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Sample records for health coaching home

  1. Advancing the Practice of Health Coaching: Differentiation From Wellness Coaching.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Melinda H

    2016-09-01

    The increasing demand for health coaches and wellness coaches in worksite health promotion and the marketplace has resulted in a plethora of training programs with wide variations in coaching definitions, content, attributes, and eligibility of those who may train. It is in the interest of public awareness and safety that those in clinical practice take the lead in this discussion and offer a reasonable contrast and comparison focusing on the risks and responsibilities of health coaching in particular. With the endorsement of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), the National Society of Health Coaches, whose membership is primarily nurses, discusses the issue and states its position here. PMID:27174131

  2. Advancing the Practice of Health Coaching: Differentiation From Wellness Coaching.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Melinda H

    2016-09-01

    The increasing demand for health coaches and wellness coaches in worksite health promotion and the marketplace has resulted in a plethora of training programs with wide variations in coaching definitions, content, attributes, and eligibility of those who may train. It is in the interest of public awareness and safety that those in clinical practice take the lead in this discussion and offer a reasonable contrast and comparison focusing on the risks and responsibilities of health coaching in particular. With the endorsement of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), the National Society of Health Coaches, whose membership is primarily nurses, discusses the issue and states its position here.

  3. Health Coaching for the Underserved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Twelve individuals (four homeless, two formerly homeless, and six low-income) received 12 weeks of free health coaching, an intervention normally undertaken by clients who pay $40 to $200 out of pocket for coaching services. The health coaching relationships were conducted with protocols developed for managing executive health at a Fortune 100 firm. This experimental model was constructed to explore what happens when coaching conversations for change and possibility are delivered to marginalized and underserved communities that typically undergo vastly different interactions with authorities in law, healthcare, and social services. Phase 1 of the project recruited the homeless individuals from street sites throughout San Francisco, California, and a temporary shelter. Phase 2 of the project worked with low-income and formerly homeless individuals who occupied a subsidized housing complex. Of the coaching recipients, three were black, five were Hispanic, three were of mixed race, and one declined to disclose his ethnicity. Half were Spanish speaking; immigrant status was recent for five of the 12. None had ever talked with a health coach before; only three knew how to utilize low-cost public health clinics. This case report illustrates how the motivational power of coaching conversations was a modestly useful methodology in breaking through the social isolation and loneliness of street-dwelling adults with chronic health problems. It also was a useful methodology for developing capacity for accomplishing short-term goals that were self-identified. Additionally, health coaching presented an opportunity for transitioning poverty-level individuals from passive recipients using public health sector services to more empowered actors with first-stage awareness who initiated preventive health actions. PMID:24416675

  4. Health coaching for the underserved.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Meg

    2013-05-01

    Twelve individuals (four homeless, two formerly homeless, and six low-income) received 12 weeks of free health coaching, an intervention normally undertaken by clients who pay $40 to $200 out of pocket for coaching services. The health coaching relationships were conducted with protocols developed for managing executive health at a Fortune 100 firm. This experimental model was constructed to explore what happens when coaching conversations for change and possibility are delivered to marginalized and underserved communities that typically undergo vastly different interactions with authorities in law, healthcare, and social services. Phase 1 of the project recruited the homeless individuals from street sites throughout San Francisco, California, and a temporary shelter. Phase 2 of the project worked with low-income and formerly homeless individuals who occupied a subsidized housing complex. Of the coaching recipients, three were black, five were Hispanic, three were of mixed race, and one declined to disclose his ethnicity. Half were Spanish speaking; immigrant status was recent for five of the 12. None had ever talked with a health coach before; only three knew how to utilize low-cost public health clinics. This case report illustrates how the motivational power of coaching conversations was a modestly useful methodology in breaking through the social isolation and loneliness of street-dwelling adults with chronic health problems. It also was a useful methodology for developing capacity for accomplishing short-term goals that were self-identified. Additionally, health coaching presented an opportunity for transitioning poverty-level individuals from passive recipients using public health sector services to more empowered actors with first-stage awareness who initiated preventive health actions.

  5. Health coaching for the underserved.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Meg

    2013-05-01

    Twelve individuals (four homeless, two formerly homeless, and six low-income) received 12 weeks of free health coaching, an intervention normally undertaken by clients who pay $40 to $200 out of pocket for coaching services. The health coaching relationships were conducted with protocols developed for managing executive health at a Fortune 100 firm. This experimental model was constructed to explore what happens when coaching conversations for change and possibility are delivered to marginalized and underserved communities that typically undergo vastly different interactions with authorities in law, healthcare, and social services. Phase 1 of the project recruited the homeless individuals from street sites throughout San Francisco, California, and a temporary shelter. Phase 2 of the project worked with low-income and formerly homeless individuals who occupied a subsidized housing complex. Of the coaching recipients, three were black, five were Hispanic, three were of mixed race, and one declined to disclose his ethnicity. Half were Spanish speaking; immigrant status was recent for five of the 12. None had ever talked with a health coach before; only three knew how to utilize low-cost public health clinics. This case report illustrates how the motivational power of coaching conversations was a modestly useful methodology in breaking through the social isolation and loneliness of street-dwelling adults with chronic health problems. It also was a useful methodology for developing capacity for accomplishing short-term goals that were self-identified. Additionally, health coaching presented an opportunity for transitioning poverty-level individuals from passive recipients using public health sector services to more empowered actors with first-stage awareness who initiated preventive health actions. PMID:24416675

  6. Health Coaching: An Update on the National Consortium for Credentialing of Health & Wellness Coaches

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In September 2014, Global Advances in Health and Medicine editor Michele Mittelman, RN, MPH, interviewed four of the leaders in health and wellness coaching about trends in coaching and the progress of the National Consortium for Credentialing of Health & Wellness Coaches. Following are the transcripts of those interviews. Additionally, videos of the interviews are available at www.gahmj.com. PMID:25694854

  7. Health coaching: an update on the national consortium for credentialing of health & wellness coaches.

    PubMed

    Mittelman, Michele

    2015-01-01

    In September 2014, Global Advances in Health and Medicine editor Michele Mittelman, RN, MPH, interviewed four of the leaders in health and wellness coaching about trends in coaching and the progress of the National Consortium for Credentialing of Health & Wellness Coaches. Following are the transcripts of those interviews. Additionally, videos of the interviews are available at www.gahmj.com.

  8. Coaching via Electronic Performance Feedback to Support Home Visitors' Use of Caregiver Coaching Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krick Oborn, Kellie M.; Johnson, LeAnne D.

    2015-01-01

    Recommended practices for Part C early childhood special education home visitors encourage use of caregiver coaching strategies to enhance learning opportunities within the natural routines of infants and toddlers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a multicomponent professional development intervention on home visitors' use…

  9. Health Coaching: A Developing Field within Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The health promotion and health education literature has references to health counselling. Yet, beyond the field of health, coaching has become a popular method to enhance and facilitate individual and group performance in business, sports, and personal areas of life. This paper focuses on the recent development of health coaching by practitioners…

  10. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  11. Health coaching: holistically empowering change.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Becky

    2013-05-01

    It's no secret that the rate and magnitude of stress in daily life, both at work and at home, are drastically affecting the health and well-being of people in our communities and around the world. People are desperate to find ways to improve their lives and feel happier, healthier, and more vibrant. Likewise, industry is clamoring to find resources to improve the health and well-being of their staff and their teams.(1) (,) (2) With the aging population and rapidly growing demands of modern life, this need is expanding exponentially. Billions of dollars are spent annually on complementary and integrative care resources. Many people seek to combine allopathic medical care with proactive self-initiated choices and behaviors to prevent or manage illness and to increase their overall health and well-being. PMID:24416676

  12. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  13. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skilled nursing - home care; Physical therapy - at home; Occupational therapy - at home; Discharge - home health care ... medicines that you may be taking. Physical and occupational therapists can make sure your home is set ...

  14. Complexity and Health Coaching: Synergies in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gail J.; Wong, Winnie; Rush, Danica

    2013-01-01

    Health care professionals are increasingly aware that persons are complex and live in relation with other complex human communities and broader systems. Complex beings and systems are living and evolving in nonlinear ways through a process of mutual influence. Traditional standardized approaches in chronic disease management do not address these non-linear linkages and the meaning and changes that impact day-to-day life and caring for self and family. The RN health coach role described in this paper addresses the complexities and ambiguities for persons living with chronic illness in order to provide person-centered care and support that are unique and responsive to the context of persons' lives. Informed by complexity thinking and relational inquiry, the RN health coach is an emergent innovation of creative action with community and groups that support persons as they shape their health and patterns of living. PMID:24102025

  15. Group health coaching: strengths, challenges, and next steps.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Colin; Wolever, Ruth Q; Manning, Linda; Elam, Roy; Moore, Margaret; Frates, Elizabeth Pegg; Duskey, Heidi; Anderson, Chelsea; Curtis, Rebecca L; Masemer, Susan; Lawson, Karen

    2013-05-01

    There is great need for cost effective approaches to increase patient engagement and improve health and well-being. Health and wellness coaching has recently demonstrated great promise, but the majority of studies to date have focused on individual coaching (ie, one coach with one client). Newer initiatives are bringing a group coaching model from corporate leadership development and educational settings into the healthcare arena. A group approach potentially increases cost-effective access to a larger number of clients and brings the possible additional benefit of group support. This article highlights some of the group coaching approaches currently being conducted across the United States. The group coaching interventions included in this overview are offered by a variety of academic and private sector institutions, use both telephonic and in-person coaching, and are facilitated by professionally trained health and wellness coaches as well as trained peer coaches. Strengths and challenges experienced in these efforts are summarized, as are recommendations to address those challenges. A working definition of "Group Health and Wellness Coaching" is proposed, and important next steps for research and for the training of group coaches are presented.

  16. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  17. Group Health Coaching: Strengths, Challenges, and Next Steps

    PubMed Central

    Wolever, Ruth Q.; Manning, Linda; Elam, Roy; Moore, Margaret; Frates, Elizabeth Pegg; Duskey, Heidi; Anderson, Chelsea; Curtis, Rebecca L.; Masemer, Susan; Lawson, Karen

    2013-01-01

    There is great need for cost effective approaches to increase patient engagement and improve health and well-being. Health and wellness coaching has recently demonstrated great promise, but the majority of studies to date have focused on individual coaching (ie, one coach with one client). Newer initiatives are bringing a group coaching model from corporate leadership development and educational settings into the healthcare arena. A group approach potentially increases cost-effective access to a larger number of clients and brings the possible additional benefit of group support. This article highlights some of the group coaching approaches currently being conducted across the United States. The group coaching interventions included in this overview are offered by a variety of academic and private sector institutions, use both telephonic and in-person coaching, and are facilitated by professionally trained health and wellness coaches as well as trained peer coaches. Strengths and challenges experienced in these efforts are summarized, as are recommendations to address those challenges. A working definition of “Group Health and Wellness Coaching” is proposed, and important next steps for research and for the training of group coaches are presented. PMID:24416678

  18. Danish Health Professionals' Experiences of Being Coached: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne Irene; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze health professionals' experiences from…

  19. Are Low-Income Peer Health Coaches Able to Master and Utilize Evidence-Based Health Coaching?

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Matthew L.; Ghorob, Amireh; Hessler, Danielle; Yamamoto, Russell; Thom, David H.; Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE A randomized controlled trial found that patients with diabetes had lower HbA1c levels after 6 months of peer health coaching than patients who did not receive coaching. This paper explores whether the peer coaches in that trial, all low-income patients with diabetes, mastered and utilized an evidence-based health coaching training curriculum. The curriculum included 5 core features: ask-tell-ask, closing the loop, know your numbers, behavior-change action plans, and medication adherence counseling. METHODS This paper includes the results of exams administered to trainees, exit surveys performed with peer coaches who completed the study and those who dropped out, observations of peer coaches meeting with patients, and analysis of in-depth interviews with peer coaches who completed the study. RESULTS Of the 32 peer coach trainees who completed the training, 71.9% lacked a college degree; 25.0% did not graduate from high school. The 26 trainees who passed the exams attended 92.7% of training sessions compared with 80.6% for the 6 trainees who did not pass. Peer coaches who completed the study wanted to continue peer coaching work and had confidence in their abilities despite their not consistently employing the coaching techniques with their patients. Quotations describe coaches’ perceptions of the training. CONCLUSIONS Of low-income patients with diabetes who completed the evidenced-based health coaching training, 81% passed written and oral exams and became effective peer health coaches, although they did not consistently use the techniques taught. PMID:26304970

  20. The study of health coaching: the ithaca coaching project, research design, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Sforzo, Gary A

    2013-05-01

    Health coaching (HC) is a process holding tremendous potential as a complementary medical intervention to shape healthy behavior change and affect rates of chronic lifestyle diseases. Empirical knowledge of effectiveness for the HC process, however, is lacking. The purposes of this paper are to present the study protocol for the Ithaca Coaching Project while also addressing research design, methodological issues, and directions for HC research. This is one of the first large-scale, randomized control trials of HC for primary prevention examining impact on physical and emotional health status in an employee population. An additional intent for the project is to investigate self-determination theory as a theoretical framework for the coaching process. Participants (n=300) are recruited as part of a campus-wide wellness initiative and randomly assigned to one of three levels of client-centered HC or a control with standard wellness program care. Repeated measures analyses of covariance will be used to examine coaching effectiveness while path analyses will be used to examine relationships between coaching processes, self-determination variables, and health outcomes. There is a great need for well-designed HC studies that define coaching best practices, examine intervention effectiveness, provide cost:benefit analysis, and address scope of practice. This information will allow a clearer definition of HC to emerge and determination of if, and how, HC fits in modern-day healthcare. This is an exciting but critical time for HC research and for the practice of HC.

  1. Improving awareness, accountability, and access through health coaching

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Johnston, Sharon; Irving, Hannah; Nash, Kate; Ward, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess patients’ experiences with and perceptions of health coaching as part of their ongoing care. Design A qualitative research design using semistructured interviews that were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Setting Ottawa, Ont. Participants Eleven patients (> 18 years of age) enrolled in a health coaching pilot program who were at risk of or diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients’ perspectives were assessed with semistructured interviews. Interviews were conducted with 11 patients at the end of the pilot program, using a stratified sampling approach to ensure maximum variation. Main findings All patients found the overall experience with the health coaching program to be positive. Patients believed the health coaching program was effective in increasing awareness of how diabetes affected their bodies and health, in building accountability for their health-related actions, and in improving access to care and other health resources. Conclusion Patients perceive one-on-one health coaching as an acceptable intervention in their ongoing care. Patients enrolled in the health coaching pilot program believed that there was an improvement in access to care, health literacy, and accountability, all factors considered to be precursors to behavioural change. PMID:25932483

  2. Evaluation of Telephone Health Coaching of German Health Insurants with Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Härter, Martin; Dwinger, Sarah; Seebauer, Laura; Simon, Daniela; Herbarth, Lutz; Siegmund-Schultze, Elisabeth; Temmert, Daniel; Bermejo, Isaac; Dirmaier, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate how patients with chronic conditions evaluate telephone health coaching provided by their health insurance company. Methods: A retrospective survey was conducted among coaching participants ("n" = 834). Outcomes included the general evaluation of the coaching, the evaluation of process and…

  3. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    PubMed

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management.

  4. Home Health in Chinatown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    The document reports on the successful efforts of the San Francisco Home Health Service, which brings much needed homemaker/home health aide services to hundreds of elderly people in the San Francisco Chinatown area. Providing historical and cultural background information about the area, its residents, and its particular health problems, the…

  5. Home advantage in soccer--A matter of expectations, goal setting and tactical decisions of coaches?

    PubMed

    Staufenbiel, Kathrin; Lobinger, Babett; Strauss, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    In soccer, home teams win about 67% of decided games. The causes for this home advantage are still unresolved. There is a shortage of research on the psychological states of actors involved. In this study, we examined soccer coaches' expectations, goal setting and tactical decisions in relation to game location. Soccer coaches (N = 297) with different expertise levels participated in an experimental, online management game and were randomly assigned to one of two groups, "home game (HG)" or "away game." Participants received information on the game for which they were asked to make decisions in multiple points. The only differing information between groups was game location. Regardless of expertise, HG coaches had higher expectations to win, set more challenging goals and decided for more offensive and courageous playing tactics. Possible consequences of these findings concerning home advantage in soccer are discussed.

  6. The role of health and wellness coaching in worksite health promotion.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Larry S; Lesch, Nancy; Baun, MaryBeth Pappas

    2007-01-01

    Health and wellness coaching has rapidly become a best practice element of worksite health promotion programs. Coaching as a process is a very old technology, but its use in the field of health promotion is relatively new. Coaching can be provided in different forms or modalities yet currently lacks a rigorous science base or a defined set of standards or common elements. In larger worksite settings several variants or forms of coaching are usually provided to employee populations. The need for more proactive and direct forms of intervention in health promotion is contributing to the rapid growth of coaching programs. There are currently an assortment of coaching strategies or techniques that are in common use in most coaching interventions. A main contention of current coaching practice is that coaching that uses facilitation strategies rather than prescriptive advice is more effective at producing long term behavior change. The congruence and size of wellness incentives with the coaching process are likely to be of significant importance. From a long term perspective, coaching is likely to become a staple of worksite health promotion practice.

  7. Problematizing health coaching for chronic illness self-management.

    PubMed

    Howard, Lisa M; Ceci, Christine

    2013-09-01

    To address the growing costs associated with chronic illness care, many countries, both developed and developing, identify increased patient self-management or self-care as a focus of healthcare reform. Health coaching, an implementation strategy to support the shift to self-management, encourages patients to make lifestyle changes to improve the management of chronic illness. This practice differs from traditional models of health education because of the interactional dynamics between nurse and patient, and an orientation to care that ostensibly centres and empowers patients. The theoretical underpinnings of coaching reflect these differences, however in its application, the practices arranged around health coaching for chronic illness self-management reveal the social regulation and professional management of everyday life. This becomes especially problematic in contexts defined by economic constraint and government withdrawal from activities related to the 'care' of citizens. In this paper, we trace the development of health coaching as part of nursing practice and consider the implications of this practice as an emerging element of chronic illness self-management. Our purpose is to highlight health coaching as an approach intended to support patients with chronic illness and at the same time, problematize the tensions contained in (and by) this practice.

  8. Distance Coursework and Coaching to Improve Nursing Home Incontinence Care: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Anna N.; Schnelle, John F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Simmons, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether a distance coaching course on improving nursing home incontinence care could be replicated and brought to scale with a larger group of nursing homes without sacrificing outcomes. Design The study collected descriptive and comparative data. Setting The setting was comprised of 14 nursing homes in the original course and 34 homes in the replication course. Participants Participants in the study were supervisors and staff from enrolled nursing homes who completed the distance coaching courses on incontinence management. Measures Data for both courses were collected using a resident assessment form to evaluate implementation of new practices, pre- and post-training quizzes, a course evaluation survey, and a supervisor’s report. Results There were few significant differences between the course groups with respect to course participation, knowledge transfer, and training program preferences. Although course 1 nursing homes reported assessing more residents on average than course 2 homes (22 residents vs. 12 residents, respectively), this difference is likely an artifact of differences in the reporting methodologies for the two courses. Conclusion This study found qualified support for using a distance coaching course to facilitate adoption of evidence-based incontinence care practices in nursing homes. The findings also underscore the challenges associated with designing dissemination/implementation programs that are both effective and feasible to implement with nursing homes. We recommend that nursing home educators consider this study’s findings when designing new training programs. Outcomes may improve if some dissemination resources are diverted to distance coaching activities that support nursing home improvement efforts over extended periods. PMID:22642640

  9. Health coaching education: a conversation with pioneers in the field.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Suzanne

    2013-05-01

    In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success.

  10. Health Coaching Education: A Conversation With Pioneers in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    In February 2013, Global Advances in Health and Medicine (GAHMJ) interviewed eight pioneers in the field of health coaching education: Michael Arloski, PhD, PCC; Linda Bark, PhD, RN, MCC, NC-BC; Georgianna Donadio, PhD; Meg Jordan, PhD, RN; Sam Magill, MBA, MCC; Margaret Moore, MBA; Linda Smith, PA-C, MA; and Cheryl Walker, ML, MCC. This article features biographies of the participants and their perspectives on the evolution and value of health coaching education and the keys to its success. PMID:24416669

  11. 76 FR 52377 - Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Consolidated Energy, Inc., Diamond Home Services, Inc., Goran Capital Inc., Kingsley Coach, Inc... that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Diamond...

  12. Transforming Farm Health and Safety: The Case for Business Coaching.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Anna; Franklin, Richard C; Rossetto, Allison; Gray, David E

    2015-01-01

    In the U.S. and Australia, agriculture is consistently ranked as one of the most hazardous industries. The cost of injuries and deaths on Australian farms is significant, estimated to be between AU$0.5 billion and AU$1.2 billion per year. Death and injury in agriculture also place a significant financial and social burden on the family and friends of the injured, the community, and the health system. This article proposes that if farmers were to employ coaching in their businesses, they would benefit from advances in safety practices, resulting in associated improvements in overall farm productivity and a reduction in injury costs to the wider community. A coaching model is presented to demonstrate what an effective coaching process would need to include. An agenda for future research areas is also provided.

  13. Towards a Psychology of Coaching: The Impact of Coaching on Metacognition, Mental Health and Goal Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Anthony M.

    A theoretical framework for a psychology of coaching was developed. First, the literature on cognitive approaches to coaching, behavioral approaches to coaching, and combinations of the cognitive and behavioral approaches was reviewed. Next, two studies examined the development and validation of a new measure of private self-consciousness called…

  14. Implementing the COACH relationship model: health promotion for mothers and children.

    PubMed

    Hanks, C; Kitzman, H; Milligan, R

    1995-12-01

    Program designers and nurses developed and implemented the COACH Relationship Model to help low-income mothers change health-related behaviors as part of a clinical trial conducted from 1990 to 1994 of the impact of nurse home visitation. By first orienting the program nurses to the theoretical underpinnings (caring, ecological, role supplementation, and self-efficacy theories) and then involving them in developing program materials to translate the theoretical and philosophical concepts into nursing interventions, the essential features of the relationship model were retained through the implementation process.

  15. Rolling Back Medicare Home Health

    PubMed Central

    Komisar, Harriet L.

    2002-01-01

    The Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 included major changes to Medicare's home health benefit designed to control spending and promote efficient delivery of services. Using national data from Medicare home health claims, this study finds the initial effect of the BBA was to steeply reduce use of the home health benefit and intensify its focus on post-acute skilled nursing and therapy services. The striking responsiveness of home health agencies (HHAs) to altered financial incentives suggests that we may again see large shifts in patterns of care under the new incentives of Medicare's prospective payment system (PPS) for home health. PMID:12690694

  16. Behavioral changes following participation in a home health promotional program in King County, Washington.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, R; Koenig, J Q; Simcox, N; van Belle, G; Fenske, R; Gilbert, S G

    1997-01-01

    This study examined behavioral changes in households after participation in a home environmental assessment. Home assessment visits by a trained coach, which involved a walk-through in the home with the home residents, were conducted in 36 homes. The walk-through included a list of recommended behavioral changes that the residents could make to reduce their exposures to home pollutants in areas such as dust control, moisture problems, indoor air, hazardous household products, and hobbies. Recruited households were surveyed 3 months after the home assessment to evaluate their implementation of the recommendations. Following the home visits, 31 of 36 households reported making at least one behavioral change, and 41% of the recommendations made by the volunteer coaches were implemented. In conclusion, this study found that the majority of the households who participated in the home assessment reported implementing at least one recommendation. This home health promotional method was effective in influencing behavioral changes. PMID:9349831

  17. Behavioral changes following participation in a home health promotional program in King County, Washington.

    PubMed

    Leung, R; Koenig, J Q; Simcox, N; van Belle, G; Fenske, R; Gilbert, S G

    1997-10-01

    This study examined behavioral changes in households after participation in a home environmental assessment. Home assessment visits by a trained coach, which involved a walk-through in the home with the home residents, were conducted in 36 homes. The walk-through included a list of recommended behavioral changes that the residents could make to reduce their exposures to home pollutants in areas such as dust control, moisture problems, indoor air, hazardous household products, and hobbies. Recruited households were surveyed 3 months after the home assessment to evaluate their implementation of the recommendations. Following the home visits, 31 of 36 households reported making at least one behavioral change, and 41% of the recommendations made by the volunteer coaches were implemented. In conclusion, this study found that the majority of the households who participated in the home assessment reported implementing at least one recommendation. This home health promotional method was effective in influencing behavioral changes. PMID:9349831

  18. mHealth in the Wild: Using Novel Data to Examine the Reach, Use, and Impact of PTSD Coach

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Beth K; Kuhn, Eric; Makin-Byrd, Kerry N; Ramsey, Kelly M; Hoffman, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Background A majority of Americans (58%) now use smartphones, making it possible for mobile mental health apps to reach large numbers of those who are living with untreated, or under-treated, mental health symptoms. Although early trials suggest positive effects for mobile health (mHealth) interventions, little is known about the potential public health impact of mobile mental health apps. Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize reach, use, and impact of “PTSD Coach”, a free, broadly disseminated mental health app for managing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Methods Using a mixed-methods approach, aggregate mobile analytics data from 153,834 downloads of PTSD Coach were analyzed in conjunction with 156 user reviews. Results Over 60% of users engaged with PTSD Coach on multiple occasions (mean=6.3 sessions). User reviews reflected gratitude for the availability of the app and being able to use the app specifically during moments of need. PTSD Coach users reported relatively high levels of trauma symptoms (mean PTSD Checklist Score=57.2, SD=15.7). For users who chose to use a symptom management tool, distress declined significantly for both first-time users (mean=1.6 points, SD=2.6 on the 10-point distress thermometer) and return-visit users (mean=2.0, SD=2.3). Analysis of app session data identified common points of attrition, with only 80% of first-time users reaching the app’s home screen and 37% accessing one of the app’s primary content areas. Conclusions These findings suggest that PTSD Coach has achieved substantial and sustained reach in the population, is being used as intended, and has been favorably received. PTSD Coach is a unique platform for the delivery of mobile mental health education and treatment, and continuing evaluation and improvement of the app could further strengthen its public health impact. PMID:26543913

  19. Australian rural football club leaders as mental health advocates: an investigation of the impact of the Coach the Coach project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mental ill health, especially depression, is recognised as an important health concern, potentially with greater impact in rural communities. This paper reports on a project, Coach the Coach, in which Australian rural football clubs were the setting and football coaches the leaders in providing greater mental health awareness and capacity to support early help seeking behaviour among young males experiencing mental health difficulties, especially depression. Coaches and other football club leaders were provided with Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training. Method Pre-post measures of the ability of those club leaders undertaking mental health training to recognise depression and schizophrenia and of their knowledge of evidence supported treatment options, and confidence in responding to mental health difficulties were obtained using a questionnaire. This was supplemented by focus group interviews. Pre-post questionnaire data from players in participating football clubs was used to investigate attitudes to depression, treatment options and ability to recognise depression from a clinical scenario. Key project stakeholders were also interviewed. Results Club leaders (n = 36) who were trained in MHFA and club players (n = 275) who were not trained, participated in this evaluation. More than 50% of club leaders who undertook the training showed increased capacity to recognise mental illness and 66% reported increased confidence to respond to mental health difficulties in others. They reported that this training built upon their existing skills, fulfilled their perceived social responsibilities and empowered them. Indirect benefit to club players from this approach seemed limited as minimal changes in attitudes were reported by players. Key stakeholders regarded the project as valuable. Conclusions Rural football clubs appear to be appropriate social structures to promote rural mental health awareness. Club leaders, including many coaches, benefit from MHFA

  20. The feasibility of a telephone coaching program on heart failure home management for family caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Smith, Carol E.; Russell, Christy; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Elyachar, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To test the feasibility of delivery and evaluate the helpfulness of a coaching heart failure (HF) home management program for family caregivers. Background The few available studies on providing instruction for family caregivers are limited in content for managing HF home care and guidance for program implementation. Method This pilot study employed a mixed methods design. The measures of caregiver burden, confidence, and preparedness were compared at baseline and 3 months post-intervention. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize program costs and demographic data. Content analysis research methods were used to evaluate program feasibility and helpfulness. Results Caregiver (n=10) burden scores were significantly reduced and raw scores of confidence and preparedness for HF home management improved 3 months after the intervention. Content analyses of nurse and caregiver post-intervention data found caregivers rated the program as helpful and described how they initiated HF management skills based on the program. Conclusion The program was feasible to implement. These results suggest the coaching program should be further tested with a larger sample size to evaluate its efficacy. PMID:23116654

  1. Improving hypertension self-management with community health coaches.

    PubMed

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet Hoffman

    2015-03-01

    Approximately two thirds of those older than 60 years have a hypertension diagnosis. The aim of our program, Health Coaches for Hypertension Control, is to improve hypertension self-management among rural residents older than 60 years through education and support offered by trained community volunteers called Health Coaches. Participants received baseline and follow-up health risk appraisals with blood work, educational materials, and items such as blood pressure monitors and pedometers. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, and 16 weeks on 146 participants who demonstrated statistically significant increases in hypertension-related knowledge from baseline to 8 weeks that persisted at 16 weeks, as well as significant improvements in stage of readiness to change behaviors and in actual behaviors. Furthermore, clinically significant decreases in all outcome measures were observed, with statistically significant changes in systolic blood pressure (-5.781 mmHg; p = .001), weight (-2.475 lb; p < .001), and glucose (-5.096 mg/dl; p = .004) after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Although 40.4% of participants met the Healthy People 2020 definition of controlled hypertension at baseline, the proportion of participants meeting this definition at 16 weeks postintervention increased to 51.0%. This article describes a university-community-hospital system model that effectively promotes hypertension self-management in a rural Appalachian community.

  2. Improving hypertension self-management with community health coaches.

    PubMed

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet Hoffman

    2015-03-01

    Approximately two thirds of those older than 60 years have a hypertension diagnosis. The aim of our program, Health Coaches for Hypertension Control, is to improve hypertension self-management among rural residents older than 60 years through education and support offered by trained community volunteers called Health Coaches. Participants received baseline and follow-up health risk appraisals with blood work, educational materials, and items such as blood pressure monitors and pedometers. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, and 16 weeks on 146 participants who demonstrated statistically significant increases in hypertension-related knowledge from baseline to 8 weeks that persisted at 16 weeks, as well as significant improvements in stage of readiness to change behaviors and in actual behaviors. Furthermore, clinically significant decreases in all outcome measures were observed, with statistically significant changes in systolic blood pressure (-5.781 mmHg; p = .001), weight (-2.475 lb; p < .001), and glucose (-5.096 mg/dl; p = .004) after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Although 40.4% of participants met the Healthy People 2020 definition of controlled hypertension at baseline, the proportion of participants meeting this definition at 16 weeks postintervention increased to 51.0%. This article describes a university-community-hospital system model that effectively promotes hypertension self-management in a rural Appalachian community. PMID:24837989

  3. Coaches Coaching Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkins, Jan Miller; Ritchie, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Researchers have argued that "job-embedded" professional learning is the most valuable model for teachers (Joyce & Showers, 2002). But there is little or no corresponding literature regarding job-embedded professional learning for literacy coaches. In this paper, the authors offer an example of one such model, the Coach-to-Coach…

  4. Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

    2014-01-01

    Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

  5. Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

    2014-04-01

    Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games.

  6. Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

    2014-04-01

    Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

  7. National training and education standards for health and wellness coaching: the path to national certification.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Meg; Wolever, Ruth Q; Lawson, Karen; Moore, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: (1) to announce the findings of the job task analysis as well as national training and education standards for health and wellness coaching (HWC) that have been developed by the large-scale, collaborative efforts of the National Consortium for Credentialing Health and Wellness Coaches (NCCHWC) and (2) to invite commentary from the public. The rapid proliferation of individuals and organizations using the terms of health and/or wellness coaches and the propagation of private industry and academic coach training and education programs endeavoring to prepare these coaches has created an urgent and pressing need for national standards for use of the term health and wellness coach, as well as minimal requirements for training, education, and certification. Professionalizing the field with national standards brings a clear and consistent definition of health and wellness coaching and accepted practice standards that are uniform across the field. In addition, clear standards allow for uniform curricular criteria to ensure a minimal benchmark for education, training, and skills and knowledge evaluation of professional health and wellness coaches.

  8. National Training and Education Standards for Health and Wellness Coaching: The Path to National Certification

    PubMed Central

    Wolever, Ruth Q.; Lawson, Karen; Moore, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: (1) to announce the findings of the job task analysis as well as national training and education standards for health and wellness coaching (HWC) that have been developed by the large-scale, collaborative efforts of the National Consortium for Credentialing Health and Wellness Coaches (NCCHWC) and (2) to invite commentary from the public. The rapid proliferation of individuals and organizations using the terms of health and/or wellness coaches and the propagation of private industry and academic coach training and education programs endeavoring to prepare these coaches has created an urgent and pressing need for national standards for use of the term health and wellness coach, as well as minimal requirements for training, education, and certification. Professionalizing the field with national standards brings a clear and consistent definition of health and wellness coaching and accepted practice standards that are uniform across the field. In addition, clear standards allow for uniform curricular criteria to ensure a minimal benchmark for education, training, and skills and knowledge evaluation of professional health and wellness coaches. PMID:25984418

  9. National training and education standards for health and wellness coaching: the path to national certification.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Meg; Wolever, Ruth Q; Lawson, Karen; Moore, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold: (1) to announce the findings of the job task analysis as well as national training and education standards for health and wellness coaching (HWC) that have been developed by the large-scale, collaborative efforts of the National Consortium for Credentialing Health and Wellness Coaches (NCCHWC) and (2) to invite commentary from the public. The rapid proliferation of individuals and organizations using the terms of health and/or wellness coaches and the propagation of private industry and academic coach training and education programs endeavoring to prepare these coaches has created an urgent and pressing need for national standards for use of the term health and wellness coach, as well as minimal requirements for training, education, and certification. Professionalizing the field with national standards brings a clear and consistent definition of health and wellness coaching and accepted practice standards that are uniform across the field. In addition, clear standards allow for uniform curricular criteria to ensure a minimal benchmark for education, training, and skills and knowledge evaluation of professional health and wellness coaches. PMID:25984418

  10. The Process of Patient Empowerment in Integrative Health Coaching: How Does it Happen?

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Karen L; Gray, Jennifer; Wolever, Ruth Q

    2013-05-01

    Emerging healthcare delivery models suggest that patients benefit from being engaged in their care. Integrative health coaching (IHC) is designed to be a systematic, collaborative, and solution-focused process that facilitates the enhancement of life experience and goal attainment regarding health, but little research is available to describe the mechanisms through which empowerment occurs in the health coaching process. The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe apparent key components of the empowerment process as it actually occurs in IHC. A sample of 69 recorded health coaching sessions was drawn from 12 participants enrolled in a randomized controlled study comparing two different methods of weight-loss maintenance. Two researchers coded the word-for-word transcripts of sessions focusing on the structure of the sessions and communication strategies used by the coaches. Three basic sections of a coaching session were identified, and two main themes emerged from the communication strategies used: Exploring Participant's Experience and Active Interventions. In IHC, health coaches do not direct with prefabricated education based on the patient's presenting problem; rather, they use a concordant style of communication. The major tenets of the health coaching process are patient-centeredness and patient control focused around patient-originated health goals that guide the work within a supportive coaching partnership. As the field of health coaching continues to define itself, an important ongoing question involves how the structure of the provider-patient interaction is informed by the role of the healthcare provider (eg, nurse, therapist, coach) and in turn shapes the empowerment process.

  11. The Process of Patient Empowerment in Integrative Health Coaching: How Does it Happen?

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Karen L.; Gray, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Emerging healthcare delivery models suggest that patients benefit from being engaged in their care. Integrative health coaching (IHC) is designed to be a systematic, collaborative, and solution-focused process that facilitates the enhancement of life experience and goal attainment regarding health, but little research is available to describe the mechanisms through which empowerment occurs in the health coaching process. The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe apparent key components of the empowerment process as it actually occurs in IHC. A sample of 69 recorded health coaching sessions was drawn from 12 participants enrolled in a randomized controlled study comparing two different methods of weight-loss maintenance. Two researchers coded the word-for-word transcripts of sessions focusing on the structure of the sessions and communication strategies used by the coaches. Three basic sections of a coaching session were identified, and two main themes emerged from the communication strategies used: Exploring Participant's Experience and Active Interventions. In IHC, health coaches do not direct with prefabricated education based on the patient's presenting problem; rather, they use a concordant style of communication. The major tenets of the health coaching process are patient-centeredness and patient control focused around patient-originated health goals that guide the work within a supportive coaching partnership. As the field of health coaching continues to define itself, an important ongoing question involves how the structure of the provider-patient interaction is informed by the role of the healthcare provider (eg, nurse, therapist, coach) and in turn shapes the empowerment process. PMID:24416672

  12. Training meals on wheels volunteers as health literacy coaches for older adults.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Donald L; Freimuth, Vicki S; Johnson, Sharon D; Kaley, Terry; Parmer, John

    2014-05-01

    Homebound older adults constitute a "hardly reached" population with respect to health communication. Older adults also typically suffer from health literacy challenges, which put them at increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Suboptimal interactions with providers are one such challenge. Interventions to improve interactive health literacy focus on training consumers/patients in question preparation and asking. Meals on Wheels volunteers are uniquely suited to coach their clients in such interaction strategies. Seventy-three Meals on Wheels volunteers participated in workshops to train as health literacy coaches. The 3- to 4-hour workshops included units on communicating with older adults, on the nature of health literacy, and on the process of interactive health literacy coaching. Participants viewed and discussed videos that modeled the targeted communication behaviors for older adult patients interacting with physicians. They role-played the coaching process. After 9 months, coaches participated in a "booster" session that included videos of ideal coaching practices. Evaluation questionnaires revealed that participants had favorable reactions to the workshops with respect to utility and interest. They especially appreciated learning communication skills and seeing realistic videos. A measure of knowledge about the workshop material revealed a significant increment at posttest. Fidelity of coaching practices with respect to workshop curriculum was confirmed. This training in interactive health literacy for community-based lay volunteers constitutes one way to implement the National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy for one "hardly reached" population. An online tool kit containing all workshop materials is available.

  13. Evaluating the Treatment Fidelity of Parents Who Conduct In-Home Functional Communication Training with Coaching via Telehealth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suess, Alyssa N.; Romani, Patrick W.; Wacker, David P.; Dyson, Shannon M.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.; Lee, John F.; Lindgren, Scott D.; Kopelman, Todd G.; Pelzel, Kelly E.; Waldron, Debra B.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective, descriptive evaluation of the fidelity with which parents of three children with autism spectrum disorders conducted functional communication training (FCT) in their homes. All training was provided to the parents via telehealth by a behavior consultant in a tertiary-level hospital setting. FCT trials coached by the…

  14. Integrative Health Coaching and Motivational interviewing: Synergistic Approaches to Behavior Change in Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Leigh Ann; Wolever, Ruth Q

    2013-07-01

    As rates of preventable chronic diseases and associated costs continue to rise, there has been increasing focus on strategies to support behavior change in healthcare. Health coaching and motivational interviewing are synergistic but distinct approaches that can be effectively employed to achieve this end. However, there is some confusion in the literature about the relationship between these two approaches. The purpose of this review is to describe a specific style of health coaching-integrative health coaching-and motivational interviewing, including their origins, the processes and strategies employed, and the ways in which they are similar and different. We also provide a case example of how integrative health coaching and motivational interviewing might be employed to demonstrate how these approaches are synergistic but distinct from each other in practice. This information may be useful for both researchers and clinicians interested in investigating or using behavior change interventions to improve health and cost outcomes in chronic disease.

  15. Advancing Health Promotion in Dentistry: Articulating an Integrative Approach to Coaching Oral Health Behavior Change in the Dental Setting

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Anita R.

    2015-01-01

    Oral health is managed based on objective measures such as the presence and severity of dental caries and periodontal disease. In recent years, oral health researchers and practitioners have shown increasing interest in a widened array of physical, psychological, and social factors found to influence patients’ oral health. In this article, we introduce a behavior change coaching approach that can be used to enhance psychosocial diagnosis and client-centered delivery of health-promoting interventions. Briefly, this health coaching approach is based on an interactive assessment (both physical and psychological), a non-judgmental exploration of patients’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs, a mapping of patient behaviors that may contribute to disease progression, gauging patient motivation, and tailoring health communication to encourage health-promoting behavior change. Developed in a clinical setting, this coaching model is supported by interdisciplinary theory, research, and practice on health behavior change. We suggest that, with supervision, this coaching process may be learned. PMID:26457237

  16. A Proactive Innovation for Health Care Transformation: Health and Wellness Nurse Coaching.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Helen Lorraine; Erickson, Margaret Elizabeth; Southard, Mary Elaine; Brekke, Mary E; Sandor, M Kay; Natschke, Mary

    2016-03-01

    A cohort of holistic nurses, recognizing opportunities inherent in health care transformation, organized and worked together from 2009 to 2012. The goal was to hold space for holistic nursing by developing a health and wellness coaching role and certification program for holistic nurses. The intent was to ensure that holistic nurses could work to the fullest of their ability within the evolving health care system, and others could discover the merit of holistic nursing as they explored the possibilities of nurse coaching. Challenges emerged that required the cohort plan strategies that would hold the space for nursing while also moving toward the intended goal. As they worked, this cohort demonstrated leadership skills, knowledge, values, and attitudes of holistic nursing that provide an example for others who follow in the wake of health care transformation. The American Holistic Credentialing Corporation's perspective of the events that unfolded and of the related decisions made by the coalition provides a record of the evolution of holistic nursing.

  17. Whole person health for the whole population: one-year evaluation of health coaching.

    PubMed

    Licht, Melodi; Davis, Jeffrey M; Scripps, Allison; Cone, Juanita

    2007-01-01

    Chronic diseases drive significant health care utilization and costs in the US. Simultaneously, there is growing evidence that self-care and collaborative decision-making practices are linked to improvements in health-related outcomes and reduced health care costs.In April of 2005, Kaiser Permanente (KP) Georgia implemented a population care management service that included personal health coaching services to its 277,000 patients. KP Healthy Solutions (HS) provided the health coaching support, powered by analytics, to participants. Health coaches were available by telephone 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. HS users included patients with chronic conditions, those seeking to make healthy lifestyle changes, and patients with "preference sensitive" conditions who were considering treatment alternatives. Many of these services are provided in collaboration with HS's strategic vendor, Health Dialog, a national leader in the disease management industry. Data from September 2005 to September 2006 indicates that HS increases both quality outcomes and overall patient satisfaction with KP and achieves cost reductions, all of which create a significant return on investment.

  18. Integrating big data and actionable health coaching to optimize wellness.

    PubMed

    Hood, Leroy; Lovejoy, Jennifer C; Price, Nathan D

    2015-01-01

    The Hundred Person Wellness Project (HPWP) is a 10-month pilot study of 100 'well' individuals where integrated data from whole-genome sequencing, gut microbiome, clinical laboratory tests and quantified self measures from each individual are used to provide actionable results for health coaching with the goal of optimizing wellness and minimizing disease. In a commentary in BMC Medicine, Diamandis argues that HPWP and similar projects will likely result in 'unnecessary and potential harmful over-testing'. We argue that this new approach will ultimately lead to lower costs, better healthcare, innovation and economic growth. The central points of the HPWP are: 1) it is focused on optimizing wellness through longitudinal data collection, integration and mining of individual data clouds, enabling development of predictive models of wellness and disease that will reveal actionable possibilities; and 2) by extending this study to 100,000 well people, we will establish multiparameter, quantifiable wellness metrics and identify markers for wellness to early disease transitions for most common diseases, which will ultimately allow earlier disease intervention, eventually transitioning the individual early on from a disease back to a wellness trajectory.

  19. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Mothe, Dolores; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as homemakers/home health aides and getting them ready for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography. The following competencies…

  20. Homemaker/Home Health Aide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a five-unit home health aide course. Each unit contains 4 to 36 lesson plans. Unit topics and representative lesson plan topics are as follows: (1) introduction (ethical and legal responsibilities, time management, reporting and recording); (2) communication (techniques, meeting the public, therapeutic…

  1. Health coaching interventions with a heart-healthy lenoir project client.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Jim

    2013-05-01

    The Heart-Healthy Lenoir Project is a multi-study project designed to reduce the risk burden of heart disease in Lenoir County, North Carolina. This case report examines one client's experience in this project and the impact of health coaching interventions that were used. The client presented with unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and a systolic blood pressure (BP) of more than 200 mmHg. After 1 year of educational group meetings and personalized health coaching, the client was able to reduce her BP to an acceptable range and has adopted many new lifestyle behaviors. This case report demonstrates one way health coaching is being integrated into educational programs and in collaboration with primary care practices.

  2. Behavioral health coaching for rural veterans with diabetes and depression: a patient randomized effectiveness implementation trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and diabetes cause significant burden for patients and the healthcare system and, when co-occurring, result in poorer self-care behaviors and worse glycemic control than for either condition alone. However, the clinical management of these comorbid conditions is complicated by a host of patient, provider, and system-level barriers that are especially problematic for patients in rural locations. Patient-centered medical homes provide an opportunity to integrate mental and physical health care to address the multifaceted needs of complex comorbid conditions. Presently, there is a need to not only develop robust clinical interventions for complex medically ill patients but also to find feasible ways to embed these interventions into the frontlines of existing primary care practices. Methods/design This randomized controlled trial uses a hybrid effectiveness-implementation design to evaluate the Healthy Outcomes through Patient Empowerment (HOPE) intervention, which seeks to simultaneously address diabetes and depression for rural veterans in Southeast Texas. A total of 242 Veterans with uncontrolled diabetes and comorbid symptoms of depression will be recruited and randomized to either the HOPE intervention or to a usual-care arm. Participants will be evaluated on a host of diabetes and depression-related measures at baseline and 6- and 12-month follow-up. The trial has two primary goals: 1) to examine the effectiveness of the intervention on both physical (diabetes) and emotional health (depression) outcomes and 2) to simultaneously pilot test a multifaceted implementation strategy designed to increase fidelity and utilization of the intervention by coaches interfacing within the primary care setting. Discussion This ongoing blended effectiveness-implementation design holds the potential to advance the science and practice of caring for complex medically ill patients within the constraints of a busy patient-centered medical home. Trial

  3. Coaching vs Psychotherapy in health and Wellness: Overlap, Dissimilarities, and the Potential for Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Health coaches and psychotherapists both work with the art and science of facilitating change in their patients and clients. While the evolving field of health coaching and the established disciplines of clinical or counseling psychology share major areas of overlap, there are also significant distinctions between the two fields. This article outlines those similarities and dissimilarities with the intention of fostering a cooperative and mutually enriching stance between the two helping professions for the benefit of the respective professionals and the countless clients and patients they serve. PMID:24416682

  4. Teacher Consultation and Coaching within Mental Health Practice: Classroom and Child Effects in Urban Elementary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Elise; Hamre, Bridget K.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Henry, David B.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Atkins, Marc S.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Method Thirty-six classrooms within five urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to intervention (training + consultation/coaching) and control (training only) conditions. Classroom and child outcomes (n = 364; 43% girls) were assessed in the fall and spring. Results Random effects regression models showed main effects of intervention on teacher-student relationship closeness, academic self-concept, and peer victimization. Results of multiple regression models showed levels of observed teacher emotional support in the fall moderated intervention impact on emotional support at the end of the school year. Conclusions Results suggest teacher consultation and coaching can be integrated within existing mental health activities in urban schools and impact classroom effectiveness and child adaptation across multiple domains. PMID:22428941

  5. Coaches' Perceptions of French Sports Clubs: Health-Promotion Activities, Aims and Coach Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoye, Aurélie; Sarrazin, Philippe; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Kokko, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Background: Given the benefits of participating in sport, sports clubs have been recognised as health promoting organizations. To examine health-promotion activities in Finnish sports clubs, Kokko et al. developed a set of standards for health-promoting sports clubs (HPSC). Objective: The present study extends this line of research, by (1)…

  6. Improved cost, health, and satisfaction with a health home benefit plan for self-insured employers and small physician practices.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Jerry; Kapp, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We compared the impacts on total costs, health, and satisfaction among 615 adults enrolled 2 years in an employer's health home benefit plan to their baseline year in a standard preferred provider organization plan. The new plan combined strong continuity care incentives with nurse coaching support. After 24 months, total medical costs were 23% lower than the baseline year, biometric measures improved for more than 85% of members, and patient satisfaction exceeded 85%. Emergency department visits decreased by 16% and hospital days decreased by 48%. Health home benefit plans engaging small primary care physician practices and members in coordinated continuity care can deliver high value. PMID:23448916

  7. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimer’s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  8. The Future of Home Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Landers, Steven; Madigan, Elizabeth; Leff, Bruce; Rosati, Robert J.; McCann, Barbara A.; Hornbake, Rodney; MacMillan, Richard; Jones, Kate; Bowles, Kathryn; Dowding, Dawn; Lee, Teresa; Moorhead, Tracey; Rodriguez, Sally; Breese, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The Future of Home Health project sought to support transformation of home health and home-based care to meet the needs of patients in the evolving U.S. health care system. Interviews with key thought leaders and stakeholders resulted in key themes about the future of home health care. By synthesizing this qualitative research, a literature review, case studies, and the themes from a 2014 Institute of Medicine and National Research Council workshop on “The Future of Home Health Care,” the authors articulate a vision for home-based care and recommend a bold framework for the Medicare-certified home health agency of the future. The authors also identify challenges and recommendations for achievement of this framework. PMID:27746670

  9. Transforming home health nursing with telehealth technology.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Francisca Cisneros

    2015-06-01

    Telehealth technology is an evidence-based delivery model tool that can be integrated into the plan of care for mental health patients. Telehealth technology empowers access to health care, can help decrease or prevent hospital readmissions, assist home health nurses provide shared decision making, and focuses on collaborative care. Telehealth and the recovery model have transformed the role of the home health nurse. Nurses need to be proactive and respond to rapidly emerging technologies that are transforming their role in home care.

  10. The Role of Physical and Health Educators and Coaches in the Prevention of Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; And Others

    All teachers, coaches, and guidance counselors should be concerned about eating disorders as a health and life threatening illness. While no reliable research studies or statistics exist on the incidence of eating disorders among athletes and aerobic exercisers, estimates suggest that 10-20% of the female high school population and a much higher…

  11. Teacher Consultation and Coaching within Mental Health Practice: Classroom and Child Effects in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cappella, Elise; Hamre, Bridget K.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Henry, David B.; Frazier, Stacy L.; Atkins, Marc S.; Schoenwald, Sonja K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine effects of a teacher consultation and coaching program delivered by school and community mental health professionals on change in observed classroom interactions and child functioning across one school year. Method: Thirty-six classrooms within 5 urban elementary schools (87% Latino, 11% Black) were randomly assigned to…

  12. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Health and Wellness Coaching: Defining a Key Behavioral intervention in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Leigh Ann; Sforzo, Gary A.; Dill, Diana; Kaye, Miranda; Bechard, Elizabeth M.; Southard, Mary Elaine; Kennedy, Mary; Vosloo, Justine; Yang, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Primary Objective: Review the operational definitions of health and wellness coaching as published in the peer-reviewed medical literature. Background: As global rates of preventable chronic diseases have reached epidemic proportions, there has been an increased focus on strategies to improve health behaviors and associated outcomes. One such strategy, health and wellness coaching, has been inconsistently defined and shown mixed results. Methods: A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA)—guided systematic review of the medical literature on health and wellness coaching allowed for compilation of data on specific features of the coaching interventions and background and training of coaches. Results: Eight hundred abstracts were initially identified through PubMed, with 284 full-text articles ultimately included. The majority (76%) were empirical articles. The literature operationalized health and wellness coaching as a process that is fully or partially patient-centered (86% of articles), included patient-determined goals (71%), incorporated self-discovery and active learning processes (63%) (vs more passive receipt of advice), encouraged accountability for behaviors (86%), and provided some type of education to patients along with using coaching processes (91%). Additionally, 78% of articles indicated that the coaching occurs in the context of a consistent, ongoing relationship with a human coach who is trained in specific behavior change, communication, and motivational skills. Conclusions: Despite disparities in how health and wellness coaching have been operationalized previously, this systematic review observes an emerging consensus in what is referred to as health and wellness coaching; namely, a patient-centered process that is based upon behavior change theory and is delivered by health professionals with diverse backgrounds. The actual coaching process entails goal-setting determined by the patient, encourages self

  13. Personalized health planning with integrative health coaching to reduce obesity risk among women gaining excess weight during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nancy Y; Wroth, Shelley; Parham, Catherine; Strait, Melva; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2013-07-01

    Health coaching is an emerging behavioral intervention to improve outcomes in chronic disease management and prevention; however, no studies have investigated its utility in postpartum women who have gained excess weight during pregnancy. A 32-year-old primigravida woman who was overweight at conception and gained 23 lbs more than Institute of Medicine recommendations for her pre-pregnancy body mass index participated in a 6-month personalized health planning with integrative health coaching (PHPIHC) intervention. The intervention included a baseline health risk assessment review with a healthcare provider and eight biweekly, 30-minute telephonic health coaching sessions. The participant demonstrated improvement in physical activity, energy expenditure, knowledge, and confidence to engage in healthpromoting behaviors. Although the participant did not reach the target weight by completion of the health coaching sessions, follow up 8 months later indicated she achieved the target goal (within 5% of prepregnancy weight). This case report suggests that PHP-IHC can support postpartum women in returning to pre-pregnancy weight after gaining excess gestational weight. Future research and clinical trials are needed to determine the best timing, length, and medium (online, in-person, telephonic) of PHP-IHC for postpartum women.

  14. [Health counseling in primary care doctors' offices: a new wind! The Health Coaching Program of the Swiss College of Primary Care Medicine].

    PubMed

    Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Grüninger, Ueli; Schmid, Margareta

    2014-05-14

    The Health Coaching Program facilitates health behavior counseling in all areas of primary medical care: prevention, therapy and rehabilitation, i.e. wherever the patient is the decisive agent of change. Health Coaching gives the patient the main role. The physician becomes his coach. Health Coaching offers skills training and simple algorithms with a colour-coded visual tool to assist patient and physician through the 4 steps of developing awareness, building motivation, preparing a personal health project and implementing it. Health Coaching was tested successfully by 20 family doctors during 12 months: of 1045 patients invited 91% enrolled; 37% completed all four steps; one half achieved a positive behavior change. Acceptance and feasibility were high in physicians and patients. Nationwide dissemination is now in preparation.

  15. Instant Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Paul

    This book is intended to help managers coach individuals and groups; assess current performance; develop a coaching plan; keep track of whether their coaching is having the right effect; and learn how to motivate and communicate effectively. Chapters 1-3 establish what coaching is; who can coach; and who can be coached. Chapter 4 lays coaching out…

  16. Home Health Agency Work Environments and Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Linda; Lake, Eileen T.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: An important goal of home health care is to assist patients to remain in community living arrangements. Yet home care often fails to prevent hospitalizations and to facilitate discharges to community living, thus putting patients at risk of additional health challenges and increasing care costs. Objectives: To determine the relationship between home health agency work environments and agency-level rates of acute hospitalization and discharges to community living. Methods and Design: Analysis of linked Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Home Health Compare data and nurse survey data from 118 home health agencies. Robust regression models were used to estimate the effect of work environment ratings on between-agency variation in rates of acute hospitalization and community discharge. Results: Home health agencies with good work environments had lower rates of acute hospitalizations and higher rates of patient discharges to community living arrangements compared with home health agencies with poor work environments. Conclusion: Improved work environments in home health agencies hold promise for optimizing patient outcomes and reducing use of expensive hospital and institutional care. PMID:25215647

  17. Coping Skills Training in a Telephone Health Coaching Program for Youth at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Vanessa; Jaser, Sarah S.; Lindemann, Evie; Galasso, Pamela; Beale, Alison; Holl, Marita G.; Grey, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this paper is to describe components of a health coaching intervention based on coping skills training delivered via telephone. This intervention was provided to urban adolescents at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reinforcing a school-based curriculum designed to promote a healthy lifestyle and prevent T2DM. Method Health coaching via telephone was provided to at-risk, urban youth enrolled in a study of an intervention to reduce risk for T2DM. Vignettes are used to describe the use of several coping skills in this high risk youth population. Results A variety of vignettes illustrate how telephone health coaching reinforced lifestyle changes in students by incorporating coping skills training. Discussion Given the benefits and the challenges of the telephone health coaching intervention, several suggestions for others who plan to use a similar method are described. PMID:21514490

  18. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures. PMID:26032224

  19. Preliminary Data from the Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) Program: A Care Coordination Program for Home-Based Dementia Care and Caregiver Support in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Maria F; Davagnino, Judith; Hastings, S Nicole; Sloane, Richard; Kamholz, Barbara; Twersky, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Caring for Older Adults and Caregivers at Home (COACH) is an innovative care coordination program of the Durham Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, that provides home-based dementia care and caregiver support for individuals with dementia and their family caregivers, including attention to behavioral symptoms, functional impairment, and home safety, on a consultation basis. The objectives of this study were to describe the COACH program in its first 2 years of operation, assess alignment of program components with quality measures, report characteristics of program participants, and compare rates of placement outside the home with those of a nontreatment comparison group using a retrospective cohort design. Participants were community-dwelling individuals with dementia aged 65 and older who received primary care in the medical center's outpatient clinics and their family caregivers, who were enrolled as dyads (n = 133), and a control group of dyads who were referred to the program and met clinical eligibility criteria but did not enroll (n = 29). Measures included alignment with Dementia Management Quality Measures and time to placement outside the home during 12 months of follow-up after referral to COACH. Results of the evaluation demonstrated that COACH aligns with nine of 10 clinical process measures identified using quality measures and that COACH delivers several other valuable services to enhance care. Mean time to placement outside the home was 29.6 ± 14.3 weeks for both groups (P = .99). The present study demonstrates the successful implementation of a home-based care coordination intervention for persons with dementia and their family caregivers that is strongly aligned with quality measures.

  20. Using Unlicensed Health Coaches to Improve Care for Insured Patients with Diabetes and Hypertension: Patient and Physician Perspectives on Recruitment and Uptake.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Ellis; Panattoni, Laura; Meehan, Amy; Chuang, Judith; Wilson, Caroline; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-10-01

    Health coach programs using low-cost unlicensed providers have largely targeted uninsured or underserved populations, raising questions about uptake and effectiveness for insured patients. This observational study evaluated the referral process, uptake, and effectiveness of a health coach program for patients with diabetes and/or hypertension at a multispecialty clinic. Data included appointment observations; interviews with patients, physicians, and health coaches; patient and physician characteristics; and measures of utilization and clinical outcomes. Out of 1313 eligible patients, 308 (23.5%) were referred over a 12-month period and 169 (54.9%) had at least 1 health coach appointment. Although the health coach program did not change patients' biometrics, physicians and patients reported improved care processes and reduced physician workload. Barriers to enrollment included variability in physician referral practices, patient willingness, and scheduling difficulties. Modifications to physician and health coach workflow are needed to determine the program's true effectiveness.

  1. The effects on team emotions and team effectiveness of coaching in interprofessional health and social care teams.

    PubMed

    Dimas, Isabel Dórdio; Renato Lourenço, Paulo; Rebelo, Teresa

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of coaching behaviours provided by peers and by the leader on the emotions experienced by interprofessional health and social care teams and on members' satisfaction with the team, as well as on team performance. Data were obtained from a survey among 344 employees working in 52 interprofessional health and social care teams from nine Portuguese organizations. The results show that leader coaching and peer coaching have a positive effect on the level of team members' satisfaction with the team and on positive emotions, and a negative effect on negative emotions. Furthermore, coaching provided by peers presents a positive effect on team performance as assessed by the leader of the team. Our findings put forward the importance of engaging in coaching behaviours to promote quality of the team experience, as well as the achievement of team performance objectives. Further studies should explore how coaching behaviours impact the patient, whose well-being is the ultimate objective of a team in the health and social care system, namely in terms of the patient's perception of quality care or patient outcomes.

  2. Sustained Effects of a Nurse Coaching Intervention via Telehealth to Improve Health Behavior Change in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Young, Heather; Ward, Deborah; Dharmar, Madan; Tang-Feldman, Yajarayma; Berglund, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Diabetes educators and self-management programs are scarce in rural communities, where diabetes is the third highest-ranking health concern. The goal of this study was to evaluate the benefits of nurse telehealth coaching for persons with diabetes living in rural communities through a person-centered approach using motivational interviewing (MI) techniques. Materials and Methods: A randomized experimental study design was used to assign participants to receive either nurse telehealth coaching for five sessions (intervention group) or usual care (control group). Outcomes were measured in both groups using the Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES), SF-12, and satisfaction surveys. Mean scores for each outcome were compared at baseline and at the 9-month follow-up for both groups using a Student's t test. We also evaluated the change from baseline by estimating the difference in differences (pre- and postintervention) using regression methods. Results: Among the 101 participants included in the analysis, 51 received nurse telehealth coaching, and 50 received usual care. We found significantly higher self-efficacy scores in the intervention group compared with the control group based on the DES at 9 months (4.03 versus 3.64, respectively; p<0.05) and the difference in difference estimation (0.42; p<0.05). Conclusions: The nurse MI/telehealth coaching model used in this study shows promise as an effective intervention for diabetes self-management in rural communities. The sustained effect on outcomes observed in the intervention group suggests that this model could be a feasible intervention for long-term behavioral change among persons living with chronic disease in rural communities. PMID:25061688

  3. The four pillars of health coaching: preserving the heart of a movement.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Karen

    2013-05-01

    In this special themed issue of Global Advances in Health and Medicine and in articles published on the journal's website (www.gahmj.com), you will read all about this new and maturing approach to health behavior change and the social and cultural conditions in modern medicine that have called this practice into being. You will learn about its inception and history,(1) the philosophic constructs of its application,(2) (,) (3) and its proposed mechanism of action.(4) There are multiple case reports(5) (-) (7) and clinical studies(8) (-) (10) expanding our scientific understanding of coaching in health and wellness and descriptions about how to educate professionals to provide this new service.(11) (,) (12) A review of existing literature in the field demonstrates the rapidly growing reported demonstration of its impact.(13) I believe coaching is poised to have a major transformative impact on health and healthcare internationally; it also is at risk of being usurped and thereby deformed by the power of the existing paradigm of Western disease care and reductionistic scientific thought. That is the issue I wish to raise: How do we ensure the integrity of this new approach so that it can serve as a bridge from a broken system to a new horizon of holistic health and well-being?

  4. Marketing home health care to health maintenance organizations.

    PubMed

    Shalowitz, J

    1987-01-01

    Home health care is a rapidly growing industry whose continued success depends upon expansion into new markets. One target market a successful company will need to reach is health maintenance organizations. The following article summarizes basic marketing strategies a home care company needs to follow in order to access such contracts.

  5. Building a peer mentor home health aide program: implications for home health aide retention.

    PubMed

    Kreiser, Athena Lu; Adamski, Tom; Gallagher, Bridget

    2010-09-01

    The Home Health Aide (HHA) industry is challenged with low wages, little possibility of career advancement, and high turnover rates. Jewish Home Lifecare, Home Assistance Personnel Inc. (HAPI) is a home care aide agency that has developed a Peer Mentor HHA program. Peer Mentor HHAs mentor newly hired/trained HHAs within our agency. This career path leads to higher paying work that allows for growth of our workforce for the identified growing care need and positively impacts HHA retention. PMID:20811183

  6. Health promotion profile of youth sports clubs in Finland: club officials' and coaches' perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Kokko, Sami; Kannas, Lasse; Villberg, Jari

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The purpose of this article is to examine the current health promotion orientation of youth sports clubs in Finland in view of the standards created previously for the health promoting sports club (HPSC). Ninety-seven youth sports clubs participated, and 273 sports club officials and 240 coaches answered the questionnaires. To describe clubs health promotion orientations, an HPSC index was created. The HPSC index was formulated on sub-indices by factor analysis. The sub-indices were: policy, ideology, practice and environment indexes. The results indicate that youth sports clubs are fairly health promoting in general. On average, the clubs fulfilled 12 standards for HPSC out of 22. Every fourth club was categorized as higher health promoting (≥ 15 fulfilled standards), and every third as lower health promoting (<11 fulfilled standards). The variation between clubs was wide. The clubs that had been recognized as exemplary and hence certified by the Young Finland Association were more likely to recognize health promotion than non-certified clubs (OR = 2.36, p = 0.016). The sports club officials were twice as likely to evaluate their clubs as higher health promoting than the coaches (OR = 2.04, p = 0.041). Under the sub-indices, ideologies were recognized best, others less. These findings indicate that minority of the youth sports clubs have realized health promotion comprehensively as a part of their activities. There is a lot of need for development, especially in the area of health promotion policies and practices. The instruments used proved valid and reliable and can therefore be recommended for international use. PMID:19136676

  7. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... care + Share widget - Select to show What’s home health care & what should I expect? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  8. Health Information Technology and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Darren

    2009-01-01

    Nursing homes are considered lagging behind in adopting health information technology (HIT). Many studies have highlighted the use of HIT as a means of improving health care quality. However, these studies overwhelmingly do not provide empirical information proving that HIT can actually achieve these improvements. The main research goal of this…

  9. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home health...

  10. Cost-effectiveness implications based on a comparison of nursing home and home health case mix.

    PubMed

    Kramer, A M; Shaughnessy, P W; Pettigrew, M L

    1985-10-01

    Case-mix differences between 653 home health care patients and 650 nursing home patients, and between 455 Medicare home health patients and 447 Medicare nursing home patients were assessed using random samples selected from 20 home health agencies and 46 nursing homes in 12 states in 1982 and 1983. Home health patients were younger, had shorter lengths of stay, and were less functionally disabled than nursing home patients. Traditional long-term care problems requiring personal care were more common among nursing home patients, whereas problems requiring skilled nursing services were more prevalent among home health patients. Considering Medicare patients only, nursing home patients were much more likely to be dependent in activities of daily living (ADLs) than home health patients. Medicare nursing home and home health patients were relatively similar in terms of long-term care problems, and differences in medical problems were less pronounced than between all nursing home and all home health patients. From the standpoint of cost-effectiveness, it would appear that home health care might provide a substitute for acute care hospital use at the end of a hospital stay, and appears to be a more viable option in the care of patients who are not severely disabled and do not have profound functional problems. The Medicare skilled nursing facility, however, is likely to continue to have a crucial role in posthospital care as the treatment modality of choice for individuals who require both highly skilled care and functional assistance.

  11. Effect of telephone health coaching (Birmingham OwnHealth) on hospital use and associated costs: cohort study with matched controls

    PubMed Central

    Tunkel, Sarah; Blunt, Ian; Bardsley, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To test the effect of a telephone health coaching service (Birmingham OwnHealth) on hospital use and associated costs. Design Analysis of person level administrative data. Difference-in-difference analysis was done relative to matched controls. Setting Community based intervention operating in a large English city with industry. Participants 2698 patients recruited from local general practices before 2009 with heart failure, coronary heart disease, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; and a history of inpatient or outpatient hospital use. These individuals were matched on a 1:1 basis to control patients from similar areas of England with respect to demographics, diagnoses of health conditions, previous hospital use, and a predictive risk score. Intervention Telephone health coaching involved a personalised care plan and a series of outbound calls usually scheduled monthly. Median length of time enrolled on the service was 25.5 months. Control participants received usual healthcare in their areas, which did not include telephone health coaching. Main outcome measures Number of emergency hospital admissions per head over 12 months after enrolment. Secondary metrics calculated over 12 months were: hospital bed days, elective hospital admissions, outpatient attendances, and secondary care costs. Results In relation to diagnoses of health conditions and other baseline variables, matched controls and intervention patients were similar before the date of enrolment. After this point, emergency admissions increased more quickly among intervention participants than matched controls (difference 0.05 admissions per head, 95% confidence interval 0.00 to 0.09, P=0.046). Outpatient attendances also increased more quickly in the intervention group (difference 0.37 attendances per head, 0.16 to 0.58, P<0.001), as did secondary care costs (difference £175 per head, £22 to £328, P=0.025). Checks showed that we were unlikely to have missed reductions in

  12. 42 CFR 424.22 - Requirements for home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for home health services. 424.22 Section 424.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements § 424.22 Requirements for home health services. Medicare Part A or Part B pays for home...

  13. Misalignment between Medicare Policies and Depression Care in Home Health Care: Home health provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley; Richardson, Joshua; Bruce, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Objective Depression affects one in four older adults receiving home health care. Medicare policies are influential in shaping home health practice. This study aims to identify Medicare policy areas that are aligned or misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care. Methods Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with nurses and administrators from five home health agencies in five states (n=20). Digitally recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory method. A multi-disciplinary team iteratively developed a codebook from interview data to identify themes. Results Several important Medicare policies are largely misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care: Medicare eligibility requirements for patients to remain homebound and to demonstrate a need for skilled care restrict nurses’ abilities to follow up with depressed patients for sufficient length of time; the lack of explicit recognition of nursing time and quality of care in the home health Prospective Payment System (PPS) provides misaligned incentives for depression care; incorporation of a two-item depression screening tool in Medicare-mandated comprehensive patient assessment raised clinician awareness of depression; however, inclusion of the tool at Start-of-Care only but not any other follow-up points limits its potential in assisting nurses with depression care management; under-development of clinical decision support for depression care in vendor-developed electronic health records constitutes an important barrier to depression quality improvement in home health care. Conclusions Several influential Medicare policies and regulations for home health practice may be misaligned with evidence-based depression care for home health patients. PMID:24632686

  14. Computerized documentation in home health.

    PubMed

    Noone, C; Cavanaugh, J; McKillip, C

    1995-01-01

    Computerized documentation in community health nursing is only now receiving the attention it deserves. The authors explain one agency's experience with adapting a computerized clinical documentation system to visiting nurses' needs and the nurses' responses to the process.

  15. Comparison of Coaches' Perceptions and Officials Guidance towards Health Promotion in French Sport Clubs: A Mixed Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoye, A.; Heuzé, J.-P.; Larsen, T.; Sarrazin, P.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the call to improve health promotion (HP) in sport clubs in the existing literature, little is known about sport clubs' organizational capacity. Grounded within the setting-based framework, this study compares HP activities and guidance among 10 football clubs. At least three grassroots coaches from each club (n = 68) completed the Health…

  16. The Future of Home Health project: developing the framework for health care at home.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa; Schiller, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    In addition to providing high-quality care to vulnerable patient populations, home healthcare offers the least costly option for patients and the healthcare system, particularly in postacute care. As the baby boom generation ages, policymakers are expressing concerns about rising costs, variation in home healthcare service use, and program integrity. The Alliance for Home Health Quality and Innovation seeks to develop a research-based strategic framework for the future of home healthcare for older Americans and those with disabilities. This article describes the initiative and invites readers to provide comments and suggestions. PMID:25654456

  17. Self-care essential extras: an integration of holistic nursing, functional medicine, and health coaching to promote therapeutic lifestyle change and decrease chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Scattergood, Donna M

    2010-01-01

    The Essential Vitality Program blends holistic nursing, functional medicine, and health coaching to promote lifestyle changes that modify risk factors of costly chronic disease. Karl is a client who experienced enhanced vitality, decreased chronic pain and medications use, and improved meaningful functioning, by partnering with a holistic nurse coach.

  18. Improving care transitions from hospital to home: standardized orders for home health nursing with remote telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Sheila; Wood, Felecia; Schuck, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A task force at a multihospital health care system partnered with home health agencies to improve gaps during the discharge transition process. A standardized order template for home health nursing and remote telemonitoring was developed to decrease discrepancies in communication between hospital health care providers and home health nurses caring for patients with heart failure. Pilot results showed significantly improved communication with no readmissions, using the order template. PMID:23938358

  19. The Early Childhood Coaching Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, Dathan D.; Shelden, M'Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based and highly effective, "coaching" helps early childhood practitioners support other professionals and families as they enhance existing knowledge, develop new skills, and promote healthy development of young children. This hands-on guide shows professionals how to conduct skillful coaching in any setting--home, school, or community.…

  20. Effectiveness of Telephone-Based Health Coaching for Patients with Chronic Conditions: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dwinger, Sarah; Kriston, Levente; Herbarth, Lutz; Siegmund-Schultze, Elisabeth; Bermejo, Isaac; Matschinger, Herbert; Heider, Dirk; König, Hans-Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases, like diabetes mellitus, heart disease and cancer are leading causes of death and disability. These conditions are at least partially preventable or modifiable, e.g. by enhancing patients’ self-management. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of telephone-based health coaching (TBHC) in chronically ill patients. Methods and Findings This prospective, pragmatic randomized controlled trial compares an intervention group (IG) of participants in TBHC to a control group (CG) without TBHC. Endpoints were assessed two years after enrolment. Three different groups of insurees with 1) multiple conditions (chronic campaign), 2) heart failure (heart failure campaign), or 3) chronic mental illness conditions (mental health campaign) were targeted. The telephone coaching included evidence-based information and was based on the concepts of motivational interviewing, shared decision-making, and collaborative goal setting. Patients received an average of 12.9 calls. Primary outcome was time from enrolment until hospital readmission within a two-year follow-up period. Secondary outcomes comprised the probability of hospital readmission, number of daily defined medication doses (DDD), frequency and duration of inability to work, and mortality within two years. All outcomes were collected from routine data provided by the statutory health insurance. As informed consent was obtained after randomization, propensity score matching (PSM) was used to minimize selection bias introduced by decliners. For the analysis of hospital readmission and mortality, we calculated Kaplan-Meier curves and estimated hazard ratios (HR). Probability of hospital readmission and probability of death were analysed by calculating odds ratios (OR). Quantity of health service use and inability to work were analysed by linear random effects regression models. PSM resulted in patient samples of 5,309 (IG: 2,713; CG: 2,596) in the chronic campaign, of 660 (IG: 338; CG: 322) in the

  1. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  2. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  3. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  4. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  5. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  6. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  7. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  8. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  9. 42 CFR 440.70 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 440.70 Section 440.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.70 Home health services....

  10. 42 CFR 441.15 - Home health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Home health services. 441.15 Section 441.15 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.15 Home health services. With respect to the services defined in § 440.70 of this...

  11. Financing of pediatric home health care. Committee on Child Health Financing, Section on Home Care, American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    2006-08-01

    In certain situations, home health care has been shown to be a cost-effective alternative to inpatient hospital care. National health expenditures reveal that pediatric home health costs totaled $5.3 billion in 2000. Medicaid is the major payer for pediatric home health care (77%), followed by other public sources (22%). Private health insurance and families each paid less than 1% of pediatric home health expenses. The most important factors affecting access to home health care are the inadequate supply of clinicians and ancillary personnel, shortages of home health nurses with pediatric expertise, inadequate payment, and restrictive insurance and managed care policies. Many children must stay in the NICU, PICU, and other pediatric wards and intermediate care areas at a much higher cost because of inadequate pediatric home health care services. The main financing problem pertaining to Medicaid is low payment to home health agencies at rates that are insufficient to provide beneficiaries access to home health services. Although home care services may be a covered benefit under private health plans, most do not cover private-duty nursing (83%), home health aides (45%), or home physical, occupational, or speech therapy (33%) and/or impose visit or monetary limits or caps. To advocate for improvements in financing of pediatric home health care, the American Academy of Pediatrics has developed several recommendations for public policy makers, federal and state Medicaid offices, private insurers, managed care plans, Title V officials, and home health care professionals. These recommendations will improve licensing, payment, coverage, and research related to pediatric home health services.

  12. Home health services in New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Hale, F A; Jacobs, A R

    1976-01-01

    While home health services have traditionally been an underused component of the health care system, current trends suggest the desirability of expanding these services. These trends include an increase in the number of elderly who need the benefits of home care, the recognition that long-term chronic illnesses require appropriate management at home, and concern that patients have access to care at the level most appropriate to their illnesses. In New Hampshire, 41 certified home health agencies offer services. Little systematic research has been conducted on the kinds of services they provide and the patients seen by their staffs. Patient encounter data were collected from a sample of eight agencies for a 4-week period. Staff of the agencies used the patient contact record developed by the National Functional Task Analysis Cooperative Study to collect data. The data reflected differences among the agencies in the size of the populations they serve, organizational characteristics, reasons for patients' visits, expected sources of the revenue that supported them, and the diagnosis of the patients they cared for. The agencies served areas with populations ranging from 1,000 to 40,000. The staffs ranged from 1 to 14 full-time persons. Two were public agencies; the others had voluntary sponsorship. When data on reasons for visits were averaged for the eight agencies, it was shown that 72% of the visits were made for disease control activities such as care for a chronic or acute condition or for treatment or a laboratory test. Disease prevention activities such as a checkup for adults, children, prenatal or postnatal care, or health education accounted for only 24% of the visits. This result may indicate that, in areas short of physician manpower, the community health nurse is taking on increasing responsibility for medical care as well as health and education. Reimbursement for the visits came from Medicare, 25%; Medicaid-welfare, 14%; the patients, 18%; and health

  13. Home health services in New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Hale, F A; Jacobs, A R

    1976-01-01

    While home health services have traditionally been an underused component of the health care system, current trends suggest the desirability of expanding these services. These trends include an increase in the number of elderly who need the benefits of home care, the recognition that long-term chronic illnesses require appropriate management at home, and concern that patients have access to care at the level most appropriate to their illnesses. In New Hampshire, 41 certified home health agencies offer services. Little systematic research has been conducted on the kinds of services they provide and the patients seen by their staffs. Patient encounter data were collected from a sample of eight agencies for a 4-week period. Staff of the agencies used the patient contact record developed by the National Functional Task Analysis Cooperative Study to collect data. The data reflected differences among the agencies in the size of the populations they serve, organizational characteristics, reasons for patients' visits, expected sources of the revenue that supported them, and the diagnosis of the patients they cared for. The agencies served areas with populations ranging from 1,000 to 40,000. The staffs ranged from 1 to 14 full-time persons. Two were public agencies; the others had voluntary sponsorship. When data on reasons for visits were averaged for the eight agencies, it was shown that 72% of the visits were made for disease control activities such as care for a chronic or acute condition or for treatment or a laboratory test. Disease prevention activities such as a checkup for adults, children, prenatal or postnatal care, or health education accounted for only 24% of the visits. This result may indicate that, in areas short of physician manpower, the community health nurse is taking on increasing responsibility for medical care as well as health and education. Reimbursement for the visits came from Medicare, 25%; Medicaid-welfare, 14%; the patients, 18%; and health

  14. Managerial Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bommelje, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores how coaching equips managers and supervisors to be successful in the 21st-century workplace. Coaching has benefited these professionals by providing them with viable tools to enhance the leadership and managerial tools they already possess.

  15. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  16. Can a health coaching intervention delivered during pregnancy help prevent excessive gestational weight gain?

    PubMed

    Hill, Briony; Skouteris, Helen; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; McPhie, Skye

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated: (1) the efficacy of a health coaching (HC) intervention designed to prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG); and (2) whether there were improved psychological, motivational, and behavioural outcomes for women in the HC intervention compared to a "usual care" control group. In this quasi-experimental study, 267 pregnant women ≤18 weeks gestation were recruited between August 2011 and June 2013 from two hospital antenatal clinics in Melbourne, Australia. Intervention women received four individual HC and two group HC/educational sessions informed by theories of behaviour change. Women completed questionnaires assessing psychological, motivational and behavioural outcomes at 16-18 (baseline) and 33 (post-intervention) weeks gestation. Weight measures were collected. Compared to usual care, the intervention did not limit GWG or prevent excessive GWG. However, HC women reported greater use of active coping skills post-intervention. Despite lack of success of the HC intervention, given the risks associated with excessive weight gain in pregnancy, health professionals should continue to recommend appropriate GWG.

  17. Constraining Medicare Home Health Reimbursement: What Are the Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Nelda; Korb, Jodi; Petersons, Andrew; Moore, Stanley

    2002-01-01

    The implementation of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 resulted in substantial decreases in the amount of Medicare home health use. Use among home health users decreased by two-fifths from fiscal year (FY) 1997, just before the passage of the BBA to FY 1999, the first full year after the implementation of the home health interim payment system. This article examines whether these dramatic reductions in use resulted in increased incidence of potential adverse outcomes, i.e., increases in hospitalizations, skilled nursing home facility admissions, emergency room (ER) use, or death among home health users. PMID:12690695

  18. Comparison of coaches' perceptions and officials guidance towards health promotion in French sport clubs: a mixed method study.

    PubMed

    Van Hoye, A; Heuzé, J-P; Larsen, T; Sarrazin, P

    2016-06-01

    Despite the call to improve health promotion (HP) in sport clubs in the existing literature, little is known about sport clubs' organizational capacity. Grounded within the setting-based framework, this study compares HP activities and guidance among 10 football clubs. At least three grassroots coaches from each club (n = 68) completed the Health Promoting Sports Clubs scale to assess their perceptions of HP; an official (n = 10) was interviewed about club's activities and official's guidance provided to coaches. A concurrent embedded design with quantitative results guiding the qualitative analysis was used. Despite no significant differences regarding coaches' perceptions of HP between the 10 sport clubs, except for the policy dimension, officials' interviews revealed some contradictions. Sport participation was recognized as automatically promoting HP, meaning that sport practice entails many benefits, without questioning the nature of the activities. HP was considered as a secondary aim in regard to sport performance, leading to the lack of written policies, partnerships and sporadic HP activities. Future interventions should consider: (i) the creation of required policy and long-term vision; (ii) the link between HP and sport performance; (iii) the rootedness of sport clubs within their community and (iv) guidelines towards HP from sport federations.

  19. Marketing in home health care. A practical approach.

    PubMed

    Freitag, E M

    1988-06-01

    Home health marketing brings special problems and opportunities. One cannot rely on physical factors such as the physical plant and food service of a hospital or on the durability of a consumer product to judge home health. Opportunities exist within home health to identify activities that carry marketing value. Applying marketing principles to activities such as intake, customer service and public relations allows the home health agency to build referrals by meeting the wants and needs of the market. The home health organization needs to consider different wants and needs of those involved in the home health transaction: the decision maker, the purchaser, and the user. The success of the marketing function in meeting the organization's objectives will be aided by the placement of marketing at the senior management level. PMID:3285333

  20. Private Investment Purchase and Nursing Home Financial Health

    PubMed Central

    Cadigan, Rebecca Orfaly; Stevenson, David G; Caudry, Daryl J; Grabowski, David C

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of nursing home acquisition by private investment firms on nursing home costs, revenue, and overall financial health. Data Sources Merged data from the Medicare Cost Reports and the Online Survey, Certification, and Reporting system for the period 1998–2010. Study Design Regression specification incorporating facility and time fixed effects. Principal Findings We found little impact on the financial health of nursing homes following purchase by private investment companies. However, our findings did suggest that private investment firms acquired nursing home chains in good financial health, possibly to derive profit from the company’s real estate holdings. Conclusions Private investment acquired facilities are an important feature of today’s nursing home sector. Although we did not observe a negative impact on the financial health of nursing homes, this development raises important issues about ownership oversight and transparency for the entire nursing home sector. PMID:25104476

  1. Using TQM to improve management of home health aides.

    PubMed

    Dansky, K H; Brannon, D

    1996-12-01

    Home health aides are at the front line of the home health industry, raising quality of care issues and human resource (HR) management challenges. Total quality management (TQM) provides a framework to help meet those challenges. The authors investigated the relationship between TQM and HR effectiveness in home health agencies. Results suggest that TQM practices are related to HR effectiveness. Suggestions are offered to make human resource management consistent with a TQM culture.

  2. Collaboration and synergy in the field of health and wellness coaching: naïve or necessary?

    PubMed

    Wolever, Ruth Q

    2013-07-01

    The rise of health and wellness coaching holds significant promise for facilitating sustainable behavior change to help legions of individuals prevent and manage chronic disease. We all know the threats associated with the staggering epidemic of chronic disease and associated unhealthy lifestyles. But did we get here through a failure of personal responsibility? A failure of family units to support appropriate health behaviors? A failure of educational systems to teach healthy behaviors? A failure of medicine to cultivate health behaviors in patients? A failure of municipalities from an urban planning perspective? A failure of the social sciences to apply the latest in adult learning theory, psychology, and behavioral economics to health behaviors? A failure of government to incentivize or reinforce health behaviors? A failure of industry to prioritize health over capital? A failure of society to integrate all of the above? Or is this just the perfect time to synergize all that we know from numerous disciplines to conquer the challenge of unhealthy behavior that creates chronic disease? From my perspective as a health psychologist, understanding the origins of the problems will help us draft the solution. But from my perspective as a coach, how we got here is much less important than how we get out of here. PMID:24416680

  3. Collaboration and synergy in the field of health and wellness coaching: naïve or necessary?

    PubMed

    Wolever, Ruth Q

    2013-07-01

    The rise of health and wellness coaching holds significant promise for facilitating sustainable behavior change to help legions of individuals prevent and manage chronic disease. We all know the threats associated with the staggering epidemic of chronic disease and associated unhealthy lifestyles. But did we get here through a failure of personal responsibility? A failure of family units to support appropriate health behaviors? A failure of educational systems to teach healthy behaviors? A failure of medicine to cultivate health behaviors in patients? A failure of municipalities from an urban planning perspective? A failure of the social sciences to apply the latest in adult learning theory, psychology, and behavioral economics to health behaviors? A failure of government to incentivize or reinforce health behaviors? A failure of industry to prioritize health over capital? A failure of society to integrate all of the above? Or is this just the perfect time to synergize all that we know from numerous disciplines to conquer the challenge of unhealthy behavior that creates chronic disease? From my perspective as a health psychologist, understanding the origins of the problems will help us draft the solution. But from my perspective as a coach, how we got here is much less important than how we get out of here.

  4. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  5. Home Health Care With Telemonitoring Improves Health Status for Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Elizabeth; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Struk, Cynthia J.; DiCarlo, Christina M.; Kikano, George; Piña, Ileana L.; Boxer, Rebecca S.

    2014-01-01

    Home telemonitoring can augment home health care services during a patient's transition from hospital to home. Home health care agencies commonly use telemonitors for patients with heart failure although studies have shown mixed results in the use of telemonitors to reduce rehospitalizations. This randomized trial investigated if older patients with heart failure admitted to home health care following a hospitalization would have a reduction in rehospitalizations and improved health status if they received telemonitoring. Patients were followed up to 180 days post-discharge from home health care services. Results showed no difference in the time to rehospitalizations or emergency visits between those who received a telemonitoring vs. usual care. Older heart failure patients who received telemonitoring had better health status by home health care discharge than those who received usual care. Therefore for older adults with heart failure telemonitoring may be important adjunct to home health care services to improve health status. PMID:23438509

  6. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  7. Marketing considerations in home health care.

    PubMed

    Tanner, D J

    1985-12-01

    Methods for conducting a comprehensive analysis of the potential for strategic entry or expansion in the home health-care (HHC) market are discussed. By conducting a comprehensive analysis of the HHC market, hospital pharmacists can evaluate the feasibility of developing and implementing a hospital-based HHC service. A comprehensive market analysis should include an initial assessment of potential product-line offerings, development of strengths-and-weaknesses and opportunities-and-threats profiles, evaluations of competing providers of HHC and regulatory issues, and formulation of a business plan. The potential impact of program structure, operations management, product pricing, advertising and promotion, and marketing controls should also be considered. The hospital pharmacist has a unique opportunity to further the organizational objectives of the hospital by participating in the provision of HHC; a comprehensive market analysis represents a useful method of assessing the benefits and costs associated with providing integrated HHC services.

  8. Are ADNs Prepared to Be Home Health Nurses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neighbors, Marianne; Monahan, Frances D.

    1997-01-01

    Responses from 132 of 350 home health nurses identified techniques and skills associate degree nurses (ADNs) should acquire to work for home health agencies. Accredited ADN programs reported that only 24 of the techniques are taught in all programs and 55 of the skills are taught in 90% of the programs. (SK)

  9. The impact of a value-based insurance design plus health coaching on medication adherence and medical spending.

    PubMed

    Musich, Shirley; Wang, Sara; Hawkins, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate medication adherence, medical services utilization, and combined medical and pharmacy expenditures associated with diabetes and hypertension value-based insurance design (VBID) plus health/disease coaching programs implemented by a large employer. A pre/post participant versus nonparticipant study design was used to measure medication possession ratios (MPRs), inpatient admissions, emergency room utilization, and combined medical and pharmacy expenditures for employees/spouses with diabetes (n = 1090; average 23 months follow-up) and hypertension (n = 3254; average 13 months follow-up) participating in a VBID plus health/disease coaching relative to eligible nonparticipants. Outcome measures were propensity score weighted and regression adjusted to estimate the independent impact of the programs. MPRs for diabetes and hypertension were significantly increased 3 to 4 percentage points for VBID participants, while MPRs for respective nonparticipants decreased by about 10 percentage points. Employer-paid pharmacy expenditures increased significantly for both participants with diabetes and hypertension while out-of-pocket patient co-payments decreased significantly. Medical expenditures for diabetes VBID participants decreased but not significantly. Hypertension participants experienced medical expenditure increases. Medical services utilization of inpatient admissions and emergency room visits underwent minimal change. Thus employer-sponsored diabetes and hypertension VBID plus health/disease coaching programs can be expected to lower patient co-payments and significantly increase medication adherence. Meanwhile, medical spending outcomes indicated that increased diabetes and hypertension pharmacy expenditures were partially offset by medical savings (for diabetes) but not sufficiently to be cost neutral.

  10. Is home health care a substitute for hospital care?

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    A previous study used aggregate (region-level) data to investigate whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care and concluded that "there is no evidence that services provided at home replace hospital services." However, that study was based on a cross-section of regions observed at a single point of time and did not control for unobserved regional heterogeneity. In this article, state-level employment data are used to reexamine whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care. This analysis is based on longitudinal (panel) data--observations on states in two time periods--which enable the reduction or elimination of biases that arise from use of cross-sectional data. This study finds that states that had higher home health care employment growth during the period 1998-2008 tended to have lower hospital employment growth, controlling for changes in population. Moreover, states that had higher home health care payroll growth tended to have lower hospital payroll growth. The estimates indicate that the reduction in hospital payroll associated with a $1,000 increase in home health payroll is not less than $1,542, and may be as high as $2,315. This study does not find a significant relationship between growth in utilization of home health care and growth in utilization of nursing and residential care facilities. An important reason why home health care may serve as a substitute for hospital care is that the availability of home health care may allow patients to be discharged from the hospital earlier. Hospital discharge data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project are used to test the hypothesis that use of home health care reduces the length of hospital stays. Major Diagnostic Categories with larger increases in the fraction of patients discharged to home health care tended to have larger declines in mean length of stay (LOS). Between 1998 and 2008, mean LOS declined by 4.1%, from 4.78 to 4.59 days

  11. Is home health care a substitute for hospital care?

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    A previous study used aggregate (region-level) data to investigate whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care and concluded that "there is no evidence that services provided at home replace hospital services." However, that study was based on a cross-section of regions observed at a single point of time and did not control for unobserved regional heterogeneity. In this article, state-level employment data are used to reexamine whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care. This analysis is based on longitudinal (panel) data--observations on states in two time periods--which enable the reduction or elimination of biases that arise from use of cross-sectional data. This study finds that states that had higher home health care employment growth during the period 1998-2008 tended to have lower hospital employment growth, controlling for changes in population. Moreover, states that had higher home health care payroll growth tended to have lower hospital payroll growth. The estimates indicate that the reduction in hospital payroll associated with a $1,000 increase in home health payroll is not less than $1,542, and may be as high as $2,315. This study does not find a significant relationship between growth in utilization of home health care and growth in utilization of nursing and residential care facilities. An important reason why home health care may serve as a substitute for hospital care is that the availability of home health care may allow patients to be discharged from the hospital earlier. Hospital discharge data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project are used to test the hypothesis that use of home health care reduces the length of hospital stays. Major Diagnostic Categories with larger increases in the fraction of patients discharged to home health care tended to have larger declines in mean length of stay (LOS). Between 1998 and 2008, mean LOS declined by 4.1%, from 4.78 to 4.59 days

  12. Pragmatic Replication Trial of Health Promotion Coaching for Obesity in Serious Mental Illness and Maintenance of Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Stephen J.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Barre, Laura K.; Naslund, John A.; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Xie, Haiyi; McHugo, Gregory J.; Jimenez, Daniel E.; Jue, Ken; Feldman, James; Bird, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Few studies targeting obesity in serious mental illness report clinically significant risk reduction, and none have been replicated within community settings or have demonstrated sustained outcomes after intervention withdrawal. This pragmatic clinical trial aims to replicate positive health outcomes demonstrated in a prior randomized effectiveness study of the In SHAPE program across urban community mental health organizations serving an ethnically diverse population. Methods Persons with serious mental illness and BMI>25 receiving services in three community mental health organizations were randomized to the 12-month In SHAPE program (health promotion coach and membership to a public fitness club) or to fitness club membership alone. Primary outcomes were weight and cardiorespiratory fitness (measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test) collected at baseline, 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-, and 18-months. Results Participants (N=210) were ethnically diverse (46% non-White) with mean baseline BMI=36.8±8.2. At 12-months In SHAPE (n=104) compared to a fitness club membership alone (n=106) contributed to greater reduction in weight and improved fitness. Primary outcomes were maintained at 18-months follow-up. Approximately half of In SHAPE participants (51% at 12-month program completion and 46% at 18-month follow-up) achieved clinically significant cardiovascular risk reduction (≥5% weight loss or >50 meter increase on the 6-Minute Walk Test). Conclusions Sustained weight loss and improved fitness can be achieved by community mental health organizations providing health promotion coaching and access to fitness facilities. Health promotion should be integrated into mental health services for persons with serious mental illness at risk for cardiovascular disease and early mortality. PMID:25827032

  13. Will drivers for home energy efficiency harm occupant health?

    PubMed

    Bone, Angie; Murray, Virginia; Myers, Isabella; Dengel, Andy; Crump, Derrick

    2010-09-01

    The U.K. government has committed to an 80% reduction in carbon emissions by 2050, with housing accounting for 27% of total current emissions. There are several drivers both to reduce emissions from homes and to reduce fuel poverty, promoting a range of building and behavioural measures in homes. The health benefits of warmer homes in winter have been described, but there has been less consideration of the potential negative impacts of some of these measures. We examine the changes in U.K. homes, and the possible consequences for health. The main concerns for health surround the potential for poor indoor air quality if ventilation is insufficient and the possible risks of overheating in heatwave conditions. This paper notes a limited evidence base and the need for further research on the health effects of energy-efficient homes, particularly with regard to ventilation.

  14. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  15. The Effect of Entry Regulation in the Health Care Sector: the Case of Home Health.

    PubMed

    Polsky, Daniel; David, Guy; Yang, Jianing; Kinosian, Bruce; Werner, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    The consequences of government regulation in the post-acute care sector are not well understood. We examine the effect of entry regulation on quality of care in home health care by analyzing the universe of hospital discharges during 2006 for publicly insured beneficiaries (about 4.5 million) and subsequent home health admissions to determine whether there is a significant difference in home health utilization, hospital readmission rates, and health care expenditures in states with and without Certificate of Need laws (CON) regulating entry. We identify these effects by looking across regulated and nonregulated states within Hospital Referral Regions, which characterize well-defined health care markets and frequently cross state boundaries. We find that CON states use home health less frequently, but system-wide rehospitalization rates, overall Medicare expenditures, and home health practice patterns are similar. Removing CON for home health would have negligible system-wide effects on health care costs and quality.

  16. The Effect of Entry Regulation in the Health Care Sector: the Case of Home Health

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Daniel; David, Guy; Yang, Jianing; Kinosian, Bruce; Werner, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of government regulation in the post-acute care sector are not well understood. We examine the effect of entry regulation on quality of care in home health care by analyzing the universe of hospital discharges during 2006 for publicly insured beneficiaries (about 4.5 million) and subsequent home health admissions to determine whether there is a significant difference in home health utilization, hospital readmission rates, and health care expenditures in states with and without Certificate of Need laws (CON) regulating entry. We identify these effects by looking across regulated and nonregulated states within Hospital Referral Regions, which characterize well-defined health care markets and frequently cross state boundaries. We find that CON states use home health less frequently, but system-wide rehospitalization rates, overall Medicare expenditures, and home health practice patterns are similar. Removing CON for home health would have negligible system-wide effects on health care costs and quality. PMID:24497648

  17. Health@Home - An e-Service Model for Disease Prevention and Healthcare in the Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Milon; Chotard, Laure; Ingþórsson, Ólafur; Bastos, João; Borges, Isabel

    The ageing of the population, the growth of chronic diseases, and the explosion of healthcare costs jeopardise the sustainability of healthcare systems in many European countries. This opens opportunities for innovative prevention and healthcare services supported by information and communication technologies (ICT). The natural focus for providing such services is the home. However, the e-health services provided in the home so far are limited in scope and fragmented. This paper suggests a comprehensive service model for home-based e-health services in Europe, which aims to overcome the current service fragmentation. The Health@Home model integrates disease prevention and healthcare for different groups of citizens at different stages on the health scale. The technical challenge of this model is the national and Europe-wide integration of heterogeneous systems and services in a way that makes them reliable and easy to use for all citizens, particularly those with low technical abilities and severe impairments.

  18. Leadership and quality of working life in home health care.

    PubMed

    Smith, H L; Hood, J N; Piland, N F

    1994-01-01

    Home health care has undergone startling changes in the past decade and, in the process, become a strategically important ingredient of health care delivery. However, the question remains whether home health care organizations can deliver the benefits anticipated for integrated care delivery systems. The answer to this question depends to a great extent on whether home health care organizations build vibrant, visionary leadership capable of transforming organizations and motivating staff to deliver high quality and low cost services. This paper examines a case study of transformational leadership as it relates to the quality of working life for nurses, homemakers, and staff. The findings indicate that leader behaviour is strongly associated with homemakers', and to a lesser extent staff members', job satisfaction, job involvement, and propensity to remain with the organization. These job attitudes have been shown to be related to higher job performance. The implications for leadership in home health agencies are discussed. PMID:10134028

  19. Behavioral Coaching

    PubMed Central

    Seniuk, Holly A.; Witts, Benjamin N.; Williams, W. Larry.; Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    The term behavioral coaching has been used inconsistently in and outside the field of behavior analysis. In the sports literature, the term has been used to describe various intervention strategies, and in the organizational behavior management literature it has been used to describe an approach to training management personnel and staff. This inconsistency is problematic in terms of the replication of behavioral coaching across studies and aligning with Baer, Wolf, and Risley's (1968) technological dimension of applied behavior analysis. The current paper will outline and critique the discrepancies in the use of the term and suggest how Martin and Hrycaiko's (1983) characteristics of behavioral coaching in sports may be used to bring us closer to establishing a consistent definition of the term. In addition, we will suggest how these characteristics can also be applicable to the use of the term behavioral coaching in other domains of behavior analysis. PMID:25729141

  20. Infant Mental Health Home Visitation: Setting and Maintaining Professional Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Carla; Paradis, Nichole

    2010-01-01

    Relationship-based infant mental health home visiting services for infants, toddlers, and their families intensify the connection between the personal and professional. To promote the therapeutic relationship and maximize the effectiveness of the intervention, home visitors must exercise good judgment, in the field and in the moment, to set and…

  1. What Is Best for Esther? Building Improvement Coaching Capacity With and for Users in Health and Social Care--A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Vackerberg, Nicoline; Levander, Märta Sund; Thor, Johan

    2016-01-01

    While coaching and customer involvement can enhance the improvement of health and social care, many organizations struggle to develop their improvement capability; it is unclear how best to accomplish this. We examined one attempt at training improvement coaches. The program, set in the Esther Network for integrated care in rural Jönköping County, Sweden, included eight 1-day sessions spanning 7 months in 2011. A senior citizen joined the faculty in all training sessions. Aiming to discern which elements in the program were essential for assuming the role of improvement coach, we used a case-study design with a qualitative approach. Our focus group interviews included 17 informants: 11 coaches, 3 faculty members, and 3 senior citizens. We performed manifest content analysis of the interview data. Creating will, ideas, execution, and sustainability emerged as crucial elements. These elements were promoted by customer focus--embodied by the senior citizen trainer--shared values and a solution-focused approach, by the supportive coach network and by participants' expanded systems understanding. These elements emerged as more important than specific improvement tools and are worth considering also elsewhere when seeking to develop improvement capability in health and social care organizations. PMID:26783868

  2. What Is Best for Esther? Building Improvement Coaching Capacity With and for Users in Health and Social Care—A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Levander, Märta Sund; Thor, Johan

    2016-01-01

    While coaching and customer involvement can enhance the improvement of health and social care, many organizations struggle to develop their improvement capability; it is unclear how best to accomplish this. We examined one attempt at training improvement coaches. The program, set in the Esther Network for integrated care in rural Jönköping County, Sweden, included eight 1-day sessions spanning 7 months in 2011. A senior citizen joined the faculty in all training sessions. Aiming to discern which elements in the program were essential for assuming the role of improvement coach, we used a case-study design with a qualitative approach. Our focus group interviews included 17 informants: 11 coaches, 3 faculty members, and 3 senior citizens. We performed manifest content analysis of the interview data. Creating will, ideas, execution, and sustainability emerged as crucial elements. These elements were promoted by customer focus—embodied by the senior citizen trainer—shared values and a solution-focused approach, by the supportive coach network and by participants' expanded systems understanding. These elements emerged as more important than specific improvement tools and are worth considering also elsewhere when seeking to develop improvement capability in health and social care organizations. PMID:26783868

  3. Recovery Coaches and Substance Exposed Births: An Experiment in Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph P.; Choi, Sam; Hong, Jun Sung; Hernandez, Pedro; Larrison, Christopher R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Substance exposed infants present a major challenge to child welfare and public health systems. Prenatal substance exposure and continued substance abuse in the home are associated with a wide range of adverse social, emotional, and developmental outcomes. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the use of recovery coaches in…

  4. Designing a Technology Coach

    PubMed Central

    ROGERS, WENDY A.; ESSA, IRFAN A.; FISK, ARTHUR D.

    2012-01-01

    FEATURE AT A GLANCE Technology in the home environment has the potential to support older adults in a variety of ways. We took an interdisciplinary approach (human factors/ergonomics and computer science) to develop a technology “coach” that could support older adults in learning to use a medical device. Our system provided a computer vision system to track the use of a blood glucose meter and provide users with feedback if they made an error. This research could support the development of an in-home personal assistant to coach individuals in a variety of tasks necessary for independent living. PMID:22545001

  5. Overview of Home Health Aides: United States, 2007

    MedlinePlus

    ... 56.1%) valued their work very much. Aides’ perceptions of the three groups’ value of their work ... Aide Survey, 2007. Figure 3. Home health aides’ perception of how others value their work: United States, ...

  6. Predictors of Home-Based Child Care Providers' Participation in Professional Development Workshops and Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura B.; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith; Arthun, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Background: Little is known about factors that influence home-based child care providers' participation in professional development. Factors that predict participation in activities that are designed to promote the utilization and maintenance of skills taught are of particular interest. Objective: Our aim was to examine factors in the…

  7. 42 CFR 484.245 - Accelerated payments for home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accelerated payments for home health agencies. 484... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies § 484.245 Accelerated payments for home health agencies. (a) General...

  8. 42 CFR 484.245 - Accelerated payments for home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accelerated payments for home health agencies. 484... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Home Health Agencies § 484.245 Accelerated payments for home health agencies. (a) General...

  9. Evaluation of Home Health Care Devices: Remote Usability Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing amount of health care is now performed in a home setting, away from the hospital. While there is growing anecdotal evidence about the difficulty patients and caregivers have using increasingly complex health care devices in the home, there has been little systematic scientific study to quantify the global nature of home health care device usability in the field. Research has tended to focus on a handful of devices, making it difficult to gain a broad view of the usability of home-care devices in general. Objective The objective of this paper is to describe a remote usability assessment method using the System Usability Scale (SUS), and to report on the usability of a broad range of health care devices using this metric. Methods A total of 271 participants selected and rated up to 10 home health care devices of their choice using the SUS, which scores usability from 0 (unusable) to 100 (highly usable). Participants rated a total of 455 devices in their own home without an experimenter present. Results Usability scores ranged from 98 (oxygen masks) to 59 (home hormone test kits). An analysis conducted on devices that had at least 10 ratings showed that the effect of device on SUS scores was significant (P<.001), and that the usability of these devices was on the low end when compared with other commonly used items in the home, such as microwave ovens and telephones. Conclusions A large database of usability scores for home health care devices collected using this remote methodology would be beneficial for physicians, patients, and their caregivers. PMID:27025664

  10. Health Coaching by Medical Assistants to Improve Control of Diabetes, Hypertension, and Hyperlipidemia in Low-Income Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Willard-Grace, Rachel; Chen, Ellen H.; Hessler, Danielle; DeVore, Denise; Prado, Camille; Bodenheimer, Thomas; Thom, David H.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Health coaching by medical assistants could be a financially viable model for providing self-management support in primary care if its effectiveness were demonstrated. We investigated whether in-clinic health coaching by medical assistants improves control of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors when compared with usual care. METHODS We conducted a 12-month randomized controlled trial of 441 patients at 2 safety net primary care clinics in San Francisco, California. The primary outcome was a composite measure of being at or below goal at 12 months for at least 1 of 3 uncontrolled conditions at baseline as defined by hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Secondary outcomes were meeting all 3 goals and meeting individual goals. Data were analyzed using χ2 tests and linear regression models. RESULTS Participants in the coaching arm were more likely to achieve both the primary composite measure of 1 of the clinical goals (46.4% vs 34.3%, P = .02) and the secondary composite measure of reaching all clinical goals (34.0% vs 24.7%, P = .05). Almost twice as many coached patients achieved the hemoglobin A1c goal (48.6% vs 27.6%, P = .01). At the larger study site, coached patients were more likely to achieve the LDL cholesterol goal (41.8% vs 25.4%, P = .04). The proportion of patients meeting the systolic blood pressure goal did not differ significantly. CONCLUSIONS Medical assistants serving as in-clinic health coaches improved control of hemoglobin A1c and LDL levels, but not blood pressure, compared with usual care. Our results highlight the need to understand the relationship between patients’ clinical conditions, interventions, and the contextual features of implementation. PMID:25755034

  11. Issues and opportunities in the regulation of home health care.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D; Hyman, H H; Gary, L R

    1980-10-01

    Recent federal legislation established a Certificate of Need (CON) process by which health care providers must receive state approval before building or renovating a facility, or adding a new service. Certainly, strict regulation of cost and quality of home health care is needed, but it is asserted that CON is an ineffective way of organizing the delivery of services and limiting costs, and furthermore, that CON is biased in favor of institutionally-based providers and maintenance of the status quo. The authors feel that vested interests have a history of trying to use earlier state CON regulations to control their turf, limit competition, and consequently stifle innovation. Home health care should be incorporated into national health planning goals and integrated into state and regional health plans. Such planning must precede CON regulations and should not be confused with it. Alternatives to CON can achieve quality service and moderate costs and include licensing of personnel, standards for provider accreditation, and utilization review. Planning for these alternatives should begin now to avoid fragmented expansion of home health care. Evidence suggests a comprehensive use of home health care as a cost-effective alternative for many levels of care given in hospitals and nursing homes.

  12. Guidelines for Dietitians and Public Health Nutritionists in Home Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Health Service (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Prepared by the Public Health Service to clarify the role of health professionals and subprofessionals in the home care field, this guide is directed to dietitians and public health nutritionists who are involved in planning, directing, carrying out, and evaluating the nutrition aspects of medical care programs for patients at home. Program…

  13. Telemonitoring and Mobile Phone-Based Health Coaching Among Finnish Diabetic and Heart Disease Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Karhula, Tuula; Rääpysjärvi, Katja; Pakanen, Mira; Itkonen, Pentti; Tepponen, Merja; Junno, Ulla-Maija; Jokinen, Tapio; van Gils, Mark; Lähteenmäki, Jaakko; Kohtamäki, Kari; Saranummi, Niilo

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a strong will and need to find alternative models of health care delivery driven by the ever-increasing burden of chronic diseases. Objective The purpose of this 1-year trial was to study whether a structured mobile phone-based health coaching program, which was supported by a remote monitoring system, could be used to improve the health-related quality of life (HRQL) and/or the clinical measures of type 2 diabetes and heart disease patients. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted among type 2 diabetes patients and heart disease patients of the South Karelia Social and Health Care District. Patients were recruited by sending invitations to randomly selected patients using the electronic health records system. Health coaches called patients every 4 to 6 weeks and patients were encouraged to self-monitor their weight, blood pressure, blood glucose (diabetics), and steps (heart disease patients) once per week. The primary outcome was HRQL measured by the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among diabetic patients. The clinical measures assessed were blood pressure, weight, waist circumference, and lipid levels. Results A total of 267 heart patients and 250 diabetes patients started in the trial, of which 246 and 225 patients concluded the end-point assessments, respectively. Withdrawal from the study was associated with the patients’ unfamiliarity with mobile phones—of the 41 dropouts, 85% (11/13) of the heart disease patients and 88% (14/16) of the diabetes patients were familiar with mobile phones, whereas the corresponding percentages were 97.1% (231/238) and 98.6% (208/211), respectively, among the rest of the patients (P=.02 and P=.004). Withdrawal was also associated with heart disease patients’ comorbidities—40% (8/20) of the dropouts had at least one comorbidity, whereas the corresponding percentage was 18.9% (47/249) among the rest of the patients (P=.02). The intervention showed

  14. Medicare Interim Payment System's Impact on Medicare Home Health Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Korbin; Long, Sharon K.; Dowling, Krista

    2003-01-01

    The Medicare home health interim payment system (IPS) implemented in fiscal year 1998 provided very strong incentives for home health agencies (HHAs) to reduce the number of visits provided to each Medicare user and to avoid those beneficiaries whose Medicare plan of care was likely to exceed the average beneficiary cost limit. We analyzed multiple years of data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) to examine how the IPS affected subgroups of the Medicare population by health and socioeconomic characteristics. We found that the IPS strongly reduced overall utilization, but that few subgroups were disproportionately affected. PMID:14997695

  15. A closer look at opportunities in home health markets.

    PubMed

    Altman, K E

    1987-01-01

    The home health market is one of the health industry's fastest growing segments. Cost containment initiatives, competition, and governmental controls have been the dominant forces shaping this rapidly changing market, and observers predict that this will be the case for years to come. Its popularity as a growth industry has produced a rush of new entrants, many experiencing vastly different outcomes. Several otherwise formidable newcomers have already succumbed and others are in jeopardy of stumbling. Long established home health agencies must adapt their mission and strategies or suffer the same fate as the newcomers. However, with proper market research and careful planning, there are excellent opportunities for growth and profit in the home health market.

  16. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  17. Job satisfaction of rural public and home health nurses.

    PubMed

    Juhl, N; Dunkin, J W; Stratton, T; Geller, J; Ludtke, R

    1993-03-01

    Based on Vroom's expectancy theory, this study was conducted to identify differences in job satisfaction between nurses working in public health settings, and staff nurses and administrators working in both settings. Questionnaires containing an adaptation of a job satisfaction scale were mailed to all 258 registered nurses practicing in public health and home health settings (response rate 57%) in a rural midwestern state. Respondents were asked to rate their satisfaction with various dimensions of their jobs, as well as how important each aspect was to them. Although both groups of nurses reported low satisfaction with salary, public health nurses were significantly less satisfied with their salaries than were home health nurses (F = 32.96, P < or = 0.001); home health nurses, however, were significantly less satisfied with benefits/rewards (F = 11.85, P < or = 0.001), task requirements (F = 8.37, P < or = 0.05), and professional status (F = 5.30, P < or = 0.05). Although administrators did not differ significantly from staff nurses on job satisfaction, they did perceive organizational climate (F = 4.50, P < or = 0.05) to be an important feature of satisfaction. These differences may be partially explained by divergent salaries, roles, and responsibilities between public health and home health nurses. PMID:8516258

  18. Correlates of Home Health Care Services Use among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Richard A.; And Others

    The use of health and social services is influenced by economic, community, geographic, organizational, societal, and environmental factors. A study was conducted to examine predisposing, enabling, and need-for-care factors related to the use of home health care services by a stratified random sample of 400 older adults. Predisposing factors…

  19. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing of... health aide”. (a) Standard: Home health aide training—(1) Content and duration of training. The aide... health aide services offered by an HHA must be provided by a qualified home health aide. (d)...

  20. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing of... health aide”. (a) Standard: Home health aide training—(1) Content and duration of training. The aide... health aide services offered by an HHA must be provided by a qualified home health aide. (d)...

  1. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing of... health aide”. (a) Standard: Home health aide training—(1) Content and duration of training. The aide... health aide services offered by an HHA must be provided by a qualified home health aide. (d)...

  2. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing of... health aide”. (a) Standard: Home health aide training—(1) Content and duration of training. The aide... health aide services offered by an HHA must be provided by a qualified home health aide. (d)...

  3. 42 CFR 484.36 - Condition of participation: Home health aide services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION HOME HEALTH SERVICES Furnishing of... health aide”. (a) Standard: Home health aide training—(1) Content and duration of training. The aide... health aide services offered by an HHA must be provided by a qualified home health aide. (d)...

  4. Softball Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopiano, Donna; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A collection of articles provides current instructional information to softball players and coaches. Topics discussed in the series include practice, basic skills, defense, pitching, catching, offense, and warm-up exercises to be used in conjunction with other conditioning drills. (JN)

  5. The effectiveness of medical assistant health coaching for low-income patients with uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia: protocol for a randomized controlled trial and baseline characteristics of the study population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic disease do not reach goals for management of their conditions. Self-management support provided by medical assistant health coaches within the clinical setting may help to improve clinical outcomes, but most studies to date lack statistical power or methodological rigor. Barriers to large scale implementation of the medical assistant coach model include lack of clinician buy-in and the absence of a business model that will make medical assistant health coaching sustainable. This study will add to the evidence base by determining the effectiveness of health coaching by medical assistants on clinical outcomes and patient self-management, by assessing the impact of health coaching on the clinician experience, and by examining the costs and potential savings of health coaching. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effectiveness of clinic-based medical assistant health coaches to improve clinical outcomes and self-management skills among low-income patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia. A total of 441 patients from two San Francisco primary care clinics have been enrolled and randomized to receive a health coach (n = 224) or usual care (n = 217). Patients participating in the health coaching group will receive coaching for 12 months from medical assistants trained as health coaches. The primary outcome is a change in hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, or LDL cholesterol among patients with uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia, respectively. Self-management behaviors, perceptions of the health care team and clinician, BMI, and chronic disease self-efficacy will be measured at baseline and after 12 months. Clinician experience is being assessed through surveys and qualitative interviews. Cost and utilization data will be analyzed through cost-predictive models. Discussion Medical assistants are an untapped resource to provide self

  6. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  7. Mental health service use by the elderly in nursing homes.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, B J; Wagner, H R; Taube, J E; Magaziner, J; Permutt, T; Landerman, L R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Because current Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act regulations influence the disposition of US nursing home residents who have mental illness, National Nursing Home Survey (1985) data are analyzed for predictors of mental health service use. METHODS. Elderly residents' rates of mental health service use are presented. Logistic regression yielded odds ratios for treatment by both mental health specialists and general practitioners for client and service system variables. RESULTS. Among the two thirds of elderly residents with a mental disorder (including dementia), only 4.5% receive any mental health treatment in a 1-month period. The ratio of specialist to general practitioner care is approximately 1:1. Patients seen by a specialist are likely to be younger (aged 65 to 74); live in the Northeast; and have a diagnosis of schizophrenia (13:1), dementia (3:1), or other mental disorders (5:1). Prior residence in a psychiatric hospital predicts care by both health professional types. Rural location, nonproprietary ownership of the nursing home, and aggressive behavior point to general physician care. CONCLUSIONS. Our findings indicate significant neglect of the mental health needs of older nursing home residents and underscore the importance of monitoring the regulations for screening and treatment of mental disorders under the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. PMID:8438968

  8. Does "Word Coach" Coach Words?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Tom; Horst, Marlise

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the design and testing of an integrated suite of vocabulary training games for Nintendo[TM] collectively designated "My Word Coach" (Ubisoft, 2008). The games' design is based on a wide range of learning research, from classic studies on recycling patterns to frequency studies of modern corpora. Its general usage and learning…

  9. Adding home health care to the discussion on health information technology policy.

    PubMed

    Ruggiano, Nicole; Brown, Ellen L; Hristidis, Vagelis; Page, Timothy F

    2013-01-01

    The potential for health information technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health care has resulted in several U.S. policy initiatives aimed at integrating health information technology into health care systems. However, home health care agencies have been excluded from incentive programs established through policies, raising concerns on the extent to which health information technology may be used to improve the quality of care for older adults with chronic illness and disabilities. This analysis examines the potential issues stemming from this exclusion and explores potential opportunities of integrating home health care into larger initiatives aimed at establishing health information technology systems for meaningful use.

  10. The manager as coach.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R

    1990-01-01

    The concept of "coach" is relatively new to nursing literature this term is not uncommon in management. The coaching concept has applications for nursing management. The role of coach, coaching in one-to-one vs. group situations, and the benefits of coaching for nursing management have been considered.

  11. Sex Discrimination in Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessem, Lawrence

    1980-01-01

    Even in situations in which the underpayment of girls' coaches is due to the sex of the students coached rather than to the sex of the coaches, the coaches and the girls coached are victims of unlawful discrimination. Available from Harvard Women's Law Journal, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA 02138. (Author/IRT)

  12. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  13. Is particle board in the home detrimental to health

    SciTech Connect

    Daugbjerg, P. )

    1989-04-01

    A questionnaire concerning health and living conditions was sent to the parents of 1387 children aged 0-15 years to answer the question if children living in homes built with large amounts of particle board had more headaches and respiratory and skin symptoms than other children. There were 1376 possible respondents, and of those 1036 (75.3)% returned the questionnaire. Of the questionnaires returned, 972 (70.6%) were analyzable. The children lived in homes with much particle board (group A); little particle board, or homes as group A but treated in a special way (group B); and homes with no particle board (group C). For the 0- to 5-year-old children, living in homes with much particle board was a risk factor for developing wheezy bronchitis, eye and nose irritation, and coughing. For the 6- to 15-year-old children, living in a home with much particle board was not a risk factor. Risk factors for headache, irritation of the throat, and need for daily antiasthmatic medication were analyzed for all the children collectively. Living in a home with much particle board was a risk factor for all three conditions.

  14. Home-Sweet-Home Health Care [and] Drugs Manufacturing: A Prescription for Jobs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Laura; Heffler, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Lower costs, new technology, and expanded Medicare benefits are some of the reasons for the rapid increase in employment in home health services. Employment in the drugs manufacturing industry has increased despite recessions and structural changes in the economy. (Author/JOW)

  15. Management of type 2 diabetes in China: the Happy Life Club, a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial using health coaches

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Colette; Chapman, Anna; Yang, Hui; Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Tuohong; Enticott, Joanne C; Thomas, Shane A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of a coach-led motivational interviewing (MI) intervention in improving glycaemic control, as well as clinical, psychosocial and self-care outcomes of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) compared with usual care. Design Pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT). Setting Community Health Stations (CHSs) in Fengtai district, Beijing, China. Participants Of the 41 randomised CHSs (21 intervention and 20 control), 21 intervention CHSs (372 participants) and 18 control CHSs (296 participants) started participation. Intervention Intervention participants received telephone and face-to-face MI health coaching in addition to usual care from their CHS. Control participants received usual care only. Medical fees were waived for both groups. Outcome measures Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure was glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Secondary outcomes included a suite of anthropometric, blood pressure (BP), fasting blood, psychosocial and self-care measures. Results At 12 months, no differential treatment effect was found for HbA1c (adjusted difference 0.02, 95% CI −0.40 to 0.44, p=0.929), with both treatment and control groups showing significant improvements. However, two secondary outcomes: psychological distress (adjusted difference −2.38, 95% CI −4.64 to −0.12, p=0.039) and systolic BP (adjusted difference −3.57, 95% CI −6.08 to −1.05, p=0.005) were robust outcomes consistent with significant differential treatment effects, as supported in sensitivity analyses. Interestingly, in addition to HbA1c, both groups displayed significant improvements in triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol. Conclusions In line with the current Chinese primary healthcare reform, this study is the first large-scale cluster RCT to be implemented within real-world CHSs in China, specifically addressing T2DM. Although a differential treatment effect was not observed for Hb

  16. Athletic coaches as violence prevention advocates.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Maria Catrina D; McCauley, Heather L; Tancredi, Daniel J; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Decker, Michele R; Silverman, Jay G; O'Connor, Brian; Stetkevich, Nicholas; Miller, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) is a significant public health problem. Coaching Boys Into Men (CBIM) is an evidence-based ARA prevention program that trains coaches to deliver violence prevention messages to male athletes. Assessing acceptability and impact of CBIM on coaches may inform prevention efforts that involve these important adults in health promotion among youth. As part of a two-armed cluster-randomized controlled trial of CBIM in 16 high schools in Northern California, coaches completed baseline and postseason surveys (n = 176) to assess their attitudes and confidence delivering the program. Coaches in the intervention arm also participated in interviews (n = 36) that explored program acceptability, feasibility, and impact. Relative to controls, intervention coaches showed increases in confidence intervening when witnessing abusive behaviors among their athletes, greater bystander intervention, and greater frequency of violence-related discussions with athletes and other coaches. Coaches reported the program was easy to implement and valuable for their athletes. Findings illustrate the value of exploring attitudinal and behavioral changes among ARA prevention implementers, and suggest that coaches can gain confidence and enact behaviors to discourage ARA among male athletes. Coaches found the program to be feasible and valuable, which suggests potential for long-term uptake and sustainability.

  17. Medicare and Medicaid Programs; CY 2016 Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update; Home Health Value-Based Purchasing Model; and Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    This final rule will update Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective for episodes ending on or after January 1, 2016. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule implements the 3rd year of the 4-year phase-in of the rebasing adjustments to the HH PPS payment rates. This rule updates the HH PPS case-mix weights using the most current, complete data available at the time of rulemaking and provides a clarification regarding the use of the "initial encounter'' seventh character applicable to certain ICD-10-CM code categories. This final rule will also finalize reductions to the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rate in CY 2016, CY 2017, and CY 2018 of 0.97 percent in each year to account for estimated case-mix growth unrelated to increases in patient acuity (nominal case-mix growth) between CY 2012 and CY 2014. In addition, this rule implements a HH value-based purchasing (HHVBP) model, beginning January 1, 2016, in which all Medicare-certified HHAs in selected states will be required to participate. Finally, this rule finalizes minor changes to the home health quality reporting program and minor technical regulations text changes.

  18. The Impact of Home Health Length of Stay and Number of Skilled Nursing Visits on Hospitalization among Medicare-Reimbursed Skilled Home Health Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Melissa; Hanlon, Alexandra; Naylor, Mary D.; Bowles, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of the Home Health Prospective Payment System in 2000 led to a dramatic reduction in home health length of stay and number of skilled nursing visits among Medicare beneficiaries. While policy leaders have focused on the rising costs of home health care, its potential underutilization and the relationship between service use and patient outcomes including hospitalization rates have not been rigorously examined. A secondary analysis of five Medicare-owned assessment and claims data sets for the year 2009 was conducted among two independently randomly selected samples of Medicare-reimbursed home health recipients (each n=31,485) to examine the relationship between home health length of stay or number of skilled nursing visits and hospitalization rates within 90 days of discharge from home health. Patients who had a home health length of stay of at least 22 days or received at least 4 skilled nursing visits had significantly lower odds of hospitalization than patients with shorter home health stays and fewer skilled nursing visits. Additional study is needed to clarify the best way to structure home health services and determine readiness for discharge to reduce hospitalization among this chronically ill population. In the mean time, the findings of this study suggest that home health providers should consider the benefits of at least four SNV and/or a home health LOS of 22 days or longer. PMID:25990046

  19. Health@Home Moves All About the House!

    PubMed

    Casper, Gail R; Brennan, Patricia F; Arnott Smith, Catherine; Werner, Nicole E; He, Yuqi

    2016-01-01

    It is now well recognized that patients play an important and active role in self-care and disease management, and many of these activities happen in their homes. Information technologies to support such care might be better used if they were designed taking into account the physical context of the home and the health information management needs of the residents. We conducted home-based interviews of 20 adults including an extensive analysis of their personal health information management (PHIM) tasks. Here we present these task descriptions, locations of their performance, and distribution across space and time. Implications for the informatics community include accommodating the distributed nature of tasks in the design of consumer technologies. PMID:27332185

  20. Improving oral medication management in home health agencies.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Janelle

    2009-03-01

    This study focused on home health agency characteristics and evidence-based practices that could have an impact on the ability to improve the home health outcome-based quality improvement measure: improvement in the management of oral medications. The findings of this Quality Improvement Organization-approved study suggest that there are organizational characteristics and evidence-based practices associated with better rates for this outcome measure. Organizational characteristics include belonging to a healthcare system that is hospital based, not-for-profit part of a network focused on quality, and intentionally working on the oral medications outcome. Evidence-based practices include use of reminder strategies, phone follow-up interventions, repeat patient education about medications at subsequent home care visits, and use of medication simplification strategies for patients receiving multiple medications.

  1. Competition and quality in home health care markets.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoungrae; Polsky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Market-based solutions are often proposed to improve health care quality; yet evidence on the role of competition in quality in non-hospital settings is sparse. We examine the relationship between competition and quality in home health care. This market is different from other markets in that service delivery takes place in patients' homes, which implies low costs of market entry and exit for agencies. We use 6 years of panel data for Medicare beneficiaries during the early 2000s. We identify the competition effect from within-market variation in competition over time. We analyze three quality measures: functional improvements, the number of home health visits, and discharges without hospitalization. We find that the relationship between competition and home health quality is nonlinear and its pattern differs by quality measure. Competition has positive effects on functional improvements and the number of visits in most ranges, but in the most competitive markets, functional outcomes and the number of visits slightly drop. Competition has a negative effect on discharges without hospitalization that is strongest in the most competitive markets. This finding is different from prior research on hospital markets and suggests that market-specific environments should be considered in developing polices to promote competition.

  2. Home Economics/Health Grades 6-12. Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Moines Public Schools, IA. Teaching and Learning Div.

    Home economics programs are offered to students in grades 6-12 in the Des Moines INdependent Community School District (Iowa). Programs at the middle school level are exploratory, leading to occupational training in family and consumer science, child care, food service, and textile and fashion arts at the high school level. Health education…

  3. Meaning creation and employee engagement in home health caregivers.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Mette Strange; Jørgensen, Frances

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to an understanding on how home health caregivers experience engagement in their work, and specifically, how aspects of home healthcare work create meaning associated with employee engagement. Although much research on engagement has been conducted, little has addressed how individual differences such as worker orientation influence engagement, or how engagement is experienced within a caregiving context. The study is based on a qualitative study in two home homecare organisations in Denmark using a think-aloud data technique, interviews and observations. The analysis suggests caregivers experience meaning in three relatively distinct ways, depending on their work orientation. Specifically, the nature of engagement varies across caregivers oriented towards being 'nurturers', 'professionals', or 'workers', and the sources of engagement differ for each of these types of caregivers. The article contributes by (i) advancing our theoretical understanding of employee engagement by emphasising meaning creation and (ii) identifying factors that influence meaning creation and engagement of home health caregivers, which should consequently affect the quality of services provided home healthcare patients.

  4. Can Low-Cost Support Programmes with Coaching Accelerate Doctoral Completion in Health Science Faculty Academics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, Hilary; Bentley, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Career development for full-time Health Sciences academics through to doctoral studies is a monumental task. Many academics have difficulty completing their studies in the minimum time as well as publishing after obtaining their degree. As this problem is particularly acute in the Health Sciences, the PhD Acceleration Programme in Health Sciences…

  5. Health and Safety Guide for Home Performance Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, Chris; Walker, Iain S.

    2012-02-15

    This report is intended to provide home performance contractor trainers with a resource to keep both their workers and home residents safe and healthy. This document is an attempt to describe what we currently believe is safe, what we believe is unsafe, and what we’re unsure about. It is intended to identify health and safety issues and provide historical context and current understanding of both risks and mitigation strategies. In addition, it provides links to more in-depth resources for each issue. When we tighten the thermal envelope of a house to improve comfort and reduce energy use, we have to be sure that we are not compromising the indoor air quality of the home. This means identifying and mitigating or eliminating pollution sources before and after you make changes to the home. These sources can include materials and finishes in the home, exhaust gasses from combustion appliances, soil gasses such as radon, and moisture from a bathroom, kitchen, or unvented clothes dryer. Our first responsibility is to do no harm — this applies both to our clients and to our employees. Currently, there are many new products that are widely used but whose health effects are not well understood. Our in ability to have perfect information means the directive to do no harm can be difficult to obey. Each home is a little bit different, and in the face of a situation you’ve never encountered, it’s important to have a solid grasp of the fundamental concepts of building science when the hard and fast rules don’t apply . The home performance industry is gaining momentum, and has the potential to expand greatly as energy costs continue to rise. It is imperative that we remain vigilant about protecting the health and safety of our workers and our customers. It only takes a few news stories about a family that got sick after their home was tightened by a home performance contractor to scare off potential customers and taint the reputation of the entire industry. Good

  6. Coaching Behavior of Girls Youth Softball Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupnow, Allan; Stotlar, David

    A study examined coaches' behavior and classified the types and rates of coaches' behavior by time of athletic season (early or late), win/loss record, and throughout the time frame within a single contest. Subjects included all the volunteer coaches in a 13 team, softball program for 10-12 year old girls. The season consisted of a double…

  7. Leadership Coaching: Coaching Competencies and Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Donald; Hammack, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Leadership coaching is now seen as a valuable tool to assist school leaders. Through a survey of school principals, this study identified specific coaching competencies used by leadership coaches that were perceived by principals to influence key best practices for schools. These best practices have in turn been correlated to increased student…

  8. The nurse manager: change agent, change coach?

    PubMed

    Stefancyk, Amanda; Hancock, Beverly; Meadows, Mary T

    2013-01-01

    Change in today's health care landscape is a daily, if not hourly, reality. The nurse manager must have strong leadership skills to navigate through change with a focus on the patient and the provision of safe and reliable care. The historical term for those leading change is "change agent." In this article, the authors introduce the idea of a change coach, building on the nurse manager foundational skill of coaching and weaving this concept into the manager's role in change. A change coach uses the coaching behaviors including guidance, facilitation, and inspiration to inspire others toward change, altering human capabilities, and supporting and influencing others toward change. An exemplar of the nurse manager's role as a change coach in practice is provided using American Organization of Nurse Executives' Care Innovation and Transformation initiative. It is the agile manager that is able to successfully move between the roles of change agent and change coach to continuously transform the environment and how care is delivered.

  9. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Larsen, Torben; Strömberg, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis, and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following components: integrated multidisciplinary care, patient and partner participation, care plans with clear goals of care, patient education, self-care management, appropriate access to care and optimised treatment. Discussion We summarised the state of the art of home-based care for heart failure patients in Europe, described the typical content of such care to provide a guide for health care providers. PMID:24250283

  10. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  11. Considering Student Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keen, James P.

    2014-01-01

    What does student coaching involve and what considerations make sense in deciding to engage an outside contractor to provide personal coaching? The author explores coaching in light of his own professional experience and uses this reflection as a platform from which to consider the pros and cons of student coaching when deciding whether to choose…

  12. Coaching for ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Kevin; Ratey, Nancy; Maynard, Sandy; Sussman, Susan; Wright, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite limited scientific study on ADHD coaching as an intervention for adults with ADHD, the field of ADHD coaching has grown significantly and gained popularity in recent years. ADHD coaching is becoming a bona fide profession where one must advance through a rigorous training process, in order to be certified as a professional ADHD coach.…

  13. Uptake and Effects of the e-Vita Personal Health Record with Self-Management Support and Coaching, for Type 2 Diabetes Patients Treated in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, M; de Wit, M; Sieverink, F; Roelofsen, Y; Hendriks, S H; Bilo, H J G; Snoek, F J

    2016-01-01

    We studied the use, uptake, and effects of e-Vita, a personal health record, with self-management support and personalized asynchronized coaching, for type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care. Patients were invited by their practice nurse to join the study aimed at testing use and effects of a personal health record. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Uptake and usage were monitored using log data. Outcomes were self-reported diabetes self-care, diabetes-related distress, and emotional wellbeing. Patients' health status was collected from their medical chart. 132 patients agreed to participate in the study of which less than half (46.1%) did not return to the personal health record after 1st login. Only 5 patients used the self-management support program within the personal health record, 3 of whom asked a coach for feedback. Low use of the personal health record was registered. No statistical significant differences on any of the outcome measures were found between baseline and 6 month follow-up. This study showed minimal impact of implementing a personal health record including self-management support in primary diabetes care. Successful adoption of web-based platforms, as ongoing patient centered care, is hard to achieve without additional strategies aimed at enhancing patient motivation and engaging professionals.

  14. Uptake and Effects of the e-Vita Personal Health Record with Self-Management Support and Coaching, for Type 2 Diabetes Patients Treated in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, M.; de Wit, M.; Sieverink, F.; Roelofsen, Y.; Hendriks, S. H.; Bilo, H. J. G.; Snoek, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the use, uptake, and effects of e-Vita, a personal health record, with self-management support and personalized asynchronized coaching, for type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care. Patients were invited by their practice nurse to join the study aimed at testing use and effects of a personal health record. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Uptake and usage were monitored using log data. Outcomes were self-reported diabetes self-care, diabetes-related distress, and emotional wellbeing. Patients' health status was collected from their medical chart. 132 patients agreed to participate in the study of which less than half (46.1%) did not return to the personal health record after 1st login. Only 5 patients used the self-management support program within the personal health record, 3 of whom asked a coach for feedback. Low use of the personal health record was registered. No statistical significant differences on any of the outcome measures were found between baseline and 6 month follow-up. This study showed minimal impact of implementing a personal health record including self-management support in primary diabetes care. Successful adoption of web-based platforms, as ongoing patient centered care, is hard to achieve without additional strategies aimed at enhancing patient motivation and engaging professionals. PMID:26955640

  15. Orientation to Health Aide Careers Mini-Course & Home Health Aide Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Kathy; And Others

    Designed for use in a self-paced, open-entry/open-exit vocational training program for home health aides, this program guide is one of six for teachers of adult women offenders from a correctional institution. Module topic outlines are presented on eight topics: your career as a health aide; maintaining health; recognizing illness; positioning and…

  16. Training in testing: a pragmatic approach to recruitment and retention of homemaker-home health aides.

    PubMed

    Young, A

    1990-04-01

    In response to concerns regarding the negative effect that competency-evaluation testing might have on the attrition and recruitment of homemaker-home health aides, the home health industry of New Jersey offers an inservice education module--training supervisors to prepare homemaker-home health aides for testing.

  17. Correlates of Suicide among Home Health Care Utilizers Who Died by Suicide and Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jennifer L.; Bruce, Martha L.; Conwell, Yeates

    2006-01-01

    Home health care patients often have several late-life risk factors for suicide and constitute a high risk group for suicidal behaviors. In this study, we examined the characteristics of 14 older adult home health care utilizers who died by suicide and four community controls who used similar services. Both groups of home health care utilizers had…

  18. Economies of scale and scope in the provision of home health services.

    PubMed

    Kass, D I

    1987-06-01

    This study examines the issue of economies of scale for home health agencies. A quadratic cost function is estimated utilizing a 1982 national data set based on Medicare Cost Reports for 2000 home health agencies. This paper concludes that neither economies of scale nor scope are substantial in the provision of home health services.

  19. Contemplating Home Health PPS: Current Patterns of Medicare Service Use

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Henry B.; Schmitz, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    Implementing a per-episode prospective payment system (PPS) for home health services is one option for Medicare policy makers facing rapid increases in service use and expenditures. Analysis of data on recent episodes of Medicare home health care identified systematic differences in service patterns across provider types; these indicate potential differences in the capacity of agencies of different types to adjust to PPS. The second phase of a national demonstration, which is about to be implemented, will provide information on the extent to which the agency practices that generate much of the observed variation (such as the number of visits provided per episode) are susceptible to management decisions; and whether managers can and do respond to the incentives of per-episode prospective payment. PMID:10140150

  20. Improving nursing documentation for private-duty home health care.

    PubMed

    Borchers, E L

    1999-06-01

    Private-duty, home health care agencies have struggled in assuring compliance with accurate and complete nursing documentation. In this descriptive study, the author reports on an improvement and innovation project in a private-duty, home health care agency aimed at improving nursing documentation, as measured in chart review audits. Initial strategies were directed toward revising the documentation system, with implementation of a flow record, and conducting group nurse education. These efforts had a minimal effect on improving documentation compliance. A major, multifocus strategy was then implemented. The educational component stressed pre- and posttest. The chart audit tool was revised to track individual nurse behaviors. Nurses were mentored when documentation did not meet standards. Lastly, the nurse job description and corresponding performance appraisal document were revised to clarify nurse responsibility and strengthen nurse accountability; progressive discipline was initiated when warranted. Significant and sustained improvement was subsequently realized.

  1. Lived Experience and Community Sport Coaching: A Phenomenological Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Colum; Armour, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Coaching in the participation domain is the act of coaching participants that are less intensely engaged in sport than performance orientated athletes. This form of coaching is a popular activity occurring in community settings such as schools or sport clubs, and it is often undertaken with a broad range of social and health outcomes in mind. The…

  2. A Home Health Care System for Family Doctor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabe, Ryuji; Taketa, Norihiro

    We propose a constitution technique of small-scale Home Health Care system for family doctor that has been developed by applying various API of JAVA. One function is vital data transmission which allows a family doctor to check the data of elderly persons with ease via Internet. Vital data is encrypted and transmitted for the purpose of security. The other function is telecommunication with voice and face image for care consulting.

  3. Diet needs of patients referred to home health.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, J T; Singer, G R

    1985-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the dietary needs of patients referred to home health care. The charts of 812 patients taken for care by the Visiting Nurse Association of Chicago (VNA) were reviewed for the physician's diet order, number of restrictions, diagnoses, age, height, weight, and fee source. More than half of the patients had therapeutic diets ordered by their physicians. A quarter of the patients with therapeutic diets had two or more dietary modifications. An audit process was developed as a reliability check of the authors' determination of the appropriateness of the diet. Review of the charts by registered dietitians (R.D.s) showed that three-fourths of the patients appeared to need therapeutic diets. Forty-seven percent might have benefited from a different diet. More than half of the patients for whom the R.D.s recommended a special diet needed two or more modifications. This emphasizes the need for the R.D. to develop a system for monitoring the dietary requirements of all patients referred to home health care. It further underscores the need for collaboration between physician and dietitian. The registered dietitian who works in home health care agencies serving diverse age groups needs to be a generalist prepared to develop a plan for the total nutrition treatment of persons throughout the life cycle.

  4. The Effect of Tailored Web-Based Feedback and Optional Telephone Coaching on Health Improvements: A Randomized Intervention Among Employees in the Transport Service Industry

    PubMed Central

    Grotta, Alessandra; Pasquali, Elena; Bakkman, Linda; Bellocco, Rino; Trolle Lagerros, Ylva

    2016-01-01

    Background Lifestyle-related health problems are an important health concern in the transport service industry. Web- and telephone-based interventions could be suitable for this target group requiring tailored approaches. Objective To evaluate the effect of tailored Web-based health feedback and optional telephone coaching to improve lifestyle factors (body mass index—BMI, dietary intake, physical activity, stress, sleep, tobacco and alcohol consumption, disease history, self-perceived health, and motivation to change health habits), in comparison to no health feedback or telephone coaching. Methods Overall, 3,876 employees in the Swedish transport services were emailed a Web-based questionnaire. They were randomized into: control group (group A, 498 of 1238 answered, 40.23%), or intervention Web (group B, 482 of 1305 answered, 36.93%), or intervention Web + telephone (group C, 493 of 1333 answered, 36.98%). All groups received an identical questionnaire, only the interventions differed. Group B received tailored Web-based health feedback, and group C received tailored Web-based health feedback + optional telephone coaching if the participants’ reported health habits did not meet the national guidelines, or if they expressed motivation to change health habits. The Web-based feedback was fully automated. Telephone coaching was performed by trained health counselors. Nine months later, all participants received a follow-up questionnaire and intervention Web + telephone. Descriptive statistics, the chi-square test, analysis of variance, and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models were used. Results Overall, 981 of 1473 (66.60%) employees participated at baseline (men: 66.7%, mean age: 44 years, mean BMI: 26.4 kg/m2) and follow-up. No significant differences were found in reported health habits between the 3 groups over time. However, significant changes were found in motivation to change. The intervention groups reported higher motivation to improve dietary

  5. Building better oral health: a dental home for all Texans.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Poor oral health affects more than just the mouth. It can seriously compromise a person's general health, quality of life and life expectancy. Oral diseases can and do lead to systemic problems--damaging other parts of the body and resulting in the need for expensive emergency department visits, hospital stays and medications. The consequences of poor oral health, however, go far beyond damaging medical effects. Oral disease can also wreak economic havoc--keeping children out of school and adults home from work--not to mention lower productivity of workers in pain. Untreated oral diseases can also drive up health care costs in general. The good news is that with proper oral health care, both at home and in professional settings, many of the negative consequences associated with poor oral health can be prevented. The State of Texas has a unique and unprecedented opportunity to significantly increase access to oral health care for all Texans. Complying with the Frew agreement is a key priority. However, there are additional ways that Texas policymakers can improve the oral health of the state. In an effort to begin a constructive dialogue about improving the oral health of all Texans, the Texas Dental Association (TDA) with grant funding from the American Dental Association (ADA) commissioned an independent third-party report on the issue of access to oral health care in Texas modeled after the 2000 groundbreaking surgeon general's report, Oral Health in America. The TDA assembled a team of five nationally recognized dentists from both academia and private practice to oversee the project. The dentists (hereafter called the editorial review board or ERB) were asked to identify the state's most pressing issues, needs and challenges associated with improving the oral health of all Texans, with a special focus on the state's most vulnerable. The ERB looked carefully at the economic, medical and social consequences of untreated oral disease in Texas. It reviewed the

  6. Building better oral health: a dental home for all Texans.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Poor oral health affects more than just the mouth. It can seriously compromise a person's general health, quality of life and life expectancy. Oral diseases can and do lead to systemic problems--damaging other parts of the body and resulting in the need for expensive emergency department visits, hospital stays and medications. The consequences of poor oral health, however, go far beyond damaging medical effects. Oral disease can also wreak economic havoc--keeping children out of school and adults home from work--not to mention lower productivity of workers in pain. Untreated oral diseases can also drive up health care costs in general. The good news is that with proper oral health care, both at home and in professional settings, many of the negative consequences associated with poor oral health can be prevented. The State of Texas has a unique and unprecedented opportunity to significantly increase access to oral health care for all Texans. Complying with the Frew agreement is a key priority. However, there are additional ways that Texas policymakers can improve the oral health of the state. In an effort to begin a constructive dialogue about improving the oral health of all Texans, the Texas Dental Association (TDA) with grant funding from the American Dental Association (ADA) commissioned an independent third-party report on the issue of access to oral health care in Texas modeled after the 2000 groundbreaking surgeon general's report, Oral Health in America. The TDA assembled a team of five nationally recognized dentists from both academia and private practice to oversee the project. The dentists (hereafter called the editorial review board or ERB) were asked to identify the state's most pressing issues, needs and challenges associated with improving the oral health of all Texans, with a special focus on the state's most vulnerable. The ERB looked carefully at the economic, medical and social consequences of untreated oral disease in Texas. It reviewed the

  7. Coaching for behavior change in physiatry.

    PubMed

    Frates, Elizabeth Pegg; Moore, Margaret A; Lopez, Celeste Nicole; McMahon, Graham T

    2011-12-01

    Behavior modification is vital to the prevention or amelioration of lifestyle-related disease. Health and wellness coaching is emerging as a powerful intervention to help patients initiate and maintain sustainable change that can be critical to physiatry practice. The coach approach delivers a patient-centered collaborative partnership to create an engaging and realistic individualized plan. The coaching process builds the psychologic skills needed to support lasting change, including mindfulness, self-awareness, self-motivation, resilience, optimism, and self-efficacy. Preliminary studies indicate that health and wellness coaching is a useful and potentially important adjunct to usual care for managing hyperlipidemia, diabetes, cancer pain, cancer survival, asthma, weight loss, and increasing physical activity. Physiatrists can benefit from the insights of coaching to promote effective collaboration, negotiation, and motivation to encourage patients to take responsibility for their recovery and their future wellness by adopting healthy lifestyles.

  8. Health Coaching Reduces HbA1c in Type 2 Diabetic Patients From a Lower-Socioeconomic Status Community: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Noah; Perez, Daniel F; Kaplan, David M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adoptions of health behaviors are crucial for maintaining good health after type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) diagnoses. However, adherence to glucoregulating behaviors like regular exercise and balanced diet can be challenging, especially for people living in lower-socioeconomic status (SES) communities. Providing cost-effective interventions that improve self-management is important for improving quality of life and the sustainability of health care systems. Objective To evaluate a health coach intervention with and without the use of mobile phones to support health behavior change in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods In this noninferiority, pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT), patients from two primary care health centers in Toronto, Canada, with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin/hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥7.3% (56.3 mmol/mol) were randomized to receive 6 months of health coaching with or without mobile phone monitoring support. We hypothesized that both approaches would result in significant HbA1c reductions, although health coaching with mobile phone monitoring would result in significantly larger effects. Participants were evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome was the change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months (difference between and within groups). Other outcomes included weight, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), satisfaction with life, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), positive and negative affect (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [PANAS]), and quality of life (Short Form Health Survey-12 [SF-12]). Results A total of 138 patients were randomized and 7 were excluded for a substudy; of the remaining 131, 67 were allocated to the intervention group and 64 to the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 97 participants (74.0%). While both groups reduced their HbA1c levels, there were no significant between-group differences in

  9. Wireless Health Data Exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema. PMID:22319296

  10. Home telehealth for children with special health-care needs.

    PubMed

    Cady, Rhonda; Kelly, Anne; Finkelstein, Stanley

    2008-01-01

    The U Special Kids (USK) programme at the University of Minnesota provides intensive care coordination and case management services to children with complex special health-care needs. We conducted a one-year pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of videoconferencing between the USK office and family homes. To ensure easy installation, families were provided with prepackaged equipment and software. However, the families had different Internet providers, different modems and/or routers and different firewall software, which required case-by-case resolution during home visits by the project coordinator. Five families participated in 3-5 videoconferencing sessions with a USK nurse. All connections with urban families had clear audio and video, whereas connections with rural families had clear audio, but unclear video. All of the scheduled virtual visits were rated by nurses as providing information that was similar to a telephone call. However, the unscheduled virtual visits were rated by the nurses as providing more information than a telephone call, suggesting that home-based videoconferencing may be useful in the management of children with complex special health-care needs. PMID:18534949

  11. Perspectives on Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven; Lundh, Erik; Davies, Rachel; Eckstein, Jutta; Larsen, Diana; Vilkki, Kati

    There are many perspectives to agile coaching including: growing coaching expertise, selecting the appropriate coach for your context; and eva luating value. A coach is often an itinerant who may observe, mentor, negotiate, influence, lead, and/or architect everything from team organization to system architecture. With roots in diverse fields ranging from technology to sociology coaches have differing motivations and experience bases. This panel will bring together coaches to debate and discuss various perspectives on agile coaching. Some of the questions to be addressed will include: What are the skills required for effective coaching? What should be the expectations for teams or individu als being coached? Should coaches be: a corporate resource (internal team of consultants working with multiple internal teams); an integral part of a specific team; or external contractors? How should coaches exercise influence and au thority? How should management assess the value of a coaching engagement? Do you have what it takes to be a coach? - This panel will bring together sea soned agile coaches to offer their experience and advice on how to be the best you can be!

  12. 77 FR 72904 - In the Matter of HealthSport, Inc., Home Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION In the Matter of HealthSport, Inc., Home Director, Inc., Home Theater Products International, Inc... Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of...

  13. The Experience of Critical Self-Reflection by Life Coaches: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Deanna Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of critical self-reflection by life coaches. Life coaching is expanding within many disciplines including education, health care, business, social work, and wellness. Life coaching involves a coach working with an individual or groups aimed at effecting change for professional and personal…

  14. Task Analysis for Health Occupations. Cluster: Nursing. Occupation: Home Health Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    This document contains a task analysis for health occupations (home health aid) in the nursing cluster. For each task listed, occupation, duty area, performance standard, steps, knowledge, attitudes, safety, equipment/supplies, source of analysis, and Illinois state goals for learning are listed. For the duty area of "providing therapeutic…

  15. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  16. Americans Needing Home Care, United States. Data from the National Health Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Barbara A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents information from the Home Care Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) on the types of help needed by adults with chronic health problems who live outside of institutions. Home care items discussed include: (1) assistance in basic physical activities; (2) assistance in home management activities; (3) adults…

  17. Home Health Care Utilization: A Review of the Research for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadushin, Goldie

    2004-01-01

    The author reviewed the literature to identify the variables associated with home health care utilization using the Andersen-Newman model as a framework for analysis. Sixty-four studies published between 1985 and 2000 were identified through PUBMED, Sociofile, and PsycINFO databases. Home health care was defined as in-home skilled nursing,…

  18. Workforce Implications of Injury among Home Health Workers: Evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of study: The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)…

  19. MyCoach: In Situ User Evaluation of a Virtual and Physical Coach for Running

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemans, Margit; Haaker, Timber; Szwajcer, Ellen

    Running is an enjoyable exercise for many people today. Trainers help people to reach running goals. However, today’s busy and nomadic people are not always able to attend running classes. A combination of a virtual and physical coach should be useful. A virtual coach (MyCoach) was designed to provide this support. MyCoach consists of a mobile phone (real time) and a web application, with a focus on improving health and well-being. A randomised controlled trial was performed to evaluate MyCoach. The results indicate that the runners value the tangible aspects on monitoring and capturing their exercise and analysing progress. The system could be improved by incorporating running schedules provided by the physical trainer and by improving its usability. Extensions of the system should focus on the real-time aspects of information sharing and “physical” coaching at a distance.

  20. Automated Health Alerts Using In-Home Sensor Data for Embedded Health Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rainer Dane; Rantz, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    We present an example of unobtrusive, continuous monitoring in the home for the purpose of assessing early health changes. Sensors embedded in the environment capture behavior and activity patterns. Changes in patterns are detected as potential signs of changing health. We first present results of a preliminary study investigating 22 features extracted from in-home sensor data. A 1-D alert algorithm was then implemented to generate health alerts to clinicians in a senior housing facility. Clinicians analyze each alert and provide a rating on the clinical relevance. These ratings are then used as ground truth for training and testing classifiers. Here, we present the methodology for four classification approaches that fuse multisensor data. Results are shown using embedded sensor data and health alert ratings collected on 21 seniors over nine months. The best results show similar performance for two techniques, where one approach uses only domain knowledge and the second uses supervised learning for training. Finally, we propose a health change detection model based on these results and clinical expertise. The system of in-home sensors and algorithms for automated health alerts provides a method for detecting health problems very early so that early treatment is possible. This method of passive in-home sensing alleviates compliance issues. PMID:27170900

  1. 42 CFR 413.125 - Payment for home health agency services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for home health agency services. 413.125... Categories of Costs § 413.125 Payment for home health agency services. (a) For additional rules on the allowability of certain costs incurred by home health agencies, see §§ 409.46 and 409.49(b) of this chapter....

  2. Home telemental health implementation and outcomes using electronic messaging.

    PubMed

    Godleski, Linda; Cervone, Dana; Vogel, Donna; Rooney, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the VA Connecticut Healthcare System began a home electronic messaging programme for mental health patients. During the first two years, 76 patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, post traumatic stress disorder, depression and substance-use disorders received a home messaging device, which was connected via an ordinary telephone line. There were daily questions, which were based on disease management protocols, and included alerts, data and educational components. Patient data were sent to a nurse practitioner each day for triage and follow-up. Patients used the device for at least six months. In the six months prior to enrolment, 42 patients were hospitalized for 46 admissions. In the following six months, six patients were hospitalized for nine admissions (P < 0.0001). In the six months prior to enrolment, 47 patients had a total of 80 ER visits. In the following six months, 16 patients had a total of 32 ER visits (P < 0.0001). Questionnaire responses indicated a high level of satisfaction with the home messaging programme.

  3. Environmental Health and Safety Hazards Experienced by Home Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Polivka, Barbara J.; Wills, Celia E.; Darragh, Amy; Lavender, Steven; Sommerich, Carolyn; Stredney, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The number of personnel providing in-home health care services is increasing substantially. The unique configuration of environmental hazards in individual client homes has a significant impact on the safety and health of home health care providers (HHPs). This mixed-methods study used data from a standardized questionnaire, focus groups, and individual interviews to explore environmental health and safety hazards encountered by HHPs in client homes. The participant sample (N = 68) included nurses, aides, therapists, and owners/managers from a variety of geographic locations. The most often-reported hazards were trip/slip/lift hazards, biohazards, and hazards from poor air quality, allergens, pests and rodents, and fire and burns. Frequency of identified key hazards varied by room, that is, kitchen (e.g., throw rugs, water on floor), bathroom (e.g., tight spaces for client handling), bedroom (e.g., bed too low), living room (e.g., animal waste), and hallway (e.g., clutter). Findings indicate the need for broader training to enable HHPs to identify and address hazards they encounter in client homes. PMID:26268486

  4. Of Coaches and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groves, Richard

    1977-01-01

    Research information in sports physiology must be compiled in usable form, and coaches must incorporate the results into their coaching tactics and methods if American athletes are to be able to compete on equal terms in foreign competition. (MB)

  5. Health coaching and pedometers to enhance physical activity and prevent falls in community-dwelling people aged 60 years and over: study protocol for the Coaching for Healthy AGEing (CHAnGE) cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, Anne; Rissel, Chris; Howard, Kirsten; Tong, Allison; Merom, Dafna; Smith, Stuart; Wickham, James; Bauman, Adrian; Lord, Stephen R; Vogler, Constance; Lindley, Richard I; Simpson, Judy M; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Sherrington, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prevention of falls and promotion of physical activity are essential for maximising well-being in older age. However, there is evidence that promoting physical activity among older people without providing fall prevention advice may increase fall rates. This trial aims to establish the impact of a physical activity and fall prevention programme compared with a healthy eating programme on physical activity and falls among people aged 60+ years. Methods and analysis This cluster randomised controlled trial will involve 60 groups of community-dwelling people aged 60+ years. Participating groups will be randomised to: (1) a physical activity and fall prevention intervention (30 groups), involving written information, fall risk assessment and prevention advice, a pedometer-based physical activity tracker and telephone-based health coaching; or (2) a healthy eating intervention (30 groups) involving written information and telephone-based dietary coaching. Primary outcomes will be objectively measured physical activity at 12 months post-randomisation and self-reported falls throughout the 12-month trial period. Secondary outcomes include: the proportion of fallers, the proportion of people meeting the Australian physical activity guidelines, body mass index, eating habits, mobility goal attainment, mobility-related confidence, quality of life, fear of falling, risk-taking behaviour, mood, well-being, self-reported physical activity, disability, and health and community service use. The between-group difference in the number of falls per person-year will be analysed using negative binomial regression models. For the continuously scored primary and secondary outcome measures, linear regression adjusted for corresponding baseline scores will assess the effect of group allocation. Analyses will be preplanned, conducted while masked to group allocation, will take into account cluster randomisation, and will use an intention-to-treat approach. Ethics and

  6. Coaching Beginning Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenman, Simon; de Laat, Hanneke; Staring, Corine

    This study describes the effects of a program designed to train Dutch primary school teachers in skills needed to coach and act as mentors for beginning teachers. The study investigated whether mentors who participated in the training program would implement the target coaching skills and whether the beginning teachers coached by the mentors would…

  7. Characteristics of Managerial Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, Ann; Gilley, Jerry W.; Kouider, Elies

    2010-01-01

    Coaching has become ubiquitous in organizations. Despite its growth in popularity, the concept remains largely untested through empirical inquiry. This study examined the skills and behaviors associated with managerial coaching. Results indicate a link between specific managerial skills, behaviors, and coaching. (Contains 4 tables.)

  8. [Health hazards for immigrants when travelling to their home countries].

    PubMed

    Brunvatne, Reidun; Blystad, Hans; Hoel, Terje

    2002-06-20

    Vacations in the home country are important and positive events in the lives of immigrants, events that allow them to maintain contact with their culture, relatives and friends. However, vacations also carry certain health risks, though these risks can to some degree be prevented. Infectious disease is the greatest risk. Some children and adolescents also run the risk of female genital mutilation, forced marriage, and the risk og being left behind in the home country against their will. Among the notifiable diseases registered with the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS), five stand out as having a higher incidence in people of foreign background than in people of Norwegian origin: malaria, hepatitis A, shigella infection, typhoid and paratyphoid fever. This higher incidence is partly the result of less use of pre-travel vaccines and malaria prophylaxis. Immigrants as a group are exposed to varied risks and should be given high priority in relation to vaccines and malaria prophylaxis for travel abroad. High priority should also be given to preventive health measures designed to reduce the risk of female genital mutilation and other violations against children and young people on visit to their country of origin.

  9. Home Foreclosure, Health, and Mental Health: A Systematic Review of Individual, Aggregate, and Contextual Associations

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The U.S. foreclosure crisis intensified markedly during the Great Recession of 2007-09, and currently an estimated five percent of U.S. residential properties are more than 90 days past due or in the process of foreclosure. Yet there has been no systematic assessment of the effects of foreclosure on health and mental health. Methods and Findings I applied systematic search terms to PubMed and PsycINFO to identify quantitative or qualitative studies about the relationship between home foreclosure and health or mental health. After screening the titles and abstracts of 930 publications and reviewing the full text of 76 articles, dissertations, and other reports, I identified 42 publications representing 35 unique studies about foreclosure, health, and mental health. The majority of studies (32 [91%]) concluded that foreclosure had adverse effects on health or mental health, while three studies yielded null or mixed findings. Only two studies examined the extent to which foreclosure may have disproportionate impacts on ethnic or racial minority populations. Conclusions Home foreclosure adversely affects health and mental health through channels operating at multiple levels: at the individual level, the stress of personally experiencing foreclosure was associated with worsened mental health and adverse health behaviors, which were in turn linked to poorer health status; at the community level, increasing degradation of the neighborhood environment had indirect, cross-level adverse effects on health and mental health. Early intervention may be able to prevent acute economic shocks from eventually developing into the chronic stress of foreclosure, with all of the attendant benefits this implies for health and mental health status. Programs designed to encourage early return of foreclosed properties back into productive use may have similar health and mental health benefits. PMID:25849962

  10. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: CLABSI Definitions and Prevention Policies in Home Health Care Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Michael L.; Bundy, David G.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Deuber, Kristin; Chen, Allen R.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate home health care agency central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) definitions and prevention policies and compare them to the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG.07.04.01), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CLABSI prevention recommendations, and a best-practice central line care bundle for inpatients. Methods A telephone-based survey was conducted in 2011 of a convenience sample of home health care agencies associated with children’s hematology/oncology centers. Results Of the 97 eligible home health care agencies, 57 (59%) completed the survey. No agency reported using all five aspects of the National Healthcare and Safety Network/Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology CLABSI definition and adjudication process, and of the 50 agencies that reported tracking CLABSI rates, 20 (40%) reported using none. Only 10 agencies (18%) had policies consistent with all elements of the inpatient-focused NPSG.07.04.01, 10 agencies (18%) were consistent with all elements of the home care targeted CDC CLABSI prevention recommendations, and no agencies were consistent with all elements of the central line care bundle. Only 14 agencies (25%) knew their overall CLABSI rate: mean 0.40 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.61). Six agencies (11%) knew their agency’s pediatric CLABSI rate: mean 0.54 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% CI, 0.06 to 1.01). Conclusions The policies of a national sample of home health care agencies varied significantly from national inpatient and home health care agency targeted standards for CLABSI definitions and prevention. Future research should assess strategies for standardizing home health care practices consistent with evidence-based recommendations. PMID:23991509

  11. Coaching to promote professional development in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Aru; Penney, Vivian

    This article presents coaching, which facilitates the highest form of learning, as a potential strategy for promoting professional development in nursing. In doing so, it sets out what coaching is and highlights its benefits in terms of team building, adaptation to changes, career planning and professional development. Having established the rudiments of coaching and identifying its qualities, the article then sets out strategies of coaching using three models: the 3-D Technique Model, The Practice Spiral Model and The Grow Model. Three case histories are presented to explain how these models could be used to implement coaching and personal learning plans (PLP). Directions are provided where training for coaching is available. It is concluded that coaching can be a powerful tool in enhancing nurses' and other health professionals' ability to contribute to the success of healthcare organisations.

  12. Identifying the key performance improvement domains for home health agencies

    PubMed Central

    Koru, Güneş; Alhuwail, Dari; Rosati, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to support home health agencies (HHAs) in the United States (US) in their individualized quality assessment and performance improvement (QAPI) initiatives by identifying their key performance improvement domains (KPIDs). Methods: Qualitative research was conducted by following the Framework method. Rich contextual data were obtained through focus group meetings participated by domain experts. The analysis results were further refined in an online forum and validated at a final meeting. Results: Four focus groups involving a total of 20 participants resulted in useful discussions during which various perspectives were expressed by the expert participants. A well-defined set of 17 KPIDs emerged under four categories, namely, economical value, sociocultural sensitivity, interpersonal relationships, and clinical capabilities. Conclusions: The feedback we received from the focus groups indicates that performance improvement in HHAs is a lot more complicated than simply assessing whether certain clinical tasks are performed. The KPIDs identified in this study can help HHAs in their focused and individualized QAPI initiatives. Therefore, the results should be immediately relevant, interesting, and useful to the home care industry and policy makers in the US. PMID:27092266

  13. Coaches and Coaching in Reading First Schools: A Reality Check

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Rita M.; Draper, Jason A.; Hall, Virginia; Vandermolen, Jill; Zigmond, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    The current article investigates the work of 20 Reading First coaches to determine how coaches distribute their time and the rationale they give for their work. Teachers' responses to coaches and the relationships between what coaches do and student achievement are also analyzed. There was great variability among coaches in how they allocated…

  14. Behavioral Characteristics of "Favorite" Coaches: Implications for Coach Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig; Owens, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to use athletes' and former athletes' memories of their favorite coach to improve coach education curriculum. Player preferences of coaching behavior can affect both their attitudes toward their sport experiences and team performance. By identifying positive coaching behaviors as recalled by athletes, coach educators…

  15. Process mapping as a tool for home health network analysis.

    PubMed

    Pluto, Delores M; Hirshorn, Barbara A

    2003-01-01

    Process mapping is a qualitative tool that allows service providers, policy makers, researchers, and other concerned stakeholders to get a "bird's eye view" of a home health care organizational network or a very focused, in-depth view of a component of such a network. It can be used to share knowledge about community resources directed at the older population, identify gaps in resource availability and access, and promote on-going collaborative interactions that encourage systemic policy reassessment and programmatic refinement. This article is a methodological description of process mapping, which explores its utility as a practice and research tool, illustrates its use in describing service-providing networks, and discusses some of the issues that are key to successfully using this methodology.

  16. Home health care quality conferences: promoting change through dialogue.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Danylle

    2006-01-01

    The following brief is based on the results of two conferences on home care quality hosted by the Center for Home Care Policy and Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. For more information about the conference outcomes and proceedings please see: Feldman, P.H.,Peterson, L.E., Reische, L., Bruno, L., & Clark, A. (2004). Charting the course for home healthcare quality: Action steps for achieving sustainable improvement. Conference proceedings. Home Healthcare Nurse, 22(12): 841-850; and Feldman, P.H., Clark, A., & Bruno, L. (2006). Advancing the agenda for home healthcare quality: Conference proceedings and findings. Home Healthcare Nurse, 24(5): 282-290.

  17. Preparing Nursing Homes for the Future of Health Information Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Rantz, M.; Galambos, C.; Vogelsmeier, A.; Flesner, M.; Popejoy, L.; Mueller, J.; Shumate, S.; Elvin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Our purpose was to describe how we prepared 16 nursing homes (NHs) for health information exchange (HIE) implementation. Background NH HIE connecting internal and external stakeholders are in their infancy. U.S. initiatives are demonstrating HIE use to increase access and securely exchange personal health information to improve patient outcomes. Method To achieve our objectives we conducted readiness assessments, performed 32 hours of clinical observation and developed 6 use cases, and conducted semi-structured interviews with 230 participants during 68 site visits to validate use cases and explore HIE. Results All 16 NHs had technology available to support resident care. Resident care technologies were integrated much more with internal than external stakeholders. A wide range of technologies were accessible only during administrative office hours. Six non-emergent use cases most commonly communicated by NH staff were: 1) scheduling appointments, 2) Laboratory specimen drawing, 3) pharmacy orders and reconciliation, 4) social work discharge planning, 5) admissions and pre-admissions, and 6) pharmacy-medication reconciliation. Emerging themes from semi-structured interviews about use cases included: availability of information technology in clinical settings, accessibility of HIE at the point of care, and policies/procedures for sending/receiving secure personal health information. Conclusion We learned that every facility needed additional technological and human resources to build an HIE network. Also, use cases help clinical staff apply theoretical problems of HIE implementation and helps them think through the implications of using HIE to communicate about clinical care. PMID:26171073

  18. Framing the evidence for health smart homes and home-based consumer health technologies as a public health intervention for independent aging: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Blaine; Meyer, Ellen; Lazar, Amanda; Chaudhuri, Shomir; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a critical need for public health interventions to support the independence of older adults as the world’s population ages. Health smart homes (HSH) and home-based consumer health (HCH) technologies may play a role in these interventions. Methods We conducted a systematic review of HSH and HCH literature from indexed repositories for health care and technology disciplines (e.g., MEDLINE, CINAHL, and IEEE Xplore) and classified included studies according to an evidence-based public health (EBPH) typology. Results One thousand, six hundred and thirty nine candidate articles were identified. Thirty-one studies from the years 1998–2011 were included. Twenty-one included studies were classified as emerging, 10 as promising and 3 as effective (first tier). Conclusion The majority of included studies were published in the period beginning in the year 2005. All 3 effective (first tier) studies and 9 of 10 of promising studies were published during this period. Almost all studies included an activity sensing component and most of these used passive infrared motion sensors. The three effective (first tier) studies all used a multicomponent technology approach that included activity sensing, reminders and other technologies tailored to individual preferences. Future research should explore the use of technology for self-management of health by older adults, social support and self-reported health measures incorporated into personal health records, electronic medical records, and community health registries. PMID:23639263

  19. The Coach and the Evaluator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Bob; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation and coaching should not be linked, these authors argue. Although it's tempting for evaluators to identify deficiencies and then specify coaching as a remediation strategy, doing so turns coaching into a consequence of a poor evaluation and termination into a consequence of failed coaching. Another mistake is to use coaching as a data…

  20. IV treatment at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... home; PICC line - home; Infusion therapy - home; Home health care - IV treatment ... Often, home health care nurses will come to your home to give you the medicine. Sometimes, a family member, a friend, or ...

  1. Health information use in home care: brainstorming barriers, facilitators, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Stolee, Paul; Steeves, Brandie; Manderson, Brooke L; Toscan, Justine L; Glenny, Christine; Berg, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of sharing health information in home care; however, limited research exists to identify appropriate strategies, especially with home care providers. We engaged home care stakeholders from three locations in Ontario to determine facilitators, barriers, and recommendations for using health information in home care. The results suggest that health professionals recognize the potential of these systems to enhance communication through several emergent themes; however, there was a lack of agreement on the current facilitators, barriers, and recommendations for future interventions. More research is needed to achieve consensus before strategies for improvement can be initiated.

  2. Assessment of surgical wounds in the home health patient: definitions and accuracy with OASIS-C.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Rhonda A

    2011-10-01

    The number of surgical patients receiving home care continues to grow as hospitals discharge patients sooner. Home health clinicians must gain knowledge of the wound healing stages and surgical wound classification to collect accurate data in the Outcome and Assessment Information Set-C (OASIS-C). This article provides the information clinicians need to accurately assess surgical wounds and implement best practices for improving surgical wounds in the home health patient.

  3. Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 18, 2012 Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over ... and Roberto Valverde, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Abstract Objective —This report presents national estimates ...

  4. Training of Home Health Aides and Nurse Aides: Findings from National Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Manisha; Ejaz, Farida K.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.

    2012-01-01

    Training and satisfaction with training were examined using data from nationally representative samples of 2,897 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) from the National Nursing Assistant Survey and 3,377 home health aides (HHAs) from the National Home Health Aide Survey conducted in 2004 and 2007, respectively. This article focuses on the…

  5. The impact of home-prepared diets and home oral hygiene on oral health in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Catherine; Colyer, Alison; Skrzywanek, Michal; Jodkowska, Katarzyna; Kurski, Grzegorz; Gawor, Jerzy; Ceregrzyn, Michal

    2011-10-01

    Many factors influence the oral health status of cats and dogs. The present study aimed to elucidate the influence of feeding home-prepared (HP) food v. commercial pet food on oral health parameters in these animals and to investigate the effect of home oral hygiene on oral health. The study surveyed 17,184 dogs and 6371 cats visiting over 700 Polish veterinary surgeries in 2006-7 during a Pet Smile activity organised by the Polish Small Animal Veterinary Association. All animals underwent conscious examinations to assess dental deposits, size of mandibular lymph nodes and gingival health. An oral health index (OHI) ranging from 0 to 8 was calculated for each animal by combining examination scores, where 0 indicates good oral health and 8 indicates poorest oral health. Information was collected on age, diet and home oral hygiene regimens. There was a significant effect of diet on the OHI (P < 0.001) whereby feeding the HP diet increased the probability of an oral health problem in both cats and dogs. There was a significant beneficial effect of feeding only commercial pet food compared with the HP diet when at least part of the diet was composed of dry pet food. Daily tooth brushing or the offering of daily dental treats were both effective in significantly reducing the OHI in both cats and dogs compared with those receiving sporadic or no home oral hygiene. Feeding only a dry diet was beneficial for oral health in cats and dogs. Tooth brushing and the offering of dental treats were very effective in maintaining oral health, provided they were practised daily. PMID:22005407

  6. Nursing Homes

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Nursing Homes Basic Facts & Information Nursing homes have changed ... physical health and/or mental disabilities. Is a Nursing Home Right for You? Almost half of all ...

  7. Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

  8. Federal Enactment of Healthy Homes Legislation in the United States to Improve Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Alesia Coralie; Yates, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Not all homes across America are “healthy” homes. This contributes to the poor health of Americans and exacerbates existing health conditions costing millions each year in health-care cost. Newer research is being conducted into strategies to alleviate biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the home, and various programs exist to assist the homeowner in making improvements in the quality of their home. Not every homeowner or renter nationwide or within community localities has access to these strategies or programs that could potentially improve their home environment and therefore the health of their family. The objective of this article is to propose elements of a policy to address this inconsistency and variation. This proposal centers around the federal enactment of a national policy demanding that each state implements a healthy homes program tailored to fit their specific state housing and health needs. Members of Congress from States that have successfully implemented healthy home programs should champion this policy. Organizations that recognize the impact of housing on health should support the development of a national healthy homes strategy. This article will discuss the need, outcomes, stakeholders, and minimum requirements of such a policy. PMID:27047913

  9. Rochester’s Healthy Home: A community-based innovation to promote environmental health action

    PubMed Central

    Kuholski, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Environmental hazards in the home can contribute significantly to disease. These hazards disproportionately affect low income, urban, and minority children. Childhood lead poisoning and asthma are prime examples of health concerns to which poor housing conditions may contribute significantly. A community-academic partnership in Rochester, New York created a model Healthy Home, an interactive museum in a typical city home, to help residents, property owners, contractors, and community groups reduce environmental hazards. The Healthy Home project educates visitors about home environmental health hazards, demonstrates low-cost methods for reducing home hazards, and helps visitors develop individualized strategies for action. In its first year of operation, over 700 people visited the Healthy Home. Evaluation surveys indicate that the Healthy Home experience motivated visitors to take action to reduce environmental hazards in their homes. Follow-up phone interviews indicate that most visitors took some action to reduce home environmental hazards. The Healthy Home has established a diverse Advisory Council to share its messages more broadly, invite input into future directions, and recruit visitors. This paper presents experiences from the Healthy Home’s first year, highlighting the partnership principles that guided its development and lessons learned from the process. PMID:20634943

  10. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  11. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  12. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  13. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  14. 42 CFR 410.170 - Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for home health services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility, and for comprehensive... services, for medical and other health services furnished by a provider or an approved ESRD facility,...

  15. Merging home and health via contemporary care delivery: program management insights on a home telehealth project.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Chon; Rosenthal, David A

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a home telehealth program that uses innovative informatics and telemedicine technologies to meet the needs of a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We provide background information for the program inclusive of descriptions for the decision support system, patient selection process, and selected home telehealth technologies. Lessons learned based on interview data collected from the project team highlight issues regarding implementation and management of the program. Our goal is to provide useful information to other healthcare systems considering home telehealth as a contemporary option for care delivery. PMID:18769182

  16. Occupational health of home care aides: results of the safe home care survey

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Margaret M; Markkanen, Pia K; Galligan, Catherine J; Sama, Susan R; Kriebel, David; Gore, Rebecca J; Brouillette, Natalie M; Okyere, Daniel; Sun, Chuan; Punnett, Laura; Laramie, Angela K; Davis, Letitia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In countries with ageing populations, home care (HC) aides are among the fastest growing jobs. There are few quantitative studies of HC occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess quantitatively the OSH hazards and benefits for a wide range of HC working conditions, and (2) compare OSH experiences of HC aides who are employed via different medical and social services systems in Massachusetts, USA. Methods HC aides were recruited for a survey via agencies that employ aides and schedule their visits with clients, and through a labour union of aides employed directly by clients or their families. The questionnaire included detailed questions about the most recent HC visits, as well as about individual aides’ OSH experiences. Results The study population included 1249 HC aides (634 agency-employed, 615 client-employed) contributing information on 3484 HC visits. Hazards occurring most frequently related to musculoskeletal strain, exposure to potentially infectious agents and cleaning chemicals for infection prevention and experience of violence. Client-hired and agency-hired aides had similar OSH experiences with a few exceptions, including use of sharps and experience of verbal violence. Conclusions The OSH experience of HC aides is similar to that of aides in institutional healthcare settings. Despite OSH challenges, HC aides enjoy caring for others and the benefits of HC work should be enhanced. Quantification of HC hazards and benefits is useful to prioritise resources for the development of preventive interventions and to provide an evidence base for policy-setting. PMID:26209318

  17. 42 CFR 413.125 - Payment for home health agency services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for home health agency services. 413.125 Section 413.125 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL...

  18. Health Profile of Aging Family Caregivers Supporting Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaki, Kiyoshi; Hsieh, Kelly; Heller, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    The health status of 206 female caregivers supporting adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities at home was investigated using objective (i.e., presence of chronic health conditions and activity limitations) and subjective (i.e., self-perceived health status) health measures compared with those of women in the general population in 2…

  19. 42 CFR 441.16 - Home health agency requirements for surety bonds; Prohibition on FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Home health agency requirements for surety bonds; Prohibition on FFP. 441.16 Section 441.16 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: REQUIREMENTS...

  20. Lesson Study: Beyond Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca; Foster, David; Hurd, Jacqueline; Fisher, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The authors assert that lesson study--a collaborative, teacher-led approach to learning from practice--offers a deeper, broader, more sustainable method of improving teacher practice than one-on-one coaching does. In lesson study, teachers and coaches of all levels of experience can work together, each bringing his or her own professional…

  1. Developing Knowledge of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Sharan A.

    2005-01-01

    School-based coaching for literacy teachers has taken on an important role in school reform in recent years. Although the literature contains numerous and compelling descriptions of the perceived, positive effects of mentoring, reviews of the literature base on mentoring and/or coaching over the past 20 years have consistently identified the need…

  2. Coaching touch points.

    PubMed

    Serio, Ingrid Johnson; Kowalski, Karren

    2014-04-01

    The ability to coach staff and learners is a critical skill for current staff development educators. Coaching includes setting your intention, creating a safe space, staying present, staying curious, withholding judgment, mirroring and modeling, avoiding a set agenda, and requiring accountability.

  3. Soccer Coaching Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Bill

    The basic principles and techniques of soccer are explained and illustrated with photographs and diagrams to aid teachers who are introducing soccer into the physical education curriculum. In addition, it is designed to guide youth soccer coaches who wish to improve their presentations. The book discusses: (1) coaching methods; (2) passing and…

  4. Psychological Aspects of Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poindexter, Hally B. W.

    This is a review of concepts based upon scientific evidence and observation that may prove helpful to the athletic coach of any age group, any skill level, either sex, and in any environment. It is written with the belief that athletics should exist for athletes and that the coach should be the person who assists the athlete to gain individual…

  5. Quality Coaching Counts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Scholastic sport is a double-edged sword that can have positive or negative effects. Whether those effects are positive or negative depends on those who wield that sword--chiefly, the school's sports coach. While it is clear that coaches make a difference in ensuring that educational athletics lead to beneficial outcomes for student-athletes, a…

  6. Coaching and counseling employees.

    PubMed

    Herakovic, J

    1992-01-01

    "To be effective, coaches need to exercise different forms of power," writes Dr. Herakovic in lesson two of his correspondence course on coaching and counseling employees. According to the professor, power has five forms: reward, coercive, legitimate, referent (charismatic) and expert power. He defines the five types of power and describes the uses and abuses of each type.

  7. A Coaching Psychology Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In "Psychology in its place" (2008), John Radford considers "what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education". In this article, the author looks at the possible inclusion of coaching psychology within undergraduate psychology programmes. Coaching psychology as an applied area of psychology…

  8. Coaches as System Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael; Knight, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The role of school leadership--of principals and coaches--must be played out on a systems level to get widespread and sustainable improvement. Successful, whole-system education reform relies on capacity building, teamwork, pedagogy, and systemic reform. The strategies of good coaches and the right drivers for whole-system reform go hand in hand.…

  9. Coaching Conversations for Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paramore, Tonia Bowden

    2007-01-01

    Taking on the role of literacy coach can be a daunting task for even seasoned educators. In this article, the author examines her experiences in this role as work for a university class she was taking. In a sense, she "tries on" the coaching role in order to discover if it is a job she would truly be willing to take. She discusses the…

  10. Medicare home health payment reform may jeopardize access for clinically complex and socially vulnerable patients.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Russell, David; Peng, Timothy; Brickner, Carlin; Kurowski, Daniel; Christopher, Mary Ann; Sheehan, Kathleen M

    2014-06-01

    The Affordable Care Act directed Medicare to update its home health prospective payment system to reflect more recent data on costs and use of services-an exercise known as rebasing. As a result, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will reduce home health payments 3.5 percent per year in the period 2014-17. To determine the impact that these reductions could have on beneficiaries using home health care, we examined the Medicare reimbursement margins and the use of services in a national sample of 96,621 episodes of care provided by twenty-six not-for-profit home health agencies in 2011. We found that patients with clinically complex conditions and social vulnerability factors, such as living alone, had substantially higher service delivery costs than other home health patients. Thus, the socially vulnerable patients with complex conditions represent less profit-lower-to-negative Medicare margins-for home health agencies. This financial disincentive could reduce such patients' access to care as Medicare payments decline. Policy makers should consider the unique characteristics of these patients and ensure their continued access to Medicare's home health services when planning rebasing and future adjustments to the prospective payment system.

  11. Coaching the Multiplicity of Mind: A Strengths-based Model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Professional health and wellness coaches are passionate about helping people learn, change, and grow. We are lifelong students of what enables humans to perform at our best. The phrase coaching the whole person is common coaching parlance; full engagement in self-care often requires that clients shift a spectrum of beliefs, motives, and perspectives in order to make changes that are sustainable. Just as important is the need for coaches to fully engage in their own self-care in order to best serve their clients. PMID:24416685

  12. Leadership development: an external-internal coaching partnership.

    PubMed

    McNally, Kimberly; Lukens, Rosemary

    2006-03-01

    Professional coaching is a leadership development strategy that has the potential to improve individual and organizational performance, retain leadership talent, support succession planning, and help healthcare leaders meet professional and personal goals. The authors describe the development and benefits of a partnership between an external and an internal coach who joined forces to provide individual and group coaching to 64 clinical leaders in a health system. Program evaluation demonstrated an excellent return on investment. Recommendations for implementing professional coaching programs in other healthcare organizations are provided.

  13. Effects of Medicare payment reform: evidence from the home health interim and prospective payment systems.

    PubMed

    Huckfeldt, Peter J; Sood, Neeraj; Escarce, José J; Grabowski, David C; Newhouse, Joseph P

    2014-03-01

    Medicare continues to implement payment reforms that shift reimbursement from fee-for-service toward episode-based payment, affecting average and marginal payment. We contrast the effects of two reforms for home health agencies. The home health interim payment system in 1997 lowered both types of payment; our conceptual model predicts a decline in the likelihood of use and costs, both of which we find. The home health prospective payment system in 2000 raised average but lowered marginal payment with theoretically ambiguous effects; we find a modest increase in use and costs. We find little substantive effect of either policy on readmissions or mortality.

  14. Filipino Health Care Aides and the Nursing Home Labour Market in Winnipeg.

    PubMed

    Novek, Sheila

    2013-12-01

    Canada’s nursing homes have become increasingly dependent on immigrant health care aides. More than any other ethnic group, Filipino women are over-represented among health care aides in the Canadian health care system. This qualitative study explored the employment experiences of Filipino health care aides in nursing homes from their own perspectives as well as those of policy stakeholders. Fourteen in-depth interviews were conducted with Filipino health care aides and long-term-care policy stakeholders in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The results indicated that migrant social networks act as pathways linking immigrant women with employment opportunities in nursing homes. The composition of the labour force is also shaped by management strategies and labour market accommodations that respond to, and reinforce, these social networks. These findings have implications for workforce planning and the quality of care provision in nursing homes.

  15. [Examination of physical and psychological health conditions and the influence factors of home helpers].

    PubMed

    Ashitomi, Ikuya

    2005-12-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the physical and psychological health conditions and the influence factors of home helpers. The secondary aim was to suggest a stress management system for home helpers. Self-report questionnaires were distributed to 1147 home helpers who were with home health care agencies in Kitakyushu-city. Responses from 979 home helpers were received, yielding a response rate of 85.5%. A total of 967 home helpers (excluding 12 male home helpers) were used for analysis. The Japanese version of the General Health Questionnaire 28 (GHQ-28) was used to measure the physical and psychological health conditions of the home helpers. In addition, as an influence factor, stress coping was measured by the Lazarus-type Stress Coping Inventory (SCI). Home helpers also filled out the Ego Aptitude Scale (EAS) as a personality measure. Furthermore, the subjects were asked questions about individual background factors, including age, marital status, working hours, years working as a home helper, type of home helper, job satisfaction, job continuation and awareness of stress. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 11.5 J). The groups of full-time or part-time home helpers showed GHQ-28 total scores of 6.86 +/- 5.48 and 5.21 +/- 4.97 (Mean +/- SD): part-time home helpers had significantly higher scores than full-time home helpers. The GHQ-28 measure indicated that about 20% of home helpers had physical and psychological symptoms, and about 4% had mid-level depressive symptoms. About half of the subjects were aware of stress. There were significant negative correlations between GHQ-28 total scores and age. Also, there was a statistically significant relation between GHQ-28 and job satisfaction, awareness of stress, type of stress coping and individual personality. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant relation between GHQ-28 and the confrontive coping type, positive reappraisal of SCI, and

  16. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete's behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample included data from 165 student-athletes from two universities. Results from structural equation modeling indicate support for the effect of coaching practices on commitment to the coach. Results also support the effect of commitment to the coach on the student-athletes' role behaviour and performance. By showing that coaching practices impact commitment to the coach, and that commitment to the coach impacts student-athlete role behaviour and performance, the findings have important implications for a better understanding of the determinants of coaches' and athletes' performance. The managerial significance of this research rests in the insight provided into how coaching practices influence athlete's behaviour through commitment to the coach. This study contributes to the literature on coach-athlete relationship within universities and colleges by applying the concept of commitment to the coach. This helps diversity research approaches to understanding coach-athlete relationships and extends prior research on commitment by looking at the context of the relationship between the student-athlete and their coach.

  17. Building successful student-athlete coach relationships: examining coaching practices and commitment to the coach.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Davar; Gurney, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we utilized the concept of commitment to explain the impact of coaching practices on student-athlete's behaviour. We examined the impact of commitment to the coach on the coaching outcome of in-role behaviour, and the influence of coaching practices, of information sharing, training, and encouraging teamwork, on the formation of relationships. We adopted measures from the organizational behaviour literature and surveyed student-athletes at two universities in Canada. The sample included data from 165 student-athletes from two universities. Results from structural equation modeling indicate support for the effect of coaching practices on commitment to the coach. Results also support the effect of commitment to the coach on the student-athletes' role behaviour and performance. By showing that coaching practices impact commitment to the coach, and that commitment to the coach impacts student-athlete role behaviour and performance, the findings have important implications for a better understanding of the determinants of coaches' and athletes' performance. The managerial significance of this research rests in the insight provided into how coaching practices influence athlete's behaviour through commitment to the coach. This study contributes to the literature on coach-athlete relationship within universities and colleges by applying the concept of commitment to the coach. This helps diversity research approaches to understanding coach-athlete relationships and extends prior research on commitment by looking at the context of the relationship between the student-athlete and their coach. PMID:25105087

  18. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... medical charges associated with non-VA outpatient care, provided under 38 CFR 17.52 or 17.120. 75 FR 78901.... See 75 FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care he pricing methodology adopted by...-day period was $2,537.40 in FY 2010. The average Medicare reimbursement level for skilled home...

  19. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  20. The Fundamentals of Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandvold, Amy; Baxter, Maelou

    2008-01-01

    This book contains strategies for effective literacy coaching of teachers in districts and schools. Whether it's your job to start a literacy coaching initiative or to be an effective literacy coach to your colleagues, this guide has all the steps and strategies you need: (1) Roles and responsibilities of literacy coaches; (2) Keys to building…

  1. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program.

    PubMed

    Mankikar, Deepa; Campbell, Carla; Greenberg, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes education, and distribution of Healthy Homes supplies. Measured outcomes included changes in participant knowledge and awareness of environmental home-based hazards, rate of children's asthma-related medical use, and the presence of asthma triggers and safety hazards. Analysis of 2013-2014 baseline and post-intervention program data for a cohort of 150 families revealed a significantly lower three-month rate (p < 0.05) of children's asthma-related doctor visits and hospital admissions at program completion. In addition, there were significantly reduced reports of the presence of home-based hazards, including basement or roof leaks (p = 0.011), plumbing leaks (p = 0.019), and use of an oven to heat the home (p < 0.001). Participants' pre- and post- test scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in knowledge and awareness of home hazards. Comprehensive home interventions may effectively reduce environmental home hazards and improve the health of asthmatic children in the short term. PMID:27618087

  2. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program

    PubMed Central

    Mankikar, Deepa; Campbell, Carla; Greenberg, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes education, and distribution of Healthy Homes supplies. Measured outcomes included changes in participant knowledge and awareness of environmental home-based hazards, rate of children’s asthma-related medical use, and the presence of asthma triggers and safety hazards. Analysis of 2013–2014 baseline and post-intervention program data for a cohort of 150 families revealed a significantly lower three-month rate (p < 0.05) of children’s asthma-related doctor visits and hospital admissions at program completion. In addition, there were significantly reduced reports of the presence of home-based hazards, including basement or roof leaks (p = 0.011), plumbing leaks (p = 0.019), and use of an oven to heat the home (p < 0.001). Participants’ pre- and post- test scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in knowledge and awareness of home hazards. Comprehensive home interventions may effectively reduce environmental home hazards and improve the health of asthmatic children in the short term. PMID:27618087

  3. Evaluation of a Home-Based Environmental and Educational Intervention to Improve Health in Vulnerable Households: Southeastern Pennsylvania Lead and Healthy Homes Program.

    PubMed

    Mankikar, Deepa; Campbell, Carla; Greenberg, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    This evaluation examined whether participation in a home-based environmental educational intervention would reduce exposure to health and safety hazards and asthma-related medical visits. The home intervention program focused on vulnerable, low-income households, where children had asthma, were at risk for lead poisoning, or faced multiple unsafe housing conditions. Home visitors conducted two home visits, two months apart, consisting of an environmental home assessment, Healthy Homes education, and distribution of Healthy Homes supplies. Measured outcomes included changes in participant knowledge and awareness of environmental home-based hazards, rate of children's asthma-related medical use, and the presence of asthma triggers and safety hazards. Analysis of 2013-2014 baseline and post-intervention program data for a cohort of 150 families revealed a significantly lower three-month rate (p < 0.05) of children's asthma-related doctor visits and hospital admissions at program completion. In addition, there were significantly reduced reports of the presence of home-based hazards, including basement or roof leaks (p = 0.011), plumbing leaks (p = 0.019), and use of an oven to heat the home (p < 0.001). Participants' pre- and post- test scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.05) in knowledge and awareness of home hazards. Comprehensive home interventions may effectively reduce environmental home hazards and improve the health of asthmatic children in the short term.

  4. With Home Testing, Consumers Take Charge of Their Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... noticed an increase in the number of medical tests you can use in the privacy of your own home. Advances in testing technology—and changing attitudes towards patients’ responsibility for their ...

  5. [Home care for the chronically ill: a self-care health system].

    PubMed

    Silva, Leticia Robles

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on home care for chronically ill adults and seniors. According to our thesis, home care should be understood as a self-care system, and its aim is to guarantee the individual's social and bodily survival. Home care consists of three areas, related to illness, the home, and to life history. Caregiving, usually under women's responsibility, is present throughout the history of the illness and the health-seeking process. The article analyzes these issues in light of the ageing process, the epidemiological changes occurring worldwide, and the urgency to incorporate this analysis into the heath care research agenda. PMID:15073644

  6. Home and Health in the Third Age — Methodological Background and Descriptive Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kylén, Maya; Ekström, Henrik; Haak, Maria; Elmståhl, Sölve; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Background: The understanding of the complex relationship between the home environment, well-being and daily functioning in the third age is currently weak. The aim of this paper is to present the methodological background of the Home and Health in the Third Age Study, and describe a sample of men and women in relation to their home and health situation. Methods and Design: The study sample included 371 people aged 67–70, living in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Structured interviews and observations were conducted to collect data about objective and perceived aspects of home and health. Results: The majority of the participants were in good health and had few functional limitations. Women had more functional limitations and reported more symptoms than men. Environmental barriers were found in every home investigated; the most were found in the kitchen and hygiene area. Environmental barriers were more common in multi-family than in one-family dwellings. Discussion: This study will increase our knowledge on home and health dynamics among people in the third age. The results have potential to contribute to societal planning related to housing provision, home care and social services for senior citizens. PMID:25019267

  7. Why Hospitals and Payers are Recommending Home Care Upon Discharge Instead of SNF or Traditional Home Health Services--Alternative Payment Model Hospital Incentives Aligning with Patient Choice.

    PubMed

    Luke, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Seniors and other hospital patients in the United States have traditionally had the option of being discharged to a skilled nursing facility (convalescent home) for post-acute services, or home with nursing and therapy services provided in the home setting. Traditionally, these home based services have been referred to as "home health." As more Americans have retired, home health services have expanded and are readily accessible. This growth put tremendous stress on the Medicare fund which pays for senior care services. However, "Home Care," which traditionally has been viewed as non-medical home based services, has also become a booming industry for the cost conscious in recent years as more Americans reach retirement age. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, providers and payers are now finding themselves responsible for post-acute care and continuous patient health, so cost efficient solutions for post-acute care are thriving. For the first time in history, American hospitals and Insurers are recognizing Home Care as an effective model that achieves the Triple Aim of Health Care reform. Home Care, which is no longer completely non-medical services, has proven to be an integral part of the care continuum for seniors in recent years and is now becoming a viable solution for keeping patients well, while still honoring their desire to age and heal at home. This paper analyzes the benefits and risks of home care and provides a clear understanding as to why American hospitals are emphasizing SNF Avoidance and skipping home health, opting instead to refer patients directly to home care as the preferred discharge solution in a value based model. PMID:27180473

  8. Why Hospitals and Payers are Recommending Home Care Upon Discharge Instead of SNF or Traditional Home Health Services--Alternative Payment Model Hospital Incentives Aligning with Patient Choice.

    PubMed

    Luke, Josh

    2016-01-01

    Seniors and other hospital patients in the United States have traditionally had the option of being discharged to a skilled nursing facility (convalescent home) for post-acute services, or home with nursing and therapy services provided in the home setting. Traditionally, these home based services have been referred to as "home health." As more Americans have retired, home health services have expanded and are readily accessible. This growth put tremendous stress on the Medicare fund which pays for senior care services. However, "Home Care," which traditionally has been viewed as non-medical home based services, has also become a booming industry for the cost conscious in recent years as more Americans reach retirement age. With the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, providers and payers are now finding themselves responsible for post-acute care and continuous patient health, so cost efficient solutions for post-acute care are thriving. For the first time in history, American hospitals and Insurers are recognizing Home Care as an effective model that achieves the Triple Aim of Health Care reform. Home Care, which is no longer completely non-medical services, has proven to be an integral part of the care continuum for seniors in recent years and is now becoming a viable solution for keeping patients well, while still honoring their desire to age and heal at home. This paper analyzes the benefits and risks of home care and provides a clear understanding as to why American hospitals are emphasizing SNF Avoidance and skipping home health, opting instead to refer patients directly to home care as the preferred discharge solution in a value based model.

  9. A Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary Approach to Providing Health Care for Children in Out-of-Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Steven D.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes ENHANCE (Excellence in Health Care for Abused and Neglected Children) of Onondaga County, New York, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary clinic for children in out-of-home care involving pediatrics, child psychology, nursing, child development, and child welfare components. Also presents profiles of the health, mental health, and…

  10. Medicare and Medicaid programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System rate update for CY 2014, home health quality reporting requirements, and cost allocation of home health survey expenses. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    This final rule will update the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, the low-utilization payment adjustment (LUPA) add-on, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective January 1, 2014. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule establishes rebasing adjustments, with a 4-year phase-in, to the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates; the national per-visit rates; and the NRS conversion factor. In addition, this final rule will remove 170 diagnosis codes from assignment to diagnosis groups within the HH PPS Grouper, effective January 1, 2014. Finally, this rule will establish home health quality reporting requirements for CY 2014 payment and subsequent years and will clarify that a state Medicaid program must provide that, in certifying HHAs, the state's designated survey agency carry out certain other responsibilities that already apply to surveys of nursing facilities and Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF-IID), including sharing in the cost of HHA surveys. For that portion of costs attributable to Medicare and Medicaid, we will assign 50 percent to Medicare and 50 percent to Medicaid, the standard method that CMS and states use in the allocation of expenses related to surveys of nursing homes. PMID:24294635

  11. Medicare and Medicaid programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System rate update for CY 2014, home health quality reporting requirements, and cost allocation of home health survey expenses. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    This final rule will update the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, the low-utilization payment adjustment (LUPA) add-on, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective January 1, 2014. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule establishes rebasing adjustments, with a 4-year phase-in, to the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates; the national per-visit rates; and the NRS conversion factor. In addition, this final rule will remove 170 diagnosis codes from assignment to diagnosis groups within the HH PPS Grouper, effective January 1, 2014. Finally, this rule will establish home health quality reporting requirements for CY 2014 payment and subsequent years and will clarify that a state Medicaid program must provide that, in certifying HHAs, the state's designated survey agency carry out certain other responsibilities that already apply to surveys of nursing facilities and Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICF-IID), including sharing in the cost of HHA surveys. For that portion of costs attributable to Medicare and Medicaid, we will assign 50 percent to Medicare and 50 percent to Medicaid, the standard method that CMS and states use in the allocation of expenses related to surveys of nursing homes.

  12. Understanding Challenges in the Front Lines of Home Health Care: A Human-Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Jenay M.; McBride, Sara E.; Mitzner, Tracy L.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    A human-systems perspective is a fruitful approach to understanding home health care because it emphasizes major individual components of the system – persons, equipment/technology, tasks, and environments –as well as the interaction between these components. The goal of this research was to apply a human-system perspective to consider the capabilities and limitations of the persons, in relation to the demands of the tasks and equipment/technology in home health care. Identification of challenges and mismatches between the person(s) capabilities and the demands of providing care provide guidance for human factors interventions. A qualitative study was conducted with 8 home health Certified Nursing Assistants and 8 home health Registered Nurses interviewed about challenges they encounter in their jobs. A systematic categorization of the challenges the care providers reported was conducted and human factors recommendations were proposed in response, to improve home health. The challenges inform a human-systems model of home health care. PMID:24958610

  13. [Home care workers' oral health awareness and practice for disabled elderly].

    PubMed

    Atsushi, Ohyama; Yoshinori, Toriyama; Yoshiyuki, Sasaki; Izumi, Koyama; Chie, Shimizu; Norimasa, Kurosaki; Shiro, Mataki

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of oral health awareness, and to explore the needs for home care workers to provide oral health care for disabled elderly. We conducted a questionnaire survey at two home-help service centers and a social welfare council. Subjects for this investigation were 63 home care workers. The results were as follows: 1. Ninety-six percent of home care workers thought it was necessary to provide oral health care for disabled elderly, but only 11 percent of them put oral care into practice on a daily basis. 2. From the results of a cause and effect diagram, necessities of oral care were summarized as six major causes: 1) Disabled elderly are often unable to brush their teeth, 2) The oral hygiene level may affect physical condition, 3) Disabled elderly should be protected from oral diseases, 4) Disabled elderly should have their mouths kept clean, 5) Eating and swallowing may become increasingly difficult, 6) Disabled elderly should take in adequate nutrition. 3. Sixty-eight percent of home care workers took part in a training course of nursing care including oral care. 4. Home care workers, dentists, dental hygienists, and nurses taught oral health care to home care workers. 5. From the results of a cause and effect diagram, there were three major items that home care workers want to know: 1) denture management, 2) the routine of oral care, 3) infection control. 6. Home care workers recognized that oral care should be provided by family members of disabled elderly or home care workers. PMID:12708030

  14. Effect of a Consumer-Directed Voucher and a Disease-Management-Health-Promotion Nurse Intervention on Home Care Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R.; Mukamel, Dana; Eggert, Gerald M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the impact of two interventions, a consumer-directed voucher for in-home supportive services and a chronic disease self-management-health-promotion nurse intervention, on the probability of use of two types of home care-skilled home health care and personal assistance services-received by functionally impaired Medicare…

  15. Factors associated with a patient-centered medical home among children with behavioral health conditions.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Woodworth, Lindsey; Fernandez-Baca, Daniel; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Thompson, Lindsay; Hinojosa, Melanie

    2013-11-01

    At some point in their lives, nearly one-half of all American children will have a behavioral health condition. Many will not receive the care they need from a fragmented health delivery system. The patient-centered medical home is a promising model to improve their care; however, little evidence exists. Our study aim was to examine the association between several behavioral health indicators and having a patient-centered medical home. 91,642 children's parents or guardians completed the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. An indicator for patient-centered medical home was included in the dataset. Descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, and multivariate regression models were used in the analyses. Children in the sample were mostly Male (52 %), White (78 %), non-Hispanic (87 %), and did not have a special health care need (80 %). 6.2 % of the sample had at least one behavioral health condition. Conditions ranged from ADHD (6 %) to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (1 %). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home also varied for children with a behavioral health condition (49 % of children with ADHD and 33 % of children with ASD). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home decreased with multiple behavioral health conditions. Higher severity of depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder were associated with a decreased likelihood of a patient-centered medical home. Results from our study can be used to target patient-centered medical home interventions toward children with one or more behavioral health conditions and consider that children with depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder are more vulnerable to these disparities.

  16. Consultants as Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Increasingly, school boards are using consultants to help them hire the right superintendents for their school systems. Proposes extending the consultants' contracts to coaching both board and superintendents on developing an effective working relationship. (MLF)

  17. Tips for labor coaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... some tips for getting prepared. Before the big day arrives Labor coaches should go to childbirth classes ... get through her labor and delivery. When the day arrives You might be at the hospital for ...

  18. PERCEIVED RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AMONG HOME HEALTH AIDES: EVIDENCE FROM A NATIONAL SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doohee; Muslin, Ivan; McInerney, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Home health aides are one of our essential human resources in the U.S. long-term care industry but understanding whether home health aides experience racial discrimination in the workplace and, if so, which personal/organizational factors are associated at the national level has been unnoticed. Using a nationally representative sample (n=3377), we attempt to investigate the association between racial discrimination and personal and organizational factors. The study found the 13.5% prevalence rate of racial discrimination. The study findings from multiple regression analysis reveal that black home care aides are more likely than white aides to experience racial discrimination in the workplace, suggesting that racial disparity may be an additional barrier to our home health care industry. National chain affiliation and low income were also found to be associated with perceived racial discrimination.

  19. Sustainable ubiquitous home health care--architectural considerations and first practical experiences.

    PubMed

    Marschollek, Michael; Wolf, Klaus-H; Bott, Oliver-J; Geisler, Mirko; Plischke, Maik; Ludwig, Wolfram; Hornberger, Andreas; Haux, Reinhold

    2007-01-01

    Despite the abundance of past home care projects and the maturity of the technologies used, there is no widespread dissemination as yet. The absence of accepted standards and thus interoperability and the inadequate integration into transinstitutional health information systems (tHIS) are perceived as key factors. Based on the respective literature and previous experiences in home care projects we propose an architectural model for home care as part of a transinstitutional health information system using the HL7 clinical document architecture (CDA) as well as the HL7 Arden Syntax for Medical Logic Systems. In two short case studies we describe the practical realization of the architecture as well as first experiences. Our work can be regarded as a first step towards an interoperable - and in our view sustainable - home care architecture based on a prominent document standard from the health information system domain.

  20. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment Using Smart Home Monitoring of Complex Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    One of the many services that intelligent systems can provide is the automated assessment of resident well-being. We hypothesize that the functional health of individuals, or ability of individuals to perform activities independently without assistance, can be estimated by tracking their activities using smart home technologies. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based method for assessing activity quality in smart homes. To validate our approach we quantify activity quality for 179 volunteer participants who performed a complex, interweaved set of activities in our smart home apartment. We observed a statistically significant correlation (r=0.79) between automated assessment of task quality and direct observation scores. Using machine learning techniques to predict the cognitive health of the participants based on task quality is accomplished with an AUC value of 0.64. We believe that this capability is an important step in understanding everyday functional health of individuals in their home environments. PMID:25530925

  1. Advance directives in home health and hospice agencies: United States, 2007.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Helaine E; Hickman, Susan E; Foster, Gregory L

    2011-11-01

    This report provides nationally representative data on policies, storage, and implementation of advance directives (ADs) in home health and hospice (HHH) agencies in the United States using the National Home and Hospice Care Survey. Federally mandated ADs policies were followed in >93% of all agencies. Nearly all agencies stored ADs in a file at the agency, but only half stored them at the patient's residence. Nearly all agencies informed staff about the AD, but only 77% and 72% of home health agencies informed the attending physician and next-of-kin, respectively. Home health and hospice agencies are nearly universally compliant with ADs policies that are required in order to receive Medicare and Medicaid payments, but have much lower rates of adoption of ADs policies beyond federally mandated minimums. PMID:21398271

  2. PERCEIVED RACIAL DISCRIMINATION AMONG HOME HEALTH AIDES: EVIDENCE FROM A NATIONAL SURVEY.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doohee; Muslin, Ivan; McInerney, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Home health aides are one of our essential human resources in the U.S. long-term care industry but understanding whether home health aides experience racial discrimination in the workplace and, if so, which personal/organizational factors are associated at the national level has been unnoticed. Using a nationally representative sample (n=3377), we attempt to investigate the association between racial discrimination and personal and organizational factors. The study found the 13.5% prevalence rate of racial discrimination. The study findings from multiple regression analysis reveal that black home care aides are more likely than white aides to experience racial discrimination in the workplace, suggesting that racial disparity may be an additional barrier to our home health care industry. National chain affiliation and low income were also found to be associated with perceived racial discrimination. PMID:27079055

  3. Home Health Aide Training: An Appeal for Organizational Support.

    PubMed

    Palesy, Debra

    2016-01-01

    How home healthcare aides (HHAs) adapt their classroom training to their workplaces is central to their own safety and that of their care recipients. A qualitative approach was adopted for this inquiry, where new workers were interviewed in-depth following their classroom training. Findings suggest a perceived lack of supervisor support for classroom training and lack of follow-up in the workplace. Moreover, the need for more peer support was contended, and more comprehensive written materials in clients' homes may also assist workers' learning and enacting safe manual handling techniques in the workplace. The article concludes with recommendations for supporting HHAs' learning, and includes suggestions for future research.

  4. The health risks of incense use in the home: an underestimated source of indoor air pollution?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Debbie; Pontin, David

    2016-03-01

    The health impact of indoor air pollution is a growing area of interest for public health professionals. People typically spend up to 90 per cent of their time indoors, particularly women, young children and elders. Although the adverse health effects of second-hand tobacco smoke are well recognised, the impact of burning incense in the home has received little attention in Western literature. Incense burning in the home is common in a number of cultures (particularly Asian, North African or Arabic). Many health visitors (HVs) work with communities who use incense regularly for religious/cultural reasons and it is a neglected area of study and research.The literature suggests that home incense use can have significant adverse health effects, particularly on cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. Further research is needed to identify which individuals are most susceptible, which types of incense are most harmful, and whether any actions can be taken to minimise exposure.

  5. The health risks of incense use in the home: an underestimated source of indoor air pollution?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Debbie; Pontin, David

    2016-03-01

    The health impact of indoor air pollution is a growing area of interest for public health professionals. People typically spend up to 90 per cent of their time indoors, particularly women, young children and elders. Although the adverse health effects of second-hand tobacco smoke are well recognised, the impact of burning incense in the home has received little attention in Western literature. Incense burning in the home is common in a number of cultures (particularly Asian, North African or Arabic). Many health visitors (HVs) work with communities who use incense regularly for religious/cultural reasons and it is a neglected area of study and research.The literature suggests that home incense use can have significant adverse health effects, particularly on cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. Further research is needed to identify which individuals are most susceptible, which types of incense are most harmful, and whether any actions can be taken to minimise exposure. PMID:27111977

  6. Promoting health and home safety for children of parents with intellectual disability: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; McConnell, David; Honey, Anne; Mayes, Rachel; Russo, Domenica

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a home-based intervention targeted to parents with intellectual disability to promote child health and home safety in the preschool years. A total of 63 parents were recruited for the study with 45 parents (40 mothers and 5 fathers) from 40 families completing the project. The research design permitted comparison between the intervention and three alternative conditions with all parents receiving the intervention in an alternating sequence over the life of the project. The intervention consisted of 10 weekly lessons carried out in the parent's home focusing on child health and home safety. The program was adapted to suit the Australian context from the UCLA Parent--Child Health and Wellness Project (Tymchuk, Groen, & Dolyniuk, 2000). Outcome measures assessed parental health and safety behaviours. Standard measures included parental health, intelligence and literacy. The intervention improved parents' ability to recognize home dangers, to identify precautions to deal with these dangers and resulted in a significant increase in the number of safety precautions parents implemented in their homes with all gains being maintained at 3 months post-intervention. Parents' health behaviours including improved understanding of health and symptoms of illness, knowledge of and skills needed to manage life-threatening emergencies, knowledge about visiting the doctor, knowing when to call, what information to provide and what questions to ask, and how to use medicines safely significantly increased. Again, all gains were maintained 3 months post-intervention. The intervention was effective regardless of parental health, literacy skills, and IQ. This form of home-based intervention promotes a healthy and safe environment which is a prerequisite to continuing parental custody. PMID:14622893

  7. Coaching in Northern Canadian Communities: Reflections of Elite Coaches

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Alain P.; Schinke, Robert J.; Pickard, Pat

    2005-01-01

    This study addressed geographical uniqueness in relation to elite coaching. The study explores the complexities associated to coaching in northern Canadian communities, and how unique geographical surroundings can affect coaching success. The views of fourteen National and International elite coaches from different northern Canadian communities are included within the study. The respondents were from 9 different sport backgrounds and averaged 17.1 years of coaching experience (range: 8-30 years). Data were gathered using a structured open-ended questionnaire, a focus group, and a follow-up in-depth semi-structured interview. Content was analyzed to uncover emergent themes. Based on the respondents’ views, there is indication that despite numerous adversities, rural coaches experience advantages that are unavailable in larger urban centers. Precisely, there is evidence that northern Canadian coaches acquire unique skills while responding to the demands placed on them within their unique communities. Generalizations in regards to coaching development strategies across physical locations are questioned following the findings of the current study. Key Points The study explores the complexities associated with coaching in northern Canadian communities and how unique geographical surroundings can affect coaching success. From the respondents’ views, there is indication that northern Canadian elite coaches are subject to numerous adversities. Despite numerous adversities, northern Canadian elite coaches experience advantages that are unavailable in larger urban centers. Including context specificity within the elite coaching literature could help to better understand this profession. PMID:24431968

  8. Medicare and Medicaid Home Health and Medicaid Waiver Services for Dually Eligible Older Adults: Risk Factors for Use and Correlates of Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortinsky, Richard H.; Fenster, Juliane R.; Judge, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to, among frail dually eligible older adults, determine risk factors for the likelihood of using Medicare home health and Medicaid home health services and to, among service users, determine correlates of Medicare home health, Medicaid home health, and Medicaid waiver service expenditures. Design and Methods:…

  9. New Careers: The Community/Home Health Aide Trainee's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Florence

    Intended for trainee use, the manual is in notebook format with a curriculum corresponding to the trainers' manual (VT 007 909), a related document. Part I, Basic Health Curriculum, deals with (1) the roles of health service aides, (2) Biological Potential and Equilibrium, (3) Professionals in the Health Field, (4) Public Health Administration,…

  10. Is health care use changing? A comparison between physician, hospital, nursing-home, and home-care use of two elderly cohorts.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, E; Tate, R B

    1989-11-01

    This study used log-linear survival analysis, and log-rank tests to compare 1) the characteristics of two elderly cohorts; 2) their use of physician, hospital, nursing-home and home-care services over 8.5 years; and 3) physician and bed supplies during the two periods. Both cohorts were similar in health status and in their use of hospital, nursing-home, and home-care resources despite a steady decrease in hospital beds during both periods and a shrinking supply of nursing-home beds for the later cohort. Although physician supply increased more rapidly for the first (1971) than for the second (1976) cohort, the later cohort used significantly more ambulatory care than the earlier cohort. Home care appears to substitute for year-to-year variations in nursing-home admissions but not for variations in hospital lengths of stay.

  11. Home care of children and youth with complex health care needs and technology dependencies.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ellen Roy; Murphy, Nancy A

    2012-05-01

    Children and youth with complex medical issues, especially those with technology dependencies, experience frequent and often lengthy hospitalizations. Hospital discharges for these children can be a complicated process that requires a deliberate, multistep approach. In addition to successful discharges to home, it is essential that pediatric providers develop and implement an interdisciplinary and coordinated plan of care that addresses the child's ongoing health care needs. The goal is to ensure that each child remains healthy, thrives, and obtains optimal medical home and developmental supports that promote ongoing care at home and minimize recurrent hospitalizations. This clinical report presents an approach to discharging the child with complex medical needs with technology dependencies from hospital to home and then continually addressing the needs of the child and family in the home environment. PMID:22547780

  12. Coaching the Job Seeker with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheek, Freddie

    Career counselors and job search coaches must be prepared to assist disabled clients as this sector of the labor market increases. As the work force ages, there are greater numbers of workers dealing with disabilities and serious health problems. Sadly, individuals with disabilities often approach the job search process with misconceptions,…

  13. Coaching for workers with chronic illness: evaluating an intervention.

    PubMed

    McGonagle, Alyssa K; Beatty, Joy E; Joffe, Rosalind

    2014-07-01

    Working with chronic illness may present challenges for individuals-for instance, managing symptoms at work, attaining accommodations, and career planning while considering health limitations. These challenges may be stressful and lead to strains. We tested a 12-week, 6-session, phone-based coaching intervention designed to help workers manage these challenges and reduce strains. Using theories of stress and resources, we proposed that coaching would help boost workers' internal resources and would lead to improved work ability perceptions, exhaustion and disengagement burnout, job self-efficacy, core self-evaluations, resilience, mental resources, and job satisfaction, and that these beneficial effects would be stable 12 weeks after coaching ended. Fifty-nine full-time workers with chronic illnesses were randomly assigned to either a coaching group or a waitlisted control group. Participants completed online surveys at enrollment, at the start of coaching, after coaching ended, and 12 weeks postcoaching. Compared with the control group, the coaching group showed significantly improved work ability perceptions, exhaustion burnout, core self-evaluations, and resilience-yet no significant improvements were found for job self-efficacy, disengagement burnout, or job satisfaction. Indirect effects of coaching on work ability, exhaustion and disengagement burnout, and job satisfaction were observed through job self-efficacy, core self-evaluations, resilience, and mental resources. Results indicated that the positive effects of coaching were stable 12 weeks after coaching ended. Results suggest that this coaching intervention was helpful in improving the personal well-being of individuals navigating challenges associated with working and managing chronic illness.

  14. Home health agencies: targets of anti-fraud and abuse investigations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C

    1995-08-01

    Increased health care fraud and abuse investigations could result in home health agencies, and other targets, becoming politically acceptable casualties of war in the battle to balance the federal budget. To protect themselves, home health agencies would be well advised to conduct internal fraud and abuse audits on an annual basis and to develop corporate compliance plans (see Newsletter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1994, at 16, and next month's issue, which will discuss corporate compliance programs as well as the OIG's new voluntary disclosure program). In addition, purchasers of home health agencies should be especially vigilant of fraud and abuse problems during the due diligence phase of the acquisition and, if problems are discovered, should consider whether voluntary disclosure to the OIG and settlement of any resulting claims is an appropriate condition of closing.

  15. Publication of the OIG compliance program guidance for home health agencies--OIG. Notice.

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    This Federal Register notice sets forth the recently issued Compliance Program Guidance for Home Health Agencies developed by the Office of Inspector General (OIG) in cooperation with, and with input from, several provider groups and industry representatives. Many home health care providers have expressed interest in better protecting their operations from fraud and abuse through the adoption of a voluntary compliance program. The OIG has previously developed and published compliance program guidances focused on the clinical laboratory and hospital industries (62 FR 9435, March 3, 1997 and 63 FR 8987, February 23, 1998, respectively). We believe that the development of this compliance program guidance for the home health industry will continue as a positive step towards promoting a higher level of ethical and lawful conduct throughout the entire health care community.

  16. A remote data access architecture for home-monitoring health-care applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Hung; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Kuo, Te-Son

    2007-03-01

    With the aging of the population and the increasing patient preference for receiving care in their own homes, remote home care is one of the fastest growing areas of health care in Taiwan and many other countries. Many remote home-monitoring applications have been developed and implemented to enable both formal and informal caregivers to have remote access to patient data so that they can respond instantly to any abnormalities of in-home patients. The aim of this technology is to give both patients and relatives better control of the health care, reduce the burden on informal caregivers and reduce visits to hospitals and thus result in a better quality of life for both the patient and his/her family. To facilitate their widespread adoption, remote home-monitoring systems take advantage of the low-cost features and popularity of the Internet and PCs, but are inherently exposed to several security risks, such as virus and denial-of-service (DoS) attacks. These security threats exist as long as the in-home PC is directly accessible by remote-monitoring users over the Internet. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to improve the security of such systems, with the proposed architecture aimed at increasing the system availability and confidentiality of patient information. A broker server is introduced between the remote-monitoring devices and the in-home PCs. This topology removes direct access to the in-home PC, and a firewall can be configured to deny all inbound connections while the remote home-monitoring application is operating. This architecture helps to transfer the security risks from the in-home PC to the managed broker server, on which more advanced security measures can be implemented. The pros and cons of this novel architecture design are also discussed and summarized. PMID:16621655

  17. Developing a Coaching Portfolio: Enhancing Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubball, Harry; Robertson, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A portfolio is a well-organized document containing critical analyses and evidence related to a coach's background, context(s) of coaching, approach to coaching, coaching accomplishments, and goals for further development. Here, the authors describe different types of coaching portfolios as well as strategies for developing a coaching portfolio.…

  18. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  19. Five Years of HHS Home Health Care Evaluations: Using Evaluation to Change National Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Smith, Nick L.; Grob, George F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1997, American Evaluation Association member George Grob, now retired from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and currently President of the Center for Public Program Evaluation, made a testimony on Medicare home health care fraud and abuse before the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging. The occasion was to announce the…

  20. 77 FR 60128 - Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide Program Grantees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Noncompetitive Supplements to Nursing... Nursing Assistant and Home Health Aide (NAHHA) Program grantees to develop, implement, and evaluate... Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Nursing, 302 Pine Street, Abilene, TX 79601, T51HP20702...

  1. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  2. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health...' services furnished in the following settings that meet the specified requirements: (1) Skilled...

  3. Aids for Health and Home Extension Volunteers. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Reprint R-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This book contains various aids for Peace Corps home extension volunteers. Section I, "Culture Resource Material," contains four articles by Paul Benjamin: (1) "Values in American Culture"; (2) "The Cultural Context of Health Education"; (3) "Problems of Introducing Public Health Programs in 'Underdeveloped Areas'"; and (4) "The Role of Beliefs…

  4. Arbitration agreements in health care nursing home contracts.

    PubMed

    Infante, Marie C; Lovitch, Karen S

    2003-11-01

    Increasingly, long-term care facilities are adopting alternative dispute resolution measures, such as arbitration, in admission contracts. Whereas avoiding the onus of civil lawsuits is understandable, nursing homes must ensure that the arbitration wording in the contract is precise, enforceable, and most importantly, pursuant to state and federal laws, regulations, and guidelines. Otherwise, the contract itself may be the subject of a court action. PMID:14650372

  5. An examination of interventions to reduce respiratory health and injury hazards in homes of low-income families

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Sherry L. Fowler, Cecile; Harris, Judy; Moffat, Sally; Martinez, Yolanda; Walton, Heather; Ruiz, Bernice; Jacobs, David E.

    2009-01-15

    We evaluated whether combining asthma trigger reduction with housing structural repairs, device disbursement and education in low-income households with children would improve self-reported respiratory health and reduce housing-related respiratory health and injury hazards (convenience sample of n=67 homes with 63 asthmatic and 121 non-asthmatic children). At baseline, a visual assessment of the home environment and a structured occupant interview were used to examine 29 potential injury hazards and 7 potential respiratory health hazards. A home-specific intervention was designed to provide the children's parents or caretakers with the knowledge, skills, motivation, supplies, equipment, and minimum housing conditions necessary for a healthy and safe home. The enrolled households were primarily Hispanic and owned their homes. On average, 8 injury hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 2.2 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 97% of the parents reporting that their homes were safer following the interventions. An average of 3.3 respiratory health hazards were observed in the homes at baseline. Four months following intervention, the average declined to 0.9 hazards per home (p<0.001), with 96% of parents reporting that the respiratory health of their asthmatic children improved. A tailored healthy homes improvement package significantly improves self-reported respiratory health and safety, reduces respiratory health and injury hazards, and can be implemented in concert with a mobile clinical setting.

  6. Mental health crisis at home: service user perspectives on what helps and what hinders.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, C; Niemiec, S

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents data which emerged during the process of a participatory research study to identify the perspectives of previous users of a home treatment service. Feedback was sought in order to establish the criteria for the development of a service evaluation questionnaire. Seven themes emerged from the data which were then used as a framework for the evaluation questionnaire. These themes have also been used within this paper to present what our participants told us was important to them when they received a service at home at a time of mental health crisis. Although what is described here is the experience of one group of service users in the North of England, we hope that the views of these participants will create a resonance with providers of other home treatment services and expand the knowledge about which aspects of care at home during mental health crisis are viewed as helpful and those aspects which are not.

  7. Determinants of the use of specialist mental health services by nursing home residents.

    PubMed Central

    Shea, D G; Streit, A; Smyer, M A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines the effects of resident and facility characteristics on the probability of nursing home residents receiving treatment by mental health professionals. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study uses data from the Institutional Population Component of the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey, a secondary data source containing data on 3,350 nursing home residents living in 810 nursing homes as of January 1, 1987. STUDY DESIGN. Andersen's health services use model (1968) is used to estimate a multivariate logistic equation for the effects of independent variables on the probability that a resident has received services from mental health professionals. Important variables include resident race, sex, and age; presence of several behaviors and reported mental illnesses; and facility ownership, facility size, and facility certification. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data on 188 residents were excluded from the sample because information was missing on several important variables. For some additional variables residents who had missing information were coded as negative responses. This left 3,162 observations for analysis in the logistic regressions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Older residents and residents with more ADL limitations are much less likely than other residents to have received treatment from a mental health professional. Residents with reported depression, schizophrenia, or psychoses, and residents who are agitated or hallucinating are more likely to have received treatment. Residents in government nursing homes, homes run by chains, and homes with low levels of certification are less likely to have received treatment. CONCLUSIONS. Few residents receive treatment from mental health professionals despite need. Older, physically disabled residents need special attention. Care in certain types of facilities requires further study. New regulations mandating treatment for mentally ill residents will demand increased attention from

  8. Manager Coaching Skills: What Makes a Good Coach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Steven; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the concept of managers as coaches and summarizes a study that was conducted to evaluate coaching skills among sales managers by using telephone interviews with employees to collect data regarding managers' effectiveness in eight coaching skills. Behaviors associated with high and low rankings are identified. (Contains 26 references.)…

  9. Coaching Considerations: FAQs Useful in the Development of Literacy Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The National Advisory Board for the Literacy Coaching Clearinghouse have identified a number of considerations that it believed needed further discussion as schools, districts, and states embrace literacy coaching. It negotiated and discussed a number of issues surrounding coaching and agreed on 10 key ideas that should be part of the discussions…

  10. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, R.L.; Warren, S.

    1999-04-20

    This editorial paper presents a vision for intelligent health care in the home of the future, focusing on technologies with the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. A secure, plug-and-play information framework provides the starting point for identifying technologies that must be developed before home-based devices can know their context and assimilate information to support care decisions.

  11. Starting a hospital-based home health agency: Part II--Key success factors.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, P

    1993-09-01

    In Part II of a three-part series, the financial, technological and legislative issues of a hospital-based home health-agency are discussed. Beginning a home healthcare service requires intensive research to answer key environmental and operational questions--need, competition, financial projections, initial start-up costs and the impact of delayed depreciation. Assessments involving technology, staffing, legislative and regulatory issues can help project service volume, productivity and cost-control.

  12. Health@Home: The Work of Health Information Management in the Household (HIMH): Implications for Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Anne; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Contemporary health care places enormous health information management demands on laypeople. Insights into their skills and habits complements current developments in consumer health innovations, including personal health records. Using a five-element human factors model of work, health information management in the household (HIMH) is characterized by the tasks completed by individuals within household organizations, using certain tools and technologies in a given physical environment. Design: We conducted a descriptive-exploratory study of the work of HIMH, involving 49 community-dwelling volunteers from a rural Midwestern community. Measurements: During in-person interviews, we collected data using semistructured questionnaires and photographs of artifacts used for HIMH. Results: The work of HIMH is largely the responsibility of a single individual, primarily engaged in the tasks of acquiring, managing, and organizing a diverse set of health information. Paper-based tools are most common, and residents develop strategies for storing information in the household environment aligned with anticipated use. Affiliative relationships, e.g., parent-child or spousal, within the household serve as the organization that gives rise to health information management practices. Synthesis of these findings led to identification of several storage strategies employed in HIMH. These strategies are labeled “just-in-time,” “just-because,” “just-in-case,” and “just-at-hand,” reflecting location of the artifacts of health information and anticipated urgency in the need to retrieve it. Conclusion: Laypeople develop and employ robust, complex strategies for managing health information in the home. Capitalizing on these strategies will complement and extend current consumer health innovations to provide functional support to people who face increasing demands to manage personal health information. PMID:16049230

  13. Dwelling within political violence: Palestinian women's narratives of home, mental health, and resilience.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cindy A; Kemp, Susan; El-Zuhairi, Mona

    2014-11-01

    Political violence is increasingly played out within everyday civilian environments, particularly family homes. Yet, within the literature on political violence and mental health, the role of threats to home remains under-explored. Using focus group data from 32 Palestinian women, this paper explores the implications of violations to the home within political violence. Threats to the privacy, control, and constancy of the family home - key dimensions of ontological security (Giddens, 1990) emerged as central themes in women's narratives. Surveillance, home invasions, and actual or threatened destruction of women's home environments provoked fear, anxiety, grief, humiliation, and helplessness, particularly as women struggled to protect their children. Women also described how they mobilized the home for economic, familial and cultural survival. Study findings illuminate the impact of threats to intimate environments on the well-being of women and their families living with chronic political violence, and underscore the importance of attention to violations of place and home in research on civilian experiences of and responses to political violence.

  14. My Home Planet Earth: My Health My World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tharp, Barbara; Dresden, Judith; Moreno, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for students in grades K-4 is part of the My Health My World series which explores environmental health issues. It includes (1) an activities guide for teachers, which focuses on physical science, life science, and environment and health, presenting activity based lessons that entice students to discover concepts in science,…

  15. [EurSafety Health-Net: MRSA Eradication in Nursing Homes and Home Care - A Practice Report].

    PubMed

    Bergen, P; Rocker, D; Claußen, K; Kluba, J; Vogelsang, E; Vogelsang, G

    2016-01-01

    In 2009 the project EurSafety Health-Net, funded by Interreg IVa, was initiated in order to create a cross-border quality alliance to enhance patient safety in the field of infectious diseases. Within this framework, several studies and projects addressing key topics of infection control were carried out. We describe the two-year project "MRSA decolonisation in care settings (MSP)", which aimed at evaluating a simple and economic way of decolonisation of non-hospitalised MRSA carriers in 2 districts in Lower Saxony. In the course of the project 181 decolonisations of MRSA carriers were performed by nursing homes and nursing services for outpatients in cooperation with the local public health authorities of the districts Ammerland and Grafschaft Bentheim. Of 181 cases 134 were eligible for statistical analysis. The project provided protocols for 2 different starting situations: 1) Continuing and completing a decolonisation treatment subsequent to a hospital stay by nursing services for outpatients or in a nursing home. 2) Starting a decolonisation treatment in a nursing home or by nursing services for outpatients. The carriers were provided with the required materials either by the hospitals (situation 1) or by the local public health authorities (situation 2) free of charge. The decolonisation treatment and the testing were offered only to carriers free of properties deemed as decolonisation obstacles and was applied without involvement of the general practitioner. Short- and long-term success of the 5 day decolonisation treatment was tested afterwards by two swabs (14 days and 6 months after the end of the treatment). The results of the 6-month control swabs showed that 45% of the carriers were successfully decolonised in the long term. All parties involved regarded the procedure of the MSP project as effective with respect to the target. Thus, even after the project was finished, both districts continued applying the MSP protocol. PMID:25951112

  16. Team-level flexibility, work-home spillover, and health behavior.

    PubMed

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L

    2013-05-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE--results only work environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large U.S. corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees' health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline.

  17. Mental and behavioral health conditions among older adults: implications for the home care workforce

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Hayley P.; Coyle, Caitlin E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The shift towards home and community-based care, coupled with the growing prevalence of mental and behavioral health conditions, increases the demand for skilled home care workers. However, little is known about the experiences of home care aides who provide care to clients with mental and behavioral health diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to identify challenges aides face in providing care to this particular group of clients, as well as the strategies and support they utilize to complete their job responsibilities. Methods Data from five focus groups with home care workers (N = 49) throughout Massachusetts were used to examine the experiences of home care workers providing services to adults with mental or behavioral health needs. A constant comparative method was used during analysis of the focus group transcripts. Results Aides described a lack of prior-knowledge of challenging client behaviors, leaving them unprepared to deal with disruptions to care delivery. Aides feel unsafe or unsure providing care to someone with complex needs, made worse by a perceived lack of training and support from the broader care team. Aides develop unique strategies for accomplishing their work. Conclusion This analysis of the aide’s perspective contributes valuable, and often unheard, insight to inform what we know about providing reliable, quality and safe home care to this growing group of vulnerable adults. Implications of this convergence are discussed relative to aides. PMID:25965114

  18. Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE – Results Only Work Environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large US corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees’ health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. PMID:23517706

  19. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  20. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  1. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  2. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  3. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment § 403.764 Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. (a)...

  4. Environmental Health and Safety Hazards Experienced by Home Health Care Providers: A Room-by-Room Analysis.

    PubMed

    Polivka, Barbara J; Wills, Celia E; Darragh, Amy; Lavender, Steven; Sommerich, Carolyn; Stredney, Donald

    2015-11-01

    The number of personnel providing in-home health care services is increasing substantially. The unique configuration of environmental hazards in individual client homes has a significant impact on the safety and health of home health care providers (HHPs). This mixed-methods study used data from a standardized questionnaire, focus groups, and individual interviews to explore environmental health and safety hazards encountered by HHPs in client homes. The participant sample (N = 68) included nurses, aides, therapists, and owners/managers from a variety of geographic locations. The most often-reported hazards were trip/slip/lift hazards, biohazards, and hazards from poor air quality, allergens, pests and rodents, and fire and burns. Frequency of identified key hazards varied by room, that is, kitchen (e.g., throw rugs, water on floor), bathroom (e.g., tight spaces for client handling), bedroom (e.g., bed too low), living room (e.g., animal waste), and hallway (e.g., clutter). Findings indicate the need for broader training to enable HHPs to identify and address hazards they encounter in client homes. PMID:26268486

  5. The Medical Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy The Medical Home KidsHealth > For Parents > The Medical Home Print ... home" for your child. What Does the Term "Medical Home" Mean? A medical home isn't a ...

  6. Coaching Education in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Tom, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Because of increasingly large numbers of nonteacher elementary and secondary coaches, there is concern about the effect on participants and on the future of athletics. Nine articles highlight five North American national coaching education programs, three states with secondary coaching education programs, and a directory of U.S. sport…

  7. The Power of Virtual Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Marcia L.; Zigmond, Naomi P.; Gregg, Madeleine; Gable, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Amid budget cuts in U.S. public schools, the spotlight is on how to make less effective teachers more effective--fast. The authors describe virtual coaching--in which a coach interacts electronically with a teacher as a lesson unfolds--as a promising way to help teachers with weak teaching skills. Virtual coaching uses online and mobile technology…

  8. Handbook for Youth Sports Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seefeldt, Vern, Ed.

    This handbook was generated by a survey of the specific needs of the coaching community serving young children as athletic coaches. The survey revealed a need for information that addresses the needs of beginning level volunteer coaches. The first section discusses the benefits of competitive sports for children and youth and the role of the youth…

  9. A Holistic Approach to Coaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Bette L.

    1982-01-01

    To integrate psychological factors with traditional training programs, the athletic coach needs to develop special skills. The coach must develop appropriate strategies for coping with athletes' anxiety, fear, or lack of self-confidence by integrating practice and game behaviors and by individualizing coaching practices. (JN)

  10. Pre-Exercise Screening and Health Coaching in CHD Secondary Prevention: A Qualitative Study of the Patient Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, R.; Gillies, M.; Barber, J.; MacIntyre, K.; Harkins, C.; Findlay, I. N.; McCloy, K.; Gillie, A.; Scoular, A.; MacIntyre, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary prevention programmes can be effective in reducing morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD). In particular, UK guidelines, including those from the Department of Health, emphasize physical activity. However, the effects of secondary prevention programmes with an exercise component are moderate and uptake is highly…

  11. Home Health Care (HHC) Managers Perceptions About Challenges and Obstacles that Hinder HHC Services in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Ajlouni, Musa T.; Dawani, Hania; Diab, Salah M.

    2015-01-01

    Home care aims at supporting people with various degrees of dependency to remain at home rather than use residential, long-term, or institutional-based nursing care. Demographic, epidemiological, social, and cultural trends in Jordan as in other countries are changing the traditional patterns of care with growing emphasis on home care. The purpose of this study is to highlight the most common challenges related to home health care (HHC) services in Jordan as perceived by the managers of HHC agencies. Methods: a descriptive qualitative design that depends on focus group discussions has been used to collect data from a sample of 18 managers who met the selection criteria and who are willing to participate, the study found that, the main challenges of HHC services as perceived by managers were: shortage of female staff, lack of governance and regulation, poor management, unethical practices, lack of referral systems, and low accessibility of the poor and less privileged as HHC services are not included in health insurance schemes, it concludes also that the home health care industry in Jordan is facing many challenges and problems that may have negative effects on the effectiveness, efficiency, equity and quality of services and should be addressed by health policy makers. PMID:25946949

  12. Home care assistants’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among community-dwelling seniors with multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Grundberg, Åke; Hansson, Anna; Religa, Dorota; Hillerås, Pernilla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Elderly people with multiple chronic conditions, or multimorbidity, are at risk of developing poor mental health. These seniors often remain in their homes with support from home care assistants (HCAs). Mental health promotion by HCAs needs to be studied further because they may be among the first to observe changes in clients’ mental health status. Aim To describe HCAs’ perspectives on detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health among homebound seniors with multimorbidity. Methods We applied a descriptive qualitative study design using semi-structured interviews. Content analyses were performed on five focus group interviews conducted in 2014 with 26 HCAs. Results Most HCAs stated that they were experienced in caring for clients with mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, sleep problems, and high alcohol consumption. The HCAs mentioned as causes, or risk factors, multiple chronic conditions, feelings of loneliness, and social isolation. The findings reveal that continuity of care and seniors’ own thoughts and perceptions were essential to detecting mental health problems. Observation, collaboration, and social support emerged as important means of detecting mental health problems and promoting mental health. Conclusion The HCAs had knowledge of risk factors, but they seemed insecure about which health professionals had the primary responsibility for mental health. They also seemed to have detected early signs of mental health problems, even though good personal knowledge of the client and continuity in home visits were crucial to do so. When it came to mental health promotion, the suggestions related to the aim of ending social isolation, decreasing feelings of loneliness, and increasing physical activity. The results indicate that the HCAs seemed dependent on supervision by district nurses and on care managers’ decisions to support the needed care, to schedule assignments related to the detection of mental health

  13. Socioeconomic Disparities in the Use of Home Health Services in a Medicare Managed Care Population

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Vicki A; Rogowski, Jeannette; Wickstrom, Steven L; Adams, John; Marainen, Jonas; Escarce, José J

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate socioeconomic disparities in access to home health visits and durable medical equipment by persons enrolled in two Medicare managed care health plans. Data Sources A telephone survey of 4,613 Medicare managed care enrollees conducted between April and October of 2000 and linked to administrative claims for a subsequent 12-month period. Study Design We estimated a series of logistic regression models to determine which socioeconomic factors were related to home health visits and the use of durable medical equipment (DME) among Medicare managed care enrollees. Principal Findings Controlling for health and demographic differences, Medicare managed care enrollees in the lowest tertile for nonhousing assets had 50 percent greater odds than those in the highest tertile of having one or more home health visits. All else equal, enrollees with less than a high school education had 30 percent lower odds than those who had graduated from high school of using durable medical equipment. Conclusions Medicare managed care enrollees of low socioeconomic status do not appear to have reduced access to home health visits; however, use of durable medical equipment is considerably lower for enrollees with less than a high school education. Physicians and therapists working with Medicare managed care enrollees may want to actively target DME prescriptions to those with educational disadvantages. PMID:15333109

  14. Designing Smart Health Care Technology into the Home of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, S.; Craft, R.L.; Bosma, J.T.

    1999-04-07

    The US health care industry is experiencing a substantial paradigm shift with regard to home care due to the convergence of several technology areas. Increasingly-capable telehealth systems and the internet are not only moving the point of care closer to the patient, but the patient can now assume a more active role in his or her own care. These technologies, coupled with (1) the migration of the health care industry to electronic patient records and (2) the emergence of a growing number of enabling health care technologies (e.g., novel biosensors, wearable devices, and intelligent software agents), demonstrate unprecedented potential for delivering highly automated, intelligent health care in the home. This editorial paper presents a vision for the implementation of intelligent health care technology in the home of the future, focusing on areas of research that have the highest potential payoff given targeted government funding over the next ten years. Here, intelligent health care technology means smart devices and systems that are aware of their context and can therefore assimilate information to support care decisions. A systems perspective is used to describe a framework under which devices can interact with one another in a plug-and-play manner. Within this infrastructure, traditionally passive sensors and devices will have read/write access to appropriate portions of an individual's electronic medical record. Through intelligent software agents, plug-and-play mechanisms, messaging standards, and user authentication tools, these smart home-based medical devices will be aware of their own capabilities, their relationship to the other devices in the home system, and the identity of the individual(s) from whom they acquire data. Information surety technology will be essential to maintain the confidentiality of patient-identifiable medical information and to protect the integrity of geographically dispersed electronic medical records with which each home

  15. [Diet counseling through "Shoku-dietary Coaching"].

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Naoko

    2005-11-01

    "Shoku-dietary Coaching" is a skill under development by Kageyama, who applies "coaching," widely used in the business field, to diet counseling. This counseling aims at improving conventional "nutritional guidance-type diet counseling" and promoting self-motivation so that healthy clients eagerly improve their own health, and clients with obesity or lifestyle-related diseases can learn self-control. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, the basis for the differentiation between healthy and unhealthy conditions is not only the parameters measured by medical devices. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, attention is directed to clients' assessment of their own lifestyle, dietary goals they have, and actions they will take to achieve them. To increase the health level of clients, we are developing techniques to enhance their motivation by showing sympathy with and support for their dietary behavior and health awareness. In addition, we give guidance through both theory and the practice of such things as having three meals a day at regular hours, knowing the kinds and daily amounts of foods appropriate for each client, and clarifying the percentages of seasonings necessary for cooking. The habit of having meals at regular hours alleviates stress, promotes communication with people sitting at the same table, and increases the health level of both the client and the others. These are important elements in the theory of Shoku-dietary Coaching. Putting the above into practice should not be limited to clients, but should include the clinic staff so as to deepen their own understanding and communication. Enhanced communication reinforces team medical care in the clinic. Communication skills which involve respect for others, continuous motivation of individuals, and achievement of purposes that may even require a long time may be useful for all people.

  16. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model – a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals. PMID:27382264

  17. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model - a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals. PMID:27382264

  18. Understanding inequities in home health care outcomes: staff views on agency and system factors.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Bourjolly, Joretha; Frasso, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Results regarding staff perspectives on contributing factors to racial/ethnic disparities in home health care outcomes are discussed. Focus group interviews were conducted with home health care staff (N = 23) who represented various agencies from three Northeastern states. Participants identified agency and system factors that contribute to disparities, including: (a) administrative staff bias/discretion, (b) communication challenges, (c) patient/staff cultural discordance, (d) cost control, and (e) poor access to community resources. Participants reported that bias can influence staff at all levels and is expressed via poor coverage of predominantly minority service areas, resulting in reduced intensity and continuity of service for minority patients. PMID:25706958

  19. Understanding health decisions using critical realism: home-dialysis decision-making during chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Lori; Clark, Alexander M

    2012-03-01

    Understanding health decisions using critical realism: home-dialysis decision-making during chronic kidney disease This paper examines home-dialysis decision making in people with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) from the perspective of critical realism. CKD programmes focus on patient education for self-management to delay the progression of kidney disease and the preparation and support for renal replacement therapy e.g.) dialysis and transplantation. Home-dialysis has clear health, societal and economic benefits yet service usage is low despite efforts to realign resources and educate individuals. Current research on the determinants of modality selection is superficial and insufficient to capture the complexities embedded in the process of dialysis modality selection. Predictors of home-dialysis selection and the effect of chronic kidney disease educational programmes provide a limited explanation of this experience. A re-conceptualization of the problem is required in order to fully understand this process. The epistemology and ontology of critical realism guides our knowledge and methodology particularly suited for examination of these complexities. This approach examines the deeper mechanisms and wider determinants associated with modality decision making, specifically who chooses home dialysis and under what circumstances. Until more is known regarding dialysis modality decision making service usage of home dialysis will remain low as interventions will be based on inadequate epistemology.

  20. Assessment of Airborne Exposures and Health in Flooded Homes Undergoing Renovation

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Kimberly A.; Metwali, Nervana; Perry, Sarah Spencer; Hart, Tom; Kostle, Pamela A.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2008, the Cedar River crested flooding more than 5,000 Cedar Rapids homes. Residents whose homes were flooded were invited to participate in this study. Household assessments and resident interviews were conducted between November 2008 and April 2009. We characterized exposures and symptoms experienced by individuals inhabiting 73 flood-damaged homes. Active air sampling and passive electrostatic dust collectors were used to assess exposures to: culturable mold, culturable bacteria, fungal spores, inhalable particulate matter (iPM), endotoxin, glucans, allergens, lead, asbestos, radon, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Wall moisture levels and relative humidity were also measured. Exposures and questionnaire-based health assessments were compared at two levels of remediation, in-progress and completed. Homes with remediation in-progress (n=24), as compared to the completed homes (n=49), had significantly higher airborne concentrations of mold, bacteria, iPM, endotoxin and glucan. Residents of in-progress homes had a significantly higher prevalence of doctor diagnosed allergies (adjusted OR=3.08; 95%CI: 1.05–9.02) and all residents had elevated prevalence of self-reported wheeze (adjusted OR=3.77; 95%CI: 2.06–6.92) and prescription medication use for breathing problems (adjusted OR=1.38; 95%CI: 1.01–1.88) after the flood as compared to before. Proper post-flood remediation led to improved air quality and lower exposures among residents living in flooded homes. PMID:22519834

  1. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment From Smart Home-Based Behavior Data.

    PubMed

    Dawadi, Prafulla Nath; Cook, Diane Joyce; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2016-07-01

    Smart home technologies offer potential benefits for assisting clinicians by automating health monitoring and well-being assessment. In this paper, we examine the actual benefits of smart home-based analysis by monitoring daily behavior in the home and predicting clinical scores of the residents. To accomplish this goal, we propose a clinical assessment using activity behavior (CAAB) approach to model a smart home resident's daily behavior and predict the corresponding clinical scores. CAAB uses statistical features that describe characteristics of a resident's daily activity performance to train machine learning algorithms that predict the clinical scores. We evaluate the performance of CAAB utilizing smart home sensor data collected from 18 smart homes over two years. We obtain a statistically significant correlation ( r=0.72) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided cognitive scores and a statistically significant correlation ( r=0.45) between CAAB-predicted and clinician-provided mobility scores. These prediction results suggest that it is feasible to predict clinical scores using smart home sensor data and learning-based data analysis.

  2. Pre-Service Education for Nurses' Aides in Hospitals, Nursing Homes, Home Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Public Health, Denver. Public Health Nursing Section.

    The guide was developed on the basis of advice from a widely representative committee appointed by the Colorado State Department of Public Health. The materials were tested in a course in an urban center and a course in a rural center. The initial portion of the manual presents: (1) guidelines for organizing preparatory nurse aide courses, (2)…

  3. Seeking stability in the Medicare home health benefit. Margins evaporate; agencies in financial jeopardy.

    PubMed

    2003-07-01

    In a watershed moment for the home care industry, National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC) staff has obtained, decoded, deciphered, and tabulated rates of return for all Medicare-participating agencies in the nation. The results show the average rate of return for Medicare agencies in the latest fiscal year--that is, before the October 2002 15 percent cut in home health reimbursements, before audits, and before partial episode payment adjustments--is 5.15 percent. That figure is well below the average 22 percent rate of return the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission alleged that home care agencies were making. Following is the text of NAHC's report, along with a letter from the respected firm of Muse & Associates vouching for the accuracy of NAHC's methodology.

  4. Charting the course for home health care quality: action steps for achieving sustainable improvement: conference proceedings.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Penny Hollander; Peterson, Laura E; Reische, Laurie; Bruno, Lori; Clark, Amy

    2004-12-01

    On June 30 and July 1, 2003, the first national meeting Charting the Course for Home Health Care Quality: Action Steps for Achieving Sustainable Improvement convened in New York City. The Center for Home Care Policy & Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY) hosted the meeting with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Fifty-seven attendees from throughout the United States participated. The participants included senior leaders and managers and nurses working directly in home care today. The meeting's objectives were to: 1. foster dialogue among key constituents influencing patient safety and home care, 2. promote information-sharing across sectors and identify areas where more information is needed, and, 3. develop an agenda and strategy for moving forward. This article reports the meeting's proceedings.

  5. Human factors and ergonomics in home care: Current concerns and future considerations for health information technology

    PubMed Central

    Or, Calvin K.L.; Valdez, Rupa S.; Casper, Gail R.; Carayon, Pascale; Burke, Laura J.; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2010-01-01

    Sicker patients with greater care needs are being discharged to their homes to assume responsibility for their own care with fewer nurses available to aid them. This situation brings with it a host of human factors and ergonomic (HFE) concerns, both for the home care nurse and the home dwelling patient, that can affect quality of care and patient safety. Many of these concerns are related to the critical home care tasks of information access, communication, and patient self-monitoring and self-management. Currently, a variety of health information technologies (HITs) are being promoted as possible solutions to those problems, but those same technologies bring with them a new set of HFE concerns. This paper reviews the HFE considerations for information access, communication, and patients self-monitoring and self-management, discusses how HIT can potentially mitigate current problems, and explains how the design and implementation of HIT itself requires careful HFE attention. PMID:19713630

  6. A home health care approach to exercise for persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Logsdon, Rebecca G; McCurry, Susan M; Teri, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Regular exercise is a mainstay of preventive health care for individuals of all ages. Research with older adults has shown that exercise reduces risk of chronic illness, maintains mobility and function, enhances mood, and may even improve cognitive function. For individuals with dementia, exercise programs are particularly likely to improve health, mood, and quality of life; the challenge at this time is to make exercise accessible and enjoyable, demonstrate its benefits, and convince family caregivers of its worth for individuals with dementia. Home health providers are uniquely positioned to assist caregivers in developing and implementing a home exercise program for their care recipient with dementia. Results of a controlled critical trial conducted at the University of Washington have demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of a home health exercise and problem solving intervention (Reducing Disability in Alzheimer's Disease, or RDAD) for decreasing physical, psychological, and behavioral disabilities associated with dementia. This article describes the RDAD program, discusses the role of home health providers in its delivery, and provides an example of its implementation.

  7. Effect of Weatherization Combined With Community Health Worker In-Home Education on Asthma Control

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Sherry; Gregory, Joel; Philby, Miriam; Jacobs, David E.; Krieger, James

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the benefits of adding weatherization-plus-health interventions to an in-home, community health worker (CHW) education program on asthma control. Methods. We used a quasi-experimental design to compare study group homes (n = 34) receiving CHW education and weatherization-plus-health structural interventions with historical comparison group homes (n = 68) receiving only education. Data were collected in King County, Washington, from October 2009 to September 2010. Results. Over the 1-year study period, the percentage of study group children with not-well-controlled or very poorly controlled asthma decreased more than the comparison group percentage (100% to 28.8% vs 100% to 51.6%; P = .04). Study group caregiver quality-of-life improvements exceeded comparison group improvements (P = .002) by 0.7 units, a clinically important difference. The decrease in study home asthma triggers (evidence of mold, water damage, pests, smoking) was marginally greater than the comparison group decrease (P = .089). Except for mouse allergen, the percentage of study group allergen floor dust samples at or above the detection limit decreased, although most reductions were not statistically significant. Conclusions. Combining weatherization and healthy home interventions (e.g., improved ventilation, moisture and mold reduction, carpet replacement, and plumbing repairs) with CHW asthma education significantly improves childhood asthma control. PMID:24228661

  8. From Teaching to Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuspan, Tara

    2013-01-01

    In the course of transitioning from classroom teacher to math instructional coach, Tara Zuspan identified critical themes and lessons she had learned. She focused her efforts on building relationships, partnering with the principal, understanding the process of change, and providing teachers with opportunities to collaborate. These intentional…

  9. The Crucial Coaching Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most powerful ways to boost the payoff from school sports lays in helping coaches build developmental relationships with student-athletes. Developmental relationships are close connections through which young people develop character skills to discover who they are, gain the ability to shape their own lives, and learn how to interact…

  10. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  11. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    PubMed

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches.

  12. Drugs and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Kenneth S., Ed.

    This volume is based on the premise that professional preparation for coaching should include viable experiences in drug education, with particular reference to coping with drug-related problems. The first section provides general information on the purposes and effects of drugs, controls, and concepts of doping. The second section deals with four…

  13. Creating a Supportive Environment among Youth Football Players: A Qualitative Study of French and Norwegian Youth Grassroots Football Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Torill; Van Hoye, Aurelie; Tjomsland, Hege Eikeland; Holsen, Ingrid; Wold, Bente; Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Samdal, Oddrun; Sarrazin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The health promoting benefits of sport participation are under-utilized and should be further developed, particularly at the grassroots level. The purpose of this paper is to examine how grassroots coaches in youth football perceive their coaching practices after participating in a community-based coach education program aimed at…

  14. Distributed personal health information management system for dermatology at the homes for senior citizens.

    PubMed

    Lavanya, J; Goh, K W; Leow, Y H; Chio, M T W; Prabaharan, K; Kim, E; Kim, Y; Soh, C B

    2006-01-01

    A distributed personal health information management system (D-PHIMS) has been tested at a nursing home for the senior citizens (NHSC) in Singapore. The personal health information management system (PHIMS) from the University of Washington was customized to Singapore's context for teledermatology. A clinical trial commenced in October 2005 is ongoing and the survey results obtained indicate that the participants are satisfied with the D-PHIMS system. The diagnosis and treatment recommendations made by the dermatologists using the D-PHIMS diagnosis module were effective in most cases based on feedback from the nursing staff at the elderly nursing home. The results suggest that a teledermatology system could become a useful tool for the nursing homes and to control increasing healthcare costs for elderly care.

  15. Local adaptations to a global health initiative: penalties for home births in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Greeson, Dana; Sacks, Emma; Masvawure, Tsitsi B; Austin-Evelyn, Katherine; Kruk, Margaret E; Macwan'gi, Mubiana; Grépin, Karen A

    2016-11-01

    Global health initiatives (GHIs) are implemented across a variety of geographies and cultures. Those targeting maternal health often prioritise increasing facility delivery rates. Pressure on local implementers to meet GHI goals may lead to unintended programme features that could negatively impact women. This study investigates penalties for home births imposed by traditional leaders on women during the implementation of Saving Mothers, Giving Life (SMGL) in Zambia. Forty focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted across four rural districts to assess community experiences of SMGL at the conclusion of its first year. Participants included women who recently delivered at home (3 FGDs/district), women who recently delivered in a health facility (3 FGDs/district), community health workers (2 FGDs/district) and local leaders (2 FGDs/district). Findings indicate that community leaders in some districts-independently of formal programme directive-used fines to penalise women who delivered at home rather than in a facility. Participants in nearly all focus groups reported hearing about the imposition of penalties following programme implementation. Some women reported experiencing penalties firsthand, including cash and livestock fines, or fees for child health cards that are typically free. Many women who delivered at home reported their intention to deliver in a facility in the future to avoid penalties. While communities largely supported the use of penalties to promote facility delivery, the penalties effectively introduced a new tax on poor rural women and may have deterred their utilization of postnatal and child health care services. The imposition of penalties is thus a punitive adaptation that can impose new financial burdens on vulnerable women and contribute to widening health, economic and gender inequities in communities. Health initiatives that aim to increase demand for health services should monitor local efforts to achieve programme targets in order

  16. Health-related profile and quality of life among nursing home residents: does pain matter?

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Wan, Vanessa T C; Vong, Sinfia K S

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this exploratory cross-sectional study was to explore the health-related profile and quality of life among older persons living with and without pain in nursing homes. Ten nursing homes were approached, and 535 older persons were invited to join the study from 2009 to 2011. The nursing home residents' demographic information and information regarding their pain situation and the use of oral analgesic drug and nondrug therapy among the older residents with chronic pain were also collected. Residents' physical health (using the Barthel Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Elderly Mobility Scores); psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, depression, and loneliness (using the Happiness Scale, the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Geriatric Depression Scale, and the UCLA Loneliness Scale); and quality of life were investigated. Among the 535 nursing home residents, 396 (74%) of them suffered from pain, with mean pain scores of 4.09 ± 2.19, indicating medium pain intensity a remaining 139 (26%) reported no pain. The location of pain was mainly in the knees, back and shoulders. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of the no-pain group (p < .05), nursing home residents' pain affected both their psychologic health, including happiness, life satisfaction, and depression, and their physical quality of life. Nevertheless, only one-half of the older persons with pain used oral analgesic drug or nondrug therapy to relieve their pain. Pain had a significant impact on their mobility and ADL, was positively correlated with happiness and life satisfaction, and was negatively correlated with loneliness and depression. Pain management is a high priority in elderly care; as such, innovative and interdisciplinary strategies are necessary to enhance quality of life particularly for older persons living in nursing homes.

  17. Job Satisfaction of Home Health Satisfaction Workers in the Environment of Cost Containment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Marcia; Kadushin, Goldie

    2004-01-01

    This national survey examined the job satisfaction of 228 home health social workers in the restrictive reimbursement environment of the Medicare interim payment system. Administrators' helpfulness in resolving ethical conflicts between patient access to services and agency financial priorities contributed significantly to greater satisfaction in…

  18. Population Education in Health and Home Economics: Some Sample Lessons for the Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    This booklet contains five sample lessons integrating population education into health and home economics instruction. It is one of four in a series. Materials differ from those in an earlier series (1980) in that lessons are presented at the secondary level only; there is no duplication of lessons from the earlier series in content and teaching…

  19. 78 FR 26250 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... November 21, 2011 (76 FR 71920), VA proposed to amend its regulations concerning the billing methodology... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN98 Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care to Non-VA Providers... services and hospice care. Because the newly applicable methodology cannot supersede rates for which VA...

  20. Impact of a Statewide Home Visiting Program on Parenting and on Child Health and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldera, Debra; Burrell, Lori; Rodriguez, Kira; Crowne, Sarah Shea; Rohde, Charles; Duggan, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a voluntary, paraprofessional home visiting program on promoting child health and development and maternal parenting knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Methods: This collaborative, experimental study of 6 Healthy Families Alaska (HFAK) programs enrolled 325 families from 1/00 to 7/01, randomly assigned them to…

  1. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  2. A game-based strategy for the staff development of home health care nurses.

    PubMed

    Popil, Inna; Dillard-Thompson, Darlene

    2015-05-01

    This article describes gaming, an interactive teaching strategy that promotes active learning. An evaluation study conducted with home health care nurses tested the use of a game as a teaching tool. The study evaluated learning outcomes and learners' level of engagement and satisfaction with an educational game as a teaching method. PMID:25955422

  3. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  4. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  5. 42 CFR 415.204 - Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home health agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities... SETTINGS Services of Residents § 415.204 Services of residents in skilled nursing facilities and home... nursing facility. Payment to a participating skilled nursing facility may include the cost of services...

  6. Medicare-Certified Home Health Care: Urban-Rural Differences in Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Lacey; Jarosek, Stephanie L.; Virnig, Beth A.; Durham, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Context: Availability of Medicare-certified home health care (HHC) to rural elders can prevent more expensive institutional care. To date, utilization of HHC by rural elders has not been studied in detail. Purpose: To examine urban-rural differences in Medicare HHC utilization. Methods: The 2002 100% Medicare HHC claims and denominator files were…

  7. Promoting infant health through home visiting by a nurse-managed community worker team.

    PubMed

    Barnes-Boyd, C; Fordham Norr, K; Nacion, K W

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the Resources, Education and Care in the Home program (REACH-Futures), an infant mortality reduction initiative in the inner city of Chicago built on the World Health Organization (WHO) primary health care model and over a decade of experience administering programs to reduce infant mortality through home visits. The program uses a nurse-managed team, which includes community residents selected, trained, and integrated as health advocates. Service participants were predominately African American families. All participants were low-income and resided in inner-city neighborhoods with high unemployment, high teen birth rates, violent crime, and deteriorated neighborhoods. Outcomes for the first 666 participants are compared to a previous home-visiting program that used only nurses. Participant retention rates were equivalent overall and significantly higher in the first months of the REACH-Futures program. There were two infant deaths during the course of the study, a lower death rate than the previous program or the city. Infant health problems and developmental levels were equivalent to the prior program and significantly more infants were fully immunized at 12 months. The authors conclude that the use of community workers as a part of the home-visiting team is as effective as the nurse-only team in meeting the needs of families at high risk of poor infant outcomes. This approach is of national interest because of its potential to achieve the desired outcomes in a cost-effective manner.

  8. The Nontoxic Home. Protecting Yourself and Your Family from Everyday Toxics and Health Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadd, Debra Lynn

    The document maintains that the world is filled with health hazards and the best a person can do is to assess the danger of individual products, learn the risks, weigh the risks against the benefits, and decide whether or not to personally take these risks or to subject family members to them. This perspective begins in the home. This book…

  9. Sharps Injuries and Other Blood and Body Fluid Exposures Among Home Health Care Nurses and Aides

    PubMed Central

    Markkanen, Pia K.; Galligan, Catherine J.; Kriebel, David; Chalupka, Stephanie M.; Kim, Hyun; Gore, Rebecca J.; Sama, Susan R.; Laramie, Angela K.; Davis, Letitia

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We quantified risks of sharp medical device (sharps) injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures among home health care nurses and aides, identified risk factors, assessed the use of sharps with safety features, and evaluated underreporting in workplace-based surveillance. Methods. We conducted a questionnaire survey and workplace-based surveillance, collaborating with 9 home health care agencies and 2 labor unions from 2006 to 2007. Results. Approximately 35% of nurses and 6.4% of aides had experienced at least 1 sharps injury during their home health care career; corresponding figures for other blood and body fluid exposures were 15.1% and 6.7%, respectively. Annual sharps injuries incidence rates were 5.1 per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) nurses and 1.0 per 100 FTE aides. Medical procedures contributing to sharps injuries were injecting medications, administering fingersticks and heelsticks, and drawing blood. Other contributing factors were sharps disposal, contact with waste, and patient handling. Sharps with safety features frequently were not used. Underreporting of sharps injuries to the workplace-based surveillance system was estimated to be about 50%. Conclusions. Sharps injuries and other blood and body fluid exposures are serious hazards for home health care nurses and aides. Improvements in hazard intervention are needed. PMID:19890177

  10. The prevalence of infections and patient risk factors in home health care: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jingjing; Ma, Chenjuan; Poghosyan, Lusine; Dowding, Dawn; Stone, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Home health care (HHC) has been the fastest growing health care sector for the past 3 decades. The uncontrolled home environment, increased use of indwelling devices, and the complexity of illnesses among HHC patients lead to increased risk for infections. Methods A systematic review of studies evaluating infection prevalence and risk factors among adult patients who received HHC services was conducted and guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Literature was searched using Medline, PubMed, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health as well as hand searching. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using validated quality assessment checklists. Results Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. The infection rates and identified risk factors for infections varied dramatically between studies. In general, patients receiving home parental nutrition treatments had higher infection rates than patients receiving home infusion therapy. The identified risk factors were limited by small sample sizes and other methodologic flaws. Conclusions Establishing a surveillance system for HHC infections, identifying patients at high risk for infections, tailoring HHC and patient education based on patient living conditions, and facilitating communication between different health care facilities will enhance infection control in HHC settings. Future studies should use a nationally representative sample and multivariate analysis for the identification of risk factors for infections. PMID:24656786

  11. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  12. Readings in Homemaker Services; Selected Papers Presenting the Background, Uses and Practices of Homemaker-Home Health Aide Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council for Homemaker-Home Health Aide Services, New York, NY.

    Prepared by the National Council for Homemaker Services for those concerned with homemaker programs, this document contains selected papers which summarize the developments of the homemaker-home health aide service. Sections are: (1) The Philosophy and Goals of Homemaker-Home Health Aide Service, with papers by Elizabeth G. Watkins and Ellen…

  13. Level of empowerment and health knowledge of home support workers providing care for frail elderly.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C Shanthi; Noel, Miriam

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the profile of home support workers (HSWs) caring for the frail elderly and to determine the perceived empowerment levels and general health knowledge of these support workers. Background, work-profile, empowerment level and health knowledge related to seniors of 64 HSWs were assessed using questionnaires. Findings revealed the majority of workers to be middleaged women, and their health knowledge scores were low. Empowerment levels were moderate as was formal power. Findings demonstrate the need to revise the curriculum of HSWs to include health topics, as well as the need for continued education and strategies to enhance empowerment levels.

  14. Clinics and home-based care organisations: an interface between theformal and informal health sectors.

    PubMed

    Boros, Adam Kenneth

    2010-12-01

    The article outlines the findings of a study designed to explore the working relationship between home-based caregivers and clinic nurses at locations in two informal settlements in Johannesburg, South Africa. By considering the views and experiences of both sponsored and unsponsored caregivers, the research focused on how degrees of informality affect this relationship. The nurse/caregiver relationship represents a primary interface between the formal and informal health sectors and is an important part of the country's primary healthcare system. Despite the attention given to linking home-based care (HBC) with the formal health system, very little research has examined the functionality of this link at the ground level. Through a number of qualitative, semi-structured interviews with nurses, home-based caregivers, and staff from the Department of Health, information was collected to better understand what systems are in place to facilitate the relationship between clinics and HBC organisations, and whether these systems are helping to create the desired results. Do the formal and informal health sectors complement and strengthen or do they distract and damage each other? By examining the influence of degrees of informality, the research also lends insight into how this distinction plays a role in healthcare provision. For instance, how does state support impact the link between the formal and informal health sectors and the ultimate quality of care? And what steps can be taken to improve the health system in this regard, as a whole? The findings point to a number of problems and challenges with integrating HBC into the formal health sector. Degrees of informality are found to have a profound impact on the work of home-based caregivers in some respects, but a surprising lack of impact in others. These issues need to be confronted in order to improve the existing system and, ultimately, health outcomes in South Africa. PMID:25875880

  15. The virtual dental home: bringing oral health to vulnerable and underserved populations.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Paul; Harrington, Maureen; Namakian, Maysa; Subar, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Large and increasing oral health disparities in the U.S. population led the Institute of Medicine to call for expanded research and demonstration of delivery systems that test new methods and technologies. These new methods include delivering oral health services in nontraditional settings, using nondental professionals, expanded roles for existing dental professionals and new types of dental professionals, and incorporating telehealth technologies. The virtual dental home is a system that demonstrates the characteristics called for by the IOM.

  16. Perceptions of health and risk management among home care workers in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, A; Karlqvist, L; Westerberg, M; Gard, G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Municipal home care workers provide high-quality services to an increasing proportion of elderly people living in private homes. The work environments and working conditions of these workers vary to a great extent, implying rapid priority-making among both employers and employees to ensure that the work can be performed in a safe way. Objectives: This study aims to examine home care workers’ perceptions of health, risks, working conditions, and risk management within their organization. Method: The study was based on cross-sectional data collected from home care service staff in a municipality in the north of Sweden. Nursing assistants and care aides (n = 133) replied to a self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and between-group differences were analysed. Results: Home care work was perceived to require high levels of professional skill and ingenuity, a good psychosocial work situation, but required a high physical workload. The general health, the capacity and self-efficacy of the staff in relation to work were good. Difficulty in performing risk assessments and following safety regulations due to lack of time, equipment, and information were identified. Conclusion: There is a need to increase participation in risk assessments among the staff, improve management support, structures, and cooperation with other divisions of the social services and the medical care organizations. PMID:24078781

  17. Implementing a patient centered medical home in the Veterans health administration: Perspectives of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Stewart, Kenda R; Stewart, Gregory L; Rosenthal, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of a patient centered medical home challenges primary care providers to change their scheduling practices to enhance patient access to care as well as to learn how to use performance metrics as part of a self-reflective practice redesign culture. As medical homes become more commonplace, health care administrators and primary care providers alike are eager to identify barriers to implementation. The objective of this study was to identify non-technological barriers to medical home implementation from the perspective of primary care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with providers implementing the medical home model in Department of Veterans Affairs clinics-the most comprehensive rollout to date. Primary care providers reported favorable attitudes towards the model but discussed the importance of data infrastructure for practice redesign and panel management. Respondents emphasized the need for administrative leadership to support practice redesign by facilitating time for panel management and recognizing providers who utilize non-face-to-face ways of delivering clinical care. Health care systems considering adoption of the medical home model should ensure that they support both technological capacities and vertically aligned expectations for provider performance. PMID:26250631

  18. Levels of Engagement in Establishing Coaching Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGatha, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    Case studies of two coaches that examine the levels of engagement of each coach as they worked to establish effective coaching relationships were examined in this study. Data were collected during a seven-month period and included: (a) the coaches' reflective journals; (b) pre- and post-surveys from each coach and teacher; (c) audio-recorded…

  19. The political economy of a public health case management program's transition into medical homes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Cilenti, Dorothy; Issel, L Michele

    2015-11-01

    Throughout the United States, public health leaders are experimenting with how best to integrate services for individuals with complex needs. To that end, North Carolina implemented a policy incorporating both local public health departments and other providers into medical homes for low income pregnant women and young children at risk of developmental delays. To understand how this transition occurred within local communities, a pre-post comparative case study was conducted. A total of 42 people in four local health departments across the state were interviewed immediately before the 2011 policy change and six months later: 32 professionals (24 twice) and 10 pregnant women receiving case management at the time of the policy implementation. We used constant comparative analysis of interview and supplemental data to identify three key consequences of the policy implementation. One, having medical homes increased the centrality of other providers relative to local health departments. Two, a shift from focusing on personal relationships toward medical efficiency diverged in some respects from both case managers' and mothers' goals. Three, health department staff re-interpreted state policies to fit their public health values. Using a political economy perspective, these changes are interpreted as reflecting shifts in public health's broader ideological environment. To a large extent, the state successfully induced more connection between health department-based case managers and external providers. However, limited provider engagement may constrain the implementation of the envisioned medical homes. The increased focus on medical risk may also undermine health departments' role in supporting health over time by attenuating staff relationships with mothers. This study helps clarify how state public health policy innovations unfold at local levels, and why front line practice may in some respects diverge from policy intent.

  20. The political economy of a public health case management program's transition into medical homes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Cilenti, Dorothy; Issel, L Michele

    2015-11-01

    Throughout the United States, public health leaders are experimenting with how best to integrate services for individuals with complex needs. To that end, North Carolina implemented a policy incorporating both local public health departments and other providers into medical homes for low income pregnant women and young children at risk of developmental delays. To understand how this transition occurred within local communities, a pre-post comparative case study was conducted. A total of 42 people in four local health departments across the state were interviewed immediately before the 2011 policy change and six months later: 32 professionals (24 twice) and 10 pregnant women receiving case management at the time of the policy implementation. We used constant comparative analysis of interview and supplemental data to identify three key consequences of the policy implementation. One, having medical homes increased the centrality of other providers relative to local health departments. Two, a shift from focusing on personal relationships toward medical efficiency diverged in some respects from both case managers' and mothers' goals. Three, health department staff re-interpreted state policies to fit their public health values. Using a political economy perspective, these changes are interpreted as reflecting shifts in public health's broader ideological environment. To a large extent, the state successfully induced more connection between health department-based case managers and external providers. However, limited provider engagement may constrain the implementation of the envisioned medical homes. The increased focus on medical risk may also undermine health departments' role in supporting health over time by attenuating staff relationships with mothers. This study helps clarify how state public health policy innovations unfold at local levels, and why front line practice may in some respects diverge from policy intent. PMID:26460509

  1. Nutritional knowledge of UK coaches.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Emma; Fortune, Alistair; Briggs, Marc; Rumbold, Penny

    2014-04-10

    Athletes obtain nutritional information from their coaches, yet their competency in this area is lacking. Currently, no research exists in the UK which has a different coach education system to many other countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the sports nutrition knowledge of UK coaching certificate (UKCC) level 2 and 3, hockey and netball qualified coaches. All coaches (n = 163) completed a sports nutrition questionnaire to identify: (a) if they provided nutritional advice; (b) their level of sport nutrition knowledge; and (c) factors that may have contributed to their level of knowledge. Over half the coaches provided advice to their athletes (n = 93, 57.1%), even though they were not competent to do so. Coaches responded correctly to 60.3 ± 10.5% of all knowledge questions with no differences between those providing advice and those who did not (p > 0.05). Those coaches who had undertaken formal nutrition training achieved higher scores than those who had not (p < 0.05). In conclusion, UK sports coaches would benefit from continued professional development in sports nutrition to enhance their coaching practice.

  2. Improving osteoporosis care in high-risk home health patients through a high intensity intervention

    PubMed Central

    Outman, Ryan C.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Locher, Julie L.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Saag, Kenneth G.; Kilgore, Meredith L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We developed and tested a multi-modal intervention, delivered in the home health care setting, aimed at increasing osteoporosis treatment rates to prevent fractures. Material and Methods The intervention focused on home health nurses. Key components included: nursing education; development of a nursing care plan; patient teaching materials and creation of physician materials. Nursing education consisted of a lecture covering osteoporosis, fracture risks and prevention, and the effectiveness of anti-osteoporosis treatment options. Patients received education materials concerning osteoporosis and anti-osteoporosis medications. A pocket-sized treatment algorithm card and standardized order sets were prepared for physicians. Focus groups of physicians and nurses were conducted to obtain feedback on the materials and methods to facilitate effective nurse-physician communication. Successful application required nurses to identify patients with a fracture history, initiate the care plan, prompt physicians on risk status, and provide patient education. The intervention was piloted in one field office. Results In the year prior to the intervention, home health patients (n=92) with a fracture history were identified in the pilot field office and only 20 (22%) received osteoporosis prescription therapy. In the three months following the intervention, 21 newly enrolled patients were identified and 9 (43%) had received osteoporosis prescription medications. Conclusions Home health care provides a venue where patients and physicians can be informed by nurses about osteoporosis and fracture risks and, consequently, initiate appropriate therapy. This multi-modal intervention is easily transportable to other home health agencies and adaptable to other medical conditions and settings. PMID:22005175

  3. Cancer Health Empowerment for Living without Pain (Ca-HELP): study design and rationale for a tailored education and coaching intervention to enhance care of cancer-related pain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer-related pain is common and under-treated. This article describes a study designed to test the effectiveness of a theory-driven, patient-centered coaching intervention to improve cancer pain processes and outcomes. Methods/Design The Cancer Health Empowerment for Living without Pain (Ca-HELP) Study is an American Cancer Society sponsored randomized trial conducted in Sacramento, California. A total of 265 cancer patients with at least moderate pain severity (Worst Pain Numerical Analog Score >=4 out of 10) or pain-related impairment (Likert score >= 3 out of 5) were randomly assigned to receive tailored education and coaching (TEC) or educationally-enhanced usual care (EUC); 258 received at least one follow-up assessment. The TEC intervention is based on social-cognitive theory and consists of 6 components (assess, correct, teach, prepare, rehearse, portray). Both interventions were delivered over approximately 30 minutes just prior to a scheduled oncology visit. The majority of visits (56%) were audio-recorded for later communication coding. Follow-up data including outcomes related to pain severity and impairment, self-efficacy for pain control and for patient-physician communication, functional status and well-being, and anxiety were collected at 2, 6, and 12 weeks. Discussion Building on social cognitive theory and pilot work, this study aims to test the hypothesis that a brief, tailored patient activation intervention will promote better cancer pain care and outcomes. Analyses will focus on the effects of the experimental intervention on pain severity and impairment (primary outcomes); self-efficacy and quality of life (secondary outcomes); and relationships among processes and outcomes of cancer pain care. If this model of coaching by lay health educators proves successful, it could potentially be implemented widely at modest cost. Trial Registration [Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT00283166] PMID:19737424

  4. Integrative Health Coach Training: A Model for Shifting the Paradigm Toward Patient-centricity and Meeting New National Prevention Goals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Linda L; Lake, Noelle H; Simmons, Leigh Ann; Perlman, Adam; Wroth, Shelley; Wolever, Ruth Q

    2013-05-01

    目标:介绍一种新兴协联健康职 业在引导患者可持续地改变健康 相关行为、主导改善患者参与程 度上的进展、培训和成效。方法: 综合健康辅导 (IHC) 利 用源自于人本主义心理学和积极 心理学的技术、关注解决疗法和 正念疗法,并进行领导力辅导而 确定了一种机制,赋予患者能力 以完成不同阶段的学习和改 变。IHC 还提供了一种方法,用 以创建和执行具前瞻性的个性化 健康计划。成效: 该等临床研究采用杜克 大学综合医学的 IHC 模式,证 明对糖尿病和糖尿病风险、体重 控制以及心血管疾病和中风风险 的测量方法均已获改进。通过支 持并赋能有关人士为改善其健康 状况而做出重大生活方式改 变,IHC 有可能降低慢性疾病的 患病几率和发病率,并且影响健 康护理的多个方面。结论:作为一个旨在进行患者赋 能和生活方式修正的教育和临床 创新模式,IHC 非常符合最近批 准的联邦健康护理改革的原则和 目标,尤其是在创建首个全国预 防和健康促进战略 (National Prevention and Health Promotion Strategy) 上。实践意义: IHC 在针对与生活 方式相关且处于当前健康护理 危机核心之慢性疾病的同时, 可能允许更加注重患者的中心 性作用。

  5. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  6. Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Related Topics Assisted Living Community-Based Care Nursing Homes Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Home Care Basic Facts & Information Role of Health Care Professionals in Home Care Your physician is the leader ...

  7. Community health nursing: can being self-employed work for you in home care?

    PubMed

    Seri, S F

    1997-09-01

    There is a fine distinction between being an independent contractor and being an employee. The advantages of being self-employed as a community health nurse are many. Self-employment suits new parents, graduate students, people in transition, with more than one profession, and who don't want a fixed schedule. However, this type of nursing is not for everyone. A broker such as CHN can help nurses become successfully self-employed. At a time when hospitals are downsizing and home care is becoming more in demand, brokers such as CHN provide a framework in which busy, experienced, community health nurses can work when and where they want. Good clinical and communication skills and a wish to be autonomous are necessities. A willingness to travel to different agencies and a reliable car are also important. A love for variety, flexibility, and independence make self-employment as a home health nurse a clinician's dream.

  8. Pesticide assessment: Protecting public health on the home turf

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Meg; Walker, C Robin; van der Jagt, Richard HC; Claman, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Pesticide regulation is examined in the context of Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency’s assessment of the chlorophenoxy herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) for turf. 2,4-D is the most common herbicide used to kill weeds in grass. The medical literature does not uniformly indicate harms from herbicides. However, the balance of epidemiological research suggests that 2,4-D can be persuasively linked to cancers, neurological impairment and reproductive problems. These may arise from 2,4-D itself, from breakdown products or dioxin contamination, or from a combination of chemicals. Regulators rely largely on toxicology, but experiments may not replicate exposures from 2,4-D application to lawns because environmental breakdown products (eg, 2,4-dichlorophenol) may not accumulate and selected herbicides are possibly less contaminated. Dioxins are bioaccumulative chemicals that may cause cancer, harm neurological development, impair reproduction, disrupt the endocrine system and alter immune function. No dioxin analyses were submitted to the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, and the principal contaminants of 2,4-D are not among the 17 congeners covered in pesticide regulation. Independent assessment of all dioxins is needed, in tissues and in the environment. The 2,4-D assessment does not approach standards for ethics, rigour or transparency in medical research. Canada needs a stronger regulator for pesticides. Potentially toxic chemicals should not be registered when more benign solutions exist, risks are not clearly quantifiable or potential risks outweigh benefits. Until landscaping pesticides are curtailed nationally, local bylaws and Quebec’s Pesticide Code are prudent measures to protect public health. Physicians have a role in public education regarding pesticides. PMID:19030278

  9. Pesticide assessment: Protecting public health on the home turf.

    PubMed

    Sears, Meg; Walker, C Robin; van der Jagt, Richard Hc; Claman, Paul

    2006-04-01

    Pesticide regulation is examined in the context of Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency's assessment of the chlorophenoxy herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) for turf. 2,4-D is the most common herbicide used to kill weeds in grass.The medical literature does not uniformly indicate harms from herbicides. However, the balance of epidemiological research suggests that 2,4-D can be persuasively linked to cancers, neurological impairment and reproductive problems. These may arise from 2,4-D itself, from breakdown products or dioxin contamination, or from a combination of chemicals.Regulators rely largely on toxicology, but experiments may not replicate exposures from 2,4-D application to lawns because environmental breakdown products (eg, 2,4-dichlorophenol) may not accumulate and selected herbicides are possibly less contaminated. Dioxins are bioaccumulative chemicals that may cause cancer, harm neurological development, impair reproduction, disrupt the endocrine system and alter immune function. No dioxin analyses were submitted to the Pest Management Regulatory Agency, and the principal contaminants of 2,4-D are not among the 17 congeners covered in pesticide regulation. Independent assessment of all dioxins is needed, in tissues and in the environment.The 2,4-D assessment does not approach standards for ethics, rigour or transparency in medical research. Canada needs a stronger regulator for pesticides. Potentially toxic chemicals should not be registered when more benign solutions exist, risks are not clearly quantifiable or potential risks outweigh benefits. Until landscaping pesticides are curtailed nationally, local bylaws and Quebec's Pesticide Code are prudent measures to protect public health. Physicians have a role in public education regarding pesticides.

  10. Executive Coaching Practices in the Adult Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campone, Francine

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of key principles and practices in executive coaching. Coaching is discussed as a reflective learning opportunity and offers the theoretical grounding, strategies, and case studies for each of four key elements of a coaching engagement.

  11. Development of an Applied Framework for Understanding Health Information Technology in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Degenholtz, Howard B; Resnick, Abby; Lin, Michael; Handler, Steven

    2016-05-01

    There is growing evidence that Health Information Technology (HIT) can play a role in improving quality of care and increasing efficiency in the nursing home setting. Most research in this area, however, has examined whether nursing homes have or use any of a list of available technologies. We sought to develop an empirical framework for understanding the intersection between specific uses of HIT and clinical care processes. Using the nominal group technique, we conducted a series of focus groups with different types of personnel who work in nursing homes (administrators, directors of nursing, physicians, mid-level practitioners, consultant pharmacists, and aides). The resulting framework identified key domain areas that can benefit from HIT: transfer of data, regulatory compliance, quality improvement, structured clinical documentation, medication use process, and communication. The framework can be used to guide both descriptive and normative research.

  12. Quality of care in nursing home organizations: establishing a health services research agenda.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Charlene

    2005-01-01

    Health services research has led to exciting new findings about the critical importance of the amount and type of nursing staff in nursing homes for improving the processes and outcomes of care. This paper reviews recent theoretical and research issues and outlines areas where research is needed. The nursing home research agenda for the future needs to concentrate on: (1) the relationship between structural measures of nursing (eg, staffing levels, education, turnover rates) and the outcomes and processes of care; (2) adequate processes of care and ways to improve the reliability of clinical outcome measures; (3) better ways to risk-adjust for resident characteristics; (4) the impact of nursing home characteristics (eg, ownership) and public policies (eg, reimbursement) on structural factors, processes, and outcomes; and (5) cost-effectiveness studies of nursing care at the organizational or system level.

  13. Using e-Coaching to Support an Early Intervention Provider's Implementation of a Functional Assessment-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fettig, Angel; Barton, Erin E.; Carter, Alice S.; Eisenhower, Abbey S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of e-coaching on the implementation of a functional assessment-based intervention delivered by an early intervention provider in reducing challenging behaviors during home visits. A multiple baseline design across behavior support plan components was used with a provider-child dyad. The e-coaching intervention…

  14. Quality of life and changes in health insurance in long-term home care.

    PubMed

    Gaskamp, Carol D

    2004-01-01

    Changes in health insurance and concomitant changes in quality of life in patients receiving long-term home parenteral nutrition care were explored. A decrease in quality of life and increase in depression were significantly associated with a change of insurance providers. Knowing the importance of health insurance as a family economic resource, nurses working in these settings may be alert for potential socio-emotional problems when health insurance providers change or coverage is less. Policymakers also have an opportunity to ease the financial burden of long-term disease management by expanding coverage for prescription drugs in Medicare benefits.

  15. Sociodemographic and health profile of inmates of old age homes in and around Belgaum city, Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Viveki, R G; Halappanavar, A B; Joshi, A V; Pujar, Kirankumar; Patil, Sandhya

    2013-10-01

    A new trend of admitting more and more senior citizens hailing from the Indian middle class background to old age homes is being observed in recent times. The objectives of this study were to study sociodemographic dimensions and common health problems of inmates of old age homes and to know various reasons for their admissions and their leisure time activities in old age homes. The present cross-sectional study was conducted during March and April 2010 in 4 different old age homes in and around Belgaum city, North Karnataka, by interviewing the inmates of old age homes using predesigned, pretested, structured questionnaire followed by thorough clinical examination and haemoglobin estimation by Sahli's method. The collected data was compiled and analysed using SPSS software version 14. Out of 73 elderly, 54 were females (74.0%). Majority were in the age group of 61-70 years (50.7%) and 56 were belonging to nuclear family (76.7%). Thirty-nine inmates were widow/widower (53.4%) and 42 were having no children (57.5%). Forty-seven inmates were admitted as there was nobody to take care of them (64.4%). Common health problems observed were locomotive/joint and muscle disorders (35.6%), hypertension (34.2%), diabetes mellitus (26.0%), respiratory disorders (23.3%), hearing loss (21.9%) etc. Forty-nine were having normal body mass index (67.1%) while 19.2% were underweight. Majority were having haemoglobin levels between 10-12 g/dl (58.9%). Old age homes definitely will enable the elderly to remain sociopsychologically healthy and lead active lives if effective medical and emotional support is given.

  16. Elements of an Art - Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundh, Erik

    This tutorial gives you a lead on becoming or redefining yourself as an Agile Coach. Introduction to elements and dimensions of state-of-the-art Agile Coaching. How to position the agile coach to be effective in a larger setting. Making the agile transition - from a single team to thousands of people. How to support multiple teams as a coach. How to build a coaches network in your company. Challenges when the agile coach is a consultant and the organization is large.

  17. Health Insurance Status and the Care of Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeld, Keith S.; Grabowski, David C.; Caudry, Daryl J.; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Importance Nursing home residents with advanced dementia commonly experience burdensome and costly hospitalizations that may not extend survival or improve the quality of life. Fragmentation in health care has contributed to poor coordination of care for acutely ill nursing home residents. Objective To compare patterns of care and quality outcomes for nursing home residents with advanced dementia covered by managed care to those covered by traditional fee-for-service Medicare. Design The Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advanced Dementia at the End-of-Life (CASCADE) study was a prospective cohort study that followed 323 nursing home residents over eighteen months to better understand the course of advanced dementia at or near the end of life. CASCADE and Medicare data were linked to determine the health insurance status of study participants. Setting Twenty-two nursing homes in the Boston area. Participants Nursing home residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies. Exposure The health insurance status of the resident, either managed care or traditional fee-for-service. Main Outcomes The outcomes included survival, symptoms related to comfort, treatment of pain and dyspnea, presence of pressure ulcers, presence of a DNH order, treatment for pneumonia, hospital transfer (hospitalization or emergency room visit) for an acute illness, hospice referral, primary care visits, and family satisfaction with care. Results Residents enrolled in managed care (n=133) were more likely to have do-not-hospitalize orders compared to those in traditional Medicare fee-for service (n=158) (64% vs. 51%, p-value < 0.05), were less likely to be transferred to the hospital for acute illness (4% vs. 16%, p-value < 0.05), had more primary care visits per 90 days (4.8±2.6 vs. 4.2±5.0, p-value < 0.05), and had more nurse practitioner visits (3.0±2.1 vs. 0.8±2.6, p-value < 0.05). Survival, comfort, and other treatment outcomes did not differ across groups

  18. Food, home and health: the meanings of food amongst Bengali Women in London

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores the nature of food and plants and their meanings in a British Bengali urban context. It focuses on the nature of plants and food in terms of their role in home making, transnational connections, generational change and concepts of health. Methods An ethnographic approach to the research was taken, specific methods included participant observation, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews. Thirty women of Bengali origin were mostly composed of “mother” and “daughter” pairs. The mothers were over 45 years old and had migrated from Bangladesh as adults and their grown-up daughters grew up in the UK. Results Food and plants play an important role in the construction of home “here” (London) while continuing to connect people to home “there” (Sylhet). This role, however, changes and is re-defined across generations. Looking at perceptions of “healthy” and “unhealthy” food, particularly in the context of Bengali food, multiple views of what constitutes “healthy” food exist. However, there appeared to be little two-way dialogue about this concept between the research participants and health professionals. This seems to be based on “cultural” and power differences that need to be addressed for a meaningful dialogue to occur. Conclusion In summary, this paper argues that while food is critical to the familial spaces of home (both locally and globally), it is defined by a complex interplay of actors and wider meanings as illustrated by concepts of health and what constitutes Bengali food. Therefore, we call for greater dialogue between health professionals and those they interact with, to allow for an enhanced appreciation of the dynamic nature of food and plants and the diverse perceptions of the role that they play in promoting health. PMID:24886061

  19. Determinants of state variations in home health utilization and expenditures under Medicare.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, A E

    1986-06-01

    Of the key federal programs that finance in-home services to the elderly, the Medicare program represents the largest and fastest growing. Although Medicare is a federal program, utilization and expenditures for home care vary widely across the states. Building on the work of Feldstein, Scanlon, and others, theory and data are presented that attempt to illuminate reasons why such variations exist. Using program data by state for 1982, nearly three fourths of the variation in home health utilization (R2 = 0.72) is explained by seven state characteristics. About three fifths of the variation in expenditures (R2 = 0.61) is accounted for by six state factors. Of most explanatory importance are home health agency (HHA) supply, need levels, presence of alternative sources of care, sources of referrals, and state resources. The results suggest the need to give more analytic attention to the impact of the market share of proprietary HHAs in explaining expenditure variations and the effects of total supply on utilization and spending.

  20. Reasons for Unmet Need for Child and Family Health Services among Children with Special Health Care Needs with and without Medical Homes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jane E.; Nugent, Colleen N.; Gaboda, Dorothy; Russell, Louise B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Medical homes, an important component of U.S. health reform, were first developed to help families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) find and coordinate services, and reduce their children’s unmet need for health services. We hypothesize that CSHCN lacking medical homes are more likely than those with medical homes to report health system delivery or coverage problems as the specific reasons for unmet need. Methods Data are from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN), a national, population-based survey of 40,723 CSHCN. We studied whether lacking a medical home was associated with 9 specific reasons for unmet need for 11 types of medical services, controlling for health insurance, child’s health, and sociodemographic characteristics. Results Weighted to the national population, 17% of CSHCN reported at least one unmet health service need in the previous year. CSHCN without medical homes were 2 to 3 times as likely to report unmet need for child or family health services, and more likely to report no referral (OR= 3.3), dissatisfaction with provider (OR=2.5), service not available in area (OR= 2.1), can’t find provider who accepts insurance (OR=1.8), and health plan problems (OR=1.4) as reasons for unmet need (all p<0.05). Conclusions CSHCN without medical homes were more likely than those with medical homes to report health system delivery or coverage reasons for unmet child health service needs. Attributable risk estimates suggest that if the 50% of CSHCN who lacked medical homes had one, overall unmet need for child health services could be reduced by as much as 35% and unmet need for family health services by 40%. PMID:24340042

  1. Coaches' Experiences of Formal Coach Education: A Critical Sociological Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggott, David

    2012-01-01

    According to recent academic reviews, formal coach education courses are rarely considered important or useful events in a broader coach learning process. At present, there is insufficient research to define the nature and extent of this problem which is likely to become more important under the prevailing governing rationalities of modernisation…

  2. What Great Coaches Do Differently: 11 Elements of Effective Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Rob; Whitaker, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Why do some athletic coaches succeed every season while others suffer loss after loss? This book describes the beliefs, behaviors, and attitudes of great athletic coaches. Where do they focus their attention? How do they spend their time and energy? And how can others gain the same advantages? Here, Rob Haworth and Todd Whitaker describe the…

  3. How Coaching Forensics Made Me a Better Writing Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Lynette

    2007-01-01

    The author, a high school teacher and forensics coach, describes ways to teach writing--including on-demand essays--that draw on successful practices she developed in coaching. Students learn the importance of using personal conviction and qualified thesis statements to build arguments, as well as learning "The Debater Four-Step," an effective…

  4. Athletes' Evaluations of Their Head Coach's Coaching Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Reckase, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional…

  5. Daily Life or Diagnosis? Dual Perspectives on Perinatal Depression within Maternal and Child Health Home Visiting

    PubMed Central

    Price, Sarah Kye; Cohen-Filipic, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a qualitative inquiry–informing program development in a maternal and child home visiting program. Low-income women's perceptions of the meaning and experiences of depression were ascertained through focus groups and interviews. Simultaneously, the study examines staff member perceptions and roles related to depression. Specific findings from clients and staff reveal culturally situated beliefs about depression and stressful life events; comparing and contrasting these beliefs offers a novel perspective on identification and intervention for maternal depression. This study offers a foundation for a translational research agenda that will be used for program and policy development to enhance mental health services situated within maternal and child health home visiting programs. PMID:23944165

  6. What makes home health workers think about leaving their job? The role of physical injury and organizational support.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ahyoung Anna; Jang, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Based on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, this study explored the role of physical injury and organizational support in predicting home health workers' turnover intention. In a sample of home health workers in Central Texas (n = 150), about 37% reported turnover intention. The logistic regression model showed that turnover intention was 3.23 times more likely among those who had experienced work-related injury. On the other hand, organizational support was found to reduce the likelihood of turnover intention. Findings suggest that injury and organizational support should be prioritized in prevention and intervention efforts to promote home health workers' safety and retention. PMID:26833177

  7. What makes home health workers think about leaving their job? The role of physical injury and organizational support.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ahyoung Anna; Jang, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Based on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model, this study explored the role of physical injury and organizational support in predicting home health workers' turnover intention. In a sample of home health workers in Central Texas (n = 150), about 37% reported turnover intention. The logistic regression model showed that turnover intention was 3.23 times more likely among those who had experienced work-related injury. On the other hand, organizational support was found to reduce the likelihood of turnover intention. Findings suggest that injury and organizational support should be prioritized in prevention and intervention efforts to promote home health workers' safety and retention.

  8. Inequality in access to health care in Cambodia: socioeconomically disadvantaged women giving birth at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants.

    PubMed

    Hong, Rathavuth; Them, Rathnita

    2015-03-01

    Cambodia faces major challenges in its effort to provide access to health care for all. Although there is a sharp improvement in health and health care in Cambodia, 6 in 10 women still deliver at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants. This practice is associated with higher maternal and infant deaths. This article analyzes the 2005 Cambodia Demographic and Health Survey data to examine the relationship between socioeconomic inequality and deliveries at home assisted by unskilled birth attendants. It is evident that babies in poorer households are significantly more likely to be delivered at home by an unskilled birth attendant than those in wealthier households. Moreover, delivery at home by an unskilled attendant is associated with mothers who have no education, live in a rural residence, and are farmers, and with higher birth order children. Results from this analysis demonstrate that socioeconomic inequality is still a major factor contributing to ill health in Cambodia.

  9. Hospital Versus Home Death: Results from the Mexican Health and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Tovalín-Ahumada, Horacio; Nates, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Context Characterizing where people die is needed to inform palliative care programs in Mexico. Objectives To determine whether access to health care influences the place of death of older Mexicans and examine the modifying effects of demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods We analyzed 2001 baseline and 2003 follow-up data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Cases included adults who completed the baseline interview and died before the follow-up interview and for whom a proxy interview was obtained in 2003. The main outcome variable was the place of death (hospital vs. home). The predictors of the place of death were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results The study group included 473 deceased patients; 52.9% died at home. Factors associated with hospital death were having spent at least one night in a hospital during the last year of life (odds ratio [OR]: 6.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.29, 13.78) and dying in a city other than the city of usual residence (OR: 4.68, 95% CI: 2.56, 8.57). Factors associated with home death were not having health care coverage (OR: 2.78, 95% CI: 1.34, 5.88), living in a city of less than 100,000 residents (OR: 2.44, 95% CI: 1.43, 4.17), and older age (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.05). Conclusion Older Mexicans with access to health care services were more likely to die in the hospital even after controlling for important clinical and demographic characteristics. Findings from the study may be used to plan the provision of accessible end-of-life hospital and home-based services. PMID:21146354

  10. Curriculum analysis of home health content in associate degree and baccalaureate degree nursing education.

    PubMed

    Zink, M R

    1989-03-01

    A statewide study was done with five associate degree (ADN) and five baccalaureate degree (BSN) nursing programs in Georgia to examine the similarities and differences in curriculum based on a nationally used model. From this overall study, select content related to community/home health care was evaluated in the sample programs. Professional standards for community and home health care nursing practice, as well as other published literature on the topic, provided a basis to determine competence to practice. Data were collected through a taped telephone interview to all program chairpersons (N = 10) and mailed questionnaires to faculty involved with all required courses (N = 110). Content analyses of responses allowed for evaluation of frequency of these learning activities between ADN and BSN programs and among BSN programs in the areas of family, teaching, interdisciplinary collaboration, physical assessment, and leadership. Overall, the results indicated lack of conclusive data to support a distinct difference in these educational components between the ADN and BSN sample or among BSN programs. The study was intended to service as a basis for home health care curriculum development in the future.

  11. Effect of a Home Telecare Program on Oral Health among Adults with Tetraplegia: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Study design one group pre- and post-test design Objective The primary aim was to examine both the short- and long-term effects of an oral home telecare program on improving gingival health among adults with tetraplegia. Methods Eight adults with tetraplegia participated. The oral home telecare program consisted of individualized oral hygiene training in the use of assistive devices (powered toothbrush and adapted flosser and/or oral irrigator) using PC-based videoconferencing between each participant and an occupational therapist. Training was conducted on an average of five 15 to 30 min sessions across three months. During these training sessions, supervised practice of oral hygiene, and provision of immediate corrective feedback and positive reinforcement in the use of adaptive oral hygiene devices was emphasized. Gingival health assessment using the Löe-Silness gingival index (LSGI) was conducted at baseline, six months and 12 months. Results From baseline to six months, participants showed statistically significant differences (i.e., improvement with less gingival inflammation) in their LSGI scores (z=2.18, P=.03). From baseline to 12 months, participants also showed a statistically significant difference (i.e., improvement, z=2.03; P=.04) in their LSGI scores. Conclusion This study indicates that preventive oral home telecare with repeated oral hygiene training in the use of adaptive devices improved gingival health at six and 12 months among adults with tetraplegia. PMID:23318557

  12. Coaches, Sexual Harassment and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasting, Kari; Brackenridge, Celia

    2009-01-01

    Sexual harassment in sport has become an active research field within the past decade yet we know relatively little about the characteristics of the harassing coach. How are harassing coaches characterised by their victims, that is, the athletes themselves? Do they demonstrate specific kinds of behaviours? One purpose of this article is to address…

  13. Coaches Guide to Sport Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, Larry M.

    This guide for athletic coaches offers a practical approach to the administrative functions of organizing, planning, leading, and controlling. Included are chapters on coaching administration, fund raising, organizing competitions, and designing effective budgets and controls. The guide addresses the following topics: (1) the categories of…

  14. Relational Demography in Coaching Dyads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagas, Michael; Paetzold, Ramona; Ashley, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The decline in the proportion of female head coaches in the intercollegiate ranks is one of the most significant issues in the realm of women's sports today. To extend the body of research that has studied this topic, we investigated the impact relational demographic effects on the work attitudes of coaches, which differs from previous research…

  15. Hiring Physical Educators and Coaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hungerford, Charles W.

    1981-01-01

    The manner in which coaches are hired affects their professional attitudes toward both their teaching and coaching roles. Considerations in the hiring process should include: (1) a philosophy of the school, community, and the physical education and athletic programs; (2) written job descriptions, reviews of candidates, and conditions of…

  16. Instructional Coaching and Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avant, Rue Celia

    2012-01-01

    School site-based instructional coaching is a form of job-embedded professional development for teachers and an element of school reform. Coaches are hired based upon their pedagogical knowledge, content expertise, prior teaching experience, and "people skills." They are adept at handling a variety of social interactions at school sites,…

  17. Sports Psychology and the Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Greta L., Ed.

    This monograph documents the speeches presented at the 1988 Symposium on Sports Psychology and the Coach. Presentations ranged from empirical research studies to anecdotal methodologies for coping with problems of anxiety. The following presentations are included: (1) "The Coach as Psychologist: When and How" (Robert Rotella); (2) "Psychology for…

  18. Interpretive Flexibility in Mobile Health: Lessons From a Government-Sponsored Home Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile technologies have emerged as important tools that health care personnel can use to gain easy access to client data anywhere. This is particularly useful for nurses and care workers in home health care as they provide services to clients in many different settings. Although a growing body of evidence supports the use of mobile technologies, the diverse implications of mobile health have yet to be fully documented. Objective Our objective was to examine a large-scale government-sponsored mobile health implementation program in the Danish home care sector and to understand how the technology was used differently across home care agencies. Methods We chose to perform a longitudinal case study with embedded units of analysis. We included multiple data sources, such as written materials, a survey to managers across all 98 Danish municipalities, and semistructured interviews with managers, care workers, and nurses in three selected home care agencies. We used process models of change to help analyze the overall implementation process from a longitudinal perspective and to identify antecedent conditions, key events, and practical outcomes. Results Strong collaboration between major stakeholders in the Danish home care sector (government bodies, vendors, consultants, interest organizations, and managers) helped initiate and energize the change process, and government funding supported quick and widespread technology adoption. However, although supported by the same government-sponsored program, mobile technology proved to have considerable interpretive flexibility with variation in perceived nature of technology, technology strategy, and technology use between agencies. What was first seen as a very promising innovation across the Danish home care sector subsequently became the topic of debate as technology use arrangements ran counter to existing norms and values in individual agencies. Conclusions Government-sponsored programs can have both positive and

  19. Paraprofessional Home Visitors' Perspectives on Addressing Poor Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Domestic Violence: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, S. Darius; Mercer, Constance D.; Saylor, Elizabeth L.; Duggan, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted to understand paraprofessional home visitors' perceptions of their training in addressing poor mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence, and their actions in working with families in addressing these issues. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 paraprofessional home visitors. Three main…

  20. Providers' Reported and Actual Use of Coaching Strategies in Natural Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Christine; Cambray-Engstrom, Elizabeth; Woods, Juliann

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined the agreement between reported and actual use of coaching strategies based on home visit data collected on a diverse sample of providers and families. Paired videotape and contact note data of and from providers during home visits were collected over a six month period and analyzed using structured protocols. Results of…

  1. Working Conditions and Mental Health of Nursing Staff in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Mawn, Barbara; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Nursing staff in nursing homes suffer from poor mental health, probably associated with stressful working conditions. Working conditions may distribute differently among nursing assistants, licensed practical nurses, and registered nurses due to their different levels in the organizational hierarchy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the association between working conditions and mental health among different nursing groups, and examine the potential moderating effect of job group on this association. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,129 nursing staff in 15 for-profit non-unionized nursing homes. Working conditions included both physical and psychosocial domains. Multivariate linear regression modeling found that mental health was associated with different working conditions in different nursing groups: physical safety (β = 2.37, p < 0.05) and work-family conflict (β = -2.44, p < 0.01) in NAs; work-family conflict (β = -4.17, p < 0.01) in LPNs; and physical demands (β = 10.54, p < 0.05) in RNs. Job group did not moderate the association between working conditions and mental health. Future workplace interventions to improve mental health should reach to nursing staff at different levels and consider tailored working condition interventions in different nursing groups. PMID:27104634

  2. Working Conditions and Mental Health of Nursing Staff in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Mawn, Barbara; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Nursing staff in nursing homes suffer from poor mental health, probably associated with stressful working conditions. Working conditions may distribute differently among nursing assistants, licensed practical nurses, and registered nurses due to their different levels in the organizational hierarchy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the association between working conditions and mental health among different nursing groups, and examine the potential moderating effect of job group on this association. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,129 nursing staff in 15 for-profit non-unionized nursing homes. Working conditions included both physical and psychosocial domains. Multivariate linear regression modeling found that mental health was associated with different working conditions in different nursing groups: physical safety (β = 2.37, p < 0.05) and work-family conflict (β = -2.44, p < 0.01) in NAs; work-family conflict (β = -4.17, p < 0.01) in LPNs; and physical demands (β = 10.54, p < 0.05) in RNs. Job group did not moderate the association between working conditions and mental health. Future workplace interventions to improve mental health should reach to nursing staff at different levels and consider tailored working condition interventions in different nursing groups.

  3. How the Iranian Football Coaches and Players Know About Doping?

    PubMed Central

    Seif Barghi, Tohid; Halabchi, Farzin; Dvorak, Jiri; Hosseinnejad, Heydar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, doping is an intricate dilemma. Football is the nationally popular sport in Iran. On the other hand, doping is a serious health hazard sport faces today. Studies dealing with athletes’ knowledge, attitudes and behavior concerning doping in football are scarce. Objectives: Therefore, we aimed to investigate the knowledge and attitudes toward doping among the football coaches and players. Patients and Methods: In a cross sectional study, 375 participants (239 football players and 136 coaches) were studied. A specially made questionnaire was applied. In this study, football teams of different provinces of the country were selected by randomized clustered sampling and questionnaires were distributed among coaches and players. Results: Knowledge of football coaches and players in three categories of doping definitions, recognition of prohibited drugs and side effects of anabolic steroids was poor or moderate in 45.3%, 88.5% and 96.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Football players and coaches have poor knowledge about doping in Iran. Moreover, they believe in some inappropriate myths without any scientific or rational basis.It seems necessary to design a comprehensive educational program for all of the athletes and coaches in Iran. PMID:26448840

  4. Regulating firearm advertisements that promise home protection. A public health intervention.

    PubMed

    Vernick, J S; Teret, S P; Webster, D W

    1997-05-01

    Firearms are a consumer product responsible for 38500 deaths in the United States in 1994. Like other products, firearms are advertised. In the absence of rules governing the design of firearms, regulating the way guns are advertised may be a useful public health intervention. Some gun advertisements include messages suggesting that bringing a handgun into the home is generally protective for the occupants of the home. The best available scientific information contradicts this message. Given this disjunction, regulating those advertisements may be an appropriate response. Under federal law, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has authority to prohibit advertisements that are "deceptive" or "unfair." Under the FTC's deception analysis, the focus is on whether consumers are misled by an advertisement. For a finding of unfairness, the FTC looks for advertisements that may cause substantial injury to consumers. Under either analysis, a strong argument can be made that firearm advertisements promising home protection are unlawful. On February 14, 1996, several organizations sent separate petitions to the FTC asking it to consider the issues raised by firearm advertisements that promise home protection. The FTC is still reviewing the information presented. There are no First Amendment or Second Amendment impediments to FTC regulation of deceptive firearm advertising under the US Constitution. PMID:9134946

  5. Home care for ventilator-assisted children: implications for the children, their families, and health policy.

    PubMed

    Aday, L A; Wegener, D H

    1988-01-01

    This article presents findings from a national study of home care programs for ventilator-assisted children conducted between 1984 and 1987 by the Center for Health Administration Studies at The University of Chicago. These findings point to the issues that need to be addressed in the development of policies surrounding both the delivery and the financing of services for these children and their families: (a) ventilator-assisted children are a widely varying group with diverse needs; (b) most families report that though they are glad to bring their child home, many difficult adjustments are required to do so; (c) full-time nursing care offers support to families but also intrudes on their privacy; (d) both families and children need social and psychological support once the child is home; (e) the needs of the child and the family may change over time; and (f) the financial burden of having a child on a ventilator at home can be a big stress on the family.

  6. Family Involvement in School-Based Health Promotion: Bringing Nutrition Information Home

    PubMed Central

    Blom-Hoffman, Jessica; Wilcox, Kaila R.; Dunn, Liam; Leff, Stephen S.; Power, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Family-school collaboration related to children’s physical development has become increasingly important as childhood obesity rates continue to rise. The present study described the development and implementation of a literacy-based, family component of a school-based health education program and investigated its viability, acceptability, and effectiveness. Interactive children’s books were the mechanism by which students, parents, and teachers received consistent messages at home and school regarding nutrition information. The home-school intervention served to bridge home and school cultures in an urban population. Preliminary process evaluation results indicated that the interactive children’s books were feasible to implement in the school context. Parents, children, and teachers had positive perceptions of the books. Parents who received the books demonstrated increased knowledge of 5 a Day, the primary nutrition message communicated in the program. Although not statistically significant, after the first and second years of intervention, parents in the experimental group reported that their children were eating 0.54 and 0.36 additional servings of fruit and vegetables per day compared with children in the control group. The program did not seem to impact the availability and accessibility of fruits and vegetables at home. PMID:19633724

  7. Practice patterns among entrants and incumbents in the home health market after the prospective payment system was implemented.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjee; Norton, Edward C

    2015-03-01

    Home health care expenditures were the fastest growing part of Medicare from 2001-2009, despite the implementation of prospective payment. Prior research has shown that home health agencies adopted two specific strategies to take advantage of Medicare policies: provide at least 10 therapy visits to get an enormous marginal payment and recertify patients for additional episodes. We study whether there is heterogeneity in the adoption of those strategic behaviors between home health agency entrants and incumbents and find that entrants were more likely to adopt strategic practice patterns than were incumbents. We also find that for-profit incumbents mimicked one of the practice patterns following entrants in the same market. Our findings suggest that it is important to understand the heterogeneity in providers' behavior and how firms interact with each other in the same market. These findings help explain the rapid rise in expenditures in the home health care market.

  8. Getting Home Safe and Sound: Occupational Safety and Health Administration at 38

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHAct) declared that every worker is entitled to safe and healthful working conditions, and that employers are responsible for work being free from all recognized hazards. Thirty-eight years after these assurances, however, it is difficult to find anyone who believes the promise of the OSHAct has been met. The persistence of preventable, life-threatening hazards at work is a failure to keep a national promise. I review the history of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and propose measures to better ensure that those who go to work every day return home safe and sound. These measures fall into 6 areas: leverage and accountability, safety and health systems, employee rights, equal protection, framing, and infrastructure. PMID:18235060

  9. Ecosystem and population health: the role of Canadian physicians at home and abroad.

    PubMed Central

    Woollard, R F

    1995-01-01

    Seemingly intractable problems of overpopulation, ecologic degradation, diminishing resources and regional warfare are having a profound effect on global population health. Canadian physicians can assist in ameliorating these problems by helping to modify the overconsumption of natural resources at home and by participating in international health projects focused at the community level, where the health of individuals and that of their environment intersect. The author describes the work of the Canadian Hunger Foundation in Vietnam and Sri Lanka, where a team of professionals worked with local farmers to improve the local water supply, decrease soil erosion and increase food production. The team observed changes in the physical health of communities that resulted in part from interventions that empowered them to address their own problems. PMID:7553520

  10. Primary Health Care: Potential Home for Family-Focused Preventive Interventions.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Laurel K; Mehus, Christopher J; Hawkins, J David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C; Metzler, Carol W; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2016-10-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings.

  11. The patient-centered medical home: a case study in transforming the military health system.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Ronald P; Julian, Regina; Kugler, John; Dorrance, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Dinneen, Michael; Evans, Paula; Kosmatka, Timothy; Padden, Maureen; Reeves, Mark

    2013-02-01

    This case study describes the Military Health System's (MHS) patient-centered medical home (PCMH) initiative and how it is being delivered across the MHS by the Army, Navy, and Air Force. The MHS, an integrated delivery model that includes both military treatment facilities and civilian providers and health care institutions, is transforming its primary care platforms from the traditional acute, episodic system to the PCMH model of care to maximize patient experience, satisfaction, health care quality, and readiness and to control cost growth. Preliminary performance measures are analyzed to assess the impact of PCMH implementation on the core primary care processes of the MHS. This study also discusses lessons learned and recommendations for improving health care performance through the PCMH care model.

  12. Ecosystem and population health: the role of Canadian physicians at home and abroad.

    PubMed

    Woollard, R F

    1995-10-15

    Seemingly intractable problems of overpopulation, ecologic degradation, diminishing resources and regional warfare are having a profound effect on global population health. Canadian physicians can assist in ameliorating these problems by helping to modify the overconsumption of natural resources at home and by participating in international health projects focused at the community level, where the health of individuals and that of their environment intersect. The author describes the work of the Canadian Hunger Foundation in Vietnam and Sri Lanka, where a team of professionals worked with local farmers to improve the local water supply, decrease soil erosion and increase food production. The team observed changes in the physical health of communities that resulted in part from interventions that empowered them to address their own problems.

  13. Primary Health Care: Potential Home for Family-Focused Preventive Interventions.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Laurel K; Mehus, Christopher J; Hawkins, J David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C; Metzler, Carol W; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2016-10-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings. PMID:27498167

  14. Understanding How Ontario High School Teacher-Coaches Learn to Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Geoff; Culver, Diane; Camiré, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are approximately 52,000 teacher-coaches coaching 750,000 high school student-athletes in Canada. Despite this large population, Canadian high school teacher-coaches remain relatively unstudied. High school coaches in Canada are often asked to coach sports with which they are unfamiliar, and because they are not required to…

  15. Enhancing the Provision of Coach Education: The Recommendations of UK Coaching Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lee; Cushion, Christopher; Potrac, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coach education has been identified as a key vehicle for raising the standard of coaching practice. However, the existing body of literature suggests that coach education has had a limited impact on the learning and development of coaching practitioners. In this respect, it has been contended that coach educations ills might be…

  16. In Pursuit of Becoming a Senior Coach: The Learning Culture for Australian Football League Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallett, Clifford J.; Rossi, Tony; Rynne, Steven B.; Tinning, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Given the turbulent and highly contested environment in which professional coaches work, a prime concern to coach developers is how coaches learn their craft. Understanding the learning and development of senior coaches (SCs) and assistant coaches (ACs) in the Australian Football League (AFL--the peak organisation for…

  17. 3 Steps to Great Coaching: A Simple but Powerful Instructional Coaching Cycle Nets Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim; Elford, Marti; Hock, Michael; Dunekack, Devona; Bradley, Barbara; Deshler, Donald D.; Knight, David

    2015-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a three-step instructional coaching cycle that can helps coaches become more effective. The article provides the steps and related components to: (1) Identify; (2) Learn; and (3) Improve. While the instructional coaching cycle is only one effective coaching program, coaches also need professional learning that…

  18. Learning How to Coach: The Different Learning Situations Reported by Youth Ice Hockey Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Trevor; Trudel, Pierre; Culver, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Background: Large-scale coach education programs have been developed in many countries around the world to help prepare coaches for their important role. Coaches have said that they also learn to coach from experience, starting from when they were young athletes until their current coaching positions. Finally, in the last decade, Internet…

  19. Public health and English local government: historical perspectives on the impact of 'returning home'.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Martin; Lock, Karen; Hogarth, Sue

    2014-12-01

    This article uses history to stimulate reflection on the present opportunities and challenges for public health practice in English local government. Its motivation is the paradox that despite Department of Health policy-makers' allusions to 'a long and proud history' and 'returning public health home' there has been no serious discussion of that past local government experience and what we might learn from it. The article begins with a short resumé of the achievements of Victorian public health in its municipal location, and then considers the extensive responsibilities that it developed for environmental, preventive and health services by the mid-twentieth century. The main section discusses the early NHS, explaining why historians see the era as one of decline for the speciality of public health, leading to the reform of 1974, which saw the removal from local government and the abolition of the Medical Officer of Health role. Our discussion focuses on challenges faced before 1974 which raise organizational and political issues relevant to local councils today as they embed new public health teams. These include the themes of leadership, funding, integrated service delivery, communication and above all the need for a coherent vision and rationale for public health action in local authorities.

  20. 42 CFR 409.50 - Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as a home health service. 409.50 Section 409.50 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.50 Coinsurance for durable medical equipment (DME) furnished as...

  1. Developing Female Coaches: Strategies from Women Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore strategies for the development of aspiring female coaches based on the ideas of existing high-performance female coaches. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with national-level female coaches in the United Kingdom, four recurrent ideas for developing female coaches in a male-dominated profession emerged.…

  2. Coaches' Encouragement of Athletes' Imagery Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jedlic, Brie; Hall, Nathan; Munroe-Chandler, Krista; Hall, Craig

    2007-01-01

    To investigate whether coaches encourage their athletes to use imagery, two studies were undertaken. In the first, 317 athletes completed the Coaches' Encouragement of Athletes' Imagery Use Questionnaire. In the second, 215 coaches completed a slightly modified version of this questionnaire. It was found that coaches and athletes generally agreed…

  3. Failure to Rehire: Why Coaches Get Fired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to identify reasons coaches were not rehired in public school coaching positions. The intent was to use this information for content modification of courses in coach education. At the entry level, coaches are too often concerned only with their particular sport and how to develop successful athletes or winning teams.…

  4. National Standards for Athletic Coaches. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brylinsky, Jody

    This digest asserts that the question of coach preparation and training has become a priority issue for many schools and communities, though the research is limited. It examines reasons to have coach education; the scope of sport participation; the status of coach education and training in the United States; National standards for coach education;…

  5. Instructional Coaching in One Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krohn, Cheryl Ann

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines a model of instructional coaching in a middle school using interviews and observations of both teachers and their coaches. During the 2012-2013 school year, Creekside Middle School implemented a new model of instructional coaching that differed from the traditional model of coaching; it focused on student learning…

  6. A Coach's Code of Conduct. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Linda; Ewing, Marty; Martino, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Coaches exert a profound impact on our youths; therefore, society sets high expectations for them. As such, whether coaches are compensated or work solely as volunteers, they are responsible for executing coaching as a professional. If we are to continue to enhance the cultural perceptions of coaching, we must strive to develop and master the…

  7. A Water-Damaged Home and Health of Occupants: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Thrasher, Jack Dwayne; Gray, Michael R.; Kilburn, Kaye H.; Dennis, Donald P.; Yu, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A family of five and pet dog who rented a water-damaged home and developed multiple health problems. The home was analyzed for species of mold and bacteria. The diagnostics included MRI for chronic sinusitis with ENT and sinus surgery, and neurological testing for neurocognitive deficits. Bulk samples from the home, tissue from the sinuses, urine, nasal secretions, placenta, umbilical cord, and breast milk were tested for the presence of trichothecenes, aflatoxins, and Ochratoxin A. The family had the following diagnosed conditions: chronic sinusitis, neurological deficits, coughing with wheeze, nose bleeds, and fatigue among other symptoms. An infant was born with a total body flare, developed multiple Cafe-au-Lait pigmented skin spots and diagnoses with NF1 at age 2. The mycotoxins were detected in bulk samples, urine and nasal secretions, breast milk, placenta, and umbilical cord. Pseudomonas aueroginosa, Acinetobacter, Penicillium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were cultured from nasal secretions (father and daughter). RT-PCR revealed A. fumigatus DNA in sinus tissues of the daughter. The dog had 72 skin lesions (sebaceous glands and lipomas) from which trichothecenes and ochratoxin A. were detected. The health of the family is discussed in relation to the most recent published literature regarding microbial contamination and toxic by-products present in water-damaged buildings. PMID:22220187

  8. The Environmental Health/Home Safety Education Project: a successful and practical U.S.-Mexico border initiative.

    PubMed

    Forster-Cox, Susan C; Mangadu, Thenral; Jacquez, Benjamín; Fullerton, Lynne

    2010-05-01

    The Environmental Health/Home Safety Education Project (Proyecto de Salud Ambiental y Seguridad en el Hogar) has been developed in response to a wide array of severe and often preventable environmental health issues occurring in and around homes on the U.S.-Mexico border. Utilizing well-trained community members, called promotoras , homes are visited and assessed for potential environmental hazards, including home fire and food safety issues. Data analyzed from project years 2002 to 2005 shows a significant impact in knowledge levels and initial behavior change among targeted participants as it relates to fire and food safety issues. Since the initiation of the project in 1999, hundreds of participants have improved their quality of life by making their homes safer. The project has proven to be sustainable, replicable, flexible, and attractive to funders.

  9. The Environmental Health/Home Safety Education Project: a successful and practical U.S.-Mexico border initiative.

    PubMed

    Forster-Cox, Susan C; Mangadu, Thenral; Jacquez, Benjamín; Fullerton, Lynne

    2010-05-01

    The Environmental Health/Home Safety Education Project (Proyecto de Salud Ambiental y Seguridad en el Hogar) has been developed in response to a wide array of severe and often preventable environmental health issues occurring in and around homes on the U.S.-Mexico border. Utilizing well-trained community members, called promotoras , homes are visited and assessed for potential environmental hazards, including home fire and food safety issues. Data analyzed from project years 2002 to 2005 shows a significant impact in knowledge levels and initial behavior change among targeted participants as it relates to fire and food safety issues. Since the initiation of the project in 1999, hundreds of participants have improved their quality of life by making their homes safer. The project has proven to be sustainable, replicable, flexible, and attractive to funders. PMID:19843700

  10. "Willing but unwilling": attitudinal barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology among older adults.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Willis, Erin; Cameron, Glen; Geana, Mugur

    2014-06-01

    While much research focuses on adoption of electronic health-care records and other information technology among health-care providers, less research explores patient attitudes. This qualitative study examines barriers to adoption of home-based health information technology, particularly personal electronic health records, among older adults. We conducted in-depth interviews (30-90 min duration) with 35 American adults, aged 46-72 years, to determine their perceptions of and attitudes toward home-based health information technology. Analysis of interview data revealed that most barriers to adoption fell under four themes: technological discomfort, privacy or security concerns, lack of relative advantage, and perceived distance from the user representation. Based on our findings, systems to promote home-based health information technology should incorporate familiar computer applications, alleviate privacy and security concerns, and align with older adults' active and engaged self-image.

  11. Longer term impact of the mass media campaign to promote the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: increasing the saliency of a new public health program.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Gebel, Klaus; Banovic, Debbie; Buffett, Kym M; Bauman, Adrian E

    2014-11-01

    The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) was introduced in New South Wales in February 2009. It used mass reach media advertising and direct mail and/or proactive marketing to recruit participants. This article reports on the long-term impact of the campaign on GHS participation from July 2011 to June 2012. A stand-alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge, and behavioral variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544, August-September 2010), during the advertising period (n = 1,500, February-March 2011; n = 1,500, June-July 2011; n = 1,500, February 2012), and after the advertising period (n = 1,500, June-July 2012). GHS usage data (n = 6,095) were collated during July 2011-June 2012. Unprompted and prompted awareness of GHS mass media significantly increased (0% to 8.0%, p < .001; and 14.1% to 43.9%, p < .001, respectively) as well as knowledge and perceived effectiveness of the GHS. Those from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic disadvantage and respondents who were overweight or obese were significantly more likely to report prompted campaign awareness. The majority (84.4%) of new GHS calls occurred when television advertising was present. Participants who cited mass media as their referral source were significantly more likely to enroll in the intensive coaching program. Mass media campaigns remain an effective method of promoting a telephone-based statewide lifestyle program. PMID:24662895

  12. Longer term impact of the mass media campaign to promote the Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service®: increasing the saliency of a new public health program.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Gebel, Klaus; Banovic, Debbie; Buffett, Kym M; Bauman, Adrian E

    2014-11-01

    The Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service® (GHS) was introduced in New South Wales in February 2009. It used mass reach media advertising and direct mail and/or proactive marketing to recruit participants. This article reports on the long-term impact of the campaign on GHS participation from July 2011 to June 2012. A stand-alone population survey collected awareness, knowledge, and behavioral variables before the first advertising phase, (n = 1,544, August-September 2010), during the advertising period (n = 1,500, February-March 2011; n = 1,500, June-July 2011; n = 1,500, February 2012), and after the advertising period (n = 1,500, June-July 2012). GHS usage data (n = 6,095) were collated during July 2011-June 2012. Unprompted and prompted awareness of GHS mass media significantly increased (0% to 8.0%, p < .001; and 14.1% to 43.9%, p < .001, respectively) as well as knowledge and perceived effectiveness of the GHS. Those from the lowest three quintiles of socioeconomic disadvantage and respondents who were overweight or obese were significantly more likely to report prompted campaign awareness. The majority (84.4%) of new GHS calls occurred when television advertising was present. Participants who cited mass media as their referral source were significantly more likely to enroll in the intensive coaching program. Mass media campaigns remain an effective method of promoting a telephone-based statewide lifestyle program.

  13. Guidelines for Environmental Health Management in Children’s Homes in Sub-Sahara Africa

    PubMed Central

    Muruka, Charles; Muruka, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    organizations have sprung up to establish homes for such children, especially those orphaned by AIDS or those infected with HIV. It is important to ensure that environmental health hazards and risks are minimized in these children’s homes. By use of a conceptual synthesis approach, the authors attempt to generate guidelines from literature for environmental health management in children’s homes in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:18180543

  14. A Research Agenda on Assessing and Remediating Home Dampness and Mold to Reduce Dampness-Related Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    This report briefly summarizes, based on recent review articles and selected more recent research reports, current scientific knowledge on two topics: assessing unhealthy levels of indoor D/M in homes and remediating home dampness-related problems to protect health. Based on a comparison of current scientific knowledge to that required to support effective, evidence-based, health-protective policies on home D/M, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, prior questions and research questions specified, and necessary research activities and approaches recommended.

  15. A Research Agenda on Assessing and Remediating Home Dampness and Mold to Reduce Dampness-Related Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark J.

    2015-05-28

    This report briefly summarizes, based on recent review articles and selected more recent research reports, current scientific knowledge on two topics: assessing unhealthy levels of indoor D/M in homes and remediating home dampness-related problems to protect health. Based on a comparison of current scientific knowledge to that required to support effective, evidence-based, health-protective policies on home D/M, gaps in knowledge are highlighted, prior questions and research questions specified, and necessary research activities and approaches recommended.

  16. When professional kindness is misunderstood: boundaries and stalking issues: a case study for the home health clinician.

    PubMed

    Holz, Cheryl L

    2009-01-01

    There is the potential for home health nurses and other home care clinicians to be subjected to intrusive and possibly stalking behavior by current and former clients. Most healthcare clinicians do not receive training on the risk of intrusive interactions or stalking, nor on strategies to manage this objectionable client behavior. This article informs nurses and other home health clinicians about the potential risk of stalking. Included is a true case vignette, the legal definition of stalking, incidence occurrence among clinicians, the basic profile and behaviors of a stalker, the victimology and psychological consequences, and implications for policy and procedures and prevention techniques.

  17. Vision-specific health-related quality of life: content areas for nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Scilley, Kay; Owsley, Cynthia

    2002-08-01

    Nursing home residents have a high prevalence of remediable visual impairment and blindness. Future research on the effectiveness of providing eye care to nursing home residents will need to include a vision-targeted health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instrument appropriate for this population. The purpose of this study was to identify the core content areas for such an instrument. In-depth interviews on vision-related issues were conducted with 40 residents. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and coded using a standardized protocol. Binocular distance and near visual acuity were assessed using the resident's 'walking around' correction to examine whether one vision-specific HRQOL measure could address the needs of residents with 'good' and 'poor' vision. Overall 1070 vision-related comments were identified. Residents mentioned 315 problem comments that were grouped into 13 categories, including ocular symptoms (18% of comments), reading (15%), general vision (13%), psychological distress (12%), and activities of daily living (ADLs) (7%). Compared to published data on vision-specific content areas most relevant to community based persons, nursing home residents focused more on ocular symptoms and basic ADLs, with no mention of issues related to driving, home care, and finances. The majority of categories mentioned did not differ on the proportion of comments made- by those with 'good' and 'poor' visual acuity, suggesting that one vision-specific HRQOL instrument would be appropriate for residents with varying levels of visual acuity. Future work will focus on developing a vision-specific HRQOL instrument for nursing home residents.

  18. Problems encountered in home health service delivery to persons with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Allen, S M; Fleishman, J

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the problems encountered in delivering home health services to persons with AIDS (PWAs), based on telephone interviews conducted with administrators of 68 home care agencies located in 10 high AIDS prevalence areas nationwide. Lack of adequate insurance mechanisms was cited as a major barrier to serving PWAs. Some respondents indicated a greater potential for stress among staff treating PWAs, given the youth of this population, the intensity of illness manifestations, and the complexity of treatment regimens. Other difficulties that are especially prevalent among PWAs include the absence of informal caregivers, residence in unsafe areas, and patient and family drug abuse. Although many of the reported patient problems are not unique to PWAs, the frequency with which they occur in this population suggests a need for expanded public and private insurance coverage for custodial care, and for expanded availability of AIDS-specific housing, if excessive hospitalization is to be avoided.

  19. Fragmented implementation of maternal and child health home-based records in Vietnam: need for integration

    PubMed Central

    Aiga, Hirotsugu; Nguyen, Vinh Duc; Nguyen, Cuong Dinh; Nguyen, Tho Thi Thi; Nguyen, Lien Thi Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Background Home-based records (HBRs) are globally implemented as the effective tools that encourage pregnant women and mothers to timely and adequately utilise maternal and child health (MCH) services. While availability and utilisation of nationally representative HBRs have been assessed in several earlier studies, the reality of a number of HBRs subnationally implemented in a less coordinated manner has been neither reported nor analysed. Objectives This study is aimed at estimating the prevalence of HBRs for MCH and the level of fragmentation of and overlapping between different HBRs for MCH in Vietnam. The study further attempts to identify health workers’ and mothers’ perceptions towards HBR operations and utilisations. Design A self-administered questionnaire was sent to the provincial health departments of 28 selected provinces. A copy of each HBR available was collected from them. A total of 20 semi-structured interviews with health workers and mothers were conducted at rural communities in four of 28 selected provinces. Results Whereas HBRs developed exclusively for maternal health and exclusively for child health were available in four provinces (14%) and in 28 provinces (100%), respectively, those for both maternal health and child health were available in nine provinces (32%). The mean number of HBRs in 28 provinces (=5.75) indicates over-availability of HBRs. All 119 minimum required items for recording found in three different HBRs under nationwide scale-up were also included in the Maternal and Child Health Handbook being piloted for nationwide scaling-up. Implementation of multiple HBRs is likely to confuse not only health workers by requiring them to record the same data on several HBRs but also mothers about which HBR they should refer to and rely on at home. Conclusions To enable both health workers and pregnant women to focus on only one type of HBR, province-specific HBRs for maternal and/or child health need to be nationally standardised

  20. Coaching your unit team for results.

    PubMed

    Detmer, Sarah S

    2002-09-01

    Communication and critical thinking skills are core to the coaching processes. Bringing the coaching role to the individual and team level at the bedside is the key to improved results in patient care, nurse retention, clinical performance including error reduction, negotiation, and staff empowerment. Application of coaching concepts where the nurse meets the patient insures the growth and effectiveness of a coaching culture. Clinical review, individual communication, and teamwork examples are explored as effective arenas for coaching at the unit level.

  1. Health Behaviors and Overweight in Nursing Home Employees: Contribution of Workplace Stressors and Implications for Worksite Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Helena; Gore, Rebecca J.; Boyer, Jon; Nobrega, Suzanne; Punnett, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background. Many worksite health promotion programs ignore the potential influence of working conditions on unhealthy behaviors. Methods. A study of nursing home employees (56% nursing aides) utilized a standardized questionnaire. We analyzed the cross-sectional associations between workplace stressors and obesity, cigarette smoking, and physical inactivity. Results. Of 1506 respondents, 20% reported exposure to three or more workplace stressors (physical or organizational), such as lifting heavy loads, low decision latitude, low coworker support, regular night work, and physical assault. For each outcome, the prevalence ratio was between 1.5 and 2 for respondents with four or five job stressors. Individuals under age 40 had stronger associations between workplace stressors and smoking and obesity. Conclusions. Workplace stressors were strongly associated with smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity, even among the lowest-status workers. Current working conditions affected younger workers more than older workers. Although this study is cross-sectional, it has other strengths, including the broad range of work stressors studied. Strenuous physical work and psychosocial strain are common among low-wage workers such as nursing home aides. Workplace health promotion programs may be more effective if they include measures to reduce stressful work environment features, so that working conditions support rather than interfere with employee health. PMID:26380373

  2. The relations between psychosocial factors at work and health status among workers in home care organizations.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Hege R; Ihlebaek, Camilla; Jansen, Jeroen P; Burdorf, Alex

    2006-01-01

    A considerable proportion of sickness absence and disability pension is caused by subjective health complaints, especially low back pain (LBP). In recent years focus has been on psychosocial characteristics of work as potential risk factors. The aim of this study is to examine the relations between psychosocial work aspects and subjective health complaints, LBP, and need for recovery. A total of 779 employees working in home care participated in a cross-sectional study. Higher psychological demands were associated with subjective health complaints and need for recovery. However, decision authority, skill discretion, and the 2 aspects of social support did not seem to be important factors. Higher psychological demands do not seem to be associated with severity of LBP, but does show an association with sick leave. PMID:17078768

  3. The Impact of Living in a Care Home on the Health and Wellbeing of Spinal Cord Injured People

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brett; Caddick, Nick

    2015-01-01

    In the UK, 20% of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) are discharged from rehabilitation into an elderly care home. Despite this, and knowledge that the home is central to health and wellbeing, little research has examined the impact of being in care homes on the health and wellbeing of people with SCI. The purpose of this study was to address this gap. Twenty adults who lived in care homes or had done so recently for over two years were interviewed in-depth. Qualitative data were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Analyses revealed that living in a care home environment severely damages quality of life, physical health and psychological wellbeing in the short and long-term. Reasons why quality of life, health, and wellbeing were damaged are identified. These included a lack of freedom, control, and flexibility, inability to participate in community life, inability to sustain relationships, safety problems, restricted participation in work and leisure time physical activity, lack of meaning, self-expression, and a future, loneliness, difficulties with the re-housing process, depression, and suicidal thoughts and actions. It is concluded that for people with SCI, the care home environment violates social dignity, is oppressive, and denies human rights. Implications for housing and health care policies are also offered. PMID:25884273

  4. Quantitative and qualitative processes of change during staff-coaching sessions: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M W J; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-05-01

    Staff training is one of the interventions that managers can embed in their organizations to help staff improve their professional competences related to challenging behaviour of clients with intellectual disabilities. Individual coaching adds learning opportunities that are feasible but difficult to achieve in an in-service setting. In the present study, we have followed the coaching process of three staff members. Based on differences in the Linell balance of power across sessions, we explored the question: do different coaching processes have similar patterns in the development of dominance and coherence in interactions between coach and staff? Additionally, a qualitative approach was conducted to illustrate and enrich the meaning of quantitative outcomes. Processes were different regarding the balance of power at the start of the coaching, probably due to differences in resistance and insecurity. As a consequence of different starting points and differences in learning styles, each coaching process had its unique development over time. At the end, all dyads were comparable in the sense that all dyads were highly satisfied about the outcomes and process of coaching. This is in line with similar levels of power at the end of the coaching sessions suggesting equal contributions and leadership. The present findings suggest some relevant competencies of coaches within health-care services. Due to the small number of participants, the results have to be interpreted with caution. The present study provides suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:23474998

  5. Nutrition and eating in female college athletes: a survey of coaches.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Jaimee L; Ogles, Benjamin M; Gold, Ellsa; Marsden, Kimberlyann; Johnson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to gather information from coaches regarding their monitoring/management of athlete eating and weight, knowledge of nutritional health issues, availability of prevention/intervention services for athletes at their school, experience with athletes exhibiting symptoms of eating and body image disturbances, and their attitudes toward eating and weight in the sport. A total of 303 coaches (51% response rate) involved in six sports (i.e., gymnastics, swimming, basketball, softball, track, and volleyball) at all levels of collegiate competition (NCAA Divisions I, II, III, and NAIA) completed a 40-item survey. Gender was found to be related to differential responding on only one of the 40 items, while sport and level of competition were related to responses on multiple items. Gymnastics coaches and NCAA Division I coaches differed significantly from coaches of other sports and divisions in that they reported more monitoring/management behaviors, had more experience with athletes exhibiting eating disturbances, and had more resources available for preventing and treating athletes with eating disorders. Gymnastics coaches also differed from other coaches on a number of items related to their attitudes toward eating and weight in the sport. Many coaches have encountered disturbed eating among their athletes, and some of their coaching attitudes and behaviors may inadvertently increase the risk for such disturbances. Implications for clinical and sport psychologists providing prevention or intervention services to intercollegiate athletes are discussed.

  6. How family carers engage with technical health procedures in the home: a grounded theory study

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Janet; McKinlay, Eileen; Keeling, Sally; Levack, William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences of family carers who manage technical health procedures at home and describe their learning process. Design A qualitative study using grounded theory. Participants New Zealand family carers (21 women, 5 men) who managed technical health procedures such as enteral feeding, peritoneal dialysis, tracheostomy care, a central venous line or urinary catheter. In addition, 15 health professionals involved in teaching carers were interviewed. Methods Semistructured interviews were coded soon after completion and preliminary analysis influenced subsequent interviews. Additional data were compared with existing material and as analysis proceeded, initial codes were grouped into higher order concepts until a core concept was described. Interviewing continued until no new ideas emerged and concepts were well defined. Results The response of carers to the role of managing technical health procedures in the home is presented in terms of five dispositions: (1) Embracing care, (2) Resisting, (3) Reluctant acceptance, (4) Relinquishing and (5) Being overwhelmed. These dispositions were not static and carers commonly changed between them. Embracing care included cognitive understanding of the purpose and benefits of a procedure; accepting a ‘technical’ solution; practical management; and an emotional response. Accepting embrace is primarily motivated by perceived benefits for the recipient. It may also be driven by a lack of alternatives. Resisting or reluctant acceptance results from a lack of understanding about the procedure or willingness to manage it. Carers need adequate support to avoid becoming overwhelmed, and there are times when it is appropriate to encourage them to relinquish care for the sake of their own needs. Conclusions The concept of embracing care encourages health professionals to extend their attention beyond simply the practical aspects of technical procedures to assessing and addressing carers’ emotional and

  7. Career coaching: innovative academic-practice partnership for professional development.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Debra L

    2014-05-01

    This article describes an academic-practice partnership that uses career coaching to support the health care system's strategic plans to increase nurses' educational level. Nurses and other employees seek coaching to explore their career path and create an educational plan to accomplish their goal. Career coaching by nursing faculty provides a unique service as they have expert knowledge of various educational programs as well as methods for achieving academic success. The academic-practice partnership is a win-win-win; the health care system achieves advancement of professional nursing practice, employees are supported to advance their education and professional nursing practice, and faculty benefit from immersion in current professional concerns and issues.

  8. Elucidating the Hemodynamic Origin of Ballistocardiographic Forces: Toward Improved Monitoring of Cardiovascular Health at Home.

    PubMed

    Javaid, Abdul Qadir; Ashouri, Hazar; Tridandapani, Srini; Inan, Omer T

    2016-01-01

    The ballistocardiogram (BCG), a signal describing the reaction forces of the body to cardiac ejection of blood, has recently gained interest in the research community as a potential tool for monitoring the mechanical aspects of cardiovascular health for patients at home and during normal activities of daily living. An important limitation in the field of BCG research is that while the BCG signal measures the forces of the body, the information desired (and understood) by clinicians and caregivers, regarding mechanical health of the cardiovascular system, is typically expressed as blood pressure or flow. This paper aims to explore, using system identification tools, the mathematical relationship between the BCG signal and the better-understood impedance cardiography (ICG) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveforms, with a series of human subject studies designed to asynchronously modulate cardiac output and blood pressure and with different magnitudes. With this approach, we demonstrate for 19 healthy subjects that the BCG waveform more closely maps to the ICG (flow) waveform as compared with the finger-cuff-based ABP (pressure) waveform, and that the BCG can provide a more accurate estimate of stroke volume ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) as compared with pulse pressure changes ([Formula: see text]). We also examined, as a feasibility study, for one subject, the ability to calibrate the BCG measurement tool with an ICG measurement on the first day, and then track changes in stroke volume on subsequent days. Accordingly, we conclude that the BCG is a signal more closely related to blood flow than pressures, and that a key health parameter for titrating care-stroke volume-can potentially be accurately measured with BCG signals at home using unobtrusive and inexpensive hardware, such as a modified weighing scale, as compared with the state-of-the-art ICG and ABP devices, which are expensive and obtrusive for use at home. PMID:27620621

  9. How Do Race and Hispanic Ethnicity Affect Nursing Home Admission? Evidence From the Health and Retirement Study

    PubMed Central

    Mudrazija, Stipica; Angel, Jacqueline L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigates how health- and disability-based need factors and enabling factors (e.g., socioeconomic and family-based resources) relate to nursing home admission among 3 different racial and ethnic groups. Method. We use Cox proportional hazard models to estimate differences in nursing home admission for non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics from 1998 to 2010 in the Health and Retirement Study (N = 18,952). Results. Racial–ethnic differences in nursing home admission are magnified after controlling for health- and disability-based need factors and enabling factors. Additionally, the degree to which specific factors contribute to risk of nursing home admission varies significantly across racial–ethnic groups. Discussion. Our findings indicate that substantial racial and ethnic variations in nursing home admission continue to exist and that Hispanic use is particularly low. We argue that these differences may demonstrate a significant underuse of nursing homes for racial and ethnic minorities. Alternatively, they could signify different preferences for nursing home care, perhaps due to unmeasured cultural factors or structural obstacles. PMID:25204311

  10. A mobile-health application to detect wandering patterns of elderly people in home environment.

    PubMed

    Vuong, N K; Goh, S G A; Chan, S; Lau, C T

    2013-01-01

    Wandering is a common and risky behavior in people with dementia (PWD). In this paper, we present a mobile healthcare application to detect wandering patterns in indoor settings. The application harnesses consumer electronics devices including WiFi access points and mobile phones and has been tested successfully in a home environment. Experimental results show that the mobile-health application is able to detect wandering patterns including lapping, pacing and random in real-time. Once wandering is detected, an alert message is sent using SMS (Short Message Service) to attending caregivers or physicians for further examination and timely interventions. PMID:24111292

  11. Effects of Horticultural Therapy on Psychosocial Health in Older Nursing Home Residents: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Min; Ji, Jeng-Yi

    2015-09-01

    This preliminary study examined the effect of horticultural therapy on psychosocial health in older nursing home residents. A combined quantitative and qualitative design was adopted. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 10 older residents from a nursing home in Taichung, Taiwan. Participants joined a 10-week indoor horticultural program once a week, with each session lasting for about 1.5 hours. A single-group design with multiple measurements was adopted for the quantitative component of this study. Interviews held 1-2 days before the intervention (T0) were used to collect baseline data. The two outcome variables of this study, depression and loneliness, were reassessed during the 5th (T1) and 10th (T2) weeks of the intervention. Generalized estimating equations were used to test the mean differences among T0, T1, and T2 measures. After the 10-week program, qualitative data were collected by asking participants to share their program participation experiences. The results of generalized estimating equation showed significant improvements in depression and loneliness. Four categories emerged from the qualitative data content analysis: social connection, anticipation and hope, sense of achievement, and companionship. Given the beneficial effects of the horticulture therapy, the inclusion of horticultural activities in nursing home activity programs is recommended. PMID:25534575

  12. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  13. Why Do Women Deliver at Home? Multilevel Modeling of Ethiopian National Demographic and Health Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Yebyo, Henock; Alemayehu, Mussie; Kahsay, Alemayehu

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite of the existing intensive efforts to improve maternal health in Ethiopia, the proportion of birth delivered at home remains high and is still the top priority among the national health threats. Objective The study aimed to examine effects of individual women and community-level factors of women’s decision on place of delivery in Ethiopia. Methods Data were obtained from the nationally representative 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) which used a two-stage cluster sampling design with rural-urban and regions as strata. The EDHS collected data from a big sample size but our study focused on a sample of 7,908 women whose most recent birth was within five years preceding 2011 and 576 communities in which the women were living in. The data were analyzed using a two-level mixed-effects logistic regression to determine fixed-effects of individual- and community-level factors and random-intercept of between-cluster characteristics. Results In the current study, 6980 out of 7908 deliveries (88.3%) took place at home. Lower educational levels (OR=2.74, 95%CI:1.84,4.70; p<0.0001), making no or only a limited number of ANC visits (OR=3.72,95%CI:2.85, 4.83; p<0.0001), non-exposure to media (OR=1.51, 95%CI 1.13, 2.01; p=0.004), higher parity (OR=2.68, 95%CI:1.96,3.68; p<0.0001), and perceived distance problem to reach health facilities (OR=1.29, 95%CI:1.03,1.62; p=0.022) were positively associated with home delivery. About 75% of the total variance in the odds of giving birth at home was accounted for the between-community differences of characteristics (ICC=0.75, p<0.0001). With regard to community-level characteristics, rural communities (OR=4.67, 95%CI:3.06,7.11; p<0.0001), pastoralist communities (OR=4.53, 95%CI:2.81,7.28; p<0.0001), communities with higher poverty levels (OR=1.49 95%CI:1.08,2.22; p=0.048), with lower levels of ANC utilization (OR=2.01, 95%CI:1.42,2.85; p<0.0001) and problem of distance to a health facility (OR=1.29, 95

  14. The impact of policy on nursing and allied health services. Lessons from the Medicare Home Health Benefit.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Joan K; Choi, Sunha

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes changes in Medicare home health staffing and service delivery patterns across three different reimbursement methods: cost based (1996), interim payment system (IPS) (1999), and the prospective payment system (PPS) (2002). This study combined secondary analysis of existing data (Provider of Services File and Statistical Supplement) with qualitative interviews of 22 home health agency directors to understand agency responses to policy changes created under the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. Cuts in staff and visits were greater under the IPS than they were under the PPS. Agencies cut staff and visits more dramatically for nonskilled services across both time periods. As a proportion of total services and visits, nursing and therapy services increased the most. Directors used various strategies to sustain the agency financially during these dramatic cuts in reimbursements, including eliminating staff, shifting staff roles, training staff on reimbursement methods, increasing use of telephone monitoring, increasing patient and family education and self-care, and cutting services to patients. Directors expressed concerns about staff stress related to the changes and the need to increase productivity without increasing staff. However, directors also believed the agency's position would improve under the PPS. Additional research is needed to determine whether increased staff stress, work demands, and fewer resources for patients will affect the quality of care delivered and, thus, patient outcomes under the PPS. PMID:20078013

  15. Oral health care and smoking cessation practices of interprofessional home care providers for their patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    VanDevanter, Nancy; Dorsen, Caroline G; Messeri, Peter; Shelley, Donna; Person, Andresa

    2012-07-01

    The need for oral health services among patients with HIV, especially those in advanced stages of disease and those who smoke, has been well documented. Patients receiving HIV-related home care services provide an opportunity for assessment of oral health and smoking cessation needs; however, the majority of home care providers lack formal training to provide these services, thus interprofessional collaborations may be of value. This study assessed the oral health and smoking cessation practices of a random sample of 81 HIV home care providers. Results showed very favorable attitudes toward providing these services with some differences across disciplines. More than 70% of nurses would like to receive additional training in comprehensive oral health assessment by dental professionals. The study provides evidence for the potential of expanding these services for patients with HIV through interprofessional collaboration, in particular with nurses and dentists. PMID:22506858

  16. Mental Health Problems in Norwegian School Children Placed Out-of-Home: The Importance of Family Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havnen, Karen Skaale; Jakobsen, Reidar; Stormark, Kjell Morten

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to explore the association between mental health problems in children placed out-of-home and family risk factors reported as reasons for placement. The sample consisted of 109 Norwegian children aged 6-12 years. Mental health problems were assessed by the Revised Rutter scales reported by the parents and the…

  17. The Role of Specialty Mental Health Care in Predicting Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Out-of-Home Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glisson, Charles; Green, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This longitudinal, prospective study examines the role of specialty mental health care as provided by community-based, usual-care practice settings in predicting out-of-home placements among children served by a child welfare and juvenile justice system. Method: The mental health needs of 1,249 children from 22 counties in Tennessee…

  18. Health Facilities: New York State's Oversight of Nursing Homes and Hospitals. Report to the Honorable Bill Green, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, New York, NY. Regional Office.

    At the request of Congressman William Green, the General Accounting Office (GAO) evaluated the validity of allegations about deficiencies in the New York State Department of Health's nursing home and hospital inspection processes for certification for participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Health Care Financing Administration and…

  19. Effects of water-damaged homes after flooding: health status of the residents and the environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kenichi; Ikeda, Koichi; Kagi, Naoki; Yanagi, U; Hasegawa, Kenichi; Osawa, Haruki

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated the health status of residents and the environmental risk factors of housing after flooding. Questionnaires were distributed to 595 selected households (one adult resident per household) in six areas in Japan which were severely flooded between 2004 and 2010. A total of 379 responses were obtained. Indoor dampness and visible mold growth significantly increased in homes with greater flood damage. The incidence of respiratory, dermal, ocular, and nasal symptoms one week after flooding was significantly higher in flooded homes compared with non-flooded homes, the incidence of psychological disorders was significantly high for six months after flooding, and the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder was significantly high six months after flooding. Significant risk factors for respiratory and nasal symptoms included proximity to industrial and waste incineration plants. Our results suggest that rapid action should be taken after flooding to ensure adequate public health and environmental hygiene in the water-damaged homes.

  20. [Relations with emergency medical care and primary care doctor, home health care].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kazunari; Ohta, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    Medical care for an ultra-aging society has been shifted from hospital-centered to local community-based. This shift has yielded the so-called Integrated Community Care System. In the system, emergency medical care is considered important, as primary care doctors and home health care providers play a crucial role in coordinating with the department of emergency medicine. Since the patients move depending on their physical condition, a hospital and a community should collaborate in providing a circulating service. The revision of the medical payment system in 2014 clearly states the importance of "functional differentiation and strengthen and coordination of medical institutions, improvement of home health care". As part of the revision, the subacute care unit has been integrated into the community care unit, which is expected to have more than one role in community coordination. The medical fee has been set for the purpose of promoting the home medical care visit, and enhancing the capability of family doctors. In the section of end-of-life care for the elderly, there have been many issues such as reduction of the readmission rate and endorsement of a patient's decision-making, and judgment for active emergency medical care for patient admission. The concept of frailty as an indicator of prognosis has been introduced, which might be applied to the future of emergency medicine. As described above, the importance of a primary doctor and a family doctor should be identified more in the future; thereby it becomes essential for doctors to closely work with the hospital. Advancing the cooperation between a hospital and a community for seamless patient-centered care, the emergency medicine as an integrated community care will further develop by adapting to an ultra-aging society. PMID:26915240