emergency health care services and often requires external support to meet clinical needs. Disaster health care services require a solid infrastructure of coordination and collaboration to be effective. Following Hurricane Katrina, the state of Mississippi implemented best practices from around the nation to establish a disaster health care response system. The State Medical Response System of Mississippi provides an all-hazards system designed to support local response efforts at the time, scope, and scale required to successfully manage the incident. Components of this disaster health care response system can be replicated or adapted to meet the dynamic landscape of health care delivery following disasters. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;page 1 of 5).

  16. [The place, role and importance of emergency medical care in the Serbian health care system].

    PubMed

    Nikić-Sovilj, Ljiljana

    2009-01-01

    Emergency medical assistance is immediate, the current medical support that is provided hurted person to avoid any possible harmful consequences for his life and health. Emergency medical aid is part of the health care system that is rarely thought, but is still expected to be available always and continuously in case of need. Emergency medical assistance should always be available throughout the territory where people live, because there is no adequate replacement. Emergency Medical Services and emergency medical transportation services are health care that is provided in terms of all persons in the state of medical urgency. In urgent or emergency conditions, health care can be provided on the site of injuries and disease or health institution. Cases of medical urgency are ranked by degrees. The first and most difficult level of medical urgency indicate all urgent pathological conditions, diseases, injuries and poisoning, which occur in the workplace and public places. To expect medical team of emergency medical assistance at the scene intervened medical urgency, it is necessary to make call it. Call the phone number refers to the 94. Call sent to this number to receive orderly dispatcher. Dispatchers are employees who perform their work in the dispatching center. They appear in the phone number 94, made the assessment and screening calls, worry about the degree of urgency, and the absorption team, which team is the nearest place of the event. After received calls they send expert medical teams to the place of accident. In the dispatching center work always doctor and medical technician. Emergency medical care cases is a great professional and educational challenge and imposes a constant need in education of doctors and the whole emergency medical teams. Education of all employees in the state of emergency care is required continualy and for students too to receive new knowledge in the field of medical urgency by various professional purposes.

  17. Management and marketing in health care. Some lessons for the United States from the British system.

    PubMed

    Gumbiner, R; Frye, R

    1973-06-01

    The British health care system has been examined by sociologists, political scientists, and medical care specialists before, but in this presentation a section of the British health care system is viewed through the eyes of modern business management, particularly as to cost and consumer effectiveness. Examination of positive features as well as problems may be helpful in relation to some future health care delivery system in the United States. Cross fertilization between the disciplines of management and medicine has much to offer to the rapidly changing delivery of health care in the United States.

  18. Evaluating primary care providers' views on survivorship care plans generated by an electronic health record system.

    PubMed

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Sesto, Mary E; Hahn, David L; Buhr, Kevin A; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Sosman, James M; Andreason, Molly J; Wiegmann, Douglas A; Tevaarwerk, Amye J

    2015-05-01

    Survivorship care plans for cancer survivors may facilitate provider-to-provider communication. Primary care provider (PCP) perspectives on care plan provision and use are limited, especially when care plans are generated by an electronic health record (EHR) system. We sought to examine PCPs' perspectives regarding EHR-generated care plans. PCPs (N = 160) who were members of the Wisconsin Research and Education Network listserv received a sample 10-page plan (WREN cohort). PCPs (n = 81) who had or were currently seeing survivors enrolled onto one of our survivorship clinical trials received a copy of the survivor's personalized care plan (University of Wisconsin [UW] cohort). Both cohorts received a survey after reviewing the plan. All plans were generated within an EHR. Forty-six and 26 PCPs participated in the WREN and UW cohorts, respectively. PCPs regarded EHR-generated plans as useful in coordinating care (88%), understanding treatments (94%), understanding treatment adverse effects (89%), and supporting clinical decisions (82%). Few felt using EHR-generated plans would disrupt clinic workflow (14%) or take too much time (11%). Most (89%) preferred receiving the plan via EHR. PCPs reported consistent provision (81%) and standard location in the medical record (89%) as key factors facilitating their use of survivorship care plans. Important facilitators of care plan use included a more abbreviated plan, ideally one to three pages (32%), and/or a plan specifically tailored to PCP use (57%). Plans were viewed as useful for coordinating care and making clinical decisions. However, PCPs desired shorter, clinician-oriented plans, accessible within an EHR and delivered and located in a standardized manner. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Evaluating Primary Care Providers' Views on Survivorship Care Plans Generated by an Electronic Health Record System

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, SarahMaria; Sesto, Mary E.; Hahn, David L.; Buhr, Kevin A.; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Sosman, James M.; Andreason, Molly J.; Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Tevaarwerk, Amye J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Survivorship care plans for cancer survivors may facilitate provider-to-provider communication. Primary care provider (PCP) perspectives on care plan provision and use are limited, especially when care plans are generated by an electronic health record (EHR) system. We sought to examine PCPs' perspectives regarding EHR-generated care plans. Methods: PCPs (N = 160) who were members of the Wisconsin Research and Education Network listserv received a sample 10-page plan (WREN cohort). PCPs (n = 81) who had or were currently seeing survivors enrolled onto one of our survivorship clinical trials received a copy of the survivor's personalized care plan (University of Wisconsin [UW] cohort). Both cohorts received a survey after reviewing the plan. All plans were generated within an EHR. Results: Forty-six and 26 PCPs participated in the WREN and UW cohorts, respectively. PCPs regarded EHR-generated plans as useful in coordinating care (88%), understanding treatments (94%), understanding treatment adverse effects (89%), and supporting clinical decisions (82%). Few felt using EHR-generated plans would disrupt clinic workflow (14%) or take too much time (11%). Most (89%) preferred receiving the plan via EHR. PCPs reported consistent provision (81%) and standard location in the medical record (89%) as key factors facilitating their use of survivorship care plans. Important facilitators of care plan use included a more abbreviated plan, ideally one to three pages (32%), and/or a plan specifically tailored to PCP use (57%). Conclusion: Plans were viewed as useful for coordinating care and making clinical decisions. However, PCPs desired shorter, clinician-oriented plans, accessible within an EHR and delivered and located in a standardized manner. PMID:25804989

  20. Measures and measurement of high-performance work systems in health care settings: Propositions for improvement.

    PubMed

    Etchegaray, Jason M; St John, Cynthia; Thomas, Eric J

    2011-01-01

    Given that non-health care research has demonstrated many positive outcomes for organizations using high-performance work systems (HPWSs), a closer examination of HPWSs in health care settings is warranted. We conducted a narrative review of the literature to understand how previous researchers have measured HPWSs in health care settings and what relationships exist between HPWSs and outcomes. Articles that examined HPWSs in health care settings were identified and summarized. Key discrepancies and agreements in the existing HPWS research, including definitional, conceptual, and analytical areas of interest to health services researchers, are included. The findings demonstrate that although HPWSs might be a valuable predictor of health care-related outcomes, opportunities exist for improving HPWS measurement in health care settings. Suggestions are provided to help guide future health services researchers in conducting research on HPWSs. Practice implications are provided for health care managers.

  1. Health Care in India.

    PubMed

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    Although a stated right for all Indians, equal access to health care in India is impeded by socioeconomic barriers. With its 3-tier system of public health care centers in villages, district hospitals, and tertiary care hospitals, government expenditure in India is inordinately low, with a disproportionate emphasis on private health spending. Accordingly, the poorest receive a minority of the available subsidies, whereas the richest obtain more than a third, fostering a divide in health care infrastructure across the rich and poor in urban and rural settings. This paradigm has implications for domestic Indian public health and global public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Procurement performance measurement system in the health care industry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Ozdamar, Linet; Ng, Chai Peng

    2005-01-01

    The rising operating cost of providing healthcare is of concern to health care providers. As such, measurement of procurement performance will enable competitive advantage and provide a framework for continuous improvement. The objective of this paper is to develop a procurement performance measurement system. The paper reviews the existing literature in procurement performance measurement to identify the key areas of purchasing performance. By studying the three components in the supply chain collectively with the resources, procedures and output, a model is been developed. Additionally, a balanced scorecard is proposed by establishing a set of generic measures and six perspectives. A case study conducted at the Singapore Hospital applies the conceptual model to describe the purchasing department and the activities within and outside the department. The results indicate that the material management department has already made a good start in measuring the procurement process through the implementation of the balanced scorecard. There are many data that are collected but not properly collated and utilized. Areas lacking measurement include cycle time of delivery, order processing time, effectiveness, efficiency and reliability. Though a lot of hard work was involved, the advantages of establishing a measurement system outweigh the costs and efforts involved in its implementation. Results of balanced scorecard measurements provide decision-makers with critical information on efficiency and effectiveness of the purchasing department's work. The measurement model developed could be used for any hospital procurement system.

  3. Health care systems in Sweden and China: Legal and formal organisational aspects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sharing knowledge and experience internationally can provide valuable information, and comparative research can make an important contribution to knowledge about health care and cost-effective use of resources. Descriptions of the organisation of health care in different countries can be found, but no studies have specifically compared the legal and formal organisational systems in Sweden and China. Aim To describe and compare health care in Sweden and China with regard to legislation, organisation, and finance. Methods Literature reviews were carried out in Sweden and China to identify literature published from 1985 to 2008 using the same keywords. References in recent studies were scrutinized, national legislation and regulations and government reports were searched, and textbooks were searched manually. Results The health care systems in Sweden and China show dissimilarities in legislation, organisation, and finance. In Sweden there is one national law concerning health care while in China the law includes the "Hygienic Common Law" and the "Fundamental Health Law" which is under development. There is a tendency towards market-orientated solutions in both countries. Sweden has a well-developed primary health care system while the primary health care system in China is still under development and relies predominantly on hospital-based care concentrated in cities. Conclusion Despite dissimilarities in health care systems, Sweden and China have similar basic assumptions, i.e. to combine managerial-organisational efficiency with the humanitarian-egalitarian goals of health care, and both strive to provide better care for all. PMID:20569468

  4. Measuring primary care services performance: issues and opportunities from a home care pilot experience in the Tuscan health system.

    PubMed

    Cinquini, Lino; Vainieri, Milena

    2008-08-01

    In recent years in Italy, as in other European countries, profound changes have been introduced in health care both at central and regional levels. Most of them were oriented towards a shift from 'hospital-centred' health care to health care based more on primary care services. This transition pursues two objectives: giving more effective responses to citizens' needs and reducing public health expenditure. Changes that involve organizational structure must also be carried out with the introduction of measurement tools that can help in planning and can control the changes. The paper provides the results obtained through the experience of modelling a measurement system for primary care carried out in 2004 and 2005 by some territorial managers and controllers in the Tuscan Health system, and the main issues in measuring primary care services emerging from this pilot experience focused on integrated home care services.

  5. A preliminary analysis of the US dental health care system's capacity to treat children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Kerins, Carolyn; Casamassimo, Paul S; Ciesla, David; Lee, Yosuk; Seale, N Sue

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use existing data to determine capacity of the US dental care system to treat children with special health care needs (CSHCN). A deductive analysis using recent existing data was used to determine the: possible available appointments for CSHCN in hospitals and educational programs/institutions; and the ratio of CSHCN to potential available and able providers in the United States sorted by 6 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) districts. Using existing data sets, this analysis found 57 dental schools, 61 advanced education in general dentistry programs, 174 general practice residencies, and 87 children's hospital dental clinics in the United States. Nationally, the number of CSHCN was determined to be 10,221,436. The distribution, on average, of CSHCN per care source/provider ranged from 1,327 to 2,357 in the 6 AAPD districts. Children's hospital dental clinics had fewer than 1 clinic appointment or 1 operating room appointment available per CSHCN. The mean number of CSHCN patients per provider, if distributed equally, was 1,792. The current US dental care system has extremely limited capacity to care for children with special health care needs.

  6. Health system support for childbirth care in Southern Tanzania: results from a health facility census

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Progress towards reaching Millennium Development Goals four (child health) and five (maternal health) is lagging behind, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, despite increasing efforts to scale up high impact interventions. Increasing the proportion of birth attended by a skilled attendant is a main indicator of progress, but not much is known about the quality of childbirth care delivered by these skilled attendants. With a view to reducing maternal mortality through health systems improvement we describe the care routinely offered in childbirth at dispensaries, health centres and hospitals in five districts in rural Southern Tanzania. We use data from a health facility census assessing 159 facilities in five districts in early 2009. A structural and operational assessment was undertaken based on staff reports using a modular questionnaire assessing staffing, work load, equipment and supplies as well as interventions routinely implemented during childbirth. Results Health centres and dispensaries attended a median of eight and four deliveries every month respectively. Dispensaries had a median of 2.5 (IQR 2–3) health workers including auxiliary staff instead of the recommended four clinical officer and certified nurses. Only 28% of first-line facilities (dispensaries and health centres) reported offering active management in the third stage of labour (AMTSL). Essential childbirth care comprising eight interventions including AMTSL, infection prevention, partograph use including foetal monitoring and newborn care including early breastfeeding, thermal care at birth and prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum was offered by 5% of dispensaries, 38% of health centres and 50% of hospitals consistently. No first-line facility had provided all signal functions for emergency obstetric complications in the previous six months. Conclusions Essential interventions for childbirth care are not routinely implemented in first-line facilities or hospitals. Dispensaries

  7. Medical tourism and its impact on the US health care system.

    PubMed

    Forgione, Dana A; Smith, Pamela C

    2007-01-01

    The health care industry within the United States continues to face unprecedented increases in costs, along with the task of providing care to an estimated 46 million uninsured or underinsured patients. These patients, along with both insurers and employers, are seeking to reduce the costs of treatment through international outsourcing of medical and surgical care. Knows as medical tourism, this trend is on the rise, and the US health care system has not fully internalized the effects this will have on its economic structure and policies. The demand for low-cost health care services is driving patients to seek treatment on a globally competitive basis, while balancing important quality of care issues. In this article, we outline some of the issues facing legislators, health care policy makers, providers, and health service researchers regarding the impact of medical tourism on the US health care system.

  8. The evolution of financial incentives in the U.S. health care system.

    PubMed

    Darves-Bornoz, Annie L; Resnick, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. health care system continues to evolve toward value-based payment, rewarding providers based upon outcomes per dollar spent. To date, payment innovation has largely targeted primary care, with little consideration for the role of surgical specialists. As such, there remains appropriate uncertainty surrounding the optimal role of the urologic oncologist in alternative payment models. This commentary summarizes the context of U.S. health care reform and offers insights into supply-side innovations including accountable care organizations and bundled payments. Additionally, and importantly, we discuss the implications of rising out-of-pocket health care expenditures giving rise to health care consumerism and the implications therein.

  9. Meeting Swedish Health Care System: Immigrant Parents of Children With Asthma Narrate.

    PubMed

    Rydström, Ingela; Dalheim Englund, Ann-Charlotte

    2015-08-01

    Coming to a new country involves many challenges. One of them is to approach a new health care system when you have a child with asthma. The aim of this study was to gain a broader understanding of immigrant parents' experiences of the Swedish health care system. Twelve parents of children with asthma were interviewed and their narratives were analyzed by using qualitative content analysis. The results show that immigrant parents' experiences of Swedish health care vary and involve both advantages and disadvantages. Advantages of the Swedish health care system are described as Being met with respect and Affordable care, while disadvantages are described as Problems with communication, Being discriminated against and Lack of confidence. The disadvantages are challenges for health care professionals, who are expected to offer care on equal terms to the whole population. Therefore, they need to provide culturally competent care and encourage immigrant parents to voice their expectations and worries.

  10. [Integrality in the health care perspective: an experience of the Unified Health System in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; Merhy, Emerson Elias; Baduy, Rossana Staevie; Slomp, Helvo

    2016-03-01

    Starting with a discussion of the biomedical model and its implications in the shaping of healthcare professionals and health practices, this article analyzes the concept of integrality as associated with the Unified Health System (SUS) [Sistema Único de Salud] in Brazil. Particular attention is paid to the disputes regarding the meaning of integrality and the ways of putting the concept into practice in everyday health care work. Based in a research study conducted at the national level, the authors suggest two aspects crucial to fostering integrality: an ethical-political project founded in the recognition that other people's lives are worthwhile and enriching; as well as the existence of additional spaces conducive to discovering diverse ways of producing life, in which integrality in health care is also possible and powerful. The authors affirm the relevance of this process as a contribution to the continual construction of the SUS in Brazil.

  11. Integrated health care management through comprehensive information systems.

    PubMed

    Henderson, M

    1995-01-01

    The true impact of a company's benefit strategy can be known only when relevant indicators can be adequately tracked, evaluated and brought together. An unparalleled opportunity exists to creatively apply computer technologies to address decision makers' needs for integrated health care information.

  12. Components of equity-oriented health care system: perspective of Iranian nurses.

    PubMed

    Rooddehghan, Zahra; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Parsa Yekta, Zohreh

    2014-09-28

    Equity in health is one of key objectives in health care systems world wide. This study aimed to explain the perspective of Iranian nurses about equity in the health care system. A qualitative exploratory design with thematic analysis approach was used to collect and analyze data. Using a purposeful sampling helped the researchers to recruit 16 eligible participants. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews. Five main categories were extracted through data analysis process including (1) inequity against the nurse, (2) the recommended patient, (3) no claim for equity-oriented care in health system, (4) physicians' dominancy system; and (5) the need to define criteria to measure equity-oriented care. All health care systems around the world struggle to establish equity-oriented care. In perspective of Iranian nurses, the reform of structures in the health system is possible through providing the context of equitable care for caregivers and care recipients. Health system should commit the flow of equity at all of its levels. It should utilize policies to claim equity and consider the interests of all beneficiaries. Furthermore, certain criteria should be defined for equity-oriented care in the health care system, and also provides the possibility to measure and monitor it.

  13. A layman's guide to the U.S. health care system

    PubMed Central

    De Lew, Nancy; Greenberg, George; Kinchen, Kraig

    1992-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the U.S. health care system and recent proposals for health system reform. Prepared for a 15-nation comparative study for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the article summarizes descriptive data on the financing, utilization, access, and supply of U.S. health services; analyzes health system cost growth and trends; reviews health reforms adopted in the 1980s; and discusses proposals in the current health system reform debate. PMID:10124436

  14. A health care system for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Life science will be one of the pacing technologies for long duration manned spaceflight. The ability to effectively deliver state-of-the-art inflight medical care will have a major impact on crew health and mission success. The future Space Station crews will participate in missions of extended duration with limited capability for emergency return. This factor alone places great responsibility on program designers to ensure the health, safety, and well-being of the crews. The Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) under development at the Johnson Space Center is described.

  15. Implications of managed care for health systems, clinicians, and patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fairfield, G.; Hunter, D. J.; Mechanic, D.; Rosleff, F.

    1997-01-01

    The rhetoric and realities of managed care are easily confused. The rapid growth of managed care in the United States has had many implications for patients, doctors, employers, state and federal programmes, the health insurance industry, major medical institutions, medical research, and vulnerable patient populations. It has restricted patients' choice of doctors and limited access to specialists, reduced the professional autonomy and earnings of doctors, shifted power from the non-profit to the for-profit sectors and from hospitals and doctors to private corporations. It has also raised issues about the future structuring and financing of medical education and research and about practice ethics. However, managed care has also accorded greater prominence to the assessment of patient satisfaction, profiling and monitoring of doctors' work, the use of clinical guidelines and quality assurance procedures and indicated the potential to improve the integration and outcome of care. PMID:9224138

  16. A Learning Health Care System Using Computer-Aided Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, James J

    2017-01-01

    Physicians intuitively apply pattern recognition when evaluating a patient. Rational diagnosis making requires that clinical patterns be put in the context of disease prior probability, yet physicians often exhibit flawed probabilistic reasoning. Difficulties in making a diagnosis are reflected in the high rates of deadly and costly diagnostic errors. Introduced 6 decades ago, computerized diagnosis support systems are still not widely used by internists. These systems cannot efficiently recognize patterns and are unable to consider the base rate of potential diagnoses. We review the limitations of current computer-aided diagnosis support systems. We then portray future diagnosis support systems and provide a conceptual framework for their development. We argue for capturing physician knowledge using a novel knowledge representation model of the clinical picture. This model (based on structured patient presentation patterns) holds not only symptoms and signs but also their temporal and semantic interrelations. We call for the collection of crowdsourced, automatically deidentified, structured patient patterns as means to support distributed knowledge accumulation and maintenance. In this approach, each structured patient pattern adds to a self-growing and -maintaining knowledge base, sharing the experience of physicians worldwide. Besides supporting diagnosis by relating the symptoms and signs with the final diagnosis recorded, the collective pattern map can also provide disease base-rate estimates and real-time surveillance for early detection of outbreaks. We explain how health care in resource-limited settings can benefit from using this approach and how it can be applied to provide feedback-rich medical education for both students and practitioners. PMID:28274905

  17. A Learning Health Care System Using Computer-Aided Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cahan, Amos; Cimino, James J

    2017-03-08

    Physicians intuitively apply pattern recognition when evaluating a patient. Rational diagnosis making requires that clinical patterns be put in the context of disease prior probability, yet physicians often exhibit flawed probabilistic reasoning. Difficulties in making a diagnosis are reflected in the high rates of deadly and costly diagnostic errors. Introduced 6 decades ago, computerized diagnosis support systems are still not widely used by internists. These systems cannot efficiently recognize patterns and are unable to consider the base rate of potential diagnoses. We review the limitations of current computer-aided diagnosis support systems. We then portray future diagnosis support systems and provide a conceptual framework for their development. We argue for capturing physician knowledge using a novel knowledge representation model of the clinical picture. This model (based on structured patient presentation patterns) holds not only symptoms and signs but also their temporal and semantic interrelations. We call for the collection of crowdsourced, automatically deidentified, structured patient patterns as means to support distributed knowledge accumulation and maintenance. In this approach, each structured patient pattern adds to a self-growing and -maintaining knowledge base, sharing the experience of physicians worldwide. Besides supporting diagnosis by relating the symptoms and signs with the final diagnosis recorded, the collective pattern map can also provide disease base-rate estimates and real-time surveillance for early detection of outbreaks. We explain how health care in resource-limited settings can benefit from using this approach and how it can be applied to provide feedback-rich medical education for both students and practitioners.

  18. A Proposed ‘Health Literate Care Model’ Would Constitute A Systems Approach To Improving Patients’ Engagement In Care

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Howard K.; Brach, Cindy; Harris, Linda M.; Parchman, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Improving health outcomes relies on patients’ full engagement in prevention, decision-making, and self-management activities. Health literacy, or people’s ability to obtain, process, communicate, and understand basic health information and services, is essential to those actions. Yet relatively few Americans are proficient in understanding and acting on available health information. We propose a Health Literate Care Model to improve patient engagement in health care. As health literacy strategies are integrated into the widely adopted Care Model, the subsequent improved evidence-based framework can help promote the delivery of safe, effective, and collaborative care to patients. Our model calls for first approaching all patients with the assumption that they are at risk of not understanding their health conditions or how to deal with them, and then subsequently confirming and ensuring patients’ understanding. For health care organizations adopting our model, health literacy would then become an organizational value infused into all aspects of planning and operations, including self-management support, delivery system design, shared decision-making support, clinical information systems to track and plan patient care, and helping patients access community resources. We also propose a measurement framework to track the impact of the new Health Literate Care Model on patient outcomes and quality of care. PMID:23381529

  19. Assessing and Ensuring a Comprehensive System of Services for Children With Special Health Care Needs: A Public Health Approach

    PubMed Central

    van Dyck, Peter C.; Kogan, Michael D.; Lauver, Cassie; Blumberg, Stephen J.; Bethell, Christina D.; Newacheck, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    The US Department of Health and Human Services called for comprehensive systems of services for children with special health care needs in its Healthy People 2000 and 2010 health care objectives for the nation. We report on the proportion of children with special health care needs receiving care in high-quality systems of services measured by attainment of 6 essential system elements, or quality indicators, generated from a survey of 40 723 families of children with special health care needs in 2005 to 2006. Only 17.7% of children with special health care needs received services in a high-quality service system that met all 6 quality indicators in 2005–2006. Therefore, much more work lies ahead to meet the national Healthy People objective for these children. PMID:21228285

  20. Looking at the U.S. health care system in the rear-view mirror.

    PubMed

    Baucus, Max

    2005-01-01

    John Wennberg and his colleagues hold up a rear-view mirror on the U.S. health care system, reflecting pervasive inconsistencies and showing that more resources are not necessarily equivalent to better care. The work shows that although many hospitals are investing time and money to improve efficiency, quality, and overall patient care, the system is in trouble. Two basic reforms would help produce a system that encourages value, with efficient, effective, patient-centered care. These changes involve how we pay for care and investment in health information technology. We should begin by implementing these principles in Medicare, the largest U.S. purchaser of care.

  1. The development of the U.S. Health Care System and the contemporary role of the public health department.

    PubMed

    Grott, Catherine J

    2006-01-01

    The absence of national health care reform and the growing number of uninsured individuals in the United States have prompted states to develop plans to provide medical care for the low income and the indigent. Many local health departments are not only responsible for the core public health functions; but they are increasingly called upon to provide person health care services for those who cannot afford it. This article chronicles the development of the health care system in the United States and describes the contemporary role of the local public health department.

  2. Mental health care for the elderly in low-income countries: a health systems approach

    PubMed Central

    PRINCE, MARTIN; LIVINGSTON, GILL; KATONA, CORNELIUS

    2007-01-01

    Future development of services for older people needs to be tailored to suit the health systems context. Low-income countries lack the economic and human capital to contemplate widespread introduction of specialist services. The most cost-effective way to manage people with dementia will be through supporting, educating and advising family caregivers. The next level of care to be prioritized would be respite care, both in day centres and in residential or nursing homes. An important prerequisite to improving care for older persons is to create a climate that fosters such advances. Better awareness is a necessary precondition for appropriate help-seeking, and lack of awareness is a public health problem for which population level interventions are needed. PMID:17342213

  3. Total quality management and the Army health care system.

    PubMed

    Jeffer, E K

    1991-10-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is the newest in a long line of magic formulas which have been touted as saviors for American industry and medicine. The author discusses the basic concepts of TQM and notes that much of it resembles philosophical beliefs long held by the medical community. TQM does offer many opportunities to refine old concepts and further those goals of quality care to which health care providers have always aspired. If, however, it becomes simply another codified bureaucracy, then a great deal of time and money will be invested for very little gain.

  4. A perspective of health care in the past--insights and challenges for a health care system in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Cicatiello, J S

    2000-01-01

    Health care has been in a state of perpetual change over the past decade. The swirl of activity includes: mergers and acquisitions, downsizing, shortages of nurses, unionizing of physicians, health care cost increases, escalation of pharmaceutical prices, consumerism, managed care, high-tech-low-touch services, the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, declining reimbursement, alternative medicine, Web-based shopping for health care, medicine moving into cyberspace, nanotechnology, advances in digital technology, and a diagnostic boon in high-tech imaging. What this demonstrates is that the broad-based landscape of changes affecting health care in the United States is extensive and incredibly complex. This article provides a perspective of health care in the past, discusses issues and concerns impacting health care today, and articulates some of the challenges and opportunities that are and will continue to shape the future of our health care system in the new millennium.

  5. The development and maturation of a statewide academic health care system: Clarian Health Partners/Indiana University Health.

    PubMed

    Handel, David J; Kleit, Stuart A; Handel, Daniel A

    2014-02-01

    As health care reform continues, health care organizations are evolving both structurally and operationally to position themselves to meet the challenges ahead. Academic medical centers (i.e., teaching hospitals) particularly need an effective strategy that will allow them to meet their tripartite missions of patient care, education, and research in this time of increasing competition and resource constraints. Clarian Health Partners, recently renamed Indiana University Health, is a health care entity that developed from a partnership of the Indiana University Hospitals and Methodist Hospital of Indiana. This case study explores the history behind the development of Clarian Health Partners, the model employed, and the lessons learned. It discusses the governance and management models implemented, the steps taken to integrate the two partners in the new system, and the specific challenges of physician partnerships and collaborations. As mergers and consolidations continue in an era of health care reform, the lessons learned from previous endeavors, such as that of Clarian Health Partners, may be applicable.

  6. Interorganizational health care systems implementations: an exploratory study of early electronic commerce initiatives.

    PubMed

    Payton, F C; Ginzberg, M J

    2001-01-01

    Changing business practices, customers needs, and market dynamics have driven many organizations to implement interorganizational systems (IOSs). IOSs have been successfully implemented in the banking, cotton, airline, and consumer-goods industries, and recently attention has turned to the health care industry. This article describes an exploratory study of health care IOS implementations based on the voluntary community health information network (CHIN) model.

  7. Health Care Financing and Midlife Women: A Sick System. Gray Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Frances; And Others

    The private health financing system in the United States does not meet the needs of much of the population, especially midlife women (aged 35-65). It is no longer possible for anyone but the richest persons to pay for their own health care. This situation developed during the past 3 decades, during which employer-paid health care expanded…

  8. The POIS (Parkland On-Line Information System) Implementation of the IBM Health Care Support/Patient Care System

    PubMed Central

    Mishelevich, David J.; Hudson, Betty G.; Van Slyke, Donald; Mize, Elaine I.; Robinson, Anna L.; Brieden, Helen C.; Atkinson, Jack; Robertson, James

    1980-01-01

    The installation of major components of a comprehensive Hospital Information System (HIS) called POIS, the Parkland On-line Information System, including identified success factors is described for the Dallas County Hospital District (DCHD) known also as the Parkland Memorial Hospital. Installation of the on-line IBM Health Care Support (HCS) Registration and Admissions Packages occurred in 1976 and implementation of the HCS Patient Care System (PCS) began in 1977 which includes on-line support of health care areas such as nursing stations and ancillary areas. The Duke Hospital Information System (DHIS) is marketed as the IBM HCS/Patient Care System (PCS). DCHD was the validation site. POIS has order entry, result reporting and work management components. While most of the patient care components are currently installed for the inpatient service, the Laboratories are being installed for the outpatient and Emergency areas as well. The Clinic Appointment System developed at the University of Michigan is also installed. The HCS family of programs use DL/1 and CICS and were installed in the OS versions, currently running under MVS on an IBM 370/168 Model 3 with 8 megabytes of main memory. ImagesFigure 1-AFigure 1-B

  9. [Frequent attendance: the primary care professional's perceptions on the influence of social factors and health care system organisation].

    PubMed

    Sandín-Vázquez, M; Conde-Espejo, P

    2011-01-01

    FREQUENT ATTENDANCE: The primary care professional's perceptions on the influence of social factors and health care system organisation. To find out the primary care (PC) professional's perceptions on the social factors and healthcare system organisation that influence frequent attendance. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews in Primary Care Centres of six Health Areas in the Community of Madrid. Eighteen interviews were conducted, three per area (two physicians and one nurse). Structural sampling was carried out with regards to the variables that could influence the discourse: health area, occupation, sex and number of years worked. The transcriptions were analysed by two investigators and an agreement of interpretation was reached. Among the social factors, health professionals perceived as determining factors: the influence of the media and the medicalization of society, lack of health education and self-care abilities of the population and contextual factors of the patient (social, work and family). Among the health care organisation factors that could influence frequent attendance were, system saturation, appointment on demand, fear of potential lawsuits by the patient, chronic patients protocols, administrative consultations, professional behaviour, and poor coordination with specialised care. According to PC professionals, there are multiple environmental factors, both social and healthcare system organisational factors that encourage frequent attendance. Within the scope of health care system, organisational actions (such as teamwork and coordination with specialists) would help to manage demand. Copyright © 2010 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. The Future of Occupational Health Nursing in a Changing Health Care System.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Linda; Peterman, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has significant implications for the future of occupational health nursing practice. As changes are proposed and implemented, occupational health nurses must continue to prioritize preventive care, chronic disease management, healthy communities, environmental health, and sustainability. In particular, immigrant workers are a vulnerable population needing attention by occupational health nurses.

  11. [Health care networks].

    PubMed

    Mendes, Eugênio Vilaça

    2010-08-01

    The demographic and epidemiologic transition resulting from aging and the increase of life expectation means an increment related to chronic conditions. The healthcare systems contemporary crisis is characterized by the organization of the focus on fragmented systems turned to the acute conditions care, in spite of the chronic conditions prevalence, and by the hierarchical structure without communication flow among the different health care levels. Brazil health care situation profile is now presenting a triple burden of diseases, due to the concomitant presence of infectious diseases, external causes and chronic diseases. The solution is to restore the consistence between the triple burden of diseases on the health situation and the current system of healthcare practice, with the implantation of health care networks. The conclusion is that there are evidences in the international literature on health care networks that these networks may improve the clinical quality, the sanitation results and the user's satisfaction and the reduction of healthcare systems costs.

  12. Health care in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, A

    1993-01-01

    Brazil has great geopolitical importance because of its size, environmental resources, and potential economic power. The organisation of its health care system reflects the schisms within Brazilian society. High technology private care is available to the rich and inadequate public care to the poor. Limited financial resources have been overconcentrated on health care in the hospital sector and health professionals are generally inappropriately trained to meet the needs of the community. However, recent changes in the organisation of health care are taking power away from federal government to state and local authorities. This should help the process of reform, but many vested interests remain to be overcome. A link programme between Britain and Brazil focusing on primary care has resulted in exchange of ideas and staff between the two countries. If primary care in Brazil can be improved it could help to narrow the health divide between rich and poor. Images p503-a p504-a p505-a PMID:8448465

  13. [Computerization and the importance of information in health system, as in health care resources registry].

    PubMed

    Troselj, Mario; Fanton, Davor

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of creating a health care resources registry and its operating in Croatia as well as the importance of information in health system are described. At the Croatian Institute of Public Health, monitoring of human resources is performed through the national Health Workers Registry. It also covers basic data on all health units, bed capacities of health facilities included. The initiated health care computerization has urged the idea of forming one more database on physical resources, i.e. on registered medical devices and equipment, more complete. Linking these databases on health resources would produce a single Health Care Resources Registry. The concept views Health Care Resources Registry as part of the overall health information system with centralized information on the health system. The planned development of segments of a single health information system is based on the implementation of the accepted international standards and common network services. Network services that are based on verified Internet technologies are used within a safe, reliable and closed health computer network, which makes up the health intranet (WAN--Wide Area Network). The resource registry is a software solution based on the relational database that monitors history, thus permitting the data collected over a longer period to be analyzed. Such a solution assumes the existence of a directory service, which would replace the current independent software for the Health Workers Registry. In the Health Care Resources Registry, the basic data set encompasses data objects and attributes from the directory service. The directory service is compatible with the LDAP protocol (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), providing services uniformly to the current records on human and physical resources. Through the storage of attributes defined according to the HL7 (Health Level Seven) standard, directory service is accessible to all applications of the health information system

  14. Eye Care Productivity and Access in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Mary G; Maa, April; Delaune, William; Chasan, Joel; Cockerham, Glenn C

    2017-01-01

    Eye care in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System is challenged with increasing demand and higher prevalence of patients with complex ocular conditions. Understanding factors that impact eye care productivity and access is necessary for appropriate allocation of resources. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of various eye clinic personnel on eye care provider productivity and patient access. Utilizing data from the Veterans Health Administration National Data Warehouse, workload and level of staffing were analyzed. Trends in the data were analyzed using descriptive and regression analyses employing both linear and curve fitting modeling methods. There was a significant positive correlation between ophthalmology technicians and ophthalmologist productivity (p < 0.001), number of unique patients seen per year per provider (p = 0.047), and total yearly number of office visits per provider (p < 0.001). Similarly, there was a significant positive correlation between number of ophthalmology residents and productivity (p = 0.046) and number of clinic visits per provider (p < 0.001) but not the number of unique patients seen. Positive correlation was found between optometry technicians and the number of unique patients' seen by optometrists (p = 0.041) and total number of clinic visits per provider (p < 0.001) but not optometrist productivity. No significant correlations were present for nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, or clerical staff. Eye care technicians provide a cost-effective multiplier effect for provider productivity, especially in ophthalmology clinics, allowing significant increases in total clinic visits and number of unique patients seen per year. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  15. Universal health care and reform of the health care system: views of medical students in the United States.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Jeffrey; Agrawal, Jaya R; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Jung, Paul; Hedgecock, Joan; Simon, Steven R

    2006-08-01

    Nearly 46 million Americans did not have health insurance in 2004. Recent studies have documented physicians' support for various remedies, including universal health care. The authors undertook this study to assess medical students' views on these topics. In 2002, the authors surveyed a national random sample of first-year and fourth-year medical students (from the American Medical Association Masterfile) to determine their views about health care reform options, including universal health care. Response data were weighted and compared using chi-squared tests; statistical significance was set at p < or = .05. Of 1,363 medical students, 770 completed the questionnaire (response rate = 56.5%). In rating the importance of several health care issues, more than 80% of both first-year and fourth-year students rated the expansion of health care coverage as important. Nearly all first-year (90%) and fourth-year (88%) students agreed with the statement, "Everyone is entitled to adequate medical care regardless of ability to pay." Most students favored health care reform that would achieve universal health care, with first-year students (70%) somewhat more likely than fourth-year students (61%) to support universal health care (p = .012). Students were less likely to believe that physicians support universal health care, and more likely to believe that the public does. Both groups of students generally support the expansion of health coverage to the uninsured and some form of universal health care. This may be relevant both to policymakers in their considerations of health care reform and to medical educators concerned with teaching students about health policy issues.

  16. Measuring health care efficiency with a tripartite configuration under the "National" Health Insurance system.

    PubMed

    Kreng, Victor B; Yang, Shao-wei; Lin, Chien-Hsu

    2014-01-01

    The "National" Health Insurance (NHI) in Taiwan, China is a single-payer system that was introduced in 1995 to provide universal health care. It is worth noting that three stakeholders are involved in Taiwan's NHI, which can be seen as a triangular governance regime between the Bureau of "National" Health Insurance (BNHI), the insured and providers. Accordingly, this study intended to assess the efficiency of various different production processes that occur among these stakeholders in Taiwan's NHI system. A two-stage relational Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) model is adopted to investigate the sub-process efficiencies of the health care resources held by 23 cities and counties through stages I or II, where the outputs of the first stage serve the inputs of the second. The dataset was collected from the annual reports published by the Department of Health, Taiwan, China. Under the proposed framework, the efficiency of the whole process can be obtained from the product of productivity and allocative efficiency. Ten DMUs are efficient either in stages I or II, with only two DMUs being efficient with regard to both sub-processes. The relational DEA model not only demonstrates the physical relationship between the whole process and the sub-process components, but also produces reliable outcomes in efficiency measurement among different stakeholders in Taiwan's NHI system.

  17. Contributions of medical family therapy to the changing health care system.

    PubMed

    Doherty, William J; McDaniel, Susan H; Hepworth, Jeri

    2014-09-01

    Medical family therapy is a form of professional practice that uses a biopsychosocial approach and systemic family therapy principles in the collaborative treatment of individuals and families dealing with medical problems. It emerged out of the experience of family therapists working in primary medical care settings in the 1980s and 1990s. This article describes how contemporary medical family therapy can contribute to a transformed health care system in four areas: the patient experience of health care, the health of the population, the containment of health care costs, and enhanced practice environments.

  18. The health care system: factoring in the ethnicity, cultural and health care needs of women and children of color.

    PubMed

    Griffin, F N

    1994-01-01

    The author reviews the literature on factors which influence the health of African Americans. The concept of poverty as a health problem is discussed as well as the feminization of poverty. The author implores health care workers, to begin to implement the concepts of ethnicity and culture when giving care to clients of color.

  19. [Health economic evaluation in a local level government health care system].

    PubMed

    Sancho, Leyla Gomes; Vargens, José Muniz Costa

    2009-10-01

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the possibility of applying health economic evaluations at local level government healthcare system, and consequently use the results of this study into decision making. In order to subside this reflexion, it was analyzed the SAMU/192 Program costs evaluation in the city of Belo Horizonte, as well as data concerning effectiveness of the program and a review on electronic databases (SciELO and Medline) about the application of studies in decision making. The analysis showed that even for a simple evaluation on expenditure, there are still unsolved problems of data availability as well as of data effectiveness on information systems definition and association. It showed that decision makers do not use the result of studies for decision making either. So, we conclude that there is no possibility to apply a health economic evaluation research and have the results used in a local level government health care system.

  20. Health systems context(s) for integrating mental health into primary health care in six Emerald countries: a situation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mugisha, James; Abdulmalik, Jibril; Hanlon, Charlotte; Petersen, Inge; Lund, Crick; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Ahuja, Shalini; Shidhaye, Rahul; Mntambo, Ntokozo; Alem, Atalay; Gureje, Oye; Kigozi, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Mental, neurological and substance use disorders contribute to a significant proportion of the world's disease burden, including in low and middle income countries (LMICs). In this study, we focused on the health systems required to support integration of mental health into primary health care (PHC) in Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa and Uganda. A checklist guided by the World Health Organization Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO-AIMS) was developed and was used for data collection in each of the six countries participating in the Emerging mental health systems in low and middle-income countries (Emerald) research consortium. The documents reviewed were from the following domains: mental health legislation, health policies/plans and relevant country health programs. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Three of the study countries (Ethiopia, Nepal, Nigeria, and Uganda) were working towards developing mental health legislation. South Africa and India were ahead of other countries, having enacted recent Mental Health Care Act in 2004 and 2016, respectively. Among all the 6 study countries, only Nepal, Nigeria and South Africa had a standalone mental health policy. However, other countries had related health policies where mental health was mentioned. The lack of fully fledged policies is likely to limit opportunities for resource mobilization for the mental health sector and efforts to integrate mental health into PHC. Most countries were found to be allocating inadequate budgets from the health budget for mental health, with South Africa (5%) and Nepal (0.17%) were the countries with the highest and lowest proportions of health budgets spent on mental health, respectively. Other vital resources that support integration such as human resources and health facilities for mental health services were found to be in adequate in all the study countries. Monitoring and evaluation systems to support the integration of mental

  1. Primary Care-Based Skin Cancer Screening in a Veterans Affairs Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Swetter, Susan M; Chang, Julia; Shaub, Amanda R; Weinstock, Martin A; Lewis, Eleanor T; Asch, Steven M

    2017-08-01

    Skin cancer screening may improve melanoma outcomes and keratinocyte carcinoma morbidity, but little is known about the feasibility of skin cancer training and clinical skin examination (CSE) by primary care practitioners (PCPs) in large health care systems. To assess the association of skin cancer training and screening by PCPs with dermatology referral patterns and rates of skin biopsies. In this pilot interventional study performed at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, patients 35 years or older scheduled for an annual health habits screen in the PCP general medicine clinics were studied. Six PCPs underwent Internet Curriculum for Melanoma Early Detection (INFORMED) training in May 2015, and 5 screened patients during the following 14 months. Proportion of dermatology referrals, subsequent skin biopsies, and PCP diagnostic accuracy for skin cancer or precancer compared with dermatologist diagnosis were assessed in screened patients 14 months before the intervention (February 18, 2014, through April 30, 2015) and after the intervention (June 18, 2015, through August 30, 2016). Among 258 patients offered screening (median age, 70 years; age range, 35-94 years; 255 [98.8%] male), 189 (73.3%) received CSE and 69 (26.7%) declined. A total of 62 of 189 patients (32.8%) were referred to a dermatologist after intervention: 33 (53.2%) for presumptive skin cancers and 15 (24.2%) for precancers. Nine of 50 patients (18.0%) evaluated in dermatology clinic underwent biopsy to exclude skin cancer. Correct diagnoses were made by PCPs in 13 of 38 patients (34.2%; 4 of 27 patients [14.8%] diagnosed with skin cancers and 5 of 11 patients [45.5%] diagnosed with actinic keratoses). Comparison of all outpatient visits for the 5 main participating PCPs before vs after intervention revealed no significant differences in dermatology referrals overall and those for presumptive skin cancer or actinic keratoses, skin biopsies, or PCP diagnostic accuracy with the exception

  2. Women's health and behavioral health issues in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jean Lau; Yee, Barbara W K; Banks, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    As health care reform promises to change the landscape of health care delivery, its potential impact on women's health looms large. Whereas health and mental health systems have historically been fragmented, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates integrated health care as the strategy for reform. Current systems fragment women's health not only in their primary care, mental health, obstetrical, and gynecological needs, but also in their roles as the primary caregivers for parents, spouses, and children. Changes in reimbursement, and in restructuring financing and care coordination systems through accountable care organizations and medical homes, will potentially improve women's health care.

  3. The fundamental law that shapes the United States health care system: is universal health care realistic within the established paradigm?

    PubMed

    Gunnar, William P

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author draws from his own experience as a doctor in describing the issues the uninsured patient population faces. Pointing out that neither the U.S. Constitution nor case law provides a positive right to health care, the author describes the parameters of federal health care funding and ultimately concludes that universal health care cannot be fully achieved in the U.S.

  4. The U.S. Child Welfare System: A De Facto Public Behavioral Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John S.; Rogers, Laura

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that a child welfare system has a significant responsibility to detect and treat emotional and behavioral problems and disorders as a routine part of involvement with child protective services and out-of-home care. Given the very high risk of mental health needs in this population, preventing the development of these…

  5. Japan's health care system: containing costs and attempting reform.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Naoki; Campbell, John Creighton

    2004-01-01

    As Japan's economy declined, more intensive control of prices and even volume through the fee schedule, plus increases in various copayment rates, led to an actual reduction of medical spending in 2002 for the first time in history. To augment established mechanisms of cost containment, case-mix-based inclusive fees for inpatient care were introduced in university hospitals in 2003 and are planned for subacute and long-term care. However, substantial reform, including the introduction of market-based medicine, is not likely to occur in other areas. Progress in making the delivery system more accountable to patients has been meaningful but slow.

  6. Rural health systems' perceptions of referral to community pharmacists during transitions of care.

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephanie; DiDonato, Kristen L; Liu, Yifei; Hartwig, D Matthew; May, Justin; Schramm, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    To identify rural health systems' perceptions of value, benefits, barriers, and opportunities associated with community pharmacist involvement in patient transitions of care. Rural health systems in northwest and central Missouri. Qualitative descriptive study of key informant interviews with self-identified decision makers of rural health systems within a 50-mile radius of 15 independent community pharmacy chain locations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and coded to evaluate themes in participant responses. Fifteen interviews were conducted at 8 rural health systems. Participants expressed significant value in community pharmacist involvement in transitions of care and highlighted several benefits, barriers, and opportunities related to potential collaboration. Benefits that were identified included medication monitoring, resource for patient information, and desire among health care providers to work with community pharmacists. Barriers included legal and regulatory issues with referral, communication, and prescriber utilization. Opportunities described included: patient education, monitoring, and follow-up; targeted interventions; medication access assistance; bedside medication delivery; and collaboration between community pharmacies and health care entities. Rural health system informants perceived community pharmacy involvement to be valuable and were receptive to collaboration during transitional care to improve patient outcomes. They highlighted barriers to overcome to truly incorporate community pharmacists into the transitional care arena. Understanding these rural health systems' perceptions can guide community pharmacies in developing collaborative relationships and patient care services to assist with care transitions. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Economic crisis and access to care: Cuba's health care system since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

    PubMed

    Nayeri, Kamran; López-Pardo, Cándido M

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the effects on access to health care in Cuba of the severe economic crisis that followed the collapse of the Soviet Union and the monetary and market reforms adopted to confront it. Economic crises undermine health and well-being. Widespread scarcities and self-seeking attitudes fostered by monetary and market relations could result in differential access to health services and resources, but the authors found no evidence of such differential access in Cuba. While Cubans generally complain about many shortages, including shortages of health services and resources before the economic recovery began in 1995, no interviewees reported systemic shortages or unequal access to health care services or resources; interviewees were particularly happy with their primary care services. These findings are consistent with official health care statistics, which show that, while secondary and tertiary care suffered in the early years of the crisis because of interruptions in access to medical technologies, primary care services expanded unabated, resulting in improved health outcomes. The combined effects of the well-functioning universal and equitable health care system in place before the crisis, the government's steadfast support for the system, and the network of social solidarity based on grassroots organizations mitigated the corrosive effects of monetary and market relations in the context of severe scarcities and an intensified U.S. embargo against the Cuban people.

  8. Health care personnel delivery system: another doctor draft?

    PubMed

    Lalich, Roger A

    2004-01-01

    It appears that a general draft is not likely to occur. A physician draft is the most likely conscription into the military in the near future. Physicians inducted out of private practice with large practice expense overheads may suffer significant financial hardship. The only specific long-term deferment available to physicians is that of Essentiality of Occupation. Reserve component forces have been used extensively over the last few years to augment the active duty military. Medical units and personnel are no exceptions to this augmentation. After the most recent mobilization of reserve forces, many physicians may be leaving the National Guard and reserves because of the financial losses they suffered while mobilized. With the depletion of these supplemental physicians, who will the military use for future contingencies? A physician draft may be the only way to assure the health of our men and women in the military. Although this is not addressed in the HCPDS legislation, it is conceivable that physicians could be drafted into reserve medical units. There may be changes to the HCPDS over the next few years, such as a quicker response time for induction of health care personnel. The alternative service requirement for physician conscientious objectors has yet to be determined. Also, a reengineering effort was announced by the SSS in March 2003 to focus on the "special skills" mission. Currently this mission is only for health care personnel, but in the future it is foreseeable it may include linguists, environmental engineers, computer specialists, and other professionals.

  9. Differences in the patterns of health care system distrust between blacks and whites.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Katrina; McMurphy, Suzanne; Dean, Lorraine T; Micco, Ellyn; Putt, Mary; Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Schwartz, J Sanford; Sankar, Pamela; Pyeritz, Reed E; Bernhardt, Barbara; Shea, Judy A

    2008-06-01

    Although health care-related distrust may contribute to racial disparities in health and health care in the US, current evidence about racial differences in distrust is often conflicting, largely limited to measures of physician trust, and rarely linked to multidimensional trust or distrust. To test the hypothesis that racial differences in health care system distrust are more closely linked to values distrust than to competence distrust. Cross-sectional telephone survey. Two hundred fifty-five individuals (144 black, 92 white) who had been treated in primary care practices or the emergency department of a large, urban Mid-Atlantic health system. Race, scores on the overall health care system distrust scale and on the 2 distrust subscales, values distrust and competence distrust. In univariate analysis, overall health care system distrust scores were slightly higher among blacks than whites (25.8 vs 24.1, p = .05); however, this difference was driven by racial differences in values distrust scores (15.4 vs 13.8, p = .003) rather than in competence distrust scores (10.4 vs 10.3, p = .85). After adjustment for socioeconomic status, health/psychological status, and health care access, individuals in the top quartile of values distrust were significantly more likely to be black (odds ratio = 2.60, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-6.58), but there was no significant association between race and competence distrust. Racial differences in health care system distrust are complex with far greater differences seen in the domain of values distrust than in competence distrust. This framework may be useful for explaining the mixed results of studies of race and health care-related distrust to date, for the design of future studies exploring the causes of racial disparities in health and health care, and for the development and testing of novel strategies for reducing these disparities.

  10. Who cares for former child soldiers? Mental health systems of care in sierra leone.

    PubMed

    J Song, Suzan; van den Brink, Helene; de Jong, Joop

    2013-10-01

    While numerous studies on former child soldiers (FCS) have shown mental health needs, adequate services are a challenge. This study aimed to identify priorities, barriers and facilitators of mental health care for Sierra Leonean FCS. Thematic analysis was done on 24 qualitative interviews with participants from diverse sectors. Priorities of mental distress, substance abuse, and gender-based violence were common among FCS clients. Barriers were governmental support and communication with other providers. Perceived facilitators of care were primary- and secondary-level interventions. A public mental health model would feasibly build upon local, culturally embraced interventions, targeting local priorities and reducing barriers to care.

  11. Involving the Health Care System in Domestic Violence: What Women Want

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Jinan; Antoun, Jumana; Ambuel, Bruce; Khawaja, Marwan

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Domestic violence is prevalent among women using primary health care services in Lebanon and has a negative effect on their health, yet physicians are not inquiring about it. In this study, we explored the attitudes of these women regarding involving the health care system in domestic violence management. METHODS We undertook a qualitative focus group study. Health care professionals in 6 primary health care centers routinely screened women for domestic violence using the HITS (Hurt, Insult, Threaten, Scream) instrument. At each center, 12 women who were screened (regardless of the result) were recruited to participate in a focus group discussion. RESULTS Most of the 72 women encouraged involvement of the health care system in the management of domestic violence and considered it to be a “socially accepted way to break the silence.” Women expected health care professionals to have an “active conscience”; to be open minded, ready to listen, and unhurried; and to respect confidentiality. Additionally, they recommended mass media and community awareness campaigns focusing on family relationships to address domestic violence. CONCLUSIONS Addressing domestic violence through the health care system, if done properly, may be socially acceptable and nonoffensive even to women living in conservative societies such as Lebanon. The women in this study described characteristics of health professionals that would be conducive to screening and that could be extrapolated to the health care of immigrant Arab women. PMID:22585885

  12. Health care information systems. Patient-centered integration is the key.

    PubMed

    Korpman, R A

    1991-03-01

    In today's cost-constrained health care delivery environment, hospitals are recognizing the need to optimize their care operations to improve the efficiency, efficacy, and service quality of primary health care providers, particularly the medical staff and nursing services, which comprise about 50% of the hospital's total personnel. Because health care institutions are in the business of caring for patients (not for accounts or departments), and because health care delivery largely is a personnel-intensive information industry, operations optimization is supported best by information systems that fully integrate all information concerning the patient. The goal of this is to simplify the job duties of direct care providers. The benefits of an integrated, patient-centered approach include demonstrable improvements in over-all patient care quality and staff satisfaction as well as a significant reduction in costs.

  13. Health care automation companies.

    PubMed

    1995-12-01

    Health care automation companies: card transaction processing/EFT/EDI-capable banks; claims auditing/analysis; claims processors/clearinghouses; coding products/services; computer hardware; computer networking/LAN/WAN; consultants; data processing/outsourcing; digital dictation/transcription; document imaging/optical disk storage; executive information systems; health information networks; hospital/health care information systems; interface engines; laboratory information systems; managed care information systems; patient identification/credit cards; pharmacy information systems; POS terminals; radiology information systems; software--claims related/computer-based patient records/home health care/materials management/supply ordering/physician practice management/translation/utilization review/outcomes; telecommunications products/services; telemedicine/teleradiology; value-added networks.

  14. Military Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Awareness Training for Health Care Providers Within the Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Shrader, Angela; Casero, Kellie; Casper, Bethany; Kelley, Mary; Lewis, Laura; Calohan, Jess

    2017-05-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals serving within the U.S. military and their beneficiaries have unique health care requirements. Department of Defense Directive 1304.26 "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" created a barrier for service members to speak candidly with their health care providers, which left specific health care needs unaddressed. There are no standardized cultural education programs to assist Military Health System (MHS) health care providers in delivering care to LGBT patients and their beneficiaries. The purpose of this project was to develop, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of an LGBT educational program for health care providers within the MHS to increase cultural awareness in caring for this special population. This multisite educational program was conducted at Travis Air Force Base and Joint Base Lewis-McChord from November 15, 2014, to January 30, 2015. A 15-question multiple-choice questionnaire was developed based on the education program and was administered before and after the education program. A total of 51 individuals completed the program. Overall posttest scores improved compared to pretest scores. This program was designed to begin the process of educating health care providers about the unique health care issues of military LGBT Service Members and their beneficiaries. This program was the first to address the disparities in LGBT health care needs within the Department of Defense. It also provided a platform for facilitating open communication among providers regarding LGBT population health needs in the military.

  15. The Health Care System for Veterans: An Interim Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    conditions (for example, scoliosis ), B Conditions that are known to have existed before military service, and B Conditions that began after military service...example, purchases of health IT to track adherence to clinical guidelines or spending on education and training to improve compliance with safety...structure may make providing the appropriate training on the use of health IT systems easier and thereby reduce the risks that may exist when

  16. Health care organizations as complex systems: new perspectives on design and management.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Reuben R; Driebe, Dean J; Lanham, Holly Jordan

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the impact of complexity science on the design and management of health care organizations over the past decade. We provide an overview of complexity science issues and their impact on thinking about health care systems, particularly with the rising importance of information systems. We also present a complexity science perspective on current issues in today's health care organizations and suggest ways that this perspective might help in approaching these issues. We review selected research, focusing on work in which we participated, to identify specific examples of applications of complexity science. We then take a look at information systems in health care organizations from a complexity viewpoint. Complexity science is a fundamentally different way of understanding nature and has influenced the thinking of scholars and practitioners as they have attempted to understand health care organizations. Many scholars study health care organizations as complex adaptive systems and through this perspective develop new management strategies. Most important, perhaps, is the understanding that attention to relationships and interdependencies is critical for developing effective management strategies. Increased understanding of complexity science can enhance the ability of researchers and practitioners to develop new ways of understanding and improving health care organizations. This analysis opens new vistas for scholars and practitioners attempting to understand health care organizations as complex adaptive systems. The analysis holds value for those already familiar with this approach as well as those who may not be as familiar.

  17. Effects of different broiler production systems on health care costs in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Gocsik, É; Kortes, H E; Lansink, A G J M Oude; Saatkamp, H W

    2014-06-01

    This study analyzed the effects of different broiler production systems on health care costs in the Netherlands. In addition to the conventional production system, the analysis also included 5 alternative animal welfare systems representative of the Netherlands. The study was limited to the most prevalent and economically relevant endemic diseases in the broiler farms. Health care costs consisted of losses and expenditures. The study investigated whether higher animal welfare standards increased health care costs, in both absolute and relative terms, and also examined which cost components (losses or expenditures) were affected and, if so, to what extent. The results show that health care costs represent only a small proportion of total production costs in each production system. Losses account for the major part of health care costs, which makes it difficult to detect the actual effect of diseases on total health care costs. We conclude that, although differences in health care costs exist across production systems, health care costs only make a minor contribution to the total production costs relative to other costs, such as feed costs and purchase of 1-d-old chicks.

  18. The role of the primary care physician in the Israeli health care system as a 'gatekeeper'--the viewpoint of health care policy makers.

    PubMed

    Tabenkin, H; Gross, R

    2000-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the attitudes of policy makers in the health care system in Israel to a change in the role of primary care physicians (PCP) and to ascertain the conditions under which they would be ready to adopt the model of PCP as gatekeeper. The study design was qualitative, with analyses of in-depth structured interviews of 20 policy makers from the Ministry of Health, the Sick Funds' central administrations and the Israel Medical Association (IMA) central office. The majority of the respondents claim that they want highly trained PCPs (family physicians, pediatricians and internals) to play a central role in the health care system. They should be co-ordinators, highly accessible and should be able to weigh cost considerations. However, only about half of the respondents support a full gatekeeper model and most of them think that the gatekeeper concept has a negative connotation. They also feel that it would be difficult to implement regulations regarding primary care. The barriers to implementation of the gatekeeper model, as cited by the respondents include loss of faith in PCPs by the general population, dearth of PCPs with adequate training, low stature, lack of availability on a 24-h basis, resistance by specialists, strong competition between the sick funds including promises of direct access to specialists, the medical care habits of the general population many of whom do not settle for only one opinion, and a declared anti-gatekeeper policy by one of the sick funds. Ways to overcome these obstacles include implementation of fundholding clinics, patient education on the importance of having a personal physician, appropriate marketing by family medicine and primary care advocates, and continued training in primary care. Israeli health care policy makers have an ambivalent attitude to strengthening the role of primary care. In theory, they profess support for placing primary care physicians in a central role in the health care system

  19. MEDICARE PAYMENTS AND SYSTEM-LEVEL HEALTH-CARE USE: The Spillover Effects of Medicare Managed Care.

    PubMed

    Baicker, Katherine; Robbins, Jacob A

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of Medicare managed care over the past decade has the potential to increase the efficiency of health-care delivery. Improvements in care management for some may improve efficiency system-wide, with implications for optimal payment policy in public insurance programs. These system-level effects may depend on local health-care market structure and vary based on patient characteristics. We use exogenous variation in the Medicare payment schedule to isolate the effects of market-level managed care enrollment on the quantity and quality of care delivered. We find that in areas with greater enrollment of Medicare beneficiaries in managed care, the non-managed care beneficiaries have fewer days in the hospital but more outpatient visits, consistent with a substitution of less expensive outpatient care for more expensive inpatient care, particularly at high levels of managed care. We find no evidence that care is of lower quality. Optimal payment policies for Medicare managed care enrollees that account for system-level spillovers may thus be higher than those that do not.

  20. Economic crisis and counter-reform of universal health care systems: Spanish case.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Paulo Antônio de Carvalho; Carvalho, Regina Ribeiro Parizi; Louvison, Marília Cristina Prado

    2015-01-01

    The economic crisis that has been affecting Europe in the 21st century has modified social protection systems in the countries that adopted, in the 20th century, universal health care system models, such as Spain. This communication presents some recent transformations, which were caused by changes in Spanish law. Those changes relate to the access to health care services, mainly in regards to the provision of care to foreigners, to financial contribution from users for health care services, and to pharmaceutical assistance. In crisis situations, reforms are observed to follow a trend which restricts rights and deepens social inequalities.

  1. Economic crisis and counter-reform of universal health care systems: Spanish case

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Paulo Antônio de Carvalho; Carvalho, Regina Ribeiro Parizi; Louvison, Marília Cristina Prado

    2015-01-01

    The economic crisis that has been affecting Europe in the 21st century has modified social protection systems in the countries that adopted, in the 20th century, universal health care system models, such as Spain. This communication presents some recent transformations, which were caused by changes in Spanish law. Those changes relate to the access to health care services, mainly in regards to the provision of care to foreigners, to financial contribution from users for health care services, and to pharmaceutical assistance. In crisis situations, reforms are observed to follow a trend which restricts rights and deepens social inequalities. PMID:26083942

  2. Comparisons of Health Care Systems in the United States, Germany and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ridic, Goran; Gleason, Suzanne; Ridic, Ognjen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research paper is to compare health care systems in three highly advanced industrialized countries: The United States of America, Canada and Germany. The first part of the research paper will focus on the description of health care systems in the above-mentioned countries while the second part will analyze, evaluate and compare the three systems regarding equity and efficiency. Finally, an overview of recent changes and proposed future reforms in these countries will be provided as well. We start by providing a general description and comparison of the structure of health care systems in Canada, Germany and the United States. PMID:23678317

  3. Patient Care Outcomes: Implications for the Military Health Services Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-05

    assessment of "outcome". Stroke , 13, 873-876. 63. Ferguson, G. H., Hildman, T., & Nichols, B. (1987). The effect of nursing care planning systems on patient...Outcome assessment. (1987). New England Journal of Medicine, 317(4), 251-252. 177. Partridge, C. J. (1982). The outcome of physiotherapy and its...measurement. Physiotherapy , 68(11), 362-363. 178. Penckofer, S. H., & Holm, K. (1984). Early appraisal of coronary revascularization on quality of life

  4. Health delivery system for renal disease care in bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ur Rashid, Harun

    2004-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the densely populated countries, a nation of 128 million people, 75% of whom lives in rural areas and the annual per capita gross national product (GNP) is US$ 380.00. The health care budget is 1.2% of GNP and the priority areas are population control, provision of clean drinking water and eradication of communicable diseases. The country has a small number of nephrologists and renal care is available in large cities only. The causes of renal diseases include glomerulonephritis, diabetes, hypertension, nephrolithiasis, obstructive uropathy and interstitial nephropathy. The incidence of end-stage renal disease is not known, but would be much higher than in developed countries because of high incidence of infection and environmental pollution. The treatment of ESRD has low priority in Bangladesh because of the government health policy and high cost of treatment. As a result, less than 10% of ESRD patients are able to maintain dialysis in private hospitals and governmental dialysis centers that are already overcrowded. The vast majority of patients who are started on dialysis die or stop treatment within the first three months. Renal transplantation is not as expensive as dialysis and is less costly in the university hospital than in private hospitals. Cyclosporine is usually replaced by azathioprine after six months of transplantation. Although organ act law is effective since 1998, cadaveric transplant has not picked up due to lack of infrastructure, facility and orientation regarding cadaveric transplantation. Preventive measures of renal disease can not be overemphasized.

  5. Managed behavioral health care: a key component of integrated regional delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Nauert, R C

    1997-01-01

    Managed behavioral health care is a key component of integrated regional delivery systems. Mental health and chemical dependency services are of growing importance in developing insurance programs and establishing health systems. Primary features include full involvement of the medical community, development of a free-standing organization, joint ventures with existing entities, and effective contract negotiations.

  6. The consumer choice model: a humane reconstruction of the U.S. health care system.

    PubMed

    Coulter, C H

    2000-01-01

    "Consumer choice," "defined contribution health programs," "voucher systems," and "health marts" are variations on a theme: employees buying their own health care. This new approach to health care purchasing, which is designed to minimize the role of employers, is being proposed by an array of economists and by both Republican and Democratic legislators as the best way to address the nation's health care ills. Although enabling national legislation is unlikely to pass soon, the debate will nevertheless change the face of health care in America. The prospect is reminiscent of the debate over "Clinton Care" in 1993--although legislation was never passed, managed care rapidly came to dominate the U.S. health care system. As this reform takes hold, beneficiaries will make their own health plan selections but will have more responsibility and may bear more cost. Providers will have to adapt to new, customer-driven requirements for performance, accountability, and communications but will also find opportunities in a marketplace that they will have a major role in shaping. Physicians, health plans, and insurers should understand how these proposals will transform their role in health care.

  7. Implementation and Performance Evaluation of WWW Conference System for Supporting Remote Mental Health Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugita, Kaoru; De Marco, Giuseppe; Barolli, Leonard; Uchida, Noriki; Miyakawa, Akihiro

    2006-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has changed our lives and many applications are based on IT. IT can be helpful for remote mental health care education. Because there are very few mental health care specialists, it is very important to decrease their moving time. But it is not easy to use the conventional TV conference systems for ordinary people,…

  8. Implementation and Performance Evaluation of WWW Conference System for Supporting Remote Mental Health Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugita, Kaoru; De Marco, Giuseppe; Barolli, Leonard; Uchida, Noriki; Miyakawa, Akihiro

    2006-01-01

    Information technology (IT) has changed our lives and many applications are based on IT. IT can be helpful for remote mental health care education. Because there are very few mental health care specialists, it is very important to decrease their moving time. But it is not easy to use the conventional TV conference systems for ordinary people,…

  9. Patient Autonomy Investigation under the Technology-Based Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    With widespread advances in the diffusion and application of medical technologies, the phenomena of misuse and overuse have become pervasive. These phenomena not only increase the cost of health care systems and deplete the accessibility and availability of health care services, they also jeopardize patient autonomy. From a literature review on…

  10. Patient Autonomy Investigation under the Technology-Based Health Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    With widespread advances in the diffusion and application of medical technologies, the phenomena of misuse and overuse have become pervasive. These phenomena not only increase the cost of health care systems and deplete the accessibility and availability of health care services, they also jeopardize patient autonomy. From a literature review on…

  11. A SWOT analysis of the organization and financing of the Danish health care system.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Terkel

    2002-02-01

    The organization and financing of the Danish health care system was evaluated within a framework of a SWOT analysis (analysis of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) by a panel of five members with a background in health economics. The present paper describes the methods and materials used for the evaluation: selection of panel members, structure of the evaluation task according to the health care triangle model, selection of background material consisting of documents and literature on the Danish health care system, and a 1-week study visit.

  12. Health care lessons from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S

    1993-01-01

    Thailand's health care system incorporates the private and public sectors. The government regulates health care through a system of capping, which protects its interests while providing a climate for competition. As a result, the private sector has developed and implemented some interesting concepts in health care as it turned to prevention, hospital care alternatives, neighbourhood-based ambulatory care and home care. The author suggests that Canada could benefit by examining some of Thailand's innovations.

  13. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  14. The dynamics of health care reform--learning from a complex adaptive systems theoretical perspective.

    PubMed

    Sturmberg, Joachim P; Martin, Carmel M

    2010-10-01

    Health services demonstrate key features of complex adaptive systems (CAS), they are dynamic and unfold in unpredictable ways, and unfolding events are often unique. To better understand the complex adaptive nature of health systems around a core attractor we propose the metaphor of the health care vortex. We also suggest that in an ideal health care system the core attractor would be personal health attainment. Health care reforms around the world offer an opportunity to analyse health system change from a complex adaptive perspective. At large health care reforms have been pursued disregarding the complex adaptive nature of the health system. The paper details some recent reforms and outlines how to understand their strategies and outcomes, and what could be learnt for future efforts, utilising CAS principles. Current health systems show the inherent properties of a CAS driven by a core attractor of disease and cost containment. We content that more meaningful health systems reform requires the delicate task of shifting the core attractor from disease and cost containment towards health attainment.

  15. Pragmatic (trial) informatics: a perspective from the NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel L; Green, Beverly B; Laws, Reesa; Puro, Jon; Kahn, Michael G; Bauck, Alan; Smerek, Michelle; Van Eaton, Erik G; Zozus, Meredith; Ed Hammond, W; Stephens, Kari A; Simon, Greg E

    2017-03-14

    Pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) are research investigations embedded in health care settings designed to increase the efficiency of research and its relevance to clinical practice. The Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory, initiated by the National Institutes of Health Common Fund in 2010, is a pioneering cooperative aimed at identifying and overcoming operational challenges to pragmatic research. Drawing from our experience, we present 4 broad categories of informatics-related challenges: (1) using clinical data for research, (2) integrating data from heterogeneous systems, (3) using electronic health records to support intervention delivery or health system change, and (4) assessing and improving data capture to define study populations and outcomes. These challenges impact the validity, reliability, and integrity of PCTs. Achieving the full potential of PCTs and a learning health system will require meaningful partnerships between health system leadership and operations, and federally driven standards and policies to ensure that future electronic health record systems have the flexibility to support research.

  16. [Organization of the health system from the perspective of home care professionals].

    PubMed

    Andrade, Angélica Mônica; Brito, Maria José Menezes; Silva, Kênia Lara; Montenegro, Lívia Cozer; Caçador, Beatriz Santana; Freitas, Letícia Fernanda de Cota

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this qualitative case study is to analyze how the health system is organized from the perspective of homecare professionals. Data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews with seven professionals that provide home healthcare services. Content analysis revealed the following empirical categories: Perception of home care professionals in relation to their work and the health system; Difficulties in articulating the Home Care Program with other services of the health system; and, Opportunities to articulate the various health services with the Home Care Program. Results indicate that the work conducted in the Home Care Program significantly interfaces with other health service programs, and is considered important to implement principles of the National Health Service.

  17. Operationalizing the Learning Health Care System in an Integrated Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Psek, Wayne A.; Stametz, Rebecca A.; Bailey-Davis, Lisa D.; Davis, Daniel; Darer, Jonathan; Faucett, William A.; Henninger, Debra L.; Sellers, Dorothy C.; Gerrity, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Learning Health Care System (LHCS) model seeks to utilize sophisticated technologies and competencies to integrate clinical operations, research and patient participation in order to continuously generate knowledge, improve care, and deliver value. Transitioning from concept to practical application of an LHCS presents many challenges but can yield opportunities for continuous improvement. There is limited literature and practical experience available in operationalizing the LHCS in the context of an integrated health system. At Geisinger Health System (GHS) a multi-stakeholder group is undertaking to enhance organizational learning and develop a plan for operationalizing the LHCS system-wide. We present a framework for operationalizing continuous learning across an integrated delivery system and lessons learned through the ongoing planning process. Framework: The framework focuses attention on nine key LHCS operational components: Data and Analytics; People and Partnerships; Patient and Family Engagement; Ethics and Oversight; Evaluation and Methodology; Funding; Organization; Prioritization; and Deliverables. Definitions, key elements and examples for each are presented. The framework is purposefully broad for application across different organizational contexts. Conclusion: A realistic assessment of the culture, resources and capabilities of the organization related to learning is critical to defining the scope of operationalization. Engaging patients in clinical care and discovery, including quality improvement and comparative effectiveness research, requires a defensible ethical framework that undergirds a system of strong but flexible oversight. Leadership support is imperative for advancement of the LHCS model. Findings from our ongoing work within the proposed framework may inform other organizations considering a transition to an LHCS. PMID:25992388

  18. A Context-Aware Interactive Health Care System Based on Ontology and Fuzzy Inference.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Tzu-Chiang; Liang, Wen-Hua

    2015-09-01

    In the present society, most families are double-income families, and as the long-term care is seriously short of manpower, it contributes to the rapid development of tele-homecare equipment, and the smart home care system gradually emerges, which assists the elderly or patients with chronic diseases in daily life. This study aims at interaction between persons under care and the system in various living spaces, as based on motion-sensing interaction, and the context-aware smart home care system is proposed. The system stores the required contexts in knowledge ontology, including the physiological information and environmental information of the person under care, as the database of decision. The motion-sensing device enables the person under care to interact with the system through gestures. By the inference mechanism of fuzzy theory, the system can offer advice and rapidly execute service, thus, implementing the EHA. In addition, the system is integrated with the functions of smart phone, tablet PC, and PC, in order that users can implement remote operation and share information regarding the person under care. The health care system constructed in this study enables the decision making system to probe into the health risk of each person under care; then, from the view of preventive medicine, and through a composing system and simulation experimentation, tracks the physiological trend of the person under care, and provides early warning service, thus, promoting smart home care.

  19. Health equity in the New Zealand health care system: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In all countries people experience different social circumstances that result in avoidable differences in health. In New Zealand, Māori, Pacific peoples, and those with lower socioeconomic status experience higher levels of chronic illness, which is the leading cause of mortality, morbidity and inequitable health outcomes. Whilst the health system can enable a fairer distribution of good health, limited national data is available to measure health equity. Therefore, we sought to find out whether health services in New Zealand were equitable by measuring the level of development of components of chronic care management systems across district health boards. Variation in provision by geography, condition or ethnicity can be interpreted as inequitable. Methods A national survey of district health boards (DHBs) was undertaken on macro approaches to chronic condition management with detail on cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke and diabetes. Additional data from expert informant interviews on program reach and the cultural needs of Māori and Pacific peoples was sought. Survey data were analyzed on dimensions of health equity relevant to strategic planning and program delivery. Results are presented as descriptive statistics and free text. Interviews were transcribed and NVivo 8 software supported a general inductive approach to identify common themes. Results Survey responses were received from the majority of DHBs (15/21), some PHOs (21/84) and 31 expert informants. Measuring, monitoring and targeting equity is not systematically undertaken. The Health Equity Assessment Tool is used in strategic planning but not in decisions about implementing or monitoring disease programs. Variable implementation of evidence-based practices in disease management and multiple funding streams made program implementation difficult. Equity for Māori is embedded in policy, this is not so for other ethnic groups or

  20. Leadership Perspectives on Operationalizing the Learning Health Care System in an Integrated Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Psek, Wayne; Davis, F Daniel; Gerrity, Gloria; Stametz, Rebecca; Bailey-Davis, Lisa; Henninger, Debra; Sellers, Dorothy; Darer, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare leaders need operational strategies that support organizational learning for continued improvement and value generation. The learning health system (LHS) model may provide leaders with such strategies; however, little is known about leaders' perspectives on the value and application of system-wide operationalization of the LHS model. The objective of this project was to solicit and analyze senior health system leaders' perspectives on the LHS and learning activities in an integrated delivery system. A series of interviews were conducted with 41 system leaders from a broad range of clinical and administrative areas across an integrated delivery system. Leaders' responses were categorized into themes. Ten major themes emerged from our conversations with leaders. While leaders generally expressed support for the concept of the LHS and enhanced system-wide learning, their concerns and suggestions for operationalization where strongly aligned with their functional area and strategic goals. Our findings suggests that leaders tend to adopt a very pragmatic approach to learning. Leaders expressed a dichotomy between the operational imperative to execute operational objectives efficiently and the need for rigorous evaluation. Alignment of learning activities with system-wide strategic and operational priorities is important to gain leadership support and resources. Practical approaches to addressing opportunities and challenges identified in the themes are discussed. Continuous learning is an ongoing, multi-disciplinary function of a health care delivery system. Findings from this and other research may be used to inform and prioritize system-wide learning objectives and strategies which support reliable, high value care delivery.

  1. Health care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S

    1984-07-01

    This is the third and last article reporting professional exchange tours between American nurses and nurses of other countries. In this article, the health care system of Kenya is discussed and comparisons made between this system and our own. Out of this comparison come several insights into our own way of doing things and possibilities for improving them. "Health Care in the Soviet Union" appeared in the April 1984 issue of The Nurse Practitioner. "Health Care in China" appeared in the May 1984 issue of the journal.

  2. Equity in health care.

    PubMed

    La Rosa-Salas, Virginia; Tricas-Sauras, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    It has long been known that a segment of the population enjoys distinctly better health status and higher quality of health care than others. To solve this problem, prioritization is unavoidable, and the question is how priorities should be set. Rational priority setting would seek equity amongst the whole population, the extent to which people receive equal care for equal needs. Equity in health care is an ethical imperative not only because of the intrinsic worth of good health, or the value that society places on good health, but because, without good health, people would be unable to enjoy life's other sources of happiness. This paper also argues the importance of the health care's efficiency, but at the same time, it highlights how any innovation and rationalization undertaken in the provision of the health system should be achieved from the consideration of human dignity, making the person prevail over economic criteria. Therefore, the underlying principles on which this health care equity paper is based are fundamental human rights. The main aim is to ensure the implementation of these essential rights by those carrying out public duties. Viewed from this angle, equity in health care means equality: equality in access to services and treatment, and equality in the quality of care provided. As a result, this paper attempts to address both human dignity and efficiency through the context of equity to reconcile them in the middle ground.

  3. Analyzing the Historical Development and Transition of the Korean Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yi; Kim, Chul-Woung; Seo, Nam-Kyu; Lee, Seung Eun

    2017-08-01

    Many economically advanced countries have attempted to minimize public expenditures and pursue privatization based on the principles of neo-liberalism. However, Korea has moved contrary to this global trend. This study examines why and how the Korean health care system was formed, developed, and transformed into an integrated, single-insurer, National Health Insurance (NHI) system. We describe the transition in the Korean health care system using an analytical framework that incorporates such critical variables as government economic development strategies and the relationships among social forces, state autonomy, and state power. This study focuses on how the relationships among social forces can change as a nation's economic development or governing strategy changes in response to changes in international circumstances such as globalization. The corporatist Social Health Insurance (SHI) system (multiple insurers) introduced in 1977 was transformed into the single-insurer NHI in July 2000. These changes were influenced externally by globalization and internally by political democratization, keeping Korea's private-dominant health care provision system unchanged over several decades. Major changes such as integration reform occurred, when high levels of state autonomy were ensured. The state's power (its policy capability), based on health care infrastructures, acts to limit the direction of any change in the health care system because it is very difficult to build the infrastructure for a health care system in a short timeframe.

  4. Organized colorectal cancer screening in integrated health care systems.

    PubMed

    Levin, Theodore R; Jamieson, Laura; Burley, Daniel A; Reyes, Juan; Oehrli, Michael; Caldwell, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an ideal target for early detection and prevention through screening. Noninvasive screening options are the guaiac fecal occult blood test and the fecal immunochemical test. Organized screening offers the promise of uniformly delivering screening to all members of a population who are eligible and due. Organized screening is defined as an explicit policy with defined age categories, method, and interval for screening in a defined target population with a defined implementation and quality assurance structure, and tracking of cancer in the population. The UK National Health Service; the Ontario, Canada Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care; and the US Veteran's Health Administration have used varied organized approaches to deliver guaiac fecal occult blood test screening to their populations. Kaiser Permanente Northern California began CRC screening in the 1960s, initially using flexible sigmoidoscopy. Implementation of organized fecal immunochemical test outreach was associated with improved Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set CRC screening rates between 2005 and 2010 from 37% to 69% and from 41% to 78% in the commercial and Medicare populations, respectively. Organized fecal immunochemical test screening has been associated with an increase in annually detected CRCs, almost entirely because of increased detection of localized-stage cancers.

  5. Effect of medicare payment on rural health care systems.

    PubMed

    McBride, Timothy D; Mueller, Keith J

    2002-01-01

    Medicare payments constitute a significant share of patient-generated revenues for rural providers, more so than for urban providers. Therefore, Medicare payment policies influence the behavior of rural providers and determine their financial viability. Health services researchers need to contribute to the understanding of the implications of changes in fee-for-service payment policy, prospects for change because of the payment to Medicare+Choice risk plans, and implications for rural providers inherent in any restructuring of the Medicare program. This article outlines the basic policy choices, implications for rural providers and Medicare beneficiaries, impacts of existing research, and suggestions for further research. Topics for further research include implications of the Critical Access Hospital program, understanding how changes in payment to rural hospitals affect patient care, developing improved formulas for paying rural hospitals, determining the payment-to-cost ratio for physicians, measuring the impact of changes in the payment methodology used to pay for services delivered by rural health clinics and federally qualified health centers, accounting for the reasons for differences in historical Medicare expenditures across rural counties and between rural and urban counties, explicating all reasons for Medicare+Choice plans withdrawing from some rural areas and entering others, measuring the rural impact of proposals to add a prescription drug benefit to the Medicare program, and measuring the impact of Medicare payment policies on rural economies.

  6. Expenditures in the health care system in Brazil: the participation of states and the Federal District in financing the health care system from 2002 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    de Deus Costa, Renata Maria; da Silva Barbosa, Rafael; Zucchi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the public expenditures of states on health care and the participation of states and the Federal District in financing the Unified Health System, better known by the acronym SUS. To develop the research, two targets were used: “to rescue expenses per government source (federal, state and municipal) during the period from 2002 to 2013” and “to rescue resource transfers from the federal SUS to the states and also to municipalities”. METHODS: This research is bibliographic, documentary and descriptive and used a quantitative approach. Data were extracted from the Information System Public Health Budget, and additional data were collected from the public managers of states, municipalities and the Federal District during the period from 2002 to 2013. Federal data from the Undersecretary of Planning and Budget (originally extracted from the Integrated System of Financial Administration of the Federal Government and available on the Budget Public Health System webpage) were also collected. RESULTS: The data revealed that during the same researched period, the Federal District has maintained the health care system budget, whereas states and municipalities have increased their budgets for the same spending. CONCLUSIONS: By analyzing the results, there is clearly a disparity regarding the investment expended by the entities of the Federation. Although municipalities and states have gradually increased their application of resources to health care, the federal state has maintained the same budget. These results reveal a bit of concern about public health funding. PMID:26017788

  7. Education of the Health Professions in the Context of the Health Care System: The Ontario Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charron, K. C.

    The document examines the education of health professionals in Ontario within the context of changing patterns for health care. The first of four chapters contains background information on geographic and population characteristics, Federal health legislation requiring a provincial response, and Ontario health legislation. The second chapter deals…

  8. The role and uptake of private health insurance in different health care systems: are there lessons for developing countries?

    PubMed Central

    Odeyemi, Isaac AO; Nixon, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Social and national health insurance schemes are being introduced in many developing countries in moving towards universal health care. However, gaps in coverage are common and can only be met by out-of-pocket payments, general taxation, or private health insurance (PHI). This study provides an overview of PHI in different health care systems and discusses factors that affect its uptake and equity. Methods A representative sample of countries was identified (United States, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, France, Australia, and Latvia) that illustrates the principal forms and roles of PHI. Literature describing each country’s health care system was used to summarize how PHI is utilized and the factors that affect its uptake and equity. Results In the United States, PHI is a primary source of funding in conjunction with tax-based programs to support vulnerable groups; in the UK and Latvia, PHI is used in a supplementary role to universal tax-based systems; in France and Latvia, complementary PHI is utilized to cover gaps in public funding; in The Netherlands, PHI is supplementary to statutory private and social health insurance; in Australia, the government incentivizes the uptake of complementary PHI through tax rebates and penalties. The uptake of PHI is influenced by age, income, education, health care system typology, and the incentives or disincentives applied by governments. The effect on equity can either be positive or negative depending on the type of PHI adopted and its role within the wider health care system. Conclusion PHI has many manifestations depending on the type of health care system used and its role within that system. This study has illustrated its common applications and the factors that affect its uptake and equity in different health care systems. The results are anticipated to be helpful in informing how developing countries may utilize PHI to meet the aim of achieving universal health care. PMID:23494071

  9. Looking at Graduate Medical Education Through a Different Lens: A Health Care System's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Beth M; Azevedo, Theresa; Blumberg, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    In the era of the accountable care organization, U.S. models of physician practice are shifting from the solo, independent practitioner to the physician who is part of a multispecialty group practice or is employed by a health care institution, and from paper-based small offices to practice settings that emphasize technology-enabled, team-based systems of care. In this light, Kaiser Permanente's (KP's) long experience as an integrated, population-based health care delivery system makes it an increasingly relevant model in which to consider how graduate medical education (GME) can best prepare physicians for 21st-century health care. KP's multiple perspectives-as a GME setting, a health care delivery system, a health research enterprise, a community benefit organization, and the nation's largest private, multispecialty group practice of physicians-provide a multifaceted opportunity to consider GME in the context of health care transformation. The authors suggest that all participants in medical education have a role to play in preparing physicians for this future. They recommend that partnerships between universities and health care delivery systems serve as a highly effective model for education; that to better serve the needs of society, medical education institutions must adopt a broad community benefit mindset; and that, when medical groups and other institutions that employ physicians take the baton from GME, they need to commit to ongoing development and lifelong learning to enable their new physicians to reach their full potential.

  10. Current pulse: can a production system reduce medical errors in health care?

    PubMed

    Printezis, Antonios; Gopalakrishnan, Mohan

    2007-01-01

    One of the reasons for rising health care costs is medical errors, a majority of which result from faulty systems and processes. Health care in the past has used process-based initiatives such as Total Quality Management, Continuous Quality Improvement, and Six Sigma to reduce errors. These initiatives to redesign health care, reduce errors, and improve overall efficiency and customer satisfaction have had moderate success. Current trend is to apply the successful Toyota Production System (TPS) to health care since its organizing principles have led to tremendous improvement in productivity and quality for Toyota and other businesses that have adapted them. This article presents insights on the effectiveness of TPS principles in health care and the challenges that lie ahead in successfully integrating this approach with other quality initiatives.

  11. Mobile Technologies and Geographic Information Systems to Improve Health Care Systems: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing body of research has employed mobile technologies and geographic information systems (GIS) for enhancing health care and health information systems, but there is yet a lack of studies of how these two types of systems are integrated together into the information infrastructure of an organization so as to provide a basis for data analysis and decision support. Integration of data and technical systems across the organization is necessary for efficient large-scale implementation. Objective The aim of this paper is to identify how mobile technologies and GIS applications have been used, independently as well as in combination, for improving health care. Methods The electronic databases PubMed, BioMed Central, Wiley Online Library, Scopus, Science Direct, and Web of Science were searched to retrieve English language articles published in international academic journals after 2005. Only articles addressing the use of mobile or GIS technologies and that met a prespecified keyword strategy were selected for review. Results A total of 271 articles were selected, among which 220 concerned mobile technologies and 51 GIS. Most articles concern developed countries (198/271, 73.1%), and in particular the United States (81/271, 29.9%), United Kingdom (31/271, 11.4%), and Canada (14/271, 5.2%). Applications of mobile technologies can be categorized by six themes: treatment and disease management, data collection and disease surveillance, health support systems, health promotion and disease prevention, communication between patients and health care providers or among providers, and medical education. GIS applications can be categorized by four themes: disease surveillance, health support systems, health promotion and disease prevention, and communication to or between health care providers. Mobile applications typically focus on using text messaging (short message service, SMS) for communication between patients and health care providers, most prominently

  12. Mobile technologies and geographic information systems to improve health care systems: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Nhavoto, José António; Grönlund, Ake

    2014-05-08

    A growing body of research has employed mobile technologies and geographic information systems (GIS) for enhancing health care and health information systems, but there is yet a lack of studies of how these two types of systems are integrated together into the information infrastructure of an organization so as to provide a basis for data analysis and decision support. Integration of data and technical systems across the organization is necessary for efficient large-scale implementation. The aim of this paper is to identify how mobile technologies and GIS applications have been used, independently as well as in combination, for improving health care. The electronic databases PubMed, BioMed Central, Wiley Online Library, Scopus, Science Direct, and Web of Science were searched to retrieve English language articles published in international academic journals after 2005. Only articles addressing the use of mobile or GIS technologies and that met a prespecified keyword strategy were selected for review. A total of 271 articles were selected, among which 220 concerned mobile technologies and 51 GIS. Most articles concern developed countries (198/271, 73.1%), and in particular the United States (81/271, 29.9%), United Kingdom (31/271, 11.4%), and Canada (14/271, 5.2%). Applications of mobile technologies can be categorized by six themes: treatment and disease management, data collection and disease surveillance, health support systems, health promotion and disease prevention, communication between patients and health care providers or among providers, and medical education. GIS applications can be categorized by four themes: disease surveillance, health support systems, health promotion and disease prevention, and communication to or between health care providers. Mobile applications typically focus on using text messaging (short message service, SMS) for communication between patients and health care providers, most prominently reminders and advice to patients. These

  13. Creating a high-reliability health care system: improving performance on core processes of care at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Armstrong, C Michael; Demski, Renee; Callender, Tiffany; Winner, Laura; Miller, Marlene R; Austin, J Matthew; Berenholtz, Sean M; Yang, Ting; Peterson, Ronald R; Reitz, Judy A; Bennett, Richard G; Broccolino, Victor A; Davis, Richard O; Gragnolati, Brian A; Green, Gene E; Rothman, Paul B

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the authors describe an initiative that established an infrastructure to manage quality and safety efforts throughout a complex health care system and that improved performance on core measures for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, pneumonia, surgical care, and children's asthma. The Johns Hopkins Medicine Board of Trustees created a governance structure to establish health care system-wide oversight and hospital accountability for quality and safety efforts throughout Johns Hopkins Medicine. The Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality was formed; institute leaders used a conceptual model nested in a fractal infrastructure to implement this initiative to improve performance at two academic medical centers and three community hospitals, starting in March 2012. The initiative aimed to achieve ≥ 96% compliance on seven inpatient process-of-care core measures and meet the requirements for the Delmarva Foundation and Joint Commission awards. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients at each hospital who received the recommended process of care. The authors compared health system and hospital performance before (2011) and after (2012, 2013) the initiative. The health system achieved ≥ 96% compliance on six of the seven targeted measures by 2013. Of the five hospitals, four received the Delmarva Foundation award and two received The Joint Commission award in 2013. The authors argue that, to improve quality and safety, health care systems should establish a system-wide governance structure and accountability process. They also should define and communicate goals and measures and build an infrastructure to support peer learning.

  14. Accessibility and the Canadian health care system: squaring perceptions and realities.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kathi; Rosenberg, Mark W

    2004-02-01

    The 1984 Canada Health Act (CHA) is the major piece of Federal legislation that governs health care accessibility in the provinces and territories. According to the CHA, all provinces and territories in Canada must uphold five principles in order to receive federal funding for health care (universality, comprehensiveness, portability, public administration, and accessibility). In Canada, there are competing views among policy makers and consumers about how the CHA's principle of accessibility should be defined, interpreted and used in delivering health care. During the 1990s, the health care perceptions of Canadians and their health care behaviours were measured through both public opinion polls and Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey (NPHS). The goal of this paper is to examine perceptions of accessibility in public opinion polls and actual accessibility as measured through the NPHS. Public opinion polls demonstrate that while Canadians want to preserve the principles of the CHA, a majority of Canadians are losing confidence in their health care system. In contrast, the results from the NPHS reveal that only 6% of Canadians aged 25 years and older have experienced accessibility problems. Among those who report access problems, the barriers to accessibility are linked to specific socio-economic, socio-demographic and health characteristics of individuals. We discuss these findings in the context of the current debates surrounding accessibility within the CHA and the Canadian health care system.

  15. Description of Nurse Scientists in a Large Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, M Cynthia; Kleiner, Catherine; Oster, Cynthia A; Smith, Claudia DiSabatino; Bergman-Evans, Brenda; Kempnich, Jodeena M; Hogan, Felicia; Myers, John

    Replicating a research study that described the work of nurse scientists in children's hospitals, the purpose of the study was to describe the role, activities, and outcomes of nurse scientists employed in a national health care organization. The characteristics of nurses filling the nurse scientist role in clinical settings and outcomes associated with the role have not been extensively described. The setting of this study is ideal since the organization includes facilities of various sizes located in rural, urban, and suburban areas in 18 states. Names and contact information of nurse scientists were obtained from nurse executives at each of the 110 affiliated organizations. Nurse scientists completed an anonymous survey. The primary role of the nurse scientists is to facilitate the work of others. Recommendations to strengthen the research infrastructure are provided.

  16. The Role of Research in Integrated Health Care Systems: The HMO Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Thomas M; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; Tolsma, Dennis D; Greene, Sarah M

    2004-01-01

    Integrated care systems have unique advantages for conducting research. The HMO Research Network (HMORN) includes research centers associated with 13 large integrated care systems whose research focuses on improving health and health care delivery using the extraordinary platform provided by these health systems. We conducted literature reviews and surveys and interviews with directors of HMORN research centers, research investigators, and selected support staff in order to identify the characteristics of the research in HMORN centers and to present examples of how this research has affected health and health policy. The 13 HMORN member health systems deliver health care to 13 million people. HMORN research centers have access to large, defined populations, comprehensive medical information, extensive computerized data systems and to medical care delivery systems that offer extraordinary research opportunities. HMORN centers publish about 1200 scientific articles each year and received about $180 million in external research funding in 2002, most of it from NIH, CDC, and other federal sources. More than 2000 research studies are currently underway at these centers, which employ approximately 1500 persons in the research activities. HMORN research centers have had a profound impact on health policy and care. New technologies are steadily expanding the research capacities of these research groups. Increased collaboration between academic and HMO researchers would enhance the work of both. PMID:26705313

  17. CT Radiation Dose Optimization and Tracking Program at a Large Quaternary-Care Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Ajit H; Dong, Frank; Wildman, Bonnie; Hulme, Katie; Johnson, Paul; Herts, Brian R

    2015-07-01

    The authors report the implementation and outcomes of a CT radiation dose optimization and tracking program at a large quaternary-care health care system. A committee reviewed, optimized, and released standardized imaging protocols for the most common CT examinations across the health system. Volume CT dose index and dose-length product (DLP) diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were established, with the goal of decreasing the percentage of outliers (CT scans with DLPs greater than the established DRLs) to <5% of tracked CT examinations. Baseline radiation dose data were manually extracted for 5% of total examinations. A semiautomated process to analyze all DLP data was then implemented to monitor outliers. The baseline percentage of outliers was slightly higher than 10% for pediatric scans but nearly 26.5% for adult scans. Over the first year, after standardized protocols were distributed, the percentage of outliers decreased for pediatric brain (from 22% to 6%), adult brain (from 23% to 3%), and adult chest (from 22% to 11%) examinations. Over the next 2 years, after the dose-tracking program was implemented, the percentage of outliers decreased for adult (brain, from 3% to 1%; chest, from 11% to 1%; abdomen, from 24% to 1%) and pediatric (brain, from 6% to 2%; chest, from 11% to 0%; abdomen, from 7% to 1%) examinations. The reported CT protocol optimization and dose-tracking program enabled a sustainable reduction in the proportion of CT examinations being performed above established DRLs from as high as 26% to <1% over a period of 2 years. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ethnic Classification in the New Zealand Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Rata, Elizabeth; Zubaran, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The ethnic or “racial” classification of Maori and non-Maori is a pivotal feature of New Zealand’s health system and affects government policy and professional practice within the context of Treaty of Waitangi “partnership” politics. Although intended to empower Maori, ethnic categorization can have unintended and negative consequences by ignoring the causality of material forces in social phenomena. The authors begin by showing how the use of ethnic categories in health policy is justified by the Treaty of Waitangi partnership policies. This provides the context for the argument made in the manuscript that an understanding of the social experience of ethnicity within the complex interaction of sociocultural factors such as socioeconomic location and lifestyle is more useful than using the political construct of ethnic categories in explaining the persistence of low health status for a section of the Maori population. PMID:26892248

  19. Effects of an Integrated Care System on quality of care and satisfaction for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Madden, Vanessa; Sloyer, Phyllis; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    To assess the effects of an Integrated Care System (ICS) on parent-reported quality of care and satisfaction for Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). In 2006 Florida reformed its Medicaid program in Broward and Duval counties. Children's Medical Services Network (CMSN) chose to participate in the reform and developed an ICS for CSHCN. The ICS ushered in several changes such as more prior approval requirements and closing of the provider network. Telephone surveys were conducted with CMSN parents whose children reside in the reform counties and parents whose children reside outside of the reform counties in 2006 and 2007 (n = 1,727). Results from multivariate quasi-experimental models show that one component of parent-report quality of care, customer service, increased. Following implementation of the ICS, customer service increased by 0.22 points. After implementation of the ICS, parent-reported quality and satisfaction were generally unaffected. Although significant increases were not seen in the majority of the quality and satisfaction domains, it is nonetheless encouraging that parents did not report negative experiences with the ICS. It is important to present these interim findings so that progress can be monitored and decision-makers can begin to consider if the program should be expanded statewide.

  20. The German and Japanese health care systems: an international comparison using an input-output model.

    PubMed

    Rump, A; Schöffski, O

    2016-12-01

    The German and Japanese health care systems have common roots, but have evolved differently. Whereas the German system is often considered as expensive and poorly efficient, people in Japan are viewed as healthy and health care as comparatively cheap. In this study, we compared the quality, the effectiveness and efficiency of the German and Japanese health care systems. This study includes comparative health care data analysis. The quality and effectiveness of the German and Japanese health care systems were analyzed using an input-output model including 12 countries based on health indicators published by the OECD. Besides the invested resources, a risk-related input dimension was used for risk adjustment. The efficiency of the systems was assessed by relating the average output to the health expenses per capita. Health risks seem qualitatively different in Germany and Japan, but at the aggregate level, lifestyle does not seem to be an outstanding explanatory factor for health outcome differences between both countries. For investments in health resources, Germany is in a top position, whereas in the international comparison, the outcome is rather poor. The resources invested in Japan are also high, but slightly less than in Germany, whereas on average, the outcome is better. However, in the international comparison, resources as well as results in Japan show a very high variability. Relating the average output to the health expenses per capita indicates that on the average, the health care system in Japan is more efficient than in Germany. Germany and Japan have a quality problem with their health care systems. In Germany there is a transmission failure from structural to outcome quality that might be related to coordination problems between the outpatient and inpatient sector. Japan shows an unbalanced system that may be suspected to have a quality problem as a whole. As the development of the remuneration system including quality requirements is under the

  1. Changes in the health care system of Vietnam in response to the emerging market economy.

    PubMed

    Ladinsky, J L; Nguyen, H T; Volk, N D

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact on the Vietnamese health care system of the change from a centralized socialist system to a market economy. It discusses recent policies based on expectations in relation to actual outcomes, and the impacts these changes have had on health care delivery and health infrastructure in Vietnam. It has become clear that the private medical sector is draining resources from the State rather than complementing the weakened national health system. Impacts on health education, pharmaceuticals, infrastructure support, geographic distribution of physicians, and equity are all discussed in terms of recent economic changes. It is suggested that adjustments must be made to ensure adequate health care for all Vietnamese including those in rural areas and the urban poor. The State must develop mechanisms to support the national health service before further deterioration occurs.

  2. Special health care needs among children in the child welfare system.

    PubMed

    Ringeisen, Heather; Casanueva, Cecilia; Urato, Mathew; Cross, Theodore

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine levels of special health care need among children in the child welfare system and how these needs may affect children's functioning. Data were from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being, a national probability study of children investigated for child maltreatment. The sample consisted of 5496 children aged 0 to 15 years at baseline. For analysis, we used descriptive statistics to determine special health care needs and children's functioning from baseline to 3-year follow-up. Logistic regression was used to examine correlates of special health care needs. At any point in the study period, approximately one third of the children were identified as having special health care needs. Overall, across 3 years of follow-up data, 50.3% of the children were identified as having special health care needs. Boys were significantly more likely than girls to have had special health care needs, and children aged 0 to 2 years at baseline were significantly less likely to have had special health care needs than older children. Adopted and foster children were significantly more likely to have had special health care needs than children never placed out of the home. The most commonly reported type of chronic health condition was asthma. The most commonly reported type of special need was a learning disability. Special health care needs are prevalent among children in the child welfare system. Many children with special health care needs have cognitive, language, adaptive, social, or behavioral functional impairments. Mechanisms are needed to ensure that this vulnerable population has access to and receives coordinated health and related social services.

  3. Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute of Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicine Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-06-2-0031 TITLE: Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute of Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin...complications are preventable. The primary goal of treatment is to manage diabetes to live a healthy lifeIn general, the traditional physician

  4. Does the organizational structure of health care systems influence care-seeking decisions? A qualitative analysis of Danish cancer patients' reflections on care-seeking

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Rikke Sand; Vedsted, Peter; Olesen, Frede; Bro, Flemming; Søndergaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Objective The absence of a more significant improvement in cancer survival in countries such as the UK and Denmark may be partly rooted in delayed care-seeking among cancer patients. Past research on patient delay has mainly focused on patient characteristics (e.g. sociodemographic and psychological factors and symptom recognition) as causes of delayed care-seeking, while few studies have examined how the organizational structure of health care systems may influence patients’ reflections on seeking care. The aim of this study was to explore this relationship. Design The analysis presented is based on semi-structured interviews with 30 cancer patients and their families. Results The article raises two hypotheses on the relationship between structural elements of a health care system and people's reflections on seeking health care: (1) Gatekeeping introduces an asymmetrical relationship between the patient and the GP which potentially results in self-restricting care-seeking, (2) Continuity in the doctor–patient relationship may negatively influence patient reflections on access to health care, as the focus shifts from the medical issues of the consultation to reflections on how to properly interact with the GP and the system in which she/he is situated. Conclusion It is concluded that these hypotheses form a sound basis for further primary care research on how the organizational structure of health care systems influences patient reflections on access to medical care. PMID:21861597

  5. Toward a Confucian family-oriented health care system for the future of China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yongfu; Chen, Xiaoyang; Fan, Ruiping

    2011-10-01

    Recently implemented Chinese health insurance schemes have failed to achieve a Chinese health care system that is family-oriented, family-based, family-friendly, or even financially sustainable. With this diagnosis in hand, the authors argue that a financially and morally sustainable Chinese health care system should have as its core family health savings accounts supplemented by appropriate health insurance plans. This essay's arguments are set in the context of Confucian moral commitments that still shape the background culture of contemporary China.

  6. New systems of care can leverage the health care workforce: how many doctors do we really need?

    PubMed

    Garson, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    Improving access to appropriate health care, currently inadequate for many Americans, is more complex than merely increasing the projected number of physicians and nurses. Any attainable increase in their numbers will not solve the problem. To bring supply and demand closer, new systems of care are required, leveraging every member of the health care workforce, permitting professionals to provide their unique contributions.To increase supply: Redefine the roles of physicians and nurse practitioners (NPs), assess how much primary care must be delivered by a physician, and provide support from other team members to let the physician deal with complex patients. NPs can deliver much primary care and some specialty care. Care must be delivered in integrated systems permitting new payment models (e.g., salary with bonus) and team-based care as well as maximum use of electronic health records. Teams must make better use of nonprofessionals, such as Grand-Aides, using telephone protocols and portable telemedicine with home visits and online direct reporting of every encounter. The goals are to improve health and reduce unnecessary clinic and emergency department visits, admissions, and readmissions.To decrease demand: Physician payment must foster quality and appropriate patient volume (if accompanied by high patient satisfaction). Patients must be part of the team, work to remain healthy, and reduce inappropriate demand.The nation may not need as many physicians and nurses if the systems can be changed to promote integration, leveraging every member of the workforce to perform at his or her maximum competency.

  7. Measuring the Mental Health-Care System Responsiveness: Results of an Outpatient Survey in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Forouzan, Setareh; Padyab, Mojgan; Rafiey, Hassan; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Dejman, Masoumeh; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    As explained by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2000, the concept of health system responsiveness is one of the core goals of health systems. Since 2000, further efforts have been made to measure health system responsiveness and the factors affecting responsiveness, yet few studies have applied responsiveness concepts to the evaluation of mental health systems. The present study aims to measure responsiveness and its related domains in the mental health-care system of Tehran. Utilizing the same method used by the WHO for its responsiveness survey, responsiveness for outpatient mental health care was evaluated using a validated Farsi questionnaire. A sample of 500 public mental health service users in Tehran participated and subsequently completed the questionnaire. On average, 47% of participants reported experiencing poor responsiveness. Among responsiveness domains, confidentiality and dignity were the best performing factors while autonomy, access to care, and quality of basic amenities were the worst performing. Respondents who reported their social status as low were more likely to experience poor responsiveness overall. Attention and access to care were responsiveness dimensions that performed poorly but were considered to be highly important by study participants. In summary, the study suggests that measuring responsiveness could provide guidance for further development of mental health-care systems to become more patient orientated and provide patients with more respect.

  8. Measuring the Mental Health-Care System Responsiveness: Results of an Outpatient Survey in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Forouzan, Setareh; Padyab, Mojgan; Rafiey, Hassan; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Dejman, Masoumeh; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    As explained by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2000, the concept of health system responsiveness is one of the core goals of health systems. Since 2000, further efforts have been made to measure health system responsiveness and the factors affecting responsiveness, yet few studies have applied responsiveness concepts to the evaluation of mental health systems. The present study aims to measure responsiveness and its related domains in the mental health-care system of Tehran. Utilizing the same method used by the WHO for its responsiveness survey, responsiveness for outpatient mental health care was evaluated using a validated Farsi questionnaire. A sample of 500 public mental health service users in Tehran participated and subsequently completed the questionnaire. On average, 47% of participants reported experiencing poor responsiveness. Among responsiveness domains, confidentiality and dignity were the best performing factors while autonomy, access to care, and quality of basic amenities were the worst performing. Respondents who reported their social status as low were more likely to experience poor responsiveness overall. Attention and access to care were responsiveness dimensions that performed poorly but were considered to be highly important by study participants. In summary, the study suggests that measuring responsiveness could provide guidance for further development of mental health-care systems to become more patient orientated and provide patients with more respect. PMID:26858944

  9. Adult Educators and Cultural Competence within Health Care Systems: Change at the Individual and Structural Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegahn, Linda; Ton, Hendry

    2011-01-01

    Goals of cultural competence are commonly described as creation of a health care system and workforce capable of delivering high-quality care to all patients regardless of race, ethnicity, culture, or language. While this "system" is made up of individuals, it also has a life of its own, as with all institutions. In this chapter, the…

  10. Adult Educators and Cultural Competence within Health Care Systems: Change at the Individual and Structural Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegahn, Linda; Ton, Hendry

    2011-01-01

    Goals of cultural competence are commonly described as creation of a health care system and workforce capable of delivering high-quality care to all patients regardless of race, ethnicity, culture, or language. While this "system" is made up of individuals, it also has a life of its own, as with all institutions. In this chapter, the…

  11. Exploring information systems outsourcing in U.S. hospital-based health care delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Diana, Mark L

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the factors associated with outsourcing of information systems (IS) in hospital-based health care delivery systems, and to determine if there is a difference in IS outsourcing activity based on the strategic value of the outsourced functions. IS sourcing behavior is conceptualized as a case of vertical integration. A synthesis of strategic management theory (SMT) and transaction cost economics (TCE) serves as the theoretical framework. The sample consists of 1,365 hospital-based health care delivery systems that own 3,452 hospitals operating in 2004. The findings indicate that neither TCE nor SMT predicted outsourcing better than the other did. The findings also suggest that health care delivery system managers may not be considering significant factors when making sourcing decisions, including the relative strategic value of the functions they are outsourcing. It is consistent with previous literature to suggest that the high cost of IS may be the main factor driving the outsourcing decision.

  12. From Coverage to Care: Strengthening and Facilitating Consumer Connections to the Health System.

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurie T; Luoto, Jill E

    2015-11-30

    To date, most Affordable Care Act implementation efforts have focused on getting individuals enrolled in health insurance coverage; indeed, millions of Americans, many of whom had never been insured, have since obtained health coverage, either through the health insurance marketplaces or through expanded Medicaid eligibility, if available in their state. Yet reducing the number of uninsured is only part of the law's goal. It also aims to improve population health and lower health care costs. Less attention has been paid to confirming that the newly insured obtain appropriate health care and maintain long-term relationships with their health care providers, which are critical steps to help achieve these latter goals. This article describes lessons learned from conversations with a variety of stakeholders in the health care industry. These conversations covered the gamut of steps consumers must undergo to become fully engaged with their health care, from applying for coverage and selecting a plan to finding a provider, accessing care, and engaging in care over time. In each phase of the process, consumers must take specific actions and overcome new challenges. Stakeholder efforts to help consumers often focus on just one of these phases, at the expense of the bigger picture, and often occur in isolation, with little coordination across stakeholder groups. Thinking more strategically and holistically can help provide the "connective tissue" that can help prevent consumers from becoming disengaged and falling through the system's cracks.

  13. Socio-Technical Systems Analysis in Health Care: A Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Ellen; Bellandi, Tommaso; Gurses, Ayse; Hallbeck, Susan; Mollo, Vanina

    2012-01-01

    Given the complexity of health care and the ‘people’ nature of healthcare work and delivery, STSA (Sociotechnical Systems Analysis) research is needed to address the numerous quality of care problems observed across the world. This paper describes open STSA research areas, including workload management, physical, cognitive and macroergonomic issues of medical devices and health information technologies, STSA in transitions of care, STSA of patient-centered care, risk management and patient safety management, resilience, and feedback loops between event detection, reporting and analysis and system redesign. PMID:22611480

  14. An electronic health record to support patients and institutions of the health care system.

    PubMed

    Uckert, Frank; Müller, Marcel Lucas; Bürkle, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-08-24

    The department of Medical Informatics of the University Hospital Münster and the Gesakon GmbH (an university offspring) initiated the cooperative development of an electronic health record (EHR) called "akteonline.de" in 2000. From 2001 onwards several clinics of the university hospital have already offered this EHR (within pilot projects) as an additional service to selected subsets of their patients. Based on the experiences of those pilot projects the system architecture and the basic data model underwent several evolutionary enhancements, e.g. implementations of electronic interfaces to other clinical systems (considering for example data interchange methods like the Clinical Document Architecture - standardized within the HL7 group - and also interfacing architectures of German GP systems, such as VCS and D2D). "akteonline.de" in its current structure supports patients as well as health care professionals and aims at providing a collaborative health information system which perfectly supports the clinical workflow even across institutional boundaries and including the patient himself. Since such an EHR needs to strictly fulfill high data security and data protection requirements, a complex authorization and access control component has been included. Furthermore the EHR data are encrypted within the database itself and during their transfer across the internet.

  15. 76 FR 13209 - United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final Judgment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Antitrust Division United States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System; Proposed Final... Falls Division, in United States of America and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System... that United Regional Health Care System has entered, maintained, and enforced exclusionary contracts...

  16. 76 FR 35017 - United States et al. v. United Regional Health Care System; Public Comments and Response on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Antitrust Division United States et al. v. United Regional Health Care System; Public Comments and Response... States and State of Texas v. United Regional Health Care System, Civil Action No. 7:11-cv- 00030-0, which.... United Regional Health Care System, Defendant. Case No.: 7:11-cv-00030 Response Of Plaintiff United...

  17. [The Japanese Health Care System: An Analysis of the Funding and Reimbursement System].

    PubMed

    Rump, Alexis; Schöffski, Oliver

    2017-08-10

    Objective The modern Japanese health care system was established during the Meiji period (1868-1912) using the example of Germany. In this paper, the funding and remuneration of health services and products in Japan are described. The focus lies on the mechanisms used to implement health policy goals and to control costs. Method Selective literature search. Results All permanent residents in Japan are enrolled in one of more than 3,000 compulsory health funds. Employees and public servants are covered through company or government-related health insurance schemes. Independent workers, the unemployed and the pensioners are usually assigned to health insurance plans managed by local city governments. The elderly over 75 years are insured through special health funds managed at the prefectural level. To correct the fiscal disparities among the health insurance programs, a risk adjustment is realized by compensatory financial transfers between the funds and substantial subsidies from the central and local governments. The statutory benefits package that is identical for all insurance plans is regulated in a single comprehensive schedule. All the covered health services and products are listed with the fees and compensations, and the conditions for the service providers to be remunerated are also stated. This fee and compensation schedule is regularly revised every 2 years under the leadership of the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. The revisions are intended to contain health expenditures and to set incentives for the achievement of health policy goals. Conclusion The funding of the Japanese health care system and the risk adjustment mechanisms among health funds are well established and show a rather static character. The short- and mid-term development of the system is mainly controlled on the side of the expenditures through the unique and comprehensive fee and compensation schedule. The regular revisions of this schedule permit to react at relatively short

  18. Health system and community level interventions for improving antenatal care coverage and health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Medley, Nancy; Darzi, Andrea J; Richardson, Marty; Habiba Garga, Kesso; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends at least four antenatal care (ANC) visits for all pregnant women. Almost half of pregnant women worldwide, and especially in developing countries do not receive this amount of care. Poor attendance of ANC is associated with delivery of low birthweight babies and more neonatal deaths. ANC may include education on nutrition, potential problems with pregnancy or childbirth, child care and prevention or detection of disease during pregnancy. This review focused on community-based interventions and health systems-related interventions. Objectives To assess the effects of health system and community interventions for improving coverage of antenatal care and other perinatal health outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (7 June 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials and cluster-randomised trials. Trials of any interventions to improve ANC coverage were eligible for inclusion. Trials were also eligible if they targeted specific and related outcomes, such as maternal or perinatal death, but also reported ANC coverage. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Main results We included 34 trials involving approximately 400,000 women. Some trials tested community-based interventions to improve uptake of antenatal care (media campaigns, education or financial incentives for pregnant women), while other trials looked at health systems interventions (home visits for pregnant women or equipment for clinics). Most trials took place in low- and middle-income countries, and 29 of the 34 trials used a cluster-randomised design. We assessed 30 of the 34 trials as of low or unclear overall risk of bias. Comparison 1: One intervention versus no intervention We

  19. Monitoring a correctional mental health care system: the role of the mental health expert.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Jeffrey L

    2009-01-01

    Class action litigation has been instrumental in jail and prison reform over the past four decades. This article provides a very brief introduction underlying the legal basis for such litigation. It focuses on the role of the mental health expert in monitoring a correctional mental health care system as a result of class action litigation including issues related to selection of the expert, development of the remedial plan, and monitoring of the implementation of the remedial plan. The importance of policies and procedures and a quality improvement process is emphasized. Essential elements of the monitoring process, prior to and during the site assessment, are described. Inmates and correctional staff alike have benefited substantially from such litigation in the form of increased resources and positive changes in institutional culture.

  20. HEALTH CARE GUIDE TO POLLUTION PREVENTION IMPLEMENTATION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health Care Guide to Pollution Prevention Implementation through Environmental Management Systems provides example EMS procedures and forms used in four ISO 14001 EMS certified hospitals. The latest revisions include more EMS hospital case studies, more compliance resources, ...

  1. HEALTH CARE GUIDE TO POLLUTION PREVENTION IMPLEMENTATION THROUGH ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health Care Guide to Pollution Prevention Implementation through Environmental Management Systems provides example EMS procedures and forms used in four ISO 14001 EMS certified hospitals. The latest revisions include more EMS hospital case studies, more compliance resources, ...

  2. [Legislative management of the direct sale of genetic testing and the health care system of Quebec].

    PubMed

    Tassé, Anne Marie; Godard, Béatrice

    2007-01-01

    The increasing availability of direct to consumer genetic tests, particularly over the Internet, raises a number of difficult to answer legal questions for health care professionals. While lawmakers have enacted an exhaustive legislative scheme aimed at ensuring the efficiency and universality of publicly funded health care, genetic services sold outside the public system create have created a new challenge for the public system. An analysis of both Quebec and Federal legislation highlights the gaps in the current legal framework with regards to freely available genetic services. The varied impact of failing to address direct to consumer sales of genetic testing services is identified, including implications for consumer protection, control and regulation of testing, and their integration into the public health care system. According to this analysis, resolving these problems, in light of the need for consumer protection, and controlling the use of genetic tests is an essential first step towards the integration of genetic services into the public health care system.

  3. The Nuka System of Care: improving health through ownership and relationships

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Southcentral Foundation’s Nuka System of Care, based in Anchorage, Alaska, is a result of a customer-driven overhaul of what was previously a bureaucratic system centrally controlled by the Indian Health Service. Alaska Native people are in control as the “customer-owners” of this health care system. The vision and mission focus on physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual wellness and working together as a Native Community. Coupled with operational principles based on relationships, core concepts and key points, this framework has fostered an environment for creativity, innovation and continuous quality improvement. Alaska Native people have received national and international recognition for their work and have set high standards for performance excellence, community engagement, and overall impact on population health. In this article, the health care transformation led by Alaska Native people is described and the benefits and results of customer ownership and the relationship-based Nuka System of Care are discussed. PMID:23984269

  4. The Nuka System of Care: improving health through ownership and relationships.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Southcentral Foundation's Nuka System of Care, based in Anchorage, Alaska, is a result of a customer-driven overhaul of what was previously a bureaucratic system centrally controlled by the Indian Health Service. Alaska Native people are in control as the "customer-owners" of this health care system. The vision and mission focus on physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual wellness and working together as a Native Community. Coupled with operational principles based on relationships, core concepts and key points, this framework has fostered an environment for creativity, innovation and continuous quality improvement. Alaska Native people have received national and international recognition for their work and have set high standards for performance excellence, community engagement, and overall impact on population health. In this article, the health care transformation led by Alaska Native people is described and the benefits and results of customer ownership and the relationship-based Nuka System of Care are discussed.

  5. Development of a measure of health care affordability applicable in a publicly funded universal health care system.

    PubMed

    Haggerty, Jeannie L; Levesque, Jean-Frédéric

    2015-02-04

    Direct measures of health care affordability from the user perspective are needed to monitor equitable access to publicly funded health care in Canada. The objective of our study was to develop a survey-based measure of healthcare affordability applicable to the Canadian context. We developed items after focus group exploration of access and cost barriers in the healthcare trajectory. We administered an initial instrument by telephone to a randomly-selected sample of 750 respondents in metropolitan, rural, and remote settings in Quebec. After analysis we developed a new, self-administered version eliciting the frequency of problem access due to five affordability dimensions. This version was mailed to a subset of participants. We conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. We used ordinal logistic regression modelling to examine how individual items and the subscale score predicted indicators of difficult access. We looked for effect modification by income categories. The five items load on a single construct with good internal consistency (α = 0.77). The overall score, 0 to 5, reflects the sum of problems with healthcare affordability due to direct and indirect costs. The item and subscale scores are sensitive to income status, with affordability problems more prevalent among low-income than high-income respondents. Each unit increase in the subscale score predicts increased likelihood of unmet needs (OR = 1.54), emergency room use (OR = 1.41), and health problem aggravation (OR = 1.80). This subscale reliably and validly measures cost barriers to medically necessary services in Canada, and can potentially be applied in other settings with publicly funded health systems. It can be used to monitor and compare healthcare equity.

  6. The nursing case management computerized system: meeting the challenge of health care delivery through technology.

    PubMed

    DiJerome, L

    1992-01-01

    Does nursing case management compute? In this article, the author attempts to explain how computerizing the team plan of care and critical pathways decreases paperwork, makes it easier to develop standardized team care plans, enhances quality improvement trending, and is flexible enough to update the plan of care according to the patient's changing needs. The Nurse Case Management Computerized System puts the patient care team plan into an interactive computer program. The computer does the work of presenting the nurse with care plan options and printing a hard copy ready to implement. Use of the computer program enhances the health care team's ability to individualize the team plan of care while maintaining patient care standards. The system is also used to collect patient care data automatically and to trend for quality improvement.

  7. Arkansas: a leading laboratory for health care payment and delivery system reform.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Deborah; du Pont, Lammot; Lipson, Mindy

    2014-08-01

    As states' Medicaid programs continue to evolve from traditional fee-for-service to value-based health care delivery, there is growing recognition that systemwide multipayer approaches provide the market power needed to address the triple aim of improved patient care, improved health of populations, and reduced costs. Federal initiatives, such as the State Innovation Model grant program, make significant funds available for states seeking to transform their health care systems. In crafting their reform strategies, states can learn from early innovators. This issue brief focuses on one such state: Arkansas. Insights and lessons from the Arkansas Health Care Payment Improvement Initiative (AHCPII) suggest that progress is best gained through an inclusive, deliberative process facilitated by committed leadership, a shared agreement on root problems and opportunities for improvement, and a strategy grounded in the state's particular health care landscape.

  8. The Influence of Health Care Policies and Health Care System Distrust on Willingness to Undergo Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Katrina; Putt, Mary; Halbert, Chanita Hughes; Grande, David; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Liao, Kaijun; Marcus, Noora; Demeter, Mirar Bristol; Shea, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose As the potential role of genetic testing in disease prevention and management grows, so does concern about differences in uptake of genetic testing across social and racial groups. Characteristics of how genetic tests are delivered may influence willingness to undergo testing and, if they affect population subgroups differently, alter disparities in testing. Methods Conjoint analysis study of the effect of three characteristics of genetic test delivery (i.e. attributes) on willingness to undergo genetic testing for cancer risk. Data were collected using a random digit dialing survey of 128 African American and 209 White individuals living in the US. Measures included conjoint scenarios, the Revised Health Care System Distrust Scale (including the values and competence subscales), health insurance coverage, and sociodemographic characteristics. The three attributes studied were disclosure of test results to the health insurer, provision of the test by a specialist or primary care doctor, and race specific or race neutral marketing. Results In adjusted analyses, disclosure of test results to insurers, having to get the test from a specialist, and race specific marketing were all inversely associated with willingness to undergo the genetic test, with the greatest effect for the disclosure attribute. Racial differences in willingness to undergo testing were not statistically significant (p=0.07) and the effect of the attributes on willingness to undergo testing did not vary by patient race. However, the decrease in willingness to undergo testing with insurance disclosure was greater among individuals with high values distrust (p=0.03) and the decrease in willingness to undergo testing from specialist access was smaller among individuals with high competence distrust (p=0.03). Conclusions Several potentially modifiable characteristics of how genetic tests are delivered are associated with willingness to undergo testing. The effect of two of these characteristics

  9. Interoperability of a mobile health care solution with electronic healthcare record systems.

    PubMed

    De Toledo, P; Lalinde, W; Del Pozo, F; Thurber, D; Jimenez-Fernandez, S

    2006-01-01

    Mobile health care solutions involving patient monitoring are an increasingly accepted element in chronic disease management strategies. When used in healthcare systems with different providers, it is essential that the information gathered from the patient is available at each of these providers information repositories. This paper describes the design of a connectivity interface based on the HL7 standard that allows the MOTOHEALTH mobile health care solution to communicate with external electronic healthcare record systems supporting HL7.

  10. Using photovoice to explore patient perceptions of patient-centered care in the Veterans Affairs health care system

    PubMed Central

    Balbale, Salva Najib; Morris, Megan A.; LaVela, Sherri L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accounting for patient views and context is essential in evaluating and improving patient-centered care initiatives, yet few studies have examined the patient perspective. In the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care System, several VA facilities have transitioned from traditionally disease- or problem-based care to patient-centered care. We used photovoice to explore perceptions and experiences related to patient-centered care among Veterans receiving care in VA facilities that have implemented patient-centered care initiatives. Design Participants were provided prompts to facilitate their photography, and were asked to capture salient features in their environment that may describe their experiences and perceptions related to patient-centered care. Follow-up interviews were conducted with each participant to learn more about their photographs and intended meanings. Participant demographic data were also collected. Results Twenty-two Veteran patients (n=22) across two VA sites participated in the photovoice protocol. Participants defined patient-centered care broadly as caring for a person as a whole while accommodating for individual needs and concerns. Participant-generated photography and interview data revealed various contextual factors influencing patient-centered care perceptions, including patient-provider communication and relationships, physical and social environments of care, and accessibility of care. Conclusions This study contributes to the growing knowledge base around patient views and preferences regarding their care, care quality, and environments of care. Factors that shaped patient-centered care perceptions and the patient experience included communication with providers and staff, décor and signage, accessibility and transportation, programs and services offered, and informational resources. Our findings may be integrated into system redesign innovations and care design strategies that embody what is most meaningful to patients. PMID

  11. Participation and coordination in Dutch health care policy-making. A network analysis of the system of intermediate organizations in Dutch health care.

    PubMed

    Lamping, Antonie J; Raab, Jörg; Kenis, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the system of intermediate organizations in Dutch health care as the crucial system to understand health care policy-making in the Netherlands. We argue that the Dutch health care system can be understood as a system consisting of distinct but inter-related policy domains. In this study, we analyze four such policy domains: Finances, quality of care, manpower planning and pharmaceuticals. With the help of network analytic techniques, we describe how this highly differentiated system of >200 intermediate organizations is structured and coordinated and what (policy) consequences can be observed with regard to its particular structure and coordination mechanisms. We further analyze the extent to which this system of intermediate organizations enables participation of stakeholders in policy-making using network visualization tools. The results indicate that coordination between the different policy domains within the health care sector takes place not as one would expect through governmental agencies, but through representative organizations such as the representative organizations of the (general) hospitals, the health care consumers and the employers' association. We further conclude that the system allows as well as denies a large number of potential participants access to the policy-making process. As a consequence, the representation of interests is not necessarily balanced, which in turn affects health care policy. We find that the interests of the Dutch health care consumers are well accommodated with the national umbrella organization NPCF in the lead. However, this is no safeguard for the overall community values of good health care since, for example, the interests of the public health sector are likely to be marginalized.

  12. Changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuan-Fen; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Sales, Anne EB

    2005-01-01

    Background The Department of Veterans Affairs' Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provides a health care safety net to veterans. This study examined changes in characteristics of veterans using the VHA health care system between 1996 and 1999 when VHA implemented major organizational changes to improve access of ambulatory care and to provide care to more veterans. Methods The study used two cross-sectional samples of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey (MEPS), a national representative survey, in 1996 and 1999. The 1996 MEPS survey included 1,944 veterans and the 1999 MEPS survey included 1,974 veterans. There were 534 veterans and 740 veterans who used VHA services in 1996 and 1999, respectively. Results The proportion of veterans using the VHA system increased from 12.4% in 1996 to 14.6% in 1999. In both years, veterans were more likely to use VHA care if they were older, male, less educated, uninsured, unemployed, and in fair or poor health status. Only two variables, marital status and income, were different between the two years. Married veterans were more likely to use VHA care in 1999, but not in 1996. Veterans with higher incomes had greater odds of using VHA care in 1996, but there was no significant association between income and VHA use in 1999. Conclusion Characteristics of VHA users did not fundamentally change despite the reorganization of VHA health care delivery system and changes in eligibility and enrollment policy. The VHA system maintains its safety net mission while attracting more veterans. PMID:15836789

  13. Primary Care Behavioral Health Provider Training: Systematic Development and Implementation in a Large Medical System.

    PubMed

    Dobmeyer, Anne C; Hunter, Christopher L; Corso, Meghan L; Nielsen, Matthew K; Corso, Kent A; Polizzi, Nicholas C; Earles, Jay E

    2016-09-01

    The expansion of integrated, collaborative, behavioral health services in primary care requires a trained behavioral health workforce with specific competencies to deliver effective, evidence-informed, team-based care. Most behavioral health providers do not have training or experience working as primary care behavioral health consultants (BHCs), and require structured training to function effectively in this role. This article discusses one such training program developed to meet the needs of a large healthcare system initiating widespread implementation of the primary care behavioral health model of service delivery. It details the Department of Defense's experience in developing its extensive BHC training program, including challenges of addressing personnel selection and hiring issues, selecting a model for training, developing and implementing a phased training curriculum, and improving the training over time to address identified gaps. Future directions for training improvements and lessons learned in a large healthcare system are discussed.

  14. Space Station Freedom CHeCS overview. [Crew Health Care System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joey B.

    1990-01-01

    The current status, progress, and future plans for development of the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) for the International Space Station Freedom are presented. Essential operational biomedical support requirements for the astronauts, including medical care, environmental habitat monitoring, and countermeasures for the potentially maladaptive physiological effects of space flight will be provided by the CHeCS. Three integral parts will make up the system: a health maintenance facility, an environmental health system, and the exercise countermeasures facility. Details of each of the major systems and their subsystems are presented.

  15. Space Station Freedom CHeCS overview. [Crew Health Care System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joey B.

    1990-01-01

    The current status, progress, and future plans for development of the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) for the International Space Station Freedom are presented. Essential operational biomedical support requirements for the astronauts, including medical care, environmental habitat monitoring, and countermeasures for the potentially maladaptive physiological effects of space flight will be provided by the CHeCS. Three integral parts will make up the system: a health maintenance facility, an environmental health system, and the exercise countermeasures facility. Details of each of the major systems and their subsystems are presented.

  16. Teleradiology as a foundation for an enterprise-wide health care delivery system.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, J D; Taira, R K; Sinha, U; Johnson, D B; Dai, B Y; Tashima, G H; Blythe, S; Johnson, R; Kangarloo, H

    2000-01-01

    An effective, integrated telemedicine system has been developed that allows (a) teleconsultation between local primary health care providers (primary care physicians and general radiologists) and remote imaging subspecialists and (b) active patient participation related to his or her medical condition and patient education. The initial stage of system development was a traditional teleradiology consultation service between general radiologists and specialists; this established system was expanded to include primary care physicians and patients. The system was developed by using a well-defined process model, resulting in three integrated modules: a patient module, a primary health care provider module, and a specialist module. A middle agent layer enables tailoring and customization of the modules for each specific user type. Implementation by using Java and the Common Object Request Broker Architecture standard facilitates platform independence and interoperability. The system supports (a) teleconsultation between a local primary health care provider and an imaging subspecialist regardless of geographic location and (b) patient education and online scheduling. The developed system can potentially form a foundation for an enterprise-wide health care delivery system. In such a system, the role of radiologist specialists is enhanced from that of a diagnostician to the management of a patient's process of care.

  17. [Challenges of an integrative and personalised health care for health economics and the insurance system].

    PubMed

    Schoch, Goentje-Gesine; Würdemann, E

    2014-11-01

    "Stratifying medicine" is a topic of increasing importance in the public health system. There are several questions related to "stratifying medicine". This paper reconsiders definitions, opportunities and risks related to "stratifying medicine" as well as the main challenges of "stratifying medicine" from the perspective of a public health insurance. The application of the term and the definition are important points to discuss. Terms such as "stratified medicine", "personalised medicine" or "individualised medicine" are used. The Techniker Krankenkasse prefers "stratifying medicine", because it usually means a medicine that tailors therapy to specific groups of patients by biomarkers. OPPORTUNITIES AND RISKS: "Stratifying medicine" is associated with various hopes, e. g., the avoidance of ineffective therapies and early detection of diseases. But "stratifying medicine" also carries risks, such as an increase in the number of cases by treatment of disease risks, a duty for health and the weakening of the criteria of evidence-based medicine. The complexity of "stratifying medicine" is a big challenge for all involved parties in the health system. A lot of interrelations are still not completely understood. So the statutory health insurance faces the challenge of making innovative therapy concepts accessible in a timely manner to all insured on the one hand but on t