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Sample records for health depression level

  1. Stress, depression, quality of life and salivary cortisol levels in community health agents.

    PubMed

    Knuth, Berenice Scaletzky; Cocco, Rafaela Abreu; Radtke, Vinicius Augusto; Medeiros, João Ricardo Carvalho; Oses, Jean Pierre; Wiener, Carolina David; Jansen, Karen

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of and factors associated with depression and stress with perceived quality of life and the salivary cortisol levels in Community Health Agent (CHA). Materials and Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study of CHAs in Pelotas-RS, Brazil. Data collection, including sociodemographic information and factors related to work and health. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) II was used to assess depressive symptoms, Inventory of Stress Symptoms Lipp (ISSL) was used for the analysis of stress and the WHOQOL-BREF was used to investigate quality of life. Salivary cortisol was quantified via ELISA test. The assessments showed that 71.0% are in a state of stress resistance, 30.5% were in the alert state of stress and 32.8% were in the stress state of exhaustion. Depressive episodes (BDI≥12) were observed in 28.2%. The environmental domain had the lowest score for quality of life. We observed significantly higher salivary cortisol levels in CHAs with less than 1 year of service and with the lowest quality of life scores in the environmental subsection. A high prevalence of stress and depression was observed in this sample of CHAs. In addition, the worst levels of quality of life were identified in the environmental subsection. Cortisol levels corroborate these findings regarding quality of life within the environmental domain and began working less than a year previously.

  2. Levels of depression and satisfaction with life as indicators of health services consumption.

    PubMed

    Sagy, Roi; Amitai, Maya; Weizman, Abraham; Aizenberg, Dov

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the correlation between depression, satisfaction with life, and primary healthcare services consumption. A random sample of primary healthcare clinic patients agreed to complete self-report questionnaires on demographics and physical activity, the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Satisfaction with Life Scale and the Visual Analog Scale for Happiness. Treating physicians completed the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) for each patient. The relationships among psychometric, medical, the number of visits to health maintenance organization (HMO)-physicians during the previous year was assessed. Positive correlation was found between visits to HMO-physicians and depression severity, as assessed by GDS (p = .049), and between visits/year and illness severity, as measured by CIRS (p < .001). Correlation was also found between depression and number of chronic medications used (p = .005). Physical activity correlated inversely with depression severity (p = .014). Gender and income had no impact on frequency of visits to HMO-physicians, depression, or satisfaction with life. The results indicate that there is a correlation between depression and healthcare service consumption, as represented by number of HMO-physician visits and medication use. Thus, early detection of depression, using tools such as GDS, and early initiation of antidepressive treatment may help to lower the burden on the health system.

  3. Mental health of Japanese psychiatrists: the relationship among level of occupational stress, satisfaction and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Koreki, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Abe, Akiko; Ikeuchi, Hidetsugu; Okubo, Jo; Oguri, Atsushi; Orimo, Keisuke; Katayama, Nariko; Sato, Hiroyo; Shikimoto, Ryo; Nishiyama, Go; Nogami, Waka; Haki, Kazuma; Hayashi, Tetsuro; Fukagawa, Yuko; Funaki, Kei; Matsuzawa, Mia; Matsumoto, Ayako; Mimura, Masaru

    2015-03-26

    Psychiatrists in clinical practice face a number of stressors related to patient care, such as overwork. On the other hand, they gain satisfaction from their work. We quantified and assessed the potential relationship between levels of occupational stress, satisfaction, and depressive symptoms among Japanese clinical psychiatrists. We surveyed 206 psychiatrists with up to 15 years of clinical experience who primarily worked in patient care. Levels of occupational stress and occupational satisfaction were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale and the level of depressive symptoms was measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Workplace stressors and satisfiers were also evaluated. Out of 206 psychiatrists, 154 (74.8%) responded to the survey. The respondents' mean (SD) age was 34.3 (5.2) years. The estimated prevalence of significant depressive symptoms was 34.4% (n = 53), and the experienced frequent violence was 14.9% (n = 23). The level of depressive symptoms was inversely correlated with the level of occupational satisfaction. In respondents who reported a moderate level of occupational stress, having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction, but this association was not significant in those who reported a high level of stress. In addition, high occupational satisfaction was associated with interest towards work content, ability to work at one's discretion, opportunities for growth and career development, and ease of communication with supervisors and colleagues. Nearly one-third of the psychiatrists screened positive for significant depressive symptoms. Having fewer depressive symptoms was associated with higher occupational satisfaction in those who reported a moderate level of stress. Implications from the present findings may be to enhance occupational satisfaction by discussing work interests with a supervisor, as well as increased opportunities for career development, which may

  4. Reproductive health problems and depression levels of women living in sanctuary houses as a result of husband violence.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Ozlem Çiftçi; Yldz, Hatice

    2011-09-01

    We conducted this study to examine the reproductive health status and depression levels of women who live in sanctuary houses after being subjected to domestic violence. The total number of women in the study is 65. Data were collected via descriptive, violence, and women's reproductive health problems questionnaires and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The women had experienced all kinds of extreme violence. As regards to reproductive health, the women had undergone several kinds of disorders such as menstrual irregularities, genital infection, and premenstrual syndrome. Based on the BDI cut-off values, it was concluded that all these women need medical treatment.

  5. High level of depressive symptoms as a barrier to reach an ideal cardiovascular health. The Paris Prospective Study III.

    PubMed

    Gaye, B; Prugger, C; Perier, M C; Thomas, F; Plichart, M; Guibout, C; Lemogne, C; Pannier, B; Boutouyrie, P; Jouven, X; Empana, J P

    2016-01-08

    We hypothesized that depression might represent a barrier to reach an ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) as estimated by the 7-item tool proposed by the American Heart Association. Between 2008 and 2012, 9,417 subjects 50-75 years of age were examined in a large health center and enrolled in the Paris Prospective Study III (PPS3). Participants with 0-2, 3-4 and 5-7 health metrics at the ideal level were categorized as having poor, intermediate and ideal CVH, respectively. Participants with a score ≥ 7 on the 13-item Questionnaire of Depression 2nd version, Abridged or who were on antidepressants were referred as having high level of depressive symptoms (HLDS). The mean age of the 9417 study participants was 59.57 (SD 6.28) years and 61.16% were males. A total of 9.55% had HLDS. Poor, intermediate and ideal CVH was present in 40.38%, 49.52% and 10.10% of the participants. In multivariate polytomous logistic regression analysis, HLDS was inversely associated with ideal CVH (odds ratio = 0.70; 95% CI: 0.55;0.90). This was driven by an association with the behavioural component of the CVH. Participants with HLDS had a substantial reduced chance of reaching an ideal CVH.

  6. Self-perception of seizure precipitants and their relation to anxiety level, depression, and health locus of control in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Michael R; Schilling, Courtney A; Glosser, David; Tracy, Joseph I; Asadi-Pooya, Ali A

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and nature of self-perceived seizure precipitants in epilepsy patients, and evaluate whether anxiety level, depression, or health locus of control influence self-perception of seizure precipitants. Adults aged 18 and older who had epilepsy for at least 1 year were recruited in either the inpatient epilepsy monitoring unit or the outpatient epilepsy clinic at Thomas Jefferson University in 2006. Patients anonymously filled out a questionnaire, which included data about age, sex, education, seizure control, and three questionnaires including identification of seizure precipitants, Hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) scale, and Form C of the multidimensional health locus of control (MHLC). Discriminant function analysis was used for statistical analysis. Two hundred patients participated, with a mean age of 40.3+/-16 years. One hundred thirty (65%) patients reported one or more seizure precipitants. Stress (49.5%), lack of sleep (35.5%), and fatigue (32.5%) were the most common seizure triggers reported. Seizure control, anxiety level, and powerful others subscale in HLC scores were significantly related to self-perception of seizure precipitants. Subjective seizure triggers (stress, lack of sleep) were related to psychological factors. The perception that certain triggers precipitate seizures is related to anxiety, health locus of control, and seizure control. Hence, seizures might be misattributed to irrelevant precipitants because of an underlying psychological predisposition. Alternatively, there may be a physiological relationship between seizures and the triggers. Prospective studies are required to clarify the relationship between seizure precipitants and seizure occurrence.

  7. National Dissemination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System: Therapist and Patient-Level Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Bradley E.; Brown, Gregory K.; Trockel, Mickey; Cunning, Darby; Zeiss, Antonette M.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is nationally disseminating and implementing cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (CBT-D). The current article evaluates therapist and patient-level outcomes associated with national training in and implementation of CBT-D in the VA health care system. Method: Therapist…

  8. National Dissemination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System: Therapist and Patient-Level Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Bradley E.; Brown, Gregory K.; Trockel, Mickey; Cunning, Darby; Zeiss, Antonette M.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is nationally disseminating and implementing cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (CBT-D). The current article evaluates therapist and patient-level outcomes associated with national training in and implementation of CBT-D in the VA health care system. Method: Therapist…

  9. Lack of association between depression and C-reactive protein level in the baseline of Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Sara Teles; de Figueiredo, Roberta Carvalho; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Nunes, Maria Angélica; M Benseñor, Isabela; Viana, Maria Carmen; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2017-01-15

    Depression has been linked to increased levels of inflammatory markers in clinical studies, but results from general population samples are inconsistent. We aimed to investigate whether depression was associated with serum CRP levels in a cross-sectional analysis of a large cohort from a middle-income country. We analyzed baseline data from 14,821 participants (35-74 years) of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Current depression (last 7 days) was assessed by the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R). Because individuals on antidepressants could be negative on CIS-R due to their therapeutic effect, the explanatory variable had three categories: (1) negative on CIS-R and not using antidepressant (reference); (2) negative on CIS-R but using antidepressant; (3) positive on CIS-R with/without antidepressant use. Associations with CRP were investigated by general linear model (GLM). After adjustments for confounders, neither current depression, nor antidepressant use was statistically associated with elevated CRP levels. Additionally, analyzes stratified by gender, type and severity of depression did not change the results. The reference group in our analysis might include participants with a lifetime history of depression. Additionally, the exclusion of questions on weight fluctuation and appetite from the CIS-R applied in ELSA-Brasil may have slightly underestimated the prevalence of depression, as well as limited our ability to assess the presence of somatic symptoms. This study found no association between current depression, use of antidepressants, and serum CRP levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Value of health, incidence of depression, and level of self-esteem in low-income mothers of pre-school children.

    PubMed

    Burns, E I; Doremus, P C; Potter, M B

    1990-01-01

    health. Based on their high valuing of health and the potential for increasing self-esteem through activity, it can be concluded that the women in this sample will benefit from planned health activities. It is also anticipated that, because of the strong relationship between self-esteem and depression, women who participate in these activities will demonstrate lower levels of depression.

  11. Changes of levels of depression and quality of life after short-term cognitive behavioral educational program for adolescent students in health class.

    PubMed

    Aki, Atsuko; Tomotake, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the changes of levels of depression and quality of life in adolescent students after receiving short-term cognitive behavioral educational program in health class for stress management. Subjects were 176 middle school students aged 12 to 14 years. They completed the Depression Self-Rating Scale for Children (DSRS-C) and the Revised Children Quality of Life Questionnaire (Kiddo-KINDL(R)) before, after and 6-months after the program. The three-session program consisted of psychoeducation and learning skills of cognitive restructuring and problem solving. The total scores of the DSRS-C and the Kiddo-KINDL(R) in all subjects did not significantly change after the completion of program. However, as for the high risk group (score of the DSRS-C≥16), significant improvement in the two scales was found after the program. Especially, depression level in the high risk group significantly decreased and the improvement was maintained 6-months later. These results suggest that this type of approach may be effective for adolescents with high risk of depression in terms of improving not only depressive symptom but also quality of life.

  12. The Relationship of Depression to Health Risk Behaviors and Health Perceptions in Korean College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Oksoo

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the relationship of depression to health risk behaviors and health perceptions in Korean college students. The level of students' depression predicted alcohol consumption, symptom pattern, and physical health. Students who were more depressed reported more symptoms and perceived their health as worse than those who were less…

  13. Perinatal depression: implications for child mental health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal depression is common and primary care holds a crucial role for detecting, treating or, if necessary, providing referrals to mental health care for affected women. Family doctors should be aware of risk factors for peripartum depression, including previous history of depression, life events and interpersonal conflict. Perinatal depression has been associated with many poor outcomes, including maternal, child and family unit challenges. Infants and young children of perinatally depressed mothers are more likely to have a difficult temperament, as well as cognitive and emotional delays. The primary care setting is uniquely poised to be the screening and treatment site for perinatal depression; however, several obstacles, both at patient and systems level, have been identified that interfere with women's treatment engagement. Current published treatment guidelines favour psychotherapy above medicines as first line treatment for mild to moderate perinatal depression, while pharmacotherapy is first choice for severe depression, often in combination with psychosocial or integrative approaches. Among mothers who decide to stop taking their antidepressants despite ongoing depression during the perinatal period, the majority suffer from relapsing symptoms. If depression continues post‐partum, there is an increased risk of poor mother–infant attachment, delayed cognitive and linguistic skills in the infant, impaired emotional development and risk for behavioural problems in later life. Complex, comprehensive and multilevel algorithms are warranted to treat perinatal depression. Primary care doctors are best suited to initiate, carry out and evaluate the effectiveness of such interventions designed to prevent adverse outcomes of maternal perinatal depression on mother and child wellbeing. PMID:22477948

  14. Screening for Depression in Low-Income Elderly Patients at the Primary Care Level: Use of the Patient Health Questionnaire-2

    PubMed Central

    Lino, Valéria Teresa Saraiva; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Camacho, Luiz Antônio Bastos; Atie, Soraya; Lima, Maria José Barbosa; Rodrigues, Nádia Cristina Pinheiro; Barros, Mônica Bastos de Lima; Andrade, Mônica Kramer de Noronha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Depression is one of the most common mental disorders and a leading cause of disability worldwide. It constitutes a serious public health problem, particularly among elderly individuals. Most depressed elderly patients are treated by primary care (PC) physicians. The “Patient Health Questionnaire” (PHQ-2) is an instrument used for the detection of depression in PC settings. Objective Evaluate the performance of the PHQ-2 in a low-income and uneducated elderly PC population. Methods A non-probabilistic population sample of 142 individuals was selected from the healthcare unit's users ≧60 years. Criterion validity was assessed by estimating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the PHQ-2 in comparison with the structured interview using the DSM-IV. The estimates of sensitivity and specificity were obtained from varying cut-offs of the PHQ-2 score. A Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curve was constructed and the area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Results The group was predominantly female (73.9%), with low education level (mean 3 years of schooling). The mean age was 72.5 years old. The prevalence of depression was 26.1%. The best values of sensitivity (0.74), specificity (0.77), PPV (0.50) e NPV (0.90) were obtained with score equal to 1. The AUC was 0.77, indicating a modest performance of the test accuracy. Conclusion The simplicity of the PHQ-2 is an advantage for its use in PC. The high NPV indicated that 90% of those who tested negative would not need additional tests. However, the low PPV indicated that the PHQ-2 is not sufficient to screen for depression. The application of the instrument could be the first step of the screening, that would include a second step to all those with positive tests formerly. PMID:25473845

  15. Depression May Worsen Health for Cancer Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166958.html Depression May Worsen Health for Cancer Caregivers Identifying signs ... 29, 2017 THURSDAY, June 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is known to be linked to worsening physical ...

  16. Quality of Life, Health Status, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Nancy A.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Doering, Lynn V.; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Lewis, Alan B.; Child, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QOL) in adolescents and adults who have undergone the Fontan procedure and are living with only 1 ventricle is presumed to be diminished. Objectives This study aimed to compare QOL, health status, and prevalence of depression in adolescents/adults after the Fontan procedure with healthy counterparts and to identify predictors of QOL in the Fontan group. Methods Using a comparative, cross-sectional design, 54 adolescents and adults with single ventricle congenital heart disease who have undergone the Fontan procedure were compared with 66 age-matched healthy counterparts. Quality of life, health status, depression, and social support were measured using the Satisfaction With Life Scale, Short Form Survey Version 2, Patient Health Questionnaire Depression Module, and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Clinical variables were abstracted from medical records. Predictors of QOL were determined using multiple linear regression. Results Adolescents and adults in the Fontan group reported lower physical health status (mean [SD] = 46.5 [9.3] vs mean [SD] = 55.9 [5.1], P < .001) and were more depressed (mean [SD] = 7.3 [5.9] vs mean [SD] = 4.5 [4.3], P < .004) than their healthy counterparts. There were no differences in QOL, mental health status, or social support between the 2 groups. Functional status (New York Heart Association class), depression, and social support accounted for 55% of the variance in QOL in the Fontan group. Conclusions Despite lower levels of physical health, the QOL of Fontan patients was comparable with that of their healthy counterparts; this finding contradicts previous proxy reports, self-reports, and assumptions that QOL is lower in patients with complex single ventricle congenital heart disease. However, because Fontan patients were more depressed than their healthy counterparts, the need for early screening and detection is warranted. PMID:21912272

  17. Vitamin D levels and perinatal depressive symptoms in women at risk: a secondary analysis of the mothers, omega-3, and mental health study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer Anne; Romero, Vivian C; Clinton, Chelsea M; Vazquez, Delia M; Marcus, Sheila M; Chilimigras, Julie L; Hamilton, Susan E; Allbaugh, Lucy J; Vahratian, Anjel M; Schrader, Ronald M; Mozurkewich, Ellen L

    2016-08-03

    Vitamin D insufficiency may be associated with depressive symptoms in non-pregnant adults. We performed this study to evaluate whether low maternal vitamin D levels are associated with depressive symptoms in pregnancy. This study was a secondary analysis of a randomized trial designed to assess whether prenatal omega-3 fatty acid supplementation would prevent depressive symptoms. Pregnant women from Michigan who were at risk for depression based on Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale Score or history of depression were enrolled. Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview at 12-20 weeks, 26-28 weeks, 34-36 weeks, and 6-8 weeks postpartum. Vitamin D levels were measured at 12-20 weeks (N = 117) and 34-36 weeks (N = 112). Complete datasets were available on 105 subjects. Using regression analyses, we evaluated the relationship between vitamin D levels with BDI scores as well as with MINI diagnoses of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder. Our primary outcome measure was the association of maternal vitamin D levels with BDI scores during early and late pregnancy and postpartum. We found that vitamin D levels at 12-20 weeks were inversely associated with BDI scores both at 12-20 and at 34-36 weeks' gestation (P < 0.05, both). For every one unit increase in vitamin D in early pregnancy, the average decrease in the mean BDI score was .14 units. Vitamin D levels were not associated with diagnoses of major depressive disorder or generalized anxiety disorder. In women at risk for depression, early pregnancy low vitamin D levels are associated with higher depressive symptom scores in early and late pregnancy. Future investigations should study whether vitamin D supplementation in early pregnancy may prevent perinatal depressive symptoms. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ NCT00711971.

  18. The effects of fatigue, depression and the level of disability on the health-related quality of life of glatiramer acetate-treated relapsing-remitting patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Fricska-Nagy, Zsanett; Füvesi, Judit; Rózsa, Csilla; Komoly, Sámuel; Jakab, Gábor; Csépány, Tünde; Jobbágy, Zita; Lencsés, Gyula; Vécsei, László; Bencsik, Krisztina

    2016-05-01

    The common symptoms of multiple sclerosis are fatigue, depression, cognitive dysfunction, pain and sexual dysfunction, which influence the health-related quality of life of the patients. We aimed to determine the correlations between the health-related quality of life, the level of disability, fatigue and depression in glatiramer acetate-treated patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. The Hungarian versions of the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life-54, Fatigue Impact Scale and Beck Depression Inventory questionnaires were completed by 428 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients treated with glatiramer acetate from 19 Hungarian centers. The prevalence of fatigue was found to be 62.4%. The prevalence of depression was lower (13.4%) than that described in previous studies (36-54%) among patients with multiple sclerosis. Significant differences in the health-related quality of life were found between fatigued and non-fatigued patients. The level of disability, fatigue, depression and the duration of the disease correlated significantly with the quality of life. However, linear regression analysis indicated that the quality of life was predicted by the level of disability, depression, social and cognitive fatigue, but not by physical fatigue. Decreasing the disease activity in multiple sclerosis with immunomodulatory therapy, together with improvements of the diagnostics and treatment of the accompanying depression and fatigue are of high priority to improve the health-related quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Community-level risk factors for depression hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Fortney, John; Rushton, Gerard; Wood, Scott; Zhang, Lixun; Xu, Stan; Dong, Fran; Rost, Kathryn

    2007-07-01

    This study measured geographic variation in depression hospitalizations and identified community-level risk factors. Depression hospitalizations were identified from the Statewide Inpatient Database. The dependent variable was specified as the indirectly standardized hospitalization rate. County-level data for 14 states were collected from federal agencies. The Bayesian spatial regression model included socio-demographic, economic, and health system characteristics as independent variables. There were 8.5 depression hospitalizations per 1,000 residents. 8.8% of counties had hospitalization rates 33% greater than the standardized rate. Significant risk factors included unemployment, poverty, physician supply, and hospital bed supply. Significant protective factors included rurality, economic dependence, and housing stress.

  20. Is Health Literacy Associated With Depressive Symptoms Among Korean Adults? Implications for Mental Health Nursing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Taeho Greg; Lee, Hee Yun; Kim, Nam Keol; Han, Gyounghae; Lee, Jeonghwa; Kim, Kyoungwoo

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated whether health literacy is associated with depressive symptoms among Korean adults, when adjusting for relevant risk factors for depression. Data were collected from a sample of 585 community-dwelling Korean adults living in Seoul and Kwangju, South Korea, using a quota sampling strategy. A cross-sectional, multivariate regression analysis was used to investigate the association between health literacy and depressive symptoms. When controlled for covariates, a lower level of health literacy was significantly associated with a higher level of depressive symptoms. Health literacy may play an important role in preventing and treating depression. Future research is needed to determine if improving health literacy, through health promotion interventions, can enhance community-dwelling Korean adults' understanding of depressive symptoms and relevant treatment options. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Utilization of Professional Mental Health Services Related to Population-Level Screening for Anxiety, Depression, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Among Public High School Students.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, John D; Le, Vi Donna; Baillargeon, Jacques; Temple, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    This study examines results from three mental health screening measures in a cohort of adolescent public school students in seven public schools in Southeast Texas affiliated with the Dating it Safe study. We estimated the odds of receiving professional mental health treatment in the previous year given results from different mental health screening batteries: the CES-D 10 battery for depression screening, the Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders, and the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder screen. Overall, students with higher scores on screening instruments for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and combinations of screening instruments were more likely to have sought past-year professional mental health treatment than non-symptomatic youth. However, the proportion of students screening positive and receiving professional treatment was low, ranging from 11 to 16 %. This study emphasizes the need for broader evaluation of population-based mental health screening among adolescents.

  2. MATERNAL SELF-REPORTED DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AND MATERNAL CORTISOL LEVELS INTERACT TO PREDICT INFANT CORTISOL LEVELS.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Jennifer E; Gonzalez, Andrea; Levitan, Robert; Masellis, Mario; Basile, Vincenzo; Atkinson, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Three basic findings have emerged from research on maternal depressive symptoms and offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal functioning: (a) Mothers' depressive symptoms are positively associated with their offsprings' cortisol stress response, (b) numerous individual and interpersonal maternal characteristics moderate this association, and (c) maternal and infant cortisol levels are highly correlated. In combination, these findings have suggested that maternal cortisol levels may moderate the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and infant cortisol responsivity; the current study assessed this hypothesis. Participants were 297 mother-infant dyads who were recruited from the community. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed via self-report. Dyads participated in two differentially stressful infant challenges when infants were 16 and 17 months old. Mother and infant salivary cortisol was collected before and after challenges. Results indicate that maternal cortisol levels moderated associations between maternal depressive symptoms and infant cortisol levels across both challenges. Infants showed higher cortisol levels if their mothers had both higher depressive symptoms and higher cortisol levels, as compared to infants of mothers with higher depressive symptoms and lower cortisol, and to infants of mothers with lower depressive symptoms and either higher or lower cortisol levels. We discuss findings in relation to environmental and biological factors that may contribute to the intergenerational transmission of depressive symptoms. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  3. Identity gaps and level of depression among Korean immigrants.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eura; Hecht, Michael L

    2008-07-01

    Identity gaps are a new theoretical construct that provide a framework for integrating communication into the study of identity and understanding the relationship between identity and health outcomes, such as depression. Derived from the communication theory of identity, identity gaps emerge when elements of identity are inconsistent with each other. This article focuses on 2 types of identity gaps, personal-enacted and personal-relational, examining their relationships with situational variables and depression. A questionnaire was administered to a community sample of 377 Korean immigrants to test a hypothesized path model predicting that 3 situational variables (intercultural communication competence, middleperson status, and perception of racial hierarchy) would influence the identity gaps that, in turn, influence Korean immigrants' levels of depression. Results showed that all 3 situational variables predicted Korean immigrants' personal-relational identity gaps, whereas only intercultural communication competence predicted their personal-enacted identity gaps. Both types of identity gaps predicted the level of depression. The personal-relational identity gap significantly mediated the effects of all 3 situational variables on levels of depression. However, the personal-enacted identity gap mediated only the effects of intercultural communication competence on the levels of depression.

  4. Describing the population health burden of depression: health-adjusted life expectancy by depression status in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Steensma, C.; Loukine, L.; Orpana, H.; McRae, L.; Vachon, J.; Mo, F.; Boileau-Falardeau, M.; Reid, C.; Choi, B. C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Few studies have evaluated the impact of depression in terms of losses to both premature mortality and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) on the overall population. Health-adjusted life expectancy (HALE) is a summary measure of population health that combines both morbidity and mortality into a single summary statistic that describes the current health status of a population. Methods: We estimated HALE for the Canadian adult population according to depression status. National Population Health Survey (NPHS) participants 20 years and older (n = 12 373) were followed for mortality outcomes from 1994 to 2009, based on depression status. Depression was defined as having likely experienced a major depressive episode in the previous year as measured by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview Short Form. Life expectancy was estimated by building period abridged life tables by sex and depression status using the relative risks of mortality from the NPHS and mortality data from the Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System (2007–2009). The Canadian Community Health Survey (2009/10) provided estimates of depression prevalence and Health Utilities Index as a measure of HRQOL. Using the combined mortality, depression prevalence and HRQOL estimates, HALE was estimated for the adult population according to depression status and by sex. Results: For the population of women with a recent major depressive episode, HALE at 20 years of age was 42.0 years (95% CI: 40.2–43.8) compared to 57.0 years (95% CI: 56.8–57.2) for women without a recent major depressive episode. For the population of Canadian men, HALE at 20 was 39.0 years (95% CI: 36.5–41.5) for those with a recent major depressive episode compared to 53.8 years (95% CI: 53.6–54.0) for those without. For the 15.0-year difference in HALE between women with and without depression, 12.3 years can be attributed to the HRQOL gap and the remaining 2.7 years to the mortality gap. The

  5. Predicting levels of Latino depression: acculturation, acculturative stress, and coping.

    PubMed

    Torres, Lucas

    2010-04-01

    Past research has noted that aspects of living in the United States place Latinos at risk for experiencing psychological problems. However, the specific features of the adaptation process that contribute to depression remain unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the ability of acculturation, acculturative stress, and coping to predict membership into low, medium, and high groups of depression among Latinos. Within a group of 148 Latino adults from the community, a multinomial logistic regression revealed that an Anglo orientation, English competency pressures, and active coping differentiated high from low depression and that a Latino orientation and, to some extent, the pressure to acculturate distinguished medium from low depression. These results highlight a pattern of characteristics that function as risk and protective factors in relation to level of symptom severity. The findings are discussed in terms of implications for Latino mental health, including considerations for intervention and prevention.

  6. Attitude scale and general health questionnaire subscales predict depression?

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Afshar, Hamid; Doost, Hamid Taher Neshat; Mousavi, Seyed Ghafur; Moolavi, Hoseyn

    2012-01-01

    According to Beck theory, dysfunctional attitude has a central role in emergence of depression. The aim of this study was to determine contributions of dysfunctional attitude and general health index to depression. In this case-control study, two groups of subjects participated. The first group consisted of 65 patients with major depression and dysthymic disorder, who were recruited from Noor and Navab Safavi Psychiatry Clinics in Isfahan. The control group was consisted of 65 non-patient individuals who were accompanied or relatives of the patients and was matched with them based on age, sex and education. Both groups completed 26-item Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS-26) and 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Logistic regression and correlation methods were applied for statistical analysis. Logistic regression analysis showed that by an increase of one level in categorized DAS-26 scores and one score in the physical symptoms, anxiety, social dysfunction and depression subscales of GHQ-28 the risk of depression increase by 6.8, 1.6, 1.9, 3.7, 4.78 times, respectively. Capability of dysfunctional attitude and general health subscales to predict depression supports the Beck's cognitive diathesis stress theory of depression that dysfunctional attitude may be a predisposing risk factor for depression.

  7. Health-Promoting Lifestyles and Depression in Urban Elderly Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yan; Wang, Bo; Wallen, Gwenyth R.; Shao, Pei; Ni, Chunping; Hua, Qianzhen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore health-promoting lifestyles, depression and provide further insight into the relationship between health-promoting lifestyles and depression in an urban community sample of elderly Chinese people. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive and correlational study of 954 community-dwelling urban elderly Chinese (aged ≥ 60) was conducted from July to December 2010. Lifestyles and depression were assessed using the revised Chinese Version of the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP-C) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), respectively. Results In this cohort, 15.8% of elderly urban adults met the criteria for depression. Over half of the sample (62.1%) scored greater than 100 on the HPLP-C, with range of score sum from 55 to 160. There were significant correlations between self-actualization (OR = 1.167, 95%CI: 1.111–1.226), nutrition (OR = 1.118, 95%CI: 1.033–1.209), physical activity (OR = 1.111, 95%CI: 1.015–1.216) and depression among community-dwelling elderly Chinese. Limitations This was a cross-sectional study. The significant associations found do not represent directional causation. Further longitudinal follow-up is recommended to investigate the specific causal relationship between lifestyles and depression. Conclusions Depression was common with medium to high levels of health-promoting lifestyles among urban elderly Chinese people. Lifestyle behaviors such as self-actualization, good nutrition habits and frequent physical activity were correlated to fewer depressive symptoms. Healthy lifestyles should be further developed in this population and measures should be taken for improving their depression. PMID:25781326

  8. Maternal Depression and Childhood Health Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    An increasing body of literature documents considerable inequalities in the health of young children in the United States, though maternal depression is one important, yet often overlooked, determinant of children's health. In this article, the author uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 4,048) and finds that maternal…

  9. Maternal Depression and Childhood Health Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turney, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    An increasing body of literature documents considerable inequalities in the health of young children in the United States, though maternal depression is one important, yet often overlooked, determinant of children's health. In this article, the author uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 4,048) and finds that maternal…

  10. The Long-Term Effects of Maternal Depression: Early Childhood Physical Health as a Pathway to Offspring Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia; Najman, Jake

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cross sectional and retrospective studies have highlighted the long-term negative effects of maternal depression on offspring physical, social, and emotional development, but longitudinal research is needed to clarify the pathways by which maternal depression during pregnancy and early childhood affects offspring outcomes. The current study tested one developmental pathway by which maternal depression during pregnancy might negatively impact offspring mental health in young adulthood, via poor physical health in early childhood. Methods The sample consisted of 815 Australian youth and their mothers who were followed for 20 years. Mothers reported on their own depressive symptoms during pregnancy and offspring early childhood. Youth completed interviews about health-related stress and social functioning at age 20, and completed a questionnaire about their own depressive symptoms two to five years later. Results Path analysis indicated that prenatal maternal depressive symptoms predicted worse physical health during early childhood for offspring, and this effect was partially explained by ongoing maternal depression in early childhood. Offspring poor physical health during childhood predicted increased health-related stress and poor social functioning at age 20. Finally, increased health-related stress and poor social functioning predicted increased levels of depressive symptoms later in young adulthood. Maternal depression had a significant total indirect effect on youth depression via early childhood health and its psychosocial consequences. Conclusions Poor physical health in early childhood and its effects on young adults’ social functioning and levels of health related stress are one important pathway by which maternal depression has long-term consequences for offspring mental health. PMID:24060574

  11. Cross-cultural patterns of the association between varying levels of alcohol consumption and the common mental disorders of depression and anxiety: secondary analysis of the WHO Collaborative Study on Psychological Problems in General Health Care.

    PubMed

    Bellos, Stefanos; Skapinakis, Petros; Rai, Dheeraj; Zitko, Pedro; Araya, Ricardo; Lewis, Glyn; Lionis, Christos; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2013-12-15

    Alcohol consumption is associated with several complications of both physical and mental health. Light or moderate alcohol consumption may have beneficial effects on physical or mental health but this effect is still controversial and research in the mental health field is relatively scarce. Our aim was to investigate the association between varying levels of alcohol consumption and the common mental disorders of depression and anxiety in a large international primary care sample. The sample consisted of 5438 primary care attenders from 14 countries who participated in the WHO Collaborative Study of Psychological Problems in General Health Care. Alcohol use was assessed using Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and the mental disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower prevalence of depression and generalized anxiety disorder compared to abstinence while excessive alcohol consumption was associated with a higher prevalence of depression. This non-linear association was not substantially affected after adjustment for a range of possible confounding variables, including the presence of chronic disease and the current physical status of participants and was evident in different drinking cultures. The study confirms that excessive drinking is associated with an increased prevalence of depression, but also raises the possibility that light/moderate drinking may be associated with a reduced prevalence of both depression and anxiety. Any causal interpretation of this association is difficult in the context of this cross-sectional study and further longitudinal studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD and depression

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Thomas; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Kohler, Michaela; Carraro, Giovanni E.; Schnyder, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, mental health professionals’ attitudes toward posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), compared to other psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or depression, have rarely been studied. Objective We assessed mental health professionals’ attitudes toward patients with PTSD compared to patients suffering from depression. Method Case vignettes of a patient with either PTSD or depression were presented to two samples of mental health professionals: attendees of a conference on posttraumatic stress (N=226) or of a lecture for psychiatry residents (N=112). Participants subsequently completed a questionnaire that assessed their attitude reactions to the presented case. Results Participants showed similarly positive attitudes toward depression and PTSD. PTSD elicited a more favorable attitude with regard to prosocial reactions, estimated dependency, attributed responsibility, and interest in the case, particularly in mental health professionals specializing in psychotraumatology. Across diagnoses, higher age and longer professional experience were associated with more positive attitudes toward patients. Conclusions Mental health professionals’ positive attitudes toward patients with depression and PTSD correlate with their specific knowledge about the disorder, their level of professional training, and their years of professional experience. Limitations The instruments used, although based on established theoretical concepts in attitude research, were not validated in their present versions. PMID:26507340

  13. Designing Consumer Health Technologies for the Treatment of Patients With Depression: A Health Practitioner's Perspective.

    PubMed

    White, Ginger; Caine, Kelly; Connelly, Kay; Selove, Rebecca; Doub, Tom

    2014-01-10

    The consumer health technologies used by patients on a daily basis can be effectively leveraged to assist them in the treatment of depression. However, because treatment for depression is a collaborative endeavor, it is important to understand health practitioners' perspectives on the benefits, drawbacks, and design of such technologies. The objective of this research was to understand how patients and health practitioners can effectively and successfully influence the design of consumer health treatment technologies for treating patients with depression. A group of 10 health practitioners participated in individual semistructured contextual interviews at their offices. Health practitioners rated an a priori identified list of depression indicators using a 7-point Likert scale and generated a list of depression indicators. Finally, health practitioners were asked to rate the perceived usefulness of an a priori identified list of depression treatment technologies using a 7-point Likert scale. Of the 10 health practitioners interviewed, 5 (50%) were mental health practitioners, 3 (30%) nurses, and 2 (20%) general practitioners. A total of 29 unique depression indicators were generated by the health practitioners. These indicators were grouped into 5 high-level categories that were identified by the research team and 2 clinical experts: (1) daily and social functioning, (2) medication, (3) nutrition and physical activity, (4) demographics and environment, and (5) suicidal thoughts. These indicators represent opportunities for designing technologies to support health practitioners who treat patients with depression. The interviews revealed nuances of the different health practitioners' clinical practices and also barriers to using technology to guide the treatment of depression. These barriers included (1) technology that did not fit within the current practice or work infrastructure, (2) technology that would not benefit the current treatment process, (3) patients

  14. Metacognition and depressive realism: evidence for the level-of-depression account.

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, Nicholas C; Davalos, Deana B; Vázquez, Susana M

    2011-09-01

    Introduction. The present study examined the relationship between metacognition (i.e., "thinking about thinking") and depression. More specifically, the depressive realism hypothesis (Alloy & Abramson, 1979), which posits that depressed people have a more accurate view of reality than nondepressed people, was tested. Methods. Nondepressed, mildly depressed, and moderately depressed individuals predicted their memory performance by making judgements of learning after each studied item. These predictions were then compared with actual performance on a free recall task to assess calibration, an index of metacognitive accuracy. Results and conclusions. Consistent with the depressive realism hypothesis, mild depression was associated with better calibration than nondepression. However, this "sadder but wiser" phenomenon appears to only exist to point, as moderate depression and nondepression showed no calibration differences. Thus, the level-of-depression account of depressive realism is supported.

  15. The relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression level in psychiatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu Mi; Lai, Chien Yu; Chang, Yong-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Yu, Ching-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Psychiatric nurses are exposed to highly stressful work environments that can lead to depression over time. This study aimed to explore the relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression levels of psychiatric nurses. A cross-sectional design with randomized sampling was used; 154 psychiatric nurses were recruited from six medical centers in Taiwan. Psychiatric nurses' work stress was found positively correlated with their depression level, and negatively related to resourcefulness. Work stress significantly predicted depression level. These results suggest that the hospital administrative units may develop training courses about resourcefulness skills to reduce psychiatric nurses' work stress, and improve their mental health.

  16. National Health Priority Areas Report, 1998--Mental Health: A Report Focusing on Depression, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Dept. of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

    This report presents procedures for national mental health that involve many levels of government and draws advice from a range of professional organizations. Due to the enormous impact of depression on the social, human, economic, and public health costs to Australians and the Australian government, this initiative focuses efforts on dealing with…

  17. Macro-level gender equality and depression in men and women in Europe.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Sarah; Huijts, Tim; Bracke, Piet; Bambra, Clare

    2013-06-01

    A recurrent finding in international literature is a greater prevalence of depression in women than in men. While explanations for this gender gap have been studied extensively at the individual level, few researchers have studied macro-level determinants of depression in men and women. In the current study we aim to examine the micro-macro linkage of the relationship between gender equality and depression by gender in Europe, using data from the European Social Survey, 2006-2007 (N=39,891). Using a multilevel framework we find that a high degree of macro-level gender equality is related to lower levels of depression in both women and men. It is also related to a smaller gender difference in depression, but only for certain social subgroups and only for specific dimensions of gender equality. © 2013 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2013 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Neighborhood socioeconomic status, depression, and health status in the Look AHEAD (Action for health in diabetes) study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Depression and diminished health status are common in adults with diabetes, but few studies have investigated associations with socio-economic environment. The objective of this manuscript was to evaluate the relationship between neighborhood-level SES and health status and depression. Individual-le...

  19. Country- and individual-level socioeconomic determinants of depression: multilevel cross-national comparison.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dheeraj; Zitko, Pedro; Jones, Kelvyn; Lynch, John; Araya, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    The prevalence and correlates of depression vary across countries. Contextual factors such as country-level income or income inequalities have been hypothesised to contribute to these differences. To investigate associations of depression with socioeconomic factors at the country level (income inequality, gross national income) and individual (education, employment, assets and spending) level, and to investigate their relative contribution in explaining the cross-national variation in the prevalence of depression. Multilevel study using interview data of 187 496 individuals from 53 countries participating in the World Health Organization World Health Surveys. Depression prevalence varied between 0.4 and 15.7% across countries. Individual-level factors were responsible for 86.5% of this variance but there was also reasonable variation at the country level (13.5%), which appeared to increase with decreasing economic development of countries. Gross national income or country-level income inequality had no association with depression. At the individual level, fewer material assets, lower education, female gender, economic inactivity and being divorced or widowed were associated with increased odds of depression. Greater household spending, unlike material assets, was associated with increasing odds of depression (adjusted analysis). The variance of depression prevalence attributable to country-level factors seemed to increase with decreasing economic development of countries. However, country-level income inequality or gross national income explained little of this variation, and individual-level factors appeared more important than contextual factors as determinants of depression. The divergent relationship of assets and spending with depression emphasise that different socioeconomic measures are not interchangeable in their associations with depression.

  20. State Psychological Reactance to Depression Public Service Announcements Among People With Varying Levels of Depressive Symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Lienemann, Brianna A; Siegel, Jason T

    2016-01-01

    Campaigns seeking to help people with depression can be effective, but they can also backfire. Psychological reactance is proposed as a partial explanation. Two experimental studies examined the effect of two depression messages (i.e., autonomy-supportive language, controlling language) for participants (n = 2027, n = 777) with varying levels of depressive symptomatology. For Study 1, two versions of a print public service announcement about seeking help for depression served as the experimental stimulus. Study 2 used an existing video public service announcement about seeking help for depression, but the text was altered to create the two conditions. In both studies, increased depressive symptomatology was associated with reduced help-seeking attitudes and intentions, as well as greater state reactance to a public service announcement about depression. Increased state reactance mediated the relationship between increased depressive symptomology and unfavorable help-seeking outcomes. Further, across the two studies, participants with high levels of depressive symptomatology who were exposed to the autonomy-supportive language ad reported either as much, or more, state reactance than participants with high levels of depressive symptomatology who were in the control condition. These results warn that language perceived as autonomy-supportive by people without depression might be perceived as controlling among people with depression.

  1. Grief, Depressive Symptoms, and Physical Health Among Recently Bereaved Spouses

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Rebecca L.; Caserta, Michael; Lund, Dale

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Widowhood is among the most distressing of all life events, resulting in both mental and physical health declines. This paper explores the dynamic relationship between physical health and psychological well-being among recently bereaved spouses. Design and Methods: Using a sample of 328 bereaved persons who participated in the “Living After Loss” study, we modeled trends in physical health, somatic symptoms, and psychological well-being over the first year and a half of widowhood. The primary focus is whether physical health at the time of widowhood modifies psychological well-being over time. Results: There were considerable somatic symptoms during the earliest months of bereavement but no major health declines over the first year and half of bereavement. Those in poor health had initially higher levels of grief and depressive symptoms, but the trajectories or changes over time were similar regardless of health status. Those with poor health at the time of widowhood had significantly higher risks of complicated grief and major depression disorder. Implications: Bereavement requires physical and emotional adjustment, but the psychological trajectory of bereavement may be somewhat universal. Bereavement support ought to include a focus on self-care and health promotion in addition to emotional support, especially because those with poor health initially may be most susceptible to prolonged and intense clinical distress. PMID:22156713

  2. Grief, depressive symptoms, and physical health among recently bereaved spouses.

    PubMed

    Utz, Rebecca L; Caserta, Michael; Lund, Dale

    2012-08-01

     Widowhood is among the most distressing of all life events, resulting in both mental and physical health declines. This paper explores the dynamic relationship between physical health and psychological well-being among recently bereaved spouses.   Using a sample of 328 bereaved persons who participated in the "Living After Loss" study, we modeled trends in physical health, somatic symptoms, and psychological well-being over the first year and a half of widowhood. The primary focus is whether physical health at the time of widowhood modifies psychological well-being over time.   There were considerable somatic symptoms during the earliest months of bereavement but no major health declines over the first year and half of bereavement. Those in poor health had initially higher levels of grief and depressive symptoms, but the trajectories or changes over time were similar regardless of health status. Those with poor health at the time of widowhood had significantly higher risks of complicated grief and major depression disorder.   Bereavement requires physical and emotional adjustment, but the psychological trajectory of bereavement may be somewhat universal. Bereavement support ought to include a focus on self-care and health promotion in addition to emotional support, especially because those with poor health initially may be most susceptible to prolonged and intense clinical distress.

  3. Decreased Prostaglandin D2 Levels in Major Depressive Disorder Are Associated with Depression-Like Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Cuilin; Wei, Hui; Zhu, Wanwan; Shen, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is the most abundant prostaglandin in the mammalian brain. The physiological and pharmacological actions of PGD2 in the central nervous system seem to be associated with some of the symptoms exhibited by patients with major depressive disorder. Previous studies have found that PGD2 synthase was decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of major depressive disorder patients. We speculated that there may be a dysregulation of PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder. Methods Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with a stable isotopic-labeled internal standard was used to determine PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice. A total of 32 drug-free major depressive disorder patients and 30 healthy controls were recruited. An animal model of depression was constructed by exposing mice to 5 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress. To explore the role of PGD2 in major depressive disorder, selenium tetrachloride was administered to simulate the change in PGD2 levels in mice. Results Mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress exhibited depression-like behaviors, as indicated by reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice were both decreased compared with their corresponding controls. Further inhibiting PGD2 production in mice resulted in an increased immobility time in the forced swimming test that could be reversed by imipramine. Conclusion Decreased PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder are associated with depression-like behaviors. PMID:28582515

  4. Decreased Prostaglandin D2 Levels in Major Depressive Disorder Are Associated with Depression-Like Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cuilin; Wei, Hui; Zhu, Wanwan; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is the most abundant prostaglandin in the mammalian brain. The physiological and pharmacological actions of PGD2 in the central nervous system seem to be associated with some of the symptoms exhibited by patients with major depressive disorder. Previous studies have found that PGD2 synthase was decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of major depressive disorder patients. We speculated that there may be a dysregulation of PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with a stable isotopic-labeled internal standard was used to determine PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice. A total of 32 drug-free major depressive disorder patients and 30 healthy controls were recruited. An animal model of depression was constructed by exposing mice to 5 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress. To explore the role of PGD2 in major depressive disorder, selenium tetrachloride was administered to simulate the change in PGD2 levels in mice. Mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress exhibited depression-like behaviors, as indicated by reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice were both decreased compared with their corresponding controls. Further inhibiting PGD2 production in mice resulted in an increased immobility time in the forced swimming test that could be reversed by imipramine. Decreased PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder are associated with depression-like behaviors.

  5. Complementary and Integrative Health Practices for Depression.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Judy

    2017-09-11

    The current article reviews selected complementary health approaches for the treatment of depressive symptoms. Complementary and integrative health (CIH) focuses on the whole person with the goal of optimal health-body, mind, and spirit. Patient use of integrative health practices and products is increasing; therefore, providers must understand these practices and products and be able to recommend or advise for or against their use based on research and guidelines. Difficulty with the current limitations of research on CIH practices is discussed, as these studies often may not have the same rigor or scientific weight as conventional treatment research. Although some individuals may use certain treatment options alone, such as massage therapy, meditation, and supplements to diet, the article discusses ways to combine CIH with allopathic care. Nurse practitioners should be open to considering complementary practices for health care and knowledgeable to guide patients in making safe health decisions. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. General health mediates the relationship between loneliness, life satisfaction and depression. A study with Malaysian medical students.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Chamorro-Premuzic, Tomas; Sinniah, Dhachayani; Maniam, Thambu; Kannan, Kumaraswami; Stanistreet, Debbi; Furnham, Adrian

    2007-02-01

    To examine the associations between life satisfaction, loneliness, general health and depression among 172 medical students in Malaysia. Participants completed a questionnaire battery, which included the 12-item General Health Questionnaire, Beck's Depression Inventory, the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale and the Satisfaction With Life Scale. Life satisfaction was negatively and significantly correlated with suicidal attitudes, loneliness and depression; and positively with health, which was negatively and significantly correlated with depression and loneliness. Self-concept was negatively correlated with loneliness and depression, depression was positively and significantly correlated with loneliness. Mediational analyses showed that the effects of loneliness and life dissatisfaction on depression were fully mediated by health. Even though less satisfied, and particularly lonelier, individuals are more likely to report higher levels of depression, this is only the case because both higher loneliness and life dissatisfaction are associated with poorer health. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for the diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders in developing nations.

  7. Depression, social factors, and farmworker health care utilization.

    PubMed

    Georges, A; Alterman, T; Gabbard, S; Grzywacz, J G; Shen, R; Nakamoto, J; Carroll, D J; Muntaner, C

    2013-08-01

    Farmworkers frequently live in rural areas and experience high rates of depressive symptoms. This study examines the association between elevated depressive symptoms and health care utilization among Latino farmworkers. Data were obtained from 2,905 Latino farmworkers interviewed for the National Agricultural Workers Survey. Elevated depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression short-form. A dichotomous health care utilization variable was constructed from self-reported use of health care services in the United States. A categorical measure of provider type was constructed for those reporting use of health care. Over 50% of farmworkers reported at least 1 health care visit in the United States during the past 2 years; most visits occurred in a private practice. The odds of reporting health care utilization in the United States were 45% higher among farmworkers with elevated depressive symptoms. Type of provider was not associated with depressive symptoms. Women were more likely to seek health care; education and family relationships were associated with health care utilization. Latino farmworkers who live and work in rural areas seek care from private practices or migrant/Community Health Clinics. Farmworkers with elevated depressive symptoms are more likely to access health care. Rural health care providers need to be prepared to recognize, screen, and treat mental health problems among Latino farmworkers. Outreach focused on protecting farmworker mental health may be useful in reducing health care utilization while improving farmworker quality of life. © 2013 National Rural Health Association.

  8. Managing workplace depression: an untapped opportunity for occupational health professionals.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Kelly; McKibbin, Laura

    2004-03-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent and costly health issues affecting the American work force. Despite well established research demonstrating the association between employee depression and reduced on-the-job productivity, increased absenteeism, and higher health care use, most employers remain largely unresponsive to the need for company based depression initiatives. Organizational and individual barriers can prevent companies from effectively managing employee depression. Organizational barriers include information gaps, lack of data to justify increased investment in employee mental health programs, and employers' ambiguous roles in addressing depression. Individual barriers such as an inability to recognize signs and symptoms; stigma; confidentiality and privacy concerns; and unavailability of easily accessible, quality resources can keep employees who are depressed from seeking treatment. Many occupational health professionals may feel ill prepared or uncomfortable taking the lead in creating more aggressive worksite responses to depression, but they are, perhaps, in the best of all possible positions within an organization to succeed. Occupational health professionals have the credentials, credibility, training, and experience necessary to build a strong case for business leaders for why investing in workplace depression programs is so important. Occupational health professionals are the most qualified to design and deliver destigmatized, customer friendly programs and services for employees to access for help with depression, and to integrate their services with other departments such as benefits, health promotion, EAP, and human resources, to create an effective, organization-wide depression initiative.

  9. Does a higher educational level protect against anxiety and depression? The HUNT study.

    PubMed

    Bjelland, Ingvar; Krokstad, Steinar; Mykletun, Arnstein; Dahl, Alv A; Tell, Grethe S; Tambs, K

    2008-03-01

    The relationship of education to the experience of anxiety and depression throughout adult life is unclear. Our knowledge of this relationship is limited and inconclusive. The aim of this study was to examine (1) whether higher educational level protects against anxiety and/or depression, (2) whether this protection accumulates or attenuates with age or time, and (3) whether such a relationship appears to be mediated by other variables. In a sample from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 1995--1997 (HUNT 2) (N=50,918) of adults, the cross-sectional associations between educational level and symptom levels of anxiety and depression were examined, stratified by age. The long-term effects of educational level on anxiety/depression were studied in a cohort followed up from HUNT 1 (1984--1986) to HUNT 2 (N=33,774). Low educational levels were significantly associated with both anxiety and depression. The coefficients decreased with increasing age, except for the age group 65-74 years. In the longitudinal analysis, however, the protective effect of education accumulated somewhat with time. The discrepancy between these two analyses may be due to a cohort effect in the cross-sectional analysis. Among the mediators, somatic health exerted the strongest influence, followed by health behaviors and socio-demographic factors. Higher educational level seems to have a protective effect against anxiety and depression, which accumulates throughout life.

  10. The prevalence of depression among patients and its detection by primary health care workers at Matawale Health Centre (Zomba).

    PubMed

    Udedi, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Little information is available on the prevalence of depression in Malawi in primary health care settings and yet there is increased number of cases of depression presenting at tertiary level in severe form. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of depression among patients and its detection by health care workers at a primary health care clinic in Zomba. A cross-sectional survey was done among patients attending outpatient department at Matawale Health Centre, in Zomba from 1st July 2009 through to 31st July 2009. A total of 350 adults were randomly selected using systematic sampling. The "Self Reporting Questionnaire", a questionnaire measuring social demographic factors and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders Non-Patient Version (SCID-NP) were administered verbally to the participants. The prevalence of depression among the patients attending the outpatients department was found to be 30.3% while detection rate of depression by clinician was 0%. The results revealed the magnitude of depression which is prevalent in the primary health care clinic that goes undiagnosed and unmanaged. It is therefore recommended that primary health care providers do thorough assessments to address common mental disorders especially depression and they should be educated to recognise and manage depression appropriately at primary care level.

  11. Public awareness about the connection between depression and physical health: specifically heart disease.

    PubMed

    Blumenfield, Michael; Suojanen, Julianne K; Weiss, Charlene

    2012-09-01

    The medical community continues to acknowledge a connection between depression and physical health, for example, cardiac disease. This study addresses public awareness about depression's effects on physical health, the relationship between cardiac disease and depression, and preferred sources of health information, in an effort to inform future health education programs. A survey, administered to 816 adults ages 40-69, focused on public awareness, perception of depression as an illness, its impact on other illnesses such as heart disease, and sources of health information. (1) Eighty-three percent (83%) of respondents felt depression was an illness; (2) a slightly higher percentage (85.8%) felt a mental disorder, like depression, could affect the course of a physical illness; (3) respondents' awareness of links between depression and cardiac disease ranged from 29.8% (awareness of depression as a risk factor for coronary artery disease) to 31.6% (awareness that depression can increase the risk of having a second heart attack); (4) print media were the most frequently cited sources of health information (22.7%); and (5) more highly educated respondents were more informed about depression than respondents with less education. Although a majority of respondents (1) recognized depression as an illness (2) thought it could complicate recovery from a physical illness, less than a third of them were aware of links between cardiac disease and depression. Demographic groups differed in their preferred sources of health information, especially across educational levels, demonstrating a need for targeted health educational outreach in efforts to reach a variety of populations.

  12. Relationship between serum homocysteine levels and depressive symptoms: the Cooper Center Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Phillip; DeFina, Laura F; Leonard, David; John, Sherin; Weiner, Myron F; Brown, E Sherwood

    2012-05-01

    Elevated serum levels of the amino acid homocysteine (HCY) are associated with a variety of diseases. To resolve conflicting findings in studies that suggest a relationship between elevated serum HCY levels and depression, we examined the relationship between HCY levels and depressive symptoms in the largest sample studied to date. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 11,757 participants (68.9% men) aged 20 to 90 years who completed preventive health examinations at the Cooper Clinic, Dallas, Texas, from 2007 to 2010. Currently experiencing depression was defined as a 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of ≥ 10. Serum HCY levels were obtained. Data were analyzed in a multiple logistic regression model of CES-D score of ≥ 10. When controlling for age, sex, body mass index, exercise, education, smoking, antidepressant use, creatinine level, alcohol use, and chronic medical conditions, elevated HCY was associated with 26% greater odds of currently experiencing depressive symptoms (P = .007) as defined by CES-D score. In the largest sample examined to date, we found a significant positive relationship between elevated serum HCY levels and currently experiencing depressive symptoms. Given the cross-sectional nature of the study, it is not possible to determine the direction of the relationship or whether lowering HCY levels will ameliorate depressive symptoms. Thus, longitudinal studies are needed. © Copyright 2012 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  13. Women's Use of Multi sector Mental Health Services in a Community-Based Perinatal Depression Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sarah Kye

    2010-01-01

    Low-income and ethnic minority women have been described as at risk for experiencing depression during and around the time of pregnancy, a finding complicated by low levels of mental health service use within this population. This study retrospectively examined data from a community-based perinatal depression project targeting low-income women in…

  14. Women's Use of Multi sector Mental Health Services in a Community-Based Perinatal Depression Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sarah Kye

    2010-01-01

    Low-income and ethnic minority women have been described as at risk for experiencing depression during and around the time of pregnancy, a finding complicated by low levels of mental health service use within this population. This study retrospectively examined data from a community-based perinatal depression project targeting low-income women in…

  15. Is satisfaction among orthopaedic trauma patients predicted by depression and activation levels?

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Elisa J; Paryavi, Ebrahim; Castillo, Renan C; OʼToole, Robert V

    2015-05-01

    Among orthopaedic trauma patients, little is known regarding the relationship between patient satisfaction and patient levels of depression and "activation" (level of involvement of patient in his or her own care). Our hypothesis was that satisfaction is correlated to levels of depression and activation. Patient questionnaires. Level 1 trauma center. One hundred twenty-four patients with at least one fracture. Patients were evaluated at orthopaedic trauma clinics 6 weeks or longer after injury. Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ), Patient Activation Measure, and Patient Health Questionnaire, a screening and evaluation tool for the presence and severity of depression. Spearman correlation coefficients assessed the relationship between activation level and depression severity with PSQ domains. Bivariate and multivariate linear regression models determined independent effects of depression and activation on general satisfaction. Patient satisfaction was moderate to high in general (mean score, 4.17). Spearman correlation coefficients were high for patient activation and all PSQ domains (generally >0.3, P < 0.05). Correlation coefficients were weaker for depression and PSQ domains (rho range, 0.16-0.33). Final multivariate linear regression model indicated improvement in general satisfaction of 0.14 with increasing patient activation. A decrease in general satisfaction of -0.03 was noted with increasing Patient Health Questionnaire depression score. Patient satisfaction is strongly correlated with patient activation but less correlated with the presence of depression. Patient satisfaction after orthopaedic trauma might be improved by encouraging and coaching patients on how to be more involved in their own health care. Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  16. Association between depression, patient scar assessment and burn-specific health in hospitalized burn patients.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Sook; Chung, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Boeun; Kim, Giyon

    2012-06-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychological problems arising after a burn, but its relationship with patient scar assessment and burn-specific health are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of in-hospital symptoms of depression, compare level of patient scar assessment, and burn-specific health by depression cutoff point, and identify the relationship between depression and these variables. In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 113 burn patients from two inpatient burn centers were divided into two groups based on the cutoff point of the Korean Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (Korean CES-D): ≥25 or <25. Patient Scar Assessment Scale and Korean Burn-Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B-K) were used to identify associations with depression. Incidence of severe, definite depression as assessed by a score of 25 or above on the Korean CES-D was approximately 50% on an average at 60.9 days after injury. Burn patients with the Korean CES-D≥25 had significantly higher total mean patient scar assessment scores (43.34±11.49 vs. 36.84±9.56, t=3.265, p=.001), and lower burn-specific health subscale scores compared to patients with Korean CES-D<25. Depression was positively correlated with all subscales of the Patient Scar Assessment, ranging from r=.196 to .335 except scar color. Depression was significantly correlated with all subscales of the BSHS-B-K, range from r=-.320 to -.725. Results indicate that incidence of symptoms of depression is relatively high, and depressed burn patients report worse burn scar or sensation and lower levels of burn-specific health. Early, timely recognition and management of depression in these patients are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors accounting for the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema: the Hordaland health study (HUSK)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The association between anxiety and depression, and eczema is well known in the literature, but factors underlying this association remain unclear. Low levels of omega-3 fatty acids and female gender have been found to be associated with both depression and eczema. Somatization and health anxiety are known to be associated with anxiety and depression, further, somatization symptoms and health anxiety have also been found in several dermatological conditions. Accordingly, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, female gender, somatization and health anxiety are possible contributing factors in the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema. The aim of the study is to examine the relevance of proposed contributing factors for the association between anxiety and depression, and eczema, including, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, female gender, health anxiety and somatization. Methods Anxiety and depression was measured in the general population (n = 15715) employing the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Information on eczema, female gender, omega-3 fatty acid supplement, health anxiety and somatization was obtained by self-report. Results Somatization and health anxiety accounted for more than half of the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema, while the other factors examined were of minor relevance for the association of interest. Conclusions We found no support for female gender and omega-3 fatty acid supplement as contributing factors in the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema. Somatization and health anxiety accounted for about half of the association between anxiety/depression, and eczema, somatization contributed most. The association between anxiety/depression, and eczema was insignificant after adjustment for somatization and health anxiety. Biological mechanisms underlying the mediating effect of somatization are yet to be revealed. PMID:20412596

  18. Caring for Depression in Older Home Health Patients.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Martha L

    2015-11-01

    Depression is common in older home health patients and increases their risk of adverse outcomes. Depression screening is required by Medicare's Outcome and Assessment Information Set. The Depression Care for Patients at Home (CAREPATH) was developed as a feasible strategy for home health nurses to manage depression in their patients. The protocol builds on nurses' existing clinical skills and is designed to fit within routine home visits. Major components include ongoing clinical assessment, care coordination, medication management, education, and goal setting. In a randomized trial, Depression CAREPATH patients had greater improvement in depressive symptoms compared to usual care. The difference between groups was significant at 3 months, growing larger and more clinically meaningful over 1 year. The intervention had no impact on patient length of stay, number of home visits, or duration of visits. Thus, nurses can play a pivotal role in the long-term course and outcomes of patients with depression.

  19. Environmental and individual characteristics associated with depressive disorders and mental health care use.

    PubMed

    Annequin, Margot; Weill, Alain; Thomas, Frédérique; Chaix, Basile

    2015-08-01

    Few studies examined the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and both depressive disorders and the corresponding mental health care use. The aim of our study was to investigate neighborhood effects on depressive symptomatology, antidepressant consumption, and the consultation of psychiatrists. Data from the French Residential Environment and Coronary heart Disease Study (n = 7290, 2007-2008, 30-79 years of age) were analyzed. Depressive symptomatology was cross-sectionally assessed. Health care reimbursement data allowed us to assess antidepressant consumption and psychiatric consultation prospectively more than 18 months. Multilevel logistic regression models were estimated. The risk of depressive symptoms increased with decreasing personal educational level and unemployment and slightly with decreasing neighborhood income. In a sample comprising participants with and without depressive symptoms, high individual and parental educational levels were both associated with the consultation of psychiatrists. In this sample, a low personal educational level increased the odds of consumption of antidepressants. No heterogeneity between neighborhoods was found for antidepressant consumption. However, the odds of consulting psychiatrists increased with median neighborhood income and with the density of psychiatrists, after adjustment for individual characteristics. Among depressive participants only, a particularly strong gradient in the consultation of psychiatrists was documented according to individual socioeconomic status. Future research on the relationships between the environments and depression should take into account health care use related to depression and consider the spatial accessibility to mental health services among other environmental factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Elevated morning cortisol is a stratified population-level biomarker for major depression in boys only with high depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Matthew; Herbert, Joe; Jones, Peter B.; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Wilkinson, Paul O.; Dunn, Valerie J.; Croudace, Timothy J.; Goodyer, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MD) is a debilitating public mental health problem with severe societal and personal costs attached. Around one in six people will suffer from this complex disorder at some point in their lives, which has shown considerable etiological and clinical heterogeneity. Overall there remain no validated biomarkers in the youth population at large that can aid the detection of at-risk groups for depression in general and for boys and young men in particular. Using repeated measurements of two well-known correlates of MD (self-reported current depressive symptoms and early-morning cortisol), we undertook a population-based investigation to ascertain subtypes of adolescents that represent separate longitudinal phenotypes. Subsequently, we tested for differential risks for MD and other mental illnesses and cognitive differences between subtypes. Through the use of latent class analysis, we revealed a high-risk subtype (17% of the sample) demarcated by both high depressive symptoms and elevated cortisol levels. Membership of this class of individuals was associated with increased levels of impaired autobiographical memory recall in both sexes and the greatest likelihood of experiencing MD in boys only. These previously unidentified findings demonstrate at the population level a class of adolescents with a common physiological biomarker specifically for MD in boys and for a mnemonic vulnerability in both sexes. We suggest that the biobehavioral combination of high depressive symptoms and elevated morning cortisol is particularly hazardous for adolescent boys. PMID:24550453

  1. Elevated morning cortisol is a stratified population-level biomarker for major depression in boys only with high depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Owens, Matthew; Herbert, Joe; Jones, Peter B; Sahakian, Barbara J; Wilkinson, Paul O; Dunn, Valerie J; Croudace, Timothy J; Goodyer, Ian M

    2014-03-04

    Major depressive disorder (MD) is a debilitating public mental health problem with severe societal and personal costs attached. Around one in six people will suffer from this complex disorder at some point in their lives, which has shown considerable etiological and clinical heterogeneity. Overall there remain no validated biomarkers in the youth population at large that can aid the detection of at-risk groups for depression in general and for boys and young men in particular. Using repeated measurements of two well-known correlates of MD (self-reported current depressive symptoms and early-morning cortisol), we undertook a population-based investigation to ascertain subtypes of adolescents that represent separate longitudinal phenotypes. Subsequently, we tested for differential risks for MD and other mental illnesses and cognitive differences between subtypes. Through the use of latent class analysis, we revealed a high-risk subtype (17% of the sample) demarcated by both high depressive symptoms and elevated cortisol levels. Membership of this class of individuals was associated with increased levels of impaired autobiographical memory recall in both sexes and the greatest likelihood of experiencing MD in boys only. These previously unidentified findings demonstrate at the population level a class of adolescents with a common physiological biomarker specifically for MD in boys and for a mnemonic vulnerability in both sexes. We suggest that the biobehavioral combination of high depressive symptoms and elevated morning cortisol is particularly hazardous for adolescent boys.

  2. Hopelessness and depression levels of parents of children with cancer.

    PubMed

    Kostak, Melahat Akgun; Avci, Gulcan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine the hopelessness and depression levels of parents of children diagnosed with cancer and undergoing cancer treatment and factors affecting these levels. The study was carried out with parents of 44 children receiving treatment in a paediatric haematology clinic of a university hospital. Data were collected using a survey form, the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) and the Beck Depression Scale (BDS). The mean BDS score of the mothers and fathers was 18.3 ± 11.30 and 15.2 ± 11.33, respectively. The mean BHS score of the mothers was 6.45 ± 4.40, whereas the mean BHS score of the fathers was 5.88 ± 4.27. The results showed that the levels of hopelessness and depression among the mothers were higher than among the fathers (p<0.001). There was a positive relationship between the hopelessness and depression scores of the mothers and the fathers (p<0.05), and the levels of hopelessness and depression scores of the fathers increased as those of the mothers increased. A weak financial situation of the family increased the hopelessness and depression levels of the fathers. The hopelessness and depression levels of the mothers who were supported by their families and relatives were decreased compared to those without such support (p<0.05). The results show that the parents of children with cancer face many psychosocial and spiritual problems. Using simple screening tools, nurses can identify at-risk parents and direct them to support services. We conclude that actively encouraging families to avail themselves of support resources and supporting them financially would positively affect the levels of depression and hopelessness of parents of children with cancer.

  3. Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Andreae, Christina; Strömberg, Anna; Chung, Misook L; Hjelm, Carina; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2017-06-01

    Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status. The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association. In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status. There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001). Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  4. Relationships among depression during pregnancy, social support and health locus of control among Iranian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Moshki, Mahdi; Cheravi, Khadijeh

    2016-03-01

    Prenatal depression is a significant predictor of postpartum depression and is detrimental to fetal development. To examine whether depression during pregnancy is associated with social support and health locus of control (HLC). Data were collected from a sample of 208 Iranian pregnant women using a demographic questionnaire, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, the multidimensional HLC Scale and the social support appraisals. Depression was experienced by 37% of participants. Overall, women reported higher level of family support (6.88 ± 1.15) than other supports (6.87 ± 1.29). Protective supports from other resources (6.87 ± 1.29) were higher than those from friends (5.94 ± 1.5). Internal, powerful others and chance beliefs had the highest mean scores. Social support and chance HLC significantly influenced the proposed mediator (depressive mood) in the linear regression model. Bivariate analysis showed significant associations between social support (friend, family and others) and depressive mood. Internal HLC had a significant association with social support and powerful others HLC. However, Pearson correlation coefficient was not significant between depressive mood and all dimensions of HLC. Clinicians could assess social support and chance HLC to identify and treat women at risk of prenatal depression. By providing support during pregnancy, depression levels in women and its effects on the fetus may be decreased, which could prevent postpartum depression. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The Level of Depression and Assertiveness among Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Rezayat, Fatemeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nursing students are susceptible to a higher risk of depression. Recognition of depression, assertiveness and the relationship between them is important since if a relationship exists, probably enhancing the level of assertiveness can reduce depression in this high risk group. We aimed to investigate depression and assertiveness levels and the relationship between them in nursing students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The target population of this cross-sectional study was bachelor nursing students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, as the largest and one of the most prestigious Iranian universities. For selecting samples, the convenience sampling method was used. Having no previous information about classes, the researcher selected the students from the courses held while the researcher was present for sampling at the faculty and studied all the students willing to participate in the study in selected classes. The questionnaire consisted of demographic information, Gambrill and Richey assertion inventory, and Beck’s depression inventory. SPSS software, version 16, was used to analyze the data. ANOVA and independent samples t test were used for as appropriated. Results: 55.6% of students indicated average and low levels of assertiveness and 38.7% were suffering from mild to severe depression. Pearson correlation test showed a significant inverse relationship (r=0.314 and P<0.001) between assertiveness and depression. There were significant relationships between depression and interest in the field of study (P=0.001) and between assertiveness and gender (P=0.035). Conclusion: There was an inverse significant relationship between depression and assertiveness among nursing students. We suggest a cohort study design that can determine the effect of these variables on each other completely. PMID:25349860

  6. The Level of Depression and Assertiveness among Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Rezayat, Fatemeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid

    2014-07-01

    Nursing students are susceptible to a higher risk of depression. Recognition of depression, assertiveness and the relationship between them is important since if a relationship exists, probably enhancing the level of assertiveness can reduce depression in this high risk group. We aimed to investigate depression and assertiveness levels and the relationship between them in nursing students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The target population of this cross-sectional study was bachelor nursing students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, as the largest and one of the most prestigious Iranian universities. For selecting samples, the convenience sampling method was used. Having no previous information about classes, the researcher selected the students from the courses held while the researcher was present for sampling at the faculty and studied all the students willing to participate in the study in selected classes. The questionnaire consisted of demographic information, Gambrill and Richey assertion inventory, and Beck's depression inventory. SPSS software, version 16, was used to analyze the data. ANOVA and independent samples t test were used for as appropriated. 55.6% of students indicated average and low levels of assertiveness and 38.7% were suffering from mild to severe depression. Pearson correlation test showed a significant inverse relationship (r=0.314 and P<0.001) between assertiveness and depression. There were significant relationships between depression and interest in the field of study (P=0.001) and between assertiveness and gender (P=0.035). There was an inverse significant relationship between depression and assertiveness among nursing students. We suggest a cohort study design that can determine the effect of these variables on each other completely.

  7. Lower levels of physical activity in childhood associated with adult depression.

    PubMed

    Jacka, F N; Pasco, J A; Williams, L J; Leslie, E R; Dodd, S; Nicholson, G C; Kotowicz, M A; Berk, M

    2011-05-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that early life exposures influence adult health outcomes and there is cause to hypothesise a role for physical activity (PA) in childhood as a protective factor in adult depression. This study aimed to investigate the association between self-reported levels of PA in childhood and self-reported depressive illness. Lifetime depression and levels of physical activity (low/high) in childhood (<15 yr) were ascertained by self-report in 2152 adults (20-97 yr) participating in an ongoing epidemiological study in south-eastern Australia. Data were collected between 2000 and 2006. In this sample, 141 women (18.9%) and 169 men (12.0%) reported ever having a depressive episode. Low PA in childhood was associated with an increased risk of reporting depression in adulthood (OR=1.70, 95%CI=1.32-2.17, p<0.001). Adjustment for age, gender and adult PA attenuated the relationship somewhat (OR=1.35, 95%CI=1.01-1.78, p=0.04), however further adjustment for SES or country of birth did not affect this relationship. In this community-based study, lower levels of self-reported PA in childhood were associated with a 35% increase in odds for self-reported depression in adulthood. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that lower levels of PA in childhood may be a risk factor for adult depression. Copyright © 2010 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Association between Serum Magnesium Levels and Depression in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yingying; Zhao, Kai; Luan, Xiaoqian; Liu, Zhihua; Cai, Yan; Wang, Qiongzhang; Zhu, Beilei; He, Jincai

    2016-01-01

    Post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common psychiatric complication of stroke that is associated with a poor outcome in stroke patients. Our aim was to assess the association between the serum magnesium levels and the presence of PSD in Chinese patients. Two hundred nine stroke patients were included in the study. Depressive symptoms were measured by the 17-Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at 3 months after stroke. Based on the depressive symptoms, diagnoses of depression were made in line with the DSM-IV criteria for PSD. Serum magnesium levels were evaluated using the dimethyl aniline blue colorimetric method at admission. Multivariate analyses were conducted using logistic regression models. Further, 120 normal subjects were recruited, and their serum magnesium levels were also measured as control. At 3 months, fifty-nine patients (28.2%) were diagnosed as PSD. The serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in both PSD patients and non-PSD patients than in normal subjects (p < 0.001). Indeed, patients with PSD showed lower serum magnesium levels (p < 0.001) than did non-PSD patients at admission. In the multivariate analyses, after adjusting for potential variables, we found that an increased risk of PSD was associated with serum magnesium levels ≤ 0.84mmol/L (OR 2.614, 95% CI 1.178-5.798, p=0.018). Low serum magnesium levels at admission were found to be associated with the presence of PSD at 3 months after stroke. PMID:28053818

  9. High levels of anxiety and depression in diabetic patients with Charcot foot

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background/aims Charcot foot is a rare but devastating complication of diabetes. Little research is available on the mental health impact of Charcot foot. Aim of the study is to assess mental health in diabetes patients with Charcot foot and to investigate the moderating effects of socio-demographic factors. The severity of the problem will be statistically evaluated with the help of a reference data set. Methods Cross-sectional questionnaire data using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and demographic background were collected from 50 patients with diabetes and Charcot complications (males 62%; mean age 62.2 ± 8.5 years). Statistical comparisons with a large data set of general diabetes patients acting as a point of reference were carried out. Results Anxiety and depression levels were high, (anxiety and depression scores 6.4 ± 4 and 6.3 ± 3.6 respectively). Females reported more severe anxiety and depression. Ethnic minorities and patients out of work reported more severe anxiety. Comparisons with published HADS data indicate that diabetes patients with Charcot foot experience more serious levels of anxiety and depression. Conclusions The high levels of mental health problems which were found in this study in diabetes patients with Charcot foot require recognition by researchers and clinicians. The findings imply the need to screen for mental health problems in diabetes patients with Charcot foot. PMID:24650435

  10. The effect of sunlight exposure on interleukin-6 levels in depressive and non-depressive subjects.

    PubMed

    Levandovski, Rosa; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Carissimi, Alicia; Gama, Clarissa S; Hidalgo, Maria Paz Loayza

    2013-03-05

    The objective of this epidemiological study was to evaluate the effect of length of sunlight exposure on interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels in depressive and non-depressive subjects. This was a cross-sectional study with 154 subjects (54 males, mean age: 43.5 ± 12.8 years) who were living in a rural area in south Brazil. Chronobiological and light parameters were assessed using the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. Sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. Plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon) were collected during the daytime and measured. IL-6 levels showed a positive correlation with light exposure (r = 0.257; p < 0.001) and a negative correlation with the mid-sleep phase on work-free days (r = -0.177; p = 0.028). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the length of light exposure was an independent factor for predicting IL-6 levels (ß = 0.26; p = 0.002). In non-depressed subjects, exposure to a different intensity of light did not affect IL-6 levels (t = -1.6; p = 0.1). However, when the two depressive groups with low and high light exposure were compared, the low light exposure group had lower levels of IL-6 compared with the high light exposure group (t = -2.19 and p = 0.0037). The amount of time that participants are exposed to sunlight is directly related to their IL-6 levels. Additionally, depressed subjects differ in their IL-6 levels if they are exposed to light for differing amounts of time.

  11. The effect of sunlight exposure on interleukin-6 levels in depressive and non-depressive subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this epidemiological study was to evaluate the effect of length of sunlight exposure on interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels in depressive and non-depressive subjects. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with 154 subjects (54 males, mean age: 43.5 ± 12.8 years) who were living in a rural area in south Brazil. Chronobiological and light parameters were assessed using the Munich Chronotype Questionnaire. Sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Beck Depression Inventory. Plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon) were collected during the daytime and measured. Results IL-6 levels showed a positive correlation with light exposure (r = 0.257; p < 0.001) and a negative correlation with the mid-sleep phase on work-free days (r = -0.177; p = 0.028). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the length of light exposure was an independent factor for predicting IL-6 levels (ß = 0.26; p = 0.002). In non-depressed subjects, exposure to a different intensity of light did not affect IL-6 levels (t = -1.6; p = 0.1). However, when the two depressive groups with low and high light exposure were compared, the low light exposure group had lower levels of IL-6 compared with the high light exposure group (t = -2.19 and p = 0.0037). Conclusions The amount of time that participants are exposed to sunlight is directly related to their IL-6 levels. Additionally, depressed subjects differ in their IL-6 levels if they are exposed to light for differing amounts of time. PMID:23497121

  12. Mother-Infant Antidepressant Levels, Maternal Depression and Perinatal Events

    PubMed Central

    Sit, Dorothy; Perel, James M.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Helsel, Joseph C.; Luther, James F.; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The authors explored the relationship of cord-maternal antidepressant concentration ratios and maternal depression with perinatal events and preterm birth. Method The investigators examined 21 mother-infant pairs with antidepressant exposure during pregnancy. The antidepressants included serotonergic reuptake inhibitors (SRI) and nortriptyline (noradrenergic inhibitor and mild SRI). The mothers were evaluated with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Depression ratings were repeated at 20, 30 and 36 weeks pregnancy. At delivery, investigators assessed cord and maternal antidepressant concentrations, neonatal outcomes on the Peripartum Events Scale (PES) and gestational weeks at birth. Results Mean cord-to-maternal concentration ratios were 0.52±0.35 (0.08–1.64) - parent drug and 0.54±0.17 (0.28–0.79) - metabolite. Nine of 21 mothers (43%) had a major depressive episode. From examining the maximum depression ratings, the mean SIGH-ADS score was 16.0±7.6. One-third (7/21) of infants had at least one perinatal event (PES≥1). The frequency of deliveries complicated by perinatal event(s) was similar in depressed and non-depressed mothers. There was no significant association between perinatal events and cord-to-maternal antidepressant concentration ratios or maternal depression levels. Exposure to short half-life antidepressants compared to fluoxetine resulted in more perinatal events (7/16 =44% vs 0/5=0%; p=0.06). Fourteen percent (3/21) of infants were preterm. Preterm birth was not associated with cord-to-maternal metabolite concentration ratios, depression levels or exposure to fluoxetine. Conclusion Antidepressant-exposed infants experienced a limited number of transient perinatal events. No association between cord-maternal concentration ratios or maternal depression and perinatal events could be identified. Contrary to other reports, we detected no increased risk for perinatal events with fluoxetine therapy compared to the short half

  13. Problem solving, loneliness, depression levels and associated factors in high school adolescents.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ummugulsum; Adana, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    To determine problem solving, loneliness, depression levels and associated factors in high school adolescents. This cross-sectional study was conducted in a city west of Turkey (Bursa) in a public high school and the population was 774 and the sampling was 394 students. Students to be included in the study were selected using the multiple sampling method. A personal Information Form with 23 questions, Problem Solving Inventory (PSI), Loneliness Scale (UCLA), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used as data collection tools in the study. Basic statistical analyses, t-test, Kruskall Wallis-H, One Way Anova and Pearson Correlation test were used to evaluate the data. Necessary permissions were obtained from the relevant institution, students, parents and the ethical committee. The study found significant differences between "problem solving level" and family type, health assessment, life quality and mothers', fathers' siblings' closeness level; between "loneliness level" and gender, family income, health assessment, life quality and mothers', fathers', siblings' closeness level; between "depression level" and life quality, family income, fathers' closeness level. Unfavorable socio-economic and cultural conditions can have an effect on the problem solving, loneliness and depression levels of adolescents. Providing structured education to adolescents at risk under school mental health nursing practices is recommended.

  14. Biofeedback Intervention for Stress, Anxiety, and Depression among Graduate Students in Public Health Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Kaewboonchoo, Orawan; Ratanasiripong, Nop; Hanklang, Suda; Chumchai, Pornlert

    2015-01-01

    Globally, graduate students have been found to have high prevalence of mental health problems. With increasing severity of mental health problems on university campuses and limited resources for mental health treatment, alternative interventions are needed. This study investigated the use of biofeedback training to help reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. A sample of 60 graduate students in public health nursing was randomly assigned to either the biofeedback intervention or the control group. Results indicated that biofeedback intervention was effective in significantly reducing the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression over the 4-week period, while the control group had increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression over the same timeframe. As future leaders in the public health nursing arena, the more psychologically healthy the graduate students in public health nursing are, the better the public health nursing professionals they will be as they go forth to serve the community after graduation. PMID:25954515

  15. Stress, anxiety, and depression in hospital consultants, general practitioners, and senior health service managers.

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, R. P.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study stress, anxiety, and depression in a group of senior health service staff. DESIGN--Postal survey. SUBJECTS--81 hospital consultants, 322 general practitioners, and 121 senior hospital managers (total 524). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Scores on the general health questionnaire and the hospital anxiety and depression scale. RESULTS--Sixty five (80%) consultants, 257 (80%) general practitioners, and 67 (56%) managers replied. Of all 389 subjects, 183 (47%) scored positively on the general health questionnaire, indicating high levels of stress. From scores on the hospital anxiety and depression scale only 178 (46%) would be regarded as free from anxiety, with 100 (25%) scoring as borderline cases and 111 (29%) likely to be experiencing clinically measurable symptoms. The findings for depression were also of some concern, especially for general practitioners, with 69 (27%) scoring as borderline or likely to be depressed. General practitioners were more likely to be depressed than managers (69 (27%) v 4 (6%) scored > or = 8 on hospital anxiety and depression scale-D; P = 0.004) with no significant difference between general practitioners and consultants. General practitioners were significantly more likely to show suicidal thinking than were consultants (36 (14%) v 3 (5%); P = 0.04) but not managers (9 (13%)). No significant difference could be found between the three groups on any other measure. CONCLUSIONS--The levels of stress, anxiety, and depression in senior doctors and managers in the NHS seem to be high and perhaps higher than expected. PMID:7888846

  16. Depression Screening Patterns for Women in Rural Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudiver, Fred; Edwards, Joellen Beckett; Pfortmiller, Deborah T.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rates and types of screening for depression in rural primary care practices are unknown. Purpose: To identify rates of depression screening among rural women in a sample of rural health clinics (RHCs). Methods: A chart review of 759 women's charts in 19 randomly selected RHCs across the nation. Data were collected from charts of female…

  17. Depression Screening Patterns for Women in Rural Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudiver, Fred; Edwards, Joellen Beckett; Pfortmiller, Deborah T.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rates and types of screening for depression in rural primary care practices are unknown. Purpose: To identify rates of depression screening among rural women in a sample of rural health clinics (RHCs). Methods: A chart review of 759 women's charts in 19 randomly selected RHCs across the nation. Data were collected from charts of female…

  18. The level of depression and its related factors among the mothers with mentally retarded girl children in exceptional primary schools

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Newsha; Taebi, Mahboubeh; Kazemi, Ashraf; Khalafian, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, depression is one of the most prevalent mental diseases to which some individuals like mothers of mentally retarded children are more vulnerable due to their (children’s) special condition. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the level of depression and its related factors in these mothers. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 120 qualified mothers with mentally retarded children who were from exceptional children girls’ schools in Isfahan. The subjects filled personal characteristics and Beck depression inventory assessment, and their level of depression and its association with some baseline factors were analyzed through descriptive statistics in SPSS. Results: Results showed that 75% of the mothers experienced various levels of depression, of whom 25.8% suffered from minor depression, 24.2% from moderate depression, and 25% suffered from major depression. The results obtained showed that there was a significant direct association between the intensity of depression and students’ age, mothers’ age, fathers’ age, the number of children, and the length of parents’ marriage and a reverse association between the intensity of depression and subjects’, fathers’, and mothers’ education (P = 0.004). No association was observed between mothers’ occupation and the intensity of depression. Meanwhile, there was a negative significant association between fathers’ occupation and mothers’ depression (P = 0.02). About 33.3% of the mothers did not believe that their spouses’ and families’ psychological and mental support was adequate. Conclusions: The present study showed that mothers of mentally retarded children are predisposed to depression. With regard to the important role of mothers in the family and, consequently, the risk of impaired health of the family members, especially these children's health, prevention and diagnosis of depression and treatment of these mothers seem to be

  19. Mediating role of activity level in the depressive realism effect.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Fernando; Matute, Helena; A Vadillo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Several classic studies have concluded that the accuracy of identifying uncontrollable situations depends heavily on depressive mood. Nondepressed participants tend to exhibit an optimistic illusion of control, whereas depressed participants tend to better detect a lack of control. Recently, we suggested that the different activity levels (measured as the probability of responding during a contingency learning task) exhibited by depressed and nondepressed individuals is partly responsible for this effect. The two studies presented in this paper provide further support for this mediational hypothesis, in which mood is the distal cause of the illusion of control operating through activity level, the proximal cause. In Study 1, the probability of responding, P(R), was found to be a mediator variable between the depressive symptoms and the judgments of control. In Study 2, we intervened directly on the mediator variable: The P(R) for both depressed and nondepressed participants was manipulated through instructions. Our results confirm that P(R) manipulation produced differences in the participants' perceptions of uncontrollability. Importantly, the intervention on the mediator variable cancelled the effect of the distal cause; the participants' judgments of control were no longer mood dependent when the P(R) was manipulated. This result supports the hypothesis that the so-called depressive realism effect is actually mediated by the probability of responding.

  20. Mediating Role of Activity Level in the Depressive Realism Effect

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Fernando; Matute, Helena; A. Vadillo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Several classic studies have concluded that the accuracy of identifying uncontrollable situations depends heavily on depressive mood. Nondepressed participants tend to exhibit an optimistic illusion of control, whereas depressed participants tend to better detect a lack of control. Recently, we suggested that the different activity levels (measured as the probability of responding during a contingency learning task) exhibited by depressed and nondepressed individuals is partly responsible for this effect. The two studies presented in this paper provide further support for this mediational hypothesis, in which mood is the distal cause of the illusion of control operating through activity level, the proximal cause. In Study 1, the probability of responding, P(R), was found to be a mediator variable between the depressive symptoms and the judgments of control. In Study 2, we intervened directly on the mediator variable: The P(R) for both depressed and nondepressed participants was manipulated through instructions. Our results confirm that P(R) manipulation produced differences in the participants’ perceptions of uncontrollability. Importantly, the intervention on the mediator variable cancelled the effect of the distal cause; the participants’ judgments of control were no longer mood dependent when the P(R) was manipulated. This result supports the hypothesis that the so-called depressive realism effect is actually mediated by the probability of responding. PMID:23029435

  1. Mid-pregnancy vitamin D levels and postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Gur, Esra Bahar; Gokduman, Ayse; Turan, Guluzar Arzu; Tatar, Sumeyra; Hepyilmaz, Irem; Zengin, Esma Burcak; Eskicioglu, Fatma; Guclu, Serkan

    2014-08-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common disorder that affects 10-15% of postpartum women, and it can have negative effects on both the mother and newborn. Recent studies have suggested that low levels of vitamin D are associated with poor mood and depression. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate a possible association between PPD and serum levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 (25(OH)D3), a reliable measurement of vitamin D, during mid-pregnancy. The source population consisted of all pregnant women between 24 and 28 gestational weeks from June 2012 to October 2012 at Bornova Health Research and Application Hospital, Sifa University. In order to better evaluate a possible effect between vitamin D levels and PPD, individuals with characteristics that put them at risk for developing PPD were excluded from the study. Serum 25(OH)D3 levels were evaluated mid-pregnancy in the study group. Serum 25(OH)D3 concentrations ≤20ng/mL (50nmol/L) were classified as a mild deficiency and those ≤10ng/mL (25nmol/L) were classified as a severe deficiency. Pregnant subjects having complications during birth or with the newborn after delivery were excluded from the study. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was used to assess maternal PPD 1 week, 6 weeks, and 6 months after delivery. A Pearson correlation was used to measure the strength of the associations between the EPDS scores and vitamin D levels analyzed during the three time periods. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent effects of vitamin D on PPD. Six hundred and eighty-seven pregnant women were included in this study. After excluding women due to PPD risk factors (in two stages), 179 pregnant women were screened for vitamin D levels during mid-pregnancy and in the 6th month postpartum. Eleven percent of our study group had severe vitamin D deficiency and 40.3% had mild vitamin D deficiency. The frequency of PPD was 21.6% at the 1st week, 23.2% at 6th week, and 23.7% at

  2. Nutrition health issues in self-reported postpartum depression

    PubMed Central

    Mortimore, Denise; Snow, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Aim In this retrospective survey women with and without self-reported postpartum depression (PPD) were compared in regards to consumption-frequency of foods and supplements rich in nutrients beneficial to nervous system (NS) health, in regards to consumption-frequency of compounds which may counteract the effect of the above and in regards to nutritional support provided to them during a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Background Postpartum depression (PPD) is defined as a major depressive episode that begins within 1 month of delivery and is experienced by roughly 13% of mothers. Patients and methods Four Hundred participants were recruited through the internet. Data gathered via multiple choice questionnaires was statistically analyzed using SPSS and Statistical software; statistical procedures included discriminant analysis, Pearson's product moment correlation, independent t-test and cross-tabulations. Results Out of 400 participants 83 (20.8%) were affected by self-reported depression after a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Depressed subjects consumed oily fish and offal significantly more often than non depressed subjects. Depression was more prevalent among women with vegetarian diets. No significant difference concerning food group intake or the ratios between foods rich in nutrients beneficial to NS health and foods rich in compounds antagonising their effect were found between depressed and non depressed subjects. Iron supplementation correlated positively with zinc supplementation in both groups. Roughly 70% of women reported to have received no information about n-3 fatty acid fish oils during pregnancy; informed subjects consumed fish oils more often. The majority of subjects with self-reported depression described nutritional support during pregnancy as inadequate. Conclusion Within this Austrian sample, the prevalence rate of postpartum depression was high; while the consumption of oily fish and vegetarian diets negatively correlated with

  3. Nutrition health issues in self-reported postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Hogg-Kollars, Sabine; Mortimore, Denise; Snow, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    In this retrospective survey women with and without self-reported postpartum depression (PPD) were compared in regards to consumption-frequency of foods and supplements rich in nutrients beneficial to nervous system (NS) health, in regards to consumption-frequency of compounds which may counteract the effect of the above and in regards to nutritional support provided to them during a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Postpartum depression (PPD) is defined as a major depressive episode that begins within 1 month of delivery and is experienced by roughly 13% of mothers. Four Hundred participants were recruited through the internet. Data gathered via multiple choice questionnaires was statistically analyzed using SPSS and Statistical software; statistical procedures included discriminant analysis, Pearson's product moment correlation, independent t-test and cross-tabulations. Out of 400 participants 83 (20.8%) were affected by self-reported depression after a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Depressed subjects consumed oily fish and offal significantly more often than non depressed subjects. Depression was more prevalent among women with vegetarian diets. No significant difference concerning food group intake or the ratios between foods rich in nutrients beneficial to NS health and foods rich in compounds antagonising their effect were found between depressed and non depressed subjects. Iron supplementation correlated positively with zinc supplementation in both groups. Roughly 70% of women reported to have received no information about n-3 fatty acid fish oils during pregnancy; informed subjects consumed fish oils more often. The majority of subjects with self-reported depression described nutritional support during pregnancy as inadequate. Within this Austrian sample, the prevalence rate of postpartum depression was high; while the consumption of oily fish and vegetarian diets negatively correlated with depression, Patient information positively correlated with the

  4. Blood BDNF Level Is Gender Specific in Severe Depression

    PubMed Central

    Kreinin, Anatoly; Lisson, Serah; Nesher, Elimelech; Schneider, Jenny; Bergman, Josef; Farhat, Kamal; Farah, Joseph; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Yadid, Gal; Raskin, Leon; Koman, Igor; Pinhasov, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Though the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a marker for major depressive disorder (MDD) and antidepressant efficacy has been widely studied, the role of BDNF in distinct groups of patients remains unclear. We evaluated the diagnostic value of BDNF as a marker of disease severity measured by HAM-D scores and antidepressants efficacy among MDD patients. Fifty-one patients who met DSM-IV criteria for MDD and were prescribed antidepressants and 38 controls participated in this study. BDNF in serum was measured at baseline, 1st, 2nd and 8th treatment weeks. Depression severity was evaluated using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). BDNF polymorphism rs6265 (val66met) was genotyped. We found a positive correlation between blood BDNF levels and severity of depression only among untreated women with severe MDD (HAM-D>24). Serum BDNF levels were lower in untreated MDD patients compared to control group. Antidepressants increased serum BDNF levels and reduced between-group differences after two weeks of treatment. No correlations were observed between BDNF polymorphism, depression severity, duration of illness, age and BDNF serum levels. Further supporting the role of BDNF in the pathology and treatment of MDD, we suggest that it should not be used as a universal biomarker for diagnosis of MDD in the general population. However, it has diagnostic value for the assessment of disease progression and treatment efficacy in individual patients. PMID:26010085

  5. Effects of Health Status and Health Behaviors on Depression Among Married Female Immigrants in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung A; Yang, Sook Ja; Chee, Yeon Kyung; Kwon, Kyoung Ja; An, Jisook

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effects of health status and health behaviors on depression in married female immigrants in South Korea. Sampling 316 immigrant women from the Philippines, Vietnam, China, and other Asian countries, a cross-sectional research design was used with self-report questionnaires that assessed sociodemographic characteristics, health status, health behaviors, and depression. There were significant differences in stillbirth experience, induced abortion, morbidity, perceived health status, meal skipping, and physical activity between depressed and nondepressed immigrant women. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, stillbirth experience, poorer perceived health status, more meal skipping, and less physical activity were associated with greater depressive symptoms. Both health status and health behaviors had significant impacts on depression, suggesting that development of nursing interventions and educational programs should be targeted towards improving maternal health, healthy lifestyle, and subjective health perception to promote married female immigrants' psychological well-being. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Contextual socioeconomic status and mental health counseling use among US adolescents with depression.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Janet R

    2014-07-01

    Most adolescents with depressive disorders do not receive any mental health services, even though effective treatments exist. Although research has examined numerous individual-level factors associated with mental health service use among depressed adolescents, less is known about the role of contextual factors. This study examines the relationship between contextual-level socioeconomic status (SES) and clinic-based mental health counseling use among US adolescents with high depressive symptoms in urban and suburban areas. Data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,133; 59 % female) were analyzed using multilevel logistic models in which adolescents were nested within counties. After controlling for individual-level predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics, as well as county racial/ethnic composition, county SES was positively associated with clinic-based counseling use among depressed youth. A one standard deviation increase in the county affluence index was associated with 43 % greater odds of receiving any clinical counseling services. Furthermore, the positive relationship between county affluence and clinical counseling use was no longer significant after controlling for the county supply of mental health specialist physicians. The results indicate that county residential context is a key correlate of mental health service use among depressed adolescents, such that those who live in lower SES counties with fewer mental health specialists are less likely to receive treatment.

  7. Contextual Socioeconomic Status and Mental Health Counseling Use Among U.S. Adolescents with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Most adolescents with depressive disorders do not receive any mental health services, even though effective treatments exist. Although research has examined numerous individual-level factors associated with mental health service use among depressed adolescents, less is known about the role of contextual factors. This study examines the relationship between contextual-level socioeconomic status (SES) and clinic-based mental health counseling use among U.S. adolescents with high depressive symptoms in urban and suburban areas. Data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N=1,133; 59% female) were analyzed using multilevel logistic models in which adolescents were nested within counties. After controlling for individual-level predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics, as well as county racial/ethnic composition, county SES was positively associated with clinic-based counseling use among depressed youth. A one standard deviation increase in the county affluence index was associated with 43% greater odds of receiving any clinical counseling services. Furthermore, the positive relationship between county affluence and clinical counseling use was no longer significant after controlling for the county supply of mental health specialist physicians. The results indicate that county residential context is a key correlate of mental health service use among depressed adolescents, such that those who live in lower SES counties with fewer mental health specialists are less likely to receive treatment. PMID:24114588

  8. Effectiveness of bibliotherapy self-help for depression with varying levels of telephone helpline support.

    PubMed

    Bilich, Linda L; Deane, Frank P; Phipps, Andrew B; Barisic, Marcella; Gould, Grahame

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of a cognitive behavioural bibliotherapy self-help package, with varied levels of telephone support, delivered through a mental health telephone service was examined with 84 mildly to moderately depressed adults. The study compared the changes in depressive symptoms of three groups: control, self help with minimal contact and self-help with telephone assistance. Both the minimal contact and the assisted self-help groups had significant reductions in their levels of depression compared with the control group. Treatment gains were maintained at a 1-month follow-up. The potential of self-help resources such as this to be successfully disseminated and delivered through a national mental health telephone information service is discussed.

  9. Impact of Health Literacy on Depressive Symptoms and Mental Health-related: Quality of Life Among Adults with Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Alisa; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Cheng, Debbie M; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine; Caruso, Christine; Saitz, Richard; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Health literacy has been linked to health status in a variety of chronic diseases. However, evidence for a relationship between health literacy and mental health outcomes is sparse. OBJECTIVE We hypothesized that low literacy would be associated with higher addiction severity, higher levels of depressive symptoms, and worse mental health functioning compared with those with higher literacy in adults with alcohol and drug dependence. METHODS The association of literacy with multiple mental health outcomes was assessed using multivariable analyses. Measurement instruments included the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale, the Mental Component Summary scale of the Short Form Health Survey, and the Addiction Severity Index for drug and alcohol addiction. Subjects included 380 adults recruited during detoxification treatment and followed prospectively at 6-month intervals for 2 years. Based on the REALM, subjects were classified as having either low (≤8th grade) or higher (≥9th grade) literacy levels. RESULTS In longitudinal analyses, low literacy was associated with more depressive symptoms. The adjusted mean difference in CES-D scores between low and high literacy levels was 4 (P<.01). Literacy was not significantly associated with mental health-related quality of life or addiction severity. CONCLUSIONS In people with alcohol and drug dependence, low literacy is associated with worse depressive symptoms. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between literacy and mental health outcomes should be explored to inform future intervention efforts. PMID:16881940

  10. Problem solving, loneliness, depression levels and associated factors in high school adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ummugulsum; Adana, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine problem solving, loneliness, depression levels and associated factors in high school adolescents. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a city west of Turkey (Bursa) in a public high school and the population was 774 and the sampling was 394 students. Students to be included in the study were selected using the multiple sampling method. A personal Information Form with 23 questions, Problem Solving Inventory (PSI), Loneliness Scale (UCLA), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used as data collection tools in the study. Basic statistical analyses, t-test, Kruskall Wallis-H, One Way Anova and Pearson Correlation test were used to evaluate the data. Necessary permissions were obtained from the relevant institution, students, parents and the ethical committee. Results: The study found significant differences between “problem solving level” and family type, health assessment, life quality and mothers’, fathers’ siblings’ closeness level; between “loneliness level” and gender, family income, health assessment, life quality and mothers’, fathers’, siblings’ closeness level; between “depression level” and life quality, family income, fathers’ closeness level. Conclusion: Unfavorable socio-economic and cultural conditions can have an effect on the problem solving, loneliness and depression levels of adolescents. Providing structured education to adolescents at risk under school mental health nursing practices is recommended. PMID:27882035

  11. Processes of mental health service use by adolescents with depression.

    PubMed

    Draucker, Claire Burke

    2005-01-01

    To begin development of a substantive theory of the processes of mental health service use by adolescents who are depressed and by their families. Grounded theory. Open-ended interviews were conducted with 52 young adults who were depressed as adolescents, four of their parents, and eight professionals who work with adolescents who are depressed. The constant comparison method was used to analyze the data. Adolescents who are depressed and their families perceived several "treatment pitfalls" associated with formal mental health services: (a) "They'll (mental health clinicians) think I'm crazy," (b) "They'll tell my business," and (c) "They won't have a clue." The adolescents and their families interacted with the mental health care providers by engaging in the psychosocial process of "venturing through the system," that is, proceeding despite possible dangers and risks by steering clear, holding back, and letting it take hold. Mental health service use by adolescents with depression involved complex and fluid interactional processes among the depressed adolescents, their parents or caretakers, and mental health care providers. Strategies are needed to avoid creating the pitfalls that concern adolescents and their families.

  12. Temporomandibular disorders, otologic symptoms and depression levels in tinnitus patients.

    PubMed

    Hilgenberg, P B; Saldanha, A D D; Cunha, C O; Rubo, J H; Conti, P C R

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and otologic symptoms in patients with and without tinnitus. The influence of the level of depression was also addressed. The tinnitus group was comprised of 100 patients with tinnitus, and control group was comprised of 100 individuals without tinnitus. All subjects were evaluated using the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) to determine the presence of TMD and depression level. Chi-square, Spearman Correlation and Mann-Whitney tests were used in statistical analysis, with a 5% significance level. TMD signs and symptoms were detected in 85% of patients with tinnitus and in 55% of controls (P≤0·001). The severity of pain and higher depression levels were positively associated with tinnitus (P≤0·001). It was concluded that tinnitus is associated with TMD and with otalgia, dizziness/vertigo, stuffy sensations, hypoacusis sensation and hyperacusis, as well as with higher depression levels.

  13. The relationships among health functioning indicators and depression in older adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Amoako, Emelia P; Gruber, Kenneth J; Rossen, Eileen K

    2007-02-01

    A common health problem among the elderly with diabetes is the onset of depressive symptoms that can adversely affect self-care and control of diabetes. The study examined the relationships of gender, race, comorbid conditions, symptom distress, and functional status with depression in a sample (N = 55) of older adults with diabetes. Most participants were female and black; mean age was 73 years. Gender and symptom distress were the strongest predictors of depression, accounting for 53% of the variance in depression. Although the sample was reasonably high functioning with only moderate levels of symptom distress, these findings serve as an important reminder for nurses that even moderate levels of symptom distress may be an indicator of depressive symptomatology among older diabetic adults.

  14. The association between erectile dysfunction, depressive symptoms and testosterone levels among middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Suija, Kadri; Kerkelä, Marja; Rajala, Ulla; Jokelainen, Jari; Laakso, Mauri; Härkönen, Pirjo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Timonen, Markku

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between erectile dysfunction and depressive symptoms and testosterone levels among middle-aged men at the community level. The study population consisted of 614 men born in 1945 and living in the city of Oulu, Finland. Erectile dysfunction was assessed by the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire and depressive symptoms by the Beck Depression Inventory. Blood samples were collected to measure testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin level. After adjusting for confounders, erectile dysfunction was statistically significantly associated with depressive symptoms (risk ratio (RR) 1.66, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.29-2.15), as well as with obesity (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.12-2.62). Neither total nor free testosterone level was associated with erectile dysfunction among our study group. Depressive symptoms rather than testosterone levels should be taken into consideration while treating middle-aged men with erectile problems at the community level. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  15. Pesticide exposure and self-reported incident depression among wives in the Agricultural Health Study.

    PubMed

    Beard, John D; Hoppin, Jane A; Richards, Marie; Alavanja, Michael C R; Blair, Aaron; Sandler, Dale P; Kamel, Freya

    2013-10-01

    Depression in women is a public health problem. Studies have reported positive associations between pesticides and depression, but few studies were prospective or presented results for women separately. We evaluated associations between pesticide exposure and incident depression among farmers' wives in the Agricultural Health Study, a prospective cohort study in Iowa and North Carolina. We used data on 16,893 wives who did not report physician-diagnosed depression at enrollment (1993-1997) and who completed a follow-up telephone interview (2005-2010). Among these wives, 1054 reported physician diagnoses of depression at follow-up. We collected information on potential confounders and on ever use of any pesticide, 11 functional and chemical classes of pesticides, and 50 specific pesticides by wives and their husbands via self-administered questionnaires at enrollment. We used inverse probability weighting to adjust for potential confounders and to account for possible selection bias induced by the death or loss of 10,639 wives during follow-up. We used log-binomial regression models to estimate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After weighting for age at enrollment, state of residence, education level, diabetes diagnosis, and drop out, wives' incident depression was positively associated with diagnosed pesticide poisoning, but was not associated with ever using any pesticide. Use of individual pesticides or functional or chemical classes of pesticides was generally not associated with wives' depression. Among wives who never used pesticides, husbands' ever use of individual pesticides or functional or chemical classes of pesticides was generally not associated with wives' incident depression. Our study adds further evidence that high level pesticide exposure, such as pesticide poisoning, is associated with increased risk of depression and sets a lower bound on the level of exposure related to depression, thereby providing reassurance that the moderate levels

  16. Pesticide Exposure and Self-Reported Incident Depression among Wives in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Beard, John D.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Richards, Marie; Alavanja, Michael C. R.; Blair, Aaron; Sandler, Dale P.; Kamel, Freya

    2013-01-01

    Background Depression in women is a public health problem. Studies have reported positive associations between pesticides and depression, but few studies were prospective or presented results for women separately. Objectives We evaluated associations between pesticide exposure and incident depression among farmers’ wives in the Agricultural Health Study, a prospective cohort study in Iowa and North Carolina. Methods We used data on 16,893 wives who did not report physician-diagnosed depression at enrollment (1993-1997) and who completed a follow-up telephone interview (2005-2010). Among these wives, 1,054 reported physician diagnoses of depression at follow-up. We collected information on potential confounders and on ever use of any pesticide, 11 functional and chemical classes of pesticides, and 50 specific pesticides by wives and their husbands via self-administered questionnaires at enrollment. We used inverse probability weighting to adjust for potential confounders and to account for possible selection bias induced by the death or loss of 10,639 wives during follow-up. We used log-binomial regression models to estimate risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results After weighting for age at enrollment, state of residence, education level, diabetes diagnosis, and not dropping out of the cohort, wives’ incident depression was positively associated with diagnosed pesticide poisoning, but was not associated with ever using any pesticide. Use of individual pesticides or functional or chemical classes of pesticides was generally not associated with wives’ depression. Among wives who never used pesticides, husbands’ ever use of individual pesticides or functional or chemical classes of pesticides was generally not associated with wives’ incident depression. Conclusions Our study adds further evidence that high level pesticide exposure, such as pesticide poisoning, is associated with increased risk of depression and sets a lower bound on the level of

  17. [Regular physical activity and mental health. The role of exercise in the prevention of, and intervention in depressive disorders].

    PubMed

    Takács, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    In our review we examine the relationship between physical activity and mental health; especially we determine the effectiveness of exercise in the prevention and treatment of depression. Over the past two decades the literature in the area of physical activity and mental health has been growing. However it seems that the findings and evidences not being utilized by mental health agencies and health practitioners. Depression is the most common disorder in the world, generally has a higher prevalence among women. In our study we overview and demonstrate that the exercise is a powerful intervention for prevention and treatment not only in non-clinical but also in clinical levels of depression. In sub-clinical levels of depression the meta-analytic findings and population surveys suggest that the exercise is associated with a significant moderate reduction of depression in different groups by gender and age; as well as a physically active lifestyle associates with lower levels of depression. In clinical levels of depression the physical activity is an effective tool in the prevention, studies support an association between higher levels of physical activity and lower levels of depression. In the treatment of clinical depression the randomized-controlled trials suggest the clear positive effects of exercise. This effect is similar to psychotherapeutic interventions and it was appeared under relatively short time (4-8 weeks). The exercise is one of the most important preventive health-related behaviors. Our review suggests a protective effect from activity on the development of clinical levels of depression and depressive symptoms. In addition the randomized controlled trials support a causal connection between exercise and reduction of depression. In sum the reviewed studies clearly support the antidepressant effect of exercise.

  18. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment, the depression will lift Where can I go for help? If you are unsure where to go for help, ask your health provider or check ... one’s health professional. Call 911 for emergency services. Go to the nearest hospital emergency room. Call the ...

  19. Health Care Engagement Among LGBT Older Adults: The Role of Depression Diagnosis and Symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Chengshi; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Optimal engagement in health care plays a critical role in the success of disease prevention and treatment, particularly for older adults who are often in greater need of health care services. However, to date, there is still limited knowledge about the relationship between depression and health care engagement among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. This study utilized data from Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, Sexuality/Gender Study, from the 2014 survey with 2,450 LGBT adults 50 years old and older. Multiple-variable regression was utilized to evaluate relationships between three indicators of health care engagement and four depression groups after controlling for background characteristics and discrimination in health care. Health care engagement indicators were "not using preventive care," "not seeking care when needed," and "difficulty in adhering to treatments." Depression groups were defined by depression diagnosis and symptomatology, including Diagnosed-Symptomatic group (Diag-Sympt), Diagnosed-Nonsymptomatic group (Diag-NoSympt), Nondiagnosed-Symptomatic group (NoDiag-Sympt), and Nondiagnosed-Nonsymptomatic group (NoDiag-NoSympt). Depression groups displayed different patterns and levels of health care engagement. The Diag-Sympt group displayed the highest "difficulty in adhering to treatments." Diag-NoSympt group displayed the lowest "not using preventive care." The NoDiag-Sympt group reported the highest "not using preventive care" and "not seeking care when needed." The NoDiag-NoSympt group had the lowest "not seeking care when needed" and "difficulty in adhering to treatments." Depression diagnosis and symptomatology are jointly associated with health care engagement among LGBT older adults. Interventions aiming to promote health care engagement among this population should simultaneously consider both depression diagnosis and symptomatology. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The

  20. Recession Depression: Mental Health Effects of the 2008 Stock Market Crash*

    PubMed Central

    McInerney, Melissa; Mellor, Jennifer M.; Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

    2013-01-01

    Do sudden, large wealth losses affect mental health? We use exogenous variation in the interview dates of the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to assess the impact of large wealth losses on mental health among older U.S. adults. We compare cross-wave changes in wealth and mental health for respondents interviewed before and after the October 2008 stock market crash. We find that the crash reduced wealth and increased feelings of depression and use of antidepressant drugs, and that these effects were largest among respondents with high levels of stock holdings prior to the crash. These results suggest that sudden wealth losses cause immediate declines in subjective measures of mental health. However, we find no evidence that wealth losses lead to increases in clinically-validated measures of depressive symptoms or indicators of depression. PMID:24113241

  1. Recession depression: mental health effects of the 2008 stock market crash.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Melissa; Mellor, Jennifer M; Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

    2013-12-01

    Do sudden, large wealth losses affect mental health? We use exogenous variation in the interview dates of the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to assess the impact of large wealth losses on mental health among older U.S. adults. We compare cross-wave changes in wealth and mental health for respondents interviewed before and after the October 2008 stock market crash. We find that the crash reduced wealth and increased feelings of depression and use of antidepressant drugs, and that these effects were largest among respondents with high levels of stock holdings prior to the crash. These results suggest that sudden wealth losses cause immediate declines in subjective measures of mental health. However, we find no evidence that wealth losses lead to increases in clinically-validated measures of depressive symptoms or indicators of depression.

  2. Does the level of wealth inequality within an area influence the prevalence of depression amongst older people?

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Alan; Jivraj, Stephen; Nazroo, James; Tampubolon, Gindo; Vanhoutte, Bram

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers whether the extent of inequality in house prices within neighbourhoods of England is associated with depressive symptoms in the older population using the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. We consider two competing hypotheses: first, the wealth inequality hypothesis which proposes that neighbourhood inequality is harmful to health and, second, the mixed neighbourhood hypothesis which suggests that socially mixed neighbourhoods are beneficial for health outcomes. Our results are supportive of the mixed neighbourhood hypothesis, we find a significant association between neighbourhood inequality and depression with lower levels of depression amongst older people in neighbourhoods with greater house price inequality after controlling for individual socio-economic and area correlates of depression. The association between area inequality and depression is strongest for the poorest individuals, but also holds among the most affluent. Our results are in line with research that suggests there are social and health benefits associated with economically mixed communities. PMID:24662528

  3. [Depressive disorders and use of health services in the French population according to the Health Barometer 2005].

    PubMed

    Lamboy, B; Léon, C; Guilbert, P

    2007-06-01

    Whereas depressive disorders are major problems of public health, there is few reliable data in general population in France. The objective of this study is to estimate the 12-month prevalence rates of depressive disorders and use of health services in French general population, and to identify the sociodemographic variables associated with Major Depressive Episode (MDE) and use of health services for mental disorder. This study was carried out from the data of the Health Barometer 2005, a random survey about several topics of health. Thirty thousand five hundred and fourteen individuals from 12 to 75 years were interviewed by telephone from October 2004 to February 2005. Depressive disorders were assessed by a standardized tool (CIDIsf) according to the classification of the DSM-IV (16710 individuals have answered the questions of mental health: 60% of the individuals aged 15 or older). 7.8% of the individuals interviewed reported a MDE over the last 12 months. In majority, the episodes were relatively serious (0.4% of mild episode and 2.9% of single episode) and were mainly associated with sex, age and marital status. Among these individuals, only 38.3% had consulted a health service for mental health during that period and 10.8% had psychotherapy. The main associated factors for use of services were age, educational level and depression severity. These first national reliable dataset confirms the extent of depressive disorders in general population and highlights the problems of use of health services and treatments. Also, this study shows that there are instruments and methodologies making it possible to study mental disorders and use of health services in general population. It suggests to look further into the exploration of these issue and to develop this kind of survey to study other problems of mental health.

  4. Anxiety and physical health problems increase the odds of women having more severe symptoms of depression.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sandra J; Simeonova, Diana I; Kimmel, Mary C; Battle, Cynthia L; Maki, Pauline M; Flynn, Heather A

    2016-06-01

    Severely depressed women incur substantial disability and suicide risk, necessitating an understanding of factors that may contribute to severe depression. The purpose of this research was to determine the degree to which age, physical morbidity, anxiety, and hormonal status predict the likelihood of severe depression among women with mood disorders (n = 298). Data arose from a standardized battery of measures in a multi-center clinical registry of patients with mood disorders. The women were being treated at 17 participating sites of the National Network of Depression Centers. Results of logistic regression analyses indicate that a woman's level of anxiety was the strongest predictor of her likelihood of having severe depression (Exp(B) = 1.33, p = .000), including thoughts of death or suicide. The number of physical health problems that a woman reported was also a significant predictor (Exp(B) = 1.09, p = .04). Neither age nor hormonal status was significant in the final model, although a trend was observed for women with surgically induced menopause to have more severe depression. Findings support the need to work closely with medical practitioners to address physical health problems as part of the treatment plan for depression and to give comorbid anxiety and depression equal priority in symptom management.

  5. Jewish spirituality, depression, and health: an empirical test of a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Krumrei, Elizabeth J; Pirutinsky, Steven; Rosmarin, David H

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about the links between spirituality and mental health among Jews. This study assessed trust/mistrust in God and religious coping and examined their relationships to depressive symptoms and physical health. Religious affiliation and intrinsic religiousness were examined as moderating variables and religious coping was examined as a mediator. Anonymous internet surveys were completed by 208 Jewish women and men of diverse denominations who resided primarily in the USA. Trust in God and positive religious coping were associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms and mistrust in God and negative religious coping were associated with greater depressive symptoms. Intrinsic religiosity showed a small moderation effect for mistrust in God and negative religious coping in relation to depressive symptoms and for trust in God in relation to physical health. Further, positive religious coping fully mediated the link between trust in God and less depressive symptoms and negative religious coping fully mediated the relationship between mistrust in God and greater depressive symptoms. The data lend themselves to a possible integrative cognitive-coping model, in which latent core beliefs about the Divine activate coping strategies during times of distress, which in turn impact psychological health. The findings highlight the potential clinical significance of spirituality to mental health among Jews and provide a basis for future longitudinal, experimental, and treatment outcome research.

  6. A study on level of physical activity, depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tajik, Esra; Abd Latiff, Latiffah; Adznam, Siti N; Awang, Hamidin; Yit Siew, Chin; Abu Bakar, Azrin S

    2017-10-01

    Inadequate physical activity has adverse health consequences among adolescents. Mental health problem can be developed by lack of physical activity however it is controversial. The current study aimed to examine the association between level of physical activity with depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among adolescents. A representative sample of 1747 adolescents (13-14 years) was randomly selected from 6 schools in a south part of Malaysia. Respondents were asked to fill consent form, and questionnaires including Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 and Physical Activity Questionnaire for Adolescents. Majority of respondents (71.9%) was Malay and more than half of the adolescents had low physical activity. About 40% had depression symptoms, followed by anxiety symptoms (65.9%) and stress symptoms (38.5%). Level of physical activity was significantly associated with gender, anxiety and stress (P<0.001). There were no associations with race, religion and depression symptom. This study provides some evidence among school-going adolescents related to anxiety and stress symptoms and low physical activities. Further studies are needed to show the protection effects of higher physical activity for depression, anxiety and stress symptoms in adolescents.

  7. The Roles of Social Support and Self-efficacy in Physical Health's Impact on Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Paukert, Amber L.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Kunik, Mark E.; Wilson, Nancy; Novy, Diane M.; Rhoades, Howard M.; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Wehmanen, Oscar A.; Stanley, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    Physical illness may precipitate psychological distress among older adults. This study examines whether social support and self-efficacy moderate the associations between physical health and depression and anxiety. Predictions were tested in 222 individuals age 60 or older presenting for help with worry. Physical health was assessed through self-report (subjective) and physical diagnoses (objective). Objective physical health did not have a significant association with depression or anxiety. Worse subjective physical health was associated with increased somatic anxiety, but not with depression or worry. The relationship between subjective physical health and depressive symptoms was moderated by self-efficacy and social support. As predicted, when self-efficacy was low, physical health had its strongest negative association with depressive symptoms such that as physical health improved, depressive symptoms also improved. However, the moderation effect was not as expected for social support; at high levels of social support, worse physical health was associated with increased depressive affect. PMID:21110074

  8. Depression and suicide ideation among students accessing campus health care.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Sara; Wiegel, Jennifer R; Mundt, Marlon; Brown, David; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Heiligenstein, Eric; Harahan, Brian; Fleming, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Depression and suicide are of increasing concern on college campuses. This article presents data from the College Health Intervention Projects on the frequency of depression and suicide ideation among 1,622 college students who accessed primary care services in 4 university clinics in the Midwest, Northwest, and Canada. Students completed the Beck Depression Inventory and other measures related to exercise patterns, alcohol use, sensation seeking, and violence. The frequency of depression was similar for men (25%) and women (26%). Thought of suicide was higher for men (13%) than women (10%). Tobacco use, emotional abuse, and unwanted sexual encounters were all associated with screening positive for depression. "Days of exercise per week" was inversely associated with screening positive for depression. Because the majority of students access campus-based student health centers, medical providers can serve a key role in early identification and intervention. With every 4th student reporting symptoms of depression and every 10th student having suicidal thoughts, such interventions are needed.

  9. Population impact of depression on functional disability in elderly: results from "São Paulo Ageing & Health Study" (SPAH).

    PubMed

    da Silva, Simone Almeida; Scazufca, Marcia; Menezes, Paulo R

    2013-03-01

    With the fast population aging, functional disability among the elderly is becoming a major public health issue. Depression is highly prevalent in this phase of life and may be associated with a significant proportion of the disability among elderly populations. We investigated the association of depressive symptoms and ICD-10 depression with functional disability in older adults and estimated the corresponding population attributable fractions (PAF). A cross-sectional one-phase population-based study was carried out with 2,072 individuals aged 65 years or over living in a low-income area of São Paulo, Brazil. Depressive symptoms and ICD-10 depression were assessed with the Geriatric Mental State and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. We assessed functional disability with the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule Instrument. Prevalence Ratios and PAF were calculated using Poisson regression. The prevalence of depressive symptoms and ICD-10 depression was 21.4 and 4.8 %, respectively. Depression and depressive symptoms were strongly associated with high functional disability, even after adjustment for demographic factors, socioeconomic conditions, physical morbidities, and dementia. The PAFs for depressive symptoms and ICD-10 depression were 12.0 % for each of the psychiatric morbidity. Depressive symptoms contributed as much as ICD-10 depression to the population burden of functional disability in the elderly. Effective management of clinically significant depressive symptoms, delivered mainly at the primary care level, may reduce the total population disability.

  10. Misalignment between Medicare Policies and Depression Care in Home Health Care: Home health provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley; Richardson, Joshua; Bruce, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Objective Depression affects one in four older adults receiving home health care. Medicare policies are influential in shaping home health practice. This study aims to identify Medicare policy areas that are aligned or misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care. Methods Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with nurses and administrators from five home health agencies in five states (n=20). Digitally recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory method. A multi-disciplinary team iteratively developed a codebook from interview data to identify themes. Results Several important Medicare policies are largely misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care: Medicare eligibility requirements for patients to remain homebound and to demonstrate a need for skilled care restrict nurses’ abilities to follow up with depressed patients for sufficient length of time; the lack of explicit recognition of nursing time and quality of care in the home health Prospective Payment System (PPS) provides misaligned incentives for depression care; incorporation of a two-item depression screening tool in Medicare-mandated comprehensive patient assessment raised clinician awareness of depression; however, inclusion of the tool at Start-of-Care only but not any other follow-up points limits its potential in assisting nurses with depression care management; under-development of clinical decision support for depression care in vendor-developed electronic health records constitutes an important barrier to depression quality improvement in home health care. Conclusions Several influential Medicare policies and regulations for home health practice may be misaligned with evidence-based depression care for home health patients. PMID:24632686

  11. Prevalence of depression and anxiety in top-level male and female football players

    PubMed Central

    Junge, Astrid; Feddermann-Demont, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Background Scientific studies on the prevalence of mental health problems in elite athletes are rare, and most have had considerable methodological limitations, such as low response rate and heterogeneous samples. Aims To evaluate the prevalence of depression and anxiety in top-level football players in comparison to the general population, and to analyse potential risk factors. Methods Players of all first league (FL) and of four U-21 football teams in Switzerland were asked to answer a questionnaire on player's characteristics, the Centre of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale. Results All 10 women's FL teams, 9 of 10 men's FL teams and 4 male U-21 teams (n=471 football players) took part in the study. The CES-D score indicated a mild to moderate depression in 33 (7.6%) players and a major depression in 13 (3.0%) players. The GAD-7 score indicated an at least moderate anxiety disorder in 6 (1.4%) players. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of depression was similar and the prevalence of anxiety disorders was significantly (χ2=16.7; p<0.001) lower in football players. Significant differences were observed with regard to player characteristics, such as age, gender, player position, level of play and current injury. Conclusions Swiss FL football players had the same prevalence of depression as the general population, while male U-21 players had a higher prevalence of depression. It is important to raise awareness and knowledge of athletes’ mental health problems in coaches and team physicians, and to provide adequate treatment to athletes. PMID:27900164

  12. Prenatal health behaviors and postpartum depression: is there an association?

    PubMed

    Dagher, Rada K; Shenassa, Edmond D

    2012-02-01

    Postpartum depression is a prevalent mental disorder; however, scarce research has examined its association with prenatal health behaviors. This study investigated the associations of cigarette smoking, caffeine intake, and vitamin intake during pregnancy with postpartum depressive symptoms at 8 weeks after childbirth. Using a prospective cohort study design, participants were recruited from the postpartum floor at a hospital for women and newborns located in a northeastern city, from 2005 through 2008. Eligible women who were at least 18 years old and spoke English were interviewed in person while hospitalized for childbirth (N = 662). A follow-up home interview was conducted at 8 weeks postpartum with a 79% response rate (N = 526). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that smoking cigarettes anytime during pregnancy and not taking prenatal vitamins in the first trimester were significantly associated with worse depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale). Moreover, having a colicky infant, an infant that refuses feedings, being stressed out by parental responsibility, and having difficulty balancing responsibilities were stressors associated with worse depressive symptoms. Primary health care providers should consider evaluating women for risk of postpartum depression during their first prenatal visit, identifying prenatal health behaviors such as smoking and taking prenatal vitamins.

  13. Race, life course socioeconomic position, racial discrimination, depressive symptoms and self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Darrell L; Puterman, Eli; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Matthews, Karen A; Adler, Nancy E

    2013-11-01

    Greater levels of socioeconomic position (SEP) are generally associated with better health. However results from previous studies vary across race/ethnicity and health outcomes. Further, the majority of previous studies do not account for the effects of life course SEP on health nor the effects of racial discrimination, which could moderate the effects of SEP on health. Using data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, we examined the relationship between a life course SEP measure on depressive symptoms and self-rated health. A life course SEP was constructed for each participant, using a framework that included parental education and occupation along with respondents' highest level of education and occupation. Interaction terms were created between life course SEP and racial discrimination to determine whether the association between SEP and health was moderated by experiences of racial discrimination. Analyses revealed that higher levels of life course SEP were inversely related to depressive symptoms. Greater life course SEP was positively associated with favorable self-rated health. Racial discrimination was associated with more depressive symptoms and poorer self-rated health. Analyses indicated a significant interaction between life course SEP and racial discrimination on depressive symptoms in the full sample. This suggested that for respondents with greater levels of SEP, racial discrimination was associated with reports of more depressive symptoms. Future research efforts should be made to examine whether individuals' perceptions and experiences of racial discrimination at the interpersonal and structural levels limits their ability to acquire human capital as well as their advancement in education and occupational status. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antenatal Betamethasone Depresses Maternal and Fetal Aldosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, Julie M; Cale, Jackie M; Verbrick, Erin; Parker, C Richard; Carlton, David P.; Bird, Ian M

    2013-01-01

    Antenatal glucocorticoids are used to mature lung function in fetuses at risk for preterm delivery, but they also suppress cortisol synthesis in both pregnant women and their fetuses through blockade of ACTH and so adrenocortical P450c17 expression. We recently discovered in pregnant rabbits that even though exogenous betamethazone is not a mineralocorticoid, it also suppress production of aldosterone, a mineralocorticoid that does not require P450c17 for its biosynthesis. Lower aldosterone levels were linked to reduced P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) mRNA levels in the rabbit maternal and fetal adrenal cortex. To establish if this occurs in humans, we assayed aldosterone levels in women and newborns treated with antenatal betamethasone for preterm labor. In mothers treated with betamethasone, maternal cortisol depression after 48 hours was accompanied by aldosterone depression. Both pregnant women and their newborns treated with betamethasone showed depressed aldosterone levels in a 1-3 day period after the first betamethasone dose. We conclude that suppression of aldosterone biosynthesis is a side effect of antenatal steroids that has been largely overlooked, but may be clinically relevant at a time when the newborn is learning to control plasma electrolytes and blood volume. PMID:18997118

  15. Depression treatment and health-related quality of life among adults with diabetes and depression.

    PubMed

    Alenzi, Ebtihag O; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-06-01

    Previous findings regarding depression treatment and its consequences on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of adults with diabetes were inconsistent and targeted certain groups of population. Therefore, there is a critical need to conduct a population-based study that focuses on a general population with diabetes and depression. The primary aim of this study was to examine the physical and mental HRQoL associated with depression treatment during the follow-up year. We adopted a longitudinal design using multiple panels (2005-2011) of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to create a baseline year and follow-up year. We included adults with diabetes and depression. We categorized the baseline depression treatment into: (1) antidepressant use only; (2) psychotherapy with or without antidepressants; and (3) no treatment. HRQOL was measured using SF-12 version 2 physical component summary (PCS) and SF-12 mental component summary (MCS) scores during both baseline year and follow-up year. Ordinary least squares (OLS) were used to estimate the association between depression treatment and the HRQoL measures. The OLS regression controlled for predisposing, enabling, need, external environment factors, personal health practices, and baseline HRQoL measures. After controlling for all the independent variables and the baseline PCS, individuals who received psychotherapy with or without antidepressants had higher PCS scores as compared to those without any treatment for depression (beta = 1.28, p < 0.001). Individuals who reported using only antidepressants had lower PCS scores (beta = -0.54, p < 0.001) as compared to those without depression treatment. On the contrary, individuals who reported receiving psychotherapy with or without antidepressants had lower MCS scores as compared to those without depression treatment (beta = -1.43, p < 0.001). Those using only antidepressants had higher MCS scores as compared to those without depression treatment (beta = 0

  16. Determining depression level of caregivers providing home healthcare services

    PubMed Central

    Arican, Bilal; Guney, Murat; Akbal, Nuseybe; Demiral, Bahadir Han; Nadir, Ahmet; Kokar, Ilknur Kavci; Dabak, Mustafa Resat; Sargin, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Due to increase in elderly population as result of longer life expectancy and the incidence of chronic disease, greater importance should be given to elderly care and the needs of primary caregivers. The purpose of this study was to determine depression status of caregivers who were providing in-home healthcare services. METHODS: This study was conducted with caregivers for 63 home-dependent patients who benefited from the services provided by Kartal Dr. Lutfi Kirdar Training and Research Hospital Family Practice Clinic between May 15, 2013 and July 1, 2013 using a socio-demographic variables questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory. Data were analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Mann-Whitney U test, Student’s-t test and chi-square test. RESULTS: Of the total, 87.3% of survey participants were women. Average age was 52.47 years; 73% were married, 17.5% were single, and 9.5% were widows. Monthly income of 50.8% of participants was between TL 1000 and 3000. Of all the patients, 77.8% were totally, and 22.2% were semi-dependent. Depression was detected in 61.1% of patient relatives who were responsible for patient healthcare and in 22.2% of paid professional caregivers (p=0.052). Depression was detected at rate of 37% in caregivers who had been providing nursing care for less than 1 year, 63% for those who had been caregivers for 1 to 5 years, and for those providing care for more than 5 years, rate was 63 %. Rate of depression in study participants overall was 55.6%. CONCLUSION: Duration of providing care, dependency level of patient, and level of intimacy affect caregivers. They need psychological support. PMID:28058398

  17. Postpartum lipid levels in women with major depression.

    PubMed

    Prairie, Beth A; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Luther, James F; Sit, Dorothy; Wisner, Katherine L

    2012-05-01

    Maternal plasma lipids, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), increase during pregnancy, remaining elevated over prepregnancy levels through the immediate postpartum period. Triglycerides decrease rapidly to prepregnancy levels after delivery. Few data on postpartum lipid levels are available, and levels in postpartum women with depression have not been evaluated. We sought to determine the cross-sectional levels of total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, and triglycerides between 1 and 14 weeks postpartum in postpartum women with DSM-4 diagnoses of major depression and determine if they are similarly elevated to published levels in other postpartum populations. As part of screening for a randomized controlled trial comparing treatments for postpartum depression (PPD), women (n=120) had postpartum fasting lipid levels determined. Linear regression models were used to assess the association between time postpartum and lipid levels. Analysis of covariance models (ANCOVA) assessed the association of baseline characteristics with lipids. Total cholesterol levels were >200 mg/dL in 45% of the sample at baseline. Mean baseline total cholesterol was 196±39 mg/dL. There was an inverse linear relationship between postpartum week and total cholesterol, with cholesterol values decreasing an average of 4.5 mg/dL per week. Similarly, LDL-C and HDL-C trended down over time. Triglycerides were stable and within the normal range during the observation period. Total cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDL-C are significantly elevated in the early postpartum period and do not return to <200 mg/dL until 6 weeks postpartum in women with PPD. The magnitude and duration of elevation are consistent with the sparse published data on nondepressed women.

  18. Crisis as opportunity: international health work during the economic depression.

    PubMed

    Borowy, Iris

    2008-01-01

    The economic depression of the 1930s represented the most important economic and social crisis of its time. Surprisingly, its effect on health did not show in available morbidity and mortality rates. In 1932, the League of Nations Health Organisation embarked on a six-point program addressing statistical methods of measuring the effect and its influence on mental health and nutrition and establishing ways to safeguard public health through more efficient health systems. Some of these studies resulted in considerations of general relevance beyond crisis management. Unexpectedly, the crisis offered an opportunity to reconsider key concepts of individual and public health.

  19. Mental health treatment associated with community-based depression screening: considerations for planning multidisciplinary collaborative care.

    PubMed

    Winchester, Bruce R; Watkins, Sarah C; Brahm, Nancy C; Harrison, Donald L; Miller, Michael J

    2013-06-01

    Depression places a large economic burden on the US health care system. Routine screening has been recognized as a fundamental step in the effective treatment of depression, but should be undertaken only when support systems are available to ensure proper diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. To estimate differences in prescribing new antidepressants and referral to stress management, psychotherapy, and other mental health (OMH) counseling at physician visits when documented depression screening was and was not performed. Cross-sectional physician visit data for adults from the 2005-2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were used. The final analytical sample included 55,143 visits, representing a national population estimate of 1,741,080,686 physician visits. Four dependent variables were considered: (1) order for new antidepressant(s), and referral to (2) stress management, (3) psycho therapy, or (4) OMH counseling. Bivariable and multivariable associations between depression screening and each measure of depression follow-up care were evaluated using the design-based F statistic and multivariable logistic regression models. New antidepressant prescribing increased significantly (2.12% of visits without depression screening vs 10.61% with depression screening resulted in a new prescription of an antidepressant). Referral to stress management was the behavioral treatment with the greatest absolute change (3.31% of visits without depression screening vs 33.10% of visits with depression screening resulted in a referral to stress management). After controlling for background sociodemographic characteristics, the adjusted odds ratio of a new antidepressant order remained significantly higher at visits involving depression screening (AOR 5.36; 99.9% CI 2.92-9.82), as did referrals for all behavioral health care services (ie, stress management, psychotherapy, and OMH counseling). At the national level, depression screening was associated with increased new

  20. Depression and Burnout in Hospital Health Care Professionals.

    PubMed

    Martin; Poyen; Bouderlique; Gouvernet; Rivet; Disdier; Martinez; Scotto

    1997-07-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted on a random sample of 1,200 health care professionals in Marseille, France, in order to assess the prevalences of depression and burnout, and to compare these two entities. Depression was assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale (CES-D), and burnout by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization towards patients, and reduced sense of personal accomplishment. Some psychiatrists consider burnout to be a clinical form of depression. The prevalences of depression and burnout were very close: 17.1% and 15.7% among the women, 19.4% and 22% among the men, but 6.5% of the women and 9.4% of the men were both depressive and burned-out. A correlation was found between the CES-D and the subscales Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization of the MBI. Multivariate analysis and logistic regression models showed that many demographic and subjective variables influenced depression and burnout in different ways.

  1. Elevated social stress levels and depressive symptoms in primary hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gross, Katharina M; Schote, Andrea B; Schneider, Katja Kerstin; Schulz, André; Meyer, Jobst

    2014-01-01

    Primary hyperhidrosis is defined as excessive sweating of certain body areas without physiological reasons. Hyperhidrotic individuals report a high psychological strain and an impairment of their quality of life. Thus, the aim of the study is to investigate the relation between hyperhidrosis and different psychological as well as physiological aspects of chronic stress as a co-factor for the etiology of depression. In this study, forty hyperhidrotic subjects were compared to forty age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. The Trier Inventory of Chronic Stress ('Trierer Inventar zum chronischen Stress': TICS), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and the Screening for Somatoform Disorders (SOMS-2) were used to examine the correlation between primary hyperhidrosis and stress as well as accompanying depressive and somatic symptoms. The cortisol awakening response of each subject was analyzed as a physiological stress correlate. In hyperhidrotics, we found a significant lack of social recognition as well as significantly more depressive symptoms compared to the control subjects. A subgroup of patients with axillary hyperhidrosis had the highest impact on these increased issues of chronic stress, pointing to a higher embarrassment in these subjects. Especially in social situations, hyperhidrotics showed higher stress levels, whereby a vicious circle of stress and sweating is triggered. However, the cortisol awakening response did not significantly differ between hyperhidrotics and controls. Moreover, affected persons suffer from more depressive symptoms, which may be caused by feelings of shame and a lack of self-confidence. This initial study provides an impetus for further investigation to reveal a causative relationship between hyperhidrosis and its psychological concomitants.

  2. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Watch for changes in school work, sleep, and behavior. If you wonder whether your child might be depressed, talk with your health care ... families. This may be due to your genes, behaviors you learn at home, or your ... life events, such as job loss, divorce, or death of a spouse or other family ...

  3. Adjunctive yoga v. health education for persistent major depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Uebelacker, L A; Tremont, G; Gillette, L T; Epstein-Lubow, G; Strong, D R; Abrantes, A M; Tyrka, A R; Tran, T; Gaudiano, B A; Miller, I W

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether hatha yoga is an efficacious adjunctive intervention for individuals with continued depressive symptoms despite antidepressant treatment. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of weekly yoga classes (n = 63) v. health education classes (Healthy Living Workshop; HLW; n = 59) in individuals with elevated depression symptoms and antidepressant medication use. HLW served as an attention-control group. The intervention period was 10 weeks, with follow-up assessments 3 and 6 months afterwards. The primary outcome was depression symptom severity assessed by blind rater at 10 weeks. Secondary outcomes included depression symptoms over the entire intervention and follow-up periods, social and role functioning, general health perceptions, pain, and physical functioning. At 10 weeks, we did not find a statistically significant difference between groups in depression symptoms (b = -0.82, s.e. = 0.88, p = 0.36). However, over the entire intervention and follow-up period, when controlling for baseline, yoga participants showed lower levels of depression than HLW participants (b = -1.38, s.e. = 0.57, p = 0.02). At 6-month follow-up, 51% of yoga participants demonstrated a response (⩾50% reduction in depression symptoms) compared with 31% of HLW participants (odds ratio = 2.31; p = 0.04). Yoga participants showed significantly better social and role functioning and general health perceptions over time. Although we did not see a difference in depression symptoms at the end of the intervention period, yoga participants showed fewer depression symptoms over the entire follow-up period. Benefits of yoga may accumulate over time.

  4. Stress levels and depressive symptoms in NICU mothers in the early postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Alkozei, Anna; McMahon, Erin; Lahav, Amir

    2014-11-01

    This study examined whether particular maternal and infant factors can identify mothers at risk for increased stress upon admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Eighty-five mothers of preterm infants (25-34 weeks gestation) were assessed using the Parental Stressor Scale (PSS:NICU) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) within 3.24 ± 1.58 d postpartum. Hierarchical linear regression models were used to determine the extent to which maternal stress is influenced by individual factors. Fifty-two percent of mothers experienced increased stress (PSS:NICU score ≥3) and 38% had significant depressive symptoms (EPDS score ≥10). Stress related to alterations in parental role was the most significant source of stress among NICU mothers. Distance from the hospital and married marital status were significant predictors for stress related to alterations in parental role (p = 0.003) and NICU sights and sounds (p = 0.01), respectively. Higher stress levels were associated with higher depressive scores (p = 0.001). Maternal mental health factors, demographic factors, pregnancy factors and infant characteristics were not associated with increased stress. Elevated stress levels and depressive symptoms are already present in mothers of preterm infants upon NICU admission. Being married or living long distance from the hospital is associated with higher stress. Future work is needed to develop effective interventions for alleviating stress in NICU mothers and preventing its potential development into postnatal depression.

  5. Positive attitude toward life, emotional expression, self-rated health, and depressive symptoms among centenarians and near-centenarians.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kaori; Zweig, Richard; Schechter, Clyde B; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil

    2016-09-01

    Favorable attitudes, emotions, personality characteristics, and self-rated health have been associated with successful aging in late life. However, less is known regarding these constructs and their relationships to mental health outcomes in the oldest old persons. This study examined cross-sectional relationships of these psychological factors to depressive symptoms in centenarians and near-centenarians. A selected sample of Ashkenazi Jewish older adults aged 98-107 (n = 54, 78% female) without significant cognitive impairment participated. Cognitive function was assessed by Mini-Mental Status Examination, positive attitude toward life and emotional expression by the Personality Outlook Profile Scale (POPS), self-rated health by participants' subjective rating of their present health, and depressive symptoms by the Geriatric Depression Scale. Results demonstrated inverse associations of the positive attitude toward life domain of the POPS and self-rated health with participants' levels of depressive symptoms even after adjusting for the effects of history of medical illnesses, cognitive function, and demographic variables. Additionally, participants with high levels of care showed higher levels of depressive symptoms. Path analysis supported the partially mediating role of positive attitude toward life in the relationship between self-rated health and depressive symptoms. These findings emphasized the important roles of positive attitudes and emotions as well as self-rated health in mental health outcomes in the oldest old. Although, limited by its cross-sectional design, findings suggest these psychological factors may exert protective effects on mental health outcomes in advanced age.

  6. Effect of music on anxiety, stress, and depression levels in patients undergoing coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Moradipanah, F; Mohammadi, E; Mohammadil, A Z

    2009-01-01

    Control of stress and anxiety and the promotion of comfort are challenges facing health practitioners involved in catheterization. The aim of this case-control study was to examine the effect of music on the levels of anxiety, stress, and depression experienced by patients undergoing coronary angiography, as measured by the 21-item Depression Anxiety Stress Scales. Differences in pre- and post-intervention scores demonstrated that there were significant decreases in mean scores of state anxiety (P = 0.006), stress (P = 0.001) and depression P = 0.02) in the intervention group, who listened to 20 minutes of relaxing music, as compared with the control group who had 20 minutes of bed rest.

  7. Major depression during and after the menopausal transition: Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    PubMed

    Bromberger, J T; Kravitz, H M; Chang, Y-F; Cyranowski, J M; Brown, C; Matthews, K A

    2011-09-01

    It is unclear whether risk for major depression during the menopausal transition or immediately thereafter is increased relative to pre-menopause. We aimed to examine whether the odds of experiencing major depression were greater when women were peri- or post-menopausal compared to when they were pre-menopausal, independent of a history of major depression at study entry and annual measures of vasomotor symptoms (VMS), serum levels of, or changes in, estradiol (E2), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH) or testosterone (T) and relevant confounders. Participants included the 221 African American and Caucasian women, aged 42-52 years, who were pre-menopausal at entry into the Pittsburgh site of a community-based study of menopause, the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN). We conducted the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID) to assess diagnoses of lifetime, annual and current major depression at baseline and at annual follow-ups. Psychosocial and health factors, and blood samples for assay of reproductive hormones, were obtained annually. Women were two to four times more likely to experience a major depressive episode (MDE) when they were peri-menopausal or early post-menopausal. Repeated-measures logistic regression analyses showed that the effect of menopausal status was independent of history of major depression and annually measured upsetting life events, psychotropic medication use, VMS and serum levels of or changes in reproductive hormones. History of major depression was a strong predictor of major depression throughout the study. The risk of major depression is greater for women during and immediately after the menopausal transition than when they are pre-menopausal.

  8. Expanded mental health benefits and outpatient depression treatment intensity.

    PubMed

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Lindrooth, Richard C; Lurie, Ithai Z; Lyons, John S

    2006-04-01

    The justification for higher cost-sharing for behavioral health treatment is its greater price sensitivity relative to general healthcare treatment. Despite this, recent policy efforts have focused on improving access to behavioral health treatment. We measured the effects on outpatient treatment of depression of a change in mental health benefits for employees of a large U.S.-based corporation. The benefit change involved 3 major elements: reduced copayments for mental health treatment, the implementation of a selective contracting network, and an effort to destigmatize mental illness. Claims data and a difference-in-differences methodology were used to examine how the benefit change affected outpatient treatment of depression. Subjects consisted of 214,517 employee-years of data for individuals who were continuously enrolled for at least 1 full year at the intervention company and 96,365 employee-years in the control group. We measured initiation into treatment of depression and the number of outpatient therapy visits. The benefit change was associated with a 26% increase in the probability of initiating depression treatment. Conditional on initiating treatment, patients in the intervention company received 1.2 additional (P < 0.001) outpatient mental health treatment visits relative to the control group. Our results suggest that the overall effect of the company's benefit change was to significantly increase the number of outpatient visits per episode of treatment conditional on treatment initiation.

  9. Depressed mood in breast cancer survivors: associations with physical activity, cancer-related fatigue, quality of life, and fitness level.

    PubMed

    Galiano-Castillo, Noelia; Ariza-García, Angelica; Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    One out of five cancer survivors suffer from depression after oncology treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between depression and quality of life (QoL), cancer-related symptoms, physical activity level, health-related fitness, and salivary flow rate in breast cancer survivors. 108 breast cancer survivors in the year after the conclusion of treatment were included in this cross-sectional study. Demographic and clinically relevant information, cancer-related fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale), QoL (QLQ-Br23 module), pain intensity VAS scale, salivary flow rate, physical activity level (Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire), and health-related fitness were assessed in all participants. Depressed mood was measured with the Profile of Mood States (POMS) Depression subscale. Significant positive correlations between depressed mood and fatigue, systemic side effects, perceived shoulder pain, and breast-arms symptoms (r ranged between .57 and .28, P < .01) were found. In addition, significant negative correlations between depressed mood and body image, future perspective, force handgrip, and physical activity level (r ranged between -.41 and -.19; p < .05) were found. Regression analyses revealed that cancer-related fatigue, physical activity level, systemic side effects, and body image were significant predictors of depressed mood, and when combined, they explained 39.6% of the variance in depressed mood. Cancer-related fatigue, physical activity level, and QoL partially explain the variability of depressed mood in breast cancer survivors. This paper facilitates a better understanding of the relationship between depressed mood and possible factors associated with it. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Health-related quality of life and depression in patients with dentofacial deformity.

    PubMed

    de Ávila, Erica Dorigatti; de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Loffredo, Leonor Castro Monteiro; Massucato, Elaine Maria Sgavioli; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    Patients with dentofacial deformities present difficulties at work and in social adaptation. At the same time, they often appear depressed, and as a consequence, the psychosocial aspects of surgery play an important role. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects that depression causes in the quality of life of patients with dentofacial deformity. Filthy patients were recruited 1 year before undergoing orthognathic surgery and correlated oral and general health with the presence and absence of depression. In order to accomplish this, these patients received an adapted questionnaires of quality of life and Beck Depression Inventory to fill out. Fisher's test was applied, with a significance level of 5 %. Intercooled Stata version 9.0 was used to analyze data. Among the eight domains of quality of life, there were three associated with depression status: vitality (p < 0.001), social aspects (p = 0.011), and mental health (p = 0.008). There is growing interest in the impact of dentofacial deformity conditions on patients' quality of life. The scientific literature has discussed the social aspects of these deformities and showed that untreated patients had low self-esteem and suffered social restrictions before making the orthodontic and surgical treatments. This study concluded that the depression interferes significantly in vitality, social aspects of the individual, and mental health and, at the same time, emphasizes that the orthognathic surgery aims to not only restore esthetics and function to the patient but also improve the quality of life.

  11. Relationship between symptoms of depression, functional health status, and chronic disease among a residential sample of African Americans.

    PubMed

    Larson, Celia; Belue, Rhonda; Schlundt, David G; McClellan, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Depression and psychological distress often go unrecognized and untreated in primary care settings. The association between depression, socioeconomic status, and chronic disease underscore the importance of incorporating mental health education and screening into community-based health initiatives. This is particularly critical for African Americans who bear a disproportionate burden of poverty and chronic disease. This descriptive study assessed associations between symptoms of depression, socioeconomic status, healthcare utilization, physical and mental health functioning, and reactions to race among a sample of low-income African Americans. Consistent with the findings of previous research, respondents with symptoms of depression reported lower levels of physical and mental health functioning, and perceived that they had been treated worse by others at work, and had worse healthcare experiences than those of other races. Community-based programs for reducing disparities in physical illness may need to address the burden of undiagnosed and untreated depression in order to become optimally effective.

  12. Mental health literacy towards depression among non-medical students at a Malaysian university.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahir M; Sulaiman, Syed A; Hassali, Mohamed A

    2010-03-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the knowledge and perception of depression among students of University Sains Malaysia (USM), in Penang, Peninsular Malaysia.Method Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a pre-validated 21-item questionnaire among students at USM.Results A total of 500 respondents participated in the survey comprising 24.6% (n=123) males and 75.4% (n=377) females. Half (50.0%, n=250) were Malays, followed by Chinese (44.0%, n=220) and Indians (6.0%, n=30). Whilst exploring the respondents' knowledge of the symptoms of depression, it was found that Chinese females had a comparatively better knowledge (P=0.058) of the symptoms of depression in comparison with Malays and Indians. Overall, social issues were attributed as the possible cause of depression. A cursory knowledge level was observed regarding medication for depression. Female students were more inclined towards the use of alternative and traditional medicines. However, with regard to seeking professional help, consultation with a psychiatrist was preferred by the majority.Conclusion Overall, a moderate level of knowledge about the symptoms of depression and a cursory knowledge of its therapy were observed. Those with personal experience of depression had better knowledge of the symptoms and therapy. Alternative treatments and traditional medicines were also favoured. There is a risk that this may affect the ability of Malaysian youths to seek evidence-based mental health care.

  13. Mental health literacy towards depression among non‐medical students at a Malaysian university

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the knowledge and perception of depression among students of University Sains Malaysia (USM), in Penang, Peninsular Malaysia. Method Face‐to‐face interviews were conducted using a pre‐validated 21‐item questionnaire among students at USM. Results A total of 500 respondents participated in the survey comprising 24.6% (n=123) males and 75.4% (n=377) females. Half (50.0%, n=250) were Malays, followed by Chinese (44.0%, n=220) and Indians (6.0%, n=30). Whilst exploring the respondents' knowledge of the symptoms of depression, it was found that Chinese females had a comparatively better knowledge (P=0.058) of the symptoms of depression in comparison with Malays and Indians. Overall, social issues were attributed as the possible cause of depression. A cursory knowledge level was observed regarding medication for depression. Female students were more inclined towards the use of alternative and traditional medicines. However, with regard to seeking professional help, consultation with a psychiatrist was preferred by the majority. Conclusion Overall, a moderate level of knowledge about the symptoms of depression and a cursory knowledge of its therapy were observed. Those with personal experience of depression had better knowledge of the symptoms and therapy. Alternative treatments and traditional medicines were also favoured. There is a risk that this may affect the ability of Malaysian youths to seek evidence‐based mental health care. PMID:22477920

  14. Estimating Genetic and Environmental Influences on Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence: Differing Effects on Higher and Lower Levels of Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rende, Richard; Slomkowski, Cheryl; Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth; Stroud, Laura; Niaura, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    We estimate the relative effect sizes of genetic and environmental influences on both higher and lower levels of depressive symptoms with attention to persistence over a 1-year period in the genetically informative subsample of adolescents participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Shared environmental…

  15. Estimating Genetic and Environmental Influences on Depressive Symptoms in Adolescence: Differing Effects on Higher and Lower Levels of Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rende, Richard; Slomkowski, Cheryl; Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth; Stroud, Laura; Niaura, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    We estimate the relative effect sizes of genetic and environmental influences on both higher and lower levels of depressive symptoms with attention to persistence over a 1-year period in the genetically informative subsample of adolescents participating in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Shared environmental…

  16. Impact of aggression, depression, and anxiety levels on quality of life in epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Izci, Filiz; Fındıklı, Ebru; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Tuncel, Deniz; Şahin, Merve

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of aggression levels on the quality of life (QoL) of epilepsy patients. This study was conducted on 66 volunteer control subjects, who were matched by age and sex to the patient group, which consisted of 66 patients who applied to the Psychiatry and Neurology clinics for outpatient treatment, were aged between 18 years and 65 years, and were diagnosed with epilepsy. A sociodemographic and clinical data form designed by us was distributed among the study participants, along with Buss-Perry Aggression Scale, Beck Anxiety Scale, Beck Depression Scale, and the Quality of Life Scale Short Form (SF-36). Compared with the control group, the patient group displayed higher scores in all subgroups of Buss-Perry Aggression Scale subscales at a statistically significant level (P<0.05). As per the SF-36 questionnaire, physical functioning, physical role disability, general health perception, social functioning, mental health perception, and pain subscales were statistically lower in the patient group (P<0.05). Significant links between Beck Depression Scale and Beck Anxiety Scale levels, as well as some subscales of QoL and aggression levels, were also determined. In conclusion, epilepsy patients experienced impaired QoL compared with the healthy control group and their QoL was further impaired due to increased levels of anxiety, depression, and aggression.

  17. Impact of aggression, depression, and anxiety levels on quality of life in epilepsy patients

    PubMed Central

    Izci, Filiz; Fındıklı, Ebru; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Tuncel, Deniz; Şahin, Merve

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of aggression levels on the quality of life (QoL) of epilepsy patients. This study was conducted on 66 volunteer control subjects, who were matched by age and sex to the patient group, which consisted of 66 patients who applied to the Psychiatry and Neurology clinics for outpatient treatment, were aged between 18 years and 65 years, and were diagnosed with epilepsy. A sociodemographic and clinical data form designed by us was distributed among the study participants, along with Buss–Perry Aggression Scale, Beck Anxiety Scale, Beck Depression Scale, and the Quality of Life Scale Short Form (SF-36). Compared with the control group, the patient group displayed higher scores in all subgroups of Buss–Perry Aggression Scale subscales at a statistically significant level (P<0.05). As per the SF-36 questionnaire, physical functioning, physical role disability, general health perception, social functioning, mental health perception, and pain subscales were statistically lower in the patient group (P<0.05). Significant links between Beck Depression Scale and Beck Anxiety Scale levels, as well as some subscales of QoL and aggression levels, were also determined. In conclusion, epilepsy patients experienced impaired QoL compared with the healthy control group and their QoL was further impaired due to increased levels of anxiety, depression, and aggression. PMID:27785037

  18. Links between depressive symptoms and unmet health and social care needs among older prisoners

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Kate; Forsyth, Katrina; Webb, Roger; Senior, Jane; Hayes, Adrian Jonathan; Challis, David; Fazel, Seena; Shaw, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Background: absolute numbers of older prisoners and their proportion of the total prison population are increasing. They have multiple health and social care needs that are prominent on entry into prison. No previous studies have identified older prisoners' health and social care needs at this crucial point. Objective: to examine unmet health and social care needs among older men entering prison and their links with depressive symptoms. Methods: a cross-sectional survey across nine prisons in the North of England was completed. One hundred male prisoners aged between 60 and 81 were interviewed, using the Camberwell Assessment of Need—Forensic short version (CANFOR-S) and Geriatric Depression Scale—Short Form (GDS-15). Descriptive statistics were generated and χ2 tests performed. Results: participants reported high levels of unmet needs as measured with the CANFOR-S, notably in the domains of knowledge about their condition and treatment (38%); psychological distress (34%); daytime activities (29%); benefits (28%); food (22%) and physical health (21%). The mean total number of unmet needs was 2.74, with a median of 2.0. More than half the sample (56%, 95% CI 45–66%) exhibited clinical signs of depression. A significant association between depressive symptomology and an unmet physical health need, as measured by the CANFOR-S, was detected (χ2 = 6.76, df = 1, P < 0.01). Conclusions: high levels of depressive symptoms were experienced by older prisoners on entry into prison. Personalised health and social care needs assessment and discrete depression screening are required on prison entry to facilitate effective management of unmet needs. PMID:26764402

  19. Links between depressive symptoms and unmet health and social care needs among older prisoners.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Kate; Forsyth, Katrina; Webb, Roger; Senior, Jane; Hayes, Adrian Jonathan; Challis, David; Fazel, Seena; Shaw, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    absolute numbers of older prisoners and their proportion of the total prison population are increasing. They have multiple health and social care needs that are prominent on entry into prison. No previous studies have identified older prisoners' health and social care needs at this crucial point. to examine unmet health and social care needs among older men entering prison and their links with depressive symptoms. a cross-sectional survey across nine prisons in the North of England was completed. One hundred male prisoners aged between 60 and 81 were interviewed, using the Camberwell Assessment of Need-Forensic short version (CANFOR-S) and Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form (GDS-15). Descriptive statistics were generated and χ(2) tests performed. participants reported high levels of unmet needs as measured with the CANFOR-S, notably in the domains of knowledge about their condition and treatment (38%); psychological distress (34%); daytime activities (29%); benefits (28%); food (22%) and physical health (21%). The mean total number of unmet needs was 2.74, with a median of 2.0. More than half the sample (56%, 95% CI 45-66%) exhibited clinical signs of depression. A significant association between depressive symptomology and an unmet physical health need, as measured by the CANFOR-S, was detected (χ(2) = 6.76, df = 1, P < 0.01). high levels of depressive symptoms were experienced by older prisoners on entry into prison. Personalised health and social care needs assessment and discrete depression screening are required on prison entry to facilitate effective management of unmet needs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

  20. Job strain - attributable depression in a sample of working Australians: assessing the contribution to health inequalities.

    PubMed

    LaMontagne, Anthony D; Keegel, Tessa; Vallance, Deborah; Ostry, Aleck; Wolfe, Rory

    2008-05-27

    The broad aim of this study was to assess the contribution of job strain to mental health inequalities by (a) estimating the proportion of depression attributable to job strain (low control and high demand jobs), (b) assessing variation in attributable risk by occupational skill level, and (c) comparing numbers of job strain-attributable depression cases to numbers of compensated 'mental stress' claims. Standard population attributable risk (PAR) methods were used to estimate the proportion of depression attributable to job strain. An adjusted Odds Ratio (OR) of 1.82 for job strain in relation to depression was obtained from a recently published meta-analysis and combined with exposure prevalence data from the Australian state of Victoria. Job strain exposure prevalence was determined from a 2003 population-based telephone survey of working Victorians (n = 1101, 66% response rate) using validated measures of job control (9 items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.80) and psychological demands (3 items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.66). Estimates of absolute numbers of prevalent cases of depression and successful stress-related workers' compensation claims were obtained from publicly available Australian government sources. Overall job strain-population attributable risk (PAR) for depression was 13.2% for males [95% CI 1.1, 28.1] and 17.2% [95% CI 1.5, 34.9] for females. There was a clear gradient of increasing PAR with decreasing occupational skill level. Estimation of job strain-attributable cases (21,437) versus "mental stress" compensation claims (696) suggest that claims statistics underestimate job strain-attributable depression by roughly 30-fold. Job strain and associated depression risks represent a substantial, preventable, and inequitably distributed public health problem. The social patterning of job strain-attributable depression parallels the social patterning of mental illness, suggesting that job strain is an important contributor to mental health inequalities. The

  1. Misalignment between medicare policies and depression care in home health care: home health provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley A; Richardson, Joshua E; Bruce, Martha L

    2014-07-01

    Semistructured interviews with nurses working for home health care agencies in five states raise serious questions about the deleterious effects of Medicare policies and procedures on depression care. The agencies have strong incentives to limit nursing time in a given payment episode and to increase volume, making it difficult to provide high-quality depression care for homebound patients. Some nurses felt forced to "abandon" many patients with depression. The authors call for incremental policy changes in several key areas.

  2. Self-efficacy and the promotion of health for depressed single mothers.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Rahshida

    2010-09-01

    Single mothers are a vulnerable population at risk for poor mental and physical health. This paper discusses the mental and physical health of single mothers, as well as the psychosocial and socio-economic risk factors placing single mothers at risk for poor health outcomes. Some of these include, gender, income level, educational status, social support, stress and certain personality characteristics. Theoretical models with the potential to explore ways to promote health in depressed single mothers will also be presented. The paper concludes with the application of these models to primary prevention and the promotion of health for single mothers along with recommendations for future research.

  3. Does family history of depression predict major depression in midlife women? Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study (SWAN MHS).

    PubMed

    Colvin, Alicia; Richardson, Gale A; Cyranowski, Jill M; Youk, Ada; Bromberger, Joyce T

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women independent of psychosocial and health profiles at midlife. Participants were 303 African American and Caucasian women (42-52 years at baseline) recruited into the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and the Women's Mental Health Study (MHS) in Pittsburgh. Major depression was assessed annually with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Family mental health history was collected at the ninth or tenth follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether family history of depression predicted major depression in midlife, adjusting for covariates. The odds of experiencing major depression during the study were three times greater for those with a family history than for those without a family history (OR = 3.22, 95% CI = 1.95-5.31). Family history predicted depression (OR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.50-4.78) after adjusting for lifetime history of depression, age, trait anxiety, chronic medical conditions, and stressful life events. In analyses stratified by lifetime history of depression, family history significantly predicted depression only among women with a lifetime history of depression. Family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women generally, but particularly in those with a lifetime history of depression prior to midlife.

  4. Health-related social control among older men with depressive symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Mavandadi, Shahrzad; Jacques, Natacha; Sayers, Steven L; Oslin, David W

    2015-01-01

    Social control attempts, or attempts by social network members to influence a person's behavior, significantly predict men's health behaviors and psychological well-being. Despite the fact that depression is associated with compromised interpersonal functioning and poor health behaviors, the association between social control processes and depression has not been studied. Thus, this pilot study explored differential vulnerability to spouses' social control attempts among older, male primary care patients with varying levels of depression symptom severity and the degree to which these attempts predicted patients' behavioral and affective responses. Participants included 88 older men referred by their primary care providers for a behavioral health assessment at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Data on sociodemographics, depressive symptomatology, health behaviors, spouses' positive and negative social control attempts, and patients' behavioral and affective responses to attempts were collected by telephone. The sample was primarily Caucasian (mean age = 65.3 (SD = 8.1) years). Patients' higher depressive symptoms were significantly associated with positive and negative affective responses to their spouses' social control attempts. The frequency of control attempts and patients' behavioral responses, however, were unrelated to patients' depressive symptoms. Multiple regression models revealed that while spouses' control attempts were unrelated to patients' positive behavioral responses, more frequent negative attempts predicted greater negative behavioral responses (e.g., ignoring spouses' attempts). Moreover, negative control attempts predicted greater negative affective responses (e.g., resentment, sadness). The findings highlight the value of identifying effective social control strategies that maximize positive behavioral change, emotional responses, and health outcomes among older men with depressive symptoms.

  5. Population level effectiveness of implementing collaborative care management for depression.

    PubMed

    Fortney, John C; Enderle, Mark A; Clothier, Jeff L; Otero, Jay M; Williams, James S; Pyne, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Care management is feasible to deploy in routine care, and the depression outcomes of patients reached by this evidence-based practice are similar to those observed in randomized controlled trials. However, no studies have estimated the population level effectiveness of care management when deployed in routine care. Population level effectiveness depends on both reach into the target population and the clinical effectiveness for those reached. This multisite hybrid Type 3 effectiveness-implementation study employed a pre-post, quasi-experimental design. The study was conducted at 22 Veterans Affairs community-based outpatient clinics. Evidence-based quality improvement was used as the facilitation strategy to promote adoption. Medication possession ratios (MPRs) were calculated for 1558 patients with an active antidepressant prescription. Differences in treatment response rates at implementation and control sites were estimated from observed differences in MPR. Reach into the target population at implementation sites was 10.3%. Patients at implementation sites had a significantly higher probability of having MPR≥0.9 than patients at control sites [odds ratio=1.38, confidence interval95=(1.07, 1.78), P=.01]. This increase in MPR was estimated to yield a 1% point increase in response rates. While depression care management improves outcomes for patients receiving services, low levels of reach can reduce overall population level effectiveness. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Mental Health Comorbidity in MS: Depression, Anxiety, and Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Turner, Aaron P; Alschuler, Kevin N; Hughes, Abbey J; Beier, Meghan; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sloan, Alicia P; Ehde, Dawn M

    2016-12-01

    Among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), mental health comorbidities play a significant role in contributing to secondary disability and detracting from quality of life. This review examines current evidence surrounding three mental health issues of particular relevance to MS: depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. We review what is known of the prevalence, correlates, screening mechanisms, and current treatment of each issue and provide recommendations for future areas of research.

  7. Depression Prevalence and Associated Factors Among Alaska Native People: The Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Denise A.; Smith, Julia J.; Ferucci, Elizabeth D.; Lanier, Anne P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated depression among Alaska Native people (ANs). Depression prevalence and associated factors among EARTH Alaska study participants is described. Methods The nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) assessed depression among 3,771 ANs. Participants with PHQ-9 scores ≥ 10 out of 27 were classified as positive for depression. Logistic regression analyses evaluated odds of scoring positive versus negative for depression by demographic, cultural, then health and lifestyle factors. Results Twenty percent of women and thirteen percent of men scored positive for depression. Univariate and multivariate models were fit separately for men and women. Among demographic factors, below median income was associated with positive depression scores for both genders. Among men, odds of depression were higher if unmarried and/or if highest educational level was less than high school. Women 34 to 59 years of age had increased odds of scoring positive. Little or no identification with tribal tradition was associated with increased odds of depression in women and decreased odds in men. For both genders, chronic physical conditions and poorer self-reported health were associated with positive depression scores then binge alcohol drinking and current tobacco use increased odds of depression among women only. Limitations Factors analyzed were self-reported without clinician follow-up in a non-random convenience sample of adults. Conclusions Depression is common among ANs with rates comparable to other indigenous cross-sectional investigations. Depression is associated with lower income and poorer physical health. Prevention and intervention efforts should consider gender as other associated factors varied between men and women. PMID:22138285

  8. Parent Health Literacy, Depression, and Risk for Pediatric Injury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Erika R; Bauer, Nerissa S; Downs, Stephen M; Sanders, Lee M

    2016-07-01

    Population-wide research on the impact of parent health literacy to children's health outcomes is limited. We assessed the relationship of low parent health literacy to a range of pediatric health risks within a large cohort of primary care patients. Data were from 17 845 English- and Spanish-speaking parents of children aged ≤7 years presenting for well-child care. We used a 3-item screener to measure health literacy. Outcomes included secondhand smoke exposure, asthma treatment nonadherence, parent depression, child-rearing practices, injury prevention, and parent first-aid knowledge. We summarized study variables with descriptive statistics and then performed multivariable logistic regression to identify associations between low parent literacy and our dependent measures. Mean child age was 4.8 years (SD 3.7); 36.5% of parent respondents had low health literacy. In models adjusted for child gender, race/ethnicity, insurance, age, and parent language preference, low parent health literacy was related to a range of pediatric health risks, including parent depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.48), firearm access (AOR 1.68; 1.49-1.89), not having a working smoke detector (AOR 3.54; 2.74-4.58), and lack of first-aid knowledge about choking (AOR 1.67; 1.44-1.93) and burns (AOR 1.45; 1.29-1.63). Children of parents with low health literacy were also more likely to watch >2 hours of television per day (AOR 1.27; 1.17-1.36). Low parent health literacy is independently and significantly related to parent depression, child television viewing, and at-risk family behaviors associated with child injury. Use of low-literacy approaches to health-behavior interventions may be essential to address common child morbidities. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Depressive Symptoms in a Sample of Social Work Students and Reasons Preventing Students from Using Mental Health Services: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Limited research exists on social work students' level of depression and help-seeking beliefs. This study empirically examined the rates of depression among 215 BSW students and explored students' reasons for not using mental health services. Approximately 50% scored at or above the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale cutoff;…

  10. Spiritual health, clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ya-Chu; Chien, Li-Yu; Wu, Li-Yu; Chiang, Chih-Ming; Huang, Song-Yuan

    2010-07-01

    This paper is a report of an exploration of the association of spiritual health with clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours among nursing students. Several studies in western countries have demonstrated an association between spirituality and health. Spirituality-related research in eastern countries, however, is still in its infancy. A cross-sectional design was adopted and structured questionnaires were used for data collection. We adopted the Probability Proportional to Size cluster sampling method to recruit nursing students in senior grades. Data were collected in 2005 using the Spiritual Health Scale, Perceived Clinical Practice Stress Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-II and Health Promotion Behaviours Scale. A total of 1276 nursing students with an average age of 20.1 years (sd = 1.6 years) participated in the study. Spiritual health was negatively associated with clinical practice stress (r = -0.211, P < 0.001) and depressive tendency (r = -0.324, P < 0.001) and positively associated with health-promoting behaviours (r = 0.611, P < 0.001). Using hierarchical regression analysis to control for demographic factors, spiritual health was found to be an important predictive factor for clinical practice stress, depressive tendency and health-promoting behaviours. These results are consistent with research findings from western countries. Educators should develop strategies to address nursing students' spiritual health. This may help nursing students to manage their stress, to reduce depressive symptoms and to enhance health-promoting behaviours.

  11. Mental health literacy about depression: a survey of portuguese youth.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Luís M; Jorm, Anthony F; Mendes, Aida C; Santos, José C; Ferreira, Ricardo O; Pedreiro, Ana T

    2013-05-07

    Depression is a common disorder in adolescents and young adults, but help seeking is low. Mental health literacy about depression is a key concept to plan interventions for improving help seeking. This study aimed to evaluate youth mental literacy about depression in order to design school-based interventions. During 2012, a survey was conducted with a stratified cluster sample of 4938 Portuguese young people between 14 and 24 years of age. Following the presentation of a vignette describing depression, a series of questions was asked concerning: recognition of the disorder; knowledge of professional help and treatments available; knowledge of effective self-help strategies; knowledge and skills to give first aid and support to others; and knowledge of how to prevent this disorder. In response to an open-ended question, around a quarter of the participants failed to recognize depression in the vignette. When asked about the potential helpfulness of various people, most of the participants considered mental health professionals, family and friends to be helpful. However, teachers, social workers and a helpline were less likely to be considered as helpful. With regard to medications, vitamins received more positive views than psychotropics. Some interventions were frequently rated as likely to be helpful, whereas for others there was a lack of knowledge about their effectiveness. A positive finding is that alcohol and tobacco consumption were seen as harmful. When asked about mental health first aid strategies, participants supported the value of listening to the person in the vignette and advising professional help, but some unhelpful strategies were commonly endorsed as well. Deficits were found in some aspects of depression literacy in Portuguese youth. Therefore intervention in this area is needed.

  12. Effectiveness of guided imagery relaxation on levels of pain and depression in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Onieva-Zafra, María Dolores; García, Laura Hernandez; Del Valle, Mayte Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of guided imagery as a nursing intervention for pain management and depression in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Many studies support the use of guided imagery to improve patient outcomes. Guided imagery has been used for different purposes and it is thought to be an effective intervention for people suffering from nonmalignant pain. A 2-group quasi-experimental study was conducted during 8 weeks by the University of Nursing in Almeria (Spain). Patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia aged 18 to 70 years (n = 60) were randomly assigned to a guided imagery group (n = 30) or a control group (n = 30). The outcomes measures were scores for pain with the McGill Pain Questionnaire long form (MPQ-LF) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and depression with the Beck Depression Inventory and the VAS for depression. The effects were examined at baseline, postintervention (4th week), and at the end of the study (8th week). Treatment efficacy was analyzed by using a t test for paired samples. Temporal changes in the scores were examined by using a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. The treatment group reported statistically significantly lower levels of pain (P < .046) and depression (P < .010) than the control group at the week 4 evaluation. A statistically significant effect on pain as measured by the daily VAS diary was also found in the experimental group. At week 8, no significant differences were found for pain. Patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia may benefit from this nursing intervention in terms of relieving pain and depression. Guided imagery relaxation therapy could be incorporated as part of fibromyalgia treatment to promote health among people with fibromyalgia. Guided imagery as a nursing intervention can alleviate pain and depression in patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia.

  13. Anxiety, Depression, and Functional Status Are the Best Predictors of Health Status Patients With Heart Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-04

    living alone), clinical (comorbidities, NYHA class, EF), health perception, and emotional (anxiety, depression , and hostility measured using the Brief... depression . Conclusions: Although emotional variables are not routinely assessed clinically, clearly they have a major impact on health status.

  14. Mental Health Treatment Seeking Among Older Adults with Depression: The Impact of Stigma and Race

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Kyaien O.; Copeland, Valire Carr; Grote, Nancy K.; Koeske, Gary; Rosen, Daniel; Reynolds, Charles F.; Brown, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Objective Stigma associated with mental illness continues to be a significant barrier to help seeking, leading to negative attitudes about mental health treatment and deterring individuals who need services from seeking care. This study examined the impact of public stigma (negative attitudes held by the public) and internalized stigma (negative attitudes held by stigmatized individuals about themselves) on racial differences in treatment seeking attitudes and behaviors among older adults with depression. Method Random digit dialing was utilized to identify a representative sample of 248 African American and White adults older adults (over the age of 60) with depression (symptoms assessed via the Patient Health Questionnaire-9). Telephone based surveys were conducted to assess their treatment seeking attitudes and behaviors, and the factors that impacted these behaviors. Results Depressed older adult participants endorsed a high level of public stigma and were not likely to be currently engaged in, nor did they intend to seek mental health treatment. Results also suggested that African American older adults were more likely to internalize stigma and endorsed less positive attitudes toward seeking mental health treatment than their White counterparts. Multiple regression analysis indicated that internalized stigma partially mediated the relationship between race and attitudes toward treatment. Conclusion Stigma associated with having a mental illness has a negative influence on attitudes and intentions toward seeking mental health services among older adults with depression, particularly African American elders. Interventions to target internalized stigma are needed to help engage this population in psychosocial mental health treatments. PMID:20220602

  15. The Modified Depression Scale (MDS): A Brief, No-Cost Assessment Tool to Estimate the Level of Depressive Symptoms in Students and Schools

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Erin C.; Johnson, Renee M.; Green, Jennifer G.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent health researchers and practitioners are frequently interested in assessing depression as part of student screening and for school-wide prevention and intervention planning. However, this task is challenging given the lack of free, brief assessments of depressive symptoms in youth. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of an adapted version of the Modified Depression Scale (MDS). Data came from a school-based survey of 9th-12th graders in Boston (N=1,657). We assessed internal consistency reliability and known-groups validity, in addition to the feasibility of establishing a dichotomous cut-point to classify adolescents as having high versus low depressive symptoms. We also evaluated the validity of the adapted MDS as a school-wide measure. At the student-level, the adapted MDS demonstrated acceptable internal consistency. Students engaging in risk behaviors (e.g., substance use) or who were victimized (e.g., bullied) had significantly higher depressive symptom scores. Students who endorsed four or five MDS symptoms often or always had a heightened risk of suicidal ideation, substance use, and failing grades when compared to students who endorsed three or fewer symptoms often or always. At the school-level, higher mean levels of depressive symptoms in a school were associated with higher mean levels of suicidal ideation and failing grades. Results of this study suggest that the adapted MDS is a promising measurement tool that could be useful to school-based professionals and researchers to evaluate depressive symptoms in adolescents and ascertain the prevalence of depressive symptoms in schools. PMID:22639697

  16. Self-management abilities, physical health and depressive symptoms among patients with cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to identify the predictive role of direct resources (educational level and marital status) and self-management abilities on physical health and depressive symptoms in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our cross-sectional questionnaire-based study included 1570 CVD patients, 917 COPD patients, and 412 patients with diabetes. Physical health and depressive symptoms of COPD patients was lower than those of CVD and diabetic patients. Correlation analyses indicated that self-management abilities were strong indicators for physical health and depressive symptoms (all p<0.001). This relationship was strongest for depressive symptoms. Self-management abilities were related to educational level in all groups (all p<0.001). Regression analyses revealed that self-management abilities were strong predictors of physical health and depressive symptoms in all three patient groups (all p<0.001). This research showed that self-management abilities are strong predictors of physical health and depressive symptoms. Interventions that improve self-management abilities may counteract a decline in physical health and depressive symptoms. Such interventions may be important tools in the prevention of the loss of self-management abilities, because they may motivate people who are not yet experiencing serious problems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status, Depression, and Health Status in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Depression and diminished health status are common in adults with diabetes, but few studies have investigated associations with socio-economic environment. The objective of this manuscript was to evaluate the relationship between neighborhood-level SES and health status and depression. Methods Individual-level data on 1010 participants at baseline in Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes), a trial of long-term weight loss among adults with type 2 diabetes, were linked to neighborhood-level SES (% living below poverty) from the 2000 US Census (tracts). Dependent variables included depression (Beck Inventory), and health status (Medical Outcomes Study (SF-36) scale). Multi-level regression models were used to account simultaneously for individual-level age, sex, race, education, personal yearly income and neighborhood-level SES. Results Overall, the % living in poverty in the participants' neighborhoods varied, mean = 11% (range 0-67%). Compared to their counterparts in the lowest tertile of neighborhood poverty (least poverty), those in the highest tertile (most poverty) had significantly lower scores on the role-limitations(physical), role limitations(emotional), physical functioning, social functioning, mental health, and vitality sub-scales of the SF-36 scale. When evaluating SF-36 composite scores, those living in neighborhoods with more poverty had significantly lower scores on the physical health (β-coefficient [β] = -1.90 units, 95% CI: -3.40,-0.039), mental health (β = -2.92 units, -4.31,-1.53) and global health (β = -2.77 units, -4.21,-1.33) composite scores. Conclusion In this selected group of weight loss trial participants, lower neighborhood SES was significantly associated with poorer health status. Whether these associations might influence response to the Look AHEAD weight loss intervention requires further investigation. PMID:22182286

  18. Neighborhood socioeconomic status, depression, and health status in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) study.

    PubMed

    Gary-Webb, Tiffany L; Baptiste-Roberts, Kesha; Pham, Luu; Wesche-Thobaben, Jacquline; Patricio, Jennifer; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier; Brown, Arleen F; Jones-Corneille, LaShanda; Brancati, Frederick L

    2011-05-19

    Depression and diminished health status are common in adults with diabetes, but few studies have investigated associations with socio-economic environment. The objective of this manuscript was to evaluate the relationship between neighborhood-level SES and health status and depression. Individual-level data on 1010 participants at baseline in Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes), a trial of long-term weight loss among adults with type 2 diabetes, were linked to neighborhood-level SES (% living below poverty) from the 2000 US Census (tracts). Dependent variables included depression (Beck Inventory), and health status (Medical Outcomes Study (SF-36) scale). Multi-level regression models were used to account simultaneously for individual-level age, sex, race, education, personal yearly income and neighborhood-level SES. Overall, the % living in poverty in the participants' neighborhoods varied, mean =11% (range 0-67%). Compared to their counterparts in the lowest tertile of neighborhood poverty (least poverty), those in the highest tertile (most poverty) had significantly lower scores on the role-limitations(physical), role limitations(emotional), physical functioning, social functioning, mental health, and vitality sub-scales of the SF-36 scale. When evaluating SF-36 composite scores, those living in neighborhoods with more poverty had significantly lower scores on the physical health (beta-coefficient [beta]= -1.90 units, 95% CI: -3.40,-0.039), mental health (beta= -2.92 units, -4.31,-1.53) and global health (beta= -2.77 units, -4.21,-1.33) composite scores. In this selected group of weight loss trial participants, lower neighborhood SES was significantly associated with poorer health status. Whether these associations might influence response to the Look AHEAD weight loss intervention requires further investigation.

  19. Comparative Performance of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale for Screening Antepartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiuyue; Gelaye, Bizu; Rondon, Marta; Sánchez, Sixto E; García, Pedro J; Sánchez, Elena; Barrios, Yasmin V; Simon, Gregory E.; Henderson, David C.; Cripe, Swee May; Williams, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Objective We sought to evaluate the psychometric properties of two widely used screening scales: the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) among pregnant Peruvian women. Methods This cross-sectional study included 1,517 women receiving prenatal care from February 2012 to March 2013. A structured interview was used to collect data using PHQ-9 and EPDS. We examined reliability, construct and concurrent validity between two scales using internal consistency indices, factor structures, correlations, and Cohen’s kappa. Results Both scales had good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha > 0.8). Correlation between PHQ-9 and EPDS scores was fair (rho=0.52). Based on exploratory factor analysis (EFA), both scales yielded a two-factor structure. EFA including all items from PHQ-9 and EPDS yielded four factors, namely, “somatization”, “depression and suicidal ideation”, “anxiety and depression”, and “anhedonia”. The agreement between the two scales was generally fair at different cutoff scores with the highest Cohen’s kappa being 0.46. Conclusions Both the PHQ-9 and EPDS are reliable and valid scales for antepartum depression assessment. The PHQ-9 captures somatic symptoms, while EPDS detects depressive symptoms comorbid with anxiety during early pregnancy. Our findings suggest simultaneous administration of both scales may improve identification of antepartum depressive disorders in clinical settings. PMID:24766996

  20. The level of anxiety, depression and quality of life among patients with heart failure in Greece.

    PubMed

    Aggelopoulou, Zoi; Fotos, Nikolaos V; Chatziefstratiou, Anastasia A; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Elefsiniotis, Ioannis; Brokalaki, Hero

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of the level of anxiety, depression and quality of life among patients with heart failure. It was an observational study. The populations were 231 patients with heart failure who were hospitalized in cardiology departments of 2 general hospitals in Athens, from September 1, 2010 through January 31, 2012. We used the "Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire - MLHFQ" to evaluate patients' quality of life and the " State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - STAI" and the "Maastricht Questionnaire - MQ" to evaluate the level of stress and depression, respectively. The mean age of patients was 66.1±10.1years. The quality of life was poor, since the average score in MLHFQ was 65.4±20.6. Also, patients revealed high levels of both trait and state anxiety (mean score in STAI was 54.5±9.4 and 52.8±8.5 respectively) and depression (mean score in MQ was 34.3±8.4). Factors associated with poor quality of life and high levels of anxiety and depression were older age, low level of education, unemployment, poor economic situation, multiple hospitalizations (> 4 times) and heart failure stages III and IV in NYHA (p<0.001 in all cases). Patients with heart failure present severe symptoms of anxiety and depression and poor quality of life. Assessing those patients for these symptoms and providing holistic health care by a multidisciplinary team, will lead to the prevention and early treatment not only of physical but also of the psychosocial manifestations of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comorbid Chronic General Health Conditions and Depression Care: A Population-Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Puyat, Joseph H; Kazanjian, Arminee; Wong, Hubert; Goldner, Elliot

    2017-09-01

    Untreated depression among persons with chronic general health conditions (chronic health conditions) affects mortality, functional disability, quality of life, and health care costs. Currently, studies of the association between depression care and chronic health conditions report inconsistent results, and studies of depression care among persons with specific health conditions are rare. This study investigated the association between chronic health conditions and the likelihood of receiving depression care among individuals with depression. Retrospective data from physician claims, hospital separations, vital statistics, and insurance plan registries were used to identify a cohort of individuals with depression and track 12-month use of health services among those with and without a chronic health condition. Disparities were analyzed by using generalized linear models. Individuals with depression and a chronic health condition had higher use of psychological therapy, higher use of any depression care, greater continuity of care, and better adherence to antidepressant therapy compared with individuals with depression only. However, they were less likely, in general, to be on antidepressant therapy, and individuals with diabetes had fewer visits to general practitioners for a mental health-related reason compared with individuals without diabetes. A trend toward lower use of any depression care was observed among patients with cerebrovascular disease. Use of depression care was generally higher among individuals with chronic health conditions, although there were differences in patterns of use by type of health condition. Some patients with specific health conditions could be at risk of being inappropriately treated for depression.

  2. Depression Screening Using Daily Mental-Health Ratings from a Smartphone Application for Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junetae; Lim, Sanghee; Min, Yul Ha; Shin, Yong-Wook; Lee, Byungtae; Sohn, Guiyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Lee, Jae-Ho; Son, Byung Ho; Ahn, Sei Hyun; Shin, Soo-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile mental-health trackers are mobile phone apps that gather self-reported mental-health ratings from users. They have received great attention from clinicians as tools to screen for depression in individual patients. While several apps that ask simple questions using face emoticons have been developed, there has been no study examining the validity of their screening performance. Objective In this study, we (1) evaluate the potential of a mobile mental-health tracker that uses three daily mental-health ratings (sleep satisfaction, mood, and anxiety) as indicators for depression, (2) discuss three approaches to data processing (ratio, average, and frequency) for generating indicator variables, and (3) examine the impact of adherence on reporting using a mobile mental-health tracker and accuracy in depression screening. Methods We analyzed 5792 sets of daily mental-health ratings collected from 78 breast cancer patients over a 48-week period. Using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) as the measure of true depression status, we conducted a random-effect logistic panel regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to evaluate the screening performance of the mobile mental-health tracker. In addition, we classified patients into two subgroups based on their adherence level (higher adherence and lower adherence) using a k-means clustering algorithm and compared the screening accuracy between the two groups. Results With the ratio approach, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) is 0.8012, indicating that the performance of depression screening using daily mental-health ratings gathered via mobile mental-health trackers is comparable to the results of PHQ-9 tests. Also, the AUC is significantly higher (P=.002) for the higher adherence group (AUC=0.8524) than for the lower adherence group (AUC=0.7234). This result shows that adherence to self-reporting is associated with a higher accuracy of depression screening. Conclusions Our results

  3. Depression and health behaviors in Brazilian adults - PNS 2013.

    PubMed

    Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo; Lima, Margareth Guimarães; Azevedo, Renata Cruz Soares de; Medina, Lhais Barbosa de Paula; Lopes, Claudia de Souza; Menezes, Paulo Rossi; Malta, Deborah Carvalho

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of health-related behaviors according to presence and type of depression in Brazilian adults. Based on a sample of 49,025 adults (18 to 59 years) from the National Survey on Health 2013 (PNS 2013), we estimated the prevalence of health-related behaviors (smoking; passive smoking; frequent or risky alcohol consumption; leisure time physical activity; time watching TV; and eating pattern indicators), according to the presence of depression (minor and major), evaluated by the Patient Health Questionnaire - 9 (PHQ-9), and the report of depressive mood (in up to seven days or more than seven days) over a two-week period. Prevalence ratios were estimated by Poisson regression. Evaluated by the PHQ-9 scale, 9.7% of the Brazilian adults had depression and 3.9% presented major depression. About 21.0% reported depressive mood and, in 34.9% of them, that feeling has been present for more than seven days. In individuals with major depression (PHQ-9), higher prevalence was found in almost all unhealthy behaviors analyzed, in particular, smoking (PR = 1.65), passive smoking (PR = 1.55), risk alcohol consumption (PR = 1.72), TV for ≥ 5 hours/day (PR = 2.13), consumption of fat meat (PR = 1.43) and soft drink (PR = 1.42). The prevalence ratios tended to be lower in those with minor depression. Similar results were observed in adults with depressive mood. This study detected relevant association between depression and health behaviors, in particular for smoking and physical activity. The associations found with the PHQ were similar to those observed with the application of a single question about depressive mood. Our results indicate the importance of assessing the presence of depression and the frequency and severity of symptoms when implementing actions for the promotion of healthy behaviors. Avaliar a prevalência de comportamentos relacionados à saúde segundo a presença e tipo de depressão em adultos brasileiros. Com base em amostra de 49

  4. Ethical issues in using Twitter for population-level depression monitoring: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mikal, Jude; Hurst, Samantha; Conway, Mike

    2016-04-14

    Recently, significant research effort has focused on using Twitter (and other social media) to investigate mental health at the population-level. While there has been influential work in developing ethical guidelines for Internet discussion forum-based research in public health, there is currently limited work focused on addressing ethical problems in Twitter-based public health research, and less still that considers these issues from users' own perspectives. In this work, we aim to investigate public attitudes towards utilizing public domain Twitter data for population-level mental health monitoring using a qualitative methodology. The study explores user perspectives in a series of five, 2-h focus group interviews. Following a semi-structured protocol, 26 Twitter users with and without a diagnosed history of depression discussed general Twitter use, along with privacy expectations, and ethical issues in using social media for health monitoring, with a particular focus on mental health monitoring. Transcripts were then transcribed, redacted, and coded using a constant comparative approach. While participants expressed a wide range of opinions, there was an overall trend towards a relatively positive view of using public domain Twitter data as a resource for population level mental health monitoring, provided that results are appropriately aggregated. Results are divided into five sections: (1) a profile of respondents' Twitter use patterns and use variability; (2) users' privacy expectations, including expectations regarding data reach and permanence; (3) attitudes towards social media based population-level health monitoring in general, and attitudes towards mental health monitoring in particular; (4) attitudes towards individual versus population-level health monitoring; and (5) users' own recommendations for the appropriate regulation of population-level mental health monitoring. Focus group data reveal a wide range of attitudes towards the use of public

  5. The Relationship Between Depressive Symptom Levels and Subsequent Increases in Substance Use Among Youth With Severe Emotional Disturbance*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Hoven, Christina W.; Liu, Xinhua; Fuller, Cordelia J.; Fan, Bin; Musa, George; Wicks, Judith; Mandell, Donald; Cook, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined the relationship between levels of depressive symptoms and subsequent increases in substance use among 784 youth with severe emotional disturbance enrolled in Medicaid-funded behavioral health care plans. Method Youth at five sites nationwide were interviewed about their emotional and behavior problems, as well as their use of cigarettes, alcohol, and drugs—at both baseline and follow-up. Results (1) Levels of depressive symptoms were significantly associated with concurrent substance use at baseline. (2) Baseline levels of depressive symptoms predicted subsequent changes in substance use, especially use of illicit drugs and multiple drugs. (3) These findings remained significant, even after controlling for sociodemographic, family, and individual characteristics. Conclusions These results indicate that depressive symptoms early in life may signal a risk for increasing involvement in substance use among severe emotional disturbed youth. This finding has important clinical implications for the prevention of substance misuse in this population. PMID:18612567

  6. Depression in Europe: does migrant integration have mental health payoffs? A cross-national comparison of 20 European countries.

    PubMed

    Levecque, Katia; Van Rossem, Ronan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Depression is a leading cause of ill health and disability. As migrants form an increasing group in Europe, already making up about 8.7% of the population in 2010, knowledge on migrant-related inequalities in depression is of main public health interest. In this study, we first assess whether migrants in Europe are at higher risk for depression compared to the native population. Second, we assess whether the association between migration and depression is dependent on different forms of migrant integration. Migrant integration is looked at both from the individual and from the national level. Design. Hierarchical linear regression analyses based on data for 20 countries in the European Social Survey 2006/2007 (N = 37,076 individuals aged 15 or more). Depression is measured using the center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale. We consider migrant integration over time (first- and second-generation migrants, differentiated according to European Union (EU) or non-EU origin), barriers to integration (low educational level, financial difficulties, being out of the labor market, ethnic minority status, discrimination), and the host country environment (national migrant integration policy). Controls are gender, age, partner relationship, social support, and welfare state regime. Results. Natives and second-generation migrants do not differ significantly in their risk profile for depression. First-generation migrants show higher levels of depression, with those born outside of Europe to be the worst off. This higher risk for depression is not attributable to ethnic minority status but is mainly due to experienced barriers to socioeconomic integration and processes of discrimination. A country's national policy on migrant integration shows not to soften the depressing effect of being a first-generation migrant nor does it have indirect beneficial health effects by reducing barriers to integration. Conclusion. In Europe, first-generation EU and non-EU migrants

  7. Likelihood of Suicidality at Varying Levels of Depression Severity: A Re-Analysis of NESARC Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Strong, David; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    Although it is clear that increasing depression severity is associated with more risk for suicidality, less is known about at what levels of depression severity the risk for different suicide symptoms increases. We used item response theory to estimate the likelihood of endorsing suicide symptoms across levels of depression severity in an…

  8. Likelihood of Suicidality at Varying Levels of Depression Severity: A Re-Analysis of NESARC Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Strong, David; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    Although it is clear that increasing depression severity is associated with more risk for suicidality, less is known about at what levels of depression severity the risk for different suicide symptoms increases. We used item response theory to estimate the likelihood of endorsing suicide symptoms across levels of depression severity in an…

  9. Social class and mental health: testing exploitation as a relational determinant of depression.

    PubMed

    Muntaner, Carles; Ng, Edwin; Prins, Seth J; Bones-Rocha, Katia; Espelt, Albert; Chung, Haejoo

    2015-01-01

    This study tests whether social class exploitation operates as a relational mechanism that generates mental health inequalities in the nursing home industry. We ask, does social class exploitation (i.e., the acquisition of economic benefits from the labor of those who are dominated) have a systematic and predictable impact on depression among nursing assistants? Using cross-sectional data from 868 nursing assistants employed in 50 nursing homes in three U.S. states, we measure social class exploitation as "ownership type" (private for-profit, private not-for-profit, and public) and "managerial domination" (labor relations violations, perceptions of labor-management conflict). Depression is assessed using the original and revised versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and CESD-R). Using two-level logistic regressions, we find that private for-profit ownership and higher managerial domination are predictive of depression among nursing assistants even after adjustment for potential confounders and mediators. Our findings confirm the theoretical and empirical value of applying a social class approach to understanding how mental health inequalities are generated through exploitative mechanisms. Ownership type and managerial domination appear to affect depression through social relations that generate mental health inequalities through the process of acquiring profits, controlling production, supervising and monitoring labor, and enforcing disciplinary sanctions. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions:]br]sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Social Class and Mental Health: Testing Exploitation as a Relational Determinant of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Muntaner, Carles; Ng, Edwin; Prins, Seth J.; Bones-Rocha, Katia; Espelt, Albert; Chung, Haejoo

    2016-01-01

    This study tests whether social class exploitation operates as a relational mechanism that generates mental health inequalities in the nursing home industry. We ask, does social class exploitation (i.e., the acquisition of economic benefits from the labor of those who are dominated) have a systematic and predictable impact on depression among nursing assistants? Using cross-sectional data from 868 nursing assistants employed in 50 nursing homes in three U.S. states, we measure social class exploitation as “ownership type” (private for-profit, private not-for-profit, and public) and “managerial domination” (labor relations violations, perceptions of labor-management conflict). Depression is assessed using the original and revised versions of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D and CESD-R). Using two-level logistic regressions, we find that private for-profit ownership and higher managerial domination are predictive of depression among nursing assistants even after adjustment for potential confounders and mediators. Our findings confirm the theoretical and empirical value of applying a social class approach to understanding how mental health inequalities are generated through exploitative mechanisms. Ownership type and managerial domination appear to affect depression through social relations that generate mental health inequalities through the process of acquiring profits, controlling production, supervising and monitoring labor, and enforcing disciplinary sanctions. PMID:25813501

  11. Depression and mental health among older Mexican American spouses.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, J P; Peek, M K; Markides, K S

    2006-07-01

    Although the association between marriage and well-being is well established, few studies have focused on learning more about the context of marriage and mental health. Recent research studying the mechanisms of marriage and health has focused on contagion of well-being among spouses. This study examined the association of depression with self-esteem, social support, life satisfaction, concern for independence, and cognitive function using baseline data for 553 older, Mexican American couples. Overall, we found evidence to suggest an interdependent relationship between husbands' and wives' emotional states, but the association was not equal for couples. Husbands' depression was significantly associated with the well-being of their wife, but the wife's depression was rarely associated with the husband's well-being. The findings from this study add to the increasing literature on spousal contagion by focusing on an under studied minority group, examining how depression affects well-being, and highlighting unequal effects of marriage on spousal well-being.

  12. Does Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Predict Levels of Depressive Symptoms during Emerging Adulthood?

    PubMed

    Meinzer, Michael C; Pettit, Jeremy W; Waxmonsky, James G; Gnagy, Elizabeth; Molina, Brooke S G; Pelham, William E

    2016-05-01

    Little is known about the development and course of depressive symptoms through emerging adulthood among individuals with a childhood history of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The aim of this study was to examine if a history of ADHD in childhood significantly predicted depressive symptoms during emerging adulthood (i.e., ages 18-25 years), including the initial level of depressive symptoms, continued levels of depressive symptoms at each age year, and the rate of change in depressive symptoms over time. 394 participants (205 with ADHD and 189 without ADHD; 348 males and 46 females) drawn from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS) completed annual self-ratings of depressive symptoms between the ages of 18 and 25 years. Childhood history of ADHD significantly predicted a higher initial level of depressive symptoms at age 18, and higher levels of depressive symptoms at every age year during emerging adulthood. ADHD did not significantly predict the rate of change in depressive symptoms from age 18 to age 25. Childhood history of ADHD remained a significant predictor of initial level of depressive symptoms at age 18 after controlling for comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, but not after controlling for concurrent ADHD symptoms and psychosocial impairment. Participants with childhood histories of ADHD experienced significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms than non-ADHD comparison participants by age 18 and continued to experience higher, although not increasing, levels of depressive symptoms through emerging adulthood. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  13. Does Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Predict Levels of Depressive Symptoms during Emerging Adulthood?

    PubMed Central

    Meinzer, Michael C.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Gnagy, Elizabeth; Molina, Brooke S.G.; Pelham, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the development and course of depressive symptoms through emerging adulthood among individuals with a childhood history of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The aim of this study was to examine if a history of ADHD in childhood significantly predicted depressive symptoms during emerging adulthood (i.e., ages 18–25 years), including the initial level of depressive symptoms, continued levels of depressive symptoms at each age year, and the rate of change in depressive symptoms over time. 394 participants (205 with ADHD and 189 without ADHD; 348 males and 46 females) drawn from the Pittsburgh ADHD Longitudinal Study (PALS) completed annual self-ratings of depressive symptoms between the ages of 18 and 25 years. Childhood history of ADHD significantly predicted a higher initial level of depressive symptoms at age 18, and higher levels of depressive symptoms at every age year during emerging adulthood. ADHD did not significantly predict the rate of change in depressive symptoms from age 18 to age 25. Childhood history of ADHD remained a significant predictor of initial level of depressive symptoms at age 18 after controlling for comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, but not after controlling for concurrent ADHD symptoms and psychosocial impairment. Participants with childhood histories of ADHD experienced significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms than non-ADHD comparison participants by age 18 and continued to experience higher, although not increasing, levels of depressive symptoms through emerging adulthood. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:26272531

  14. Generic and health-related quality of life in patients with seasonal and nonseasonal depression.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Erin E; Tam, Edwin M; Manjunath, C V; Solomons, Kevin; Levitt, Anthony J; Levitan, Robert; Enns, Murray; Morehouse, Rachel; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Lam, Raymond W

    2004-10-30

    Although a relatively large body of research has now accumulated concerning the relationship between quality of life (QoL) and nonseasonal depression, there is a dearth of information about QoL in seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The aim of this study was to compare perceived levels of broad ('generic') and health-related QoL in patients with seasonal and nonseasonal depression. Participants were 72 patients with SAD enrolled in an on-going multicentre study in Canada, and 72 patients with nonseasonal major depressive disorder (MDD) matched for severity of depression attending an outpatient psychiatric clinic in Vancouver, British Columbia. All participants completed two measures of QoL (the 20-item Medical Outcomes Study [MOS] Short-Form General Health Survey [SF-20] and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire [Q-LES-Q]) at baseline prior to treatment. The results of the study indicated that both generic and health-related QoL were compromised in patients with SAD compared with general population norms. For example, mean Q-LES-Q scores (range 0-100, where higher scores indicate better QoL) were 44%, compared with scores of 83% reported for the general population. Patients with nonseasonal depression showed significantly poorer functioning in several domains on the SF-20, but no significant differences in Q-LES-Q scores emerged. Perceived QoL is impaired in patients with SAD. Degree of impairment between seasonal and nonseasonal depressives is equivalent when assessed using the Q-LES-Q, but significant inter-group differences are apparent in SF-20 domain scores. Future research is required to determine whether perceived QoL is improved by treatment interventions for seasonal depression such as light therapy or antidepressant medication.

  15. Measuring depression and stigma towards depression and mental health treatment among adolescents in an Arab-American community

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, R.M.; Farroukh, M.; Ismail, M.; Najda, J.; Sobh, H.; Hammad, A.; Dalack, G.W.

    2014-01-01

    There has been limited research that has examined the prevalence of depression and attitudes towards depression and mental health treatment in Arab-American adolescents; we sought to assess these in a predominantly Arab-American community in metro Detroit. A health survey of adolescents aged 12–17 years was conducted (n=98). Participants were recruited from two local community organizations in Dearborn, MI. Depression was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) Depression Scale, and attitude towards depression and willingness to seek help for mental health conditions were assessed by the Self-Stigma of Depression Scale (SSDS). To assess whether attitudes might be affected by information about mental health treatment, adolescents were randomized to view either an educational video about mental health, or a control video before responding to questions about their willingness to seek help for mental health conditions. Overall, 14% of Arab-American adolescents in this study endorsed moderate or moderately severe depression (PHQ-9 ≥ 11), suggesting a need to increase awareness of and access to mental health services and screening for Arab-American youth. PMID:26257824

  16. Chronic disease management for depression in US medical practices: results from the Health Tracking Physician Survey.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Waleed; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2011-07-01

    Chronic care model (CCM) envisages a multicomponent systematic remodeling of ambulatory care to improve chronic diseases management. Application of CCM in primary care management of depression has traditionally lagged behind the application of this model in management of other common chronic illnesses. In past research, the use of CCM has been operationalized by measuring the use of evidence-based organized care management processes (CMPs). To compare the use of CMPs in treatment of depression with the use of these processes in treatment of diabetes and asthma and to examine practice-level correlates of this use. Using data from the 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey, a nationally representative sample of physicians in the United States, we compared the use of 5 different CMPs: written guidelines in English and other languages for self-management, availability of staff to educate patients about self-management, availability of nurse care managers for care coordination, and group meetings of patients with staff. We further examined the association of practice-level characteristics with the use of the 5 CMPs for management of depression. CMPs were more commonly used for management of diabetes and asthma than for depression. The use of CMPs for depression was more common in health maintenance organizations [adjusted odds ratios (AOR) ranging from 2.45 to 5.98 for different CMPs], in practices that provided physicians with feedback regarding quality of care to patients (AOR range, 1.42 to 1.69), and in practices with greater use of clinical information technology (AOR range, 1.06 to 1.11). The application of CMPs in management of depression continues to lag behind other common chronic conditions. Feedbacks on quality of care and expanded use of information technology may improve application of CMPs for depression care in general medical settings.

  17. Mental Health Outcomes of Psychosocial Intervention Among Traditional Health Practitioner Depressed Patients in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Musyimi, Christine W; Mutiso, Victoria; Ndetei, David M; Henderson, David C; Bunders, Joske

    2017-03-01

    Task-shifting in mental health such as engaging Traditional Health Practitioners (THPs) in appropriate management of mental disorders is crucial in reducing global mental health challenges. This study aims to determine the outcomes of using evidence-based mental health Global Action Programme Intervention guide (mhGAP-IG) to provide psychosocial interventions among depressed patients seeking care from THPs. THPs were trained to deliver psychosocial interventions to their patients screening positive for mild to severe depression on Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). Assessments were conducted at 0, 6 and 12 weeks and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) performed to determine the change in depression scores over the three time period. BDI mean score was 26.52 before intervention and reduced significantly at 6 (13%) and 12 (35%) weeks after intervention. 58 and 78% of patients showed reduction in symptoms of depression at 6 and 12 weeks. It is therefore crucial to engage THPs in the care of patients with depression and the need for inclusion of training packages; and other mental disorders in order to establish and maintain collaboration between THPs and conventional health workers and promote evidence-based care among marginalized populations. Moreover, further research on randomized control trials of mhGAP-IG intervention versus usual care is required.

  18. The Onset of Depression During the Great Recession: Foreclosure and Older Adult Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Cagney, Kathleen A.; Browning, Christopher R.; Iveniuk, James; English, Ned

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined neighborhood-level foreclosure rates and their association with onset of depressive symptoms in older adults. Methods. We linked data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (2005–2006 and 2010–2011 waves), a longitudinal, nationally representative survey, to data on zip code–level foreclosure rates, and predicted the onset of depressive symptoms using logit-linked regression. Results. Multiple stages of the foreclosure process predicted the onset of depressive symptoms, with adjustment for demographic characteristics and changes in household assets, neighborhood poverty, and visible neighborhood disorder. A large increase in the number of notices of default (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14, 2.67) and properties returning to ownership by the bank (OR = 1.62; 95% CI = 1.06, 2.47) were associated with depressive symptoms. A large increase in properties going to auction was suggestive of such an association (OR = 1.45; 95% CI = 0.96, 2.19). Age, fewer years of education, and functional limitations also were predictive. Conclusions. Increases in neighborhood-level foreclosure represent an important risk factor for depression in older adults. These results accord with previous studies suggesting that the effects of economic crises are typically first experienced through deficits in emotional well-being. PMID:24446830

  19. Postnatal depression: use of health services and satisfaction with health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Webster, J; Pritchard, M A; Linnane, J W; Roberts, J A; Hinson, J K; Starrenburg, S E

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare health-care use and satisfaction with health-care providers between depressed and non-depressed women in the first 4 months after childbirth. Sixteen weeks after delivery a questionnaire, which included the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and items about health-care use and satisfaction, was mailed to women who attended the antenatal clinic, Royal Women's Hospital, Brisbane. Completed questionnaires were returned by 574 (86.4%) of the 664 women surveyed. During the study period most women (91%) visited a general practitioner at least once and 117 (12%) saw their doctor on five or more occasions. A total of 118 (20.7%) scored above 12 on the EPDS. Depressed women were more likely to visit a psychiatrist (OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 4.3-19.6), social worker (OR, 6.1; 95% CI, 3.3-11.1), postnatal depression group (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.3-12.6), paediatrician (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.6-3.9), or a general practitioner (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.2) than non-depressed women. Twenty-two (18.5%) of the depressed women had contact with a psychiatrist. Compared with non-depressed women, those scoring above 12 on the EPDS were less satisfied with the services of general practitioners (P=< 0.000), paediatricians (P=0.002), Nursing Mothers' Associations of Australia (P=0.043) and obstetricians (P=0.045). Postpartum depression leads to an increase use of health-care services and has a negative effect on satisfaction with some services.

  20. Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Level Varies Nonlinearly with Symptom Severity in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Uh, Dasom; Jeong, Hyun-Ghang; Choi, Kwang-Yeon; Oh, So-Young; Lee, Suji; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Joe, Sook-Haeng

    2017-05-31

    The pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) is still not well understood. Conflicting results for surrogate. biomarkers in MDD have been reported, which might be a consequence of the heterogeneity of MDD patients. Therefore, we aim to investigate how the severity of depression and various symptom domains are related to the levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s) in MDD patients. We recruited 117 subjects from a general practice. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Depressive symptoms were divided into three subdomains according to BDI items; somatic symptoms, guilt and failure, and mood and inhibition. In subjects with very-mild-to-moderate depression, the DHEA-s level increased as BDI score did. However, the DHEA-s levels in the subjects with severe depression were significantly lower than in subjects with moderate depression (p=0.003). DHEA-s level was correlated with the BDI subscore for guilt and failure in very-mild-to-moderate depression (r=0.365, p=0.006). The DHEA-s level appears to be indicative of MDD severity with respect to depressive symptoms, especially regarding guilt and failure. Our findings suggest that the upregulation of DHEA-s may be a part of a compensatory process in very-mild-to-moderate depression, and the failure of this compensation mechanism may underlie the development of severe depression.

  1. Associations between delayed completion of high school and educational attainment and symptom levels of anxiety and depression in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Melkevik, Ole; Hauge, Lars Johan; Bendtsen, Pernille; Reneflot, Anne; Mykletun, Arnstein; Aarø, Leif Edvard

    2016-03-15

    There is a higher prevalence of anxiety and depression among adults with lower educational attainment. Delayed completion of high school (HS) is common and represents a potentially complicating factor in the relationship between educational attainment and anxiety and depression. This study aims to investigate whether delayed HS completion is associated with symptom levels of anxiety and depression in adulthood and whether it interacts with later educational attainment in predicting symptom-levels of anxiety and depression in adulthood. The sample consisted of 10 149 participants from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Survey (HUNT 3) between 30 and 46 years of age in 2006. The outcome variables were symptoms of anxiety and depression as measured by the HADS scale. Variables measuring educational attainment were obtained from the National Educational Database in Norway. We used linear regression to estimate associations between educational attainment, delayed HS completion and symptom levels of anxiety and depression in adulthood. We found delayed HS completion to be associated with higher symptom levels of both anxiety and depression. There was a dose-response association suggesting that each additional year of delay in HS was associated with higher symptom levels for both anxiety and depression. Mean symptom levels of both anxiety and depression were significantly lower among individuals who completed HS within a normative timeframe vs those who were substantially delayed in their HS completion. For anxiety symptoms, we found a statistically significant interaction between delayed HS completion and later educational attainment. This interaction suggested that individuals with a combination of being delayed in HS and having no higher educational attainment had significantly higher levels of anxiety symptoms than all other combinations of later educational attainment and normative/delayed HS completion. For depression, associations between predictors and symptom levels were

  2. Depression - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - depression ... Depression is a medical condition. If you think you may be depressed, see a health care provider. ... following organizations are good sources of information on depression : American Psychological Association -- www.apa.org/topics/depress/ ...

  3. Chronic Depression of Serum Sialic Acid Levels in Alloxan-Induced Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    AFRRI SR74-25 OCTOBER 1974 AFRRI SCIENTIFIC REPORT CHRONIC DEPRESSION OF SERUM SIALIC ACID LEVELS IN ALLOXAN-INDUCED DIABETES R. J. O. Woods...1974 CHRONIC DEPRESSION OF SERUM SIALIC ACID LEVELS IN ALLOXAN-INDUCED DIABETES R. J. O. WOODS P. Z. SOBOCINSKI W. J. CANTERBURY...occurs with no apparent alteration in the level of L-fucose. The depression in sialic acid level may be attributed in part to decreased activities of

  4. Development of a user-centered health information service system for depressive symptom management.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jeongyee; Wolpin, Seth; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Sowoo; Yoon, Sookhee; An, Kyungeh

    2009-06-01

    A user-centered, Web-based depressive symptoms management system might be particularly useful in Korea, where those who seek mental health care face stigmatizing and where personal computers and the Internet have reached saturation levels. The purpose of this article is to describe the development process of a Web-based system for depressive symptom management through user-centered design principles. Our design process included four distinct phases: a needs assessment, analysis, design/development/testing, and the application release. The final revised website was released with the URL address, "http://www.baejy.com/smiles/". In the 3 years since the site was made available publicly, it is notable that 161,604 Koreans have accessed this website, either for educational purposes or for managing their depressive symptoms. A Web-based depressive symptom management system with a high degree of usability was developed. This website can be used to assess depressive symptoms and to serve as an intervention strategy to improve mental health.

  5. Overeducation and depressive symptoms: diminishing mental health returns to education.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Piet; Pattyn, Elise; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

    2013-11-01

    In general, well-educated people enjoy better mental health than those with less education. As a result, some wonder whether there are limits to the mental health benefits of education. Inspired by the literature on the expansion of tertiary education, this article explores marginal mental health returns to education and studies the mental health status of overeducated people. To enhance the validity of the findings we use two indicators of educational attainment - years of education and ISCED97 categories - and two objective indicators of overeducation (the realised matches method and the job analyst method) in a sample of the working population of 25 European countries (unweighted sample N = 19,089). Depression is measured using an eight-item version of the CES-D scale. We find diminishing mental health returns to education. In addition, overeducated people report more depression symptoms. Both findings hold irrespective of the indicators used. The results must be interpreted in the light of the enduring expansion of education, as our findings show that the discussion of the relevance of the human capital perspective, and the diploma disease view on the relationship between education and modern society, is not obsolete.

  6. Does Mother-Child Interaction Mediate the Relation Between Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Children's Mental Health Problems?

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Marleen M E M; Kuijpers, Rowella C W M; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Anna; Bodden, Denise; Jansen, Mélou; Granic, Isabela

    The relation between maternal depressive symptoms and children's mental health problems has been well established. However, prior studies have predominantly focused on maternal reports of children's mental health problems and on parenting behavior, as a broad and unilateral concept. This cross-sectional study examined specific observed mother-child interaction behaviors through which maternal depressive symptoms are assumed to affect children's mental health problems. We expected higher rates of maternal depressive symptoms to predict higher rates of children's mental health problems, and we expected this relation to be mediated by low maternal warmth and high maternal psychological control. The sample consisted of 111 mother-child dyads referred for treatment. The mother-child interaction behaviors were coded according to the observed mother-child interaction tasks. Children's mental health problems were assessed using both maternal reports and children's self-reports. As expected, the results showed that maternal depressive symptoms were strongly related to maternal reports of children's internalizing and externalizing mental health problems. Surprisingly, maternal depressive symptoms were unrelated to children's self-reported depressive symptoms. Furthermore, mother-child interactions did not mediate the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and child mental health problems. Maternal depressive symptoms were associated with high maternal warmth, and high psychological control was associated with high levels of mother-reported externalizing mental health problems in children. These results partially replicate previous findings but add to these by using observational methods and multi-informant data. The importance of using a multi-informant and multi-method approach in assessing children's mental health problems in clinical practice and research are discussed.

  7. Higher Reported Levels of Depression, Stress, and Anxiety Are Associated with Increased Endorsement of ADHD Symptoms by Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allyson G.; Alexander, Sandra J.; Armstrong, Irene T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which postsecondary students endorse symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and whether experienced level of stress, depression, or anxiety are associated with higher reporting of ADHD symptoms. Students attending a combined health and counseling service completed the Conners Adult ADHD Rating…

  8. Higher Reported Levels of Depression, Stress, and Anxiety Are Associated with Increased Endorsement of ADHD Symptoms by Postsecondary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Allyson G.; Alexander, Sandra J.; Armstrong, Irene T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which postsecondary students endorse symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and whether experienced level of stress, depression, or anxiety are associated with higher reporting of ADHD symptoms. Students attending a combined health and counseling service completed the Conners Adult ADHD Rating…

  9. Depression and anxiety levels and self-concept characteristics of adolescents with congenital complete visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Bolat, Nurullah; Doğangün, Burak; Yavuz, Mesut; Demir, Türkay; Kayaalp, Levent

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that visual impairment can affect the mental health of children and adolescents. The aim of this study is to investigate the depression and anxiety levels and the self-concept characteristics of adolescents with congenital complete visual impairment. This is a cross-sectional study. 40 adolescents with congenital complete visual impairment studying in a specialized primary school for visual impairment, and 40 sighted adolescents were included in the study. Both groups were matched in terms of age, gender and socio-economic status. The mean age of the adolescents in both groups was 12.82±1.17. The Children's Depression Inventory, Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children and sociodemographic form were used in the study. The mean scores of the scales obtained from both groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant either in terms of depression scores or in terms of total scores; the happiness, physical appearance, popularity, behavior and adjustment subscales scores of the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale. The intellectual and school-status subscale scores of the adolescents with visual impairment were significantly higher than those of the controls. Anxiety levels of the adolescents with visual impairment were significantly higher when compared with sighted adolescents. These results indicate that the depression levels and self-concept characteristics of adolescents with visual impairment are similar to those of sighted adolescents, whereas the anxiety levels of the adolescents with visual impairment are significantly higher than those of the sighted ones.

  10. Stability and change in levels of depression and personality: a follow-up study of postpartum depressed mothers that were hospitalized in a mother-infant unit.

    PubMed

    Vliegen, Nicole; Luyten, Patrick; Besser, Avi; Casalin, Sara; Kempke, Stefan; Tang, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study investigated the role of the personality dimensions of dependency and self-criticism in the course of depressive symptoms in a sample of inpatient severely postpartum depressed mothers (n = 55). Depressive symptoms and personality were measured during hospitalization and on average 3 1/2 years later. In line with previous research, a considerable subgroup of mothers (39%) reported moderate to severe symptoms of depression at time 2. In addition, although these mothers did not exhibit more depressive episodes during follow-up period compared with mothers with a less chronic course of depression, their depressive episodes were considerably longer, and they had higher levels of severity of depression as well as of dependency and self-criticism at Time 1. Finally, self-criticism, but not dependency, assessed at Time 1, predicted both depression diagnosis and levels of depression at follow-up, supporting a vulnerability model positing that self-criticism confers vulnerability for depression over time.

  11. Disparities in adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes among Caucasian and Hispanic youths.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Pierre K; Martins, Silvia S; Richard, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    Following efforts made in recent years to provide effective mental health treatments based on evidence-based guidelines, a working definition was developed in the literature detailing a minimum level of "adequate mental health care" for serious mental illness. However, little is known about racial or ethnic disparities in receipt of adequate mental health care for individuals affected with serious mental illness. The objective of this study was to examine disparities among Caucasian and Hispanic youths in receipt of adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes. Data for this study were drawn from the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. The study sample was composed of 1,169 Caucasian youths and 316 Hispanic youths aged 12 to 17 with past-year major depressive episodes. The percentages of youths in the sample who received adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes were estimated, and the correlates of receipt of adequate mental health care were examined. Thirty-four percent of the full sample received adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes, but separate analyses indicated that adequate mental health care was received by a significantly higher proportion of Caucasian youths (36%) than Hispanic youths (27%). The odds of receiving adequate mental health care for past-year major depressive episodes for Caucasians were 1.55 times that of Hispanics (p=.01). Having Medicaid or coverage via the State Children's Health Insurance Program significantly increased the odds of receiving adequate mental care for past-year major depressive episodes for both Hispanics and Caucasians. As mental health problems of adolescents from diverse racial or ethnic backgrounds become more easily identified and a larger proportion of these groups is referred to mental health treatment services, it is important to examine the degree to which treatment should be tailored to engage and retain specific racial or

  12. Development of depression in survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer: a multi-level life course conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Erica C; Brinkman, Tara M; Baker, Justin N

    2017-03-09

    As therapeutic and supportive care interventions become increasingly effective, growing numbers of childhood and adolescent cancer survivors face a myriad of physical and psychological sequelae secondary to their disease and treatment. Mental health issues, in particular, present a significant problem in this unique patient population, with depression affecting a sizable number of childhood and adolescent cancer survivors. Multiple key determinants impact a survivor's risk of developing depression, with variables traversing across biologic, individual, family, community, and global levels, as well as spanning throughout the life course of human development from the preconception and prenatal periods to adulthood. A multi-level life course conceptual model offers a valuable framework to identify and organize the diverse variables that modulate the risk of developing depression in survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer. This review describes the first multi-level life course perspective applied to development of depression in childhood and adolescent cancer survivors. This conceptual framework may be used to guide the investigation of mental health interventions for SCACs to ensure that key determinants of depression occurrence are adequately addressed across various levels and throughout the life trajectory.

  13. Evaluation of the level of depression among medical students from Poland, Portugal and Germany.

    PubMed

    Seweryn, Mariusz; Tyrała, Kinga; Kolarczyk-Haczyk, Aleksandra; Bonk, Magdalena; Bulska, Weronika; Krysta, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Depression is a serious illness affecting health, family and professional life of many people of all sectors of society. It also concerns students, regardless of their geographical location. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is a proper tool to brief check of the level of depression because it has high correlation with depression. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the level of depression among medical students from Poland, Portugal and Germany. Students from different countries were asked to fill in an electronic form containing the BDI. The form was created separately for each country, using official translation of the BDI, approved by the competent psychiatric association. Google Drive software was used for the electronic form, and Stat soft Statistica v10 software for statistical analysis. There were statistically significant differences (p<0.05) in terms of average score of the BDI and of the proportion of the scores more than 10 points of medical and technology students among kinds of studies and countries. The average score of the BDI of medical students: Poland: 13.76±9.99 points; Germany: 8.49±7.64 points; Portugal: 7.37±7.67 points. The average score of the BDI of technology students: Poland: 12.42±9.66 points; Germany: 10.51±8.49 points; Portugal: 9.25±8.97 points. The proportion of the scores more than 10 points of medical students: Poland 56.32% (285/506) Germany 34.92% (154/441) Portugal 26.03% (82/315). The proportion of the scores more than 10 points of technology students: Poland 55.01% (368/669) Germany 43.82% (156/356) Portugal 37.57% (136/362). The highest depression score among medical and technology students according the BDI was found in Poland. A proper monitoring of depression is required, as well as rapid and appropriate help for those who suffer from it.

  14. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... The depression generally lifts during spring and summer. Bipolar disorder is different from depression but is included in this list is because someone with bipolar disorder experiences episodes of extreme low moods (depression). But ...

  15. Comparison of Health Status and Nutrient Intake between Depressed Women and Non-depressed Women: Based on the 2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Won, Myeong Suk; Kim, Sunghee

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to provide supporting data for the management of dietary habits in depression by comparing health and nutrition in adult Korean women according to depression status. A total of 2,236 women aged between 19 and 64 years who participated in the 2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were divided into a depression group (n = 315) and a non-depression group (n = 1,921). Among 19–29-year-old women, the depression group showed higher proportions of individuals with impairment of everyday activities, menopause, and suicidal thoughts than the non-depression group. The depression group showed lower intake of cereal, chocolate, meat, and carbonated drinks, as well as a lower index of nutritional quality (INQ) for protein, iron, and niacin. Among 30–49-year-old women, the depression group showed higher proportions of individuals with impairment of everyday activities, chronic disease, stress, and suicidal thoughts. The depression group showed lower intake of rice with mixed grains and higher intake of instant and cup noodles than the non-depression group. Among 50–64-year-old women, the depression group showed higher proportions of individuals with impairment of everyday activities, menopause, stress, and suicidal thoughts. The depression group showed lower intake of vegetables, mushrooms, and seaweed, lower nutritional intake of fat, saturated fat, and n-3 fatty acids, as well as a lower INQ for niacin and a lower Recommended Food Score. For all age groups, individuals with depression showed poorer health and nutritional intake than healthy individuals, demonstrating a correlation of depression with health and nutritional intake. PMID:27152301

  16. Comparison of Health Status and Nutrient Intake between Depressed Women and Non-depressed Women: Based on the 2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Won, Myeong Suk; Kim, Sunghee; Yang, Yoon Jung

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to provide supporting data for the management of dietary habits in depression by comparing health and nutrition in adult Korean women according to depression status. A total of 2,236 women aged between 19 and 64 years who participated in the 2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were divided into a depression group (n = 315) and a non-depression group (n = 1,921). Among 19-29-year-old women, the depression group showed higher proportions of individuals with impairment of everyday activities, menopause, and suicidal thoughts than the non-depression group. The depression group showed lower intake of cereal, chocolate, meat, and carbonated drinks, as well as a lower index of nutritional quality (INQ) for protein, iron, and niacin. Among 30-49-year-old women, the depression group showed higher proportions of individuals with impairment of everyday activities, chronic disease, stress, and suicidal thoughts. The depression group showed lower intake of rice with mixed grains and higher intake of instant and cup noodles than the non-depression group. Among 50-64-year-old women, the depression group showed higher proportions of individuals with impairment of everyday activities, menopause, stress, and suicidal thoughts. The depression group showed lower intake of vegetables, mushrooms, and seaweed, lower nutritional intake of fat, saturated fat, and n-3 fatty acids, as well as a lower INQ for niacin and a lower Recommended Food Score. For all age groups, individuals with depression showed poorer health and nutritional intake than healthy individuals, demonstrating a correlation of depression with health and nutritional intake.

  17. Factors Associated with Depression Assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 in Long-Term Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Goo, Ae-Jin; Song, Yun-Mi; Shin, Jinyoung; Ko, Hyeonyoung

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of depressive disorders and factors associated in long-term cancer survivors. A total of 702 long-term cancer survivors over 5-years in remission were recruited in a university-affiliated tertiary hospital in Korea. Self-report using the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 and the Fatigue Severity Scale assessed depression and fatigue, respectively. Demographic characteristics, cancer-related clinical characteristics, comorbidity, health behaviors, and physical symptoms were assessed through the review of medical records or a structured self-administered questionnaire. We identified 26.1% of patients who had a depressed mood or displayed a loss of interest. The most prevalent primary site of cancer was the stomach (65.2%), followed by lung, breast, colorectal, and thyroid cancer. We also found that 5.7% of subjects experienced double or triple primary cancers. Larger proportion among depressive group (89.1%) complained at least one physical problem than among non-depressive group (53.2%). Physical symptoms including sleep problems, dry mouth, indigestion, pain, decreased appetite, and febrile sense were more frequent in the depressive group than in the non-depressive group. The Fatigue Severity Scale scores were higher in the depressive group than in the non-depressive group (P<0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the highest tertile level of fatigue (odds ratio, 7.31; 95% confidence interval, 3.81-14.02) was associated with the increased risk of depression. These findings suggest that careful concern about depression is necessary in long-term cancer survivors. Fatigue may be a surrogate sign for depression, and warrants further evaluation.

  18. Continuity of Depressive Disorders From Childhood and Adolescence to Adulthood: A Naturalistic Study in Community Mental Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Carballo, Juan J.; Muñoz-Lorenzo, Laura; Blasco-Fontecilla, Hilario; Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; García-Nieto, Rebeca; Dervic, Kanita; Oquendo, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare rates of homotypic continuity of childhood- and adolescent-onset depression into adulthood. Method: This was a naturalistic, prospective cohort study of children and adolescents receiving psychiatric care at all community mental health centers in Madrid, Spain, from January 1986 to December 2007. Data were obtained from a regional registry wherein all psychiatric visits to public mental health centers are recorded. Patients received their first diagnosis of an ICD-10 F32 or F33 depressive disorder between 6 and 17 years of age and were at least 20 years old at the time of their last visit. Subjects whose first diagnosis was in childhood (aged 6–12 years: depressed-child group) and subjects whose first diagnosis was in adolescence (aged 13–17 years: depressed-adolescent group) were compared in terms of demographic characteristics, psychiatric comorbidity, and rates of homotypic continuity in adulthood. Results: Five hundred twenty-eight patients with depressive disorders met inclusion criteria. The depressed-adolescent group had a higher proportion of girls (60.3%) compared to the depressed-child group, but did not differ on other demographic or clinical variables. Most subjects who later received treatment in adult mental health facilities (n = 243; 57.2%; 95% CI, 50.9–57.2) continued to be diagnosed with a depressive disorder. High rates of anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, personality disorders, and psychotic disorders in adulthood were observed among subjects from both groups. The absence of psychiatric comorbidity prior to age 18 years was associated with homotypic continuity of depressive disorder into adulthood. Conclusions: Subjects with adolescent-onset depression and subjects without comorbid psychiatric disorders in youth appear to have a higher level of homotypic continuity into adulthood. Both children and adolescents with depressive disorders are at risk for other psychiatric disorders in adulthood. PMID

  19. Fatigue, anxiety and depression levels, activities of daily living of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Karakurt, Papatya; Ünsal, Ayla

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the fatigue, anxiety and depression levels, activities of daily living of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 255). It was found that there was significant difference between Visual Analogue Scale for Fatigue (VAS-F) point averages and gender, education levels, marital status and economical status of patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the participants in this study, 36.5% had an anxiety disorder whereas 69.0% exhibited depression. In the study, it was determined that 85.5% of those were independent in their Katz's Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and 49.4% of those were independent in their Lawton and Brody's Index of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs). This study has shown that VAS-F, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, ADL and IADL instruments that measure the various aspects of health-related quality of living can contribute considerably to a more diversified understanding of the patients' situation with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  20. Depressed Mood, Usual Activity Level, and Continued Employment after Starting Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rebecca; Huang, Yijian; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: When patients start dialysis, their employment rate declines and disability benefits are an option. With patient sociodemographic and clinical characteristics including disability income status controlled, we investigated the significance of depressed mood and usual activity level as predictors of patients' continued employment after dialysis start. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Incident patients from 296 randomly selected dialysis clinics were surveyed in the Comprehensive Dialysis Study (CDS). Participants provided information about employment status, disability income status, education, depressive symptoms measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2), and usual activity level/energy expenditure measured by the Human Activity Profile. Age, gender, race, insurance, diabetes, inability to ambulate or transfer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular conditions, and hemoglobin and serum albumin values at treatment start were obtained from US Renal Data System files. Dialysis modality was defined at time of interview. Results: Among 585 CDS participants who worked in the previous year, 191 (32.6%) continued working after dialysis start. On the basis of the PHQ-2 cutoff score ≥3, 12.1% of patients who remained employed had possible or probable depression, compared with 32.8% of patients who were no longer employed. In adjusted analyses, higher Human Activity Profile scores were associated with increased likelihood of continued employment, and there was a borderline association between lower PHQ-2 scores and continued employment. Conclusions: Screening and management of depressive symptoms and support for increased activity level may facilitate patients' opportunity for continued employment after dialysis start, along with generally improving their overall quality of life. PMID:20884777

  1. Self-reported upper extremity health status correlates with depression.

    PubMed

    Ring, David; Kadzielski, John; Fabian, Lauren; Zurakowski, David; Malhotra, Leah R; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2006-09-01

    The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire is the most widely used upper extremity-specific health-status measure. The DASH score often demonstrates greater variability than would be expected on the basis of objective pathology. This variability may be related to psychosocial factors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the DASH score and psychological factors for specific diagnoses with relatively limited variation in objective pathology. Two hundred and thirty-five patients with a single, common, discrete hand problem known to have limited variations in objective pathology completed the DASH questionnaire, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R) to assess neuroticism, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale to quantify depressive symptoms, and the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS). Forty-five patients had carpal tunnel syndrome, forty-four had de Quervain tenosynovitis, forty-eight had lateral elbow pain, and seventy-one had a single trigger finger. In addition, twenty-seven patients were evaluated six weeks after a nonoperatively treated fracture of the distal part of the radius. Relationships between psychosocial factors and the DASH score were determined. A significant positive correlation between the DASH score and depression was noted for all diagnoses (r = 0.38 to 0.52; p < 0.01 for all). The DASH score also correlated with pain anxiety for four of the five diagnoses (carpal tunnel syndrome, r = 0.40; de Quervain tendinitis, r = 0.46; lateral elbow pain, r = 0.42; and trigger finger, r = 0.24) (p < 0.05 for all). The DASH score was not correlated with neuroticism for any diagnosis. There was a highly significant effect of depression (as measured with the CES-D score) on the DASH score for all diagnoses. Both the CES-D score (F = 62.68, p < 0.0001) and gender (F = 11.36, p < 0.001) were independent predictors of the DASH score. Self-reported upper extremity

  2. Changes in health behaviors and their associations with depressive symptoms among Israelis aged 50 +

    PubMed Central

    Khalaila, Rabia; Litwin, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the longitudinal association between changes in health behaviors and depression, and to determine the mediating effect of health characteristics on this association. Method Based on the first and second waves of the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)-Israel, depressive symptoms of 1,524 Israelis aged 50 or older were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Changes in physical activity and body weight are associated with depressive symptoms after adjusting for confounders. However, after adding measures of health, the respective correlations of weight gain and commenced physical activity with depression disappear, and the correlation between continued activity and depression is reduced. Discussion Changes in health behaviors are related to mental health in late life, but their effect is mediated by physical and functional health. Future interventions should nevertheless target older individuals who stop physical activity and those who remain inactive to lessen the risk of depression. PMID:24401321

  3. Depressive symptoms in the second trimester relate to low oxytocin levels in African-American women: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garfield, Lindsey; Giurgescu, Carmen; Carter, C Sue; Holditch-Davis, Diane; McFarlin, Barbara L; Schwertz, Dorie; Seng, Julia S; White-Traut, Rosemary

    2015-02-01

    Low-income African-American women report elevated prenatal depressive symptoms more often (42 %) than the national average (20 %). In the USA in 2012, 16.5 % of African-American women experienced a premature birth (less than 36 completed gestational weeks) compared to 10.3 % of white women. In addition, 13 % of African-American women had a low-birth weight infant (less than 2,500 g) compared to 7 % of white women. Variation in the neuropeptide, oxytocin has been implicated in perinatal depression, maternal behavior, regulation of stress responses, and may be associated with this health disparity. The purpose of this investigation was to examine factors associated with prenatal depressive symptoms, including plasma oxytocin levels and birth weight, in a sample of urban African-American women. Pregnant African-American women (N = 57) completed surveys and had blood drawn twice during pregnancy at 15-22 weeks and 25-37 weeks. In addition, birth data were collected from medical records. A large number of participants reported elevated prenatal depressive symptoms at the first (n = 20, 35 %) and the second (n = 19, 33 %) data points. Depressive symptoms were higher in multigravidas (t(51) = -2.374, p = 0.02), women with higher anxiety (r(47) = 0.71, p = 0.001), women who delivered their infants at an earlier gestational age (r(51) = -0.285, p = 0.04), and those without the support of the infant's father (F(4, 48) = 2.676, p = 0.04). Depressive symptoms were also higher in women with low oxytocin levels than in women with high oxytocin levels (F(2, 47) = 3.3, p = 0.05). In addition, women who had low oxytocin tended to have infants with lower birth weights (F(2, 47) = 2.9, p = 0.06). Neither prenatal depressive symptoms nor prenatal oxytocin levels were associated with premature birth. Pregnant multigravida African-American women with increased levels of anxiety and lacking the baby's father's support during the

  4. Positive Attitude Towards Life, Emotional Expression, self-rated health, and depressive symptoms among centenarians and near-centenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kaori; Zweig, Richard; Schechter, Clyde B.; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Favorable attitudes, emotions, personality characteristics, and self-rated health have been associated with successful aging in late life. However, less is known regarding these constructs and their relationships to mental health outcomes in the oldest old persons. This study examined cross-sectional relationships of these psychological factors to depressive symptoms in centenarians and near-centenarians. Methods A selected sample of Ashkenazi Jewish older adults ages 98 to 107 (n = 54, 78% female) without significant cognitive impairment participated. Cognitive function was assessed by Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE), Positive Attitude Towards Life and Emotional Expression by the Personality Outlook Profile Scale (POPS), self-rated health by participants’ subjective rating of their present health, and depressive symptoms by the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Results Results demonstrated inverse associations of the Positive Attitude Towards Life domain of the POPS and self-rated health with participants’ levels of depressive symptoms even after adjusting for the effects of history of medical illnesses, cognitive function, and demographic variables. Additionally, participants with high levels of care showed higher levels of depressive symptoms. Path analysis supported the partially mediating role of Positive Attitude Towards Life in the relationship between self-rated health and depressive symptoms. Conclusion These findings emphasized the important roles of positive attitudes and emotions as well as self-rated health in mental health outcomes in the oldest old. Although, limited by its cross-sectional design, findings suggest these psychological factors may exert protective effects on mental health outcomes in advanced age. PMID:26114814

  5. Oral health-related quality of life is linked with subjective well-being and depression in early old age.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Alexander Jochen; Danner, Daniel; Schmitt, Marina; Nitschke, Ina; Rammelsberg, Peter; Wahl, Hans-Werner

    2011-10-01

    Although a body of research has targeted predictors of well-being and depression in old age, the consideration of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) as a predictor of these major psychosocial endpoints has been rare in the previous literature. The objective of this study was to test whether OHRQoL is associated with well-being and depression, after controlling for relevant confounders; also, the mediating role of subjective health, a major predictor of both well-being and depression, has been explored. OHRQoL was measured by two commonly used assessment instruments, the geriatric oral health assessment index (GOHAI) and oral health impact profile (OHIP); well-being was assessed by the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS) and depression by the self-rating depression scale (SDS). We used a subsample of 197 participants from the older cohort (1930-1932) of the Interdisciplinary Longitudinal Study of Adult Development. Regression models and structural equations modeling (SEM) were used for the test for study variable relationships. Both GOHAI and OHIP revealed significant associations to both PGCMS and SDS at the bivariate level. In regression analyses considering gender, household situation, subjective health, and both OHRQoL indicators, only OHIP remained a significant predictor of well-being and depression. In addition, supportive evidence for a mediating role of subjective health regarding the linkage between OHRQoL and an overall latent construct of well-being was found in the SEM analysis. In conclusion, OHRQoL is significantly linked with well-being and depression in old age, while subjective health is able to mediate the relationship. The generally underrated role of OHRQoL with respect to well-being and depression in late adulthood deserves more attention.

  6. The influence of shoulder pain on functional limitation, perceived health, and depressive mood in patients with traumatic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Chi; Chan, Rai-Chi; Tsai, Yun-An; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich; Wu, Han-Lin; Huang, Shih-Fong

    2015-09-01

    To assess whether functional activity, perceived health, and depressive symptoms differ between individuals with traumatic paraplegia with and without shoulder pain. Cross sectional and comparative investigation using the unified questionnaire. Neural Regeneration and Repair Division unit of Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan. Seventy-six patients with paraplegia (23 with and 53 without shoulder pain) who had experienced spinal cord injury at American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale T2 to T12 neurologic level (at least 6 months previously). Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM), a single item from the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) depression scale. Shoulder pain was prevalent in 30% patients. Patients with shoulder pain had significantly worse perceived health and greater depressive symptoms than those without. No significant difference was found in functional ability between groups. Greater shoulder pain intensity was related to higher depressive scores (r=0.278, P=0.017) and lower self-perceived health scores (r=-0.433, P<0.001) but not SCIM scores (P=0.342). Although shoulder pain was unrelated to functional limitation, it was associated with lower perceived health and higher depressive mood levels.

  7. The influence of shoulder pain on functional limitation, perceived health, and depressive mood in patients with traumatic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Chi; Chan, Rai-Chi; Tsai, Yun-An; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich; Wu, Han-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether functional activity, perceived health, and depressive symptoms differ between individuals with traumatic paraplegia with and without shoulder pain. Design Cross sectional and comparative investigation using the unified questionnaire. Setting Neural Regeneration and Repair Division unit of Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan. Participants Seventy-six patients with paraplegia (23 with and 53 without shoulder pain) who had experienced spinal cord injury at American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale T2 to T12 neurologic level (at least 6 months previously). Outcome measures Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM), a single item from the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) depression scale. Results Shoulder pain was prevalent in 30% patients. Patients with shoulder pain had significantly worse perceived health and greater depressive symptoms than those without. No significant difference was found in functional ability between groups. Greater shoulder pain intensity was related to higher depressive scores (r = 0.278, P = 0.017) and lower self-perceived health scores (r = −0.433, P < 0.001) but not SCIM scores (P = 0.342). Conclusion Although shoulder pain was unrelated to functional limitation, it was associated with lower perceived health and higher depressive mood levels. PMID:25296991

  8. Factors associated with depression detection in a New Hampshire mental health outreach program.

    PubMed

    Ghesquiere, Angela R; Pepin, Renee; Kinsey, Jennifer; Bartels, Stephen J; Bruce, Martha L

    2017-08-16

    For mental health outreach programs for older adults, accurately detecting depression is key to quality service provision. Multiple factors, including gender, cognitive impairment, or recent bereavement may affect depression detection, but this is under-studied. Therefore, we sought to both establish rates of depressive symptom detection and to examine factors associated with inaccuracies of detecting depression among participants in a mental health outreach program serving older adults. We conducted a chart review of 1126 cases in an older adult-focused mental health outreach program in New Hampshire, the Referral Education Assistance & Prevention (REAP) program. Accuracy of depression detection was identified by comparing screen-positive scores for depressive symptoms on the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) to depression identification by counselors on a 'presenting concerns' list. Inaccurate depression detection (positive on the GDS but depression not identified by counselors) occurred in 27.6% of cases. Multivariate regression analyses indicated that anxiety, cognitive concerns, and rurality were all associated with detection innaccuracy. This study appears to be the first to examine factors influencing depression detection in a mental health outreach program. Future efforts should help ensure that all older mental health outreach clients have depression detected at optimal rates.

  9. Impact of Depression on Health Care Utilization and Costs among Multimorbid Patients – Results from the MultiCare Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jens-Oliver; Luppa, Melanie; Brettschneider, Christian; Riedel-Heller, Steffi; Bickel, Horst; Fuchs, Angela; Gensichen, Jochen; Maier, Wolfgang; Mergenthal, Karola; Schäfer, Ingmar; Schön, Gerhard; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wiese, Birgitt; König, Hans-Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe and analyze the effects of depression on health care utilization and costs in a sample of multimorbid elderly patients. Method This cross-sectional analysis used data of a prospective cohort study, consisting of 1,050 randomly selected multimorbid primary care patients aged 65 to 85 years. Depression was defined as a score of six points or more on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). Subjects passed a geriatric assessment, including a questionnaire for health care utilization. The impact of depression on health care costs was analyzed using multiple linear regression models. A societal perspective was adopted. Results Prevalence of depression was 10.7%. Mean total costs per six-month period were €8,144 (95% CI: €6,199-€10,090) in patients with depression as compared to €3,137 (95% CI: €2,735-€3,538; p<0.001) in patients without depression. The positive association between depression and total costs persisted after controlling for socio-economic variables, functional status and level of multimorbidity. In particular, multiple regression analyses showed a significant positive association between depression and pharmaceutical costs. Conclusion Among multimorbid elderly patients, depression was associated with significantly higher health care utilization and costs. The effect of depression on costs was even greater than reported by previous studies conducted in less morbid patients. PMID:24638040

  10. Behavioral health coaching for rural veterans with diabetes and depression: a patient randomized effectiveness implementation trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and diabetes cause significant burden for patients and the healthcare system and, when co-occurring, result in poorer self-care behaviors and worse glycemic control than for either condition alone. However, the clinical management of these comorbid conditions is complicated by a host of patient, provider, and system-level barriers that are especially problematic for patients in rural locations. Patient-centered medical homes provide an opportunity to integrate mental and physical health care to address the multifaceted needs of complex comorbid conditions. Presently, there is a need to not only develop robust clinical interventions for complex medically ill patients but also to find feasible ways to embed these interventions into the frontlines of existing primary care practices. Methods/design This randomized controlled trial uses a hybrid effectiveness-implementation design to evaluate the Healthy Outcomes through Patient Empowerment (HOPE) intervention, which seeks to simultaneously address diabetes and depression for rural veterans in Southeast Texas. A total of 242 Veterans with uncontrolled diabetes and comorbid symptoms of depression will be recruited and randomized to either the HOPE intervention or to a usual-care arm. Participants will be evaluated on a host of diabetes and depression-related measures at baseline and 6- and 12-month follow-up. The trial has two primary goals: 1) to examine the effectiveness of the intervention on both physical (diabetes) and emotional health (depression) outcomes and 2) to simultaneously pilot test a multifaceted implementation strategy designed to increase fidelity and utilization of the intervention by coaches interfacing within the primary care setting. Discussion This ongoing blended effectiveness-implementation design holds the potential to advance the science and practice of caring for complex medically ill patients within the constraints of a busy patient-centered medical home. Trial

  11. Behavioral health coaching for rural veterans with diabetes and depression: a patient randomized effectiveness implementation trial.

    PubMed

    Cully, Jeffrey A; Breland, Jessica Y; Robertson, Suzanne; Utech, Anne E; Hundt, Natalie; Kunik, Mark E; Petersen, Nancy J; Masozera, Nicholas; Rao, Radha; Naik, Aanand D

    2014-04-28

    Depression and diabetes cause significant burden for patients and the healthcare system and, when co-occurring, result in poorer self-care behaviors and worse glycemic control than for either condition alone. However, the clinical management of these comorbid conditions is complicated by a host of patient, provider, and system-level barriers that are especially problematic for patients in rural locations. Patient-centered medical homes provide an opportunity to integrate mental and physical health care to address the multifaceted needs of complex comorbid conditions. Presently, there is a need to not only develop robust clinical interventions for complex medically ill patients but also to find feasible ways to embed these interventions into the frontlines of existing primary care practices. This randomized controlled trial uses a hybrid effectiveness-implementation design to evaluate the Healthy Outcomes through Patient Empowerment (HOPE) intervention, which seeks to simultaneously address diabetes and depression for rural veterans in Southeast Texas. A total of 242 Veterans with uncontrolled diabetes and comorbid symptoms of depression will be recruited and randomized to either the HOPE intervention or to a usual-care arm. Participants will be evaluated on a host of diabetes and depression-related measures at baseline and 6- and 12-month follow-up. The trial has two primary goals: 1) to examine the effectiveness of the intervention on both physical (diabetes) and emotional health (depression) outcomes and 2) to simultaneously pilot test a multifaceted implementation strategy designed to increase fidelity and utilization of the intervention by coaches interfacing within the primary care setting. This ongoing blended effectiveness-implementation design holds the potential to advance the science and practice of caring for complex medically ill patients within the constraints of a busy patient-centered medical home. Behavioral Activation Therapy for Rural Veterans

  12. Policy for Promotion of Women's Mental Health: Insight from Analysis of Policy on Postnatal Depression in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Place, Jean Marie S; Billings, Deborah L; Frongillo, Edward A; Blake, Christine E; Mann, Joshua R; deCastro, Filipa

    2016-03-01

    This article critically examines federal, state and facility-level policies, as well as clinical practice guidelines regarding postnatal depression in Mexico. Thirteen documents including national health plans, national action plans, federal and state laws and regulations, clinical practice guidelines, and public-sector healthcare facility policies were collected and evaluated according to whether they included a statement of intent and/or actions related to the care of women at risk for or experiencing postnatal depression. While postnatal depression is included in several policies in Mexico, it is not addressed in ways that guide actions to manage postnatal depression. Specific direction on postnatal depression in policies would bridge a gap in maternal mental healthcare given that medication, treatment, and timing of interventions is unique in the postpartum context.

  13. Health-related stress, affect, and depressive symptoms experienced by caregiving mothers of adults with a developmental disability.

    PubMed

    Pruchno, Rachel A; Meeks, Suzanne

    2004-09-01

    The interrelationships among health-related stress, positive and negative affect, and depressive symptoms patterned in the dynamic model of affect (J. Reich, A. Zautra, & M. Davis, 2003) were examined using data from 932 women having an adult child with a developmental disability. Results indicate that women experience a moderate inverse correlation between positive and negative affect under conditions of low levels of health-related stress, whereas at high levels of stress, positive and negative affect become more strongly inversely correlated. Under high-stress conditions, both negative affect and positive affect have a stronger relationship to depressive symptoms than they do under low-stress conditions. Copyright 2004 American Psychological Association

  14. Hemoglobin levels in persons with depressive and/or anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Lever-van Milligen, Bianca A; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Smit, Johannes H; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2014-04-01

    Both low and high hemoglobin levels lead to more physical diseases, and both are linked to mortality. Low hemoglobin, often classified as anemia, has also been linked to more depressive symptoms, but whether both hemoglobin extremes are associated with depressive disorder and potentially also with anxiety disorder has not been examined before. This study examines to which extent hemoglobin levels are associated with depression and anxiety disorders in a large cohort. The study sample consisted of 2920 persons from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Hemoglobin levels were determined after venipuncture. Depressive and anxiety disorders were determined according to a DSM-IV-based psychiatric interview. Clinical psychiatric characteristics included the severity of depression and anxiety, the duration of symptoms, the age of onset and the antidepressant use. Higher hemoglobin levels were found in those with current depressive and/or anxiety disorders after sociodemographic adjustment and both higher, and lower hemoglobin levels were found in persons with higher depression and anxiety severity. However, after full adjustment for sociodemographics, disease indicators and lifestyle, associations were no longer significant. This cohort study showed that there is no independent association between depressive and/or anxiety disorders and hemoglobin levels or anemia status. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum ApoB levels in depressive patients: associated with cognitive deficits

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Li; Han, Mei; Du, Xiang Dong; Zhang, Bao Hua; He, Shu Chang; Shao, Tian Nan; Yin, Guang Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive deficits have been regarded as one of the most significant clinical symptoms of depressive disorder. Accumulating evidence has shown that apolipoprotein B (ApoB) levels, which are responsible for inducing neurodegeneration, may be involved in cognitive deficits. This study examines cognitive deficits, and the correlation of serum ApoB levels with cognitive deficits of depressive disorder. 90 depressive patients and 90 healthy controls with matched age and gender were recruited. Cognition was assessed using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS). Serum ApoB levels in depressive patients were measured by immunoturbidimetric method. Our results showed that depressive patients had lower scores of cognition including RBANS total score and subscales of language and delayed memory (all, p < 0.001) than healthy controls after controlling for the variables. The differences in cognitive functions also passed Bonferroni corrections. Serum ApoB levels were negatively correlated with delayed memory score in depressive patients (r = −0.30, p = 0.01). Furthermore, stepwise multivariate regression analysis indicated that serum ApoB levels independently contributed to delayed memory in depressive patients (t = −2.68, p = 0.01). Our findings support that serum ApoB levels may be involved in delayed memory decline in depressive patients. Depressive patients also experience greater cognitive deficits, especially in delayed memory and language than healthy controls. PMID:28054633

  16. The Effects of Intermittent Reminiscence Therapy on Nursing Home Residents' Depression Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Patricia

    Depression is regarded as the most prevalent mental health disorder in the elderly. Reminiscence, a normative and universal process which can facilitate the resolution, integration, and reorganization of past conflicts can have positive or negative effects on depression. One environment where the elderly are particularly at risk for the negative…

  17. Alterations of amino Acid level in depressed rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei; Li, Xuechun; Ni, Jian; Tian, Jingchen; Jing, Fu; Qu, Changhai; Lin, Longfei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Amino-acid neurotransmitter system dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of depression. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of amino acids as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers could be used in future diagnosis of depression. Only partial amino acids such as glycine and asparagine were determined from certain parts of rats' brain included hippocampi and cerebral cortex in previous studies. However, according to systematic biology, amino acids in different area of brain are interacted and interrelated. Hence, the determination of 34 amino acids through entire rats' brain was conducted in this study in order to demonstrate more possibilities for biomarkers of depression by discovering other potential amino acids in more areas of rats' brain. As a result, 4 amino acids (L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine and γ-amino-n-butyric acid) among 34 were typically identified as potentially primary biomarkers of depression by data statistics. Meanwhile, an antidepressant called Fluoxetine was employed to verify other potential amino acids which were not identified by data statistics. Eventually, we found L-α-amino-adipic acid could also become a new potentially secondary biomarker of depression after drug validation. In conclusion, we suggested that L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine, γ-amino-n-butyric acid and L-α-amino-adipic acid might become potential biomarkers for future diagnosis of depression and development of antidepressant.

  18. Relationship between Problematic Internet Use, Depression and Quality of Life Levels of Turkish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekinarslan, Erkan

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between problematic Internet use (PIU), depression and quality of life levels of individuals is a growing concern in many societies. One of the main purposes of this study was to examine the relationships or correlations among PIU, depression and quality of life levels of Turkish undergraduate students. Furthermore, this study…

  19. Paternal postpartum depression: what health care providers should know.

    PubMed

    Musser, Anna K; Ahmed, Azza H; Foli, Karen J; Coddington, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    Paternal postpartum depression (PPD) is a clinically significant problem for families that is currently underscreened, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. Maternal PPD is a well-known condition and has been extensively researched. In comparison, PPD in fathers and its potential effects on the family are not widely recognized. Studies have shown the importance of optimal mental health in fathers during the postpartum period. Negative effects of paternal PPD affect marital/partner relationships, infant bonding, and child development. To promote optimal health for parents and children, pediatric nurse practitioners must stay up to date on this topic. This article discusses the relationship of paternal PPD to maternal PPD; the consequences, signs, and symptoms; and the pediatric nurse practitioner's role in assessing and managing paternal PPD.

  20. Risk and Protective Factors for Depression and Health Outcomes in American Indian and Alaska Native Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barney, David D.

    2001-01-01

    A study examined whether protective factors reduce the effects of depression in American Indian and Alaska Native adolescents. Surveys of 2,034 Native high school students from 33 states indicated that depression moderately influenced self-perceived health status and that caring and connectedness counteracted the risk factors from depression that…

  1. Mental Health and Functional Outcomes of Maternal and Adolescent Reports of Adolescent Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Frances; Lifford, Kate J.; Thomas, Hollie V.; Thapar, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of maternal and self-ratings of adolescent depression by investigating the extent to which these reports predicted a range of mental health and functional outcomes 4 years later. The potential influence of mother's own depressed mood on her ratings of adolescent depression and suicidal ideation on adolescent outcome…

  2. Postnatal Depression and Infant Health Practices among High-Risk Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajicek-Farber, Michaela L.

    2009-01-01

    Women's postnatal depressive symptoms have been associated with many adverse outcomes for children. The current study examined the frequency association with relative risk between postnatal depressive symptoms and mothers' use of preventative infant health practices. The study used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Parental…

  3. Depression Research at the National Institute of Mental Health. Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is committed to reducing the burden of mental illness through research on mind, brain, and behavior. This report presents the latest information on what is known about depression. The symptoms and types of depression are considered. Research on the treatments of depression is described, including the…

  4. Postnatal Depression and Infant Health Practices among High-Risk Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajicek-Farber, Michaela L.

    2009-01-01

    Women's postnatal depressive symptoms have been associated with many adverse outcomes for children. The current study examined the frequency association with relative risk between postnatal depressive symptoms and mothers' use of preventative infant health practices. The study used the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Parental…

  5. Mental Health Literacy of Those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation: An Impediment To Help Seeking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldney, Robert D.; Fisher, Laura J.; Wilson, David H.; Cheok, Frida

    2002-01-01

    A vignette depicting classical features of major depression was presented to subjects along with questions related to mental health literacy. Responses of those with major depression were compared to those of a control group. Results demonstrated that despite increased professional contact by those with major depression and suicidal ideation,…

  6. Health conditions, physical disabilities, perceived burdensomeness, and depressive symptoms influence suicidal ideation.

    PubMed

    Khazem, Lauren R; Jahn, Danielle R; Cukrowicz, Kelly C; Anestis, Michael D

    2017-04-01

    The roles of perceived burdensomeness and depressive symptoms in the relationship between physical disabilities or health conditions and suicidal ideation warrant examination. The authors examined indirect effects using cross-sectional data from adults who answered questions online. The serial indirect effect of the number of physical disabilities on suicidal ideation through perceived burdensomeness and depressive symptoms was not significant, but the serial indirect effects of the combined number of physical disabilities and health conditions and number of health conditions on suicidal ideation through perceived burdensomeness and depression were each significant. For those with disabilities or health conditions, perceived burdensomeness may precede depressive symptoms in the development of suicidal ideation.

  7. [Health in all policies. Is the economic depression a time of opportunities? SESPAS Report 2010].

    PubMed

    Urbanos, Rosa

    2010-12-01

    A cost-effective and equitable health policy design involves tackling social determinants of health and becoming aware of the impact of non-healthcare policies. Structural changes in institutional organization, targeted to create a new space for network governance, are required. Some factors tend to delay this process, such as institutional inertia, poor coordination and cooperation mechanisms among sectors, levels of government and agents, the consolidation of the biomedical paradigm reinforced by lobbies and cultural patterns, and inadequate collaboration among experts, practitioners and health authorities. However, these factors may be counterbalanced by political will and by the knowledge provided by domestic and foreign experiences. The present situation arising from the recent public health crises, and particularly from the current economic depression, offers a major chance to introduce the needed changes in health oriented actions. Copyright © 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Screening for depressive symptoms in older adults in the Family Health Strategy, Porto Alegre, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Eduardo Lopes; Rubin, Leonardo Librelotto; Giacobbo, Sara de Souza; Gomes, Irenio; Cataldo, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the prevalence of depression in older adults and associated factors. METHODS Cross-sectional study using a stratified random sample of 621 individuals aged ≥ 60 from 27 family health teams in Porto Alegre, RS, Southern Brazil, between 2010 and 2012. Community health agents measured depression using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Scores of ≥ 6 were considered as depression and between 11 and 15 as severe depression. Poisson regression was used to search for independent associations of sociodemographic and self-perceived health with both depression and its severity. RESULTS The prevalence of depression was 30.6% and was significantly higher in women (35.9% women versus 20.9% men, p < 0.001). The variables independently associated with depression were: female gender (PR = 1.4, 95%CI 1.1;1.8); low education, especially illiteracy (PR = 1.8, 95%CI 1.2;2 6); regular self-rated health (OR = 2.2, 95%CI 1.6;3.0); and poor/very poor self-rated health (PR = 4.0, 95%CI 2.9;5.5). Except for education, the strength of association of these factors increases significantly in severe depression. CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of depression was observed in the evaluations conducted by community health agents, professionals who are not highly specialized. The findings identified using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale in this way are similar to those in the literature, with depression more associated with low education, female gender and worse self-rated health. From a primary health care strategic point of view, the findings become still more relevant, indicating that community health agents could play an important role in identifying depression in older adults. PMID:25119932

  9. The MMPI-2 neurotic triad subscales and depression levels after pharmacological treatment in patients with depressive disorders - clinical study.

    PubMed

    Talarowska, Monika; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Chamielec, Marcelina; Gałecki, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    Affective disorders provide for one third of the main causes of psychiatric inpatient care, both in male and female subjects. An early diagnosis of the disease with precise identification of the character of its particular symptoms are key important factors for the efficacy of treatment. The goal of the study was an identification of possible associations between scores of the neurotic triad in the MMPI-2 test (hypochondria - Hs, depression - D, hysteria - Hy), evaluated at initial hospitalization period with remission degree assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), following eight weeks of treatment with SSRI. A group of 50 subjects took part in the study. The MMPI-2 test and HDRS were used in the study. The HDRS was performed at the therapy onset and reapplied after 8 weeks of its continuation. The MMPI-2 test was applied at the beginning of treatment. Higher scores in Hs (p=0.007), D (p=0.021) and Hy scales (p=0.001) are associated with the higher degree of depression, measured by the HDRS at the therapy onset. The highest performance in Hs scale (p=0.003) and Hy scale (p=0.001) evaluated on admission, was associated with the highest depression level after pharmacological treatment. The higher the degree of hypochondria and hysteria symptoms, measured by the MMPI-2 test at the onset of therapy in patients with depressive disorders, the higher severity of depression is being found after 8 weeks of therapy with SSRI agents, measured by the HDRS scale.

  10. [From the Competence Network on Depression and Suicidality to the German Depression Foundation. National and international prevention of suicidal behaviour and optimizing health care through using of E‑Mental-Health].

    PubMed

    Hegerl, Ulrich; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Heinz, Ines

    2016-04-01

    Depression is a very common, severe, socio-economically highly relevant disorder and the main cause for approximately 10,000 suicides in Germany annually. There is capital room for improvement and optimization of the care for depressed patients, as effective and evidence-based treatment options are available. However, they are only used optimally by a minority of the people affected due to huge diagnostic and therapeutic deficits. The "Compentence Network on Depression and Suicidality" provided several evidence-based concepts to improve care for patients affected by depression and to prevent suicidal behaviour. Especially the four-level intervention approach of the Alliances Against Depression has been successfully adapted and implemented by more than 100 regions within Europe and globally as well. The infrastructure of the Competence Network could be efficiently sustained throughout the establishment of the German Depression Foundation and the European Alliance against Depression. Since 2014, all research activities have been extended nationally and internationally by the establishment of a Depression Research Centre with a special focus on various E‑Mental-Health-projects.

  11. No relation between folate and homocysteine levels and depression in early pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroko; Suganuma, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Ayako; Hirowatari, Yumiko; Hirowatari, Tsuneharu; Ohsawa, Masami

    2010-12-01

    The objective in this study was to evaluate the association between folate and homocysteine (Hcy) levels and depressive symptoms in early pregnancy. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 86 pregnant women in the first trimester. A Japanese version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale was used to screen for depression. Non-fasting blood samples were collected from the women to measure folate and Hcy levels. Fifty-three (61.6%) women scored at or above a clinical cut-off of 16, and were classified with depression. In logistic regression analyses, no significant associations were observed between the incidence of depression in the first trimester and elevated Hcy and deficiencies of serum folate, folate intake, vitamin B6 intake and vitamin B12 intake. Folate and Hcy concentrations, and folate consumption, may not be protective against depression in early pregnancy.

  12. Demographic, maternal, and infant health correlates of post-partum depression in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Safadi, Reema R; Abushaikha, Lubna A; Ahmad, Muayyad M

    2016-09-01

    This cross-sectional correlational study examined post-partum depression and its relationship with demographic, maternal, and infant health problems in urban Jordanian women. Participants (n = 315) were selected from five maternal child healthcare centers and one major hospital in Amman, Jordan. Patient Health Questionnaire-9 was used to measure post-partum depression within 12 weeks of birth. A number of socio-demographic and health problems were examined for an association with post-partum depression. Results showed that 25% of post-partum women suffered moderate to severe depression and 50% of the sample had mild depression. None of the socio-demographic variables (age, education, employment, income) were significantly related to post-partum depression; however, two obstetric/infant variables (mode of birth and breastfeeding), were significantly associated with post-partum depression. There was a significant association between post-partum depression and 15 health problems of obstetric, gynecologic (i.e. episiotomy pain, infection), and general health conditions (i.e. fatigue, headache). Nurses and midwives need to emphasize post-partum depression screening, follow-up, and proper management of maternal and infant health factors predisposing to post-partum depression rather than merely focusing on women's inherent demographic factors. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Use of the Air Force Post-Deployment Health Reassessment for the Identification of Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Public Health Implications for Suicide Prevention

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Michael D.; Knox, Kerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Military members are required to complete the Post-Deployment Health Assessment on return from deployment and the Post-Deployment Health Reassessment (PHDRA) 90 to 180 days later, and we assessed the PDHRA’s sensitivity and specificity in identifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression after a military deployment among US Air Force personnel. Methods. We computed the PDHRA’s sensitivity and specificity for depression and PTSD and developed a structural model to suggest possible improvements to it. Results. For depression, sensitivity and specificity were 0.704 and 0.651, respectively; for PTSD, they were 0.774 and 0.650, respectively. Several variables produced significant direct effects on depression and trauma, suggesting that modifications could increase its sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions. The PDHRA was moderately effective in identifying airmen with depression and PTSD. It identified behavioral health concerns in many airmen who did not develop a diagnostic mental health condition. Its low level of specificity may result in reduced barriers to care and increased support services, key components of a public health approach to suicide prevention, for airmen experiencing subacute levels of distress after deployment, which may, in part, account for lower suicide rates among airmen after deployment. PMID:22390604

  14. Plasma homocysteine levels in depression and schizophrenia in South Indian Tamilian population

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Sunil K; Verman, Arul; Kattimani, Shivanand; Ananthanarayanan, P H; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Context: Hyperhomocysteinemia has been associated with psychiatric diseases in non-Indian populations. Objectives: We aimed to determine if total plasma Homocysteine (Hcys) is associated with schizophrenia or depression in South Indian Tamil patients and if so, to correlate their severity and phenomenology to Hcys levels. Settings and Design: 40 patients each with schizophrenia and depression and 40 healthy controls were recruited from the psychiatry department of a quaternary referral centre. Association between Hcys and psychiatric disorders was determined using a Case- control design. Hcys levels were correlated with age, gender and severity and duration of the disease by appropriate statistical methods using SPSS17. Materials and Methods: Schizophrenia and depression were defined using ICD10 DCR version. Severity of depression was assessed by Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and that of schizophrenia using Positive and Negative Schizophrenia scales (PANSS). Hcys levels were determined using automated chemiluminiscence immunoassay (74-76). Statistical Analysis: Differences between the mean values of plasma homocysteine levels among schizophrenia, depression and control groups were compared using analysis of variants. The association between the severity and duration of schizophrenia and depression and the plasma homocysteine levels were determine using Pearson correlation. Conclusions: In Tamilian population, schizophrenia and depression are associated with total plasma Hcys levels which correlated with the duration and severity of psychosis. PMID:24574558

  15. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... the winter months, when there is less natural sunlight. Return to top What causes depression? There is ... alone. Others with moderate to severe depression might benefit from antidepressants. It may take a few weeks ...

  16. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... judgment and mental functioning nausea and vomiting memory loss (depressants can cause users to have no memory of events that happened while they were under the influence) Long-Term Effects When people misuse depressants over a long ...

  17. Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth of a baby. Some people get seasonal affective disorder in the winter. Depression is one part of bipolar disorder. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants, talk therapy, or ...

  18. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... of depressants, including alcohol and the illegal drugs GHB and Rohypnol , come in liquid or powder form ... by prescription only. Some depressants, including Rohypnol and GHB, are illegal in the United States. Illegal possession ...

  19. Current depression as a potential barrier to health care utilization in adult cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Cheruvu, Vinay K; Oancea, S Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Depression in cancer survivors is a major concern and is associated with poor health related quality of life (HRQOL). Delaying or forgoing care due to depression may further augment poor HRQOL. Although several studies have documented depression as a barrier to health care utilization in non-cancer populations, the impact of current depression on health care utilization among adult cancer survivors (ACS) has not been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to examine the association between current depression and health care utlization among ACS. Data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System involving ACS were used in this study. The Patient Health Questionnaire 8 (PHQ-8) item scale was used to measure current depression. Two indicators of health care utilization were examined as outcomes of interest: cost as a barrier to medical care and not having a routine care. Logistic regression models were used to examine the association between current depression and health care utilization. Overall, 13.0% of ACS reported symptoms of current depression. Despite no differences in having access to care, current depression in ACS was a significant barrier to health care utilization: cost as a barrier to medical care (AOR: 5.3 [95% CI: 3.1-9.1]), and not having a routine care (AOR: 2.0 [95% CI: 1.2-3.3]). Our findings have implications for future studies to further understand the association between depression and health care utlization among ACS, its impact on their overall wellbeing, and efforts to detect and treat depression in ACS. Routine assessment of depression in ACS and effective treatment interventions may aid in seeking timely and appropriate medical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and carotid atherosclerosis in women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) heart study.

    PubMed

    Whipple, Mary O; Lewis, Tené T; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Matthews, Karen A; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Powell, Lynda H; Everson-Rose, Susan A

    2009-10-01

    Depression and hopelessness are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality; however, few studies have compared these constructs early in the atherogenic process, particularly in women or minorities. This cross-sectional study examined associations of hopelessness and depressive symptoms with carotid artery intimal-medial thickening (IMT) in 559 women (62% white, 38% black; mean+/-SD age, 50.2+/-2.8 years) without evidence of clinical CVD from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart Study. Hopelessness was measured by 2 questionnaire items; depressive symptoms were measured with the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Mean and maximum IMT were assessed by B-mode ultrasonography of the carotid arteries. Increasing hopelessness was significantly related to higher mean (P=0.0139) and maximum (P=0.0297) IMT in regression models adjusted for age, race, site, income, and CVD risk factors. A weaker pattern of associations was noted for depressive symptoms and mean (P=0.1056) and maximum (P=0.0691) IMT. Modeled simultaneously in a risk factor-adjusted model, hopelessness was related to greater mean IMT (P=0.0217) and maximum IMT (P=0.0409), but depressive symptoms were unrelated to either outcome (P>0.4). No interactions with race or synergistic effects of depressive symptoms and hopelessness were observed. Among middle-aged women, higher levels of hopelessness are associated with greater subclinical atherosclerosis independent of age, race, income, CVD risk factors, and depressive symptoms.

  1. [Health-related quality of life assessment in depression after low-frequency transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Dumas, R; Boyer, L; Richieri, R; Guedj, E; Auquier, P; Lançon, C

    2014-02-01

    TMS treatment on the SF-36 and the clinical outcome was evaluated for significance with the Wilcoxon two-tailed signed-rank test. The reliable change index (RCI) was calculated to determine clinically significant change in the eight dimension and composite scores of the SF-36 from pre-intervention to post-intervention, at the level of individual patients. Effect size (r) was then calculated, r values from 0.1 to 0.29, 0.3 to 0.49 and from 0.5 were considered as indicating small, medium and large effect sizes, respectively. Correlations between improvement in Health-related Quality of Life and improvement in the other rating scale scores were calculated using Spearman's correlation test. There were significant improvements of 37.6% in the mental health (P=0.018), 130 % in the role-emotional problem (P=0.045), 15.5% in the physical functioning (P=0.008), 110.6% in the role-physical problem (P=0.002), 22.4% in the bodily pain (P=0.013) dimensions, 6.1% in the Physical Component Score (P=0.043), and 22,5 % in the Beck Depression Inventory (P=0.002). Eighteen patients (54%) showed clinically significant improvement in one of the two composite scores after RCI calculation. Seven out of the eight SF-36 dimension scores and the two composite scores showed effect sizes ranging from 0.12 to 0.38, indicating small to moderate effect. Significant correlations were found between improvement in the Beck Depression Inventory and improvement in the Mental Component Score, the social functioning, the mental health, the general health, the vitality and the physical functioning dimensions. Small sample size and non-controlled design. Low-frequency rTMS over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex improves Health-related Quality of Life in unipolar and bipolar patients with medication-resistant depression. Improvement in mental health-related quality of life is significantly correlated with improvement in depressive symptoms. However, further studies with larger samples and controlled designs are

  2. Depression and Rural Environment are Associated With Poor Oral Health Among Pregnant Women in Northern Appalachia.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Daniel W; Hayes, Sarah E; Randall, Cameron L; Polk, Deborah E; Neiswanger, Kathy; Shaffer, John R; Weyant, Robert J; Foxman, Betsy; Kao, Elizabeth; Crout, Richard J; Chapman, Stella; Brown, Linda J; Maurer, Jennifer L; Marazita, Mary L

    2016-01-01

    Both oral health problems and depression among pregnant women contribute to maternal-infant health outcomes. Little is known, however, about the potential effects of clinically significant depression on the oral health status of pregnant women. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of clinically significant depression and rural- or urban-dwelling status on oral health outcomes among pregnant women. Pregnant women (N = 685) in rural (i.e., West Virginia) and urban (i.e., Pittsburgh, PA) areas of northern Appalachia were assessed by calibrated examiners regarding gingivitis, oral hygiene, and DMFT (decayed, missing, and filled teeth), completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) and provided demographics. Participants were categorized based on clinically significant depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 16) and rural/urban domicile. Women with depression and those living in rural areas had worse oral health on all three indices than their non-depressed and urban counterparts. Depression, particularly among women in rural areas, affects certain oral health indices and represents a modifiable target for intervention. Moreover, treatments designed specifically for rural populations may be of particular utility. Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant may benefit from regular depression screenings from their dental and medical health care providers.

  3. Beyond "somatization" and "psychologization": symptom-level variation in depressed Han Chinese and Euro-Canadian outpatients.

    PubMed

    Dere, Jessica; Sun, Jiahong; Zhao, Yue; Persson, Tonje J; Zhu, Xiongzhao; Yao, Shuqiao; Bagby, R Michael; Ryder, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    The finding that people of Chinese heritage tend to emphasize somatic rather than psychological symptoms of depression has frequently been discussed in the culture and mental health literature since the 1970s. Recent studies have confirmed that Chinese samples report more somatic and fewer psychological depression symptoms compared to "Western" samples. The question remains, however, as to whether or not these effects are attributable to variation in all the constituent symptoms or to a subset. If the latter, there is the additional possibility that some symptoms might show a divergent pattern. Such findings would have implications for how cultural variations in symptom presentation are interpreted, and would also inform the cultural study of affective experiences more broadly. The current study addressed these issues in Chinese (n = 175) and Euro-Canadian (n = 107) psychiatric outpatients originally described by Ryder et al. (2008). Differential item functioning (DIF) was used to examine whether specific somatic and psychological symptoms diverged from the overall patterns of cultural variation. Chi-square analyses were used to examine atypical somatic symptoms (e.g., hypersomnia), previously neglected in this literature. No DIF was observed for the typical somatic symptoms, but Euro-Canadians reported greater levels of atypical somatic symptoms, and showed higher rates of atypical depression. DIF was observed for psychological symptoms-the Chinese reported high levels of "suppressed emotions" and "depressed mood," relative to their overall psychological symptom reporting. Chinese outpatients also spontaneously reported "depressed mood" at similar levels as the Euro-Canadians, contrary to prevailing ideas about Chinese unwillingness to discuss depression. Overall, the findings provide a more nuanced picture of how culture shapes symptom presentation and point toward future studies designed to unpack cultural variation in narrower subsets of depressive symptoms.

  4. When the ends outweigh the means: Mood and level of identification in depression

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Edward R.; Moberly, Nicholas J.; Moulds, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Research in healthy controls has found that mood influences cognitive processing via level of action identification: happy moods are associated with global and abstract processing; sad moods are associated with local and concrete processing. However, this pattern seems inconsistent with the high level of abstract processing observed in depressed patients, leading Watkins (2008, 2010) to hypothesise that the association between mood and level of goal/action identification is impaired in depression. We tested this hypothesis by measuring level of identification on the Behavioural Identification Form after happy and sad mood inductions in never-depressed controls and currently depressed patients. Participants used increasingly concrete action identifications as they became sadder and less happy, but this effect was moderated by depression status. Consistent with Watkins' (2008) hypothesis, increases in sad mood and decreases in happiness were associated with shifts towards the use of more concrete action identifications in never-depressed individuals, but not in depressed patients. These findings suggest that the putatively adaptive association between mood and level of identification is impaired in major depression. PMID:22017614

  5. Decreased plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in institutionalized elderly with depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chin-Liang; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Lin, Yu-Te; Pan, Chih-Chuan; Lu, Ti; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chow, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    To compare the differences in plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels among institutionalized ethnic Chinese elderly participants with major depression, those with subclinical depression, and a nondepressed control group. A cross-sectional study. The veterans' home in southern Taiwan. One hundred sixty-seven residents. Questionnaires including the Minimum Data Set Nursing Home 2.1, Chinese-language version, and the short-form Geriatric Depression Scale, Chinese-language version. Depressive disorder was diagnosed by a well-trained psychiatrist using DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision) criteria. We measured plasma BDNF levels in the following 3 groups: nondepressive subjects (n = 122), subclinically depressive subjects (n = 33), and subjects with major depression (n = 12). Plasma BDNF was assayed using the sandwich ELISA method. We noted a significantly negative association between age and plasma BDNF in the regression model. There was no significant correlation between BDNF plasma levels and body weight or platelet counts. We found that plasma BDNF was significantly lower in the major depressive group (mean, 115.1 pg/mL; SD, 57.2) than in the nondepressive group (mean, 548.8 pg/mL; SD, 370.6; P < .001). The BDNF plasma concentrations in the subclinically depressive group (mean, 231.8 pg/mL; SD, 92.4; P < .001) and control group were also significantly different. Our findings revealed that plasma BDNF levels were reduced not only in ethnic Chinese elderly patients with major depressive disorder but also in those with subclinical depression. This makes the plasma BDNF level a potential biological marker for clinical or subclinical depression. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and Levels of Depression Among Parents of Children with Cancer in Basrah, Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maliki, Shukrya K.; Al-Asadi, Jasim; Al-Waely, Akeel; Agha, Sabah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cancer in a family member can be a major source of psychological disorders, especially for the parents of children diagnosed with cancer. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and levels of depression among parents of children with cancer in Basrah, Iraq. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between November 2014 and April 2015 at the Specialist Paediatric Hospital in Basrah City, Iraq. One parent each of 384 children with cancer admitted to the hospital for treatment or follow-up during the study period were invited to participate in the study. Age, gender, years of education, occupation, monthly income, place of residence and the overall number of children in a family were recorded. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale was used to identify depression and assess levels of depression. Results: A total of 336 parents participated in the study (response rate: 87.5%). Of these, 70.5% were depressed, 54.1% of which had major depression. Depression was significantly more common (77.2% versus 57.1%) and more severe (60.7% versus 41.1%) among mothers compared to fathers (P = 0.001). Parents with fewer years of education were more likely to be depressed; this association was significant for mothers but not fathers (P = 0.001 and 0.814, respectively). Depression was significantly inversely associated with monthly income (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The prevalence of depression among the parents of children with cancer was high. Depression was significantly more severe among mothers compared to fathers and among mothers who were less educated. Income also had a significant association with levels of depression among parents. PMID:27606113

  7. Optimal Levels of Emotional Arousal in Experiential Therapy of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carryer, Jonathan R.; Greenberg, Leslie S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between length of time spent expressing highly aroused emotion and therapeutic outcome. Method: Thirty-eight clients (14 male, 24 female) between the ages of 22 and 60 years (M = 39.5, SD = 9.71), treated for depression with experiential therapy, were rated on working alliance and expressed emotional…

  8. Level of Depression in Intellectually Gifted Secondary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahzad, Salman; Begume, Nasreen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to investigate the difference in depression between intellectually gifted and non-gifted secondary school children. After a detailed review of literature the following hypothesis was formulated; there would be a significant difference between intellectually gifted and non-gifted secondary school children on…

  9. Level of Depression in Intellectually Gifted Secondary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahzad, Salman; Begume, Nasreen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to investigate the difference in depression between intellectually gifted and non-gifted secondary school children. After a detailed review of literature the following hypothesis was formulated; there would be a significant difference between intellectually gifted and non-gifted secondary school children on…

  10. Optimal Levels of Emotional Arousal in Experiential Therapy of Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carryer, Jonathan R.; Greenberg, Leslie S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between length of time spent expressing highly aroused emotion and therapeutic outcome. Method: Thirty-eight clients (14 male, 24 female) between the ages of 22 and 60 years (M = 39.5, SD = 9.71), treated for depression with experiential therapy, were rated on working alliance and expressed emotional…

  11. Clinical Effectiveness of Integrating Depression Care Management into Medicare Home Health: The Depression CAREPATH Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Martha L.; Raue, Patrick J.; Reilly, Catherine F.; Greenberg, Rebecca L.; Meyers, Barnett S.; Banerjee, Samprit; Pickett, Yolonda R.; Sheeran, Thomas F.; Ghesquiere, Angela; Zukowski, Diane; Rosas, Vianca H.; McLaughlin, Jeanne; Pledger, Lori; Doyle, Joan; Joachim, Pamela; Leon, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Depression is highly prevalent, inadequately treated, and contributes to hospitalization and other poor outcomes in older home healthcare patients. Feasible and effective interventions are needed to reduce this burden of depression. Objective To determine whether among older Medicare home health recipients who screen positive for depression, patients of nurses randomized to intervention have greater improvement in depressive symptoms over one year compared to patients receiving enhanced usual care. Design The cluster-randomized effectiveness trial randomized nurse-teams to Intervention (12 teams) or enhanced usual care (9 teams). Patients were recruited 2009–2012, assessed, and followed at 3, 6, and 12-months by research staff blind to intervention status. Setting Conducted at six home healthcare agencies nationwide. Patients interviewed at home and by telephone. Participants Medicare home health patients age ≥65 who screened positive for depression on routine nurse assessments. Of 502 eligible patients, 306 enrolled. Intervention Depression CAREPATH (CARE for PATients at Home) requires nurses to manage depression during routine home visits by weekly symptom assessment, medication management, care coordination, education, goal setting. Training totaled 7 hours (4 on-site, 3 web). Researchers telephoned supervisors every other week. Main Outcome and Measure Depression severity, assessed by 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Results 306 participants were predominately female (69.6%), diverse (18.0% Black, 16.0% Hispanic), average age 76.5 (SD=8.0) years. In full sample, the intervention had no effect (treatment × time interaction: P=0.13). Adjusted HDRS scores (CAREPATH vs control) did not differ at three (10.5 vs 11.4; P=0.26) or six months (9.3 vs 10.5; P=0.12), barely reaching significance at twelve months (8.7 vs 10.6; P=0.05). In subsample with mild depression (HDRS<10), the intervention had no effect (P=.90) and HDRS did not differ

  12. Asian Americans and European Americans' stigma levels in response to biological and social explanations of depression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhen Hadassah

    2015-05-01

    Mental illness stigma is prevalent among Asian Americans, and it is a key barrier that prevents them from seeking psychological services. Limited studies have experimentally examined how Asian Americans respond to biological and social explanations of mental illness. Understanding how to educate and communicate about mental illness effectively is crucial in increasing service utilization among Asian Americans. To assess how genetic, neurobiological, and social explanations for the onset of depression affects Asian American and European American's mental illness stigma. 231 Asian Americans and 206 European Americans read about an individual with major depression and were randomly assigned to be informed that the cause was either genetic, neurobiological, social, or unknown. Various stigma outcomes, including social distance, fear, and depression duration were assessed. Consistent with prior research, Asian Americans had higher baseline levels of stigma compared to European Americans. Greater social essentialist beliefs predicted positive stigma outcomes for Asian Americans, such as a greater willingness to be near, help, and hire someone with depression, but genetic essentialist beliefs predicted negative stigma outcomes, such as fear. In addition, a social explanation for the etiology of depression led to lower stigma outcomes for Asian Americans; it decreased their fear of someone with depression and increased the perception that depression is treatable. For European Americans, both genetic and social essentialist beliefs predicted a greater perception of depression treatability. Although genetics do play a role in the development of depression, emphasizing a social explanation for the origin of depression may help reduce stigma for Asian Americans.

  13. Factors associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms among international university students in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Romeo B; Maria, Madelene Sta; Estanislao, Susana; Rodriguez, Cristina

    2013-11-01

    Over the years, the number of international university students has been increasing in the Philippines. Depression tends to be common among this demographic sector, because of the varying challenges and expectations associated with studying abroad. Depression can be prevented if its symptoms, particularly those at higher levels, are identified and addressed early and effectively. This survey examined the social and demographic factors that are significantly associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. One hundred twenty-six international university students were interviewed using the University Students Depression Inventory. Of the 13 factors analyzed, 3 were found with statistically significant associations with more intense levels of depressive symptoms. These factors were: level of satisfaction with one's financial condition, level of closeness with parents, and level of closeness with peers. In identifying international students with greater risk for depression, characteristics related to their financial condition and primary group relationships can be considered. There is a need to carry out more studies to confirm this initial evidence. The findings can help guide further discourse, research and program to benefit international students with higher levels of depressive symptoms.

  14. The epidemiology of major depression in South Africa: results from the South African stress and health study.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Mark; Grimsrud, Anna T; Stein, Dan J; Williams, David R; Myer, Landon

    2009-05-01

    Mental disorders are a major contributor to the burden of disease in all regions of the world. There are limited data on the epidemiology of major depressive disorder in South Africa. A nationally representative household survey was conducted between 2002 and 2004 using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) to establish a diagnosis of depression. The dataset analysed included 4351 adult South Africans of all racial groups. The prevalence of major depression was 9.7% for lifetime and 4.9% for the 12 months prior to the interview. The prevalence of depression was significantly higher among females than among males. The prevalence was also higher among those with a low level of education. Over 90% of all respondents with depression reported global role impairment. In comparison with data from other countries, South Africa has lower rates of depression than the USA but higher rates than Nigeria. The findings are broadly consistent with previous findings in South Africa. These findings are the first step in documenting a level of need for care in a context of significant under-funding of mental health services and research in South Africa

  15. The Effects of Depression, Health Status, and Stressful Life-Events on Self-Reported Memory Problems among Aged Blacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazargan, Mohsen; Barbre, Ann R.

    1994-01-01

    Examined prevalence and correlates of self-reported memory problems among 1,250 black elders. Over 48.3% of sample reported poor memory/forgetfulness as very or somewhat serious problem. Subjects with hearing impairments, higher number of stressful life events, higher level of depression, and poorer health were more likely to complain of memory…

  16. Mental health care use in relation to depressive symptoms among pregnant women in the USA.

    PubMed

    Byatt, Nancy; Xiao, Rui S; Dinh, Kate H; Waring, Molly E

    2016-02-01

    We examined mental health care use in relation to depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) ≥ 10) among a nationally representative sample of pregnant women using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2012. Logistic regression models estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios for mental health care use in the past year in relation to depressive symptoms. While 8.2 % (95 % CI 4.6-11.8) of pregnant women were depressed, only 12 % (95 % CI 1.8-22.1) of these women reported mental health care use in the past year.

  17. Neighbourhood characteristics, individual level socioeconomic factors, and depressive symptoms in young adults: the CARDIA study

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, C.; Diez, R; Jacobs, D.; Kiefe, C.; West, D.; Williams, D.

    2005-01-01

    Study objective: To investigate the relation between neighbourhood socioeconomic and ethnic characteristics with depressive symptoms in a population based sample. Design: Cross sectional data from the CARDIA study, including the Center for Epidemiological Studies depression scale score (CES-D). Neighbourhoods were 1990 US census blocks of 1000 people; six census variables reflecting wealth/income, education, and occupation investigated separately and as a summary score; neighbourhood racial composition (percentage white and black) and individual level income and education were also examined. Setting: Participants recruited in 1985/86 from community lists in Birmingham, AL; Chicago, IL; Minneapolis MN; from a health plan in Oakland, CA. Participants: 3437 adults aged 28–40 years in 1995/96: 24% white men, 27% white women, 20% black men, 29% black women. Main results: For each race-sex group, CES-D was inversely related to neighbourhood score and individual income and education. Associations of neighbourhood score with CES-D became weak and inconsistent after adjusting for individual level factors; personal income remained strongly and inversely associated with CES-D. Age adjusted mean differences (standard errors) in CES-D between the lowest and highest income categories were 3.41 (0.62) for white men, 4.57 (0.64) for white women, 5.80 (0.87) for black men, and 5.74 (0.83) for black women. For both black and white participants, CES-D was associated negatively with percentage of white people and positively with percentage of black people in their census block, before, but not after, adjustment for individual and neighbourhood socioeconomic variables. Conclusions: Neither neighbourhood socioeconomic characteristics nor ethnic density were consistently related to depressive symptoms once individual socioeconomic characteristics were taken into account. PMID:15767387

  18. Evaluating Mental Health Literacy and Adolescent Depression: What Do Teenagers "Know?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, John; Bruno, Michelle; Fernandes, Teresa E.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of depression increases markedly during adolescence, yet many youth are not receiving the support that they need. One factor that has been speculated as contributing to low rates of care is a lack of mental health literacy about depression and viable sources of support. This pilot study focused on mental health literacy as it…

  19. Social, Health, and Age Differences Associated with Depressive Disorders in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plach, Sandra K.; Napholz, Linda; Kelber, Sheryl T.

    2005-01-01

    Depression in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be related to social role experiences, physical health, and age. The purpose of this study was to examine the social and health factors contributing to depression in two age groups of women with RA. One-hundred and thirty-eight midlife and late-life women with a diagnosis of RA participated in…

  20. Social, Health, and Age Differences Associated with Depressive Disorders in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plach, Sandra K.; Napholz, Linda; Kelber, Sheryl T.

    2005-01-01

    Depression in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be related to social role experiences, physical health, and age. The purpose of this study was to examine the social and health factors contributing to depression in two age groups of women with RA. One-hundred and thirty-eight midlife and late-life women with a diagnosis of RA participated in…

  1. Women's reproductive health and depression: a community survey in the Gambia, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Rosalind; Morison, Linda; Paine, Katie; Powell, Richard A; Walraven, Gijs

    2006-09-01

    Depression is the commonest mental illness in developing countries and impoverished women are most at risk. Formal mental health services in these situations are rare. Depression commonly co-presents with physical symptoms or else is unspectacular, so the condition often goes unrecognised. To strengthen the prevention and management of depression, information is required on easily recognisable correlates of depression. This study explored associations between depression and reproductive health conditions in rural African women of reproductive age. A community-based reproductive health survey among rural women aged 15-54 years in The Gambia, West Africa, included screening with a modified Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS), a reproductive health questionnaire and a gynaecological examination. Depression was then assessed clinically and data for 565 women were used to estimate the prevalence of depression and examine associations with reproductive health conditions and demographic factors. The weighted prevalence of depression was 10.3% (95% CI 8.3-12.7). Being depressed was most significantly associated with widowhood or divorce (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) 8.42, 2.77-25.57), infertility (3.69, 1.42-9.65) and severe menstrual pain (3.94, 1.52-10.27). There were significant differences between ethnic groups. Being in the postpartum period was not associated with an increased likelihood of depression. This study points to the importance of reproductive potential and reproductive health in maintaining women's mental well-being across different strata of a rural and resource-poor society. It could provide an initial focus for the management of women with depression as well as directing future research in reproductive health and psychiatry.

  2. Job strain — Attributable depression in a sample of working Australians: Assessing the contribution to health inequalities

    PubMed Central

    LaMontagne, Anthony D; Keegel, Tessa; Vallance, Deborah; Ostry, Aleck; Wolfe, Rory

    2008-01-01

    Background The broad aim of this study was to assess the contribution of job strain to mental health inequalities by (a) estimating the proportion of depression attributable to job strain (low control and high demand jobs), (b) assessing variation in attributable risk by occupational skill level, and (c) comparing numbers of job strain–attributable depression cases to numbers of compensated 'mental stress' claims. Methods Standard population attributable risk (PAR) methods were used to estimate the proportion of depression attributable to job strain. An adjusted Odds Ratio (OR) of 1.82 for job strain in relation to depression was obtained from a recently published meta-analysis and combined with exposure prevalence data from the Australian state of Victoria. Job strain exposure prevalence was determined from a 2003 population-based telephone survey of working Victorians (n = 1101, 66% response rate) using validated measures of job control (9 items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.80) and psychological demands (3 items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.66). Estimates of absolute numbers of prevalent cases of depression and successful stress-related workers' compensation claims were obtained from publicly available Australian government sources. Results Overall job strain-population attributable risk (PAR) for depression was 13.2% for males [95% CI 1.1, 28.1] and 17.2% [95% CI 1.5, 34.9] for females. There was a clear gradient of increasing PAR with decreasing occupational skill level. Estimation of job strain–attributable cases (21,437) versus "mental stress" compensation claims (696) suggest that claims statistics underestimate job strain–attributable depression by roughly 30-fold. Conclusion Job strain and associated depression risks represent a substantial, preventable, and inequitably distributed public health problem. The social patterning of job strain-attributable depression parallels the social patterning of mental illness, suggesting that job strain is an important

  3. Anxiety and depression following cumulative low-level exposure to organophosphate pesticides.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Virginia; Mackenzie Ross, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    Previous research suggests that individuals with a prior history of pesticide poisoning are at increased risk of psychiatric disorder (Freire and Koifman, 2013), but findings regarding the impact of cumulative low-level exposure are inconsistent. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether sheep farmers with a history of low-level exposure to organophosphate pesticides (1) report a higher level of psychological distress on subjective symptom questionnaires, compared to unexposed controls (2) also meet internationally agreed diagnostic criteria for a psychiatric disorder more often than unexposed controls. 127sheep farmers were evaluated and compared to 78 unexposed controls, matched in terms of gender, education, level of intelligence, working status and area of residence. Both self-report measures and structured clinical interviews were used to assess mental health. The exposed cohort reported significantly higher rates of anxiety and depression when self-report questionnaires were used to evaluate mood, even when stressful life events, demographic and physical health factors were taken into account. However, when diagnostic interviews were used to assess mood, this pattern only held true for anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Perinatal Obstetric Office Depression Screening and Treatment: Implementation in a Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Tracy; Avalos, Lyndsay A

    2016-05-01

    Perinatal depression affects between 12% and 20% of pregnant and postpartum women and is underdiagnosed. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended universal perinatal depression screening. We discuss challenges to instituting universal screening, describe the development and implementation between 2007 and 2014 of Kaiser Permanente Northern California's successful program, and highlight key measures of success. A quality improvement system approach with four steps guided development: 1) identify and use best practices, 2) identify champions and educate clinicians, 3) use data that drive performance, and 4) streamline office workflow. Clinical success was determined by at least 50% improvement in depression care metrics from diagnosis to 120 days afterward. Depression diagnoses, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores, medication dispensation, and treatment for all births in 2014 (N=37,660) were extracted from electronic health records. Ninety-six percent of pregnant and postpartum women were screened at least once. Fourteen percent screened positive for depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score of 10 or greater). Approximately 6% of pregnant and postpartum women had severe depression with a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 of 15 or greater and a depression diagnosis, and 80% of these women received treatment. Forty percent of women with a depression diagnosis demonstrated improved symptoms. Kaiser Permanente Northern California's universal perinatal depression screening program can serve as a model for the feasibility and clinical effectiveness of universal depression screening in obstetric care.

  5. Quantifying the importance of disease burden on perceived general health and depressive symptoms in patients within the Mayo Clinic Biobank.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Euijung; Takahashi, Paul Y; Olson, Janet E; Hathcock, Matthew A; Novotny, Paul J; Pathak, Jyotishman; Bielinski, Suzette J; Cerhan, James R; Sloan, Jeff A

    2015-07-03

    Deficits in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) may be associated with worse patient experiences, outcomes and even survival. While there exists evidence to identify risk factors associated with deficits in HRQOL among patients with individual medical conditions such as cancer, it is less well established in more general populations without attention to specific illnesses. This study used patients with a wide range of medical conditions to identify contributors with the greatest influence on HRQOL deficits. Self-perceived general health and depressive symptoms were assessed using data from 21,736 Mayo Clinic Biobank (MCB) participants. Each domain was dichotomized into categories related to poor health: deficit (poor/fair for general health and ≥3 for PHQ-2 depressive symptoms) or non-deficit. Logistic regression models were used to test the association of commonly collected demographic characteristics and disease burden with each HRQOL domain, adjusting for age and gender. Gradient boosting machine (GBM) models were applied to quantify the relative influence of contributors on each HRQOL domain. The prevalence of participants with a deficit was 9.5 % for perception of general health and 4.6 % for depressive symptoms. For both groups, disease burden had the strongest influence for deficit in HRQOL (63 % for general health and 42 % for depressive symptoms). For depressive symptoms, age was equally influential. The prevalence of a deficit in general health increased slightly with age for males, but remained stable across age for females. Deficit in depressive symptoms was inversely associated with age. For both HRQOL domains, risk of a deficit was associated with higher disease burden, lower levels of education, no alcohol consumption, smoking, and obesity. Subjects with deficits were less likely to report that they were currently working for pay than those without a deficit; this association was stronger among males than females. Comorbid health burden has the

  6. Late Life Recurrent Depression: Challenge to Mental Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.

    For the vast majority of persons of all ages who suffer from major depression, it is recurrent. A traditional wisdom has been that elderly persons respond more poorly to treatment for serious depression than younger persons. The psychiatric status of 127 elderly persons hospitalized for an episode of major depression was systematically assessed…

  7. Study of the Serum Copper Levels in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Styczeń, Krzysztof; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Siwek, Marcin; Dudek, Dominika; Reczyński, Witold; Misztak, Paulina; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Topór-Mądry, Roman; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Nowak, Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    Copper may be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Clinical data on this issue are very limited and not conclusive. The purpose of the study was to determine the copper concentration in the serum of patients with major depressive disorder and to discuss its potential clinical usefulness as a biomarker of the disease. A case-control clinical study included 69 patients with current depressive episode, 45 patients in remission and 50 healthy volunteers. Cu concentration was measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The mean serum copper level in depressed patients was slightly lower (by 11 %; not statistically significant) than in the control group. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in Cu(2+) concentration between depressive episode and remission, nor between remission and control group. In the remission group were observed significant correlations between copper levels and the average number of relapses over the past years or time of remission. There was no correlation between serum copper and severity of depression, as measured by HDRS and MADRS. The obtained results showed no significant differences between the copper concentration in the blood serum of patients (both with current depressive episode and in remission) and healthy volunteers, as well as the lack of correlations between the copper level in the active stage of the disease and clinical features of the population. Our study is the first conducted on such a large population of patients, so the results may be particularly important and reliable source of knowledge about the potential role of copper in depression.

  8. Lesbian, gay, & bisexual older adults: linking internal minority stressors, chronic health conditions, and depression

    PubMed Central

    Hoy-Ellis, Charles P.; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to: (1) test whether the minority stressors disclosure of sexual orientation; and (2) internalized heterosexism are predictive of chronic physical health conditions; and (3) depression; (4) to test direct and indirect relationships between these variables; and (5) whether chronic physical health conditions are further predictive of depression, net of disclosure of sexual orientation and internalized heterosexism. Methods Secondary analysis of national, community-based surveys of 2349 lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults aged 50 and older residing in the US utilizing structural equation modeling. Results Congruent with minority stress theory, disclosure of sexual orientation is indirectly associated with chronic physical health conditions and depression, mediated by internalized heterosexism with a suppressor effect. Internalized heterosexism is directly associated with chronic physical health conditions and depression, and further indirectly associated with depression mediated by chronic physical health conditions. Finally, chronic physical health conditions have an additional direct relationship with depression, net of other predictor variables. Conclusion Minority stressors and chronic physical health conditions independently and collectively predict depression, possibly a synergistic effect. Implications for depression among older sexual minority adults are discussed. PMID:27050776

  9. Different serum BDNF levels in depression: results from BDNF studies in FYR Macedonia and Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Ristevska-Dimitrovska, Gordana; Shishkov, Rinaldo; Gerazova, Vesna Pejoska; Vujovik, Viktorija; Stefanovski, Branislav; Novotni, Antoni; Marinov, Petar; Filov, Izabela

    2013-06-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in depressive disorder. Serum BDNF levels are lower in depressed patients and they increase after a long course of antidepressant treatment. Our study aims to test the effect of antidepressant treatment on serum BDNF levels in patients with a depressive episode, after they have achieved remission in two studies in Macedonia and Bulgaria. In the Macedonian study 23 patients were included (11 female, 12 male) diagnosed with a first depressive episode according to ICD-10, as well as 23 control subjects age- and sex-matched without a history of psychiatric disorder. In the Bulgarian study 10 female patients with depression and 10 control subjects were included. We have applied the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) to assess depression severity. Blood samples were collected before antidepressive treatment and after remission was achieved (decrease to 7 points or less on HDRS). In the Macedonian study, mean serum BDNF level at baseline was 13.15±6.75 ng/ml and the mean HDRS score was 28.52±4.02. Untreated depressed patients showed significantly lower serum BDNF levels compared to the control group (25.95±9.17 ng/ml). After remission was achieved, the mean serum BDNF level was 24.73±11.80 ng/ml whereas the mean HDRS score was 7.04±3.15. After 8 weeks of treatment there was no statistically significant difference in the serum BDNF levels between the two groups. In the Bulgarian study, baseline mean serum BDNF levels were 26.84±8.66 ng/ml, after 3 weeks treatment and remission was achieved mean serum BDNF levels were 30.33±9.25 ng/ml and in the control group mean serum BDNF levels were 25.04±2.88 ng/ml. Integrated results showed baseline mean serum BDNF levels of 17.30±9.66 ng/ml, after achieved remission 26.43±11.25 ng/ml and in the control group mean serum BDNF levels of 25.68±7.76 ng/ml. The Bulgarian results showed no statistical difference between the depressed

  10. The relationship between social support networks and depression in the 2007 National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being.

    PubMed

    Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Afzali, Mohammad H; Chapman, Cath; Sunderland, Matthew; Slade, Tim

    2017-09-09

    Social isolation and low levels of social support are associated with depression. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationship between depression and social connectivity factors (frequency of contact and quality of social connections) in the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-being. A national survey of 8841 participants aged 16-85 years was conducted. Logistic regression was used to investigate the relationship between social connectivity factors and 12-month prevalence of Major Depressive Disorder in the whole sample, as well as across three age groups: younger adults (16-34 years), middle-aged adults (35-54 years), and older adults (55+ years). Respondents indicated how often they were in contact with family members and friends (frequency of contact), and how many family and friends they could rely on and confide in (quality of support), and were assessed for Major Depressive Disorder using the World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostics Interview. Overall, higher social connection quality was more closely and consistently associated with lower odds of the past year depression, relative to frequency of social interaction. The exception to this was for the older group in which fewer than a single friendship interaction each month was associated with a two-fold increased likelihood of the past year depression (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.14-4.25). Friendship networks were important throughout life, although in middle adulthood, family support was also critically important-those who did not have any family support had more than a three-fold increased odds of the past year depression (OR 3.47, 95% CI 2.07-5.85). High-quality social connection with friends and family members is associated with reduced likelihood of the past year depression. Intervention studies that target the quality of social support for depression, particularly support from friends, are warranted.

  11. Perceptions, Uses of, and Interests in Complementary Health Care Approaches in Depressed Pregnant Women: The PAW Survey.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jennifer; Huberty, Jennifer L; Leiferman, Jenn A; McClain, Darya; Larkey, Linda K

    2017-01-01

    Depression affects up to 23% of pregnant women and is associated with adverse physical/mental health outcomes for both the mother and baby. Depressed pregnant women may be more likely to engage in unhealthy lifestyle behaviors that contribute to an increased risk for chronic disease. Little is known regarding depressed pregnant women's perceptions, uses of, and interests in complementary health approaches. Study participants (mean age 28.7 ± 6.8; n = 1032) included pregnant women ≥8 weeks gestation who responded to a survey assessing physical and mental health and wellness practices. Of those completing the survey, depressed pregnant women (n = 272) had significantly higher levels of anxiety (P < .001) and stress (P < .001) and had poorer sleep quality (P < .001), mindfulness (P < .001), and social support (P < .001) compared to nondepressed pregnant women (n = 760). A majority (84%) of depressed pregnant women would consider using a complementary health approach for weight and/or stress management during pregnancy, and more than 50% were interested in yoga.

  12. Existential Anxiety Among Adolescents Exposed to Disaster: Linkages Among Level of Exposure, PTSD, and Depression Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Weems, Carl F; Russell, Justin D; Neill, Erin L; Berman, Steven L; Scott, Brandon G

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to natural disasters can be highly traumatic and have a detrimental effect on youth mental health by threatening the satisfaction of basic human needs and goals. Recent research in adults suggests that exposure to disasters may exacerbate existential anxiety about the meaning of life. The current study expands this investigation to adolescents, who may be particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of disaster. Data came from 325 adolescents (mean age = 15.05 years, SD = 1.05) residing in the Greater New Orleans area who were exposed to Hurricanes Katrina and/or Gustav. Existential anxiety concerns were highly prevalent in the sample and were associated with elevated levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (R(2) = .09) and depression symptoms (R(2) = .13). Consistent with theoretical predictions, disaster exposure levels moderated the association between facets of existential anxiety and mental health symptoms. Findings highlight the salience of existential concerns in disaster exposed youth, and provide evidence that exposure to traumatic stress may strengthen their association with mental health problems. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  13. Associations between Vitamin D Levels and Depressive Symptoms in Healthy Young Adult Women

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, David C. R.; Zava, David T.; Piper, Walter T.; Saturn, Sarina R.; Frei, Balz; Gombart, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    There have been few studies of whether vitamin D insufficiency is linked with depression in healthy young women despite women’s high rates of both problems. Female undergraduates (n = 185) living in the Pacific Northwest during fall, winter, and spring academic terms completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale weekly for four weeks (W1–W5). We measured serum levels of vitamin D3 and C (ascorbate; as a control variable) in blood samples collected at W1 and W5. Vitamin D insufficiency (<30ng/mL) was common at W1 (42%) and W5 (46%), and rates of clinically significant depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 16) were 35–42% at W1–W5. Lower W1 vitamin D3 predicted clinically significant depressive symptoms across W1–W5 (β = −.20, p < .05), controlling for season, BMI, race/ethnicity, diet, exercise, and time outside. There was some evidence that lower levels of depressive symptoms in Fall participants (vs. Winter and Spring) were explained by their higher levels of vitamin D3. W1 depressive symptoms did not predict change in vitamin D3 levels from W1 to W5. Findings are consistent with a temporal association between low levels of vitamin D and clinically meaningful depressive symptoms. The preventive value of supplementation should be tested further. PMID:25791903

  14. Associations between vitamin D levels and depressive symptoms in healthy young adult women.

    PubMed

    Kerr, David C R; Zava, David T; Piper, Walter T; Saturn, Sarina R; Frei, Balz; Gombart, Adrian F

    2015-05-30

    There have been few studies of whether vitamin D insufficiency is linked with depression in healthy young women despite women׳s high rates of both problems. Female undergraduates (n=185) living in the Pacific Northwest during fall, winter, and spring academic terms completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale weekly for 4 weeks (W1-W5). We measured serum levels of vitamin D3 and C (ascorbate; as a control variable) in blood samples collected at W1 and W5. Vitamin D insufficiency (<30ng/mL) was common at W1 (42%) and W5 (46%), and rates of clinically significant depressive symptoms (CES-D≥16) were 34-42% at W1-W5. Lower W1 vitamin D3 predicted clinically significant depressive symptoms across W1-W5 (β=-0.20, p<0.05), controlling for season, BMI, race/ethnicity, diet, exercise, and time outside. There was some evidence that lower levels of depressive symptoms in Fall participants (vs. Winter and Spring) were explained by their higher levels of vitamin D3. W1 depressive symptoms did not predict change in vitamin D3 levels from W1 to W5. Findings are consistent with a temporal association between low levels of vitamin D and clinically meaningful depressive symptoms. The preventive value of supplementation should be tested further.

  15. Relationship of Somatic Symptoms With Depression Severity, Quality of Life, and Health Resources Utilization in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder Seeking Primary Health Care in Spain

    PubMed Central

    García-Campayo, Javier; Ayuso-Mateos, José Luis; Caballero, Luis; Romera, Irene; Aragonés, Enric; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Quail, Deborah; Gilaberte, Inmaculada

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the characteristics of somatic symptoms and depression severity, quality of life (QOL), and health resources utilization in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) in primary care setting. Method: This cross-sectional, nationwide epidemiologic study, carried out in 1150 primary care patients with DSM-IV–defined MDD, evaluated the characteristics of somatic symptoms by means of the Standardized Polyvalent Psychiatric Interview. Depression severity and QOL were evaluated by means of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the Physical and Mental Component Summaries of the Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short-Form Health Survey. Health resources utilization was measured in terms of doctor consultations and hospitalizations. The associations were assessed by means of adjusted analyses. The study was carried out from April 2004 to July 2004. Results: Disability associated with somatic symptoms and number of somatic symptoms were strongly associated with increased depression severity (2.45 and 0.29 increase in SDS score, respectively) and health resources utilization (odds ratios of 1.42 and 1.04, respectively). Associated disability, frequency, and persistence during leisure time of somatic symptoms were strongly associated with poorer QOL. In contrast, we found a weaker relationship between duration and intensity of somatic symptoms and depression severity, QOL, and health resources utilization. Conclusions: Of the studied somatic symptom characteristics, somatic symptom–associated disability and number of somatic symptoms are strongly associated with increased depression severity and health resources utilization, as well as with decreased QOL. Our results may help physicians identify relevant characteristics of somatic symptoms to more effectively diagnose and treat depression in primary care patients. PMID:19158973

  16. Inflammation, obesity and metabolic syndrome in depression: Analysis of the 2009–2010 National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES)

    PubMed Central

    Rethorst, Chad D.; Bernstein, Ira; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the rates of elevated inflammation, obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS) within a large cohort of individuals with depression and to examine the inter-relationships of inflammation and metabolic syndrome in depressed individuals. Method Analyses were conducted on study participants from the 2009–2010 National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) with Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 depression scores ≥ 10 to: 1) examine the relationship of inflammation (C-reactive protein; CRP) with demographic and clinical characteristics and 2) examine the prevalence of MetS criteria within CRP groups. Results 5579 participants provided PHQ-9 data; of those, 606 had PHQ-9 scores ≥ 10 and were included in further analysis. Of the 606 depressed participants, 585 participants had valid CRP data; 275 participants (47.01%) had CRP levels ≥ 3.0 mg/L, while 170 (29.06%) had CRP levels ≥ 5.0 mg/L. Elevated inflammation was significantly correlated with body weight, waist circumference, BMI, insulin, 2-hour glucose tolerance, and self-report general health (p’s < 0.05). 112 subjects (41.18%) met AHA/NHLBI criteria for metabolic syndrome (MetS). Those with elevated CRP were more likely to meet criteria for MetS (Odds Ratios of 2.81 for those with CRP levels ≥ 3.0 mg/L and 1.94 for those with CRP levels ≥ 5.0 mg/L). Conclusion Over 29% of depressed individuals have elevated levels of CRP and 41% met criteria for MetS. Individuals with elevated inflammation are more likely to be obese and meet criteria for MetS. These results highlight the significant inflammatory and metabolic burden of individuals with depression. PMID:25551239

  17. Leisure Time Physical Activity in Relation to Depressive Symptoms in the Black Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Lauren A.; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L.; Palmer, Julie R.; Rosenberg, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence suggests that physical activity might reduce the risk of depressive symptoms, but there are limited data on Black women. Purpose The objective was to evaluate the association between leisure time physical activity and depressive symptoms in U.S. Black women. Methods Participants included 35,224 women ages 21 to 69 from the Black Women’s Health Study, a follow-up study of African American women in which data are collected biennially by mail questionnaire. Women answered questions on past and current exercise levels at baseline (1995) and follow-up (1997). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to measure depressive symptoms in 1999. Women who reported a diagnosis of depression before 1999 were excluded. We used multivariate logistic regression models to compute odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for physical activity in relation to depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 16) with control for potential confounders. Results Adult vigorous physical activity was inversely associated with depressive symptoms. Women who reported vigorous exercise both in high school (≥ 5 hr per week) and adulthood (≥ 2 hr per week) had the lowest odds of depressive symptoms (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.71–0.82) relative to never active women; the OR was 0.90 for women who were active in high school but not adulthood (95% CI = 0.85–0.96) and 0.83 for women who were inactive in high school but became active in adulthood (95% CI = 0.77–0.91). Although walking for exercise was not associated with risk of depressive symptoms overall, there was evidence of a weak inverse relation among obese women (Body Mass Index ≥ 30). Conclusions Leisure time vigorous physical activity was associated with a reduced odds of depressive symptoms in U.S. Black women. PMID:16827631

  18. Coping, problem solving, depression, and health-related quality of life in patients receiving outpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Visser, Marieke M; Heijenbrok-Kal, Majanka H; Spijker, Adriaan Van't; Oostra, Kristine M; Busschbach, Jan J; Ribbers, Gerard M

    2015-08-01

    To investigate whether patients with high and low depression scores after stroke use different coping strategies and problem-solving skills and whether these variables are related to psychosocial health-related quality of life (HRQOL) independent of depression. Cross-sectional study. Two rehabilitation centers. Patients participating in outpatient stroke rehabilitation (N=166; mean age, 53.06±10.19y; 53% men; median time poststroke, 7.29mo). Not applicable. Coping strategy was measured using the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations; problem-solving skills were measured using the Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised: Short Form; depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; and HRQOL was measured using the five-level EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire and the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale. Independent samples t tests and multivariable regression analyses, adjusted for patient characteristics, were performed. Compared with patients with low depression scores, patients with high depression scores used less positive problem orientation (P=.002) and emotion-oriented coping (P<.001) and more negative problem orientation (P<.001) and avoidance style (P<.001). Depression score was related to all domains of both general HRQOL (visual analog scale: β=-.679; P<.001; utility: β=-.009; P<.001) and stroke-specific HRQOL (physical HRQOL: β=-.020; P=.001; psychosocial HRQOL: β=-.054, P<.001; total HRQOL: β=-.037; P<.001). Positive problem orientation was independently related to psychosocial HRQOL (β=.086; P=.018) and total HRQOL (β=.058; P=.031). Patients with high depression scores use different coping strategies and problem-solving skills than do patients with low depression scores. Independent of depression, positive problem-solving skills appear to be most significantly related to better HRQOL. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. New Perspectives in Mental Health: Addressing Cognitive Deficits in Remitted Depression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jason I; Hergert, Danielle C

    2017-02-08

    The purpose of this essay is to explore the long-term impact of depression on cognitive functioning and to discuss possible treatment strategies that mental health and psychiatric nurses may employ in practice or pursue in research to improve patient outcomes. As psychiatric and mental health nurses play a valuable role in promoting recovery from depression, addressing cognitive difficulties associated with depression may be an important area for nursing practice. This essay will first introduce the rationale for evaluating cognitive deficits in remitted depression in regards to the impact on quality of life (QOL). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. GABA+ levels in postmenopausal women with mild-to-moderate depression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhensong; Zhang, Aiying; Zhao, Bin; Gan, Jie; Wang, Guangbin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo; Gong, Tao; Liu, Wen; Edden, Richard A.E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: It is increasingly being recognized that alterations of the GABAergic system are implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. This study aimed to explore in vivo gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex (ACC/mPFC) and posterior-cingulate cortex (PCC) of postmenopausal women with depression using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Methods: Nineteen postmenopausal women with depression and thirteen healthy controls were enrolled in the study. All subjects underwent 1H-MRS of the ACC/mPFC and PCC using the “MEGA Point Resolved Spectroscopy Sequence” (MEGA-PRESS) technique. The severity of depression was assessed by 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD). Quantification of MRS data was performed using Gannet program. Differences of GABA+ levels from patients and controls were tested using one-way analysis of variance. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to evaluate the linear associations between GABA+ levels and HAMD scores, as well as estrogen levels. Results: Significantly lower GABA+ levels were detected in the ACC/mPFC of postmenopausal women with depression compared to healthy controls (P = 0.002). No significant correlations were found between 17-HAMD/14-HAMA and GABA+ levels, either in ACC/mPFC (P = 0.486; r = 0.170/P = 0.814; r = −0.058) or PCC (P = 0.887; r = 0.035/ P = 0.987; r = −0.004) in the patients; there is also no significant correlation between GABA+ levels and estrogen levels in patients group (ACC/mPFC: P = 0.629, r = −0.018; PCC: P = 0.861, r = 0.043). Conclusion: Significantly lower GABA+ levels were found in the ACC/mPFC of postmenopausal women with depression, suggesting that the dysfunction of the GABAergic system may also be involved in the pathogenesis of depression in postmenopausal women. PMID:27684829

  1. A model for community health service development in depressed rural areas in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To introduce a model of community health service organization (as implemented in urban areas) to less developed rural areas in China and evaluate the impact of this model on health care utilization. Methods The intervention involved developing leadership at county level, training rural health practitioners, providing clinical management guidelines and standards, encouraging clinic improvements and providing access to subsidies for public health work. We chose 7 townships and 49 administrative villages in Chongyi County as the intervention sites; 3 townships and 9 administrative villages in Luxi County as the comparison sites. Officers from county health bureaus and postgraduates from School of Public Health, Nanchang University visited each township hospital and village clinic in field together and made observations and interviewed clinic staff. Results There was little change in health facilities or workforce in the two areas. However, there was an increase in the use of public health services at township and village level in the intervention sites in Chongyi. In these, the proportion of clinics which had developed a child health (under the age of 3) management system, maternal postpartum visit and chronic disease management increased from 53%, 51% and 47% to 78%, 73%, and 71% respectively. There was no significant change in the comparison sites. Conclusions The trial demonstrated that it was feasible to implement a model of community health service delivery that was adapted to depressed rural areas because it required little organizational change, additional funding or personnel. The model had a positive impact on the provision of public health programs, a finding which has implications for efforts to improve access to primary health care in rural China. PMID:23244489

  2. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and depression in Korean women: results from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Eun; Lee, Jung Eun

    2011-12-30

    Depression is the fourth leading factor of disease burden for the global female population, but while increasing evidence has supported a contributing role of depression in cardiovascular disease, little is known about this association within the female population of Korea. We examined the association in a study of 5658 Korean women who participated in the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 279 cases of depression were included. Cardiovascular disease risk factors were associated with higher odds of depression: ORs (95% CIs) were 3.99 (2.25-7.05) for current smokers with <5 pack-years vs. never-smokers, 1.97 (1.18-3.30) for ≥28 vs. <20kg/m(2) of body mass index, 1.42 (1.03-1.95) for 100-125 vs. <100mg/dL of fasting serum glucose levels, and 2.10 (1.46-3.03) for a history of hyperlipidemia. Women with a history of two or three comorbid disorders (diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease) had a 1.63-fold higher OR for depression than women without any of these diseases. Korean women with depression had a greater prevalence of major risk factors for cardiovascular disease than women without depression.

  3. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem levels in obese children: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Topçu, Seda; Orhon, Filiz Şimşek; Tayfun, Meltem; Uçaktürk, Seyit Ahmet; Demirel, Fatma

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a global health problem affecting all age groups. Childhood obesity, which may cause chronic diseases including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and cancer, etc., deserves more attention. However, few studies highlight the association between childhood obesity and psychological diseases. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the psychological condition in obese children. One hundred and sixty-seven obese (body mass index (BMI) >95th percentile) and 200 normal weight children (BMI between 5th and 85th percentile) aged 9-16 years were enrolled into this case-control study. In order to assess the self-concept, anxiety and depression levels: the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale (PHCSCS), state and trait anxiety inventory for children (STAI-C) and the children depression inventory (CDI) were administered both obese and control groups. There were significant differences among obese and control groups in terms of the total score of PHCSCS [55 (22-69) versus 65 (57-74)], STAI-C [37 (20-55) versus 28 (20-42)], and CDI [12 (4-39)] versus [8 (3-19)]; respectively (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001). We also found statistically significant differences among groups in all of the subscales parameters of PHCSCS (p<0.001). Our results indicate that obese children may experience psychiatric disorders more than normal-weight peers.

  4. Effect of BMI on quality of life and depression levels after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Sierżantowicz, Regina; Lewko, Jolanta; Hady, Hady Razak; Kirpsza, Bożena; Trochimowicz, Lech; Dadan, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Studies conducted in Poland have found that 1% (~300,000) of Polish adults are obese. The degree of weight loss and reduction of discomfort associated with severe obesity are used to evaluate bariatric surgery outcomes. From the patient's point of view, QoL and mental health are the most important determinants of successful surgery, which is why interest in QoL assessment has increased. To assess the effect of BMI on quality of life and depression levels depending on the type of bariatric surgery. The group included 57 women and 43 men aged 20-60 years (mean age 40 years) with BMI from 36 to 40 (31%) and > 40 (69%). Twelve patients (12%) underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric binding (LAGB), 58 (58%) sleeve gastrectomy, and 30 (30%) Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB). The Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS) was used to assess QoL. The severity of mood disorders was assessed using the Self-Rating Scale of Depression and Anxiety. Six months or 1 year after bariatric surgery, the number of patients with BMI > 40 had decreased from 69 to 14%. We found that the time since bariatric surgery contributed to a significant (p < 0.01) difference in BAROS outcomes. In the long-term perspective, we observed better quality of life. MA-QoL II is a useful tool in assessing bariatric surgery, including quality of life. Long-term monitoring will be essential in determining psychological changes and the degree of weight loss.

  5. Primary Care-Mental Health Integration in the VA Health System: Associations Between Provider Staffing and Quality of Depression Care.

    PubMed

    Levine, Debra S; McCarthy, John F; Cornwell, Brittany; Brockmann, Laurie; Pfeiffer, Paul N

    2017-05-01

    The study examined whether staffing of Primary Care-Mental Health Integration (PCMHI) services in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health system is related to quality of depression care. Site surveys and administrative data from 349 VA facilities for fiscal year 2013 were used to calculate PCMHI staffing (full-time equivalents) per 10,000 primary care patients and discipline-specific staffing proportions for PCMHI psychologists, social workers, nurses, and psychiatric medication prescribers. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted at the facility level and assessed associations between PCMHI staffing ratios and the following indicators of depression treatment in the three months following a new episode of depression: any antidepressant receipt, adequacy of antidepressant receipt, any psychotherapy receipt, and psychotherapy engagement (three or more visits). Higher facility PCMHI staffing ratios were associated with a greater percentage of patients who received any psychotherapy treatment (B=1.16, p<.01) and who engaged in psychotherapy (B=.39, p<.01). When analyses controlled for total PCMHI staffing, the proportion of social workers as part of PCMHI was positively correlated with the percentage of patients with adequate antidepressant treatment continuation (B=3.16, p=.03). The proportion of nurses in PCMHI was negatively associated with the percentage of patients with engagement in psychotherapy (B=-2.83, p=.02). PCMHI programs with greater overall staffing ratios demonstrated better performance on indicators of psychotherapy for depression but not on indicators of antidepressant treatment. Further investigation is needed to determine whether differences in discipline-specific staffing play a causal role in driving associated differences in receipt of treatment.

  6. Decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the remitted state of unipolar depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hasselbalch, B J; Knorr, U; Bennike, B; Hasselbalch, S G; Søndergaard, M H Greisen; Vedel Kessing, L

    2012-09-01

    Decreased levels of peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been associated with depression. It is uncertain whether abnormally low levels of BDNF in blood are present beyond the depressive state and whether levels of BDNF are associated with the course of clinical illness. Whole-blood BDNF levels were measured in blood samples from patients with unipolar disorder in a sustained state of clinical remission and in a healthy control group. Participants were recruited via Danish registers, a method that benefits from the opportunity to obtain well-matched community-based samples as well as providing a high diagnostic validity of the patient sample. A total of 85 patients and 50 controls were included in the study. In multiple linear regression analyses, including the covariates age, gender, 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores, body-mass index, education, smoking and physical exercise, patients with unipolar depressive disorder had decreased levels of BDNF compared to healthy control individuals [B = -7.4, 95% CI (-11.2, -3.7), = 0.21 P < 0.001]. No association between course of clinical illness and BDNF levels was present. Whole-blood BDNF levels seem to be decreased in patients remitted from unipolar depressive disorder, suggesting that neurotrophic changes may exist beyond the depressive state. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Relationship between depressive symptoms and perceived individual level occupational stress among Japanese schoolteachers

    PubMed Central

    NAKADA, Akihiro; IWASAKI, Shinichi; KANCHIKA, Masaru; NAKAO, Takehisa; DEGUCHI, Yasuhiko; KONISHI, Akihito; ISHIMOTO, Hideyuki; INOUE, Koki

    2016-01-01

    Japanese teachers are mentally and physically burdened with various work stressors. This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and perceived individual level occupational stress including role problems among Japanese schoolteachers. This study included 1,006 teachers working in public schools in a Japanese city. The Japanese version of Zung’s Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) was used to evaluate depressive symptoms, and the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire was used to evaluate occupational stress and three measures of social support. Subjects with SDS scores of more than 50 were categorized into the “depressive group.” We examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and perceived individual level occupational stress using multiple logistic regression analyses. A total of 202 (20.1%) teachers belonged to the depressive group. We found that high role ambiguity, high role conflict, high quantitative workload, and low social support from family or friends were significantly related to depressive symptoms. To moderate role ambiguity and role conflict experienced by teachers, it is necessary to clarify the priority order of teachers’ work. Furthermore, it is necessary to reduce workload by focusing on the content of teachers’ work and the setting of education itself. Focusing on these elements will reduce teachers’ depressive symptoms. PMID:27021060

  8. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Anxiety, and Depression Levels in Fibromyalgia and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    BAYRAM, Korhan; EROL, Almıla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The close relationship between chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and childhood traumatic experiences is well known. The aim of this study is to investigate childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression levels in patients with fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, which are diseases that cause chronic pain. Method A total of 30 patients with fibromyalgia, 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 30 healthy controls, matched with patients with respect to gender, age, and education, were included in the study (90 participants in total). All participants were given a form for sociodemographic characteristics, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD). Patients were also asked to complete a numeric pain scale (NPS). Results Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Patients with fibromyalgia reported significantly higher scores for HAD anxiety than both healthy controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis reported significantly higher scores for CTQ emotional abuse and HAD depression compared with healthy controls. Pain scores of patients with fibromyalgia were higher than in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Participants who had scores over the threshold on HAD anxiety and depression had significantly higher scores on CTQ sexual abuse. Conclusion Both patients with fibromyalgia and patients with rheumatoid arthritis have high levels of childhood traumatic experiences and depression. Patients with pain-related disorders should be examined for childhood traumatic experiences, anxiety, and depression for better treatment outcomes.

  9. Relationship between depressive symptoms and perceived individual level occupational stress among Japanese schoolteachers.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Akihiro; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Kanchika, Masaru; Nakao, Takehisa; Deguchi, Yasuhiko; Konishi, Akihito; Ishimoto, Hideyuki; Inoue, Koki

    2016-10-08

    Japanese teachers are mentally and physically burdened with various work stressors. This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and perceived individual level occupational stress including role problems among Japanese schoolteachers. This study included 1,006 teachers working in public schools in a Japanese city. The Japanese version of Zung's Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) was used to evaluate depressive symptoms, and the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire was used to evaluate occupational stress and three measures of social support. Subjects with SDS scores of more than 50 were categorized into the "depressive group." We examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and perceived individual level occupational stress using multiple logistic regression analyses. A total of 202 (20.1%) teachers belonged to the depressive group. We found that high role ambiguity, high role conflict, high quantitative workload, and low social support from family or friends were significantly related to depressive symptoms. To moderate role ambiguity and role conflict experienced by teachers, it is necessary to clarify the priority order of teachers' work. Furthermore, it is necessary to reduce workload by focusing on the content of teachers' work and the setting of education itself. Focusing on these elements will reduce teachers' depressive symptoms.

  10. Depression and Barriers to Mental Health Care in Older Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Mark I.; Bruce, Martha L.; Roth, Andrew J.; Breitbart, William; Nelson, Christian J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on depression in cancer patients with a particular focus on depression assessment and barriers to mental health treatment in older cancer patients. Design We conducted a review of the literature on depression and barriers to mental health treatment in older cancer patients. Results Depression is prevalent in cancer patients. However, little is known about prevalence rates of depression in older adults with cancer, assessing depression in older cancer patients and barriers that impede proper mental health treatment in this sample. Conclusion Improved diagnostic clarity and a better understanding of barriers to mental health treatment can help clarify and facilitate mental health referrals and ultimately improve access to care among older cancer patients in need. Continuing to consider the complexities associated with diagnosing depression in older cancer patients is necessary. Further work may be needed to develop new diagnostic measures for such detection, determine the prevalence of depression among older cancer and ways in which to overcome barriers to mental health care. PMID:21157847

  11. Mental health in senior housing: racial/ethnic patterns and correlates of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Robison, Julie; Schensul, Jean J; Coman, Emil; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Radda, Kim E; Gaztambide, Sonia; Disch, William B

    2009-09-01

    Mental health problems are associated with disability, overuse of medical care, higher rates of mortality and suicide as well as personal suffering for older adults. Residents of urban, low-income senior housing may face increased risk of a variety of mental health problems, including depression. This study identified the prevalence of multiple mental health problems in older residents of low-income senior housing and explored correlates of major depressive disorder for the two largest ethnic groups: black and Latino. In-person diagnostic interviews identified rates of mental illness in a sample of 635 residents of 13 low-income senior housing buildings in a medium-sized northeastern city. Applying George's Social Antecedent Model of Depression, logistic regression analyses identified shared and unique correlates of depression for Latino and black participants. This population had high rates of major depressive disorder (26%), generalized anxiety disorder (12%) and other mental health problems that varied significantly by ethnic and racial group. Separate multivariate models for Latino and black people showed that younger age, more chronic conditions and social distress were related to major depressive disorder for both ethnic groups. Perceived environmental stress, shorter tenure in the building, poorer perceived health, higher life stress and fewer leisure activities were associated with depression for Latinos only. Mental health screening and treatment services are needed in senior housing to address these high rates of mental illness. Unique constellations of correlates of depression for different ethnic groups underscore a need for culturally competent approaches to identification and treatment.

  12. The relationship between depression level and smoking motives in college smokers.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Christine; McVay, Megan M; Copeland, Amy L; Carrigan, Maureen H

    2012-03-01

    While the link between cigarette smoking and depression symptomatology has been well established, more research is needed to determine how smoking motives are related to depression levels in smokers. Specifically, smoking motives related to the friendship-like attachment to smoking (i.e., affiliative attachment) may play an important role in individuals reporting depressive symptomatology. The present study examined the relationship between three smoking motives and depression levels in a sample of 79 mildly nicotine-dependent, college student cigarette smokers. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted with depression as the dependent variable and gender and cigarettes per day as the independent variables (Step 1), positive and negative reinforcement motives (Step 2), and affiliative attachment motives (Step 3). Results of regression analyses indicated that affiliative attachment motives explained significant variance in participant depression level above and beyond that explained by positive and negative reinforcement motives. These findings suggest that smokers with elevated depression should be assessed for social functioning and affiliative attachment smoking motives, and future research should be conducted to determine if individuals with high levels of affiliative attachment may benefit from smoking cessation treatment programs with an enhanced social support component.

  13. [Postnatal depression in Colombian women: secondary analysis of the 2010 Colombian Demographic and Health Survey].

    PubMed

    Rincón-Pabón, David; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2014-01-01

    Examining the prevalence of self-reported postpartum depression (PD) in a representative sample of Colombian women. A secondary analysis was made of the Colombian Demographic and Health Survey 2010; the survey included 53 521 women aged 13 to 49 years-old. A clinical diagnosis of depression by self-report, during the first six months’ postpartum as a perinatal complication, was defined as the dependent variable by interview. Logistic regression was used, taking into account the multistage study design and adjusting for potential confounders. The results were presented as adjusted odds ratios (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI). Overall PD prevalence was 12.9 %, being higher in urban areas (15.1 %) than in rural areas (6.8 %) and in women aged 20-34 years-old (13.4 %). The Amazonas and Guainía departments had lower PD prevalence (3.1 % and 3.5 % respectively), while the city of Bogotá and the Quindío department had higher prevalence (18.1 % and 22.1 % PD, respectively). After adjustment, women aged 20 to 34 years-old (OR=1.15: 1.03 to 1.28 95 % CI), primigravidae (OR=1.42: 1.28-1.57 95 % CI), residing in urban areas (OR=2.43: 2.06 to 2.87 95 % CI) and having had university level education (OR=2.22: 1.98 to 2.48 95 % CI) were associated with PD. A high prevalence of postpartum depression was found in the study population. Socio-demographic and geographic factors contributed towards depression according to self-report. More research is needed to enable early identification of and intervention in women suffering from depression.

  14. EFFECT OF PERCEIVED SOCIAL SUPPORT ON THE LEVELS OF ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION OF HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lilympaki, Ioanna; Makri, Andriana; Vlantousi, Kyriaki; Koutelekos, Ioannis; Babatsikou, Fotoula; Polikandrioti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: of this study was to explore the effect of social support on the levels of anxiety and depression of hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: 258 patients undergoing hemodialysis were enrolled. A questionnaire developed for the purpose of the study was used to collect data through the interview process. Apart from socio-demographic, clinical and other characteristics, the questionnaire also included the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) to assess social support from significant others, family and friends, and the questionnaire Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADs) to assess the levels of anxiety and depression of patients. Results: 53,9% of the participants were male while 34,1% of the participants were >70 years old. 32,9% and 30,2% of the participants felt high levels of anxiety and depression, respectively. Analysis of data showed a statistically significant association between anxiety/depression and social support from significant others, family and friends (p=<0,001 for all associations). In particular, patients with high levels of anxiety and depression felt less support from their significant others, family and friends. The multinomial logistic regression, showed a statistically significant effect of social support from friends in anxiety levels (p=0,004). An one point increase of the support from friends seems to reduce by 57% the probability of having high levels of anxiety. In addition, statistically significant effect of social support from significant others, family and friends was observed on the levels of depression (p=<0,001, p=0,001 & p=0,003, respectively). Specifically, an one point increase of the support from significant others, family and friends it was found to reduce by 77%, 71% and 56% respectively the probability of experiencing high levels of depression. Conclusions: Phyco-social evaluation is essential when providing holistic care to hemodialysis patients. PMID:27999485

  15. Annual direct health care expenditures and employee absenteeism costs in high-risk, low-income mothers with major depression.

    PubMed

    Ammerman, Robert T; Chen, Jie; Mallow, Peter J; Rizzo, John A; Folger, Alonzo T; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2016-01-15

    To determine the health care and labor productivity costs associated with major depressive disorder in high-risk, low-income mothers. This study was conducted using the 1996-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). The MEPS is a nationally-representative database that includes information on health care utilization and expenditures for the civilian, non-institutionalized population in the United States. High-risk mothers were between the ages of 18-35 years, and either unmarried, receiving Medicaid, or with incomes less than 300% of the Federal Poverty Level. Mothers were categorized as being depressed if they had an ICD-9 diagnosis code of 296 or 311 (N=2310) or not depressed (N=18,221). Insurer expenditures, out-of-pocket (OOP) expenses, and lost wage earnings were calculated. After controlling for comorbidities, demographics, region, and year, high-risk depressed mothers were more likely to incur insurer (0.84 vs. 0.79) and OOP expenses (0.84 vs. 0.81) and to have higher insurer ($4448 vs. $3072) and OOP expenses ($794 vs. $523). Depression significantly increased the likelihood of missing work days (OR=1.40; p<0.01). Depression increased overall direct health care expenditures by $1.89 billion (range=$1.28-$2.60 billion) and indirect costs by $523 million annually, with a range of $353-$719 million. In this high-risk population, the direct and indirect aggregate costs of depression-related to health care expenditures and lost work productivity were substantial. These findings establish a quantifiable cost for policy makers and highlight the need to target this population for prevention and treatment efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hair cortisol levels, psychological stress and psychopathological symptoms as predictors of postpartum depression.

    PubMed

    Caparros-Gonzalez, Rafael A; Romero-Gonzalez, Borja; Strivens-Vilchez, Helen; Gonzalez-Perez, Raquel; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Peralta-Ramirez, Maria Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum depression affects a huge number of women and has detrimental consequences. Knowing the factors associated with postpartum depression during pregnancy can help its prevention. Although there is evidence surrounding behavioral or psychological predictors of postpartum depression, there is a lack of evidence of biological forecasters. The aim of this study was to analyze the sociodemographic, obstetric, and psychological variables along with hair cortisol levels during the first, second, and third trimesters of pregnancy that could predict postpartum depression symptoms. A sample of 44 pregnant women was assessed during 3 trimesters of pregnancy and the postpartum period using psychological questionnaires and hair cortisol levels. Participants were divided into 2 groups: a group with postpartum depression symptoms and a group with no postpartum depression symptoms. Results showed significant positive differences between groups in the first trimester regarding the Somatization subscale of the SCL-90-R (p < .05). In the second trimester, significant differences were found in the Somatization, Depression, Anxiety, and GSI subscales (p < .05). In the third trimester significant differences between both groups were found regarding pregnancy-specific stress. We found significant positive differences between groups regarding hair cortisol levels in the first and the third trimester. Hair cortisol levels could predict 21.7% of the variance of postpartum depression symptoms. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that psychopathological symptoms, pregnancy-specific stress, and hair cortisol levels can predict postpartum depression symptoms at different time-points during pregnancy. These findings can be applied in future studies and improve maternal care in clinical settings.

  17. Hair cortisol levels, psychological stress and psychopathological symptoms as predictors of postpartum depression

    PubMed Central

    Caparros-Gonzalez, Rafael A.; Strivens-Vilchez, Helen; Gonzalez-Perez, Raquel; Martinez-Augustin, Olga; Peralta-Ramirez, Maria Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum depression affects a huge number of women and has detrimental consequences. Knowing the factors associated with postpartum depression during pregnancy can help its prevention. Although there is evidence surrounding behavioral or psychological predictors of postpartum depression, there is a lack of evidence of biological forecasters. The aim of this study was to analyze the sociodemographic, obstetric, and psychological variables along with hair cortisol levels during the first, second, and third trimesters of pregnancy that could predict postpartum depression symptoms. A sample of 44 pregnant women was assessed during 3 trimesters of pregnancy and the postpartum period using psychological questionnaires and hair cortisol levels. Participants were divided into 2 groups: a group with postpartum depression symptoms and a group with no postpartum depression symptoms. Results showed significant positive differences between groups in the first trimester regarding the Somatization subscale of the SCL-90-R (p < .05). In the second trimester, significant differences were found in the Somatization, Depression, Anxiety, and GSI subscales (p < .05). In the third trimester significant differences between both groups were found regarding pregnancy-specific stress. We found significant positive differences between groups regarding hair cortisol levels in the first and the third trimester. Hair cortisol levels could predict 21.7% of the variance of postpartum depression symptoms. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that psychopathological symptoms, pregnancy-specific stress, and hair cortisol levels can predict postpartum depression symptoms at different time-points during pregnancy. These findings can be applied in future studies and improve maternal care in clinical settings. PMID:28846691

  18. The natural course of elevated levels of depressive symptoms in patients with vascular disease over eight years of follow-up. The SMART-Medea study.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, Minke; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Grool, Anne M; Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Jan Biessels, Geert; Geerlings, Mirjam I

    2016-09-15

    Patients with cardiovascular disease have an increased risk for depression, and depression predicts poor prognosis in these patients, but the long-term course of depression is not known. We studied the natural course of elevated levels of depressive symptoms in patients with cardiovascular disease over eight years follow-up. Within the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease - Memory, depression and aging (SMART-Medea) study, depressive symptoms were assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) in 690 patients (62±10 years) at baseline and bi-annually during 8 years follow-up. Natural course was described for symptom severity and course type (never, single episode, intermittent, and chronic) based on the cut-off point of ≥6 on the PHQ-9. Using multinomial regression analysis (reference: never depressed) we estimated age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios (OR) for the associations of demographic factors and vascular disease categories with course type. Of the 690 patients, 60% was never depressed, 10% had a single episode, 19% had an intermittent and 11% a chronic course of depression. Increased risk for chronic course was observed for women (OR=3.42; 95% CI=1.98-5.90), those with younger age (OR=3.20; 95% CI=1.73-5.94), and for patients with cerebrovascular disease when compared to patients with coronary artery disease (OR=2.50; 95% CI=1.31-4.78). No information was available on clinical diagnosed major depressive disorder and/or clinical events during follow-up. In patients with cardiovascular disease, an intermittent or chronic course of elevated levels of depressive symptoms is very common. Patients with cardiovascular disease may require more careful clinical monitoring and management of depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strock, Margaret

    Approximately ten percent of the population suffers from a depressive illness each year. Although the economic cost is high, the cost in human suffering is immeasurable. To help educate the population about this disorder, this paper presents a definition of depression and its common manifestations. The symptoms that people often experience are…

  20. Experimental evidence that high levels of inbreeding depress sperm competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Zajitschek, S R K; Lindholm, A K; Evans, J P; Brooks, R C

    2009-06-01

    The effects of inbreeding on sperm quantity and quality are among the most dramatic examples of inbreeding depression. The extent to which inbreeding depression results in decreased fertilization success of a male's sperm, however, remains largely unknown. This task is made more difficult by the fact that other factors, such as cryptic female choice, male sperm allocation and mating order, can also drive patterns of paternity. Here, we use artificial insemination to eliminate these extraneous sources of variation and to measure the effects of inbreeding on the competitiveness of a male's sperm. We simultaneously inseminated female guppies (Poecilia reticulata) with equal amounts of sperm from an outbred (f = 0) male and either a highly (f = 0.59) or a moderately inbred (f = 0.25) male. Highly inbred males sired significantly fewer offspring than outbred males, but share of paternity did not differ between moderately inbred and outbred males. These findings therefore confirm that severe inbreeding can impair the competitiveness of sperm, but suggest that in the focal population inbreeding at order of a brother-sister mating does not reduce a male's sperm competitiveness.

  1. Association between vitamin b12 levels and melancholic depressive symptoms: a Finnish population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An association between vitamin B12 levels and depressive symptoms (DS) has been reported in several epidemiological studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate vitamin B12 levels in population-based samples with melancholic or non-melancholic DS as the relationship between vitamin B12 levels and different subtypes of DS has not been evaluated in previous studies. Methods Subjects without previously known type 2 diabetes, aged 45–74 years were randomly selected from the National Population Register as a part of the Finnish diabetes prevention programme (FIN-D2D). The study population (N = 2806, participation rate 62%) consisted of 1328 men and 1478 women. The health examinations were carried out between October and December 2007 according to the WHO MONICA protocol. The assessment of DS was based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, cut-off ≥10 points). A DSM-IV- criteria based summary score of melancholic items in the BDI was used in dividing the participants with DS (N = 429) into melancholic (N = 138) and non-melancholic DS (N = 291) subgroups. In the statistical analysis we used chi-squared test, t-test, permutation test, analysis of covariance, multivariate logistic regression analysis and multinomial regression model. Results The mean vitamin B12 level was 331±176 pmol/L in those without DS while the subjects with non-melancholic DS had a mean vitamin B12 level of 324 ± 135 pmol/L, and those with melancholic DS had the lowest mean vitamin B12 level of 292±112 pmol/L (p < 0.001 after adjusted for age, sex, use of antidepressive medication and chronic diseases sum index). The adjusted difference of vitamin B12 levels between the non-melancholic and the melancholic group was 33 pmol/L (95%CI 8 to 57, p = 0.008). Melancholic DS and vitamin B12 levels showed an independent linearly inverse association. The relative risk ratio (RRR) for melancholic DS was 2.75 (95%CI 1.66 to 4.56) in the lowest vitamin B12 level

  2. Comorbid depression is associated with increased health care use and expenditures in individuals with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Egede, Leonard E; Zheng, Deyi; Simpson, Kit

    2002-03-01

    This study ascertained the odds of diagnosed depression in individuals with diabetes and the relation between depression and health care use and expenditures. First, we compared data from 825 adults with diabetes with that from 20,688 adults without diabetes using the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). Second, in patients with diabetes, we compared depressed and nondepressed individuals to identify differences in health care use and expenditures. Third, we adjusted use and expenditure estimates for differences in age, sex, race/ethnicity, health insurance, and comorbidity with analysis of covariance. Finally, we used the Consumer Price Index to adjust expenditures for inflation and used SAS and SUDAAN software for statistical analyses. Individuals with diabetes were twice as likely as a comparable sample from the general U.S. population to have diagnosed depression (odds ratio 1.9, 95% CI 1.5-2.5). Younger adults (<65 years), women, and unmarried individuals with diabetes were more likely to have depression. Patients with diabetes and depression had higher ambulatory care use (12 vs. 7, P < 0.0001) and filled more prescriptions (43 vs. 21, P < 0.0001) than their counterparts without depression. Finally, among individuals with diabetes, total health care expenditures for individuals with depression was 4.5 times higher than that for individuals without depression ($247,000,000 vs. $55,000,000, P < 0.0001). The odds of depression are higher in individuals with diabetes than in those without diabetes. Depression in individuals with diabetes is associated with increased health care use and expenditures, even after adjusting for differences in age, sex, race/ethnicity, health insurance, and comorbidity.

  3. Associations among Depression, Perceived Self-Efficacy and Immune Function and Health in Preadolescent Children

    PubMed Central

    Caserta, Mary T.; Wyman, Peter A.; Wang, Hongyue; Moynihan, Jan; O’Connor, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental animal studies and adult research consistently show that stress exposure and/or psychological symptoms are associated with poorer health and immune function. The application to children is not yet clear, however, and we lack developmental models for studies in this area. The objective of this paper was to test the hypothesis that self-reported self-efficacy and depression, two markers of psychological well-being in children, would predict immunity and rate of illnesses. The data are based on a prospective study of 141 healthy, normally developing children aged 7 – 13 years who were recruited from an ambulatory pediatric setting. Children completed self-efficacy and depression measures and had blood obtained for IL-6 plasma levels and natural killer (NK) cell functional assays on three occasions, six months apart. Parents maintained weekly child illness diaries over one year, using a thermometer to record fever. Parent psychiatric symptoms and income were used as covariates. Results indicated that, across the three occasions of measurement collected over the one-year period, higher perceived self-efficacy was significantly associated with lower plasma IL-6 concentrations. There was no overall main effect of depressive symptoms on immune measures; however, for older girls, higher depression was associated with elevated NK cell cytotoxicity and an increased rate of total illnesses and febrile illnesses. The findings provide some of the first evidence that psychological processes are associated with immunity and health in a normally developing sample of pre-adolescents. Furthermore, the pattern of results suggests a modified model of a link between psychological well-being and immunological processes in children. These results build on and expand research on the notion of allostatic load, and develop a groundwork for developmental studies in this area. PMID:22018086

  4. Associations among depression, perceived self-efficacy, and immune function and health in preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Mary T; Wyman, Peter A; Wang, Hongyue; Moynihan, Jan; O'Connor, Thomas G

    2011-11-01

    Experimental animal studies and adult research consistently show that stress exposure and/or psychological symptoms are associated with poorer health and immune functioning. The application to children is not yet clear, however, and we lack developmental models for studies in this area. The objective of this paper was to test the hypothesis that self-reported self-efficacy and depression, two markers of psychological well-being in children, would predict immunity and rate of illnesses. The data are based on a prospective study of 141 healthy, normally developing children aged 7-13 years who were recruited from an ambulatory pediatric setting. Children completed self-efficacy and depression measures and had blood obtained for IL-6 plasma levels and natural killer cell functional assays on three occasions, 6 months apart. Parents maintained weekly child illness diaries over 1 year using a thermometer to record fever. Parent psychiatric symptoms and income were used as covariates. Results indicated that, across the three occasions of measurement collected over the 1-year period, higher perceived self-efficacy was significantly associated with lower plasma interleukin 6 concentrations. There was no overall main effect of depressive symptoms on immune measures; however, for older girls, higher depression was associated with elevated natural killer cell cytotoxicity and an increased rate of total illnesses and febrile illnesses. The findings provide some of the first evidence that psychological processes are associated with immunity and health in a normally developing sample of preadolescents. Furthermore, the pattern of results suggests a modified model of a link between psychological well-being and immunological processes in children. These results build on and expand research on the notion of allostatic load and develop a groundwork for developmental studies in this area.

  5. The Effect of Group Logotherapy on Meaning in Life and Depression Levels of Iranian Students.

    PubMed

    Robatmili, Somaye; Sohrabi, Faramarz; Shahrak, Mohammad Ali; Talepasand, Siavash; Nokani, Mostafa; Hasani, Mohaddese

    This paper identifies the effectiveness of group logotherapy in reducing depression and increasing meaning in life levels of university students in Iran. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a pre- post- and follow-up test design. The instruments used were the Purpose in Life (PIL) test and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Data were collected from 10 subjects in an experimental group and 10 in a control group. The experimental group participated in 10 sessions of group logotherapy, whilst the control group received no intervention. The mean scores for depression levels was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group and significantly higher in regard to meaning in life. Results suggest that group logotherapy has the potential to reduce depression levels and improve the meaning in life of university students.

  6. Prenatal and Postpartum Evening Salivary Cortisol Levels in Association with Peripartum Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Iliadis, Stavros I.; Comasco, Erika; Sylvén, Sara; Hellgren, Charlotte; Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Skalkidou, Alkistis

    2015-01-01

    Background The biology of peripartum depression remains unclear, with altered stress and the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal axis response having been implicated in its pathophysiology. Methods The current study was undertaken as a part of the BASIC project (Biology, Affect, Stress, Imaging, Cognition), a population-based longitudinal study of psychological wellbeing during pregnancy and the postpartum period in Uppsala County, Sweden, in order to assess the association between evening salivary cortisol levels and depressive symptoms in the peripartum period. Three hundred and sixty-five pregnant women from the BASIC cohort were recruited at pregnancy week 18 and instructed to complete a Swedish validated version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at the 36th week of pregnancy as well as the sixth week after delivery. At both times, they were also asked to provide evening salivary samples for cortisol analysis. A comprehensive review of the relevant literature is also provided. Results Women with postpartum EPDS score ≥ 10 had higher salivary evening cortisol at six weeks postpartum compared to healthy controls (median cortisol 1.19 vs 0.89 nmol/L). A logistic regression model showed a positive association between cortisol levels and depressive symptoms postpartum (OR = 4.1; 95% CI 1.7–9.7). This association remained significant even after controlling for history of depression, use of tobacco, partner support, breastfeeding, stressful life events, and sleep problems, as possible confounders (aOR = 4.5; 95% CI 1.5–14.1). Additionally, women with postpartum depressive symptoms had higher postpartum cortisol levels compared to both women with depressive symptoms antenatally and controls (p = 0.019 and p = 0.004, respectively). Conclusions Women with depressive symptoms postpartum had higher postpartum cortisol levels, indicating an altered response of the HPA-axis in postpartum depression. PMID:26322643

  7. Current Use of Depression Rating Scales in Mental Health Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jeong; Kim, Jung Bum; Shin, Im Hee; Lim, Kyung Hee; Lee, Sang Hee; Cho, Gyung Ah; Sung, Hyung Mo; Jung, Sung Won; Zmimmerman, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was to investigate the current use of depression rating scales by psychiatrists and clinical psychologists in Korea. Methods The questionnaires from many psychiatrists and clinical psychologists were included in the analysis. The questionnaire was composed of items about examining the percentage of patients clinically using depression rating scales, reasons for not use of them, the degree of satisfaction, the perceived agreement rate between the result of depression rating scales and doctor's clinical interview in the evaluation of patients with depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed by χ2 and independent t-test. Results The clinical use of depression rating scales was more frequent in the psychologists than in the psychiatrists. The purposes for using depression rating scales were assessed into six areas, there was no significant difference in between two groups, and both groups pointed out their purpose as rating of severity and screening. The reasons for not using scales were that their interview may be sufficient for diagnosis and assessment of depressive patients and they are not familiar with the use of depression rating scales. The psychiatrists usually prefer the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Symptom Checklist 90-Revision (SCL-90-R) in order of frequency, and the clinical psychologists are more likely to use the BDI, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and SCL-90-R. Overall rate of satisfaction in the use of the scales was 67.29±14.45% and overall perceived agreement rate was 70.89±16.45%. Conclusion Currently used depression rating scales at the clinical practice were not various. Therefore, to heighten clinicians' utility of these depression rating scales measures, either educational efforts or advertisements, or both, will be necessary to spread them wildly. PMID:20927305

  8. Stress and Depression in Relation to Functional Health Behaviors in African American Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Williams, Edith M; Bruner, Larisa; Penfield, Megan; Kamen, Diane; Oates, James C

    While increased psychological distress in SLE has been clinically and empirically reported, the relationship between emotional distress, treatment adherence, and disease activity are complex and even more unclear in African American lupus patients. In an effort to elucidate this phenomenon in these patients, this exploratory study aimed to investigate relationships between stress, depression, and various health behaviors in this group. Thirty patients invited to participate in this study were African American systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients attending rheumatology clinics at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). This study was part of a larger interventional pilot study, the Balancing Lupus Experiences with Stress Strategies (BLESS) study, that included a comprehensive battery of psychosocial, quality of life, and behavior change measures. When looking at the association between anxiety/stress and functionality, levels of reported stress had strong effects upon functionality, especially between health distress and functionality. When looking at the association between depressive symptoms and functionality, depressive symptoms had moderate effects upon social/role limitations and nights spent in the hospital. Not only did the larger pilot project demonstrate significant reductions in stress and depression as a result of workshop participation; this nested study also showed that those improvements were positively associated with improved health behaviors. These results could have implications for developing interventions to improve disease experience and quality of life in SLE patients with stress and depression.

  9. Patient's views on depression care in obstetric settings: how do they compare to the views of perinatal health care professionals?

    PubMed

    Byatt, Nancy; Biebel, Kathleen; Friedman, Liz; Debordes-Jackson, Gifty; Ziedonis, Douglas; Pbert, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The objectives were to examine patients' perspectives on patient-, provider- and systems-level barriers and facilitators to addressing perinatal depression in outpatient obstetric settings. We also compare the views of patients and perinatal health care professionals. Four 90-min focus groups were conducted with women 3-36 months after delivery (n=27) who experienced symptoms of perinatal depression, anxiety or emotional distress. Focus groups were transcribed, and resulting data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Barriers to addressing perinatal depression included fear of stigma and loss of parental rights, negative experiences with perinatal health care providers and lack of depression management knowledge/skills among professionals. Facilitators included psychoeducation, peer support and training for professionals. Patients perceive many multilevel barriers to treatment that are similar to those found in our previous similar study of perinatal health care professionals' perspectives. However, patients and professionals do differ in their perceptions of one another. Interventions would need to close these gaps and include an empathic screening and referral process that facilitates discussion of mental health concerns. Interventions should leverage strategies identified by both patients and professionals, including empowering both via education, resources and access to varied mental health care options. © 2013.

  10. Screening for and Diagnosis of Depression Among Adolescents in a Large Health Maintenance Organization.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, R Eric; O'Connor, Briannon; Bertagnolli, Andrew; Beck, Arne; Tinoco, Aldo; Gardner, William P; Jelinek-Berents, Christine X; Newton, Douglas A; Wain, Kris F; Boggs, Jennifer M; Brace, Nancy E; deSa, Patricia; Scholle, Sarah Hudson; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this analysis was to determine changes in patterns of depression screening and diagnosis over three years in primary and specialty mental health care in a large health maintenance organization (HMO) as part of a project to develop quality measures for adolescent depression treatment. Two series of aggregate data (2010-2012) were gathered from the electronic health records of the HMO for 44,342 unique adolescents (ages 12 to 21) who had visits in primary and mental health care. Chi square tests assessed the significance of changes in frequency and departmental location of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) administration, incidence of depression symptoms, and depression diagnoses. There was a significant increase in PHQ-9 use, predominantly in primary care, consistent with internally generated organizational recommendations to increase screening with the PHQ-9. The increase in PHQ-9 use led to an increase in depression diagnoses in primary care and a shift in the location of some diagnoses from specialty mental health care to primary care. The increase in PHQ-9 use was also linked to a decrease in the proportion of positive PHQ-9 results that led to formal depression diagnoses. The rate of depression screening in primary care increased over the study period. This increase corresponded to an increase in the number of depression diagnoses made in primary care and a shift in the location in which depression diagnoses were made, from the mental health department to primary care. The frequency of positive PHQ-9 administrations not associated with depression diagnoses also increased.

  11. Arrhythmia care co-ordinators: Their impact on anxiety and depression, readmissions and health service costs.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Hanif; Coulton, Simon

    2016-08-01

    In 2005, the UK Department of Health recommended that a new role, the arrhythmia care coordinator (ACC), be created to guide patients through the diagnosis and treatment for arrhythmia. The belief was that this would improve the efficiency of care and improve their quality of life. The British Heart Foundation provided funding for 32 such posts, all of which were filled by arrhythmia specialist nurses, and commissioned an evaluation of the new service to assess its impact on patients. This paper focuses on the impact of the ACCs on their patients' levels of anxiety and depression, hospital readmissions and costs to the National Health Service (NHS). From 2008 to 2010, using questionnaires, we conducted a longitudinal audit of the psychological status of the patients referred to the ACCs; we also assessed the ACCs' impact on readmissions and cost benefits to the NHS using UK Hospital Episode Statistics. We found high levels of anxiety and depression amongst patients. Nearly one-third were at the 'borderline' or 'clinically anxious' and 18% were at the 'borderline' or 'clinically depressed' level at their first assessment with small changes at follow-up. In arrhythmia specialist nurse sites, readmission rates were reduced by half. After deducting the cost of the ACCs and their support, the estimated annual saving was £29,357 per ACC. This evaluation has shown that the NHS saves £29,357 per year over and above the costs of employing a British Heart Foundation ACC and that all arrhythmia centres should be encouraged to employ an appropriate number of such specialists. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  12. Riboflavin status and its association with serum hs-CRP levels among clinical nurses with depression.

    PubMed

    Naghashpour, Mahshid; Amani, Reza; Nutr, R; Nematpour, Sorur; Haghighizadeh, Mohammad Hosein

    2011-10-01

    The objective of present study was to assess the relationship between the dietary intake and blood status of riboflavin and the prevalence of systemic inflammation among both depressed and nondepressed nurses. This was a cross-sectional study on 98 female clinical nurses (45 depressed and 53 nondepressed subjects). Depression status was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. We assessed dietary intake of riboflavin using 3-day 24-hour recalls. The serum concentrations of high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were also measured. Riboflavin status was assessed as the erythrocyte glutathione reductase activity coefficient (EGRAC). Marginal riboflavin deficiency was more prevalent in depressed subjects (P = 0.028). The results of the dietary intake and status of riboflavin were classified to 3 tertiles of serum hs-CRP levels. In both nondepressed and depressed subjects, there was no significant difference between hs-CRP tertiles in dietary intakes of riboflavin, EGRAC, or riboflavin deficiencies. This study showed a higher prevalence of marginal riboflavin deficiency in depressed subjects. We found no association between dietary intake and status of riboflavin with low-grade systematic inflammation in nondepressed and depressed clinical nurses.

  13. Depression Screening at a Community Health Fair: Descriptives and Treatment Linkage.

    PubMed

    Opperman, Kiel J; Hanson, Devin M; Toro, Paul A

    2017-08-01

    Health fairs are a cost-efficient platform for dissemination of preventive services to vulnerable populations. Effectiveness of depression screenings and associated treatment linkage via community health fairs warrants investigation. This study offers the first examination of a depression screening at a community health fair in 261 adult men (18-87years). The PHQ-9 was administered via interview by graduate students and on-site psychiatric nurses were available for a brief consultation for those interested. Over a quarter of participants screened positive for at least moderate depressive symptomatology. Of those who screened positive, 35.8% met with an on-site psychiatric nurse for a consultation. At six-month follow-up, none of the participants given a referral made an appointment at the community mental health agency. This suggests the importance of providing on-site clinician consultations at health fairs and the need for a more coordinated system to schedule future appointments while at the event. Community health fairs reach vulnerable populations, such as those who are uninsured and who have not spoken with a professional about mental health concerns. By conducting depression screening and providing onsite access to a mental health consultation at community health fairs, participants are better able to identify their depressive symptoms and are introduced to ways to treat depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of depression and anxiety, general health, and academic performance in three cohorts of veterinary medical students across the first three semesters of veterinary school.

    PubMed

    Reisbig, Allison M J; Danielson, Jared A; Wu, Tsui-Feng; Hafen, McArthur; Krienert, Ashley; Girard, Destiny; Garlock, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This study builds on previous research on predictors of depression and anxiety in veterinary medical students and reports data on three veterinary cohorts from two universities through their first three semesters of study. Across all three semesters, 49%, 65%, and 69% of the participants reported depression levels at or above the clinical cut-off, suggesting a remarkably high percentage of students experiencing significant levels of depression symptoms. Further, this study investigated the relationship between common stressors experienced by veterinary students and mental health, general health, and academic performance. A factor analysis revealed four factors among stressors common to veterinary students: academic stress, transitional stress, family-health stress, and relationship stress. The results indicated that both academic stress and transitional stress had a robust impact on veterinary medical students' well-being during their first three semesters of study. As well, academic stress negatively impacted students in the areas of depression and anxiety symptoms, life satisfaction, general health, perception of academic performance, and grade point average (GPA). Transitional stress predicted increased depression and anxiety symptoms and decreased life satisfaction. This study helped to further illuminate the magnitude of the problem of depression and anxiety symptoms in veterinary medical students and identified factors most predictive of poor outcomes in the areas of mental health, general health, and academic performance. The discussion provides recommendations for considering structural changes to veterinary educational curricula to reduce the magnitude of academic stressors. Concurrently, recommendations are suggested for mental health interventions to help increase students' resistance to environmental stressors.

  15. An examination of prenatal and postpartum depressive symptoms among women served by urban community health centers.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, Abbey C; Hellerstedt, Wendy L; Harrison, Patricia A; Hennrikus, Deborah

    2014-02-01

    We characterized depressive symptoms in the prenatal and/or postpartum periods and examined associated risk factors among 594 women who received care at community health care centers. Women were screened with comprehensive risk assessments, which included the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 depression screen, during pregnancy and at least 4 weeks after delivery. Fifteen percent had depressive symptoms in the prenatal period only; 6 % in the postpartum period only, and 8 % had depressive symptoms in both periods. Risk markers varied for women who reported depressive symptoms at one period only compared with those who reported persistent depressive symptoms. Age (25 years versus younger), having experienced abuse, not living with the infant's father, and cigarette smoking were associated with depressive symptoms at both periods; being US-born, lacking social support, and experiencing food insecurity were associated with reporting symptoms only in the prenatal period, and lack of phone access was associated with risk only in the postpartum period. Our findings confirm the importance of repeated screenings for depressive symptoms during the perinatal period. The variability in risk markers associated with periods of reported depressive symptoms may reflect their varying associations with persistence, new onset, or recovery from depressive symptoms.

  16. A conceptual framework of stress vulnerability, depression, and health outcomes in women: potential uses in research on complementary therapies for depression

    PubMed Central

    Kinser, Patricia A; Lyon, Debra E

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is a chronic mental health condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. It is well-established that psychological stress plays an integral role in depression and that depression has numerous negative health outcomes. However, a closer look at components of stress vulnerabilities and depression is required to allow for the development and testing of appropriate interventions. Aims and Discussion This article describes a conceptual framework about the complex and bidirectional relationship between stress vulnerability, depression, and health outcomes in women. The authors elucidate how the framework can be applied in clinical research about cellular aging and on the mechanisms of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for depression, using yoga as an example of a CAM modality. Conclusion The proposed conceptual framework may be helpful for adding depth to the body of knowledge about the use of mind-body therapies for individuals at high risk of stress vulnerability and/or depression. PMID:25328843

  17. [Prevalence of depressive symptoms, ways of coping, and related factors among medical school and health services higher education students].

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mine; Genç, Metin; Kaya, Burhanettin; Pehlivan, Erkan

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore the prevalence of depressive symptoms, ways of coping, and their relationships to sociodemographic variables among students of the Medical Faculty (MF) and the Health Services Higher Education School (HSHES) at Inönü University. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Styles of Coping Inventory (SCI), and a sociodemographic questionnaire were used. Among the HSHES students (n = 128), the prevalence of depressive symptoms was higher. The MF students whose fathers had a higher level of education had higher BDI scores. The MF students from families with lower levels of income had a higher frequency of depressive symptoms. In both groups, the students with previous histories of psychiatric and physical ilness had higher BDI scores. Among the MF students, older age (OR = 2.72), and among the HSHES students, having a previous history of psychiatric disorder (OR = 5.25) and female gender (OR = 1.85) affected the prevalence of depressive symptoms. The HSHES students used passive styles of coping more frequently. Active coping styles were used more frequently by the male students in both groups. The HSHES students whose mothers had lower levels of education, had higher passive coping style scores; active coping styles and higher family income correlated positively. In both groups, BDI and active styles scores correlated positively. Passive styles were used more frequently by male and female students that had a higher frequency of depressive symptoms. The rate of mental health problems was quite high among the students. Preventive mental health programs should be developed and implemented.

  18. Depression and health-seeking behaviour among migrant workers in Shenzhen.

    PubMed

    Lam, Kelvin K F; Johnston, Janice M

    2015-06-01

    This study describes the prevalence of depression symptoms and its impact on health-seeking behaviour among Chinese migrant workers in a sample of 1,533 Shenzhen residents. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered in Shenzhen with a random sample of 859 registered and 674 non-registered residents. The 20-item Centre for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) scale was used to measure depression symptoms. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to assess healthcare services utilisation. Non-registered residents were more likely to have clinically significant depressive symptoms (CES-D score ≥ 16) (odds ratio (OR) = 1.81; confidence interval (CI) = 1.18, 2.76). Despite this, depressed non-registered residents had no significant difference in health-seeking behaviour when compared to those without depression (OR = 2.86; CI = 0.98, 8.32), while in contrast, depressed registered residents had a positive and stronger association with healthcare services utilisation and/or self-medication (OR = 3.34; CI = 1.28, 8.71). The findings suggest higher prevalence of depression but less utilisation of healthcare services or self-medication among migrant residents. That migrants with depression lack access to healthcare suggests healthcare inequality. Psychological disorders require careful management and treatment; the mismatch in their health needs and access to care may contribute to the Inverse-care law. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Does a Mobile Phone Depression-Screening App Motivate Mobile Phone Users With High Depressive Symptoms to Seek a Health Care Professional's Help?

    PubMed

    BinDhim, Nasser F; Alanazi, Eman M; Aljadhey, Hisham; Basyouni, Mada H; Kowalski, Stefan R; Pont, Lisa G; Shaman, Ahmed M; Trevena, Lyndal; Alhawassi, Tariq M

    2016-06-27

    The objective of disease screening is to encourage high-risk subjects to seek health care diagnosis and treatment. Mobile phone apps can effectively screen mental health conditions, including depression. However, it is not known how effective such screening methods are in motivating users to discuss the obtained results of such apps with health care professionals. Does a mobile phone depression-screening app motivate users with high depressive symptoms to seek health care professional advice? This study aimed to address this question. This was a single-cohort, prospective, observational study of a free mobile phone depression app developed in English and released on Apple's App Store. Apple App Store users (aged 18 or above) in 5 countries, that is, Australia, Canada, New Zealand (NZ), the United Kingdom (UK), and the United States (US), were recruited directly via the app's download page. The participants then completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and their depression screening score was displayed to them. If their score was 11 or above and they had never been diagnosed with depression before, they were advised to take their results to their health care professional. They were to follow up after 1 month. A group of 2538 participants from the 5 countries completed PHQ-9 depression screening with the app. Of them, 322 participants were found to have high depressive symptoms and had never been diagnosed with depression, and received advice to discuss their results with health care professionals. About 74% of those completed the follow-up; approximately 38% of these self-reported consulting their health care professionals about their depression score. Only positive attitude toward depression as a real disease was associated with increased follow-up response rate (odds ratio (OR) 3.2, CI 1.38-8.29). A mobile phone depression-screening app motivated some users to seek a depression diagnosis. However, further study should investigate how other app users use

  20. Diagnosing Depression in Alzheimer Disease With the National Institute of Mental Health Provisional Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Edmond; Ringman, John M.; Ross, Leslie K.; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Dick, Malcolm B.; Bartzokis, George; Davies, Helen D.; Galasko, Douglas; Hewett, Linda; Mungas, Dan; Reed, Bruce R.; Schneider, Lon S.; Segal-Gidan, Freddi; Yaffe, Kristine; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the rates of depression in Alzheimer Disease (AD) determined using National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) provisional criteria for depression in AD (NIMH-dAD) to those determined using other established depression assessment tools. Design Descriptive longitudinal cohort study. Setting The Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers of California. Participants A cohort of 101 patients meeting NINDS-ADRDA criteria for possible/probable AD, intentionally selected to increase the frequency of depression at baseline. Measurements Depression was diagnosed at baseline and after 3 months using NIMH-dAD criteria and the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) Axis I Disorders. Depressive symptoms also were assessed with the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD), the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire. Results The baseline frequency of depression using NIMH-dAD criteria (44%) was higher than that obtained using DSM-IV criteria for major depression (14%; Z = −5.50, df = 101, p <0.001) and major or minor depression (36%; Z = −2.86, df = 101, p = 0.021) or using established cut-offs for the CSDD (30%; Z = −2.86, df = 101, p = 0.004) or GDS (33%; Z = −2.04, df = 101, p = 0.041). The NIMH-dAD criteria correctly identified all patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depression, and correlated well with DSM-IV criteria for major or minor depression (κ = 0.753, p <0.001), exhibiting 94% sensitivity and 85% specificity. The higher rates of depression found with NIMH-dAD criteria derived primarily from its less stringent requirements for the frequency and duration of symptoms. Remission rates at 3 months were similar across instruments. Conclusions The NIMH-dAD criteria identify a greater proportion of AD patients as depressed than several other established tools. PMID:18515691

  1. High C-reactive protein levels are associated with depressive symptoms in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Faugere, M; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Faget-Agius, C; Lançon, C; Cermolacce, M; Richieri, R

    2018-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are frequently associated with schizophrenia symptoms. C - Reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, had been found elevated in patients with schizophrenia and in patients with depressive symptoms. However, the association between CRP level and depressive symptoms has been poorly investigated in patients with schizophrenia. The only study conducted found an association between high CRP levels and antidepressant consumption, but not with depressive symptoms investigated with the Calgary Depression Rating Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). The aim of this study was to evaluate CRP levels and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, and to determine whether high CRP levels are associated with depressive symptoms and/or antidepressant consumption, independently of potential confounding factors, especially tobacco-smoking and metabolic syndrome. Three hundred and seven patients with schizophrenia were enrolled in this study (mean age = 35.74 years, 69.1% male gender). Depressive symptoms was investigated with the CDSS. Patients were classified in two groups: normal CRP level (≤ 3.0mg/L) and high CRP level (> 3.0mg/L). Current medication was recorded. 124 subjects (40.4%) were classified in the high CRP level group. After adjusting for confounding factors, these patients were found to have higher CDSS scores than those with normal CRP levels in multivariate analyses (p = 0.035, OR = 1.067, 95% CI = 1.004-1.132). No significant association between CRP levels and antidepressants consumption was found. The size sample is relatively small. The cut-off point for high cardiovascular risk was used to define the two groups. CRP was the sole marker of inflammation in this study and was collected at only one time point. The design of this study is cross-sectional and there are no conclusions about the directionality of the association between depression and inflammation in schizophrenia. This study found an association between high

  2. Job stress, burnout, depression symptoms, and physical health among Chinese university teachers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jie; You, Jianing; Gan, Yiqun; Zhang, Yiwen; Lu, Changqin; Wang, Hongbo

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships among job stress, burnout, depression, and health among university teachers in China. Using a stratified random sampling method, a sample of 300 university teachers completed the Occupational Stress Indicator-2 (OSI-2), Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Path analysis showed that burnout was a mediator among job stress, the occurrence and exacerbation of depressive symptoms, and poor physical health.

  3. A "Mental-Health-at-the-Workplace" Educational Workshop Reduces Managers' Stigma Toward Depression.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Johannes; Mendel, Rosmarie; Reichhart, Tatjana; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Kissling, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Stigma and discrimination are important factors hindering people with mental health conditions to stay employed or successfully make their careers. We surveyed 580 German managers before and after visiting a "mental-health-at-the-workplace" educational workshop using the Depression Stigma Scale. The workshop significantly reduced stigma toward depression. Managers at baseline already exhibited lower stigma toward depression compared with the general population. In addition, female gender and higher education predicted lower stigma, which is in line with findings from other studies. We conclude that an educational workshop giving practical guidance regarding "mental-health-at-the-workplace" reduces managers' stigma toward depression and improves knowledge regarding depression, its course, and its treatment.

  4. Depressive symptoms, social support, and personal health behaviors in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Allgöwer, A; Wardle, J; Steptoe, A

    2001-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship of depressive symptoms, social support, and a range of personal health behaviors in 2,091 male and 3,438 female university students from 16 countries. Depressive symptoms and social support were measured using the short Beck Depression Inventory and the Social Support Questionnaire; 9 personal health behaviors were also assessed. After the authors took age, social support, and clustering by country into account, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with lack of physical activity, not eating breakfast, irregular sleep hours, and not using a seat belt in both men and women, and additionally with smoking, not eating fruit, and not using sunscreen among women. Low social support was independently associated with low alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity, irregular sleep hours, and not using a seat belt in men and women. Bidirectional causal pathways are likely to link health behaviors with depressed mood.

  5. [Association between health related quality of life and severity of depression in patients with major depressive disorder].

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuping; Li, Wen; Shen, Jingjin; Zhang, Yalin

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the association between health related quality of life (HRQoL) and severity of depression in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36) was administered to 103 MDD patients at the baseline and 6-week follow-up. Hamilton Depression Rating for Depression (HAMD) and Clinical Global Impression (CGI) were administered at the baseline, 2- and 6-week follow-up, respectively. All SF-36 component scores in the 6-week follow-up were significantly higher than those at the baseline (P<0.01). The overall and subscale scores of HAMD except weight and CGI scores at the 2- and 6-week follow-up were significantly lower than those at the baseline (all P<0.01). The role-emotion score of the clinical remission group was significantly lower than that of the non-remission group. After a 6-week antidepressant treatment, all SF-36 component scores in both groups were significantly higher than those at the baseline, except body pain in the non-remission group. While scores of role-physical, general health, vitality, social functioning, role-emotion and mental health were significantly higher in the remission group than those in the non-remission group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). A higher overall score of HAMD, scores of cognitive disturbance and CGI were significantly associated with a worse SF-36 at the baseline (P<0.05 or P<0.01). After the 6-week treatment, a worse health transition was significantly associated with higher scores of HAMD and sleep disturbance at the baseline (P<0.01), a worse general health and role-emotion were strongly associated with higher score of anxiety/somatization at the baseline (both P<0.05). Score of general health was positively associated with reduction rate of cognitive disturbance at the 2-week endpoint (P<0.05) and scores of vitality and reported health transition were positively associated with the reduction rate of sleep disturbance at the 2-week endpoint (both P<0.05). The increasing

  6. Mothers' alexithymia, depression and anxiety levels and their association with the quality of mother-infant relationship: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Yürümez, Esra; Akça, Ömer Faruk; Uğur, Çağatay; Uslu, Runa Idil; Kılıç, Birim Günay

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between mothers and their developmentally normal infants in terms of maternal alexithymia, depression and anxiety, and marital satisfaction. Fifty children between 18 and 48 months of age, and their mothers, were referred consecutively to the Infant Mental Health Unit of Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The sociodemographic features of the families and the depressive symptoms, anxiety, marital satisfaction and alexithymia levels of the mothers were assessed. The relationships between children in normal developmental stages and their mothers were evaluated and rated using a structured clinical procedure. There was a negative correlation between the mothers' alexithymia scores and the quality of the mother-infant relationship (p < 0.05). Mothers with high alexithymia showed higher depression and lower relationship qualities than mothers with low alexithymia, according to the correlation analysis. When depression and anxiety were controlled, high alexithymia levels were predictive of a low, impaired mother-infant relationship. Since alexithymia is a trait-like variable which has a negative correlation with impairment in a mother-infant relationship, it must be investigated in the assessment of mothers' interactions with their babies.

  7. The predictive value of cortisol levels on 2-year course of depression in older persons.

    PubMed

    Kabia, Fatima M; Rhebergen, Didi; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Max L; Comijs, Hannie C

    2016-01-01

    Depressive disorders in older persons are associated with an altered functioning of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA)-axis. In adults, a lower cortisol awakening response is a predictor of a worse prognosis of depression, but to date longitudinal studies in older depressed persons are lacking. We hypothesised that a lower cortisol awakening response is also associated with poorer course of depression in later life. Data were derived from the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (NESDO). Participants with a 6-month Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), who provided 2-year follow-up data, were included (n=246). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the association between diurnal cortisol levels and depressive status at 2-year follow-up. Both lower (OR=3.54; 95% CI=1.59-7.89) and higher evening cortisol levels (OR=2.41; 95% CI=1.09-5.35) at baseline were associated with poorer prognosis of MDD. Low dexamethasone suppression was associated with poorer course (OR=2.37; 95% CI=1.09-5.16), but failed to reach significance after additional adjustment for severity and chronicity of MDD (OR=1.98; 95% CI=0.89-4.42). Cortisol awakening response was not significantly associated with course. Since smoking has a great impact on cortisol levels, we conducted post-hoc analyses including non-smokers only, indicating that lower evening cortisol levels (OR=2.83, 95% CI=1.31-6.13) predicted unfavourable course. This first longitudinal study on cortisol and prognosis of depression in older persons demonstrates that in particular lower evening cortisol levels may predict poorer course in MDD. This finding may have clinical implications. Evening cortisol values may serve as a marker to identify persons at risk for an unfavourable course. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Creatine kinase levels in patients with bipolar disorder: depressive, manic, and euthymic phases.

    PubMed

    Feier, Gustavo; Valvassori, Samira S; Rezin, Gislaine T; Búrigo, Márcio; Streck, Emilio L; Kapczinski, Flávio; Quevedo, João

    2011-06-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe, recurrent, and often chronic psychiatric illness associated with significant functional impairment, morbidity, and mortality. Creatine kinase is an important enzyme, particularly for cells with high and fluctuating energy requirements, such as neurons, and is a potential marker of brain injury. The aim of the present study was to compare serum creatine kinase levels between bipolar disorder patients, in the various phases (depressive, manic, and euthymic), and healthy volunteers. Forty-eight bipolar patients were recruited: 18 in the euthymic phase; 17 in the manic phase; and 13 in the depressive phase. The control group comprised 41 healthy volunteers. The phases of bipolar disorder were defined as follows: euthymic-not meeting the DSM-IV criteria for a mood episode and scoring < 8 on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS); manic-scoring < 7 on the HDRS and > 7 on the YMRS; depressive-scoring > 7 on the HDRS and < 7 on the YMRS. Patients in mixed phases were excluded. Blood samples were collected from all participants. Creatine kinase levels were higher in the manic patients than in the controls. However, we observed no significant difference between euthymic and depressive patients in terms of the creatine kinase level. Our results suggest that the clinical differences among the depressive, manic, and euthymic phases of bipolar disorder are paralleled by contrasting levels of creatine kinase. However, further studies are needed in order to understand the state-dependent differences observed in serum creatine kinase activity.

  9. Plasma insulin-like growth factor I levels are higher in depressive and anxiety disorders, but lower in antidepressant medication users.

    PubMed

    Bot, Mariska; Milaneschi, Yuri; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Drent, Madeleine L

    2016-06-01

    It has been postulated that many peripheral and (neuro)biological systems are involved in psychiatric disorders such as depression. Some studies found associations of depression and antidepressant treatment with insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) - a pleiotropic hormone affecting neuronal growth, survival and plasticity - but evidence is mixed. We therefore studied whether depressive and anxiety disorders were associated with plasma IGF-I, and explored the role of antidepressant medication in this association in a large observational study. The sample consisted of 2714 participants enrolled in The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, classified as healthy controls (n=602), antidepressant users (76 remitted and 571 with current depressive and/or anxiety disorder(s), n=647), persons having remitted depressive and/or anxiety disorder(s) without antidepressant use (n=502), and persons having current depressive and/or anxiety disorder(s) without antidepressant use (n=963). Associations with IGF-I concentrations were studied and adjusted for socio-demographic, health, and lifestyle variables. Relative to healthy controls, antidepressant-free individuals with current disorders had significantly higher IGF-I levels (Cohen's d=0.08, p=0.006), whereas antidepressant-free individuals with remitted disorders had a trend towards higher IGF-I levels (d=0.06, p=0.09). Associations were evident for depressive and for anxiety disorders. In contrast, antidepressant users had significantly lower IGF-I levels compared to healthy controls (d=-0.08, p=0.028). Our findings suggests that antidepressant medication use modifies the association between depressive/anxiety disorders and plasma IGF-I. These results corroborate with findings of some previous small-scale case-control and intervention studies. The higher IGF-I levels related to depression and anxiety might point to a compensatory mechanism to counterbalance the impaired neurogenesis, although future studies are needed to

  10. Health Locus of Control and Depression in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Alan J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Found that, among 96 hemodialysis patients, the belief that one's health is controllable was associated with less depression among subjects who had not previously experienced a failed renal transplant. This belief was associated with greater depression for subjects who had returned to dialysis following an unsuccessful transplant. (Author/NB)

  11. A High School Depression and Suicide Prevention Program: A Collaboration between Health Education and Psychological Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Donna L.; Bradbury, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Examined a collaboration between health education and psychological services in generating a high school depression and suicide prevention program. The five-component program raised awareness of teen depression and suicide, increased communication about these issues within the school and community, and provided information about available…

  12. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  13. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adolescents with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Janet R.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the receipt of treatment for major depression in adolescents. This study examined differences in mental health service use in non-Hispanic white, black, Hispanic, and Asian adolescents who experienced an episode of major depression. Method: Five years of data (2004-2008) were pooled…

  14. A High School Depression and Suicide Prevention Program: A Collaboration between Health Education and Psychological Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Donna L.; Bradbury, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Examined a collaboration between health education and psychological services in generating a high school depression and suicide prevention program. The five-component program raised awareness of teen depression and suicide, increased communication about these issues within the school and community, and provided information about available…

  15. Health Locus of Control and Depression in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Alan J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Found that, among 96 hemodialysis patients, the belief that one's health is controllable was associated with less depression among subjects who had not previously experienced a failed renal transplant. This belief was associated with greater depression for subjects who had returned to dialysis following an unsuccessful transplant. (Author/NB)

  16. Engaging Women Who Are Depressed and Economically Disadvantaged in Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grote, Nancy K.; Zuckoff, Allan; Swartz, Holly; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Geibel, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Women disadvantaged by poverty, as well as racial or ethnic minority status, are more likely to experience depression than the rest of the U.S. population. At the same time, they are less likely to seek or remain in treatment for depression in traditional mental health settings. This article explores a therapeutic, psychosocial engagement strategy…

  17. Migration and Mental Health: An Empirical Test of Depression Risk Factors Among Immigrant Mexican Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, William A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Critical issues and methodological problems concerning migration and mental health are examined. A model for determining predictor variables of depression in immigrant Mexican women is tested. Demographic, economic, and interpersonal factors are isolated as a subset of depression predictors within the model. (VM)

  18. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  19. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adolescents with Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Janet R.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the receipt of treatment for major depression in adolescents. This study examined differences in mental health service use in non-Hispanic white, black, Hispanic, and Asian adolescents who experienced an episode of major depression. Method: Five years of data (2004-2008) were pooled…

  20. Tobacco use is associated with increased plasma BDNF levels in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Colle, Romain; Trabado, Séverine; Rotenberg, Samuel; Brailly-Tabard, Sylvie; Benyamina, Amine; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Hardy, Patrick; Falissard, Bruno; Becquemont, Laurent; Verstuyft, Céline; Fève, Bruno; Corruble, Emmanuelle

    2016-12-30

    Since serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels are higher in tobacco smokers than in non-smokers and since Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is associated with a 2-fold increased risk of smoking, we assessed the association of smoking and plasma BDNF levels in 359 depressed MDD patients. Plasma BDNF levels were positively correlated with the magnitude of tobacco consumption (current number of cigarettes/day and number of packs/year). Accordingly, current tobacco users had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels than non-users. In further studies of MDD, peripheral measures of BDNF should take into account tobacco use.

  1. The level of associated depression and anxiety traits improves during weight regain in eating disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Sala, L; Mirabel-Sarron, C; Gorwood, P; Pham-Scottez, A; Blanchet, A; Rouillon, F

    2011-12-01

    We assessed whether re-nutrition and weight gain have an influence on comorbid depression and anxiety in patients hospitalised for chronic eating disorders (ED). Seventy-five inpatients agreed to participate by completing the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y) before, during and after three months of treatment. Patients suffering from either anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa successfully regained weight during treatment. This weight gain was accompanied by statistically significant reductions in ED symptoms. Anxiety and, to a lesser extent, depressive symptoms diminished, but remained at pathological levels, with between diagnostic subtype differences. Improvement of depressive (r=0.77) and anxiety (r=0.64) levels were significantly (p<0.001) and positively correlated with the reduction of eating attitudes (EAT). These results are discussed in the context of re-orienting the therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing emotional suffering in patients with ED.

  2. Concordance of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to assess increased risk of depression among postpartum women.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Pace, Wilson; Wollan, Peter C; Bertram, Susan; Kurland, Margary; Graham, Deborah; Dietrich, Allen

    2009-01-01

    To compare the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) as screening tools for postpartum depression. This study population included the first 500 women to enroll and return their packets during an ongoing study of postpartum depression. The primary outcome of this study was to find rates of concordance and discordance in the EPDS and PHQ-9 categories of "normal" and "increased risk for major depressive disorder." Overall, 97% of eligible women enrolled and 70% returned the packets that included the EPDS and PHQ-9. Four hundred eighty-one of the first 500 packets had complete data, with elevated EPDS or PHQ-9 scores in 138 and 132 women, respectively. Concordance of the EPDS and PHQ-9 were present in 399 women (83%): 326 (67.8%) had "normal" score on both, and 73 (15.2%) had elevated scores for both. Discordant scores in 82 women included 17 with elevated PHQ-9 scores but normal EPDS scores and 65 with elevated EPDS scores and PHQ-9 scores <10. In multivariate logistic regression modeling, only age >30 and low education level were predictive of discordant scores, using EPDS and PHQ-9 scores of > or =10 as elevated (odds ratio, 1.9 and P = .02; and odds ratio, 2.3 and P = .01, respectively). PHQ-9 scores of 5 to 9 have been referred to as consistent with "mild depressive symptoms" and appropriate for "watchful waiting" and repeat PHQ-9 at follow-up. Using this follow-up approach would require re-evaluation of 120 (25%) of the women screened. Postpartum depression screening is feasible in primary care practices, and for most women the EPDS and PHQ-9 scores were concordant. Further work is required to identify reasons for the 17% discordant scores as well as to provide definitive recommendations for PHQ-9 scores of 5 to 9.

  3. Changes in Depressive Symptoms and Subsequent Risk of Stroke in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Gilsanz, Paola; Kubzansky, Laura D; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Wang, Qianyi; Kawachi, Ichiro; Patton, Kristen K; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Kop, Willem J; Longstreth, W T; Glymour, M Maria

    2017-01-01

    Depression is associated with stroke, but the effects of changes in depressive symptoms on stroke risk are not well understood. This study examined whether depressive symptom changes across 2 successive annual assessments were associated with incident stroke the following year. We used visit data from 4319 participants of the Cardiovascular Health Study who were stroke free at baseline to examine whether changes in depressive symptoms classified across 2 consecutive annual assessments predicted incident first stroke during the subsequent year. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (high versus low at ≥10). Survival models were inverse probability weighted to adjust for demographics, health behaviors, medical conditions, past depressive symptoms, censoring, and survival. During follow-up, 334 strokes occurred. Relative to stable low scores of depressive symptoms, improved depression symptoms were associated with almost no excess risk of stroke (adjusted hazards ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.58). New-onset symptoms were nonsignificantly associated with elevated stroke risk (adjusted hazards ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.97-2.14), whereas persistently high depressive symptoms were associated with elevated adjusted hazard of all-cause stroke (adjusted hazards ratio, 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.56). No evidence for effect modification by race, age, or sex was found. Persistently high symptoms of depression predicted elevated hazard of stroke. Participants with improved depressive symptoms had no elevation in stroke risk. Such findings suggest that strategies to reduce depressive symptoms may ameliorate stroke risk. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Analysis of the relation between level of asthma control and depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Trzcińska, Hanna; Przybylski, Grzegorz; Kozłowski, Bartosz; Derdowski, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Frequent co-existence of bronchial asthma and depression or anxiety is an unquestioned phenomenon. In contrast, little is known about the relationship between the degree of asthma control and the prevalence of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine the potential relationship between the degree of asthma control and the prevalence of depression and anxiety. Material/Methods This study included a group of 128 randomly selected asthmatic individuals with various degree of asthma control. The study was based on a questionnaire survey, using the following tools: the Asthma Control Test, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) – X-1 and X-2 questionnaires. All the questionnaires were completed during a single follow-up visit at the clinic. Results The occurrence of depression and its severity significantly correlated with the degree of asthma control. Individuals with depression were characterized by a significantly lower degree of asthma control compared to depression-free individuals (p<0.001). The degree of asthma control decreased significantly with increasing severity of depression (R=−0.367; p<0.001). No significant correlation was observed between the degree of asthma control and the levels of trait anxiety (R=−0.095; p=0.295) and state anxiety (R=−0.093; p=0.308). Conclusions The prevalence of depression and its severity significantly correlate with the degree of asthma control. Large, standardized multicenter studies of the relationship between the degree of asthma control and the prevalence of depression and other psychopathological symptoms are needed. Furthermore, it seems reasonable to introduce the screening of asthmatics for mental disorders. PMID:22367130

  5. Analysis of the relation between level of asthma control and depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Trzcińska, Hanna; Przybylski, Grzegorz; Kozłowski, Bartosz; Derdowski, Sebastian

    2012-03-01

    Frequent co-existence of bronchial asthma and depression or anxiety is an unquestioned phenomenon. In contrast, little is known about the relationship between the degree of asthma control and the prevalence of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine the potential relationship between the degree of asthma control and the prevalence of depression and anxiety. This study included a group of 128 randomly selected asthmatic individuals with various degree of asthma control. The study was based on a questionnaire survey, using the following tools: the Asthma Control Test, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) - X-1 and X-2 questionnaires. All the questionnaires were completed during a single follow-up visit at the clinic. The occurrence of depression and its severity significantly correlated with the degree of asthma control. Individuals with depression were characterized by a significantly lower degree of asthma control compared to depression-free individuals (p<0.001). The degree of asthma control decreased significantly with increasing severity of depression (R=-0.367; p<0.001). No significant correlation was observed between the degree of asthma control and the levels of trait anxiety (R=-0.095; p=0.295) and state anxiety (R=-0.093; p=0.308). The prevalence of depression and its severity significantly correlate with the degree of asthma control. Large, standardized multicenter studies of the relationship between the degree of asthma control and the prevalence of depression and other psychopathological symptoms are needed. Furthermore, it seems reasonable to introduce the screening of asthmatics for mental disorders.

  6. How life stressors influence modifiable lifestyle factors, depressive symptoms, and physical and mental health among Vietnamese older women?

    PubMed

    Dao-Tran, Tiet-Hanh; Anderson, Debra; Seib, Charrlotte

    2017-06-29

    Research has demonstrated that exposure to life stressors can influence health through a number of pathways. However, knowledge about the patterns of life stressors and their contributions to health in different populations is limited. Vietnamese older women have attracted little research to date in this area. This cross-sectional study used an interview-administered-questionnaire to collect data from 440 Vietnamese older women. Descriptive analysis was used to describe life stressors among Vietnamese older women. Binary analysis and Structural Equation Modelling statistical analysis were used to examine the influences of life stressors on modifiable lifestyle factors, depressive symptoms, physical and mental health among Vietnamese older women. Vietnamese older women in this study commonly reported the experience of losing a close person, including a baby/child, serious health or money problems, violence and disaster. Among the study participants, (1) exposure to more life stressors increased their depressive symptoms, and decreased their physical and mental health; (2) exposure to more life stressors also increased their physical health by increasing their physical activity levels. Life stressors influenced health among Vietnamese older women through different pathways. Interventions to manage stress and depressive symptoms are required for Vietnamese older women in the future.

  7. Bisphenol A alters transcript levels of biomarker genes for Major Depressive Disorder in vascular endothelial cells and colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H Sofia; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is capable of mimicking endogenous hormones with potential consequences for human health and BPA exposure has been associated with several human diseases including neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) results show that BPA at low concentrations (10 ng/mL and 1 μg/mL) induces differential transcript levels of four biomarker genes for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). These results substantiate increasing concerns of BPA exposure in levels currently detected in humans.

  8. Implementing Behavioral Activation and Life-Steps for Depression and HIV Medication Adherence in a Community Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Jessica F.; Seitz-Brown, C. J.; Safren, Steven A.; Daughters, Stacey B.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy to treat HIV/AIDS has substantially improved clinical outcomes among patients living with HIV/AIDS, but only in the presence of very consistent adherence. One of the most prevalent and impactful individual-level predictors of poor adherence is depressive symptoms, even at subthreshold levels. Evidence-based cognitive behavioral interventions exist to address improvements in depressive symptoms and adherence in this population, yet these techniques have largely been designed and tested as individual treatments for delivery in mental health settings. This presents a significant challenge when transporting these techniques to medical settings where other formats for delivery may be more appropriate (i.e., groups, less frequent visits) and few hands-on resources exist to guide this process. As such, primary aims of this study were to adapt and implement evidence-based cognitive behavioral techniques for depression (behavioral activation; BA) and HIV medication adherence (Life-Steps) that have potential for dissemination in an outpatient community health center. The intervention incorporated feedback from health center staff and utilized a modular, group format that did not rely on sequential session attendance. Feasibility was examined over 8 weeks (n = 13). Preliminary effects on depression, health-related quality of life, and medication adherence were examined and exit interviews were conducted with a subset of participants (n = 4) to inform future modifications. Treatment descriptions and recommendations for effective clinical implementation based on patient and clinician feedback are provided along with case material of two individual patients and an example group session. Current efforts are an important next step for disseminating evidence-based techniques for depression and HIV medication adherence to community health center or AIDS service organization settings. PMID:25419102

  9. Depressive symptoms impact health-promoting lifestyle behaviors and quality of life in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Savoy, Suzanne M; Penckofer, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD). More than 15% of persons with CVD have depressive symptoms, which are twice as likely to occur in women. Depressive symptoms in women being screened for CVD have not been well studied. The relationships between depressive symptoms, health-promoting lifestyle behaviors, heart disease risk awareness, cardiac risk, and quality of life (QOL) in women were investigated. Whether the effect of depressive symptoms on QOL was mediated by cardiac risk and/or health-promoting lifestyle behaviors was also examined. The Wilson-Cleary Health-Related Quality of Life Model guided this descriptive study. A convenience sample of 125 women was recruited from cardiac health screening events. The study measurements were the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; the Framingham risk score; the Ferrans-Powers Quality of Life Index Generic Version-III; the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II; and questions related to heart disease risk, awareness of heart disease risk, health history, and demographics. Body mass index, percentage of body fat, and lipid profile were also measured. More than one-third (34%) of the women reported significant depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were not associated with cardiac risk or risk awareness but were inversely associated with health-promoting lifestyle behaviors (r = -0.37, P < 0.01) and QOL (r = -0.51, P < 0.01). There was a dose-response relationship with health-promoting lifestyle behaviors (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.88-0.97; P < 0.001) and QOL (odds ratio, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.79-0.92; P < 0.001) and depressive symptoms. Health-promoting lifestyle behaviors mediated the association between depressive symptoms and QOL. Depressive symptoms contribute significantly to health-promoting lifestyle behaviors and QOL for women. Early detection and treatment of depressive symptoms are important for participation in healthy

  10. Body image satisfaction and depression in midlife women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN).

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kathryn L; Janssen, Imke; Appelhans, Bradley M; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Karavolos, Kelly; Dugan, Sheila A; Avery, Elizabeth A; Shipp-Johnson, Karla J; Powell, Lynda H; Kravitz, Howard M

    2014-06-01

    With aging, women's bodies undergo changes that can affect body image perception, yet little is known about body image in midlife. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between body image and depressive symptoms in Caucasian and African-American midlife women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Chicago site. Body image was measured using the Stunkard Adult Female Figure Rating Scale, and a clinically significant level of depressive symptoms was defined as Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of ≥16 (N=405; N=63 (15.6%) with clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms). Differences between perceived actual, perceived ideal, and actual body size and responses to questions concerning weight satisfaction and attractiveness were examined using logistic regression for associations with a CES-D score of ≥16. Women with body image dissatisfaction (odds ratio (OR)=1.91; p=0.04) or who perceived themselves as "unattractive" (OR=7.74; p<0.01) had higher odds of CES-D of ≥16. We found no significant difference by race. Our results were not confounded by BMI. These results suggest that midlife women with poor body image may be more likely to have clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms. Larger prospective studies are needed to better understand this association.

  11. Body image satisfaction and depression in midlife women: the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN)

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kathryn L.; Janssen, Imke; Appelhans, Bradley M.; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Karavolos, Kelly; Dugan, Sheila A.; Avery, Elizabeth A.; Shipp-Johnson, Karla J.; Powell, Lynda H.; Kravitz, Howard M.

    2014-01-01

    With aging, women's bodies undergo changes that can affect body image perception, yet little is known about body image in midlife. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between body image and depressive symptoms in Caucasian and African–American midlife women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Chicago site. Body image was measured using the Stunkard Adult Female Figure Rating Scale, and a clinically significant level of depressive symptoms was defined as Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score of ≥16 (N=405; N=63 (15.6 %) with clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms). Differences between perceived actual, perceived ideal, and actual body size and responses to questions concerning weight satisfaction and attractiveness were examined using logistic regression for associations with a CES-D score of ≥16. Women with body image dissatisfaction (odds ratio (OR)=1.91; p=0.04) or who perceived themselves as “unattractive” (OR=7.74; p<0.01) had higher odds of CES-D of ≥16. We found no significant difference by race. Our results were not confounded by BMI. These results suggest that midlife women with poor body image may be more likely to have clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms. Larger prospective studies are needed to better understand this association. PMID:24623160

  12. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and personality traits in patients with major depression.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Hiroshi; Baba, Hajime; Satomura, Emi; Maeshima, Hitoshi; Takebayashi, Naoko; Namekawa, Yuki; Suzuki, Toshihito; Arai, Heii

    2015-03-04

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors. Previous studies have demonstrated lower serum BDNF levels in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and reported an association between BDNF levels and depression-related personality traits in healthy subjects. The aim of the present study was to explore for a possible association between peripheral BDNF levels and personality traits in patients with MDD. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 123 inpatients with MDD (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 4th edition) at the Juntendo University Koshigaya Hospital were recruited. Serum levels of BDNF were measured. Personality traits were assessed using the 125-item short version of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). Multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, dose of antidepressant, and depression severity showed that TCI Self-Directedness (SD) scores were negatively associated with serum BDNF levels (β = -0.23, p = 0.026). MDD patients who have low SD did not show the reduction in serum BDNF levels that is normally associated with depressive state. Our findings suggest that depression-related biological changes may not occur in these individuals.

  13. Physiological Levels of Melatonin Relate to Cognitive Function and Depressive Symptoms: The HEIJO-KYO Cohort.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Kenji; Saeki, Keigo; Iwamoto, Junko; Tone, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Masayuki; Kurumatani, Norio

    2015-08-01

    In contrast with randomized controlled trials, observational studies have suggested that physiological levels of melatonin are reduced in patients with dementia or depression, but the relationship has not been evaluated in large populations. The objective was to determine the relationships between physiological levels of melatonin and cognitive function and depressive symptoms. A cohort of 1105 community-dwelling elderly individuals was enrolled in this cross-sectional study (mean age, 71.8 ± 7.1 y). Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin excretion (UME) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; n = 935) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS; n = 1097) scores were measured as indices of physiological melatonin levels, cognitive function, and depressive symptoms, respectively. With increases in UME quartiles, the prevalence of cognitive impairment (MMSE score ≤ 26) and depressed mood (GDS score ≥ 6) significantly decreased (P for trend = .003 and .012, respectively). In multivariate logistic regression models, after adjusting for confounders such as age, gender, socioeconomic status, physical activity, and sleep/wake cycles, higher UME levels were significantly associated with lower odds ratios (ORs) for cognitive impairment and depressed mood (ORs: Q1 = 1.00; Q2 = 0.88 and 0.76; Q3 = 0.66 and 0.85; Q4 = 0.67 and 0.53; P for trend = .023 and .033, respectively). In addition, the highest UME group showed a significantly lower OR for depressed mood than the lowest UME group (Q4 vs Q1: OR, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.89; P = .033). UME levels above the median value were significantly associated with a lower OR for cognitive impairment, even after further adjustment for depressive symptoms (OR = 0.74; 95% confidence interval, 0.55-0.99; P = .043). Significant associations of higher physiological melatonin levels with lower prevalence of cognitive impairment and depressed mood were revealed in a large general elderly population. The association between physiological

  14. Salivary cortisol levels and the 2-year course of depressive and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Vreeburg, Sophie A; Hoogendijk, Witte J G; DeRijk, Roel H; van Dyck, Richard; Smit, Johannes H; Zitman, Frans G; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2013-09-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders have been associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. However, lower cortisol levels have also been observed in depressed patients. Whether cortisol level predicts the course of these disorders has not been examined in detail. We examined whether salivary cortisol indicators predict the 2-year course of depression and anxiety disorders. Longitudinal data are obtained from 837 participants of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, with a DSM-IV based depressive and/or anxiety disorder at baseline. At baseline, seven saliva samples were obtained, including the 1-h cortisol awakening response, evening cortisol level and a 0.5mg dexamethasone suppression test. At follow-up, DSM-IV based diagnostic interviews and Life Chart Interview integrating diagnostic and symptom trajectories over 2 years were administered to determine an unfavorable course. 41.5% of the respondents had a 2-year unfavorable course trajectory without remission longer than 3 months. Adjusted analyses showed that a lower awakening response was associated with an unfavorable course (RR=0.83, p=0.03). No associations were found between evening cortisol or cortisol suppression after dexamethasone ingestion and an unfavorable course trajectory. Among patients with depressive or anxiety disorders, a lower cortisol awakening response - which may be indicative of underlying exhaustion of the HPA axis - predicted an unfavorable course trajectory. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Comorbidity in people with depression seeking help at primary health care centers in Santiago, Chile].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Pablo; Rojas, Graciela; Fritsch, Rosemarie; Martínez, Vania; Vöhringer, Paul A; Castro, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    International evidence has shown the complex interaction between depression and chronic physical diseases. Depression in scenarios involving multiple comorbidities has not received enough attention in Chile. To characterize the depressed people who consult at Primary Health Care Centers (PHCCs), taking into account the presence of chronic physical or psychiatric comorbidity. A secondary analysis of databases used in a clinical trial. Two hundred fifty six adults seeking professional help were recruited in four PHCCs located in the Metropolitan Region. These people had a major depressive episode, identified with a structured psychiatric interview (MINI), and gave their informed consent to participate. Socio-demographic information was collected, depressive symptomatology was measured with the patient health questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), psychiatric morbidity was assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), and chronic physical diseases were self-reported by the patients. Descriptive analyses of all the variables were conducted. Seventy percent of patients had a history of depression, with a median of two prior depressive episodes. Depressive symptoms were mostly considered as moderate to severe and severe and 31% of the patients had high suicide risk. Seventy eight percent displayed a physical or psychiatric comorbidity. Of these patients, 29% only had a chronic physical comorbidity, while 46% suffered from an additional psychiatric disorder. Depressed individuals who seek help at PHCCs constitute an especially complex population that must be treated taking into account multiple comorbidities.

  16. Basal cortisol levels in relation to dimensions and DSM-IV categories of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Veen, Gerthe; van Vliet, Irene M; DeRijk, Roel H; Giltay, Erik J; van Pelt, Johannes; Zitman, Frans G

    2011-01-30

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV classification may fail to adequately distinguish neuroendocrine factors involved in the etiology of depressive and anxiety disorders. Continuous phenotypic dimensions may correlate better with underlying neuroendocrine dysregulations. We compared the categorical DSM-IV diagnoses with a dimensional approach in the same group of outpatients with depressive (n=36), anxiety (n=18), and comorbid depressive and anxiety (n=19) disorders, who were free of psychotropic medication, and in 36 healthy controls. The Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (MASQ) was used to measure the three dimensions of the tripartite model, i.e., anhedonic depression, anxious arousal, and general distress. The salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR) (0, 30, 45, and 60 min after awakening), and diurnal cortisol decline (11:00 h, 15:00 h, 19:00 h, and 23:00 h) were analyzed for linear and nonlinear associations. The CAR showed statistically significant nonlinear relationships with two MASQ dimensions, i.e., anhedonic depression and general distress, but no differences between DSM-IV categories. The diurnal cortisol decline was linearly related to the MASQ dimensions anhedonic depression and general distress and significantly higher AUC(diurnal) levels and a steeper slope were found in depressive patients compared to controls using DSM-IV categories. The present study shows that linear and nonlinear associations with salivary cortisol are detected when using phenotypic dimensions and may be complementary to phenotypic DSM-IV categories when doing neuroendocrine research.

  17. Incremental decreases in quality-adjusted life years (QALY) associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms for U.S. Adults aged 65 years and older.

    PubMed

    Jia, Haomiao; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2017-01-11

    Quality-adjusted life years (QALY) is a single value index that quantifies the overall burden of disease. It reflects all aspects of heath, including nonfatal illness and mortality outcomes by weighting life-years lived with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scores. This study examine the burden of disease due to increasing levels of depressive symptoms by examining the association between the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) scores and QALY for U.S. adults aged 65 years and older. We ascertained respondents' HRQOL scores and mortality status from the 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010 cohorts of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) with mortality follow-up data through December 31, 2011. This analysis included respondents aged 65 years and older (n = 3,680). We estimated the mean QALY throughout the remaining lifetime according to participants' depression severity categories: none or minimal (PHQ-9 score 0-4), mild (5-9), moderate (10-14), and moderately severs and severe (15 or higher). We estimated QALY loss due to major depressive disorder (PHQ-9 score 10 or higher) and to mild depression (5-9). The QALY for persons with none/minimal, mild, moderate, and moderately severe/severe depression were 14.0, 7.8, 4.7, and 3.3 years, respectively. Compared to persons without major depressive disorder, persons with major depressive disorder had 8.3 fewer QALY (12.7 vs. 4.4), or a 65% loss. Compared to persons who reported "none" or minimal depressive symptoms, persons who reported mild depressive symptoms had 6.2 fewer QALY (14.0 vs. 7.8), or a 44% loss. The same patterns were noted in demographic and socioeconomic subgroups and according to number of comorbidities. This study not only confirmed the significant burden of disease for major depressive disorder among the U.S. elderly, but also showed an incremental decrease in QALY with an increasing severity of depressive symptoms as well as significant QALY loss due to mild

  18. The Patient Health Questionnaire Somatic, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptom Scales: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, Kurt; Spitzer, Robert L; Williams, Janet B W; Löwe, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Depression, anxiety and somatization are the most common mental disorders in primary care as well as medical specialty populations; each is present in at least 5-10% of patients and frequently comorbid with one another. An efficient means for measuring and monitoring all three conditions would be desirable. Evidence regarding the psychometric and pragmatic characteristics of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9 depression, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)-7 anxiety and PHQ-15 somatic symptom scales are synthesized from two sources: (1) four multisite cross-sectional studies (three conducted in primary care and one in obstetric-gynecology practices) comprising 9740 patients, and (2) key studies from the literature that have studied these scales. The PHQ-9 and its abbreviated eight-item (PHQ-8) and two-item (PHQ-2) versions have good sensitivity and specificity for detecting depressive disorders. Likewise, the GAD-7 and its abbreviated two-item (GAD-2) version have good operating characteristics for detecting generalized anxiety, panic, social anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. The optimal cutpoint is > or = 10 on the parent scales (PHQ-9 and GAD-7) and > or = 3 on the ultra-brief versions (PHQ-2 and GAD-2). The PHQ-15 is equal or superior to other brief measures for assessing somatic symptoms and screening for somatoform disorders. Cutpoints of 5, 10 and 15 represent mild, moderate and severe symptom levels on all three scales. Sensitivity to change is well-established for the PHQ-9 and emerging albeit not yet definitive for the GAD-7 and PHQ-15. The PHQ-9, GAD-7 and PHQ-15 are brief well-validated measures for detecting and monitoring depression, anxiety and somatization. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the most prevalent. In the context of slower progress in achieving Millennium Development Goals in developing countries and the ever-increasing man-made and natural disasters in these areas, it is important to understand the association between reproductive health and mental health among women with post-disaster experiences. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 387 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) randomly selected from the October 2005 earthquake affected areas of Pakistan. Data on reproductive health was collected using the Centers for Disease Control reproductive health assessment toolkit. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, while earthquake experiences were captured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. The association of either depression or anxiety with socio-demographic variables, earthquake experiences, reproductive health and access to health facilities was estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Results Post-earthquake reproductive health events together with economic deprivation, lower family support and poorer access to health care facilities explained a significant proportion of differences in the experiencing of clinical levels of depression and anxiety. For instance, women losing resources for subsistence, separation from family and experiencing reproductive health events such as having a stillbirth, having had an abortion, having had abnormal vaginal discharge or having had genital ulcers, were at significant risk of depression and anxiety. Conclusion The relationship between women's post

  20. An investigation of core liquid level depression in small break loss-of-coolant accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.R.; Watkins, J.C. ); Motley, F.E.; Stumpf, H. ); Chen, Y.S. . Div. of Systems Research)

    1991-08-01

    Core liquid level depression can result in partial core dryout and heatup early in a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) transient. Such behavior occurs when steam, trapped in the upper regions of the reactor primary system (between the loop seal and the core inventory), moves coolant out of the core region and uncovers the rod upper elevations. The net result is core liquid level depression. Core liquid level depression and subsequent core heatups are investigated using subscale data from the ROSA-IV Program's 1/48-scale Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and the 1/1705-scale Semiscale facility. Both facilities are Westinghouse-type, four-loop, pressurized water reactor simulators. The depression phenomena and factors which influence the minimum core level are described and illustrated using examples from the data. Analyses of the subject experiments, conducted using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 (Version 12.7) thermal-hydraulic code, are also described and summarized. Finally, the response of a typical Westinghouse four-loop plant (RESAR-3S) was calculated to qualitatively study coal liquid level depression in a full-scale system. 31 refs., 37 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Health-related quality of life and depression among medical sales representatives in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Atif, Muhammad; Bashir, Arslan; Saleem, Quratulain; Hussain, Rabia; Scahill, Shane; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies have been known to pose stress and mental harassment on medical sales representatives (MSRs) in-order to increase pharmaceutical sales. This cross sectional descriptive study, conducted during November and December 2014 in the Lahore and Bahawalpur districts of Punjab, Pakistan, evaluates the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and extent of depression among MSRs in Pakistan. The significant predictors of HRQoL and depression among the MSRs were also determined. Using a convenience sampling technique, all consenting MSRs (N = 318) of pharmaceutical companies were asked to self-complete the Short Form-36 (SF-36v2) Health Survey and Stanford Personal Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8). The standard scoring scheme for the SF36v2 and PHQ-8 questionnaires was used. The PHQ-8 scores showed that 16.4 % (n = 52) and 2.5 % of respondents were suffering from major depression and severe major depression, respectively. Being depressed and having difficulty in achieving sales targets were the factors independently associated with lower physical health. Similarly, depression, insufficient time for the family and monthly income less than 36,000 Pakistan Rupees were significant predictors of lower mental health. The factors associated with depression included insufficient time for the family and unsatisfactory behavior of the managers. Compromised mental health and the prevalence of depression among the MSRs suggest pharmaceutical companies need to devise health management strategies and interventions to ensure effective prevention and management of mental health problems among Pakistani MSRs.

  2. Depression and Chronic Health Conditions Among Latinos: The Role of Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Soto, Sandra; Arredondo, Elva M; Villodas, Miguel T; Elder, John P; Quintanar, Elena; Madanat, Hala

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the "buffering hypothesis" of social network characteristics in the association between chronic conditions and depression among Latinos. Cross-sectional self-report data from the San Diego Prevention Research Center's community survey of Latinos were used (n = 393). Separate multiple logistic regression models tested the role of chronic conditions and social network characteristics in the likelihood of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms. Having a greater proportion of the network comprised of friends increased the likelihood of depression among those with high cholesterol. Having a greater proportion of women in the social network was directly related to the increased likelihood of depression, regardless of the presence of chronic health conditions. Findings suggest that network characteristics may play a role in the link between chronic conditions and depression among Latinos. Future research should explore strategies targeting the social networks of Latinos to improve health outcomes.

  3. Personal and Psychosocial Risk Factors for Physical and Mental Health Outcomes and Course of Depression among Depressed Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherbourne, Cathy Donald; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Data from 604 depressed patients in The Medical Outcomes Study showed improvements in measures of functioning and well-being associated with patients who were employed, drank less alcohol, had active coping styles and higher levels of social support, who had active and less avoidant coping styles, who were physically active, and who had fewer…

  4. The Coronary Health Improvement Projects Impact on Lowering Eating, Sleep, Stress, and Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Ray M.; Aldana, Stephen G.; Greenlaw, Roger L.; Diehl, Hans A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The Coronary Health Improvement Project (CHIP) is designed to lower cardiovascular risk factors among a group of generally healthy individuals through health education. Purpose: This study will evaluate the efficacy of the CHIP intervention at improving eating, sleep, stress, and depressive disorders. Methods: A health education…

  5. Evaluation of affective temperament and anxiety-depression levels of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asik, Mehmet; Altinbas, Kursat; Eroglu, Mustafa; Karaahmet, Elif; Erbag, Gokhan; Ertekin, Hulya; Sen, Hacer

    2015-10-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are reported to experience depressive episodes at a higher rate than healthy controls (HC). Affective temperament features are psychiatric markers that may help to predict and identify vulnerability to depression in women with PCOS. Our aim was to evaluate the affective temperaments of women with PCOS and to investigate the association with depression and anxiety levels and laboratory variables in comparison with HC. The study included 71 women with PCOS and 50 HC. Hormonal evaluations were performed for women with PCOS. Physical examination, clinical history, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and TEMPS-A were performed for all subjects. Differences between groups were evaluated using Student's t-tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. Correlations and logistic regression tests were performed. All temperament subtype scores, except hyperthymic, and HADS anxiety, depression, and total scores were significantly higher in patients with PCOS compared to HC. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between BMI and irritable temperament, and insulin and HADS depression scores in patients with PCOS. Additionally, hirsutism score and menstrual irregularity were correlated with HADS depression, anxiety and total scores in PCOS patients. In logistic regression analysis, depression was not affected by PCOS, hirsutism score or menstrual irregularity. However, HADS anxiety score was associated with hirsutism score. Our study is the first to evaluate the affective temperament features of women with PCOS. Consequently, establishing affective temperament properties for women with PCOS may help clinicians predict those patients with PCOS who are at risk for depressive and anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Trauma, time and mental health: a study of temporal reintegration and Depressive Disorder among Southeast Asian refugees.

    PubMed

    Beiser, M; Wickrama, K A S

    2004-07-01

    Prior research suggested that time splitting--suppressing the past and dissociating it from present and future--protected refugee mental health in the aftermath of catastrophe. The current study investigates temporal reintegration, defined as cognitive recapture of the past and reconnecting it with present and future, the mental health effects of temporal reintegration, and factors moderating the associated risk for Depressive Disorder. A community sample of 608 Southeast Asian refugees, resettled in Vancouver British Columbia between 1979 and 1981, were interviewed on three separate occasions over a 10-year period. Participants performed a temporal orientation task and responded to questions about employment, social relations and mental health. Depressive Disorder, measured by a typology derived from Grade of Membership analysis of symptoms, constituted the dependent variable. Latent Growth Curve Analysis was used to examine both levels and rates of change in the probability of Depressive Disorder as predicted by changes in temporal reintegration, as well as the contribution of putative social and psychological moderators to explaining variations in growth parameters. Time relatedness increased over the duration of the study. Temporal reintegration jeopardized mental health. Employment and relational stability each moderated the mental health effects of temporal reintegration. Although time splitting may be effective in coping with adversity over the short-term, eventual temporal reintegration is probably ineluctable. Stability in love and work are protective factors, mitigating the mental health vicissitudes of temporal reintegration. Implications for optimal timing of clinical interventions are discussed.

  7. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for recurrent major depression: A 'best buy' for health care?

    PubMed

    Shawyer, Frances; Enticott, Joanne C; Özmen, Mehmet; Inder, Brett; Meadows, Graham N

    2016-10-01

    While mindfulness-based cognitive therapy is effective in reducing depressive relapse/recurrence, relatively little is known about its health economic properties. We describe the health economic properties of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in relation to its impact on depressive relapse/recurrence over 2 years of follow-up. Non-depressed adults with a history of three or more major depressive episodes were randomised to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy + depressive relapse active monitoring (n = 101) or control (depressive relapse active monitoring alone) (n = 102) and followed up for 2 years. Structured self-report instruments for service use and absenteeism provided cost data items for health economic analyses. Treatment utility, expressed as disability-adjusted life years, was calculated by adjusting the number of days an individual was depressed by the relevant International Classification of Diseases 12-month severity of depression disability weight from the Global Burden of Disease 2010. Intention-to-treat analysis assessed the incremental cost-utility ratios of the interventions across mental health care, all of health-care and whole-of-society perspectives. Per protocol and site of usual care subgroup analyses were also conducted. Probabilistic uncertainty analysis was completed using cost-utility acceptability curves. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy participants had significantly less major depressive episode days compared to controls, as supported by the differential distributions of major depressive episode days (modelled as Poisson, p < 0.001). Average major depressive episode days were consistently less in the mindfulness-based cognitive therapy group compared to controls, e.g., 31 and 55 days, respectively. From a whole-of-society perspective, analyses of patients receiving usual care from all sectors of the health-care system demonstrated dominance (reduced costs, demonstrable health gains). From a mental health

  8. Overgeneral autobiographical memory predicts higher prospective levels of depressive symptoms and intrusions in borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Kris; Pieters, Guido; Claes, Laurence; Berens, Ann; Raes, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Overgeneral memory (OGM), the tendency to retrieve categories of events from autobiographical memory instead of single events, is found to be a reliable predictor for future mood disturbances and post-traumatic symptom severity. Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) often report co-morbid episodes of major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Therefore, we investigated whether OGM would predict depression severity and (post-traumatic) stress symptoms in BPD patients. At admission (N = 54) and at six-month follow-up (N ≥ 31), BPD patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders, the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders, the Autobiographical Memory Test, the Beck Depression Inventory-2nd edition (BDI-II), and the Impact of Event Scale. OGM at baseline predicted (a) higher levels of depressive symptoms at follow-up and (b) more intrusions related to a stressful event over and above baseline levels of borderline symptoms, depressive symptoms, and intrusions, respectively. No association was found between memory specificity and event-related avoidance at follow-up. Despite previous findings suggesting that OGM in BPD is less robust than in MDD and PTSD, our results suggest that memory specificity in BPD patients may have some relevance for the course of depressive and stress symptomatology in BPD.

  9. Glutamate level detection by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with post-stroke depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Li, Yue-Hua; Li, Ming-Hua; Lu, Jing; Zhao, Jun-Gong; Sun, Xiao-Jiang; Zhang, Bin; Ye, Jian-Lin

    2012-02-01

    In recent studies, the glutamate (Glu) level has been quantified using the modified STEAM sequence on 3T MRI. We enrolled 15 healthy volunteers and a group of 51 patients who experienced stroke for the first time and had a good prognosis. The patients with infarction were divided into three groups according to their scores by using the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder and the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). We studied the association between post-stroke depression and (1)H-MRS measurements in unaffected frontal lobes. Single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed to assess N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA)/Cr, (Glu)/Cr, choline (Cho)/Cr, and myoinositol (mI)/Cr ratios in stroke patients. The 11 patients (21.5%) who met the criteria for depression and 9 patients (17.6%) who had a high score for HDRS, (>14) but were not depressed, had a significantly higher Glu/Cr ratio than patients who scored ≤14 on HDRS and control groups (p < 0.001). No differences were found in NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, or mI/Cr between the groups after stroke. These findings suggest that post-stroke depression is accompanied by changes in glutamate levels in the frontal lobe.

  10. Depression from childhood through adolescence: Risk mechanisms across multiple systems and levels of analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper selectively reviews recent research, especially in the last two years (2012-2014) in preschool, child, and adolescent depression. In particular, attention is paid to developmental epidemiology as well as risk factors and processes that contribute to depression trajectories over time. Emphasis is placed on a developmental psychopathology perspective in which risks are instantiated across multiple systems and levels of analysis, including genetics, stress contexts and processes, biological stress mechanisms, temperament, emotion, reward, cognitive factors and processes, and interpersonal influences. These risks dynamically transact over time, as they emerge and stabilize into relatively trait-like vulnerabilities that confer risk for the increasing rates of depression observed in adolescence. Overall, this summary illustrates that considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the complex developmental processes contributing to depression. Finally, a few gaps are highlighted as opportunities for future research. PMID:25692174

  11. Comorbid Diabetes and Depression in African Americans: Implications for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Chlebowy, Diane Orr; Coty, Mary-Beth; Fu, Liyan; Hines-Martin, Vicki

    2017-03-09

    Health care providers (HCPs) face many obstacles as they undertake efforts to meet the challenges of caring for African American patients with comorbid diabetes and depression. This review article discusses the incidence of comorbid diabetes and depression in African Americans, cultural factors affecting diabetes self-management, and clinical practice implications for the HCP. The role of patient-centered care, engagement, and best-practice strategies are discussed to provide the HCP with guidelines regarding the minimal standards that support improved health care outcomes for African Americans with comorbid diabetes and depression.

  12. Treating Tobacco Dependence in Clinically Depressed Smokers: Effect of Smoking Cessation on Mental Health Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Hall, Sharon M.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Eisendrath, Stuart; Rossi, Joseph S.; Redding, Colleen A.; Rosen, Amy B.; Meisner, Marc; Humfleet, Gary L.; Gorecki, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed data from a randomized trial of 322 actively depressed smokers and examined the effect of smoking cessation on their mental health functioning. Only 1 of 10 measures at 4 follow-up time points was significant: participants who successfully stopped smoking reported less alcohol use than did participants who continued smoking. Depressive symptoms declined significantly over time for participants who stopped smoking and those who continued smoking; there were no group differences. Individuals in treatment for clinical depression can be helped to stop smoking without adversely affecting their mental health functioning. PMID:17600251

  13. Body mass index moderates the relationship between C-reactive protein and depressive symptoms: evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Tingting; Liu, Wenhua; Yin, Minghui; Shu, Chang; Yan, Mingming; Zhang, Jianyuan; Yin, Ping

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of abnormal body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) in the depression-CRP (C-reactive protein) relationship in a healthy middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. Analytical samples were drawn from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), and participants were categorized by different BMI levels. Depressive subtypes were evaluated both at baseline and follow-up using the Center for Epidemiology Studies Depression scale. Hs-CRP and other variables were measured at baseline. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the cross-sectional and longitudinal relationship between depression and baseline hs-CRP. Depression was significantly negatively associated with BMI (ρ = −0.077, p < 0.0001), with underweight associated with worse depressive symptoms than other BMI groups. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between serum hs-CRP and depressive subtypes were significantly positive in the underweight group (p < 0.05). However, in the other BMI groups (from normal weight to obesity), the CRP-depression relationship was no longer significant (p > 0.05). The significant relationship between CRP and depression in the underweight group suggested that not only obesity but also a low BMI could explain a substantial portion of the inflammation-depression link. PMID:28128231

  14. Attitudes and beliefs about mental health among African American older adults suffering from depression

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Kyaien O.; Lee, Brenda; Mayers, Vanessa; Robinson, Deborah; Reynolds, Charles F.; Albert, Steve; Brown, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Depression among older adults is a major public health concern leading to increased disability and mortality. Less than 3% of older adults utilize professional mental health services for the treatment of depression, less than any other adult age group. And despite similar rates of depression, African Americans are significantly less likely to seek, engage and be retained in professional mental health services than their white counterparts. Cultural differences in the way depression symptoms are manifested, defined, interpreted and labeled may in part explain some of these racial differences in help-seeking behaviors. Focus group methodology was utilized to identify and explore attitudes and beliefs about depression and mental health treatment utilization among 42 older African Americans who had recently suffered a major depressive episode. Thematic analysis of identified six overarching themes: (a) perceptions of depression, (b) the African American experience, (c) seeking treatment as a last resort, (d) myths about treatment, (e) stigma associated with seeking treatment and (f) culturally appropriate coping strategies. We discuss implications for practice, education and research. PMID:21423819

  15. Analyzing the Levels of Depressive Symptoms among Secondary School Students in Canada and Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karatas, Zeynep; Tremblay, Richard Ernest

    2015-01-01

    To examine the level of depressive symptoms of the secondary school students in Turkey and Canada has been aimed in this study. The research group of the study consists of 1050 secondary school students with the average age of 13. Their socio-economic levels are low in both countries, Canada and Turkey. Data has been analyzed by independent groups…

  16. Screening mixed depression and bipolarity in the postpartum period at a primary health care center.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Sercan Bulut; Bucaktepe, Gamze Erten; Uludağ, Ayşegül; Bulut, İbrahim Umud; Erdem, Özgür; Altınbaş, Kürşat

    2016-11-01

    Mixed depression is a clinical condition accompanied by the symptoms of (hypo)mania and is considered to be a predictor for bipolar disorder. Compared to pure major depression, mixed depression is worse in progress. There are limited data on the prevalence of mixed depression since it is a relatively new entity. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of mixed depression during the postpartum period which is risky for mood disorders. The study included 63 postpartum women. The participants were administered Beck Depression Scale, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Mood Disorders Questionnaire (MDQ), and Modified Hypomania Symptom Checklist-32 (mHCL-32). The MDQ scores of the women with expected depression according to the EPDS cut-off scores, were significantly higher than the women with lower EPDS scores (t=-4.968; p<0.001). The modified hypomania scores were significantly higher in the women with higher depression scores compared to the women under EPDS cut-off scores (t=-4.713; p<0.001). According to the EPDS and BDS results, 27 (42.9%) and 14 (22.2%) women needed additional clinical examination for depression, respectively. In addition, 3 (4.8%) women require additional clinical examination for bipolar disorder. The scores for the first item of MDQ were above the cut-off value in 11 (17.5%) women. According to the mHCL-32 results, 50 (79.4%) women had at least 1 symptom, 45 (71.4%) women had at least 3 symptoms, and 43 (68.3%) women had at least 5 symptoms of mixed depression. Postpartum mixed depression should be promptly diagnosed by using appropriate diagnostic tools, particularly by primary health care physicians. Patients with mixed depression should be closely monitored to avoid manic switch. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mental health and migration: depression, alcohol abuse, and access to health care among migrants in Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Ismayilova, Leyla; Lee, Hae Nim; Shaw, Stacey; El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Terlikbayeva, Assel; Rozental, Yelena

    2014-12-01

    One-fifth of Kazakhstan's population is labor migrants working in poor conditions with limited legal rights. This paper examines self-rated health, mental health and access to health care among migrant workers. Using geo-mapping, a random sample of internal and external migrant market workers was selected in Almaty (N = 450). We used survey logistic regression adjusted for clustering of workers within stalls. Almost half of participants described their health as fair or poor and reported not seeing a doctor when needed, 6.2% had clinical depression and 8.7% met criteria for alcohol abuse. Female external migrants were at higher risk for poor health and underutilization of health services. High mobility was associated with depression among internal migrants and with alcohol abuse among female migrant workers. This study demonstrates the urgent need to address health and mental health needs and improve access to health care among labor migrants in Central Asia.

  18. Social support, personality and depressive symptoms over 7 years: the Health and Lifestyle cohort.

    PubMed

    Grainge, M J; Brugha, T S; Spiers, N

    2000-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a negative relationship between social support and depression is stronger in extroverts. Data on social support and personality were obtained from an existing cohort of 9003 adults (the Health and Lifestyle Survey, UK), of whom 3594 respondents who were followed-up 7 years later contributed to the present analysis. Six depression items from the 30-item General Health Questionnaire, summed, were divided into five levels and a proportional odds analysis was performed. Information on social support was also obtained at follow-up. For females, there was a highly significant interaction between Time of Residence in Area and extroversion (P<0.001). For males, interactions involving Adults in Household and Living as Married reached borderline significance (0.050.10). It is unlikely that a lack of social support is more or less harmful for introverts, although the hypothesis should be re-tested in a study with a much shorter period of follow-up and higher response rate.

  19. Depressive symptoms, diet quality, physical activity, and body composition among populations in Nova Scotia, Canada: report from the Atlantic Partnership for Tomorrow's Health.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhijie M; Parker, Louise; Dummer, Trevor J B

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the association between depressive symptoms and diet quality, physical activity, and body composition among Nova Scotians. 4511 men and women aged 35-69 years were recruited to the Atlantic Partnership for Tomorrow's Health study from 2009 through 2010 in Nova Scotia, Canada. Depressive symptoms were assessed by using the Patient Health Questionnaire. Anthropometric indexes and body composition were measured. Current antidepressant use, habitual diet intake, physical activity, and potential confounders were collected through questionnaires. In multivariable regression analyses, depressive symptoms were positively associated with all obese indexes after controlling for potential confounders (all P for trend<0.001). Compared with non-depressed individuals, those with mild and major depression had significantly increased odds ratios (ORs) for both obesity and abdominal obesity (OR 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], (1.50, 2.25) and 1.56 (95% CI, 1.30, 1.87) for obesity and 1.46 (95% CI, 1.20, 1.77) and 1.88 (95% CI, 1.58, 2.24) for abdominal obesity, respectively). Depressed individuals were less likely to have a high quality diet or engage in high levels of physical activity compared with their non-depressed counterparts. Depressive symptoms are associated with higher levels of obesity, poor diet, and physical inactivity among Nova Scotians in Canada. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association between depression and work stress in nursing professionals with technical education level.

    PubMed

    Gherardi-Donato, Edilaine Cristina da Silva; Cardoso, Lucilene; Teixeira, Carla Araújo Bastos; Pereira, Sandra de Souza; Reisdorfer, Emilene

    2015-01-01

    to analize the relationship between depression and work stress in nursing professionals with technical education level of a teaching hospital in a city of the state of São Paulo. a cross-sectional study was carried out with 310 nursing technicians and nursing assistants, randomly selected. The outcome analyzed was the report of depression and its relationship with high levels of work stress, measured using the Job Stress Scale. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were performed. the prevalence of depression in this study was 20%, and it was more expressive in females, aged over 40 years, living without a partner and in smokers. The chance of depression was twice as high among professionals showing high levels of work stress, even after multiple regression adjusting. depressive symptoms were strongly associated with high stress levels among nursing assistants and nursing technicians, evidencing a problem to be considered along with the planning of specific intervention programs for this population, as well as the need for better cases management by the supervisors.

  1. Association between depression and work stress in nursing professionals with technical education level 1

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi-Donato, Edilaine Cristina da Silva; Cardoso, Lucilene; Teixeira, Carla Araújo Bastos; Pereira, Sandra de Souza; Reisdorfer, Emilene

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analize the relationship between depression and work stress in nursing professionals with technical education level of a teaching hospital in a city of the state of São Paulo. Methods: a cross-sectional study was carried out with 310 nursing technicians and nursing assistants, randomly selected. The outcome analyzed was the report of depression and its relationship with high levels of work stress, measured using the Job Stress Scale. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were performed. Results: the prevalence of depression in this study was 20%, and it was more expressive in females, aged over 40 years, living without a partner and in smokers. The chance of depression was twice as high among professionals showing high levels of work stress, even after multiple regression adjusting. Conclusion: depressive symptoms were strongly associated with high stress levels among nursing assistants and nursing technicians, evidencing a problem to be considered along with the planning of specific intervention programs for this population, as well as the need for better cases management by the supervisors. PMID:26444177

  2. A Comparison of Levels of Quality of Life, Depression and Loneliness among Athletes with Different Levels of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unver, Saban; Atan, Tulin; Cavusoglu, Gul; Erim, Vedat; Yamak, Bade

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the levels of life quality, depression and loneliness among the students of the Faculty of Sports Sciences (FSS), national wrestlers and non national wrestlers in terms of some demographic variables. The participants of the study included 37 students from the Faculty of Sports Sciences of Ondokuz Mayis…

  3. A Comparison of Levels of Quality of Life, Depression and Loneliness among Athletes with Different Levels of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unver, Saban; Atan, Tulin; Cavusoglu, Gul; Erim, Vedat; Yamak, Bade

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the levels of life quality, depression and loneliness among the students of the Faculty of Sports Sciences (FSS), national wrestlers and non national wrestlers in terms of some demographic variables. The participants of the study included 37 students from the Faculty of Sports Sciences of Ondokuz Mayis…

  4. Learned resourcefulness, danger in intimate partner relationships, and mental health symptoms of depression and PTSD in abused women.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kerry

    2013-06-01

    The study investigated the relationships among learned resourcefulness, dangerousness in abusive relationships, and symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of abused sheltered women. A cross-sectional descriptive research design was utilized and 42 women met criteria for participation. Data were collected over a ten-month period from June 2010 to March 2011 using the following instruments: (1) demographic data collection form, (2) Self-Control Schedule (SCS), (3) Danger Assessment (DA), (4) Index of Spouse Abuse (ISA), (5) Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II), and (6) Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Results indicated that 74% of the sample reported symptoms of depression and 67% met criteria for PTSD. In addition, there was 62% comorbidity between depression and PTSD. High levels of danger and low levels of resourcefulness were associated with increased symptoms of depression and PTSD. Further research is necessary, but results of the study suggest that resourcefulness may be an important consideration for abused women in reducing the impact of violence and abuse on mental health issues.

  5. Activities of daily living, quality of life, social support and depression levels of elderly individuals in Turkish society.

    PubMed

    Unsar, Serap; Dindar, Ilknur; Kurt, Seda

    2015-06-01

    To determine activities of daily living, quality of life, social support and depression levels of elderly individuals and the factors affecting each of these items. The cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2009 to June 2012 in Edirne, Turkey, and included elderly individuals over 60 years of age. Data was collected using a survey form, the Katz Activities of Daily Living Scale, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Data was analysed using Spearman's correlation analysis. Of the 912 subjects in the study, 509(55.8%) were females and 402(44.2%) were males, with an overall mean age of 68.05 ± 6.6 years (range: 60-94 years). Besides, 644(70.6%) of the subjects were married and 595(65.2%) were living with their spouse. The levels of social support and activities of daily living of elderly individuals with a high quality of life were higher, and their levels of depression were lower (p<0.05). Older age, chronic health problems and polypharmacy should be taken into account when planning healthcare services for the elderly to ensure that they maintain a better quality of life.

  6. Reconsidering the role of social disadvantage in physical and mental health: stressful life events, health behaviors, race, and depression.

    PubMed

    Mezuk, Briana; Rafferty, Jane A; Kershaw, Kiarri N; Hudson, Darrell; Abdou, Cleopatra M; Lee, Hedwig; Eaton, William W; Jackson, James S

    2010-12-01

    Prevalence of depression is associated inversely with some indicators of socioeconomic position, and the stress of social disadvantage is hypothesized to mediate this relation. Relative to whites, blacks have a higher burden of most physical health conditions but, unexpectedly, a lower burden of depression. This study evaluated an etiologic model that integrates mental and physical health to account for this counterintuitive patterning. The Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (Maryland, 1993-2004) was used to evaluate the interaction between stress and poor health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, poor diet, and obesity) and risk of depression 12 years later for 341 blacks and 601 whites. At baseline, blacks engaged in more poor health behaviors and had a lower prevalence of depression compared with whites (5.9% vs. 9.2%). The interaction between health behaviors and stress was nonsignificant for whites (odds ratio (OR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 0.98, 1.11); for blacks, the interaction term was significant and negative (β: -0.18, P < 0.014). For blacks, the association between median stress and depression was stronger for those who engaged in zero (OR = 1.34) relative to 1 (OR = 1.12) and ≥2 (OR = 0.94) poor health behaviors. Findings are consistent with the proposed model of mental and physical health disparities.

  7. Coming out in color: racial/ethnic differences in the relationship between level of sexual identity disclosure and depression among lesbians.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Frances; Matthews, Alicia K; Hughes, Tonda L; Muramatsu, Naoko; Wilsnack, Sharon C; Johnson, Timothy P; Riley, Barth B

    2015-04-01

    Disclosing one's sexual minority identity, or "coming out," has varying effects on the mental health of lesbians. Previous research indicates a negative association between disclosure and depression. However, these findings are based on research with White lesbians. To date, there is a paucity of studies that examined how the relationship between disclosure and depression may differ by race/ethnicity among lesbians. To address this gap, we examined the relationship between disclosure and depression among African American (26.5%), Latina (19.7%), and White (53.8%) self-identified lesbians (N = 351) in 2 survey-interviews (∼ 3-years apart). Over 50% of the participants reported a history of lifetime depression at baseline and 35.9% reported depression at Time 2 (T2). Disclosure levels varied: 78.9% had disclosed to their mother, 58.4% to their father, and 83.3% to a sibling. The mean level for disclosure to nonfamily individuals was 6.29 (SD 2.64; range 0-9). Disclosure results varied by race/ethnicity showing African American lesbians (vs. White lesbians) were less likely to disclose to nonfamily individuals when controlling for covariates. Results for the relationship between disclosure and depression showed disclosure to either parent or sibling was not associated with depression for the total sample. Among Latinas only, disclosure to nonfamily individuals was associated with less depression. Additional research is needed to explore racial/ethnic differences in disclosure with certain individuals and to better understand the relation between disclosure and depression. Findings have implications for reducing overall rates of depression among lesbians living with multiple-minority identities. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Coming Out in Color: Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Relationship between Level of Sexual Identity Disclosure and Depression among Lesbians

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Frances; Matthews, Alicia K.; Hughes, Tonda L.; Muramatsu, Naoko; Wilsnack, Sharon C.; Johnson, Timothy P.; Riley, Barth B.

    2014-01-01

    Disclosing one's sexual minority identity, or “coming out,” has varying effects on the mental health of lesbians. Previous research indicates a negative association between disclosure and depression. However, these findings are based on research with White lesbians. To date, there is a paucity of studies that examined how the relationship between disclosure and depression may differ by race/ethnicity among lesbians. To address this gap, we examined the relationship between disclosure and depression among African American (26.5%), Latina (19.7%), and White (53.8%) self-identified lesbians (N=351) in two survey-interviews (~3-years apart). Over 50% of the participants reported a history of lifetime depression at baseline and 35.9% reported depression at T2. Disclosure levels varied: 78.9% had disclosed to their mother, 58.4% to their father, and 83.3% to a sibling. The mean level for disclosure to nonfamily individuals was 6.29 (SD 2.64; range 0–9). Disclosure results varied by race/ethnicity showing African American lesbians (versus White lesbians) were less likely to disclose to nonfamily individuals when controlling for covariates. Results for the relationship between disclosure and depression showed disclosure to either parent or sibling was not associated with depression for the total sample. Among Latinas only, disclosure to nonfamily individuals was associated with less depression. Additional research is needed to explore racial/ethnic differences in disclosure with certain individuals and to better understand the relation between disclosure and depression. Findings have implications for reducing overall rates of depression among lesbians living with multiple-minority identities. PMID:25181323

  9. Elevated C-reactive protein levels, psychological distress, and depression in 73, 131 individuals.

    PubMed

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2013-02-01

    CONTEXT The pathogenesis of depression is not fully understood, but studies suggest that low-grade systemic inflammation contributes to the development of depression. OBJECTIVE To test whether elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with psychological distress and depression. DESIGN We performed cross-sectional and prospective analyses of CRP levels in 4 clinically relevant categories using data from 2 general population studies. SETTING The Copenhagen General Population and the Copenhagen City Heart studies. PARTICIPANTS We examined 73 131 men and women aged 20 to 100 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES We ascertained psychological distress with 2 single-item self-reports and depression using self-reported antidepressant use, register-based prescription of antidepressants, and register-based hospitalization with depression. RESULTS In cross-sectional analyses, increasing CRP levels were associated with increasing risk for psychological distress and depression (P = 3 × 10-8 to P = 4 × 10-105 for trend). For self-reported use of antidepressants, the odds ratio was 1.38 (95% CI, 1.23-1.55) for CRP levels of 1.01 to 3.00 mg/L, 2.02 (1.77-2.30) for 3.01 to 10.00 mg/L, and 2.70 (2.25-3.25) for greater than 10.00 mg/L compared with 0.01 to 1.00 mg/L. For prescription of antidepressants, the corresponding odds ratios were 1.08 (95% CI, 0.99-1.17), 1.47 (1.33-1.62), and 1.77 (1.52-2.05), respectively; for hospitalization with depression, 1.30 (1.01-1.67), 1.84 (1.39-2.43), and 2.27 (1.54-3.32), respectively. In prospective analyses, increasing CRP levels were also associated with increasing risk for hospitalization with depression (P = 4 × 10-8 for trend). CONCLUSIONS Elevated levels of CRP are associated with increased risk for psychological distress and depression in the general population.

  10. Lithium increases nitric oxide levels in subjects with bipolar disorder during depressive episodes.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rafael T; Zanetti, Marcus V; Busatto, Geraldo F; Mouro, Margaret G; Zarate, Carlos A; Gattaz, Wagner F; Higa, Elisa M; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2014-08-01

    Altered nitric oxide (NO) signaling has been associated with the pathophysiology of Bipolar Disorder (BD), directly affecting neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity cascades. Lithium has shown to regulate NO levels in preclinical models. However, no study has addressed peripheral NO levels in unmedicated BD. Also, lithium's effects on NO levels have not been studied in humans. Plasma NO was evaluated in subjects with BD I and II during a depressive episode (n = 26). Subjects had a score of ≥18 in the 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and were followed-up during a 6-week trial with lithium. Plasma NO levels were also compared to matched healthy controls (n = 28). NO was determined by chemiluminescence method. Lithium treatment significantly increased plasma NO levels after 6 weeks of treatment in comparison to baseline levels in bipolar depression (p = 0.016). Baseline NO levels during depressive episodes showed no difference when matching up to healthy controls (p = 0.66). The present findings suggest that lithium upregulates NO signaling in unmedicated BD with short illness duration. Further studies with larger samples are needed to confirm the effects of lithium on NO pathway and its association with synaptic plasticity and therapeutics of BD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Association of salivary cortisol levels and later depressive state in elderly people living in a rural community: a 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Nabeta, Hiromi; Mizoguchi, Yoshito; Matsushima, Jun; Imamura, Yoshiomi; Watanabe, Itaru; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Kojima, Naoki; Kawashima, Toshiro; Yamada, Shigeto; Monji, Akira

    2014-04-01

    Late-life depressive disorder is becoming an important issue in health economics in the world, as it has been reported to be one of major risk factors for incidence of dementia. Identification of predictive markers associated with depression in later life is therefore of high priority in public health. The aim of the study was to examine the association of salivary cortisol levels with a later depressive state in elderly healthy people living in a rural Japan community. Salivary cortisol levels were measured in 68 elderly healthy people (24 men; 44 women) followed by completion of the BDI, MMSE, and FAB from 2004 to 2006. The same cohort underwent BDI again from 2007 to 2009. In healthy elderly women subject, a significant positive correlation was found between salivary cortisol levels at baseline and BDI scores at follow-up, but not at baseline. Salivary cortisol levels at baseline were not correlated with the score of either MMSE or FAB. When the cut-off point of BDI scores were set at 20/21, logistic regression analyses revealed that salivary cortisol levels at baseline had a significant positive relationship with a later depressive state. Age and gender were also significantly related with a later depressive state. The present study involves small number of participants. Higher salivary cortisol levels were associated with a later depressive state in elderly healthy women living in rural community. Salivary cortisol might be a predictive marker for a later depressive state in elderly women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring the relevance of autonomy and relatedness for mental health in healthy and depressed women from two different cultures: when does culture matter?

    PubMed

    Balkir, Nazli; Arens, Elisabeth A; Barnow, Sven

    2013-08-01

    It is well known that the absence of both autonomy and social support (relatedness) are two important etiologic pathways to major depressive disorder (MDD). However, cross-cultural researchers state that the implications of autonomy and relatedness for mental health vary across cultures. To test these assumptions, the current study investigated the relevance of autonomy and relatedness for mental health in healthy and depressed women from two different cultures (Germans and Turkish immigrants in Germany). One hundred and eight (108) women were evaluated for their levels of autonomy/relatedness satisfaction, for overall psychopathological complaints including depression, for affectivity and for perceived loneliness through self-report measures. Among healthy groups, relatedness satisfaction predicted better mental health in Turkish women, whereas in German women, autonomy satisfaction was the better mental health predictor. Within depressed groups however, cultural differences in mental health outcomes regarding autonomy were no longer evident. Autonomy was associated with higher levels of mental health in Turkish as well as in German patients. Our findings indicate that the relationship between autonomy and mental health is culture-specific in healthy women, but disappears in depressed women. These findings are discussed with consideration of clinical implications and an outlook regarding further research.

  13. Review of a research report on postpartum depression impacted by home health visits.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    The research findings from Tamaki's (2008) study are important to EBNP for both maternity and psychiatric-mental health nurses. Although the findings demonstrated that mental health visits showed improvement in women with postpartum depression, one suggestion would be to implement a study with a larger sample population and in multiple cultures. With support supplied by numerous quantitative and qualitative studies, such as Tamaki's (2008) study, postpartum depression could be treated with a new non-pharmaceutical measure that would be more beneficial and effective to women and their babies. It will also open new doors for EBNP in mental health and revolutionize home health nursing.

  14. Age Differences in Health Literacy: Do Younger Korean Adults Have a Higher Level of Health Literacy than Older Korean Adults?

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jin; Lee, Hee Yun; Chung, Soondool

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of health literacy of adults living in South Korea and identify factors associated with health literacy in different age groups. Using a quota sampling method, authors recruited 1,000 Korean adults age 20 years and older. Health literacy was measured by using three items selected from a 16-question self-report health literacy measure. In accordance with Andersen's behavioral model, predisposing, enabling, and need factors were included in the multiple regression model. Age differences were found in health literacy levels; specifically, lower health literacy was associated with older age. For the 20 through 44-year age group, health literacy was positively associated with having private health insurance and higher self-rated health status. For the 45 through 64 and the 65 and over age groups, education was positively associated with health literacy. For the oldest age group, gender also had a positive association with health literacy. Lower levels of depression were significantly linked to a higher level of health literacy across all ages. This study illustrates ways to increase health literacy among different age groups and prioritizes target intervention groups in an effort to reduce health disparities. © 2017 National Association of Social Workers.

  15. [The relation between health-related quality of life and pain, depression, anxiety, and functional independence in persons with chronic physical disability].

    PubMed

    Tarsuslu, Tülay; Yümin, Eylem Tütün; Oztürk, Asuman; Yümin, Murat

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relation between health- related quality of life and pain, depression, anxiety, and functional independence. The study included 82 healthy subjects aged 38.18+/-11.06 and 89 physically disabled subjects aged 37.72+/-16.40. Physical and social characteristics of the subjects such as age, height, length, weight, gender, occupational and marital status, and level of education were recorded. Visual Analogue Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Nottingham Health Profile, and Functional Independence Measure were used to evaluate pain, depression, anxiety, quality of life, and functional independence, respectively. Compared to healthy individuals, chronically disabled subjects had higher pain, depression and anxiety and lower quality of life scores. Between-group comparison showed that there was a significant difference in pain, depression, anxiety levels and health-related quality of life (p<0.05). Similarly, both healthy and disabled individuals indicated a negative correlation between pain, depression, anxiety and quality of life (p<0.05). In individuals with chronic disabilities, pain may induce serious psychological problems, negatively affecting quality of life. This study showed that in chronically disabled individuals, there is a strong correlation between pain, depression, anxiety, and quality of life. These results should be considered carefully when planning assessment and rehabilitation programs for individuals with chronic disabilities.

  16. Depressants

    MedlinePlus

    ... GHB and Rohypnol ® are also misused to facilitate sexual assault. Affect on mind Depressants used therapeutically do what they are prescribed for to put you to sleep, relieve anxiety and muscle spasms, and prevent seizures. They also: cause amnesia, leaving no memory of events that occur ...

  17. Lower Odds of Poststroke Symptoms of Depression When Physical Activity Guidelines Met: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Chris M.; Simpson, Annie N.

    2017-01-01

    Background One-third of individuals with stroke report symptoms of depression, which has a negative impact on recovery. Physical activity (PA) is a potentially effective therapy. Our objective was to examine the associations of subjectively assessed PA levels and symptoms of depression in a nationally representative stroke sample. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 175 adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012 cycle. Moderate, vigorous, and combination equivalent PA metabolic equivalent (MET)-minutes per week averages were derived from the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire, and .the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines/American College of Sports Medicine recommendations of ≥500 MET-minutes per week of moderate, vigorous, or combination equivalent PA were used as cut points. Depression symptoms were measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Results Meeting moderate PA guidelines resulted in 74% lower odds of having depression symptoms (P < .0001) and 89% lower odds of major symptoms of depression (P = .0003). Meeting vigorous guidelines showed a 91% lower odds of having mild symptoms of depression (P = .04). Participating in some moderate, vigorous, or combination equivalent PA revealed the odds of depression symptoms 13 times greater compared with meeting guidelines (P = .005); odds of mild symptoms of depression were 9 times greater (P = .01); and odds of major symptoms of depression were 15 times greater (P = .006). Conclusions There is a lower risk of developing mild symptoms of depression when vigorous guidelines for PA are met and developing major symptoms of depression when moderate guidelines met. Participating in some PA is not enough to reduce the risk of depression symptoms. PMID:27145542

  18. Depression in older people: visual impairment and subjective ratings of health.

    PubMed

    Hayman, Karen J; Kerse, Ngaire M; La Grow, Steven J; Wouldes, Trecia; Robertson, M Clare; Campbell, A John

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of depression in a sample of older adults with impaired vision and investigate associations between physical and visual disability and depression. We analyzed cross-sectional baseline data from 391 participants aged >or=75 years with visual acuity of 6/24 (20/80) or less, recruited for a randomized controlled trial of interventions to prevent falls (the VIP trial). Measures included the geriatric depression scale (GDS-15), the state-trait anxiety index, activities of daily living (Nottingham extended ADL scale), physical activity (human activity profile), an index of visual functioning (VF-14), health-related quality of life (SF-36), objective measures of physical ability, and a measure of visual acuity. Regression models were developed to investigate the association between depression scores and physical, psychological, and visual disability. About 29.4% (115 of 391) of participants were identified as potentially depressed (GDS-15 score >4). Physical function, physical activity, physical ability, visual function, anxiety, and self-reported physical and mental health were significantly worse for those with depressive symptomatology. Physical, visual, and psychological factors collectively explained 41% of the variance in the depression score in a linear regression model (R=0.421, adjusted R=0.410, F (7,382)=39.680, p<0.001). Depression was not related to age, gender, living situation, ethnicity, or number of prescription or antidepressant medications taken. Depression was common in this population of older adults with severe visual impairment. Impaired visual and physical functions were associated with symptoms of depression. The effect of visual disability was independent of the effect of physical disability. The strength of this relationship, and the results of the regression analyses, indicate that a person who is visually or physically disabled is more likely to suffer from depression.

  19. Levels of serum immunomodulators and alterations with electroconvulsive therapy in treatment-resistant major depression

    PubMed Central

    Zincir, Serkan; Öztürk, Pelin; Bilgen, Ali Emrah; İzci, Filiz; Yükselir, Cihad

    2016-01-01

    Studies in recent years have indicated that neuroimmunological events and immune activation may have a place in the etiology of depression. It has been suggested from data that there is a causal relationship between activation of the immune system and excessive release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and the etiology of depression. Although the mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is unclear, there is evidence that it can reduce cytokines and immune system changes. In our study, we aimed to determine how levels of serum immunomodulators were affected by ECT in major depression patients. This study was conducted on 50 patients with treatment-resistant major depression. The data of the patients were compared with 30 healthy individuals with similar demographic characteristics. A clinical response occurred in the patients and at the end of therapy, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IL-4, and interferon-gamma levels were measured. The disease severity was assessed with the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Data analysis was performed using SPSS Version 15. Significant differences were determined between the patients with major depression and control group with respect to basal serum IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-10, IL-4, and interferon-gamma levels. ECT treatment was shown to reduce these differences. ECT may cause significant changes in the activity of the immune system. The consideration of the relationship between the immune endocrine neurotransmitter systems could contribute to new theories regarding the mechanism of antidepressant treatment and biology of depression. PMID:27366071

  20. Health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms among Hispanic adolescents: Examining acculturation discrepancies and family functioning.

    PubMed

    Cano, Miguel Ángel; Schwartz, Seth J; Castillo, Linda G; Unger, Jennifer B; Huang, Shi; Zamboanga, Byron L; Romero, Andrea J; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I; Córdova, David; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Lizzi, Karina M; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Soto, Daniel W; Villamar, Juan Andres; Pattarroyo, Monica; Szapocznik, José

    2016-03-01

    Drawing from a theory of bicultural family functioning 2 models were tested to examine the longitudinal effects of acculturation-related variables on adolescent health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms (HRB/DS) mediated by caregiver and adolescent reports of family functioning. One model examined the effects of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A second model examined the individual effects of caregiver and adolescent acculturation components in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A sample of 302 recently immigrated Hispanic caregiver-child dyads completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. cultural practices, values, and identities at baseline (predictors); measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement 6 months postbaseline (mediators); and only adolescents completed measures of smoking, binge drinking, inconsistent condom use, and depressive symptoms 1 year postbaseline (outcomes). Measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement were used to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to estimate the fit of a latent construct for family functioning. Key findings indicate that (a) adolescent acculturation components drove the effect of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning; (b) higher levels of adolescent family functioning were associated with less HRB/DS, whereas higher levels of caregiver family functioning were associated with more adolescent HRB/DS; (c) and only adolescent reports of family functioning mediated the effects of acculturation components and caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies on HRB/DS. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Health Risk Behaviors and Depressive Symptoms among Hispanic Adolescents: Examining Acculturation Discrepancies and Family Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Miguel Ángel; Schwartz, Seth J.; Castillo, Linda G.; Unger, Jennifer B.; Huang, Shi; Zamboanga, Byron L.; Romero, Andrea J.; Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.; Córdova, David; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E.; Lizzi, Karina M.; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Soto, Daniel W.; Villamar, Juan Andres; Pattarroyo, Monica; Szapocznik, José

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from a theory of bicultural family functioning two models were tested to examine the longitudinal effects of acculturation-related variables on adolescent health risk behaviors and depressive symptoms (HRB/DS) mediated by caregiver and adolescent reports of family functioning. One model examined the effects of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A second model examined the individual effects of caregiver and adolescent acculturation components in relation to family functioning and HRB/DS. A sample of 302 recently immigrated Hispanic caregiver-child dyads completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. cultural practices, values, and identities at baseline (predictors); measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement six months post-baseline (mediators); and only adolescents completed measures of smoking, binge drinking, inconsistent condom use, and depressive symptoms one year post-baseline (outcomes). Measures of family cohesion, family communications, and family involvement were used to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to estimate the fit of a latent construct for family functioning. Key findings indicate that (a) adolescent acculturation components drove the effect of caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies in relation to family functioning, (b) higher levels of adolescent family functioning were associated with less HRB/DS, whereas higher levels of caregiver family functioning were associated with more adolescent HRB/DS, (c) and only adolescent reports of family functioning mediated the effects of acculturation components and caregiver-adolescent acculturation discrepancies on HRB/DS. PMID:26301514

  2. Describing the Relationship between Cat Bites and Human Depression Using Data from an Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A.; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Seyfried, Lisa S.

    2013-01-01

    Data mining approaches have been increasingly applied to the electronic health record and have led to the discovery of numerous clinical associations. Recent data mining studies have suggested a potential association between cat bites and human depression. To explore this possible association in more detail we first used administrative diagnosis codes to identify patients with either depression or bites, drawn from a population of 1.3 million patients. We then conducted a manual chart review in the electronic health record of all patients with a code for a bite to accurately determine which were from cats or dogs. Overall there were 750 patients with cat bites, 1,108 with dog bites, and approximately 117,000 patients with depression. Depression was found in 41.3% of patients with cat bites and 28.7% of those with dog bites. Furthermore, 85.5% of those with both cat bites and depression were women, compared to 64.5% of those with dog bites and depression. The probability of a woman being diagnosed with depression at some point in her life if she presented to our health system with a cat bite was 47.0%, compared to 24.2% of men presenting with a similar bite. The high proportion of depression in patients who had cat bites, especially among women, suggests that screening for depression could be appropriate in patients who present to a clinical provider with a cat bite. Additionally, while no causative link is known to explain this association, there is growing evidence to suggest that the relationship between cats and human mental illness, such as depression, warrants further investigation. PMID:23936453

  3. Describing the relationship between cat bites and human depression using data from an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, David A; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Seyfried, Lisa S

    2013-01-01

    Data mining approaches have been increasingly applied to the electronic health record and have led to the discovery of numerous clinical associations. Recent data mining studies have suggested a potential association between cat bites and human depression. To explore this possible association in more detail we first used administrative diagnosis codes to identify patients with either depression or bites, drawn from a population of 1.3 million patients. We then conducted a manual chart review in the electronic health record of all patients with a code for a bite to accurately determine which were from cats or dogs. Overall there were 750 patients with cat bites, 1,108 with dog bites, and approximately 117,000 patients with depression. Depression was found in 41.3% of patients with cat bites and 28.7% of those with dog bites. Furthermore, 85.5% of those with both cat bites and depression were women, compared to 64.5% of those with dog bites and depression. The probability of a woman being diagnosed with depression at some point in her life if she presented to our health system with a cat bite was 47.0%, compared to 24.2% of men presenting with a similar bite. The high proportion of depression in patients who had cat bites, especially among women, suggests that screening for depression could be appropriate in patients who present to a clinical provider with a cat bite. Additionally, while no causative link is known to explain this association, there is growing evidence to suggest that the relationship between cats and human mental illness, such as depression, warrants further investigation.

  4. Development and Implementation of Health and Wellness CBT for Individuals with Depression and HIV.

    PubMed

    Kennard, B; Brown, L; Hawkins, L; Risi, A; Radcliffe, J; Emslie, G; Mayes, T; King, J; Foxwell, A; Buyukdura, J; Bethel, J; Naar-King, S; Xu, J; Lee, S; Garvie, P; London, C; Tanney, M; Thornton, S

    2014-05-01

    Rates of depression are reported to be between 22-33% in adults with HIV, which is double that of the general population. Depression negatively affects treatment adherence and health outcomes of those with medical illnesses. Further, it has been shown in adults that reducing depression may improve both adherence and health outcomes. To address the issues of depression and non-adherence, Health and Wellness (H&W) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and medication management (MM) treatment strategies have been developed specifically for youth living with both HIV and depression. H&W CBT is based on other studies with uninfected youth and upon research on adults with HIV. H&W CBT uses problem-solving, motivational interviewing, and cognitive-behavioral strategies to decrease adherence obstacles and increase wellness. The intervention is delivered in 14 planned sessions over a 6-month period, with three different stages of CBT. This paper summarizes the feasibility and acceptability data from an open depression trial with 8 participants, 16-24 years of age, diagnosed with HIV and with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) diagnosis of depression, conducted at two treatment sites in the Adolescent Trials Network (ATN). Both therapists and subjects completed a Session Evaluation Form (SEF) after each session, and results were strongly favorable. Results from The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Clinician (QIDS-C) also showed noteworthy improvement in depression severity. A clinical case vignette illustrates treatment response. Further research will examine the use of H&W CBT in a larger trial of youth diagnosed with both HIV and depression.

  5. Development and Implementation of Health and Wellness CBT for Individuals with Depression and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, B.; Brown, L.; Hawkins, L.; Risi, A.; Radcliffe, J.; Emslie, G.; Mayes, T.; King, J.; Foxwell, A.; Buyukdura, J.; Bethel, J.; Naar-King, S.; Xu, J.; Lee, S.; Garvie, P.; London, C.; Tanney, M.; Thornton, S.

    2014-01-01

    Rates of depression are reported to be between 22–33% in adults with HIV, which is double that of the general population. Depression negatively affects treatment adherence and health outcomes of those with medical illnesses. Further, it has been shown in adults that reducing depression may improve both adherence and health outcomes. To address the issues of depression and non-adherence, Health and Wellness (H&W) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and medication management (MM) treatment strategies have been developed specifically for youth living with both HIV and depression. H&W CBT is based on other studies with uninfected youth and upon research on adults with HIV. H&W CBT uses problem-solving, motivational interviewing, and cognitive-behavioral strategies to decrease adherence obstacles and increase wellness. The intervention is delivered in 14 planned sessions over a 6-month period, with three different stages of CBT. This paper summarizes the feasibility and acceptability data from an open depression trial with 8 participants, 16–24 years of age, diagnosed with HIV and with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) diagnosis of depression, conducted at two treatment sites in the Adolescent Trials Network (ATN). Both therapists and subjects completed a Session Evaluation Form (SEF) after each session, and results were strongly favorable. Results from The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Clinician (QIDS-C) also showed noteworthy improvement in depression severity. A clinical case vignette illustrates treatment response. Further research will examine the use of H&W CBT in a larger trial of youth diagnosed with both HIV and depression. PMID:24795524

  6. [The degree of asthma severity in children and the level of maternal anxiety and depression].

    PubMed

    Witkowska-Płusa, Urszula

    2015-02-01

    Care for sick children most often falls to mothers, which may affect their mental state, causing the states of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the severity of asthma in children and the level of anxiety and depression in mothers, taking into account the importance of the material status of the family, the educational level of the mothers, the presence of critical events, as well as the coexistence of allergic diseases in other family members. The study included 60 mothers of children with bronchial asthma. Age of mothers in the investigated families was on average 37.28 +/- 6.24 years, and most had a high school education (55.0%) or higher (28.3%). 16.7% of mothers and 8.3% fathers suffered from asthma. 13.3% of mothers of children with asthma were brought child alone. To assess the level of anxiety the inventory for measuring state and trait anxiety (STAI - State Trait Anxiety Inventory) developed by Spielberger, Gorsuch'a and Lushene'a was applied. To determine the changes in depressive the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI - Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire) was used. The Student's t test was included for two independent populations and a comparison of the results obtained in the questionnaire for diagnosing the level of anxiety and depression. For other parameters the correlation coefficient r-Pearson rank and Kendall's tau were performed. Mothers of children with moderate asthma compared to mothers of children with mild asthma had higher levels of anxiety (both state and properties), and also a slightly higher level of depression. Maternal age was connected positively and moderately strongly with the number held by children (r = 0.380; p = 0.003) and age of a child with asthma (r = 0.613, p = 0.0005). The duration of the child's disease was associated positively and moderately strongly with the level of state anxiety mother (X-1) (r = 0.345; p = 0.007) and a bit less and also positively with the

  7. Mental Health Literacy of Depression: Gender Differences and Attitudinal Antecedents in a Representative British Sample

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Viren

    2012-01-01

    Background Poor mental health literacy and negative attitudes toward individuals with mental health disorders may impede optimal help-seeking for symptoms of mental ill-health. The present study examined the ability to recognize cases of depression as a function of respondent and target gender, as well as individual psychological differences in attitudes toward persons with depression. Methods In a representative British general population survey, the ability to correctly recognize vignettes of depression was assessed among 1,218 adults. Respondents also rated the vignettes along a number of attitudinal dimensions and completed measures of attitudes toward seeking psychological help, psychiatric skepticism, and anti-scientific attitudes. Results There were significant differences in the ability to correctly identify cases of depression as a function of respondent and target gender. Respondents were more likely to indicate that a male vignette did not suffer from a mental health disorder compared to a female vignette, and women were more likely than men to indicate that the male vignette suffered from a mental health disorder. Attitudes toward persons with depression were associated with attitudes toward seeking psychological help, psychiatric skepticism, and anti-scientific attitudes. Conclusion Initiatives that consider the impact of gender stereotypes as well as individual differences may enhance mental health literacy, which in turn is associated with improved help-seeking behaviors for symptoms of mental ill-health. PMID:23166769

  8. Spanish consensus on the physical health of patients with depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Giner, José; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Bobes, Julio; Zamorano, Enric; López, Francisco; Hernando, Teresa; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Álamo, Cecilio; Cervilla, Jorge A; Ibáñez Cuadrado, Ángela; Ibáñez Guerra, Elena; López, Silvia; Morán, Pedro; Palao, Diego J; Romacho, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Comorbidity between depression and physical illnesses is very common and has a significant impact on the health and management of the patient. With the support of the Sociedades Españolas de Psiquiatría y Psiquiatría Biológica, and Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN) a consensus was prepared on physical health in patients with depression and is summarized in the present work. The literature review highlighted the high frequency of cardiovascular and endocrine-metabolic disorders in patients with depression such as diabetes and obesity, thus making the primary and secondary prevention recommendations for patients with cardiovascular or metabolic risk applicable to patients with depression. Comorbidity between depression and chronic pain is also frequent, and requires an integrated therapeutic approach. The presence of physical illness in patients with depression may condition, but not preclude, the pharmacological treatment; drug selection should take into account potential side-effect and drug-drug interactions. On the other hand, psychotherapy may contribute to the patient's recovery. Overall, coordination between the primary care physician, the psychiatrist and other health professionals involved is essential for the management of patients with depression and concomitant physical illness. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Salivary cortisol levels, but not salivary α-amylase levels, are elevated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis irrespective of depression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Jeon, Ja-Young; Koh, Bo-Ram; Park, Sat-Byul; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Stress is recognized as an important factor in the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we explored multiple aspects of stress in RA patients. Salivary cortisol and α-amylase levels were measured as markers of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and sympatho-adrenomedullary system activity, respectively. Depression was assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and short-term analysis of the heart rate variability (HRV) was performed to evaluate the autonomic nervous system. The salivary cortisol levels of the RA patients were significantly higher than those of the normal controls (NC; 0.12 ± 0.162 μg/dL vs. 0.068 ± 0.052 μg/dL, P = 0.006). There was no difference in salivary α-amylase levels between the RA and the NC. The BDI levels of the RA patients were significantly higher than the NC (13.7 ± 8.9 vs. 6.4 ± 6.9, P < 0.001). Depression was more prevalent in RA patients than in the NC. The salivary cortisol levels were still significantly higher in the RA than the NC after controlling BDI by logistic regression analysis (P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in the HRV of RA patients and the NC. The evaluation of relationship between stress measures and disease activity markers of RA revealed that only BDI was positively correlated with the visual analogue pain scale. Salivary cortisol levels and the BDI of RA patients were higher than those of the NC, and elevated salivary cortisol levels were independent of depression. However, the level of stress may not be correlated with disease activity in RA. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Poor Health and Loneliness in Later Life: The Role of Depressive Symptoms, Social Resources, and Rural Environments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We draw on cognitive discrepancy theory to hypothesize and test a pathway from poor health to loneliness in later life. We hypothesize that poor health will have a negative influence on social participation and social resources, and these factors will mediate between health and loneliness. We hypothesize that rural environments will amplify any difficulties associated with social participation or accessing social resources and that depression will moderate how intensely people react to levels of social contact and support. Methods. We conceptualize a mediation model and a moderated-mediation model. Nationally representative data on older people living in the Republic of Ireland are used to validate the hypothesized pathways. Results. In the mediation model, health has a significant indirect effect on loneliness through the mediating variables social resources and social participation. In the moderated-mediation model, rurality moderates the pathway between health and social resources but not social participation. Depressive symptoms moderate the effect of social resources on loneliness but not social participation. Discussion. The results provide further credence to cognitive discrepancy theory, suggesting that depressive symptoms influence cognitive processes, interfering with judgments about the adequacy of social interaction. The theory is extended by demonstrating the impact of the environment on loneliness. PMID:24326076

  11. Effect of stress inoculation training on the levels of stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Fahimeh; Kashani, Parisa; Moghimian, Maryam; Shakour, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a broad group (over 270 types) of diseases. This disease, like other chronic diseases, occurs in all ages and ethnic groups, and is considered as a major health problem. Stress is one of the most important psychological factors influencing the occurrence of physical diseases, and can lead to severe anxiety, depression, and negative effects on health. It can also make individuals vulnerable to physical diseases, and in the long term, leads to death. This study was conducted to determine the effect of inoculation training on stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in 2013 as a clinical trial with convenient random sampling of patients from the chemotherapy clinic of Seyed Al-Shohada hospital of Isfahan. Forty patients with cancer who were eligible for the study were randomly assigned to either case or control group. The case and control groups had the same treatment plans, and the only difference was stress inoculation training administered in the case group, which was composed of eight 90-min sessions over 8 weeks. Data were collected using Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales 42 (DASS-42) questionnaire and demographic questionnaire, and analyzed by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and t-test in SPSS. Results: The results showed that there was a significant difference between case and control groups in terms of stress, anxiety, and depression (P < 0.001). Stress inoculation training reduced stress, anxiety, and depression in cancer patients. Conclusions: Stress inoculation training significantly reduced stress, anxiety, and depression. Therefore, teaching this skill and the strategies of coping with stress is recommended for these patients, in addition to medicational treatment. PMID:26120337

  12. The impact of child and family stressors on the self-rated health of mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder: Associations with depressed mood over a 12-year period.

    PubMed

    Benson, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Employing a cohort sequential design and multilevel modeling, the effects of child and family stressors and maternal depressed mood on the self-rated health of 110 mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder were assessed over a 12-year period when children in the study were 7-19 years old. Findings indicate a significant decline in self-rated health over time. In addition, child and family stressors, as well as maternal depressed mood, exerted significant between-persons effects on self-rated health such that mothers who reported more stressors and depressed mood across the study period were less likely to rate themselves in better health across that period. In addition, a significant within-person relationship between maternal depressed mood and self-rated health was found, indicating that at times when mothers reported higher levels of depressed mood than usual (their personal average across the study), they were significantly less likely to report better self-rated health. Finally, maternal depressed mood partially mediated the between-persons effects of child and family stressors on self-rated health such that increased stressors led to increased maternal depressed mood which, in turn, led to poorer maternal self-rated health. Findings suggest that chronic stressors erode maternal health over time and that depression may be an important mechanism linking stressors to decreased maternal health.

  13. [Reliability and dimensionality of PHQ-9 in screening depression symptoms among health science students in Cartagena, 2014].

    PubMed

    Cassiani-Miranda, Carlos Arturo; Vargas-Hernández, María Camila; Pérez-Anibal, Eduard; Herazo-Bustos, Mariana Isabel; Hernández-Carrillo, Mauricio

    2017-04-01

    Depression among university students must be screened with valid instruments. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) is reliable and valid for screening depression in a university context; however, its psychometric performance in Colombia is unknown. To estimate the reliability and dimensionality of PHQ-9 as a screening instrument for depressive symptoms among health sciences students of a university in Cartagena, Colombia.Materials y methods: We analyzed the factorial structure and reliability of the PHQ-9 in a sample of 550 students for expected prevalence of clinically-meaningful depressive symptoms (CMDS) of 25% with a confidence level of 95% and an error level of 3%. We used the free Spanish version of PHQ-9 for Colombia, authorized by its creators. A confirmatory factorial analysis, and an estimate of internal consistency using Cronbach´s alfa and McDonald´s omega were obtained. We analyzed 541 surveys. The average age of the group was 20.18 (SD=2.59) years old, 354 (63.77%) participants were women and 196 (36.23%) men. CMDS prevalence was 27.3%. The confirmatory factorial analysis exhibited a two-factor model, which explained the total variance of 42.80%. The proportion of variance explained by the factors was 0.243 (item 5) and 0.587 (item 2). Cronbach´s alfa was 0.830 and McDonald´s omega, 0.89. PHQ-9 was a valid and reliable tool for screening depressive symptoms among health sciences students in a university in Cartagena, Colombia.

  14. Anxiety, depression, and oral health among US pregnant women: 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marushka L; Whitcomb, Brian W; Pekow, Penelope; Carbone, Elena T; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Maternal periodontal disease is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. Anxiety and depression adversely impact oral health in nonpregnant women; however, this association has not been evaluated during pregnancy, a time characterized by higher rates of anxiety and depression. Therefore, we examined the association between these factors and oral disease and oral healthcare utilization among 402 pregnant respondents to the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Self-reported lifetime diagnoses of anxiety, depression, and current depression were assessed. Oral health outcomes included self-reported tooth loss and dental visits in the past year. One-fifth (21.2 percent) of respondents reported a tooth loss and 32.5 percent reported nonuse of oral health services. The prevalence of lifetime diagnosed anxiety and depression was 13.6 percent and 11.3 percent, respectively, whereas 10.6 percent reported current depression. After adjusting for risk factors, pregnant women with diagnosed anxiety had increased odds of one or more tooth loss [odds ratio (OR) = 3.30; 95 percent confidence interval (CI): 1.01-10.77] compared with those without the disorder. Similarly, after adjusting for socioeconomic factors, women with anxiety had increased odds of nonuse of oral health services (OR = 2.67; 95 percent CI: 1.03-6.90); however, this was no longer significant after adjusting for health behaviors and body mass index. We observed no significant association with depression. In this population-based sample, we found a two- to threefold increased odds of tooth loss and nonuse of oral health services among pregnant women with a lifetime diagnosis of anxiety. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine these associations among pregnant women. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  15. Conceptualizations of postpartum depression by public-sector health care providers in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Place, Jean Marie S; Billings, Deborah L; Blake, Christine E; Frongillo, Edward A; Mann, Joshua R; deCastro, Filipa

    2015-04-01

    In this article we describe the knowledge frameworks that 61 physicians, nurses, social workers, and psychologists from five public-sector health care facilities in Mexico used to conceptualize postpartum depression. We also demonstrate how providers applied social and behavioral antecedents in their conceptualizations of postpartum depression. Using grounded theory, we identify two frameworks that providers used to conceptualize postpartum depression: biochemical and adjustment. We highlight an emerging model of the function of social and behavioral antecedents within the frameworks, as well as the representation of postpartum depression by symptoms of distress and the perception among providers that these symptoms affected responsibilities associated with motherhood. The results provide a foundation for future study of how providers' conceptualizations of postpartum depression might affect detection and treatment practices and might be useful in the development of training materials to enhance the quality of care for women who experience any form of distress in the postpartum period.

  16. Depression.

    PubMed

    Choe, Christine J; Emslie, Graham J; Mayes, Taryn L

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews the assessment and treatment for depression in children and adolescents, emphasizing the implementation of evidence-based treatments into clinical care. Past trials of antidepressant medications are reviewed, as well as the clinical use of antidepressants and pharmacologic strategies for refractory illness or in the context of comorbid conditions. Clinicians who treat youth now have a body of empiric research to help guide treatment decisions; however, personalized treatment based on associated symptoms, comorbid conditions, contextual factors, and psychiatric history is essential. Further research is needed in the pharmacologic treatment of depressed youth, including expanding the study of non-SSRI antidepressants, augmentation and adjunctive strategies, and treatment in patients with comorbid conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  18. Limitations of the Patient Health Questionnaire in Identifying Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: Many Cases Are Undetected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Greeno, Catherine G.; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the concordance between the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in diagnosing anxiety and depressive disorders. Method: Fifty women seeking psychiatric services for their children at two mental health centers in western Pennsylvania were assessed for anxiety and…

  19. Effect of Educational Intervention on General Health and Depression in Temporary Employees

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Maryam A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mental health disorders and depression are pervasive and costly problems for workplaces. The aim of this study was to examine the general health and depression in temporary employees and the effect of educational intervention on general health and depression in temporary employees in Isfahan steel company. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used to examine the effect of intervention among temporary employees of Isfahan steel company. All temporary employees of blast furnaces were studied by census method. Data were collected by questionnaires including GHQ-28, BDI-II before and after a brief three-session CB educational intervention and were analyzed by SPSS12. Results: According to the GHQ-28 scores; 16.9% were suspected to psychological disorders; 3.4% also recorded severe depression. Mean depression scores decreased significantly after the intervention (CI: 3.21-6.94). General health scores also decreased significantly after the intervention (CI: .97-5.03). Conclusion: Brief cognitive behavior educational intervention can be considered as a preliminary education for employees to develop skills to cope with depression, and included in a more extensive education to attain longer-term results. PMID:22891153

  20. Husbands’ and Wives’ Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms: Longitudinal Findings from the Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Monin, Joan K.; Levy, Becca; Chen, Baibing; Fried, Terri; Stahl, Sarah T.; Schulz, Richard; Doyle, Margaret; Kershaw, Trace

    2015-01-01

    Background When examining older adults’ health behaviors and psychological health it is important to consider the social context. Purpose To examine in older adult marriages whether each spouse’s physical activity predicted changes in their own (actor effects) and their partner’s (partner effects) depressive symptoms. Gender differences were also examined. Method Each spouse within 1,260 married couples (at baseline) in the Cardiovascular Health Study completed self-report measures at wave 1 (1989–1990), wave 3 (1992–1993), and wave 7 (1996–1997). Dyadic path analyses were performed. Results Husbands’ physical activity significantly predicted own decreased depressive symptoms (actor effect). For both spouses, own physical activity did not significantly predict the spouse’s depressive symptoms (partner effects). However, husbands’ physical activity and depressive symptoms predicted wives’ physical activity and depressive symptoms (partner effects), respectively. Depressive symptoms did not predict physical activity. Conclusion Findings suggest that husbands’ physical activity is particularly influential for older married couples’ psychological health. PMID:25868508

  1. Spouse health status, depressed affect, and resilience in mid and late life: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bookwala, Jamila

    2014-04-01

    This study used longitudinal data to examine the effects of spousal illness on depressive symptoms among middle-aged and older married individuals and the extent to which the adverse effects of illness in a spouse were mitigated by 2 psychological resources, mastery and self-esteem. Using 1,704 married participants who were 51 years of age on average, depressive symptoms were compared in 4 groups varying in their experience of spousal health transitions: those whose spouse remained ill at T1 and T2, those whose spouse declined in health from T1 to T2, those whose spouse's health improved from T1 to T2, and those whose spouse remained healthy at both time points. Mixed analyses of covariance showed that, as hypothesized, having a spouse who became or remained ill over time was linked to greater depressed affect by T2, whereas having a spouse improve in health was associated with a decline in depressive symptomatology. Moderated regression analyses indicated that while higher mastery and self-esteem were linked to lower depressed affect in general, these resources were especially protective against depressed affect for those whose spouse remained ill at both time points. These findings are at the intersection of life course theory and the stress process model highlighting the contextual forces in and the interconnectedness of individual development as well as the plasticity and resilience evident in adaptation to stress during mid and late life.

  2. Depression.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Robert M; Vanderlip, Erik R; Rado, Jeffrey

    2016-10-04

    This issue provides a clinical overview of depression, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  3. Clinical Analysis of Dizzy Patients with High Levels of Depression and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Kyun; Kim, Yong Bok; Park, Il-Seok; Hong, Seok Jin; Kim, Heejin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Some patients experiencing dizziness also report psychological distress. However, the association between vestibular deficits and psychological symptoms remains controversial. Thus, the aim of this paper is to report the proportion of patients who complained of dizziness who also had high depression and anxiety indices. Also we investigated the severity of their dizziness and the distribution of the diseases underlying this symptom. Subjects and Methods We assessed the dizziness and psychological distress of 544 patients experiencing dizziness using the Korean versions of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). We also reviewed the audio-vestibular symtoms of patients with high levels of depression and anxiety. Results The incidences of high depression and anxiety scores were 11% (60/544) and 18% (98/544), respectively. Patients with vestibular migraine were most likely to have high depression and anxiety indices. Patients in the high-BDI or high-STAI groups (117/544) obtained significantly higher DHI scores than those in neither the high-BDI nor the high-STAI group (427/544). We noticed that about 20% of the patients experiencing dizziness had high levels of psychological distress in this study; this group also suffered from various vestibular diseases and more symptoms of dizziness. Conclusions The results of the study suggest that psychological evaluation should be considered when assessing patients with vertigo. PMID:27942604

  4. The effect of orthodontic extraoral appliances on depression and the anxiety levels of patients and parents.

    PubMed

    Topcuoglu, T; Yildirim, O; Birlik, M; Sokucu, O; Semiz, M

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial consequences and post-operative anxiety in patients after fixed orthodontic treatment are important parameters that must be evaluated by clinicians not to effect patient and their parent's psychosocial mood negatively. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in depression and anxiety levels of orthodontic patients and their parents before the extraoral appliance therapy, and at a 1-year follow-up. Patients and one of their parents responded to a series of questionnaires and evaluation scales in order to assess depression and anxiety levels. Two groups of patients and their parents were surveyed; one group that had not yet embarked on the treatment and another that had commenced extra-oral appliance therapy 1 year prior to the study. The 1-year-treatment group scored significantly higher than the pre-treatment group on the depression scale and the trait-anxiety scale. State-trait anxiety inventory scores did not differ significantly between the groups. The parents of the 1-year-treatment group also scored significantly higher on the Beck depression inventory than those of the pre-treatment group. The results of this study emphasize the need for due consideration of psychological parameters before and during treatment with extra-oral appliances, particularly with regard to depression and anxiety.

  5. Effect of music on depression levels and physiological responses in community-based older adults.

    PubMed

    Chan, Moon Fai; Chan, Engle Angela; Mok, Esther; Kwan Tse, Fionca Yuk

    2009-08-01

    Many people over the age of 65 do not regard depression as a treatable mental disorder and find it difficult to express themselves verbally. Listening to music can facilitate the non-verbal expression of emotion and allow people's inner feelings to be expressed without being threatened. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of music on depression levels in elderly people. A randomized controlled study was conducted with 47 elderly people (23 using music and 24 controls) who completed the study after being recruited in Hong Kong. Blood pressure, heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and depression level variables were collected. In the music group, there were statistically-significant decreases in depression scores (P < 0.001) and blood pressure (P = 0.001), HR (P < 0.001), and RR (P < 0.001) after 1 month. The implication is that nurses may utilize music as an effective nursing intervention for patients with depressive symptoms in the community setting.

  6. Depression symptoms, social support and overall health among HIV-positive individuals in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kingori, Caroline; Haile, Zelalem T; Ngatia, Peter

    2015-03-01

    In Kenya, there was a reported decline in HIV incidence and prevalence among those aged 15 to 64 years and children. Despite the decline, closer assessment of psychosocial issues like depression, contextual factors (family and community), and social support is necessary given the likely impact on overall health and HIV prevention. This paper examines an association between symptoms of depression and social support on overall health among HIV-positive participants recruited from an HIV clinic in Kenya. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were utilized. Findings reveal that compared to those with minimal depression (referent category) participants with mild, moderate, moderately severe/severe depression had higher odds of having poor health. For social support, compared with participants with no social support (referent category), participants with high social support had lower odds of having poor overall health in both unadjusted and multivariable-adjusted models. In conclusion, this study suggests that HIV clinics and interventions need to focus more on the psychological and/or mental health status of HIV-infected individuals while providing avenues such as social support groups that can be a buffer against the negative impact of HIV infection and depression on overall health outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. A standardized chinese herbal decoction, kai-xin-san, restores decreased levels of neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors in the brain of chronic stress-induced depressive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kevin Yue; Mao, Qing-Qiu; Ip, Siu-Po; Choi, Roy Chi-Yan; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Lau, David Tai-Wai; Tsim, Karl Wah-Keung

    2012-01-01

    Kai-xin-san (KXS), a Chinese herbal decoction being prescribed by Sun Simiao in Beiji Qianjin Yaofang about 1400 years ago, contains Ginseng Radix et Rhizoma, Polygalae Radix, Acori tatarinowii Rhizoma, and Poria. KXS has been used to treat stress-related psychiatric disease with the symptoms of depression and forgetfulness in ancient China until today. However, the mechanism of its antidepression action is still unknown. Here, the chronic mild-stress-(CMS-) induced depressive rats were applied in exploring the action mechanisms of KXS treatment. Daily intragastric administration of KXS for four weeks significantly alleviated the CMS-induced depressive symptoms displayed by enhanced sucrose consumption. In addition, the expressions of those molecular bio-markers relating to depression in rat brains were altered by the treatment of KXS. These KXS-regulated brain biomarkers included: (i) the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin (ii) the transcript levels of proteins relating to neurotransmitter metabolism; (iii) the transcript levels of neurotrophic factors and their receptors. The results suggested that the anti-depressant-like action of KXS might be mediated by an increase of neurotransmitters and expression of neurotrophic factors and its corresponding receptors in the brain. Thus, KXS could serve as alternative medicine, or health food supplement, for patients suffering from depression.

  8. A Standardized Chinese Herbal Decoction, Kai-Xin-San, Restores Decreased Levels of Neurotransmitters and Neurotrophic Factors in the Brain of Chronic Stress-Induced Depressive Rats