Science.gov

Sample records for health management programs

  1. [Health economic evaluation of disease management programs].

    PubMed

    Greiner, W

    2006-01-01

    Disease management has become an important element in the improvement of care for people with chronic illnesses and has become embedded in the discussion on health policy in recent years. The approach has been introduced very differently to the health systems worldwide. Since 1 January 2003 accredited disease management programs (DMPs) have been a part of the risk structure compensation scheme of the German statutory health insurance. This is seen as the first step to a morbidity orientation of the risk structure compensation. DMPs have to be evaluated according the German Social Law, especially whether the objectives of the programs and the criteria for inclusion of the patients have been met and the quality of care for the patients is insured. The criteria for evaluation are threefold: medical issues, economic issues and subjective quality of life of the patients. Due to the immense amounts of data which can be expected the evaluation of the German DMPs is a huge logistical challenge. Until now not very much is known about the data quality. The evaluation is focused on the perspective of the sickness funds as e.g. information about indirect cost is not collected. In the article the methods for evaluation are described and critically discussed.

  2. 75 FR 54804 - Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... management systems--Requirements. The Guidelines reveal that the components of effective safety and health..., preventing harm to their workers is more than compliance with safety and health requirements; it reflects the... Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR Chapter I RIN 1219-AB71 Safety and Health Management Programs for...

  3. 76 FR 64110 - Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... Safety and Health Administration RIN 1219-AB71 Safety and Health Management Programs for Mines AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) is holding a public meeting, and plans to hold additional public...

  4. Health plans' disease management programs: extending across the medical and behavioral health spectrum?

    PubMed

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Horgan, Constance M; Garnick, Deborah W; Hodgkin, Dominic; Morley, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Although the disease management industry has expanded rapidly, there is little nationally representative data regarding medical and behavioral health disease management programs at the health plan level. National estimates from a survey of private health plans indicate that 90% of health plan products offered disease management for general medical conditions such as diabetes but only 37% had depression programs. The frequency of specific depression disease management activities varied widely. Program adoption was significantly related to product type and behavioral health contracting. In health plans, disease management has penetrated more slowly into behavioral health and depression program characteristics are highly variable.

  5. Health Plans' Disease Management Programs: Extending across the Medical and Behavioral Health Spectrum?

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, Elizabeth Levy; Horgan, Constance M.; Garnick, Deborah W.; Hodgkin, Dominic; Morley, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    While the disease management industry has expanded rapidly, there is little nationally representative data regarding medical and behavioral health disease management programs at the health plan level. National estimates from a survey of private health plans indicate that 90% of health plan products offered disease management for general medical conditions such as diabetes, but only 37% had depression programs. The frequency of specific depression disease management activities varied widely. Program adoption was significantly related to product type and behavioral health contracting. In health plans, disease management has penetrated more slowly into behavioral health, and depression program characteristics are highly variable. PMID:18806594

  6. Interdisciplinary Programs Focused Populations: The Case of Health Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Yavich, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The Ariel University has a unique interdisciplinary program in healthcare management that targets experienced healthcare professionals who wish to earn an academic degree. Only one academic study has been held so far on the integration of graduates of an academic university-level school in healthcare management in the field. In the current study,…

  7. Health technology assessment of asthma disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Steuten, Lotte; Lemmens, Karin; Vrijhoef, Bert

    2007-06-01

    To provide a critical opinion on the extent to which asthma disease management programs currently improve the effectiveness and efficiency of care and directions for future policy and research. The methodological quality of health technology assessment of asthma disease management programs remains moderate. Asthma disease management programs are predominantly educational and organizational in nature and focus either on children or on adults. Paediatric disease management programs make more effort to outreach into patients' living environments and show higher participation rates than those targeting adults. Reductions in asthma-related hospitalization, emergency department, and unplanned clinic visits range from 0 to 85%, 87% and 71%, respectively. Aspects of self-management and organization of care improved after the implementation of disease management programs. Almost no impact on asthma symptoms, lung function or the use of long-term control medication was found. There is accumulating 'circumstantial' evidence that disease management programs reduce resource utilization. The analytical rigor and uniformity of health technology assessment of asthma disease management programs has improved, but the generalizability of results remains uncertain. Practical, multicentre, clinical trials including broad representative study samples should be performed in different settings to increase methodological quality and substantiate current findings.

  8. Examining the Efficacy of Management for Pennsylvania School Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobi, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, certified school nurses were governed by the same educational rules and administrative directives as teachers. School nurses were supervised and evaluated by non-nurse managers who had no knowledge of the scope of school nurse practice. A focus of the study was to examine the efficacy of management for school health programs. The…

  9. Examining the Efficacy of Management for Pennsylvania School Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobi, Wendy J.

    2010-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, certified school nurses were governed by the same educational rules and administrative directives as teachers. School nurses were supervised and evaluated by non-nurse managers who had no knowledge of the scope of school nurse practice. A focus of the study was to examine the efficacy of management for school health programs. The…

  10. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  11. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  12. Preparing health care organizations for successful case management programs.

    PubMed

    Bonvissuto, C A; Kastens, J M; Atwell, S R

    1997-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study of four hospital-based providers in varying stages of implementing case management programs. Three of the providers had most of the necessary elements in place to ensure success, such as a mix of reimbursement sources, an effective and integrated information management system, a full range of clinical services, and continuous quality improvement programs. The authors make several suggestions for key activities that must be pursued by any health care organization seeking to implement a case management program in an era of managed care, tightening reimbursement, and consumer demand for quality care. These include the need to (a) organize essential case management functions under a centralized structure; (b) set realistic, quantifiable targets, and (c) design a communications plan for the program.

  13. Financial impact of population health management programs: reevaluating the literature.

    PubMed

    Grossmeier, Jessica; Terry, Paul E; Anderson, David R; Wright, Steven

    2012-06-01

    Although many employers offer some components of worksite-based population health management (PHM), most do not yet invest in comprehensive programs. This hesitation to invest in comprehensive programs may be attributed to numerous factors, such as other more pressing business priorities, reluctance to intervene in the personal health choices of employees, or insufficient funds for employee health. Many decision makers also remain skeptical about whether investment in comprehensive programs will produce a financial return on investment (ROI). Most peer-reviewed studies assessing the financial impact of PHM were published before 2000 and include a broad array of program and study designs. Many of these studies have also included indirect productivity savings in their assessment of financial outcomes. In contrast, this review includes only peer-reviewed studies of the direct health care cost impact of comprehensive PHM programs that meet rigorous methodological criteria. A systematic search of health sciences databases identified only 5 studies with program designs and study methods meeting these selection criteria published after 2007. This focused review found that comprehensive PHM programs can yield a positive ROI based on their impact on direct health care costs, but the level of ROI achieved was lower than that reported by literature reviews with less focused and restrictive qualifying criteria. To yield substantial short-term health care cost savings, the longer term financial return that can credibly be associated with a comprehensive, prevention-oriented population health program must be augmented by other financial impact strategies.

  14. Heart failure management: optimal health care delivery programs.

    PubMed

    Moser, D K

    2000-01-01

    Heart failure is the single most costly health care expenditure in the United States. The major proportion of these costs is attributable to rehospitalizations, and by many estimates the majority of rehospitalizations might be preventable with better health care delivery. The past 5 years have seen an explosion in the number of heart failure disease management programs put in place across the country to try to decrease the economic burden of heart failure and improve patient outcomes. Yet few of these are based on programs tested by researchers, let alone tested in randomized, controlled trials. This chapter summarizes findings from studies of heart failure disease management programs from 1980 to the present, critiques those studies, and offers suggestions for future research in this area.

  15. Essential pain management: an educational program for health care workers.

    PubMed

    Goucke, C Roger; Jackson, Tracy; Morriss, Wayne; Royle, Jane

    2015-04-01

    Education for health care workers on pain-related topics is not always readily available, and this is especially so in low and middle income countries (LMICs). The Essential Pain Management program (EPM) has been developed to offer a simple interactive educational opportunity for health care workers in LMICs. Following a needs analysis in Papua New Guinea, an 8 h educational program with the aims of improving pain knowledge and providing a simple pain management framework was developed. An evaluation of the program using the Kirkpatrick model is being used. The program has a "teach the teachers" component to encourage sustainability. The program has been run in 30 countries, delivered to 1,600 participants, and 340 instructors have been trained. Feedback has been positive, pre post testing in 27 sites showed a mean pre score of 65.89% rising to 75.23% (n = 581 respondents). A subanalysis demonstrates doctors and nurses improving by similar degrees. When local instructors have delivered the program after attending the trainer's session the participant test results were comparable to the results seen when the overseas instructors taught the course. The widespread adoption of the EPM program suggests there is a need for pain education in LMICs. The teach the teachers component of the program and the comparable results from their teaching should contribute to sustainability. Further support and mentoring using electronic systems such as Facebook, text messaging, and a website may also contribute to sustainability.

  16. Economic Impact of a Medicaid Population Health Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Strothers, Harry; Miller, William Johnson; McLaren, Susan; Moore, Barbara; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A population health management program was implemented to assess growth in health care expenditures for the disabled segment of Georgia's Medicaid population before and during the first year of a population health outcomes management program, and to compare those expenditures with projected costs based on various cost inflation trend assumptions. A retrospective, nonexperimental approach was used to analyze claims data from Georgia Medicaid claims files for all program-eligible persons for each relevant time period (intent-to-treat basis). These included all non-Medicare, noninstitutionalized Medicaid aged-blind-disabled adults older than 18 years of age. Comparisons of health care expenditures and utilization were made between base year (2003–2004) and performance year one (2006–2007), and of the difference between actual expenditures incurred in the performance year vs. projected expenditures based on various cost inflation assumptions. Demographic characteristics and clinical complexity of the population (as measured by the Chronic Illness and Disability Payment System risk score) actually increased from baseline to implementation. Actual expenditures were less than projected expenditures using any relevant medical inflation assumption. Actual expenditures were less than projected expenditures by $9.82 million when using a conservative US general medical inflation rate, by $43.6 million using national Medicaid cost trends, and by $106 million using Georgia Medicaid's own cost projections for the non-dually eligible disabled segment of Medicaid enrollees. Quadratic growth curve modeling also demonstrated a lower rate of increase in total expenditures. The rate of increase in expenditures was lower over the first year of program implementation compared with baseline. Weighted utilization rates were also lower in high-cost categories, such as inpatient days, despite increases in the risk profile of the population. Varying levels of cost avoidance could

  17. Candidate technologies for the Integrated Health Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Neal F.; Martin, Fred H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess Vehicle Health Management (VHM) technologies for implementation as a demonstration. Extensive studies have been performed to determine technologies which could be implemented on the Atlas and Centaur vehicles as part of a bridging program. This paper discusses areas today where VHM can be implemented for benefits in reliability, performance, and cost reduction. VHM Options are identified and one demonstration is recommended for execution.

  18. Impact of a comprehensive population health management program on health care costs.

    PubMed

    Grossmeier, Jessica; Seaverson, Erin L D; Mangen, David J; Wright, Steven; Dalal, Karl; Phalen, Chris; Gold, Daniel B

    2013-06-01

    Assess the influence of participation in a population health management (PHM) program on health care costs. A quasi-experimental study relied on logistic and ordinary least squares regression models to compare the costs of program participants with those of nonparticipants, while controlling for differences in health care costs and utilization, demographics, and health status. Propensity score models were developed and analyses were weighted by inverse propensity scores to control for selection bias. Study models yielded an estimated savings of $60.65 per wellness participant per month and $214.66 per disease management participant per month. Program savings were combined to yield an integrated return-on-investment of $3 in savings for every dollar invested. A PHM program yielded a positive return on investment after 2 years of wellness program and 1 year of integrated disease management program launch.

  19. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  20. The School Health Innovative Programs: integrating school health and managed care in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Taras, H; Nader, P; Swiger, H; Fontanesi, J

    1998-01-01

    Managed care organizations (MCOs) are being recruited to support school health services delivered in school clinics. Schools without clinics already provide numerous health services and could provide more if they had support from managed care organizations. This article describes the first two years of a San Diego-based collaborative consisting of MCOs, school districts, and other health care agencies. By establishing trust, developing overriding principles, and creating an interagency communication infrastructure, this collaborative has encouraged shared management of many student health issues. Because the agreements apply to all schools, programs can reduce high rates of absenteeism district-wide and avoid unnecessary doctor appointments for common health problems. These collaborative agreements are designed to be financially self-sustaining. However, data collection, the logistics of obtaining parental consent, and getting health professionals to communicate with each other in new ways remain to be significant challenges.

  1. Impact of a geriatric case management program on health plan costs.

    PubMed

    Picariello, Gloria; Hanson, Claudia; Futterman, Robert; Hill, Jerrold; Anselm, Edward

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated the impact of HIP, Health Plan of New York's geriatric case management (GCM) program, which is offered to Medicare Advantage members at high risk for high health care costs and utilization. The study design was a comparison of health plan costs for program participants and nonparticipants eligible for the program, controlling for variables predictive of high health care costs measured prior to program enrollment. The GCM program's impact on health care cost was derived from regression models comparing the costs of 101 program participants without exposure to other disease management programs to 1585 eligible nonparticipants, controlling for age, sex, and health care costs in the pre-program period. Net costs or savings from the program were computed as the sum program operation costs and the estimated change in health care costs associated with program participation. Mean annual health care costs for each program participant were $7720 lower than for eligible nonparticipants (P = .0090). The lower health care costs were attributable to the lower costs for inpatient and outpatient hospital and skilled nursing facility settings, exceeding the higher costs for physician office visits and prescription drugs. Estimated program costs were $2755 per member managed by the program, yielding a net savings of $4965 per member enrolled. A GCM program was successfully implemented in a large Medicare Advantage program. The reductions in health care costs achieved through GCM exceeded program costs resulted in meaningful savings for the health plan.

  2. Interviewing Key Informants: Strategic Planning for a Global Public Health Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kun, Karen E.; Kassim, Anisa; Howze, Elizabeth; MacDonald, Goldie

    2013-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Sustainable Management Development Program (SMDP) partners with low- and middle-resource countries to develop management capacity so that effective global public health programs can be implemented and better health outcomes can be achieved. The program's impact however, was variable. Hence, there…

  3. Health promotion and disease prevention: a look at demand management programs.

    PubMed

    Fronstin, P

    1996-09-01

    This Issue Brief describes employers' efforts to contain health expenditures through demand management programs. These programs are designed to reduce utilization by focusing on disease prevention and health promotion. Demand management includes work site health promotion, wellness programs, and access management. Work site health promotion is a comprehensive approach to improving health and includes awareness, health education, behavioral change, and organizational health initiatives. Wellness programs usually include stress management, smoking cessation, weight management, back care, health screenings, nutrition education, work place safety, prenatal and well baby care, CPR and first aid classes, and employee assistance programs (EAPs). These programs are often viewed positively by workers and can have long-term benefits for employers above and beyond health care cost containment. Demand management can benefit employers by increasing productivity, employee retention, and employee morale and by reducing turnover, absenteeism, future medical claims, and ultimately expenditures on health care. Even though a growing number of employers are offering wellness programs, only 37 percent of full-time workers employed in medium and large private establishments were eligible for wellness programs by 1993. However, a recent survey found that 88 percent of major employers have introduced some form of health promotion, disease prevention, or early intervention initiative to encourage healthy lifestyles among their salaried employees. Distinctions must be drawn between short- and long-term strategies. Demand management can be thought of as a short-term strategy when the focus of the program is on creating more appropriate and efficient health care utilization. Disease prevention is characterized by longer-term health improvement objectives. Whether the purpose is to reduce utilization in the short term or in the long term, the ultimate goal remains the same: to reduce health

  4. The Philippines Field Management Training Program (FMTP): strengthening management capacity in a decentralized public health system.

    PubMed

    Sucaldito, Nemia L; Tayag, Enrique A; Roces, Maria Concepcion R; Malison, Michael D; Robie, Brian D; Howze, Elizabeth H

    2014-12-01

    The decentralization of the Philippines' health sector in 1991 sought to improve the efficiency of local health resource allocation; however, local officials were unprepared for the increased responsibility. In 1999 the Philippines Department of Health, with assistance from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), implemented the Philippines Field Management Training Program (FMTP) to provide local health officials with the managerial skills needed to perform their new, more responsible jobs. This paper addresses whether the FMTP has provided participants with useful managerial skills needed for their more responsible positions. The method involved reviewing program outcomes, including results of applied management improvement projects the participants completed to solve managerial problems. Between 2000 and 2010, 294 participants completed the FMTP and many were later promoted to more responsible positions. The participants also completed 204 applied management improvement projects resulting in documented improvements in service delivery, information systems, logistics, health insurance, policy and laboratory outcomes. Examples of their successes are included in this paper. The results provide compelling evidence that managers are using the skills learned to solve significant managerial problems.

  5. [Disease management programs from a health insurer's point of view].

    PubMed

    Szymkowiak, Christof; Walkenhorst, Karen; Straub, Christoph

    2003-06-01

    Disease Management Programmes represent a great challenge to the German statutory health insurance system. According to politicians, disease management programmes are an appropriate tool for increasing the level of care for chronically ill patients significantly, while at the same time they can slow down the cost explosion in health care. The statutory health insurers' point of view yields a more refined picture of the chances and risks involved. The chances are that a medical guideline-based, evidence-based, co-operative care of the chronically ill could be established. But also, there are the risks of misuse of disease management programmes and of misallocation of funds due to the ill-advised linkage with the so-called risk compensation scheme (RSA) balancing the sickness funds' structural deficits through redistribution. The nation-wide introduction of disease management programmes appears to be a gigantic experiment whose aim is to change the care of chronically ill patients and whose outcome is unpredictable.

  6. An evaluation of the Well at Dell health management program: health risk change and financial return on investment.

    PubMed

    Musich, Shirley; McCalister, Tre'; Wang, Sara; Hawkins, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of the Well at Dell comprehensive health management program in delivering health care and productivity cost savings relative to program investment (i.e., return on investment). A quasi-experimental design was used to quantify the financial impact of the program and nonexperimental pre-post design to evaluate change in health risks. Ongoing worksite health management program implemented across multiple U.S. locations. Subjects were 24,651 employees with continuous medical enrollment in 2010-2011 who were eligible for 2011 health management programming. Incentive-driven, outcomes-based multicomponent corporate health management program including health risk appraisal (HRA)/wellness, lifestyle management, and disease management coaching programs. Medical, pharmacy, and short-term disability pre/post expenditure trends adjusted for demographics, health status, and baseline costs. Self-reported health risks from repeat HRA completers. Analysis: Propensity score-weighted and multivariate regression-adjusted comparison of baseline to post trends in health care expenditures and productivity costs for program participants and nonparticipants (i.e., difference in difference) relative to programmatic investment. The Well at Dell program achieved an overall return on investment of 2.48 in 2011. Most of the savings were realized from the HRA/wellness component of the program. Cost savings were supported with high participation and significant health risk improvement. An incentive-driven, well-managed comprehensive corporate health management program can continue to achieve significant health improvement while promoting health care and productivity cost savings in an employee population.

  7. Lifestyle Management Program: Promoting Cardiovascular Health: in Community College Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Felipe G.; Jichaku, Patrick

    The Lifestyle Management Project is a health promotion project and research study conducted in the spring of 1984 at five Los Angeles junior college campuses. Its goal was to increase knowledge of cardiovascular disease (CHD) risk factors among 400 to 2000 junior college students in each campus. This was done via five risk factor activities: blood…

  8. Lifestyle Management Program: Promoting Cardiovascular Health: in Community College Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Felipe G.; Jichaku, Patrick

    The Lifestyle Management Project is a health promotion project and research study conducted in the spring of 1984 at five Los Angeles junior college campuses. Its goal was to increase knowledge of cardiovascular disease (CHD) risk factors among 400 to 2000 junior college students in each campus. This was done via five risk factor activities: blood…

  9. Leadership frames and perceptions of effectiveness among health information management program directors.

    PubMed

    Sasnett, Bonita; Ross, Thomas

    2007-10-04

    Leadership is important to health science education. For program effectiveness, directors should possess leadership skills to appropriately lead and manage their departments. Therefore, it is important to explore the leadership styles of programs' leaders as health science education is undergoing reform. Program directors of two and four-year health information management programs were surveyed to determine leadership styles. The study examined leadership styles or frames, the number of leadership frames employed by directors, and the relationship between leadership frames and their perceptions of their effectiveness as a manager and as a leader. The study shows that program directors are confident of their human resource and structural skills and less sure of the political and symbolic skills required of leaders. These skills in turn are correlated with their self-perceived effectiveness as managers and leaders. Findings from the study may assist program directors in their career development and expansion of health information management programs as a discipline within the health science field. As academic health centers receive greater pressure from the Institute of Medicine and accrediting agencies to reform health science education, the question of leadership arises. These centers have taken a leadership role in reforming health professional education by partnering with educational institutions to improve the health of communities. To achieve health education reform, health sciences educators must apply effective leadership skills.1 College and university leadership is challenged on how to best approach educational reform across health science fields. This article discusses leadership styles employed by program directors of one health science department, health information management, in directing programs for health science education reform.

  10. Impact of a migraine management program on improving health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Campinha-Bacote, Dexter L; Kendle, Julie B; Jones, Climentene; Callicoat, Deborah; Webert, Allyn; Stoukides, Cheryl A; Kaul, Alan F

    2005-12-01

    The goals of this program were to evaluate the effectiveness of migraine disease management techniques in improving patient satisfaction with migraine care, decreasing the frequency and severity of headaches and migraine-associated disability, increasing the effectiveness of migraine treatment and work productivity, improving physician diagnosis and treatment of migraine, and ultimately determining the program's impact on healthcare resource utilization. A prospective observational study was undertaken. This prospective Migraine Management Program (MMP) used active patient and healthcare physician-based disease management resources, tools, and techniques. Members were identified using administrative and medical claims databases indicating an ICD-9 diagnosis code (346.XX) for migraine during the previous twelve months. All identified patients received the Migraine Therapy Assessment Questionnaire (MTAQ) to assess their level of migraine control for pre/post measurement. Of the 2,134 patients responding to the initial MTAQ, 789 completed both a baseline and follow-up and 1,345 completed only a baseline questionnaire. For those patients completing both, there was a statistically significant reduction in all identified management issues: poor symptom control, high attack frequency, knowledge/behavior barriers, economic burden, and dissatisfaction with treatment. Comparing the former group to those completing only the baseline MTAQ, the latter were significantly more likely to report problems with three migraine management issues; poorer symptom control, greater economic burden, and dissatisfaction with their treatment. The use of appropriate patient and physician educational interventions, such as Aetna's MMP incorporating disease management principles and the MTAQ questionnaire, can have a significant impact on patient-centered outcomes and satisfaction with their migraine treatment.

  11. Disease management programs in Germany's statutory health insurance system.

    PubMed

    Busse, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    The introduction in 1996 of free choice among sickness funds in Germany was accompanied by a "risk structure compensation" (RSC) mechanism based on average spending by age and sex. Because chronically ill people were not adequately taken into account, competition for newly insured consumers concentrated on the healthy. The introduction in 2002 of disease management programs addresses this problem: Insured people in such programs are treated as a separate RSC category, making them a more "attractive" group that no longer generates a deficit. The degree of sickness fund activities and the fierce dispute with physicians are valid indicators that the incentives work.

  12. Incorporating Reporting Efforts to Manage and Improve Health and Wellness Programs.

    PubMed

    Wells, Timothy S; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; McGinn, Michael P; Hawkins, Kevin; Bhattarai, Gandhi R; Serxner, Seth A; Greame, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Wellness programs are designed to help individuals maintain or improve their health. This article describes how a reporting process can be used to help manage and improve a wellness program. Beginning in 2014, a wellness pilot program became available in New Jersey for individuals with an AARP Medicare Supplement Insurance plan insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. The program has since expanded to include Missouri, Texas, Alabama, and Washington. This wellness program includes an online health portal, one-on-one telephonic coaching, gym membership discounts, and local health events. To assure smooth program operations and alignment with program objectives, weekly and monthly reports are produced. The weekly report includes metrics on member engagement and utilization for the aforementioned 4 program offerings and reports on the last 4 weeks, as well as for the current month and the current year to date. The monthly report includes separate worksheets for each state and a summary worksheet that includes all states combined, and provides metrics on overall engagement as well as utilization of the 4 program components. Although the monthly reports were used to better manage the 4 program offerings, the weekly reports help management to gauge response to program marketing. Reporting can be a data-driven management tool to help manage wellness programs. Reports provide rapid feedback regarding program performance. In contrast, in-depth program evaluations serve a different purpose, such as to report program-related savings, return on investment, or to report other longer term program-related outcomes.

  13. Incorporating Reporting Efforts to Manage and Improve Health and Wellness Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ozminkowski, Ronald J.; McGinn, Michael P.; Hawkins, Kevin; Bhattarai, Gandhi R.; Serxner, Seth A.; Greame, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Wellness programs are designed to help individuals maintain or improve their health. This article describes how a reporting process can be used to help manage and improve a wellness program. Beginning in 2014, a wellness pilot program became available in New Jersey for individuals with an AARP Medicare Supplement Insurance plan insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. The program has since expanded to include Missouri, Texas, Alabama, and Washington. This wellness program includes an online health portal, one-on-one telephonic coaching, gym membership discounts, and local health events. To assure smooth program operations and alignment with program objectives, weekly and monthly reports are produced. The weekly report includes metrics on member engagement and utilization for the aforementioned 4 program offerings and reports on the last 4 weeks, as well as for the current month and the current year to date. The monthly report includes separate worksheets for each state and a summary worksheet that includes all states combined, and provides metrics on overall engagement as well as utilization of the 4 program components. Although the monthly reports were used to better manage the 4 program offerings, the weekly reports help management to gauge response to program marketing. Reporting can be a data-driven management tool to help manage wellness programs. Reports provide rapid feedback regarding program performance. In contrast, in-depth program evaluations serve a different purpose, such as to report program-related savings, return on investment, or to report other longer term program-related outcomes. PMID:27575977

  14. The impact of an integrated population health enhancement and disease management program on employee health risk, health conditions, and productivity.

    PubMed

    Loeppke, Ron; Nicholson, Sean; Taitel, Michael; Sweeney, Matthew; Haufle, Vince; Kessler, Ronald C

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the impact of an integrated population health enhancement program on employee health risks, health conditions, and productivity. Specifically, we analyzed changes in these measures among a cohort of 543 employees who completed a health risk assessment in both 2003 and 2005. We compared these findings with 2 different sets of employees who were not offered health enhancement programming. We found that the DIRECTV cohort showed a significant reduction in health risks after exposure to the program. Relative to a matched comparison group, the proportion of low-risk employees at DIRECTV in 2005 was 8.2 percentage points higher; the proportion of medium-risk employees was 7.1 percentage points lower; and the proportion of high-risk employees was 1.1 percentage points lower (p < 0.001). The most noticeable changes in health risk were a reduction in the proportion of employees with high cholesterol; an improvement in diet; a reduction of heavy drinking; management of high blood pressure; improved stress management; increased exercise; fewer smokers; and a drop in obesity rates. We also found that a majority of employees who improved their risk levels from 2003 to 2005 maintained their gains in 2006. Employees who improved their risks levels also demonstrated relative improvement in absenteeism. Overall, this study provides additional evidence that integrated population health enhancement positively impacts employees' health risk and productivity; it also reinforces the view that "good health is good business."

  15. Navy Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS). System-Wide Module. Program Maintenance Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    NAVY OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM NOHIMS SYSTEM-WIDE MODULE PROGRAM MAINTENANCE MANUAL JUNE 1987 DTIC 00 SEP I 21988DJ 0) 4... INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (NOHIMS) N 1.98 SYSTEM-WIDE MODULE PROGRAM MAINTENANCE MANUAL 7. Author(s) a. Performing Organization Rapt. No. MITRE... Management System (NOHIMS). NORIMS, whose initial version was ,eveloped at the Naval Health Research Center (NHRC), is a composite of 4 -’o subsystems: an

  16. The impact of the Citibank, NA, health management program on changes in employee health risks over time.

    PubMed

    Ozminkowski, R J; Goetzel, R Z; Smith, M W; Cantor, R I; Shaughnessy, A; Harrison, M

    2000-05-01

    This study estimated the impact of the Citibank Health Management Program on changes in health risks among Citibank employees. McNemar chi-squared tests compared the probability of being at high risk for poor health when the first and last health-risk appraisal surveys were taken. Logistic regression controlled for baseline differences in subsequent analyses when those who participated in more intensive program features were compared with those who participated in less intensive features. Declines in risk were noted for 8 of 10 risk categories. Most changes were small, except those related to exercise habits, seatbelt use, and stress levels. For nine health risk categories, those who participated in more intensive program services were significantly more likely than others to reduce their health risks. Thus, the Citibank Health Management Program was associated with significant reductions in health risk.

  17. Promoting Stress Management: The Role of Comprehensive School Health Programs. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Marilyn S.

    This Digest examines how Comprehensive School Health Programs (CSHPs) may promote stress management in children and adolescents. CSHPs contain four key elements. The first element, community participation and focus, can be achieved through school health newsletters, health fairs, local newspaper, radio, and television promotions, and guest…

  18. Management tools for Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP).

    PubMed

    Welch, W Pete; Rudolph, Barbara A; Blewett, Lynn A; Parente, Stephen T; Brach, Cindy; Love, Denise; Harmon, Robert G

    2006-01-01

    Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program need analytic tools to manage their programs. Drawing upon extensive discussions with experts in states, this article describes the state of the art in tool use, making several observations: (1) Several states have linked Medicaid/State Children's Health Insurance Program administrative data to other data (eg, birth and death records) to measure access to care. (2) Several states use managed care encounter data to set payment rates. (3) The analysis of pharmacy claims data appears widespread. The article also describes "lessons learned" regarding building capacity and improving data to support the implementation of management tools.

  19. Health promotion and partnerships: collaboration of a community health management center, county health bureau, and university nursing program.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Ling

    2002-06-01

    Effective partnerships were established between a community health management center, a county health bureau and a university nursing program. A health fair was undertaken to heighten public health awareness through the collaboration of these various agencies. In this research, formative, process, and summative evaluations were conducted to determine the benefits of partnerships. Elements evaluated included the planning process, health fair relevancy, integration of community resources, participants satisfaction and knowledge acquisition, and partnership satisfaction. The samples of this study included (1) 529 adult participants who completed the on-site evaluation questionnaires; (2) 1,090 child participants who returned gift-reward cards; (3) 114 partners who gave written feedback on their satisfaction; and (4) 57 third-year and 16 fourth-year undergraduate nursing student participants. Data was collected from the evidence report of the Department of Health, the project proposal, activity protocols, meeting records, the project final report, students term papers, and questionnaires. The chief administrator of the County Health Bureau was very impressed with the creative exhibits in the fair and, therefore, invited a coalition to continue further workshops. Seventeen educational exhibits, two dance programs and two drama programs related to health issues were demonstrated in the fair. Resources from community organizations were successfully integrated and allocated. Community participants expressed satisfaction with the fair and anticipated similar activities in the future. Participants revealed more than 80% accuracy in health knowledge quizzes. The senior nursing students highlighted their interaction with the community, community health nurses, and health volunteers. Community-based health promotion and nursing education can be successfully connected when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships.

  20. Analyzing best practices in employee health management: how age, sex, and program components relate to employee engagement and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Terry, Paul E; Grossmeier, Jessica; Mangen, David J; Gingerich, Stefan B

    2013-04-01

    Examine the influence of employee health management (EHM) best practices on registration, participation, and health behavior change in telephone-based coaching programs. Individual health assessment data, EHM program data, and health coaching participation data were analyzed for associations with coaching program enrollment, active participation, and risk reduction. Multivariate analyses occurred at the individual (n = 205,672) and company levels (n = 55). Considerable differences were found in how age and sex impacted typical EHM evaluation metrics. Cash incentives for the health assessment were associated with more risk reduction for men than for women. Providing either a noncash or a benefits-integrated incentive for completing the health assessment, or a noncash incentive for lifestyle management, strengthened the relationship between age and risk reduction. In EHM programs, one size does not fit all. These results can help employers tailor engagement strategies for their specific population.

  1. Comparing Occupational Health and Safety Management System Programming with Injury Rates in Poultry Production.

    PubMed

    Autenrieth, Daniel A; Brazile, William J; Douphrate, David I; Román-Muñiz, Ivette N; Reynolds, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Effective methods to reduce work-related injuries and illnesses in animal production agriculture are sorely needed. One approach that may be helpful for agriculture producers is the adoption of occupational health and safety management systems. In this replication study, the authors compared the injury rates on 32 poultry growing operations with the level of occupational health and safety management system programming at each farm. Overall correlations between injury rates and programming level were determined, as were correlations between individual management system subcomponents to ascertain which parts might be the most useful for poultry producers. It was found that, in general, higher levels of occupational health and safety management system programming were associated with lower rates of workplace injuries and illnesses, and that Management Leadership was the system subcomponent with the strongest correlation. The strength and significance of the observed associations were greater on poultry farms with more complete management system assessments. These findings are similar to those from a previous study of the dairy production industry, suggesting that occupational health and safety management systems may hold promise as a comprehensive way for producers to improve occupational health and safety performance. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of such systems to reduce farm work injuries and illnesses. These results are timely given the increasing focus on occupational safety and health management systems.

  2. The Management Academy for Public Health: program design and critical success factors.

    PubMed

    Orton, Stephen; Umble, Karl E; Rosen, Benson; McIver, Jacqueline; Menkens, Anne J

    2006-01-01

    The Management Academy for Public Health is a team-based training program jointly offered by the School of Public Health and the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This 9-month program teaches public health managers how to better manage people, information, and finances. Participants learn how to work in teams with community partners, and how to think and behave as social entrepreneurs. To practice and blend their new skills, teams develop a business plan that addresses a local public health issue. This article describes the program and explains the findings of the process evaluation, which has examined how best to structure and deploy a team-based method to create more effective, more entrepreneurial public health managers. Findings indicate that recruitment and retention are strong, program elements are relevant to learners' needs, and learners are satisfied with and value the program. Several specific benefits of the program model are identified, as well as several elements that support business plan success and skills' application on the job. On the basis of these findings, four success factors critical for developing similar programs are identified.

  3. The implementation of problem-based learning in health service management training programs.

    PubMed

    Stankunas, Mindaugas; Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Avery, Mark; Kalediene, Ramune; Babich, Suzanne Marie

    2016-10-03

    Purpose Strengthening management capacity within the health care sector could have a significant impact on population health. However, many training programs in this area are still delivered using a classic lecture-based approach. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate and better understand the feasibility of using a problem-based learning (PBL) approach in health services management training programs. Design/methodology/approach A PBL teaching approach (based on the Maastricht University model) was tested with second-year postgraduate students from the Master in Public Health Management program at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Students' opinions about PBL were investigated using a questionnaire with eight open-ended questions. Thematic content analysis was chosen to reflect the search for patterns across the data. Findings Respondents stated that the main advantage of PBL was that it was a more interesting and effective way of learning: "It is easier to remember, when you study by yourself and discuss with all peers". In addition, it was mentioned that PBL initiated a rapid exchange of ideas and sharing of personal experience. Students stressed that PBL was a good tool for developing other skills as well, such as "public speaking, communication, logic thinking". All students recommended delivering all other courses in the health services management program using PBL methodologies. Originality/value Findings from our study suggest that PBL may be an effective approach to teaching health services management. Potential problems in implementation are noted.

  4. Combating Obesity at Community Health Centers (COACH): a quality improvement collaborative for weight management programs.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Abigail E; John, Priya M; Vable, Anusha M; Campbell, Amanda; Heuer, Loretta; Schaefer, Cynthia; Vinci, Lisa; Drum, Melinda L; Chin, Marshall H; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L

    2013-01-01

    Community health centers (CHCs) seek effective strategies to address obesity. MidWest Clinicians' Network partnered with [an academic medical center] to test feasibility of a weight management quality improvement (QI) collaborative. MidWest Clinicians' Network members expressed interest in an obesity QI program. This pilot study aimed to determine whether the QI model can be feasibly implemented with limited resources at CHCs to improve weight management programs. Five health centers with weight management programs enrolled with CHC staff as primary study participants; this study did not attempt to measure patient outcomes. Participants attended learning sessions and monthly conference calls to build QI skills and share best practices. Tailored coaching addressed local needs. Topics rated most valuable were patient recruitment/retention strategies, QI techniques, evidence-based weight management, motivational interviewing. Challenges included garnering provider support, high staff turnover, and difficulty tracking patient-level data. This paper reports practical lessons about implementing a weight management QI collaborative in CHCs.

  5. Evaluation of capacity-building program of district health managers in India: a contextualized theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Prashanth, N S; Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy; Criel, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Performance of local health services managers at district level is crucial to ensure that health services are of good quality and cater to the health needs of the population in the area. In many low- and middle-income countries, health services managers are poorly equipped with public health management capacities needed for planning and managing their local health system. In the south Indian Tumkur district, a consortium of five non-governmental organizations partnered with the state government to organize a capacity-building program for health managers. The program consisted of a mix of periodic contact classes, mentoring and assignments and was spread over 30 months. In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework in the form of a refined program theory to understand how such a capacity-building program could bring about organizational change. A well-formulated program theory enables an understanding of how interventions could bring about improvements and an evaluation of the intervention. In the refined program theory of the intervention, we identified various factors at individual, institutional, and environmental levels that could interact with the hypothesized mechanisms of organizational change, such as staff's perceived self-efficacy and commitment to their organizations. Based on this program theory, we formulated context-mechanism-outcome configurations that can be used to evaluate the intervention and, more specifically, to understand what worked, for whom and under what conditions. We discuss the application of program theory development in conducting a realist evaluation. Realist evaluation embraces principles of systems thinking by providing a method for understanding how elements of the system interact with one another in producing a given outcome.

  6. Evaluation of Capacity-Building Program of District Health Managers in India: A Contextualized Theoretical Framework

    PubMed Central

    Prashanth, N. S.; Marchal, Bruno; Kegels, Guy; Criel, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Performance of local health services managers at district level is crucial to ensure that health services are of good quality and cater to the health needs of the population in the area. In many low- and middle-income countries, health services managers are poorly equipped with public health management capacities needed for planning and managing their local health system. In the south Indian Tumkur district, a consortium of five non-governmental organizations partnered with the state government to organize a capacity-building program for health managers. The program consisted of a mix of periodic contact classes, mentoring and assignments and was spread over 30 months. In this paper, we develop a theoretical framework in the form of a refined program theory to understand how such a capacity-building program could bring about organizational change. A well-formulated program theory enables an understanding of how interventions could bring about improvements and an evaluation of the intervention. In the refined program theory of the intervention, we identified various factors at individual, institutional, and environmental levels that could interact with the hypothesized mechanisms of organizational change, such as staff’s perceived self-efficacy and commitment to their organizations. Based on this program theory, we formulated context–mechanism–outcome configurations that can be used to evaluate the intervention and, more specifically, to understand what worked, for whom and under what conditions. We discuss the application of program theory development in conducting a realist evaluation. Realist evaluation embraces principles of systems thinking by providing a method for understanding how elements of the system interact with one another in producing a given outcome. PMID:25121081

  7. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  8. Military Health System Utilization Management Program at Medical Centers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    adjunctive dental care, cataract removals, mental health, MRIs, and pregnancy excluding active labor and cesarean section . However, these procedures may not...cataracts, - mental health, and - pregnancy excluding active labor or scheduled cesarean section . In addition, the prospective reviews are required for...i Section A: General Information ................................................. I B ackground

  9. The impact of an online disease management program on medical costs among health plan members.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Steven M; Day, Brian; Wildenhaus, Kevin; Silberman, Anna; Wang, Chun; Silberman, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the economic impact of an online disease management program within a broader population health management strategy. A retrospective, quasi-experimental, cohort design evaluated program participants and a matched cohort of nonparticipants on 2003-2007 claims data in a mixed model. The study was conducted through Highmark Inc, Blue Cross Blue Shield, covering 4.8 million members in five regions of Pennsylvania. Overall, 413 online self-management program participants were compared with a matched cohort of 360 nonparticipants. The costs and claims data were measured per person per calendar year. Total payments were aggregated from inpatient, outpatient, professional services, and pharmacy payments. The costs of the online program were estimated on a per-participant basis. All dollars were adjusted to 2008 values. The online intervention, implemented in 2006, was a commercially available, tailored program for chronic condition self management, nested within the Blues on Call(SM) condition management strategy. General linear modeling (with covariate adjustment) was used. Data trends were also explored using second-order polynomial regressions. Health care costs per person per year were $757 less than predicted for participants relative to matched nonparticipants, yielding a return on investment of $9.89 for every dollar spent on the program. This online intervention showed a favorable and cost-effective impact on health care cost.

  10. A Worksite Occupational Health Clinic-Based Diabetes Mellitus Management Program.

    PubMed

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Li, Xingquan; Erickson, Denise; McCluskey, Maureen; Schultz, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    This study is an analysis of a workplace diabetes management program offered to employees of a Fortune 100 financial services corporation located in the United States. The 12-month worksite-based educational program was for employees who were at risk for diabetes, had prediabetes, or were diagnosed with diabetes. This employed population, with health benefits, generally had acceptable control of their diabetes at the start of the program. They statistically improved most self-efficacy measures, but improvement in biometric tests at 6 and 12 months were not significantly different from baseline. Mean hemoglobin A1c at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months was 7.2%, 7.2%, and 7.3%, respectively. At 12 months, about 40% of preprogram survey participants completed all screenings and the post-program questionnaire. Disease management programs at the workplace can be an important component in helping employees enhance their knowledge of diabetes and maintain and improve their health.

  11. Toward a joint health and disease management program. Toronto hospitals partner to provide system leadership.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Anne Marie; Gollish, Jeffrey; Kennedy, Deborah; McGlasson, Rhona; Waddell, James

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Health and Disease Management Program in the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (TC LHIN) is envisioned as a comprehensive model of care for patients with hip and knee arthritis. It includes access to assessment services, education, self-management programs and other treatment programs, including specialist care as needed. As the first phase of this program, the hospitals in TC LHIN implemented a Hip and Knee Replacement Program to focus on improving access and quality of care, coordinating services and measuring wait times for patients waiting for hip or knee replacement surgery. The program involves healthcare providers, consumers and constituent hospitals within TC LHIN. The approach used for this program involved a definition of governance structure, broad stakeholder engagement to design program elements and plans for implementation and communication to ensure sustainability. The program and approach were designed to provide a model that is transferrable in its elements or its entirety to other patient populations and programs. Success has been achieved in creating a single wait list, developing technology to support referral management and wait time reporting, contributing to significant reductions in waits for timely assessment and treatment, building human resource capacity and improving patient and referring physician satisfaction with coordination of care.

  12. Veterans Health Administration's MOVE! Weight Management Program: Primary Care Clinicians' Perceptions of Program Implementation.

    PubMed

    Arigo, Danielle; Funderburk, Jennifer; Hooker, Stephanie; Dundon, Margaret; Evans-Hudnall, Gina; Dubbert, Patricia; Dickinson, Eva-Maria; Catanese, Sarah; O'Donohue, Jenny

    2015-10-01

    The Veterans Health Administration's MOVE! Program is the largest health care-delivered weight loss intervention in the United States. As a referring clinician's perceptions and knowledge of health programs may impact implementation, examining perceptions of MOVE! may inform improvements to this and other programs. This study investigated primary care clinician perceptions of MOVE! (n = 754, 50% nurses). Perceived effectiveness ratings were highest for groups with 11 to 25 group members (p < 0.01) and for a combined lecture and support group format (p = 0.026), though session length and several other aspects of delivery were not associated with perceptions of effectiveness. MOVE! staff also rated the program as more effective than did other clinicians (p < 0.01). Many respondents lacked knowledge about program specifics, especially those not involved with MOVE! delivery (vs. those directly involved; p < 0.01). These findings indicate that variety in group size and format is related to perceptions of MOVE! effectiveness. Also, clinicians not involved with MOVE! may lack knowledge about the program and underestimate its effectiveness, which could negatively affect referral likelihood or enthusiasm expressed to referred patients. Findings highlight opportunities for clarifying perceptions of a weight control program among clinicians in a large health care system.

  13. Integration of Health Systems Management Bachelors Program graduates into the Israeli healthcare market.

    PubMed

    Schwartz-Ilan, Dana; Goldberg, Avishay; Pliskin, Joseph S; Peled, Ronit; Shvarts, Shifra

    2005-01-01

    Ben-Gurion University (BGU) in Beer-Sheva, opened a special program (B.A. degree) for training junior academic administrative personnel who can improve the quality of service in health care organizations through suitable and high-quality administration. The program the first of its kind in Israel, has been in operation since 1994, providing 50 candidates for administrative positions within the health system per year. The research goals of the project described in this paper were to examine integration of 224 graduates of the undergraduate program in Health Systems Management (HSM) within the private and public health system in Israel, including employment trends and evaluation of the program in retrospect. Questionnaires were sent to all graduates of the program. Participants were requested to answer questions regarding their present place of employment and their satisfaction with their academic degree. The findings showed that the graduates of the undergraduate program in HSM have integrated well into the health system, butnotas well as they could have. The graduates encountered difficulties in their absorption into management roles in the public health system and feel that the extent of their abilities has yet to be fully recognized and utilized by the system.

  14. A return on investment evaluation of the Citibank, N.A., health management program.

    PubMed

    Ozminkowski, R J; Dunn, R L; Goetzel, R Z; Cantor, R I; Murnane, J; Harrison, M

    1999-01-01

    Citibank, N.A., initiated a comprehensive health, demand, and disease management program in 1994, using program services offered by Healthtrac, Inc., of Menlo Park, California. Program components included an initial screening of employees, computerized triage of subjects into higher and lower risk intervention programs, extensive follow-up with the higher risk subjects, and general health education and awareness building. The objective of this study was to estimate the financial impact of this program on medical expenditures. A quasiexperimental design was applied comparing medical expenditures before vs. after the intervention for program participants and nonparticipants. The 22,838 subjects (11,194 program participants and 11,644 nonparticipants) were followed for an average of 38 months before and after administration of a Healthtrac health risk appraisal (HRA) instrument that triggered the start of the program. To adjust for selection bias to the extent possible with these data, multiple regression models were used to estimate the savings in medical expenditures associated with program participation. The resulting dollar savings were compared to program costs to estimate the economic return on the company's investment in the program. The return on investment (ROI) was estimated to be between $4.56 and $4.73 saved per dollar spent on the program, depending on the discount rate applied. These results are similar to published evaluations of Healthtrac programs implemented with other populations. Despite limitations inherent in any retrospective observational study, the strong, positive ROI shown here suggests that a well-designed health management program (HMP), which focuses interventions on high risk populations, can result in monetary savings to an organization.

  15. Leadership development programs for health care middle managers: An exploration of the top management team member perspective.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Alan; Gillis, William E

    2016-10-14

    Hospitals throughout the United States establish leadership and management programs for their middle managers. Despite their pervasiveness and an increased emphasis on physician leadership, there is limited research regarding the development programs designed for clinical and nonclinical health care middle managers. Using two theoretical lenses, signaling and institutional theory, this exploratory study investigates mid-sized hospital development programs from the perspective of top management team (TMT) members. Our objective is to find out what types of programs hospitals have, how they are developed, and how they are evaluated. We conducted semistructured interviews with 13 TMT members in six purposefully selected hospitals and matched these interviews with program curricula. Careful coding of the data allowed us not only to show our data in a meaningful visual representation but also to show the progression of the data from raw form to aggregate themes in the qualitative research process. We identified four types of development programs used in the selected hospitals: (a) ongoing series, (b) curriculum-based, (c) management orientation, and (d) mentoring. Challenges existed in aligning the need for the program with program content. Communication occurred both through direct messaging regarding policies and procedures and through hidden signals. TMT members referenced other programs for guidance but were not always clear about what it is they wanted the programs to accomplish. Finally, there was limited program outcome measurement. Our small sample indicates that specific, structured, and comprehensive programs perform best. The better programs were always trying to improve but that most needed better accountability of tracking outcomes. In setting up a program, a collaborative approach among TMT members to establish what the needs are and how to measure outcomes worked well. Successful programs also tied in their leadership development with overall employee

  16. NASA Aviation Safety Program Aircraft Engine Health Management Data Mining Tools Roadmap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Aircraft Engine Health Management Data Mining Tools is a project led by NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the NASA Aviation Safety Program’s...prognostic and diagnostic methods through the application of data mining technologies to operational data and maintenance records. This will lead to the

  17. Health Information Management Education: A Comparison of Faculty Mentoring in Traditional vs. Distance Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidian, Marilyn R.

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years of research has demonstrated the value of faculty mentoring for students. The purpose of this research was to explore the faculty mentoring experiences among graduates of traditional and distance education programs in health information management professional education. The sample (n = 1039) was drawn from baccalaureate and masters…

  18. Wealth from Health: an incentive program for disease and population management: a 12-year project.

    PubMed

    Ratner, D; Louria, D; Sheffet, A; Fain, R; Curran, J; Saed, N; Bhaskar, S; Quereshi, M; Cable, G

    2001-01-01

    The future of healthcare is linked with its ability to face the challenges of consumerism. Disease and population management will represent the dominant style of healthcare delivery in the future. This article describes the Wealth from Health programs which utilize current and future technologies to help the healthcare system become a leader in healthcare delivery and to assist many communities at an affordable cost.

  19. Health Information Management Education: A Comparison of Faculty Mentoring in Traditional vs. Distance Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidian, Marilyn R.

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years of research has demonstrated the value of faculty mentoring for students. The purpose of this research was to explore the faculty mentoring experiences among graduates of traditional and distance education programs in health information management professional education. The sample (n = 1039) was drawn from baccalaureate and masters…

  20. Integrated Vehicle Health Management for the 2nd Generation RLV Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Marshal L.

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) for Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program, including details on the second and third RLV programs, IVHM activity at Kennedy Space Center, the NASA X-37 IVHM flight experiment, propulsion and power IVHM, IVHM technologies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, structures IVHM for third generation RLVs, and IVHM systems engineering and integration.

  1. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    PubMed

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Results of the Medicare Health Support disease-management pilot program.

    PubMed

    McCall, Nancy; Cromwell, Jerry

    2011-11-03

    In the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003, Congress required the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to test the commercial disease-management model in the Medicare fee-for-service program. The Medicare Health Support Pilot Program was a large, randomized study of eight commercial programs for disease management that used nurse-based call centers. We randomly assigned patients with heart failure, diabetes, or both to the intervention or to usual care (control) and compared them with the use of a difference-in-differences method to evaluate the effects of the commercial programs on the quality of clinical care, acute care utilization, and Medicare expenditures for Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries. The study included 242,417 patients (163,107 in the intervention group and 79,310 in the control group). The eight commercial disease-management programs did not reduce hospital admissions or emergency room visits, as compared with usual care. We observed only 14 significant improvements in process-of-care measures out of 40 comparisons. These modest improvements came at substantial cost to the Medicare program in fees paid to the disease-management companies ($400 million), with no demonstrable savings in Medicare expenditures. In this large study, commercial disease-management programs using nurse-based call centers achieved only modest improvements in quality-of-care measures, with no demonstrable reduction in the utilization of acute care or the costs of care.

  3. Occupational health, waste management, and environmental research program of the Health Division 1981. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Voelz, G.L.

    1983-09-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide effective programs in health, safety, waste processing, and environmental protection for the Laboratory. During 1981, evaluations of respiratory protective equipment included 3 special DOE contractor supplied-air suits or hoods and 10 commercial supplied-air devices. Preliminary results of chemical permeation tests of different protective garment materials are reported. Industrial hygiene field studies of oil shale work were conducted at the Geokinetics true in situ facility and the Rio Blanco modified in situ facility. An occupational medical survey of workers at the Geokinetics, Inc., facility was completed. Research on the generation and characterization of aerosols was continued for inhalation studies of man-made mineral fibers and oil shale aerosols. The distribution of /sup 241/Am in a whole body was determined by tissue analyses. Preliminary results of mortality in workers formerly employed at the Rocky Flats plant were reported. A simplified method for the analysis of plutonium in urine has been developed. Instrumentation development resulted in a portable computer system for field data analysis and a small, computerized, wristwatch-style radiation dosimeter. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1981 showed the highest estimated radiation dose due to Laboratory operations is about 4% of the dose due to the natural radioactivity here. A study was completed on alternative strategies for long-term management of Los Alamos transuranic wastes. A successful 10-day test burn of pentachlorophenol-contaminated wastes was conducted in the Controlled Air Incinerator. Decontamination factors for five fission products in the off-gas handling system of the incinerator were measured.

  4. Implementation of a worksite wellness program targeting small businesses: the Pinnacol Assurance health risk management study.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lee S; Stinson, Kaylan E; Metcalf, Dianne; Fang, Hai; Brockbank, Claire vS; Jinnett, Kimberly; Reynolds, Stephen; Trotter, Margo; Witter, Roxana; Tenney, Liliana; Atherly, Adam; Goetzel, Ron Z

    2015-01-01

    To assess small business adoption and need for a worksite wellness program in a longitudinal study of health risks, productivity, workers' compensation rates, and claims costs. Health risk assessment data from 6507 employees in 260 companies were examined. Employer and employee data are reported as frequencies, with means and standard deviations reported when applicable. Of the 260 companies enrolled in the health risk management program, 71% continued more than 1 year, with 97% reporting that worker wellness improves worker safety. Of 6507 participating employees, 34.3% were overweight and 25.6% obese. Approximately one in five participants reported depression. Potentially modifiable conditions affecting 15% or more of enrollees include chronic fatigue, sleeping problems, headaches, arthritis, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension. Small businesses are a suitable target for the introduction of health promotion programs.

  5. The Effects of a Disease Management Program on Self-Reported Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes: Evidence from the "Florida--A Healthy State (FAHS)" Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; Kominski, Gerald F.; Afifi, Abdelmonem A.; Kotlerman, Jenny B.

    2009-01-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of…

  6. The Effects of a Disease Management Program on Self-Reported Health Behaviors and Health Outcomes: Evidence from the "Florida--A Healthy State (FAHS)" Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morisky, Donald E.; Kominski, Gerald F.; Afifi, Abdelmonem A.; Kotlerman, Jenny B.

    2009-01-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of…

  7. NASA aviation safety program: Aircraft Engine Health Management Data Mining Tools roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litt, Jonathan S.; Simon, Donald L.; Meyer, Claudia; DePold, Hans; Curtiss, J. R.; Winston, Howard; Wang, Yao; Statler, Irv; Gawdiak, Yuri

    2000-04-01

    Aircraft Engine Health Management Data Mining Tools is a project led by NASA Glenn Research Center in support of the NASA Aviation Safety Program's Aviation System Monitoring and Modeling Thrust. The objective of the Glenn-led effort is to develop enhanced aircraft engine health management prognostic and diagnostic methods through the application of data mining technologies to operational data and maintenance records. This will lead to the improved safety of air transportation, optimized scheduling of engine maintenance, and optimization of engine usage. This paper presents a roadmap for achieving these goals.

  8. Environmental, health, and safety management systems and auditing programs: part I--The evolution.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Patricia B

    2003-04-01

    Early auditing began as an effort to avoid fines or other action from governmental agencies, without being based on accepted standards. However, for EHS auditing to be accepted as credible in the business world, established standards were necessary. As companies expanded globally, the need for international EHS standards grew, international standards for quality management and environmental program management have now been universally accepted (ISO, 2002). Occupational health nurses increasingly are becoming involved in efforts to help their employers or clients develop management systems to handle EHS issues--whether ISO 9000 (or the automotive equivalent, QS-9000), ISO 14000, or other models are used as the basis for the management system. Many nurses are actively involved in ISO certification efforts. As an extension of those efforts, occupational health nurses are increasingly involved in EHS audits, whether audits are conducted by third parties, by company employees, or as part of a self audit. The next column in this series will focus on strategies to improve the management of occupational health programs so the programs will stand up to rigorous EHS audits.

  9. Effectiveness of self-management promotion educational program among diabetic patients based on health belief model.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Farzad; Motlagh, Fazel Zinat; Solhi, Mahnaz; Gharibnavaz, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease; it can cause serious complications. Diabetes self-management is essential for prevention of disease complications. This study was conducted to evaluate self-management promotion educational program intervention efficiency among diabetic patients in Iran and health belief model (HBM) was applied as a theoretical framework. Overall, 120 Type 2 diabetic patients referred to rural health centers in Gachsaran, Iran participated in this study as randomly divided into intervention and control group. This was a longitudinal randomized pre- and post-test series control group design panel study to implement a behavior modification based intervention to promotion self-management among diabetic patients. Cross-tabulation and t-test by using SPSS statistical package, version 16 was used for the statistical analysis. Mean age was 55.07 years (SD = 9.94, range: 30-70). Our result shows significant improvements in average response for susceptibility, severity, benefit and self-management among intervention group. Additionally, after intervention, average response of the barrier to self-management was decreased among intervention group. Our result showed education program based on HBM was improve of self-management and seems implementing these programs can be effective in the and prevention of diabetes complications.

  10. Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Programs; Medicaid Managed Care, CHIP Delivered in Managed Care, and Revisions Related to Third Party Liability. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-06

    This final rule modernizes the Medicaid managed care regulations to reflect changes in the usage of managed care delivery systems. The final rule aligns, where feasible, many of the rules governing Medicaid managed care with those of other major sources of coverage, including coverage through Qualified Health Plans and Medicare Advantage plans; implements statutory provisions; strengthens actuarial soundness payment provisions to promote the accountability of Medicaid managed care program rates; and promotes the quality of care and strengthens efforts to reform delivery systems that serve Medicaid and CHIP beneficiaries. It also ensures appropriate beneficiary protections and enhances policies related to program integrity. This final rule also implements provisions of the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act of 2009 (CHIPRA) and addresses third party liability for trauma codes.

  11. [Research program for the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS): the contribution to health management and services in Paraiba State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Celino, Suely Deysny de Matos; Costa, Gabriela Maria Cavalcanti; França, Inácia Sátiro Xavier de; Araújo, Ednaldo Cavalcante de

    2013-01-01

    The shared management in health of the Research Program for the Unified Health System (PPSUS) has the purpose of funding research in priority areas for the health of the Brazilian population. The scope of this qualitative study is to understand the researchers' perception of the contribution of research funded by the PPSUS invitations to bid in the State of Paraiba, for resolving the priority health problems of the Paraiba population, for reducing regional inequalities in health and for bolstering the management of SUS. A documentary survey of the bids and final reports of research and a semi-structured interview with 28 coordinators of these studies was conducted. Triangulation strategy of data was used and subsequently subjected to content analysis, which converged with the categories: solving the health problems; reducing regional inequalities; contribution to management. Paraiba state needs adjustments such that the PPSUS can be fully implemented, ensuring that the knowledge generated can be converted into health policies and actions, since the research funded respond to the health needs of the population and difficulties in SUS management.

  12. Establishing an Independent Mobile Health Program for Chronic Disease Self-Management Support in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Piette, John D.; Valverde, Helen; Marinec, Nicolle; Jantz, Rachel; Kamis, Kevin; de la Vega, Carlos Lazo; Woolley, Timothy; Pinto, Bismarck

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile health (m-health) work in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) mainly consists of small pilot programs with an unclear path to scaling and dissemination. We describe the deployment and testing of an m-health platform for non-communicable disease (NCD) self-management support in Bolivia. Methods: Three hundred sixty-four primary care patients in La Paz with diabetes or hypertension completed surveys about their use of mobile phones, health and access to care. One hundred sixty-five of those patients then participated in a 12-week demonstration of automated telephone monitoring and self-management support. Weekly interactive voice response (IVR) calls were made from a platform established at a university in La Paz, under the direction of the regional health ministry. Results: Thirty-seven percent of survey respondents spoke indigenous languages at home and 38% had six or fewer years of education. Eighty-two percent had a mobile phone, 45% used text messaging with a standard phone, and 9% had a smartphone. Smartphones were least common among patients who were older, spoke indigenous languages, or had less education. IVR program participants completed 1007 self-management support calls with an overall response rate of 51%. IVR call completion was lower among older adults, but was not related to patients’ ethnicity, health status, or healthcare access. IVR health and self-care reports were consistent with information reported during in-person baseline interviews. Patients’ likelihood of reporting excellent, very good, or good health (versus fair or poor health) via IVR increased during program participation and was associated with better medication adherence. Patients completing follow-up interviews were satisfied with the program, with 19/20 (95%) reporting that they would recommend it to a friend. Conclusion: By collaborating with LMICs, m-health programs can be transferred from higher-resource centers to LMICs and implemented in ways that

  13. Modeling best practices in chronic disease management: the Arthritis Program at Southlake Regional Health Centre.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lorna; Mierdel, Sandra; Thorne, Carter

    2012-01-01

    Researchers, hospital administrators and governments are striving to define competencies in interprofessional care and education, as well as to identify effective models in chronic disease management. For more than 25 years The Arthritis Program (TAP) at Southlake Regional Health Centre in Newmarket, Ontario, has actively practiced within these two interrelated priorities, which are now at the top of the healthcare agenda in Ontario and Canada. The approximately 135 different rheumatic conditions are the primary cause of long-term disability in Canada, affecting those from youth to the senior years, with an economic burden estimated at $4.4 billion (CAD$) annually, and growing. For the benefit of healthcare managers and their clients with chronic conditions, this article discusses TAP's history and demonstrable success, predicated on an educational model of patient self-management and self-efficacy. Also outlined are TAP's contributions in supporting evidence-based best practices in interprofessional collaboration and chronic disease management; approaches that are arguably understudied and under-practiced. Next steps for TAP include a larger role in empirical research in chronic-disease management and integration of a formal training program to benefit health professionals launching or expanding their interprofessional programs using TAP as the dynamic clinical example.

  14. What Would It Take? Stakeholders’ Views and Preferences for Implementing a Health Care Manager Program in Community Mental Health Clinics Under Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Gomes, Arminda P.; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders’ recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice. PMID:25542194

  15. What would it take? Stakeholders' views and preferences for implementing a health care manager program in community mental health clinics under health care reform.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Health care manager interventions can improve the physical health of people with serious mental illness (SMI). In this study, we used concepts from the theory of diffusion of innovations, the consolidated framework for implementation research and a taxonomy of implementation strategies to examine stakeholders' recommendations for implementing a health care manager intervention in public mental health clinics serving Hispanics with SMI. A purposive sample of 20 stakeholders was recruited from mental health agencies, primary care clinics, and consumer advocacy organizations. We presented participants a vignette describing a health care manager intervention and used semistructured qualitative interviews to examine their views and recommendations for implementing this program. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and content analyzed. We found that a blend of implementation strategies that demonstrates local relative advantage, addresses cost concerns, and enhances compatibility to organizations and the client population is critical for moving health care manager interventions into practice.

  16. Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element Management Plan: Human Research Program. Revision B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norsk, Peter; Baumann, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) is an applied research and technology program within the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) that addresses human health and performance risk mitigation strategies in support of exploration missions. The HRP research and technology development is focused on the highest priority risks to crew health and safety with the goal of ensuring mission success and maintaining long-term crew health. Crew health and performance standards, defined by the NASA Chief Health and Medical Officer (CHMO), set the acceptable risk level for exploration missions. The HRP conducts research to inform these standards as well as provide deliverables, such as countermeasures, that ensure standards can be met to maximize human performance and mission success. The Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element was formed as part of the HRP to develop a scientifically-based, integrated approach to understanding and mitigating the health risks associated with human spaceflight. These health risks have been organized into four research portfolios that group similar or related risks. A fifth portfolio exists for managing technology developments and infrastructure projects. The HHC Element portfolios consist of: a) Vision and Cardiovascular; b) Exercise and Performance; c) Multisystem; d) Bone; and e) Technology and Infrastructure. The HHC identifies gaps associated with the health risks and plans human physiology research that will result in knowledge required to more fully understand risks and will result in validated countermeasures to mitigate risks.

  17. Federal employees health benefits program: limitation on physician charges and FEHB Program payments--Office of Personnel Management. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1996-09-27

    The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is making final its interim regulation that amends current Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program regulations. The final regulation requires that the charges and FEHB fee-for-service plans' benefit payments for certain physician services furnished to retired enrolled individuals do not exceed the limits on charges and payments established under the Medicare fee schedule for physician services.

  18. Managed behavioral health care: an instrument to characterize critical elements of public sector programs.

    PubMed

    Ridgely, M Susan; Giard, Julienne; Shern, David; Mulkern, Virginia; Burnam, M Audrey

    2002-08-01

    To develop an instrument to characterize public sector managed behavioral health care arrangements to capture key differences between managed and "unmanaged" care and among managed care arrangements. The instrument was developed by a multi-institutional group of collaborators with participation of an expert panel. Included are six domains predicted to have an impact on access, service utilization, costs, and quality. The domains are: characteristics of the managed care plan, enrolled population, benefit design, payment and risk arrangements, composition of provider networks, and accountability. Data are collected at three levels: managed care organization, subcontractor, and network of service providers. Data are collected through contract abstraction and key informant interviews. A multilevel coding scheme is used to organize the data into a matrix along key domains, which is then reviewed and verified by the key informants. This instrument can usefully differentiate between and among Medicaid fee-for-service programs and Medicaid managed care plans along key domains of interest. Beyond documenting basic features of the plans and providing contextual information, these data will support the refinement and testing of hypotheses about the impact of public sector managed care on access, quality, costs, and outcomes of care. If managed behavioral health care research is to advance beyond simple case study comparisons, a well-conceptualized set of instruments is necessary.

  19. Managed Behavioral Health Care: An Instrument to Characterize Critical Elements of Public Sector Programs

    PubMed Central

    Ridgely, M Susan; Giard, Julienne; Shern, David; Mulkern, Virginia; Burnam, M Audrey

    2002-01-01

    Objective To develop an instrument to characterize public sector managed behavioral health care arrangements to capture key differences between managed and “unmanaged” care and among managed care arrangements. Study Design The instrument was developed by a multi-institutional group of collaborators with participation of an expert panel. Included are six domains predicted to have an impact on access, service utilization, costs, and quality. The domains are: characteristics of the managed care plan, enrolled population, benefit design, payment and risk arrangements, composition of provider networks, and accountability. Data are collected at three levels: managed care organization, subcontractor, and network of service providers. Data Collection Methods Data are collected through contract abstraction and key informant interviews. A multilevel coding scheme is used to organize the data into a matrix along key domains, which is then reviewed and verified by the key informants. Principal Findings This instrument can usefully differentiate between and among Medicaid fee-for-service programs and Medicaid managed care plans along key domains of interest. Beyond documenting basic features of the plans and providing contextual information, these data will support the refinement and testing of hypotheses about the impact of public sector managed care on access, quality, costs, and outcomes of care. Conclusions If managed behavioral health care research is to advance beyond simple case study comparisons, a well-conceptualized set of instruments is necessary. PMID:12236386

  20. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model - a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals.

  1. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model – a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals. PMID:27382264

  2. Implementing a cognitive-behavioral pain self-management program in home health care, part 1: program adaptation.

    PubMed

    Beissner, Katherine; Bach, Eileen; Murtaugh, Christopher; Parker, Samantha J; Trachtenberg, Melissa; Reid, M Carrington

    2013-01-01

    Pain is highly prevalent among older adults receiving home care, contributing to disability, increased health care utilization, nursing home placement, and diminished quality of life. Pain is a particular problem in the home care setting, where current approaches are often inadequate, resulting in persistent high levels of pain and disability in this vulnerable population. Cognitive-behavioral approaches to pain management have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing pain intensity and associated disability but have not been systematically implemented in home health care. The purpose of this project was to adapt a community-based, cognitive-behavioral pain self-management program designed for patients with persistent back pain for implementation by physical therapists (PTs) to use with patients with activity-limiting pain in the home care setting. In this observational study, 2 groups of PTs practicing in home care were trained in the community-based program and completed surveys and participated in discussions during the training workshops to gather input on the program components perceived to be most helpful for their patients with pain; modifications to the program and the patient education materials for use in home care; and recommendations concerning program training and support required for successful implementation. Data collected during the workshops were summarized and presented to 2 expert panels for additional input and final decisions regarding program adaptations. Seventeen PTs with an average of 16.6 years of practice as a PT received the training and provided input on the community-based program. Program modifications based upon PT and expert panel review included reduction in the number of sessions, deletion of content, modification of the exercise component of the program, revision of patient materials, and modification of therapist training. This study successfully adapted a group-based pain management program for implementation by health care

  3. [Management of tobacco smoking in the prison service units - The effects of the health promotion program].

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Krzysztof; Korzeniowska, Elżbieta

    In 2014 the health promotion program aimed at managing personnel smoking was implemented in the Polish prison service (PS) in cooperation with the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (NIOM). It combined education of managers, encouraging them to implement good practices, with employees' education. This paper describes the process of implementation and its effects in 159 units of PS, against the data on the management of smoking in medium and large companies in Poland gathered in 2010. Situations concerning smoking management in PS units before and after a half-year program implementation were compared. Data were gathered using self-diagnosis questionnaires (initial and final assessments) collectively filled in by representatives of management and employees. Due to the program implementation there was an increase in the percentage of PS units with known number of smoking employees (19% vs. 61%), consultions on formal smoking regulations with personnel (14% vs. 57%), minimal antismoking medical interventions (46% vs. 59%), and assessments of effects of antismoking activities (14% vs. 55%). There was also increase in the number of PS units with personnel totally obeying smoking regulations (28% vs. 41%) and decrease in those where such rules are not completely met (9% vs. 7%). In 3/4 PS units there was an increase in employees' interest in quitting smoking and in 40% of them employees smoke less at work. Almost every second unit has set up a health promotion team. In many aspects the program has brought along satisfying effects and allowed for depicting areas of improvement. Its scheme and tools can be used, after adaptation, in interventions concerning other health problems in workplaces. Med Pr 2016;67(5):605-621.

  4. The CLR/NLM Health Sciences Library Management Intern Program: first year.

    PubMed Central

    Maina, W E; Jenkins, C G; Meakin, F A

    1980-01-01

    The first year of the Health Sciences Library Management Intern Program, funded by the National Library of Medicine and administered by the Council on Library Resources, has recently been completed. This paper discusses the origins of the internship, the selection of the successful applicants, and the motivation of the interns and host directors. The basic components of the intership year are described, and its effects on the host libraries and interns are considered. The immediate future of the internship is outlined, and other methods for training health sciences library administrators are briefly discussed. PMID:7356493

  5. Web-based weight management programs in an integrated health care setting: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rothert, Kendra; Strecher, Victor J; Doyle, Laurie A; Caplan, William M; Joyce, Jodi S; Jimison, Holly B; Karm, Lya M; Mims, Adrienne D; Roth, Mark A

    2006-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of a Web-based tailored behavioral weight management program compared with Web-based information-only weight management materials. Participants, 2862 eligible overweight and obese (BMI = 27 to 40 kg/m2) members from four regions of Kaiser Permanente's integrated health care delivery system, were randomized to receive either a tailored expert system or information-only Web-based weight management materials. Weight change and program satisfaction were assessed by self-report through an Internet-based survey at 3- and 6-month follow-up periods. Significantly greater weight loss at follow-up was found among participants assigned to the tailored expert system than among those assigned to the information-only condition. Subjects in the tailored expert system lost a mean of 3 +/- 0.3% of their baseline weight, whereas subjects in the information-only condition lost a mean of 1.2 +/- 0.4% (p < 0.0004). Participants were also more likely to report that the tailored expert system was personally relevant, helpful, and easy to understand. Notably, 36% of enrollees were African-American, with enrollment rates higher than the general proportion of African Americans in any of the study regions. The results of this large, randomized control trial show the potential benefit of the Web-based tailored expert system for weight management compared with a Web-based information-only weight management program.

  6. Organizational Change Management For Health Equity: Perspectives From The Disparities Leadership Program.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Joseph R; Tan-McGrory, Aswita; Kenst, Karey S; Phan, Thuy Hoai; Lopez, Lenny

    2017-06-01

    Leaders of health care organizations need to be prepared to improve quality and achieve equity in today's health care environment characterized by a focus on achieving value and addressing disparities in a diverse population. To help address this need, the Disparities Solutions Center at Massachusetts General Hospital launched the Disparities Leadership Program in 2007. The leadership program is an ongoing, year-long, executive education initiative that trains leaders from hospitals, health plans, and health centers to improve quality and eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health care. Feedback from participating organizations demonstrates that health care leaders seem to possess knowledge about what disparities are and about what should be done to eliminate them. Data collection, performance measurement, and multifaceted interventions remain the tools of the trade. However, the barriers to success are lack of leadership buy-in, organizational prioritization, energy, and execution, which can be addressed through organizational change management strategies. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. Public health program planning logic model for community engaged type 2 diabetes management and prevention.

    PubMed

    West, Joseph F

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes remains a growing epidemic with widening health inequity gaps in disease management, self-management knowledge, access to care and outcomes. Yet there is a paucity of evaluation tools for community engaged interventions aimed at closing the gaps and improving health. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (the Community Guide) developed by the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends two healthcare system level interventions, case management interventions and disease management programs, to improve glycemic control. However, as a public health resource guide for diabetes interventions a model for community engagement is a glaringly absent component of the Community Guide recommendations. In large part there are few evidence-based interventions featuring community engagement as a practice and system-level focus of chronic disease and Type 2 diabetes management. The central argument presented in this paper is that the absence of these types of interventions is due to the lack of tools for modeling and evaluating such interventions, especially among disparate and poor populations. A conceptual model emphasizing action-oriented micro-level community engagement is needed to complement the Community Guide and serve as the basis for testing and evaluation of these kinds of interventions. A unique logic model advancing the Community Guide diabetes recommendations toward measureable and sustainable community engagement for improved Type 2 diabetes outcomes is presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacist-managed tobacco cessation program in Veterans Health Administration community-based outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Dent, Larry A; Scott, Jesse G; Lewis, Evan

    2004-01-01

    To describe an ongoing pharmacist-managed tobacco cessation clinic and assess the long-term effectiveness of the program. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) community-based outpatient clinic in Missoula, Montana. Pharmacy professor/clinical pharmacy specialist, advanced pharmacy practice experience students, and tobacco cessation participants. Ongoing, pharmacist-managed tobacco cessation program offered to veterans. With use of the "Vets without Cigarettes" program developed by the Montana VHA and the most current strategies reported in the literature, the clinical pharmacy specialist and pharmacy students provide tobacco cessation services for Missoula Veterans Affairs Primary Care Center veterans. Activities include a three-session program using the Transtheoretical Model of Change, tobacco cessation pharmacotherapy, behavioral strategies, cognitive techniques, documentation, and follow-up survey. Percentage of veterans contacted reporting tobacco abstinence. Follow-up survey results were obtained for 130 (87.8%) of 148 veterans attending one or more sessions of the tobacco cessation class between November 1999 and December 2003. Of the 130 veterans contacted, 54 (41.5%) continued to be tobacco free. This program demonstrates that pharmacists are effective providers of tobacco cessation services. Furthermore, a comprehensive tobacco cessation program is provided that can serve as a model to guide pharmacists in assisting more patients to become tobacco free and live healthier lifestyles.

  9. The Impact of a Health Education Program Targeting Patients with High Visit Rates in a Managed Care Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dally, Diana L.; Dahar, Wendy; Scott, Ann; Roblin, Douglas; Khoury, Allan T.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether a mailed health promotion program would reduce outpatient visits while improving health status among people with chronic conditions and high visit rates in a managed care organization. Surveys of treatment and control groups before and 1 year after randomization indicated that the program reduced visit rates while improving…

  10. Value drivers: an approach for estimating health and disease management program savings.

    PubMed

    Phillips, V L; Becker, Edmund R; Howard, David H

    2013-12-01

    Health and disease management (HDM) programs have faced challenges in documenting savings related to their implementation. The objective of this eliminate study was to describe OptumHealth's (Optum) methods for estimating anticipated savings from HDM programs using Value Drivers. Optum's general methodology was reviewed, along with details of 5 high-use Value Drivers. The results showed that the Value Driver approach offers an innovative method for estimating savings associated with HDM programs. The authors demonstrated how real-time savings can be estimated for 5 Value Drivers commonly used in HDM programs: (1) use of beta-blockers in treatment of heart disease, (2) discharge planning for high-risk patients, (3) decision support related to chronic low back pain, (4) obesity management, and (5) securing transportation for primary care. The validity of savings estimates is dependent on the type of evidence used to gauge the intervention effect, generating changes in utilization and, ultimately, costs. The savings estimates derived from the Value Driver method are generally reasonable to conservative and provide a valuable framework for estimating financial impacts from evidence-based interventions.

  11. Quality management and federal workers' compensation: the Veterans Health Administration workers' compensation program model.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Michael J; Mohr, David C; Lipkowitz-Eaton, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Dianne; Moreau, Sarah; McPhaul, Kate

    2015-03-01

    The federal workers' compensation program includes under a single employer five commonly encountered roles and responsibilities-injured patient, clinical provider, third-party administrator, adjudicator, and insurer. Data within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) provide a unique opportunity to apply a simple model of health care quality improvement, exploring interactions between structures, processes, and outcomes. A facility survey identified reporting structures, levels of education and training, policies and processes, tool availability and use, and perceptions of role adherence. Administrative data included process and outcome metrics, including short-term disability, long-term disability, and lost time cases. Improved collaboration between clinical and administrative staff within VHA and with the Department of Labor was associated with improved performance. Applying a clinical quality improvement model clarifies roles, expectations, and likely relationships for improved program management.

  12. The impact of management programs on physicians' work environment and health. A prospective, controlled study comparing different interventions.

    PubMed

    von Vultée, Pia Jansson; Arnetz, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    Female physicians have less influence over their daily work conditions and exhibit slower career advancement as compared to their male colleagues. The aim of this study is to assess the impact on individual and organizational well being from different kinds of management programs. Female physicians participating in management intervention programs were compared with a reference group of matched physicians and sickness absenteeism was significantly lower in the intervention group. No significant differences were found between the groups with regard to career advancement, individual, organizational and professional well being. Health care organizations spend a substantial amount of resources on management programs in order to improve leadership, autonomy and the work-environment of physicians in times of increasing discontent among this key group of health care employees. Our study indicates some beneficial health effects from structured management programs but there is a need to develop and assess the efficacy of these programs further.

  13. Physiotherapists supporting self-management through health coaching: a mixed methods program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Sinéad Patricia; Graham, Shane; Friesen, Josh; Rosenblat, Michael; Rous, Colin; Richardson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate a program in support of chronic disease self-management (CDSM) that is founded on a health coaching (HC) approach, includes supervised exercise and mindfulness-based stress reduction components and is delivered within a private practice physiotherapy setting. An explanatory mixed method design, framed by theory-based program evaluation, was employed to evaluate an eight-week group-based program. Standardized self-rated and performance measures were evaluated pre- and post intervention. Additionally, participant focus groups were conducted following the intervention period. An inductive thematic approach was undertaken to analyze the qualitative data. Seventeen participants (N = 17) completed the study. Improvements were seen in both self-report and performance outcomes. Participants explained how and why they felt the program was beneficial. Six themes were generated: (1) group dynamic; (2) learning versus doing; (3) holism and comprehensive care; (4) self-efficacy and empowerment; (5) previous solutions versus new management strategies; and (6) healthcare provider support. This study established that a group program in support of CDSM founded on a HC approach demonstrated potential value from participants as well as favorable outcomes. A pragmatic randomized control trial is required to determine efficacy of this intervention.

  14. Cooperative disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Jedrey, C M; Chaurette, K A; Winn, L B

    2001-01-01

    Cooperative disease management programs sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and managed care organizations or health care providers can offer significant benefits to patients. They can be structured so as to comply with applicable OIG, FDA, and IRS regulations. Such programs must be structured for the benefit of patients, and not to require the use of or otherwise directly promote the selection of the sponsoring pharmaceutical company's products.

  15. Employing Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework to determine the effectiveness of health information management courses and programs.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Donald Nick

    2011-04-01

    Evaluation of the impact and effectiveness of courses is necessary so that strengths and weaknesses can be identified and improvements made. This article uses Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework to present a model that health information management (HIM) instructors can use to improve upon the standard course evaluation form. Kirkpatrick's model stresses evaluation on the levels of reaction, learning, behavior, and results. The proposed course evaluation model addresses the first three of these levels and focuses on the conditions necessary for transfer of learned knowledge and skills into on-the-job application. The article provides concrete tips that HIM instructors can apply in the process of evaluating the effectiveness of their courses and programs.

  16. A Meta-Analysis of Health Status, Health Behaviors, and Health Care Utilization Outcomes of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Louise; O’Colmain, Benita J.; Beauchesne, Danielle; Daniels, Brandy; Greenberg, Michael; House, Marnie; Chervin, Doryn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is a community-based self-management education program designed to help participants gain confidence (self-efficacy) and skills to better manage their chronic conditions; it has been implemented worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively synthesize the results of CDSMP studies conducted in English-speaking countries to determine the program’s effects on health behaviors, physical and psychological health status, and health care utilization at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months after baseline. Methods We searched 8 electronic databases to identify CDSMP-relevant literature published from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2009; experts identified additional unpublished studies. We combined the results of all eligible studies to calculate pooled effect sizes. We included 23 studies. Eighteen studies presented data on small English-speaking groups; we conducted 1 meta-analysis on these studies and a separate analysis on results by other delivery modes. Results Among health behaviors for small English-speaking groups, aerobic exercise, cognitive symptom management, and communication with physician improved significantly at 4- to 6-month follow-up; aerobic exercise and cognitive symptom management remained significantly improved at 9 to 12 months. Stretching/strengthening exercise improved significantly at 9 to 12 months. All measures of psychological health improved significantly at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months. Energy, fatigue, and self-rated health showed small but significant improvements at 4 to 6 months but not at 9 to 12 months. The only significant change in health care utilization was a small improvement in the number of hospitalization days or nights at 4 to 6 months Conclusion Small to moderate improvements in psychological health and selected health behaviors that remain after 12 months suggest that CDSMP delivered in small English-speaking groups produces

  17. The role of disease management programs in the health behavior of chronically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Adams, Samantha A; Walters, Bethany Hipple; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Bal, Roland; Huijsman, Robbert; Rutten-Van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-04-01

    Investigate the effects of disease management program (DMP) implementation on physical activity, smoking, and physical quality of life among chronically ill patients. This study used a mixed-methods approach involving qualitative (35 interviews with project managers) and quantitative (survey of patients from 18 DMPs) data collection. Questionnaire response rates were 51% (2010; 2619/5108) at T0 and 47% (2011; 2191/4693) at T1. Physical activity and the percentage of smokers improved significantly over time, whereas physical quality of life declined. After adjusting for patients' physical quality of life at T0, age, educational level, marital status, and gender, physical activity at T0 (p<0.01), changes in physical activity (p<0.001), and percentage of smokers at T0 (p<0.05) predicted physical quality of life at T1. Project managers reported that DMPs improved patient-professional interaction. The ability to set more concrete targets improved patients' health behaviors. DMPs appear to improve physical activity among chronically ill patients over time. Furthermore, (changes in) health behavior are important for the physical quality of life of chronically ill patients. Redesigning care systems and implementing DMPs based on the chronic care model may improve health behavior among chronically ill patients. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Health Manager.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for a college course in health management developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, 13 references, evaluation criteria, course objectives, and course competencies. It is followed by…

  19. Facility Design and Health Management Program at the Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Barton, Carrie L; Johnson, Eric W; Tanguay, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    The number of researchers and institutions moving to the utilization of zebrafish for biomedical research continues to increase because of the recognized advantages of this model. Numerous factors should be considered before building a new or retooling an existing facility. Design decisions will directly impact the management and maintenance costs. We and others have advocated for more rigorous approaches to zebrafish health management to support and protect an increasingly diverse portfolio of important research. The Sinnhuber Aquatic Research Laboratory (SARL) is located ∼3 miles from the main Oregon State University campus in Corvallis, Oregon. This facility supports several research programs that depend heavily on the use of adult, larval, and embryonic zebrafish. The new zebrafish facility of the SARL began operation in 2007 with a commitment to build and manage an efficient facility that diligently protects human and fish health. An important goal was to ensure that the facility was free of Pseudoloma neurophilia (Microsporidia), which is very common in zebrafish research facilities. We recognize that there are certain limitations in space, resources, and financial support that are institution dependent, but in this article, we describe the steps taken to build and manage an efficient specific pathogen-free facility.

  20. Health Beliefs Describing Patients Enrolling in Community Pharmacy Disease Management Programs.

    PubMed

    Luder, Heidi; Frede, Stacey; Kirby, James; King, Keith; Heaton, Pamela

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey new enrollees in a community pharmacy, employer-based diabetes and hypertension coaching program to describe the characteristics, health beliefs, and cues to action of newly enrolled participants. A 70-question, 5-point Likert-type survey was developed using constructs from the Health Belief Model (HBM), Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), and Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA). New enrollees in the coaching programs completed the survey. Survey responses between controlled and uncontrolled patients and patient demographics were compared. Between November 2011 and November 2012, 154 patients completed the survey. Patients were fairly well controlled with a mean hemoglobin A1C of 7.3% and a mean blood pressure of 134/82 mm Hg. The strongest cue to action for enrollment was the financial incentives offered by the employer (mean: 3.33, median: 4). White patients were significantly more motivated by financial incentives. More patients indicated they had not enrolled previously in the program because they were unaware it was available (mean: 2.89, median 3.0) and these patients were more likely to have an uncontrolled condition (P ≤ 0.050). A top factor motivating patients to enroll in a disease management coaching program was the receipt of financial incentives. Significant differences in HBM, TPB, and TRA responses were seen for patients with different demographics. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. It is possible: availability of lymphedema case management in each health facility in Togo. Program description, evaluation, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Els; Dorkenoo, Ameyo M; Datagni, Michael; Cantey, Paul T; Morgah, Kodjo; Harvey, Kira; Ziperstein, Joshua; Drexler, Naomi; Chapleau, Gina; Sodahlon, Yao

    2013-07-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a vector-borne parasitic disease that can clinically manifest as disabling lymphedema. Although the LF elimination program aims to reduce disability and to interrupt transmission, there has been a scarcity of disease morbidity management programs, particularly on a national scale. This report describes the implementation of the first nationwide LF lymphedema management program. The program, which was initiated in Togo in 2007, focuses on patient behavioral change. Its goal is two-fold: to achieve a sustainable program on a national-scale, and to serve as a model for other countries. The program has five major components: 1) train at least one health staff in lymphedema care in each health facility in Togo; 2) inform people with a swollen leg that care is available at their dispensary; 3) train patients on self-care; 4) provide a support system to motivate patients to continue self-care by training community health workers or family members and providing in home follow-up; and 5) integrate lymphedema management into the curriculum for medical staff. The program achieved the inclusion of lymphedema management in the routine healthcare package. The evaluation after three years estimated that 79% of persons with a swollen leg in Togo were enrolled in the program. The adherence rate to the proposed World Health Organization treatment of washing, exercise, and leg elevation was more than 70% after three years of the program, resulting in a stabilization of the lymphedema stage and a slight decrease in reported acute attacks among program participants. Health staff and patients consider the program successful in reaching and educating the patients. After the external funding ended, the morbidity management program is maintained through routine Ministry of Health activities.

  2. It is Possible: Availability of Lymphedema Case Management in each Health Facility in Togo. Program Description, Evaluation, and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Els; Dorkenoo, Ameyo M.; Datagni, Michael; Cantey, Paul T.; Morgah, Kodjo; Harvey, Kira; Ziperstein, Joshua; Drexler, Naomi; Chapleau, Gina; Sodahlon, Yao

    2013-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a vector-borne parasitic disease that can clinically manifest as disabling lymphedema. Although the LF elimination program aims to reduce disability and to interrupt transmission, there has been a scarcity of disease morbidity management programs, particularly on a national scale. This report describes the implementation of the first nationwide LF lymphedema management program. The program, which was initiated in Togo in 2007, focuses on patient behavioral change. Its goal is two-fold: to achieve a sustainable program on a national-scale, and to serve as a model for other countries. The program has five major components: 1) train at least one health staff in lymphedema care in each health facility in Togo; 2) inform people with a swollen leg that care is available at their dispensary; 3) train patients on self-care; 4) provide a support system to motivate patients to continue self-care by training community health workers or family members and providing in home follow-up; and 5) integrate lymphedema management into the curriculum for medical staff. The program achieved the inclusion of lymphedema management in the routine healthcare package. The evaluation after three years estimated that 79% of persons with a swollen leg in Togo were enrolled in the program. The adherence rate to the proposed World Health Organization treatment of washing, exercise, and leg elevation was more than 70% after three years of the program, resulting in a stabilization of the lymphedema stage and a slight decrease in reported acute attacks among program participants. Health staff and patients consider the program successful in reaching and educating the patients. After the external funding ended, the morbidity management program is maintained through routine Ministry of Health activities. PMID:23690550

  3. Cardiovascular Disease Self-Management: Pilot Testing of an mHealth Healthy Eating Program

    PubMed Central

    Pfaeffli Dale, Leila; Whittaker, Robyn; Eyles, Helen; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Ball, Kylie; Smith, Natasha; Maddison, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is crucial in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), yet attendance is poor. Mobile technology (mHealth) offers a potential solution to increase reach of CR. This paper presents two development studies to determine mobile phone usage in adults with CVD and to evaluate the acceptability of an mHealth healthy eating CR program. Methods: CR attendees were surveyed to determine mobile phone usage rates. A second single-subject pilot study investigated perceptions of a 4-week theory-based healthy eating mHealth program and explored pre-post changes in self-efficacy. Results: 74 adults with CVD completed the survey (50/74 male; mean age 63 ± 10). Nearly all had mobile phones (70/74; 95%) and used the Internet (69/74; 93%), and most were interested in receiving CR by text message (57/74; 77%). 20 participants took part in the healthy eating pilot study. Participants read all/most of the text messages, and most (19/20) thought using mobile technology was a good way to deliver the program. The website was not widely used as visiting the website was reported to be time consuming. Exploratory t-tests revealed an increase in heart healthy eating self-efficacy post program, in particular the environmental self-efficacy subset (Mean = 0.62, SD = 0.74, p = 0.001). Conclusions: Text messaging was seen as a simple and acceptable way to deliver nutrition information and behavior change strategies; however, future research is needed to determine the effectiveness of such programs. PMID:25562145

  4. Flexible Approaches for Teaching Computational Genomics in a Health Information Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie; Abdelhak, Mervat

    2013-01-01

    The astonishing improvement of high-throughput biotechnologies in recent years makes it possible to access a huge amount of genomic data. The association between genomic data and genetic disease has already been and will continue to be applied to personalized healthcare. Health information management (HIM) professionals are the ones who will handle personal genetic information and provide solid evidence to support physicians’ diagnoses and personalized treatment strategies, and therefore they will need to have the knowledge and skills to process genomic data. In this paper, we describe flexible approaches for teaching a computational genomics course in the HIM program at the University of Pittsburgh. HIM programs at other universities may choose an appropriate approach to fit into their own curriculum. PMID:23861672

  5. Flexible approaches for teaching computational genomics in a health information management program.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie; Abdelhak, Mervat

    2013-01-01

    The astonishing improvement of high-throughput biotechnologies in recent years makes it possible to access a huge amount of genomic data. The association between genomic data and genetic disease has already been and will continue to be applied to personalized healthcare. Health information management (HIM) professionals are the ones who will handle personal genetic information and provide solid evidence to support physicians' diagnoses and personalized treatment strategies, and therefore they will need to have the knowledge and skills to process genomic data. In this paper, we describe flexible approaches for teaching a computational genomics course in the HIM program at the University of Pittsburgh. HIM programs at other universities may choose an appropriate approach to fit into their own curriculum.

  6. Innovating in health care management education: development of an accelerated MBA and MPH degree program at Yale.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Forman, Howard P; Pistell, Anne F; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    2015-03-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges.

  7. Innovating in Health Care Management Education: Development of an Accelerated MBA and MPH Degree Program at Yale

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Howard P.; Pistell, Anne F.; Nembhard, Ingrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, there is recognition of the need for individuals with expertise in both management and public health to help health care organizations deliver high-quality and cost-effective care. The Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Management began offering an accelerated Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Public Health (MPH) joint degree program in the summer of 2014. This new program enables students to earn MBA and MPH degrees simultaneously from 2 fully accredited schools in 22 months. Students will graduate with the knowledge and skills needed to become innovative leaders of health care organizations. We discuss the rationale for the program, the developmental process, the curriculum, benefits of the program, and potential challenges. PMID:25706023

  8. How compatible are participatory ergonomics programs with occupational health and safety management systems?

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Amin; Neumann, W Patrick; Imbeau, Daniel; Bigelow, Philip; Pagell, Mark; Theberge, Nancy; Hilbrecht, Margo; Wells, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a major cause of pain, disability, and costs. Prevention of MSD at work is frequently described in terms of implementing an ergonomics program, often a participatory ergonomics (PE) program. Most other workplace injury prevention activities take place under the umbrella of a formal or informal occupational health and safety management system (OHSMS). This study assesses the similarities and differences between OHSMS and PE as such knowledge could help improve MSD prevention activities. Methods Using the internationally recognized Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series (OHSAS 18001), 21 OHSMS elements were extracted. In order to define PE operationally, we identified the 20 most frequently cited papers on PE and extracted content relevant to each of the OHSAS 18001 elements. The PE literature provided a substantial amount of detail on five elements: (i) hazard identification, risk assessment and determining controls; (ii) resources, roles, responsibility, accountability, and authority; (iii) competence, training and awareness; (iv) participation and consultation; and (v) performance measurement and monitoring. However, of the 21 OHSAS elements, the PE literature was silent on 8 and provided few details on 8 others. The PE literature did not speak to many elements described in OHSMS and even when it did, the language used was often different. This may negatively affect the effectiveness and sustainability of PE initiatives within organizations. It is expected that paying attention to the approaches and language used in management system frameworks could make prevention of MSD activities more effective and sustainable.

  9. Development of an Evidence-Based mHealth Weight Management Program Using a Formative Research Process

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Robyn; McRobbie, Hayden; Dorey, Enid; Ball, Kylie; Maddison, Ralph; Myers Smith, Katie; Crawford, David; Jiang, Yannan; Gu, Yulong; Michie, Jo; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a critical need for weight management programs that are effective, cost efficient, accessible, and acceptable to adults from diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. mHealth (delivered via mobile phone and Internet) weight management programs have potential to address this need. To maximize the success and cost-effectiveness of such an mHealth approach it is vital to develop program content based on effective behavior change techniques, proven weight management programs, and closely aligned with participants’ needs. Objective This study aims to develop an evidence-based mHealth weight management program (Horizon) using formative research and a structured content development process. Methods The Horizon mHealth weight management program involved the modification of the group-based UK Weight Action Program (WAP) for delivery via short message service (SMS) and the Internet. We used an iterative development process with mixed methods entailing two phases: (1) expert input on evidence of effective programs and behavior change theory; and (2) target population input via focus group (n=20 participants), one-on-one phone interviews (n=5), and a quantitative online survey (n=120). Results Expert review determined that core components of a successful program should include: (1) self-monitoring of behavior; (2) prompting intention formation; (3) promoting specific goal setting; (4) providing feedback on performance; and (5) promoting review of behavioral goals. Subsequent target group input confirmed that participants liked the concept of an mHealth weight management program and expressed preferences for the program to be personalized, with immediate (prompt) and informative text messages, practical and localized physical activity and dietary information, culturally appropriate language and messages, offer social support (group activities or blogs) and weight tracking functions. Most target users expressed a preference for at least one text message

  10. Integrated employee assistance program/managed behavioral health plan utilization by persons with substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Elizabeth S Levy; Hodgkin, Dominic; Hiatt, Deirdre; Horgan, Constance M; Greenfield, Shelly F; McCann, Bernard

    2011-04-01

    New federal parity and health reform legislation, promising increased behavioral health care access and a focus on prevention, has heightened interest in employee assistance programs (EAPs). This study investigated service utilization by persons with a primary substance use disorder (SUD) diagnosis in a managed behavioral health care (MBHC) organization's integrated EAP/MBHC product (N = 1,158). In 2004, 25.0% of clients used the EAP first for new treatment episodes. After initial EAP utilization, 44.4% received no additional formal services through the plan, and 40.4% received regular outpatient services. Overall, outpatient care, intensive outpatient/day treatment, and inpatient/residential detoxification were most common. About half of the clients had co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses. Mental health service utilization was extensive. Findings suggest that for service users with primary SUD diagnoses in an integrated EAP/MBHC product, the EAP benefit plays a key role at the front end of treatment and is often only one component of treatment episodes.

  11. Environment, Safety and Health independent evaluation of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Company`s (FERMCO) Comprehensive Environmental Occupational Safety and Health Program (CEOSHP)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) requested the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) to perform an independent evaluation of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation`s (FERMCO`s) Comprehensive Environmental occupational Safety and Health Program (CEOSHP) document. In 1992, FERMCO was awarded the Department of Energy`s (DOE) first Environmental Restoration Management Contract and developed the CEOSHP to respond to contract requirements. EH limited its review to the CEOSHP because this document constitutes FERMCO`s written environment, safety and health (ES&H) program document and thus provides the basis for FERMCO`s ES&H program. EH`s independent review identified several major areas of the CEOSHP that need to be revised if it is to function successfully as the program-level document for FERMCO`s environment, safety and health program. The problems identified occur throughout the document and apply across the three CEOSHP sections evaluated by EH: the Occupational Safety and Health program, the Environmental Protection program, and the Radiological Control program. Primary findings of the CEOSHP: (1) Does not fully reflect the occupational safety and health, environmental protection, and radiological control requirements of the Department; (2) Does not convey a strong sense of management leadership of the program or clearly delineate employee rights, responsibilities, and roles in FERMCO`s ES&H program; (3) Is not a program management-level document; (4) Does not describe a ``seamless`` ES&H program; and (5) Does not clearly convey how FERMCO`s ES&H program actually works. EH`s detailed evaluation of FERMCO`s CEOSHP, along with specific recommendations are presented in Sections 2, 3, and 4 of this report. EH believes that EM will find this review and analysis useful in its efforts to assist FERMCO in a comprehensive redrafting of the CEOSHP.

  12. Health workers' and managers' perceptions of the integrated community case management program for childhood illness in Malawi: the importance of expanding access to child health services.

    PubMed

    Callaghan-Koru, Jennifer A; Hyder, Adnan A; George, Asha; Gilroy, Kate E; Nsona, Humphreys; Mtimuni, Angella; Bryce, Jennifer

    2012-11-01

    Community case management (CCM) is a promising task-shifting strategy for expanding treatment of childhood illness that is increasingly adopted by low-income countries. Its success depends in part on how the strategy is perceived by those responsible for its implementation. This study uses qualitative methods to explore health workers' and managers' perceptions about CCM provided by health surveillance assistants (HSAs) during the program's first year in Malawi. Managers and HSAs agreed that CCM contributed beneficially by expanding access to the underserved and reducing caseloads at health facilities. Managers differed among themselves in their endorsements of CCM, most offered constrained endorsement, and a few had stronger justifications for CCM. In addition, HSAs uniformly wanted continued expansion of their clinical role, while managers preferred to view CCM as a limited mandate. The HSAs also reported motivating factors and frustrations related to system constraints and community pressures related to CCM. The impact of CCM on motivation and workload of HSAs is noted and deserves further attention.

  13. Health Workers' and Managers' Perceptions of the Integrated Community Case Management Program for Childhood Illness in Malawi: The Importance of Expanding Access to Child Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan-Koru, Jennifer A.; Hyder, Adnan A.; George, Asha; Gilroy, Kate E.; Nsona, Humphreys; Mtimuni, Angella; Bryce, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Community case management (CCM) is a promising task-shifting strategy for expanding treatment of childhood illness that is increasingly adopted by low-income countries. Its success depends in part on how the strategy is perceived by those responsible for its implementation. This study uses qualitative methods to explore health workers' and managers' perceptions about CCM provided by health surveillance assistants (HSAs) during the program's first year in Malawi. Managers and HSAs agreed that CCM contributed beneficially by expanding access to the underserved and reducing caseloads at health facilities. Managers differed among themselves in their endorsements of CCM, most offered constrained endorsement, and a few had stronger justifications for CCM. In addition, HSAs uniformly wanted continued expansion of their clinical role, while managers preferred to view CCM as a limited mandate. The HSAs also reported motivating factors and frustrations related to system constraints and community pressures related to CCM. The impact of CCM on motivation and workload of HSAs is noted and deserves further attention. PMID:23136279

  14. Permitting program with best management practices for shale gas wells to safeguard public health.

    PubMed

    Centner, Terence J; Petetin, Ludivine

    2015-11-01

    The development of shale gas resources in the United States has been controversial as governments have been tardy in devising sufficient safeguards to protect both people and the environment. Alleged health and environmental damages suggest that other countries around the world that decide to develop their shale gas resources can learn from these problems and take further actions to prevent situations resulting in the release of harmful pollutants. Looking at U.S. federal regulations governing large animal operations under the permitting provisions of the Clean Water Act, the idea of a permitting program is proposed to respond to the risks of pollution by shale gas development activities. Governments can require permits before allowing the drilling of a new gas well. Each permit would include fluids and air emissions reduction plans containing best management practices to minimize risks and releases of pollutants. The public availability of permits and permit applications, as occurs for water pollution under various U.S. permitting programs, would assist governments in protecting public health. The permitting proposals provide governments a means for providing further assurances that shale gas development projects will not adversely affect people and the environment.

  15. Predicting changes in hypertension control using electronic health records from a chronic disease management program.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jimeng; McNaughton, Candace D; Zhang, Ping; Perer, Adam; Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Denny, Joshua C; Kirby, Jacqueline; Lasko, Thomas; Saip, Alexander; Malin, Bradley A

    2014-01-01

    Common chronic diseases such as hypertension are costly and difficult to manage. Our ultimate goal is to use data from electronic health records to predict the risk and timing of deterioration in hypertension control. Towards this goal, this work predicts the transition points at which hypertension is brought into, as well as pushed out of, control. In a cohort of 1294 patients with hypertension enrolled in a chronic disease management program at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, patients are modeled as an array of features derived from the clinical domain over time, which are distilled into a core set using an information gain criteria regarding their predictive performance. A model for transition point prediction was then computed using a random forest classifier. The most predictive features for transitions in hypertension control status included hypertension assessment patterns, comorbid diagnoses, procedures and medication history. The final random forest model achieved a c-statistic of 0.836 (95% CI 0.830 to 0.842) and an accuracy of 0.773 (95% CI 0.766 to 0.780). This study achieved accurate prediction of transition points of hypertension control status, an important first step in the long-term goal of developing personalized hypertension management plans.

  16. Chronic disease self-management program in the workplace: opportunities for health improvement.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Wilson, Mark G; DeJoy, David M; Padilla, Heather; Zuercher, Heather; Corso, Phaedra; Vandenberg, Robert; Lorig, Kate; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-01-01

    Disease management is becoming increasingly important in workplace health promotion given the aging workforce, rising chronic disease prevalence, and needs to maintain a productive and competitive American workforce. Despite the widespread availability of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP), and its known health-related benefits, program adoption remains low in workplace settings. The primary purpose of this study is to compare personal and delivery characteristics of adults who attended CDSMP in the workplace relative to other settings (e.g., senior centers, healthcare organizations, residential facilities). This study also contrasts characteristics of CDSMP workplace participants to those of the greater United States workforce and provides recommendations for translating CDSMP for use in workplace settings. Data were analyzed from 25,664 adults collected during a national dissemination of CDSMP. Only states and territories that conducted workshops in workplace settings were included in analyses (n = 13 states and Puerto Rico). Chi-squared tests and t-tests were used to compare CDSMP participant characteristics by delivery site type. CDSMP workplace participant characteristics were then compared to reports from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. Of the 25,664 CDSMP participants in this study, 1.7% (n = 435) participated in workshops hosted in worksite settings. Compared to CDSMP participants in non-workplace settings, workplace setting participants were significantly younger and had fewer chronic conditions. Differences were also observed based on chronic disease types. On average, CDSMP workshops in workplace settings had smaller class sizes and workplace setting participants attended more workshop sessions. CDSMP participants in workplace settings were substantially older and a larger proportion were female than the general United States workforce. Findings indicate opportunities to translate CDSMP for use in the workplace to

  17. The effect of a telephone-based health coaching disease management program on Medicaid members with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Chieh; Chien, Hung-Lun; Willis, Georgianna; O'Connell, Elizabeth; Rennie, Kate Staunton; Bottella, Heather M; Ferris, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of disease management programs for chronic conditions, evidence regarding the effect of these programs has been mixed. In addition, few peer-reviewed studies have examined the effect of these programs on publicly insured populations. To examine the effect of a telephone-based health coaching disease management program on healthcare utilization and expenditures in Medicaid members with chronic conditions. Using a difference-in-differences analysis, we examined changes in hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) visits, ambulatory care visits, and Medicaid expenditures among program members for 1 year before and 2 years after their enrollment compared with a matched comparison group. Medicaid members aged 18 to 64 with a diagnosis of qualifying chronic conditions and 2 acute health service events of hospitalizations and/or ED visits within a 12-month period. Changes in acute hospitalizations, ambulatory care visits, and Medicaid expenditures before and after program enrollment were similar between the 2 study groups. However, during the second year after enrollment, program members had a significantly smaller decrease in ED visits than the comparisons (8% in program members and 23% in comparisons, P value=0.03). Compared with a matched comparison group, the telephone-based health coaching disease management program did not demonstrate significant effects on healthcare utilization and expenditures in Medicaid members with chronic conditions.

  18. The Burden of Psychosocial Stressors and Urgent Mental Health Problems in a Pediatric Weight Management Program.

    PubMed

    Zenlea, Ian S; Burton, E Thomaseo; Askins, Nissa; Pluhar, Emily Israel; Rhodes, Erinn T

    2015-11-01

    To systematically screen for behavioral and mental health problems and psychosocial stressors (PS) in newly referred patients and adult caregivers (PACs) in a pediatric weight management program. We used the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) for caregivers and patients ≥18 years, and assessed urgent mental health concerns and psychosocial stressors. A total of 243 PACs were screened; data were unavailable for 6. Compared with US normative data for the SDQ-Parent Proxy Version, the proportion of patients in our sample with borderline/abnormal total difficulties and conduct problems scores was greater for all age groups. Among adult caregivers with complete CES-D, 18.4% were at risk for depression. Eleven percent of patients screened positive for urgent mental health problems. Overall, 43% of patients and 57.4% of caregivers had PS. Systematic screening identified untreated symptoms and significant PS. Addressing these complex problems likely requires collaborative approaches with community providers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Management factors affecting udder health and effects of a one year extension program in organic dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Ivemeyer, S; Walkenhorst, M; Heil, F; Notz, C; Maeschli, A; Butler, G; Klocke, P

    2009-11-01

    The first part of this study was a cross-sectional analysis of the impact of 29 management factors on udder health in organic dairy farms in Switzerland. All 77 farms joined the extension program 'pro-Q'. As a measure of udder health the theoretical bulk milk somatic cell count (TBMSCC) calculated by the monthly cow composite somatic cell count over a time period of 1 year was chosen. The basic udder health of the farms was determined by TBMSCC during the year prior to the start of the project (mean for all farms = 176 460 cells/ml). In the multivariable analysis, the five factors 'swiss brown breed', 'alpine summer pasturing', 'calf feeding with milk from mastitis diseased cows', 'hard bedding' and 'no post-milking' remained as significant risk factors on udder health. In the second part of the study, the development of management factors and the udder health situation affected by an extension program after 1 year was investigated. A partial improvement of the management factors on the farms but no overall improvement on udder health and no association between management changes and udder health changes were found. Improvement of udder health was more likely in farms with higher basic TBMSCC than in those farms with less udder health problems at the beginning of the project.

  20. Changes in psychosocial health during a 7-week paediatric weight management program.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J M; Howard, K; DeLaFuente, K; Cadieux, A; Yee, K E

    2017-09-04

    Youth with obesity are at increased risk of psychosocial symptoms; however, little is known regarding the impact of paediatric weight management (PWM) on psychosocial health. The aim of the study was to investigate changes in psychosocial health among children who completed a 7-week PWM program. Participants aged 5 to 16 years with a BMI ≥85th percentile completed a 7-week, family-centred PWM program focused on health behaviour education, exercise and mentored goal setting. The Paediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) was assessed via parent report to evaluate psychosocial symptoms before and after the program, and subscales were calculated for internalizing (PSC-IS), externalizing (PSC-ES) and attention symptoms (PSC-AS). At baseline, positive screen rates for psychosocial symptoms among the 317 patients included 16.1% for PSC, 14.1% for PSC-ES, 18.6% for PSC-IS and 12.3% for PSC-AS. Among program completers, total PSC scores improved in those with normal (p = 0.010) and elevated p < .001 psychosocial symptoms at baseline. Youth with positive screens for elevated PSC subscales improved their subscale scores, on average, and the majority reduced scores to below elevated levels for PSC (54.2%), PSC-ES (64.7%), PSC-IS (78.3%) and PSC-AS (64.7%). Improvements in PSC remained significant after adjusting for BMI changes during treatment, but BMI differed across PSC-change groups, including BMI increases among participants with PSC deterioration (0.33 ± 0.64 kg m(-2) ) (P = 0.035) and BMI decreases among patients with no reliable PSC change (-0.26 ± 1.04 kg m(-2) ) (P = 0.038) or reliable PSC improvement (-0.22 ± 0.74 kg m(-2) ) (P = 0.025). Youth with positive screens for psychosocial symptoms can improve emotional and behavioural functioning during short-term PWM. Future research is needed to elucidate mechanisms and long-term outcome durability. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  1. Online health behavior and disease management programs: are we ready for them? Are they ready for us?

    PubMed

    Evers, Kerry E; Cummins, Carol O; Prochaska, James O; Prochaska, Janice M

    2005-07-01

    Advancing the science and practice of health promotion and disease management on the Internet requires a systematic program of research examining the population impact of such programs. With impact described as the combination of effectiveness and participation, such research needs to include the examination of the quality and effectiveness of programs that are available to the general public, as well as descriptive and predictive knowledge about population readiness to participate in such programs. There have been few studies examining the quality of interactive health behavior change (HBC) programs on the Internet, and even fewer investigations of the effectiveness of such programs. Based on the review of over 300 HBC programs on the Internet using the "5 A's" of Health Behavior Change on the Internet (HBC-I Screener), which represent standard minimum guidelines for evaluation, it appears HBC on the Internet is in the early stages of development. As health behavior change on the Internet matures from the provision of health information to meeting the requirements necessary to produce health behavior change, and as program developers take advantage of the interactive nature of the Internet, the basic screening and expanded evaluation criteria developed in this project will provide templates for both consumers and developers of programs. The second component necessary for evaluating the impact of HBC on the Internet is the extent to which the population is ready to participate in such programs. We need to move beyond a narrow focus on early adopters and produce a population perspective that includes those not ready, those getting ready, and those ready to use such programs, as well as those already participating. By understanding participation levels of such programs, and what drives this participation, the development and dissemination of practical tailored and targeted interventions can help maximize population participation in Internet programs for health

  2. Patient Stratification Using Electronic Health Records from a Chronic Disease Management Program.

    PubMed

    Chen, Robert; Sun, Jimeng; Dittus, Robert S; Fabbri, Daniel; Kirby, Jacqueline; Laffer, Cheryl L; McNaughton, Candace D; Malin, Bradley

    2016-01-04

    The goal of this study is to devise a machine learning framework to assist care coordination programs in prognostic stratification to design and deliver personalized care plans and to allocate financial and medical resources effectively. This study is based on a de-identified cohort of 2,521 hypertension patients from a chronic care coordination program at the Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Patients were modeled as vectors of features derived from electronic health records (EHRs) over a six-year period. We applied a stepwise regression to identify risk factors associated with a decrease in mean arterial pressure of at least 2 mmHg after program enrollment. The resulting features were subsequently validated via a logistic regression classifier. Finally, risk factors were applied to group the patients through model-based clustering. We identified a set of predictive features that consisted of a mix of demographic, medication, and diagnostic concepts. Logistic regression over these features yielded an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.71 (95% CI: [0.67, 0.76]). Based on these features, four clinically meaningful groups are identified through clustering - two of which represented patients with more severe disease profiles, while the remaining represented patients with mild disease profiles. Patients with hypertension can exhibit significant variation in their blood pressure control status and responsiveness to therapy. Yet this work shows that a clustering analysis can generate more homogeneous patient groups, which may aid clinicians in designing and implementing customized care programs. The study shows that predictive modeling and clustering using EHR data can be beneficial for providing a systematic, generalized approach for care providers to tailor their management approach based upon patient-level factors.

  3. Comprehensive diabetes management program for poorly controlled Hispanic type 2 patients at a community health center.

    PubMed

    Welch, Garry; Allen, Nancy A; Zagarins, Sofija E; Stamp, Kelly D; Bursell, Sven-Erik; Kedziora, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Technology and improved care coordination models can help diabetes educators and providers meet national care standards and provide culturally sensitive diabetes education that may improve diabetes outcomes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of a nurse-led diabetes care program (Comprehensive Diabetes Management Program, CDMP) for poorly controlled Hispanic type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients in an urban community health center setting. Patients were randomized to the intervention condition (IC; n = 21) or an attention control condition (AC; n = 18). IC and AC conditions were compared on rates of adherence to national clinical practice guidelines (blood glucose, blood pressure, foot exam, eye exam), and levels of diabetes distress, depression, and treatment satisfaction. IC patients had a significant improvement in A1C from baseline to 12-month follow-up compared with AC (-1.6% ± 1.4% versus -0.6% ± 1.1%; P = .01). The proportion of IC patients meeting clinical goals at follow-up tended to be higher than AC for A1c (IC = 45%; AC = 28%), systolic blood pressure (IC = 55%; AC = 28%), eye screening (IC = 91%; AC = 78%), and foot screening, (IC = 86%; AC = 72%). Diabetes distress and treatment satisfaction also showed greater improvement for IC than AC (P = .05 and P = .06, respectively), with no differences for depression. The CDMP intervention was more effective than an attention control condition in helping patients meet evidence-based guidelines for diabetes care.

  4. Impact of an educational program on knowledge and practice of health care staff toward pharmaceutical waste management in Gaza, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Tabash, Mohammed I; Hussein, Rim A; Mahmoud, Aleya H; El-Borgy, Mohamed D; Abu-Hamad, Bassam A

    2016-04-01

    In health care facilities, pharmaceutical waste is generally discharged down the drain or sent to landfill. Poor knowledge about their potential downstream impacts may be a primary factor for improper disposal behavior. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of an intervention program on knowledge and practice of health care staff regarding pharmaceutical waste management. The study was designed as a pre/posttest intervention study. Total sample size was 530 in the pre-intervention phase, and then a subsample of 69 individuals was selected for the intervention and the post-intervention phases. Paired-sample t test was used to assess the difference between pretest and follow-up test results. A statistically significant improvement in knowledge and practice was achieved (P<0.001). Poor knowledge and poor practice levels (scores<50%) were found to improve to satisfactory levels (scores≥75%). Therefore, educational programs could be considered as an effective tool for changing health care staff practice in pharmaceutical waste management. In health care facilities, pharmaceutical waste is generally discharged down the drain or sent to landfill. A lack of knowledge about the potential impacts of this type of waste may be a leading factor in improper disposal behavior. Following an educational program, statistically significant improvement in knowledge and practice of health care staff as regards to pharmaceutical waste management (PWM) was achieved. It is thus recommended that authorities implement training-of-trainers (TOT) programs to educate health care staff on PWM and organize refreshment workshops regularly.

  5. The effects of a disease management program on self-reported health behaviors and health outcomes: evidence from the "Florida: a healthy state (FAHS)" Medicaid program.

    PubMed

    Morisky, Donald E; Kominski, Gerald F; Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Kotlerman, Jenny B

    2009-06-01

    Premature morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases account for a major proportion of expenditures for health care cost in the United States. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of a disease management program on physiological and behavioral health indicators for Medicaid patients in Florida. A two-year prospective study of 15,275 patients with one or more chronic illnesses (congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, or asthma) was undertaken. Control of hypertension improved from baseline to Year 1 (adjusted odds ratio = 1.60, p < .05), with maintenance at Year 2. Adjusted cholesterol declined by 6.41 mg/dl from baseline to Year 1 and by 12.41 mg/dl (p < .01) from baseline to Year 2. Adjusted average medication compliance increased by 0.19 points (p < .01) in Year 1 and 0.29 points (p < .01) in Year 2. Patients in the disease management program benefited in terms of controlling hypertension, asthma symptoms, and cholesterol and blood glucose levels.

  6. Effect of a health coaching self-management program for older adults with multimorbidity in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Chang, HeeKyung

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Although a growing number of older people are suffering from multimorbidity, most of the health problems related to multimorbidity can be improved by self-management. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a health coaching self-management program for older adults with multimorbidity in nursing homes. Methods Older adults with multimorbidity from one nursing home in Korea were randomly allocated to either an intervention group (n=22) or conventional group (n=21). Participants in the intervention group met face to face with the researchers twice a week for 8 weeks, during which time the researchers engaged them in goal setting and goal performance using the strategies in the health coaching self-management program. Regular care was provided to the other participants in the conventional group. Results Participants in the intervention group had significantly better outcomes in exercise behaviors (P=0.015), cognitive symptom management (P=0.004), mental stress management/relaxation (P=0.023), self-rated health (P=0.002), reduced illness intrusiveness (P<0.001), depression (P<0.001), and social/role activities limitations (P<0.001). In addition, there was a significant time-by-group interaction in self-efficacy (P=0.036). According to the goal attainment scales, their individual goals of oral health and stress reduction were achieved. Conclusion The health coaching self-management program was successfully implemented in older adults with multimorbidity in a nursing home. Further research is needed to develop and evaluate the long-term effects of an intervention to enhance adherence to self-management and quality of life for older adults with multimorbidity. PMID:25045253

  7. A Corporate Health and Fitness Program: Motivation and Management by Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baun, William B.; Baun, Michele

    1984-01-01

    Computers used in employee fitness programs help motivate participants by providing immediate feedback. The computer is used to record employee membership, participant check-in and check-out, fitness and medical testing, and exercise logging. A description of Tenneco's health program is offered. (DF)

  8. Management and Evaluation of a Pan-Canadian Graduate Training Program in Health Informatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Marilynne; Lau, Francis

    2010-01-01

    Eight Canadian universities partnered to establish a Collaborative Health Informatics PhD/Postdoc Strategic Training Program (CHPSTP). The 6-year goal was to increase research capacity in health informatics in Canada. Three cohorts of 20 trainees participated in the training, which included online Research Learning Experiences, annual face-to-face…

  9. The Self-Assessment Process and Impacts on the Health Information Management Program Performance: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Spohn, Renae

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how health information management (HIM) educational programs can use the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Model (MBNQAM) educational criteria to meet the self-assessment requirement for Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM) accreditation. An existing instrument, Quantum Performance Group's Organizational Assessment Survey authored by Dr. Mark Blazey, was used in this study. The instrument was designed to self-assess the entire organization. Results of the study demonstrate how the MBNQAM can be used to successfully self-assess HIM programs. This research adds to the body of literature surrounding the application of the MBNQAM for HIM programs and provides new information to deans, administrators, and educators that may be useful, as an added component, when self-assessing HIM programs. The results of this study will help to establish a foundation for HIM programs to strengthen the self-assessment process, providing a strong starting point for strategic planning prioritization for HIM program improvement initiatives. The improved process will help in maturing the HIM program while fulfilling accreditation requirements for self-assessment. As additional HIM programs formalize the self-assessment process, benchmarking opportunities with other HIM programs will be created.

  10. The Self-Assessment Process and Impacts on the Health Information Management Program Performance: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Spohn, Renae

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how health information management (HIM) educational programs can use the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Model (MBNQAM) educational criteria to meet the self-assessment requirement for Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM) accreditation. An existing instrument, Quantum Performance Group's Organizational Assessment Survey authored by Dr. Mark Blazey, was used in this study. The instrument was designed to self-assess the entire organization. Results of the study demonstrate how the MBNQAM can be used to successfully self-assess HIM programs. This research adds to the body of literature surrounding the application of the MBNQAM for HIM programs and provides new information to deans, administrators, and educators that may be useful, as an added component, when self-assessing HIM programs. The results of this study will help to establish a foundation for HIM programs to strengthen the self-assessment process, providing a strong starting point for strategic planning prioritization for HIM program improvement initiatives. The improved process will help in maturing the HIM program while fulfilling accreditation requirements for self-assessment. As additional HIM programs formalize the self-assessment process, benchmarking opportunities with other HIM programs will be created. PMID:26755899

  11. Capacity development for health research in Africa: experiences managing the African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship Program

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Africa's progress depends on her capacity to generate, adapt, and use scientific knowledge to meet regional health and development needs. Yet, Africa's higher education institutions that are mandated to foster this capacity lack adequate resources to generate and apply knowledge, raising the need for innovative approaches to enhance research capacity. In this paper, we describe a newly-developed program to support PhD research in health and population sciences at African universities, the African Doctoral Dissertation Research Fellowship (ADDRF) Program. We also share our experiences implementing the program. As health research capacity-strengthening in Africa continues to attract attention and as the need for such programs to be African-led is emphasized, our experiences in developing and implementing the ADDRF offer invaluable lessons to other institutions undertaking similar initiatives. PMID:20587016

  12. A meta-analysis of health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization outcomes of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program.

    PubMed

    Brady, Teresa J; Murphy, Louise; O'Colmain, Benita J; Beauchesne, Danielle; Daniels, Brandy; Greenberg, Michael; House, Marnie; Chervin, Doryn

    2013-01-01

    The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) is a community-based self-management education program designed to help participants gain confidence (self-efficacy) and skills to better manage their chronic conditions; it has been implemented worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to quantitatively synthesize the results of CDSMP studies conducted in English-speaking countries to determine the program's effects on health behaviors, physical and psychological health status, and health care utilization at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months after baseline. We searched 8 electronic databases to identify CDSMP-relevant literature published from January 1, 1999, through September 30, 2009; experts identified additional unpublished studies. We combined the results of all eligible studies to calculate pooled effect sizes. We included 23 studies. Eighteen studies presented data on small English-speaking groups; we conducted 1 meta-analysis on these studies and a separate analysis on results by other delivery modes. Among health behaviors for small English-speaking groups, aerobic exercise, cognitive symptom management, and communication with physician improved significantly at 4- to 6-month follow-up; aerobic exercise and cognitive symptom management remained significantly improved at 9 to 12 months. Stretching/strengthening exercise improved significantly at 9 to 12 months. All measures of psychological health improved significantly at 4 to 6 months and 9 to 12 months. Energy, fatigue, and self-rated health showed small but significant improvements at 4 to 6 months but not at 9 to 12 months. The only significant change in health care utilization was a small improvement in the number of hospitalization days or nights at 4 to 6 months Small to moderate improvements in psychological health and selected health behaviors that remain after 12 months suggest that CDSMP delivered in small English-speaking groups produces health benefits for participants and would be

  13. Heat stress management program improving worker health and operational effectiveness: a case study.

    PubMed

    Huss, Rosalyn G; Skelton, Scott B; Alvis, Kimberly L; Shane, Leigh A

    2013-03-01

    Heat stress monitoring is a vital component of an effective health and safety program when employees work in exceptionally warm environments. Workers at hazardous waste sites often wear personal protective equipment (PPE), which increases the body heat stress load. No specific Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations address heat stress; however, OSHA does provide several guidance documents to assist employers in addressing this serious workplace health hazard. This article describes a heat stress and surveillance plan implemented at a hazardous waste site as part of the overall health and safety program. The PPE requirement for work at this site, coupled with extreme environmental temperatures, made heat stress a significant concern. Occupational health nurses and industrial hygienists developed a monitoring program for heat stress designed to prevent the occurrence of significant heat-related illness in site workers. The program included worker education on the signs of heat-related illness and continuous physiologic monitoring to detect early signs of heat-related health problems. Biological monitoring data were collected before workers entered the exclusion zone and on exiting the zone following decontamination. Sixty-six site workers were monitored throughout site remediation. More than 1,700 biological monitoring data points were recorded. Outcomes included improved worker health and safety, and increased operational effectiveness. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Health management education: current alternatives.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2014-01-01

    The past several decades have witnessed a significant increase in the number of graduate programs in health management, either on campus or online. The alternative for a health professional to attending a graduate program on campus is to receive an MBA or MHA degree online. The current cost ranges from $13,600 to $78,000, with the more expensive online programs tied to graduate programs that are accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education and provide the names and qualifications of their faculty. The for-profit online programs have not been forthcoming to this author concerning their health management faculty or their curriculum. For the individual desiring more health management education who is unable to enroll, for family or financial reasons, in an on-campus program, the top-tier online programs seem like a worthwhile but is a relatively expensive option.

  15. Participation of plans and providers in Medicaid and SCHIP managed care. State Children's Health Insurance Program.

    PubMed

    Gold, Marsha; Mittler, Jesslca; Draper, Debra; Rousseau, David

    2003-01-01

    For Medicaid and SCHIP managed care programs to succeed, they must attract enough and the right kinds of plans and providers to meet access and care goals. In 2001 we analyzed practices and perceptions that bear on these goals by surveying managed care plans participating in Medicaid or SCHIP, or both, in eleven states. Participating plans appear supportive of both programs and are largely able to secure providers to participate, too. To date, SCHIP has not attracted many plans not already participating in Medicaid. While perceptions were positive in 2001, maintaining current plan and provider relationships in an environment that has become much more budget constrained will be challenging.

  16. The political economy of a public health case management program's transition into medical homes.

    PubMed

    Wells, Rebecca; Cilenti, Dorothy; Issel, L Michele

    2015-11-01

    Throughout the United States, public health leaders are experimenting with how best to integrate services for individuals with complex needs. To that end, North Carolina implemented a policy incorporating both local public health departments and other providers into medical homes for low income pregnant women and young children at risk of developmental delays. To understand how this transition occurred within local communities, a pre-post comparative case study was conducted. A total of 42 people in four local health departments across the state were interviewed immediately before the 2011 policy change and six months later: 32 professionals (24 twice) and 10 pregnant women receiving case management at the time of the policy implementation. We used constant comparative analysis of interview and supplemental data to identify three key consequences of the policy implementation. One, having medical homes increased the centrality of other providers relative to local health departments. Two, a shift from focusing on personal relationships toward medical efficiency diverged in some respects from both case managers' and mothers' goals. Three, health department staff re-interpreted state policies to fit their public health values. Using a political economy perspective, these changes are interpreted as reflecting shifts in public health's broader ideological environment. To a large extent, the state successfully induced more connection between health department-based case managers and external providers. However, limited provider engagement may constrain the implementation of the envisioned medical homes. The increased focus on medical risk may also undermine health departments' role in supporting health over time by attenuating staff relationships with mothers. This study helps clarify how state public health policy innovations unfold at local levels, and why front line practice may in some respects diverge from policy intent. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Associations between farmer participation in veterinary herd health management programs and farm performance.

    PubMed

    Derks, M; van Werven, T; Hogeveen, H; Kremer, W D J

    2014-03-01

    In the past few decades, farms have increased in size and the focus of management has changed from curative to preventive. To help farmers cope with these changes, veterinarians offer veterinary herd health management (VHHM) programs, whose major objective is to support the farmer in reaching his farm performance goals. The association between farm performance and participation in VHHM, however, remains unknown. The aim of this paper was to compare farm performance parameters between participants and nonparticipants in VHHM and to differentiate within participation to evaluate the possible added value of VHHM on the farm. Five thousand farmers received a questionnaire about the level of VHHM on their farm. Farm performance parameters of these 5,000 farms were provided. For all respondents (n=1,013), farm performance was compared between participants and nonparticipants and within level of participation, using linear mixed and linear regression models. Farmers who participated in VHHM produced 336 kg of milk/cow per year more and their average milk somatic cell count (SCC) was 8,340 cells/mL lower than farmers who did not participate in VHHM. Participating herds, however, had an older age at first calving (+12d), a lower 56-d nonreturn rate percentage (-3.34%), and a higher number of inseminations per cow (+0.09 inseminations). They also had more cows culled per year (+1.05%), and a lower age at culling (-70 d). Participants in the most-extended form of VHHM (level 3) had a lower SCC (-19,800 cells/mL), fewer cows with high SCC (-1.70%), fewer cows with new high SCC (-0.47%), a shorter calving interval (-6.01 d), and fewer inseminations per heifer (-0.07 inseminations) than participants in the least-extended form of VHHM (level 1). Level 3 participants, however, also had more cows culled per year (+1.74%) and a lower age at culling (-103 d). Discussing specific topics with the veterinarian (milk production, fertility, and udder health) had only marginal effects on

  18. Health care use and costs for participants in a diabetes disease management program, United States, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Dall, Timothy M; Roary, Mary; Yang, Wenya; Zhang, Shiping; Chen, Yaozhu J; Arday, David R; Gantt, Cynthia J; Zhang, Yiduo

    2011-05-01

    The Disease Management Association of America identifies diabetes as one of the chronic conditions with the greatest potential for management. TRICARE Management Activity, which administers health care benefits for US military service personnel, retirees, and their dependents, created a disease management program for beneficiaries with diabetes. The objective of this study was to determine whether participation intensity and prior indication of uncontrolled diabetes were associated with health care use and costs for participants enrolled in TRICARE's diabetes management program. This ongoing, opt-out study used a quasi-experimental approach to assess program impact for beneficiaries (n = 37,370) aged 18 to 64 living in the United States. Inclusion criteria were any diabetes-related emergency department visits or hospitalizations, more than 10 diabetes-related ambulatory visits, or more than twenty 30-day prescriptions for diabetes drugs in the previous year. Beginning in June 2007, all participants received educational mailings. Participants who agreed to receive a baseline telephone assessment and telephone counseling once per month in addition to educational mailings were considered active, and those who did not complete at least the baseline telephone assessment were considered passive. We categorized the diabetes status of each participant as "uncontrolled" or "controlled" on the basis of medical claims containing diagnosis codes for uncontrolled diabetes in the year preceding program eligibility. We compared observed outcomes to outcomes predicted in the absence of diabetes management. Prediction equations were based on regression analysis of medical claims for a historical control group (n = 23,818) that in October 2004 met the eligibility criteria for TRICARE's program implemented June 2007. We conducted regression analysis comparing historical control group patient outcomes after October 2004 with these baseline characteristics. Per-person total annual

  19. Efficiency of dairy farms participating and not participating in veterinary herd health management programs.

    PubMed

    Derks, Marjolein; Hogeveen, Henk; Kooistra, Sake R; van Werven, Tine; Tauer, Loren W

    2014-12-01

    This paper compares farm efficiencies between dairies who were participating in a veterinary herd health management (VHHM) program with dairies not participating in such a program, to determine whether participation has an association with farm efficiency. In 2011, 572 dairy farmers received a questionnaire concerning the participation and execution of a VHHM program on their farms. Data from the questionnaire were combined with farm accountancy data from 2008 through 2012 from farms that used calendar year accounting periods, and were analyzed using Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA). Two separate models were specified: model 1 was the basic stochastic frontier model (output: total revenue; input: feed costs, land costs, cattle costs, non-operational costs), without explanatory variables embedded into the efficiency component of the error term. Model 2 was an expansion of model 1 which included explanatory variables (number of FTE; total kg milk delivered; price of concentrate; milk per hectare; cows per FTE; nutritional yield per hectare) inserted into the efficiency component of the joint error term. Both models were estimated with the financial parameters expressed per 100 kg fat and protein corrected milk and per cow. Land costs, cattle costs, feed costs and non-operational costs were statistically significant and positive in all models (P<0.01). Frequency distributions of the efficiency scores for the VHHM dairies and the non-VHHM dairies were plotted in a kernel density plot, and differences were tested using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test. VHHM dairies had higher total revenue per cow, but not per 100 kg milk. For all SFA models, the difference in distribution was not statistically different between VHHM dairies and non-VHHM dairies (P values 0.94, 0.35, 0.95 and 0.89 for the basic and complete model per 100 kg fat and protein corrected milk and per cow respectively). Therefore we conclude that with our data farm participation in VHHM is not related

  20. Health Information Technology: DOD Needs to Provide More Information on Risks to Improve Its Program Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Management tal Issues D and Human Capi Page 4 GAO-11-148 Health Information Technology List of Congressional Committees The...Committee on Armed Services House of Representatives The Honorable Norman D . Dicks Chairman The Honorable C.W. Bill Young Ranking Member Subcommittee on...Defense Committee on Appropriations House of Representatives Page 5 GAO-11-148 Health Information Technology The Honorable Chet

  1. Exploration of patients' readiness for an eHealth management program for chronic heart failure: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Blum, Kay; Scharf, Barbara; Friedmann, Erika; Thomas, Sue; Jones, Deborah; Gottlieb, Stephen S

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major public health problem in the United States. Approximately 5 million Americans are living with HF, and each year, 550,000 more are newly diagnosed. With recent, rapidly advancing technologies, many studies have examined the effects of technology-based HF management programs. Most of these studies focused on telemonitoring devices, lacking an aspect to motivate individuals to manage their own illnesses. This exploratory study was conducted to (1) examine the readiness of patients with HF in using an eHealth program that includes both telemonitoring and motivational components (ie, Web learning modules, eCommunication) and (2) assess the specific needs of patients with HF that can be addressed by a future eHealth program. This was a single group descriptive study using a convenience sample. A total of 44 patients with HF (mean age, 72.8 years; range, 55-85 years) were recruited from the pool of enrollees of the Medicare Coordinated Care Demonstration project for HF management that used only a telemonitoring component. Although only 10 participants were users, among 34 nonusers, 17 reported availability of Web access, and 15 reported that they would use the Internet if access and training were available. Overall, confidence for using telemonitoring devices and Web-based health modules was high, with means of 27 (range, 3-30) and 7.6 (range, 1-10), respectively. Confidence for learning health information using Web modules, however, was lower with a mean of 41.5 (range, 8-80). The 2 most highly rated health information needs were research findings (n = 41, 93.2%) and medication (n = 39, 88.6%). Most participants would like to have e-mail communication with healthcare providers. The findings showed the participants' high readiness to use the proposed eHealth program if access and training were provided. This study used a small convenience sample. Further studies are needed with larger, diverse samples.

  2. Development of a Health Education Program to Promote the Self-Management of Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, L. Kay; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Social learning theory formed the basis of a program to develop self-management skills in cystic fibrosis patients. Strategies for practical learning activities for patients and their families included goal setting, reinforcement, modeling, skill training, and self-monitoring. (SK)

  3. Development of a Health Education Program to Promote the Self-Management of Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, L. Kay; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Social learning theory formed the basis of a program to develop self-management skills in cystic fibrosis patients. Strategies for practical learning activities for patients and their families included goal setting, reinforcement, modeling, skill training, and self-monitoring. (SK)

  4. A Review and Analysis of the Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness Studies of Comprehensive Health Promotion and Disease Management Programs at the Worksite: 1995-1998 Update (IV).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Kenneth R.

    1999-01-01

    Fourth in a series of articles summarizing studies that examined the impact of comprehensive health-promotion and disease-management programs on health and cost. The focus is on worksite health promotion and education. Study results provide cautious optimism about the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these worksite programs and…

  5. A pragmatic randomized controlled trial of the Flinders Program of chronic condition management in community health care services.

    PubMed

    Battersby, Malcolm; Harris, Melanie; Smith, David; Reed, Richard; Woodman, Richard

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the Flinders Program in improving self-management in common chronic conditions. To examine properties of the Partners in Health scale (PIH). Participants were randomized to usual care or Flinders Program plus usual care. Self-management competency, quality of life, and other outcomes were measured at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Of 231 participants, 172 provided data at 6 months and 61 at 12 months. At 6 months, intention-to-treat outcomes favoured the intervention group for SF-12 physical health (p=0.043). Other pre-determined outcomes did not show significance. At 6 months intervention participants' problem severity scores reduced (p<0.001) and goal achievement scores increased (p<0.001). Only 55% of the intervention group received a Flinders Program, compromising study power. The PIH was associated with other measures at baseline and for change over time. In a pragmatic community trial, the Flinders Program improved quality of life at 6 months. Incomplete in-practice intervention delivery limited trial power. Studies are now needed on improving delivery. The PIH has potential as a generic risk screening tool and predictive measure of change in self-management and chronic condition outcomes over time. Better implementation including service integration is required for improved chronic disease management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of an asthma management program for pediatric members of a large health maintenance organization.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Susan L; France, Eric K; Barón, Anna E; Crane, Lori A

    2002-09-01

    To assess the impact of an asthma management program on the dispensing of inhaled corticosteroids, hospitalizations, and emergency department (ED) visits on children, adolescents, and young adults. We used medical record and pharmacy data for the 18 months after initiation of a pilot asthma management program. Two intervention offices were matched with 2 control offices on pediatric volume, number of pediatricians or family practitioners, and specialist availability. Primary care offices at Kaiser Permanente Colorado, in Denver and Boulder. We identified 298 patients, 18 years or younger,who were listed in an asthma registry between February 1 and July 31, 1997, as having moderate or severe asthma. The Kaiser Permanente Colorado Asthma Care Management Program is an outpatient-based program that provides comprehensive evaluation, education, and follow-up to patients identified from an asthma registry or referred by providers. The proportion of patients who received more than 1 dispensing of inhaled corticosteroid during the observation period. Additional outcomes measured the proportion of patients with 1 or more hospitalizations or ED visits. A significantly greater proportion of patients from the intervention group received more than 1 dispensing of inhaled corticosteroid compared with controls (relative risk [RR], 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.72). We found no significant difference in the proportion of patients who were hospitalized (RR, 1.37; 95% CI, 0.48-3.71) or visited the ED (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.49-1.40). The presence of an asthma management program may improve dispensing of inhaled corticosteroids to young patients with moderate or severe asthma, as recommended by national guidelines. This type of program may not have an effect on hospitalizations or ED visits.

  7. [Expenditure in outpatient department and pharmacy on patients with hypertension and the influence from community health management program].

    PubMed

    Jiang, B; Li, Y C; Zhang, M; Huang, Z J; Liu, Y; Wang, L M

    2016-02-01

    To explore the impact of health management programs on hypertension related to their cost of the hypertensive, so as to provide evidence for related policy-making. Data was from the 2011 China Non-communicable and Chronic Disease Survey Project which was developed in 161 counties (districts) and Xinjiang production and Construction Corps. Information regarding hypertensive patients were collected through a questionnaire. Two-part model was used to analyze the influence from health management scheme. This study included 11 294 participants who were 35 years old or beyond, with 4 904 (43.42%) males and 6 390 (56.58%) females. The median cost from the outpatient was 100 (30-200) Yuan, and the cost of patients under management program were significantly lower than those without (P<0.05). Median pharmacy cost appeared as 30 (15-100) Yuan but there was no significant difference noticed between the cost from the managed or unmanaged patients (P>0.05). Regarding the calculation on the outpatient cost, results showed that the patients under the management program were more likely to practice 'outpatient-medical-behavior' (OR =2.50, 95% CI:2.26-2.76) with nearly three quarters of the cost from the unmanaged patients. Hypertensive patients from the urban areas were more likely to adopt 'medical behavior'(OR=1.31, 95% CI:1.18-1.45) which was 1.69 times of the costs from the rural patients. RESULTS of the pharmacy cost showed that the urban hypertension patients were more likely to purchase medicine (OR=1.10, 95% CI:1.01-1.20) and was 1.19 times the costs of the rural patients. Health management program on hypertension showed preliminary but promising results in reducing the out-patient cost in the treatment of hypertension,thus should be promoted and implemented.

  8. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program: the experience of frequent users of health care services and peer leaders

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Bouliane, Danielle; Lambert, Mireille; Hudon, Émilie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Large amount of evidence supports the contribution of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) to a global chronic disease management strategy. However, many studies have suggested further exploring of the factors influencing acceptance and completion of participants in this program. Objective. This study aimed to describe and examine factors associated with acceptance and completion rates of the CDSMP among frequent users of health care services, and to highlight the experience of patients and peer leaders who facilitated the program. Methods. A descriptive design with mixed sequential data was used. Acceptance and completion rates were calculated and their relationship with patient characteristics was examined in regression analysis (n = 167). Interviews were conducted among patients who accepted (n = 11) and refused (n = 13) to participate and with the program coordinator. Focus groups were held with the seven peer leaders who facilitated the program. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results. Of the 167 patients invited, 60 (36%) accepted to participate in the program. Group format was the most frequent reason to decline the invitation to participate. Twenty-eight participants (47%) completed the program. Participants who dropped out during the program raised different reasons such as poor health and too much heterogeneity among participants. Factors such as location, schedule, content, group composition and facilitation were considered as important elements contributing to the success of the program. Conclusion. The CDSMP could therefore be considered as a self-management support option for this vulnerable clientele, while taking measures to avoid too much heterogeneity among participants to improve completion rates. PMID:26984994

  9. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program: the experience of frequent users of health care services and peer leaders.

    PubMed

    Hudon, Catherine; Chouinard, Maud-Christine; Diadiou, Fatoumata; Bouliane, Danielle; Lambert, Mireille; Hudon, Émilie

    2016-04-01

    Large amount of evidence supports the contribution of the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) to a global chronic disease management strategy. However, many studies have suggested further exploring of the factors influencing acceptance and completion of participants in this program. This study aimed to describe and examine factors associated with acceptance and completion rates of the CDSMP among frequent users of health care services, and to highlight the experience of patients and peer leaders who facilitated the program. A descriptive design with mixed sequential data was used. Acceptance and completion rates were calculated and their relationship with patient characteristics was examined in regression analysis (n = 167). Interviews were conducted among patients who accepted (n = 11) and refused (n = 13) to participate and with the program coordinator. Focus groups were held with the seven peer leaders who facilitated the program. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Of the 167 patients invited, 60 (36%) accepted to participate in the program. Group format was the most frequent reason to decline the invitation to participate. Twenty-eight participants (47%) completed the program. Participants who dropped out during the program raised different reasons such as poor health and too much heterogeneity among participants. Factors such as location, schedule, content, group composition and facilitation were considered as important elements contributing to the success of the program. The CDSMP could therefore be considered as a self-management support option for this vulnerable clientele, while taking measures to avoid too much heterogeneity among participants to improve completion rates. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Seriously Implementing Health Capacity Strengthening Programs in Africa: Comment on "Implementation of a Health Management Mentoring Program: Year-1 Evaluation of Its Impact on Health System Strengthening in Zambézia Province, Mozambique".

    PubMed

    Lapão, Luís Velez

    2015-07-14

    Faced with the challenges of healthcare reform, skills and new capabilities are needed to support the reform and it is of crucial importance in Africa where shortages affects the health system resilience. Edwards et al provides a good example of the challenge of implementing a mentoring program in one province in a sub-Saharan country. From this example, various aspects of strengthening the capacity of managers in healthcare are examined based on our experience in action-training in Africa, as mentoring shares many characteristics with action-training. What practical lessons can be drawn to promote the strengthening so that managers can better intervene in complex contexts? Deeper involvement of health authorities and more rigorous approaches are seriously desirable for the proper development of health capacity strengthening programs in Africa. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  11. Transferring disease management and health promotion programs to other countries: critical success factors.

    PubMed

    Azarmina, Pejman; Prestwich, Graham; Rosenquist, Joel; Singh, Debbie

    2008-12-01

    Governments and health service providers around the world are under pressure to improve health outcomes while containing rising healthcare costs. In response to such challenges, many regions have implemented services that have been successful in other countries-but 'importing' initiatives has many challenges. This article summarizes factors found to be critical to the success of adapting a US disease management and health promotion programme for use in Italy and the UK. Using three illustrative case studies, it describes how in each region the programme needed to adapt (i) the form and content of the disease management service, (ii) the involvement and integration with local clinicians and services and (iii) the evaluation of programme outcomes. We argue that it is important to implement evidence-based practice by learning lessons from other countries and service initiatives, but that it is equally important to take into consideration the '3Ps' that are critical for successful service implementation: payers, practitioners and patients.

  12. Using a return-on-investment estimation model to evaluate outcomes from an obesity management worksite health promotion program.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kristin M; Goetzel, Ron Z; Pei, Xiaofei; Weiss, Audrey J; Bowen, Jennie; Tabrizi, Maryam J; Nelson, Craig F; Metz, R Douglas; Pelletier, Kenneth R; Thompson, Elizabeth

    2008-09-01

    Certain modifiable risk factors lead to higher health care costs and reduced worker productivity. A predictive return-on-investment (ROI) model was applied to an obesity management intervention to demonstrate the use of econometric modeling in establishing financial justification for worksite health promotion. Self-reported risk factors (n = 890) were analyzed using chi2 and t test methods. Changes in risk factors, demographics, and financial measures comprised the model inputs that determined medical and productivity savings. Over 1 year, 7 of 10 health risks decreased. Of total projected savings ($311,755), 59% were attributed to reduced health care expenditures ($184,582) and 41% resulted from productivity improvements ($127,173), a $1.17 to $1.00 ROI. Using an ROI model to project program savings is a practical way to provide financial justification for investment in worksite health promotion when risk reduction data are available.

  13. Managed health care.

    PubMed

    Curtiss, F R

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental components of managed-care plans are described; the development of managed-care programs is discussed; and the impact of managed care on pharmacy services and the price, quality, and accessibility of health care are reviewed. Health care can be considered to be managed when at least one of the following fundamental components is present: prospective pricing, "UCR" (usual, customary, and reasonable) pricing of services, peer review, mandatory use review, benefit redesign, capitation payments, channeling, quality criteria, and health promotion. The managed-care industry consists of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and managed fee-for-service plans. Managed-care reimbursement principles involve transferring some or all of the impetus for controlling use of services to the health-care provider. Means by which this is done include prospective pricing, services bundling, price discounts and negotiated fees, and capitation financing and reimbursement. Financial risk-sharing arrangements with providers--including hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, and home-care companies--are necessary for any managed-care plan to attain true control over its service costs. Use-review and use-management services are also fundamental to containing health-care spending. These include retrospective, concurrent, and prospective reviews of the necessity and appropriateness of medical services. Use management, like services bundling and prospective pricing, has been more effective in reducing costs of hospital inpatient services than costs associated with ambulatory care. Per case payments and services bundling have made individual charges for items irrelevant to hospital revenue. This has forced hospital pharmacy managers to become more sensitive to cost management. Drug formularies, improved productivity, and use of prescribing protocols are means by which hospital pharmacies have controlled costs. However, since shorter hospital

  14. Identification of Patients With Diabetes Who Benefit Most From a Health Coaching Program in Chronic Disease Management, Sydney, Australia, 2013.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Grace; Newlyn, Neroli; Pamplona, Elline; Hocking, Samantha L; Glastras, Sarah J; McGrath, Rachel T; Fulcher, Gregory R

    2017-03-02

    Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) that include health coaching can facilitate and coordinate diabetes management. The aim of this study was to assess changes in patients' general knowledge of diabetes, self-reported health status, diabetes distress, body mass index (BMI), and glycemic control after enrollment in a face-to-face CDMP group health coaching session (with telephone follow-up) compared with participation in telephone-only health coaching, during a 12-month period. Patients with diabetes were enrolled in a health coaching program at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia, in 2013. Questionnaires were administered at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and the results were compared with baseline. Glycemic control, measured with glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and BMI, were measured at baseline and 12 months. Overall, 238 patients attended a face-to-face CDMP session with telephone follow-up (n = 178) or participated in telephone-only health coaching (n = 60). We found no change in BMI in either group; however, HbA1c levels in patients with baseline above the current recommended target (>7%) decreased significantly from 8.5% (standard deviation [SD], 1.0%) to 7.9% (SD, 1.0%) (P = .03). Patients with the lowest self-reported health status at baseline improved from 4.4 (SD, 0.5) to 3.7 (SD, 0.9) (P = .001). Diabetes knowledge improved in all patients (24.4 [SD, 2.4] to 25.2 [SD, 2.4]; P < .001), and diabetes distress decreased among those with the highest levels of distress at baseline (3.0 [SD, 0.4] vs 3.8 [SD, 0.6]; P = .003). Diabetes health coaching programs can improve glycemic control and reduce diabetes distress in patients with high levels of these at baseline.

  15. Identification of Patients With Diabetes Who Benefit Most From a Health Coaching Program in Chronic Disease Management, Sydney, Australia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Grace; Newlyn, Neroli; Pamplona, Elline; Hocking, Samantha L.; Glastras, Sarah J.; Fulcher, Gregory R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic disease management programs (CDMPs) that include health coaching can facilitate and coordinate diabetes management. The aim of this study was to assess changes in patients’ general knowledge of diabetes, self-reported health status, diabetes distress, body mass index (BMI), and glycemic control after enrollment in a face-to-face CDMP group health coaching session (with telephone follow-up) compared with participation in telephone-only health coaching, during a 12-month period. Methods Patients with diabetes were enrolled in a health coaching program at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia, in 2013. Questionnaires were administered at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months, and the results were compared with baseline. Glycemic control, measured with glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and BMI, were measured at baseline and 12 months. Results Overall, 238 patients attended a face-to-face CDMP session with telephone follow-up (n = 178) or participated in telephone-only health coaching (n = 60). We found no change in BMI in either group; however, HbA1c levels in patients with baseline above the current recommended target (>7%) decreased significantly from 8.5% (standard deviation [SD], 1.0%) to 7.9% (SD, 1.0%) (P = .03). Patients with the lowest self-reported health status at baseline improved from 4.4 (SD, 0.5) to 3.7 (SD, 0.9) (P = .001). Diabetes knowledge improved in all patients (24.4 [SD, 2.4] to 25.2 [SD, 2.4]; P < .001), and diabetes distress decreased among those with the highest levels of distress at baseline (3.0 [SD, 0.4] vs 3.8 [SD, 0.6]; P = .003). Conclusion Diabetes health coaching programs can improve glycemic control and reduce diabetes distress in patients with high levels of these at baseline. PMID:28253473

  16. Disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, E P; Langley, P C

    1996-01-01

    Disease management (DM) activities are described, and their implementation and monitoring in managed care organizations are discussed. DM programs involve systematic evaluation of the relationships between treatment options and the associated resource use and patient outcomes for the purpose of providing a given standard of health care at the lowest possible resource cost. A DM arrangement covers a specified disease or therapy intervention for a patient group that may be defined by diagnosis, drug use, prior resource use, or patient characteristics. Often, the partners in a DM arrangement are a managed care organization and a pharmaceutical industry representative or division. The development and monitoring of disease management arrangements are dependent on access to several types of data, and these data are available in managed care plans. A DM arrangement includes interventions to change prescribing patterns or patient compliance and assessment of the effects of these interventions against target outcomes specified in the contract. The agreement that is developed specifies guidelines for treatment and requirements for data collection, monitoring, and reporting that are consistent with the target outcomes. In many DM arrangements, the partners share cost savings and risk; other arrangements involve case management on a capitated basis. A pharmaceutical company involved in risk sharing must change its focus from market share to optimal use of drugs within the total cost of treatment. If a risk-sharing contract covers an entire therapeutic class of drugs, a pharmaceutical company may share risk for the use of other manufacturers' products as well as its own. Disease management contracts must consider the full impact of each treatment option on the health system; the goal should be not simply to decrease the drug budget, but to decrease overall costs for treatment that achieves desired outcomes for specific diseases.

  17. Effect of a Health Literacy-Considered Diabetes Self-Management Program for Older Adults in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jin; Song, Misoon; Im, Eun-Ok

    2017-09-01

    The current randomized controlled study evaluated the effects of a health literacy-considered diabetes self-management program on diabetes-related parameters: diabetes self-management knowledge (DSK), diabetes health beliefs (DHB), diabetes self-efficacy (DSE), diabetes self-management behavior (DSMB), and diabetes biomarkers. Fifty-one Korean older adults with diabetes completed 12 weekly sessions that were developed based on their health literacy and health-related characteristics. The results indicate significant posttest differences between groups in DSK (p = 0.046), DSE (p = 0.046), DSMB (p = 0.012), and the DSMB self-monitored blood glucose subscale (p = 0.002). Significant pre-post changes between groups were observed in the DHB benefit subscale (p = 0.043), DSE (p = 0.006), DSMB (p = 0.008), DSMB diet (p = 0.029), and the self-monitored blood glucose subscale (p < 0.001). A significant pre-post difference was observed in the intervention group's HbA1c levels (p = 0.008). The program effectively improved participants' DSK, DHB, DSE, and DSMB values, which may be helpful for improving HbA1c levels. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(5):215-225.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Stochastic goal programming based groundwater remediation management under human-health-risk uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; He, Li; Lu, Hongwei; Fan, Xing

    2014-08-30

    An optimal design approach for groundwater remediation is developed through incorporating numerical simulation, health risk assessment, uncertainty analysis and nonlinear optimization within a general framework. Stochastic analysis and goal programming are introduced into the framework to handle uncertainties in real-world groundwater remediation systems. Carcinogenic risks associated with remediation actions are further evaluated at four confidence levels. The differences between ideal and predicted constraints are minimized by goal programming. The approach is then applied to a contaminated site in western Canada for creating a set of optimal remediation strategies. Results from the case study indicate that factors including environmental standards, health risks and technical requirements mutually affected and restricted themselves. Stochastic uncertainty existed in the entire process of remediation optimization, which should to be taken into consideration in groundwater remediation design.

  19. [Evaluating the effectiveness of a disease management program diabetes in the German Statutory Health Insurance: first results and methodological considerations].

    PubMed

    Drabik, Anna; Graf, Christian; Büscher, Guido; Stock, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Disease management programs (DMPs) were implemented in the German Statutory Health Insurance (SHI) in a nationwide rollout in 2002. The explicit goal of the programs is to improve coordination and quality of care for the chronically ill (Sect. 137f, SGB V). To reach this goal extensive quality assurance measures in the programs are mandatory, enrolment and coordination of care rests with the primary care or DMP physician, treatment is based on evidence-based care guidelines, and patients are offered diabetes education classes to support self-management. The present study evaluates the DMP diabetes mellitus type II, a nationwide program offered by the BARMER, a German health insurance company. To minimize selection bias we formed a control group of administrative data using a propensity score matching approach. In comparison to the control group DMP participants have a significantly lower mortality rate, and their average drug and hospital costs are reduced. Enrolled patients also had a lower mean number of hospital stays and shorter hospital stays. These results indicate that the programs meet the initial goal of improving the quality of care for the chronically ill. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  20. Implementation of a health management mentoring program: year-1 evaluation of its impact on health system strengthening in Zambézia Province, Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Laura J; Moisés, Abú; Nzaramba, Mathias; Cassimo, Aboobacar; Silva, Laura; Mauricio, Joaquim; Wester, C William; Vermund, Sten H; Moon, Troy D

    2015-03-12

    Avante Zambézia is an initiative of a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO), Friends in Global Health, LLC (FGH) and the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) to provide technical assistance to the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MoH) in rural Zambézia Province. Avante Zambézia developed a district level Health Management Mentorship (HMM) program to strengthen health systems in ten of Zambézia's 17 districts. Our objective was to preliminarily analyze changes in four domains of health system capacity after the HMM's first year: accounting, Human Resources (HRs), Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E), and transportation management. Quantitative metrics were developed in each domain. During district visits for weeklong, on-site mentoring, the health management mentoring teams documented each indicator as a success ratio percentage. We analyzed data using linear regressions of each indicator's mean success ratio across all districts submitting a report over time. Of the four domains, district performance in the accounting domain was the strongest and most sustained. Linear regressions of mean monthly compliance for HR objectives indicated improvement in three of six mean success ratios. The M&E capacity domain showed the least overall improvement. The one indicator analyzed for transportation management suggested progress. Our outcome evaluation demonstrates improvement in health system performance during a HMM initiative. Evaluating which elements of our mentoring program are succeeding in strengthening district level health systems is vital in preparing to transition fiscal and managerial responsibility to local authorities. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  1. Implementation of a health management mentoring program: year-1 evaluation of its impact on health system strengthening in Zambézia Province, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Laura J.; Moisés, Abú; Nzaramba, Mathias; Cassimo, Aboobacar; Silva, Laura; Mauricio, Joaquim; Wester, C. William; Vermund, Sten H.; Moon, Troy D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Avante Zambézia is an initiative of a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO), Friends in Global Health, LLC (FGH) and the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health (VIGH) to provide technical assistance to the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MoH) in rural Zambézia Province. Avante Zambézia developed a district level Health Management Mentorship (HMM) program to strengthen health systems in ten of Zambézia’s 17 districts. Our objective was to preliminarily analyze changes in four domains of health system capacity after the HMM’s first year: accounting, Human Resources (HRs), Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E), and transportation management. Methods: Quantitative metrics were developed in each domain. During district visits for weeklong, on-site mentoring, the health management mentoring teams documented each indicator as a success ratio percentage. We analyzed data using linear regressions of each indicator’s mean success ratio across all districts submitting a report over time. Results: Of the four domains, district performance in the accounting domain was the strongest and most sustained. Linear regressions of mean monthly compliance for HR objectives indicated improvement in three of six mean success ratios. The M&E capacity domain showed the least overall improvement. The one indicator analyzed for transportation management suggested progress. Conclusion: Our outcome evaluation demonstrates improvement in health system performance during a HMM initiative. Evaluating which elements of our mentoring program are succeeding in strengthening district level health systems is vital in preparing to transition fiscal and managerial responsibility to local authorities. PMID:26029894

  2. Harvest Health: Translation of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program for Older African Americans in a Senior Setting

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Chernett, Nancy L.; Harris, Lynn Fields; Palmer, Delores; Hopkins, Paul; Dennis, Marie P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We describe the translation of K. R. Lorig and colleagues’ Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for delivery in a senior center and evaluate pre–post benefits for African American participants. Design and Methods Modifications to the CDSMP included a name change; an additional introductory session; and course augmentations involving culturally relevant foods, stress reduction techniques, and communicating with racially/ethnically diverse physicians. We recruited participants from senior center members, area churches, and word of mouth. We conducted baseline and 4-month post-interviews. Results A total of 569 African American elders attended an introductory session, with 519 (91%) enrolling in the 6-session program. Of the 519, 444 (86%) completed ≥4 sessions and 414 (79%) completed pre–post interviews. We found small but statistically significant improvements for exercise (p = .001), use of cognitive management strategies (p = .001), energy/fatigue (p = .001), self-efficacy (p = .001), health distress (p = .001), and illness intrusiveness in different life domains (probabilities from .001–.021). We found no changes for health utilization. Outcomes did not differ by gender, number of sessions attended, number and type of chronic conditions, facilitator, leader, or recruitment site. Implications The CDSMP can be translated for delivery by trained senior center personnel to African American elders. Participant benefits compare favorably to original trial outcomes. The translated program is replicable and may help to address health disparities. PMID:18981286

  3. Health services outcomes for a diabetes disease management program for the elderly.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gregory D; Wadhwa, Sandeep

    2007-08-01

    Our objective was to investigate the utilization, drug, and clinical outcomes of a telephonic nursing disease management (DM) program for elderly patients with diabetes. We employed a 24-month, matched-cohort study employing propensity score matching. The setting involved Medicare + Choice recipients residing in Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana. There were 610 intervention group members over the age of 65 matched to a control group of members over the age of 65. The DM diabetes program employed a structured, evidence-based, telephonic nursing intervention designed to provide patient education, counseling, and monitoring services. Measurements consisted of Medical service utilization, including hospitalizations, emergency department visits, physician evaluation and management visits, skilled nursing facility days, drug utilization, and selected clinical indicators. Among the results, the intervention group had considerably and significantly lower rates of acute service utilization compared to the control group, including a 17.5% reduction in hospitalizations, 22.4% reduction in bed days, 12.3% increase in physician evaluation and management visits, 23.7% increase in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use, 13.3% increase in blood glucose regulator use, 11.8% increase in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests, 10.3% increase in lipid panels, 26.0% increase in eye exams, and 35.5% increase in microalbumin tests. In conclusion, the study demonstrates that a commercially delivered diabetes DM program significantly reduces hospitalizations and bed-days while increasing the use of ACE inhibitors and blood glucose regulators along with selected clinical procedures such as HbA1c tests, lipid panels, eye exams, and microalbumin tests.

  4. Evaluation of an integrated workers' compensation/managed care pharmacy benefit program: employee satisfaction and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Shadi; Washington, Stephanie; Stapleton, David; DiCiccio-Miller, Yasamin

    2005-02-01

    In response to rising costs, New York State developed an integrated workers' compensation/managed care pharmacy benefit program, ONECARD Rx. This study examined the effect of the program on employee satisfaction and health outcomes. The study design is cross-sectional; the two main study groups comprised users and nonusers of ONECARD Rx between January 1998 and March 2000. All 462 users and a sample of 880 nonusers were surveyed. More than 80% of ONECARD Rx users rated their prescription drug program as excellent, very good, or good compared with 47% of nonusers (P < .01). Of the least desirable features of ONECARD Rx were the time to get the prescription filled and the need to have a workers' compensation number to use the benefit, both of which may be a factor of the short period of exposure time to the benefit. No significant differences in health status were detected among users and nonusers. This study reveals that integration of workers' compensation and managed care pharmacy benefit programs is a promising innovative strategy to improve quality.

  5. Setting priorities for new vaccination programs by using public health officers and immunization managers opinions.

    PubMed

    Gilca, Vladimir; Sauvageau, Chantal; McNeil, Shelly; Gemmill, Ian M; Dionne, Marc; Dobson, Simon; Ouakki, Manale; Lavoie, France; Duval, Bernard

    2008-08-05

    The objective of this work was to assess the opinions of public health professionals (PHPs) about routinely recommended and new vaccines, and to evaluate the feasibility of using a modified Basic Priority Rating System (BPRS) approach to prioritize new immunization programs. One hundred and thirty six PHPs were invited to participate in the survey and 101 responded. Ninty-eight percent of respondents agreed that "recommended vaccines are very useful" (mean score=9.5 out of 10). Between 47% and 100% of respondents agreed with statements about usefulness, safety, effectiveness and acceptability of seven new vaccines (mean scores 5.7-9.7). The highest BPRS scores were observed for MMRV (7.3), DTaP-IPV-HBV-Hib (7.0), and conjugate ACYW-135 (5.4), followed by HPV (4.8), HAV (4.4), rotavirus (1.6) and zoster vaccine (1.5%). The results demonstrate that PHPs perceive presently recommended vaccines as very useful tools in infection prevention. On the other hand, the perceived usefulness, safety, effectiveness, and acceptability of new vaccines are heterogeneous. This heterogeneity is indicative of the complexity of decision-making around implementation of new immunization programs and the need for tools facilitating program prioritization. The modified BPRS approach using survey responses to five statements on program usefulness, vaccine safety, effectiveness, and acceptance by vaccinators and the population is a simple, feasible and inexpensive method of prioritizing new immunization programs. The method we propose is flexible in choosing target groups and allows a large number of professionals to be involved in the decision-making process about new immunization programs.

  6. Managing Mentoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IUME Briefs, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Some programs for helping at-risk youth achieve excellent results, while others do not. One reason for program success can be proper management. Mentoring is a promising strategy for helping at-risk youth. Planners who want to create effective mentoring programs should look at the implementation experiences of other youth programs. Evaluations…

  7. Joint Program Management Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    program examples include the Worldwide Military Command and Control System (WWMCCS), Joint Stand-Off Weapon (JSOW), V22 Osprey , the Joint...MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK LIST OF FIGURES 1-1 DEFINITION OF JOINT POTENTIAL DESIGNATOR . .1-3 2-1 JOINT DOD ACQUISITION AUTHORITY CHAIN (ACAT ID PROGRAMS...INTRODUCTION TO JOINT PROGRAM MANAGEMENT This haIKlimk is designed to help curient and future joint program personnel. It contains advice that

  8. Comparison of Three Internship Training Sites for an Undergraduate Health Information Management Program in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Bah, Sulaiman; Alanzi, Turki

    2017-07-01

    While internship training is well established for medical records and for healthcare quality improvement, it is not quite so for training related to IT/health informatics. A comparison was made on the hospital-based IT/health informatics internship training received by students completing their training at the Imam AbdulRahman Bin Faisal University (IAU) in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The three hospitals studied all have the Joint Commission International accreditation and advanced Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems. Over the period from 2011 to 2015, interns from the IAU prepared 120 reports based on their training at these three hospitals. Data abstraction was done on the internship reports, and the results were summarized and interpreted. The study found wide differences in the training received at these hospitals. The main reason for the differences is whether or not the EHR system used in the hospital was a commercial one or developed in-house. The hospital that had developed its own EHR system made more use of health information management interns during their IT rotation in comparison to hospitals which had adopted commercial EHR systems. Recommendations are made of both local relevance and of international relevance.

  9. Comparison of Three Internship Training Sites for an Undergraduate Health Information Management Program in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alanzi, Turki

    2017-01-01

    Objectives While internship training is well established for medical records and for healthcare quality improvement, it is not quite so for training related to IT/health informatics. A comparison was made on the hospital-based IT/health informatics internship training received by students completing their training at the Imam AbdulRahman Bin Faisal University (IAU) in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Methods The three hospitals studied all have the Joint Commission International accreditation and advanced Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems. Over the period from 2011 to 2015, interns from the IAU prepared 120 reports based on their training at these three hospitals. Data abstraction was done on the internship reports, and the results were summarized and interpreted. Results The study found wide differences in the training received at these hospitals. The main reason for the differences is whether or not the EHR system used in the hospital was a commercial one or developed in-house. Conclusions The hospital that had developed its own EHR system made more use of health information management interns during their IT rotation in comparison to hospitals which had adopted commercial EHR systems. Recommendations are made of both local relevance and of international relevance. PMID:28875059

  10. Impact of disease management on health care utilization: evidence from the "Florida: A Healthy State (FAHS)" Medicaid Program.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Morisky, Donald E; Kominski, Gerald F; Kotlerman, Jenny B

    2007-06-01

    To examine the impact of disease management on utilization of selected health care services. Prospective observational population-based study comparing Florida Medicaid patients who elected to participate in disease management (DM, N=15,275) with a usual-care (UC, N=32,034) group who elected not to participate in the program. Patients had at least one of four chronic diseases (diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, and hypertension) and all received standard health care. DM participants received supplementary telephone health counseling by a managed care specialist. The data for this paper were collected between October 2001 and October 2004. Annual rates of inpatient hospital stays, inpatient days, emergency room (ER) visits, and outpatient (OP) visits, during and post intervention, were used as outcomes. Age, race, gender, comorbidities, severity indicators, geographic location and pre-intervention utilization were used as covariates. Compared to UC patients, DM patients had lower adjusted post intervention annualized rates of hospitalizations ranging from 0.07 to 0.38 stays, lower rates of hospital days ranging from 0.40 to 2.54 days, and lower rates of ER visits ranging from 0.10 to 0.91 visits per DM enrollee in all four chronic conditions. Most results were statistically significant at the 5% level, except for hypertension patients, where they were suggestive, though not significant. Disease management is effective in reducing potentially avoidable inpatient hospital stays and ER visits among patients with chronic illness.

  11. Increasing physical activity for veterans in the Mental Health Intensive Case Management Program: A community-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Harrold, S Akeya; Libet, Julian; Pope, Charlene; Lauerer, Joy A; Johnson, Emily; Edlund, Barbara J

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with severe mental illness (SMI), experience increased mortality-20 years greater disparity for men and 15 years greater disparity for women-compared to the general population (Thornicroft G. Physical health disparities and mental illness: The scandal of premature mortality. Br J Psychiatr. 2011;199:441-442). Numerous factors contribute to premature mortality in persons with SMI, including suicide and accidental death (Richardson RC, Faulkner G, McDevitt J, Skrinar GS, Hutchinson D, Piette JD. Integrating physical activity into mental health services for persons with serious mental illness. Psychiatr Serv. 2005;56(3):324-331; Thornicroft G. Physical health disparities and mental illness: The scandal of premature mortality. Br J Psychiatr. 2011;199:441-442), but research has shown that adverse health behaviors-including smoking, low rate of physical activity, poor diet, and high alcohol consumption-also significantly contribute to premature deaths (Jones J. Life expectancy in mental illness. Psychiatry Services. 2010. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/07/13/life-expectancy-in-mental-illness). This quality improvement (QI) project sought to improve health and wellness for veterans in the Mental Health Intensive Case Management Program (MHICM), which is a community-based intensive program for veterans with SMI at risk for decompensation and frequent hospitalizations. At the time of this QI project, the program had 69 veterans who were assessed and treated weekly in their homes. The project introduced a pedometer steps intervention adapted from the VA MOVE! Program-a physical activity and weight management program-with the addition of personalized assistance from trained mental health professionals in the veteran's home environment. Because a large percentage of the veterans in the MHICM program had high blood pressure and increased weight, these outcomes were the focus of this project. Through mental health case management involvement and

  12. A Culturally Appropriate Self-Management Program for Hispanic Adults With Type 2 Diabetes and Low Health Literacy Skills.

    PubMed

    Brunk, Debra R; Taylor, Ann Gill; Clark, Myra L; Williams, Ishan C; Cox, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of adapting a patient-centered educational intervention for type 2 diabetes (T2D) self-management for a Hispanic population with low health literacy skills. A descriptive qualitative study design and phenomenological analyses were used. Nine Hispanic adults with T2D recruited from a rural community health center participated in an educational program that instructed on low glycemic food choices, meaningful glucose self-monitoring, and physical activity to decrease blood glucose spikes. Participants' feedback was recorded during four 2-hour focus group sessions. Findings/Results: Participants' feedback clustered around four themes: information and knowledge, motivation and barriers to change, experiences with new behaviors, and personal responsibility. Data support the feasibility of adapting an established health-enhancing approach for promoting self-management of T2D to a low health literacy Spanish-speaking population. The findings may help in further development of tools and strategies for improved T2D self-management in the study population.

  13. [Evaluation of a pilot health promotion and stress management program for Pharmacy and Biochemistry students and professionals].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, S L; Granchetti, H; Azzara, S; Carpineta, M; Pappalardo, M; Argibay, J C; Lagomarsino, E

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial results of a theory-practice pilot stress management program for Pharmacy and Biochemistry professionals and students. Its importance as a complement of traditional academic education, as well as its potential for Pharmaceutical Care is also discussed. A total of 27 students and 26 professionals took part in a program of 10 sessions, aimed at improving stress management. Ten of the students and 10 professionals were randomly assigned to control groups. Salivary cortisol levels and anxiety level tests before and after the program were used to assess efficacy. Both the cortisol and the anxiety levels significantly decreased among students and professionals after the program, whereas it significantly increased in the student control group. Anxiety levels significantly decreased in both students and professionals. This type of pilot program proved effective for students. In the case of health professionals, the sample size needs to be increased in order to achieve an acceptable level of statistical power. Considering the shift of the pharmaceutical profession towards Pharmaceutical Care, the training of competences and attitudes like those described in this work could be of value. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. University entry scores as a predictor of academic performance in a health information management program.

    PubMed

    Magennis, T; Mitchell, J

    1998-01-01

    The university entry scores for school leavers admitted to the first year of the Bachelor of Applied Science (Health Information Management) degree at the University of Sydney in 1996 were examined to determine whether the Tertiary Entrance Rank (TER) was a good predictor of academic performance, as measured by grade point average (GPA). The study also examined Higher School Certificate (HSC) results in English and mathematics, and preference selection for the health information management (HIM) course to determine whether any of these had predictive validity. The results showed that TER, HSC English and mathematics scores and preference for the course were all poor predictors of academic performance in the student's first year. Low TER was not associated with low GPA and low scores in English and mathematics were not associated with low GPA. There was no significant difference between the performance of those students who listed the HIM course as their first preference and those who did not. These results suggest that there may be no need to establish a minimum entry level for admission to the HIM course, or for prerequisites in English and mathematics. It may be that multiple criteria are required to predict academic success in this course.

  15. Effects of an Individually Tailored Web-Based Chronic Pain Management Program on Pain Severity, Psychological Health, and Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun; Oberleitner, Lindsay; Schwartz, Steven; Williams, Amy M

    2013-01-01

    Background It is estimated that 30% of adults in the United States experience daily chronic pain. This results in a significant burden on the health care system, in particular primary care, and on the workplace. Chronic pain management with cognitive-behavioral psychological treatment is effective in reducing pain intensity and interference, health-related quality of life, mood, and return to work. However, the population of individuals with chronic pain far exceeds the population of therapists that can provide this care face-to-face. The use of tailored, Web-based interventions for the management of chronic pain could address limitations to access by virtue of its unlimited scalability. Objective To examine the effects of a tailored Web-based chronic pain management program on subjective pain, activity and work interference, quality of life and health, and stress. Methods Eligible participants accessed the online pain management program and informed consent via participating employer or health care benefit systems; program participants who completed baseline, 1-, and 6-month assessments were included in the study. Of the 645 participants, the mean age was 56.16 years (SD 12.83), most were female (447/645, 69.3%), and white (505/641, 78.8%). Frequent pain complaints were joint (249/645, 38.6%), back (218/645, 33.8%), and osteoarthritis (174/654, 27.0%). The online pain management program used evidence-based theories of cognitive behavioral intervention, motivational enhancement, and health behavior change to address self-management, coping, medical adherence, social support, comorbidities, and productivity. The program content was individually tailored on several relevant participant variables. Results Both pain intensity (mean 5.30, SD 2.46), and unpleasantness (mean 5.43, SD 2.52) decreased significantly from baseline to 1-month (mean 4.16, SD 2.69 and mean 4.24, 2.81, respectively) and 6-month (mean 3.78, SD 2.79 and mean 3.78, SD 2.79, respectively) assessments

  16. Efficacy of chronic disease self-management program in older Korean adults with low and high health literacy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Hyun; Youn, Chang Ho

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of the Chronic Disease Self-management Program (CDSMP) among older Korean adults and investigated the question of whether the effects differed according to their levels of health literacy. Measures of self efficacy, physical activity, physical health, and mental health were assessed at baseline, and at 6-week, and 18-week follow up for the CDSMP intervention group (n = 23) and control group (n = 31) according to their health literacy status. The older adults in the CDSMP intervention group showed significantly higher levels of self efficacy and physical activity at follow up. Participants with low health literacy had greater benefits from the intervention than had those with high health literacy. The CDSMP is a beneficial intervention for older Korean adults with chronic disease. Healthcare professionals should encourage older Korean adults with chronic illness to participate in the CDSMP, in particular for those with low health literacy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Overcoming Barriers in the Management of Hypertension: The Experience of the Cardiovascular Health Program in Chilean Primary Health Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Daniela; Bravo, Miguel; Koch, Elard; Gatica, Sebastián; Ahlers, Ivonne; Henríquez, Oscar; Romero, Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the blood pressure control and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) in a population of hypertensive patients with access to care under a government-financed program, the Cardiovascular Health Program (CHP). Design. A cross-sectional and multicenter study. Setting. 52 primary care centers, metropolitan area of Santiago, Chile. Participants. 1,194 patients were selected by a systematic random sampling from a universe of 316,654 hypertensive patients. Key Measurements. Demographic information, blood pressure (BP) measurements, and CVRF were extracted from medical records of patients followed for a 12-month period. Results. 59.7% of patients reached target BP <140/90 mmHg. More women were captured in the sampling (2.1 : 1), achieving better BP control than men. Diabetic patients (26.4%) had worse BP control than nondiabetics. Antihypertensive medications were used in 91.5%, with multidrug therapy more frequent in patients with higher BP and more difficult control. Conclusions. The success in improving the BP control to values <140/90 mmHg from 45.3% to 59.7% underscores the contribution of this program in the Chilean primary care cardiovascular preventive strategies. However, fewer hypertensive men than women were captured by this program, and it is of concern the underperforming of BP control observed in diabetics. PMID:22701781

  18. The impact of a proactive chronic care management program on hospital admission rates in a German health insurance society.

    PubMed

    Hamar, Brent; Wells, Aaron; Gandy, William; Haaf, Andreas; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Rula, Elizabeth Y

    2010-12-01

    Hospital admissions are the source of significant health care expenses, although a large proportion of these admissions can be avoided through proper management of chronic disease. In the present study, we evaluate the impact of a proactive chronic care management program for members of a German insurance society who suffer from chronic disease. Specifically, we tested the impact of nurse-delivered care calls on hospital admission rates. Study participants were insured individuals with coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who consented to participate in the chronic care management program. Intervention (n  = 17,319) and Comparison (n  = 5668) groups were defined based on records of participating (or not participating) in telephonic interactions. Changes in admission rates were calculated from the year prior to (Base) and year after program commencement. Comparative analyses were adjusted for age, sex, region of residence, and disease severity (stratification of 3 [least severe] to 1 [most severe]). Overall, the admission rate in the Intervention group decreased by 6.2% compared with a 14.9% increase in the Comparison group (P  <  0.001). The overall decrease in admissions for the Intervention group was driven by risk stratification levels 2 and 1, for which admissions decreased by 8.2% and 14.2% compared to Comparison group increases of 12.1% and 7.9%, respectively. Additionally, Intervention group admissions decreased as the number of calls increased (P  =  0.004), indicating a dose-response relationship. These findings indicate that proactive chronic care management care calls can help reduce hospital admissions among German health insurance members with chronic disease.

  19. Nutrition Interventions for Prevention and Management of Childhood Obesity: What Do Parents Want from an eHealth Program?

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Tracy; Hutchesson, Melinda; Kheng Chai, Li; Rollo, Megan; Skinner, Geoff; Collins, Clare

    2015-01-01

    With the growth of Internet technologies, offering interventions for child and family weight management in an online format may address barriers to accessing services. This study aimed to investigate (i) whether an eHealth family healthy lifestyle program would be of interest to parents; and (ii) preferences and/or expectations for program components and features. Parents of children aged four to18 years were recruited through social media and completed an online survey (54 items) including closed and open-ended questions. Responses were collated using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Seventy-five participants were included (92% mothers, mean age 39.1 ± 8.6 years, mean BMI 27.6 ± 6.3 kg/m2). The index child had a mean age of 11 ± 6.2 years with 24% overweight/obese. The majority of parents (90.3%) reported interest in an online program, with preference expressed for a non-structured program to allow flexibility users to log-on and off as desired. Parents wanted a program that was easy to use, practical, engaging, endorsed by a reputable source, and able to provide individual tailoring and for their children to be directly involved. The current study supports the need for online delivery of a healthy lifestyle program that targets greater parental concerns of diet rather than child weight. PMID:26694456

  20. Nutrition Interventions for Prevention and Management of Childhood Obesity: What Do Parents Want from an eHealth Program?

    PubMed

    Burrows, Tracy; Hutchesson, Melinda; Chai, Li Kheng; Rollo, Megan; Skinner, Geoff; Collins, Clare

    2015-12-15

    With the growth of Internet technologies, offering interventions for child and family weight management in an online format may address barriers to accessing services. This study aimed to investigate (i) whether an eHealth family healthy lifestyle program would be of interest to parents; and (ii) preferences and/or expectations for program components and features. Parents of children aged four to18 years were recruited through social media and completed an online survey (54 items) including closed and open-ended questions. Responses were collated using descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Seventy-five participants were included (92% mothers, mean age 39.1 ± 8.6 years, mean BMI 27.6 ± 6.3 kg/m²). The index child had a mean age of 11 ± 6.2 years with 24% overweight/obese. The majority of parents (90.3%) reported interest in an online program, with preference expressed for a non-structured program to allow flexibility users to log-on and off as desired. Parents wanted a program that was easy to use, practical, engaging, endorsed by a reputable source, and able to provide individual tailoring and for their children to be directly involved. The current study supports the need for online delivery of a healthy lifestyle program that targets greater parental concerns of diet rather than child weight.

  1. Navigator program risk management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessen, Randii R.; Padilla, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, program risk management as applied to the Navigator Program: In Search of New Worlds will be discussed. The Navigator Program's goals are to learn how planetary systems form and to search for those worlds that could or do harbor life.

  2. Navigator program risk management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessen, Randii R.; Padilla, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, program risk management as applied to the Navigator Program: In Search of New Worlds will be discussed. The Navigator Program's goals are to learn how planetary systems form and to search for those worlds that could or do harbor life.

  3. The health economic impact of disease management programs for COPD: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Boland, Melinde R S; Tsiachristas, Apostolos; Kruis, Annemarije L; Chavannes, Niels H; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2013-07-03

    There is insufficient evidence of the cost-effectiveness of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Disease Management (COPD-DM) programs. The aim of this review is to evaluate the economic impact of COPD-DM programs and investigate the relation between the impact on healthcare costs and health outcomes. We also investigated the impact of patient-, intervention, and study-characteristics. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify cost-effectiveness studies of COPD-DM. Where feasible, results were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis and explorative subgroup analyses were performed. Sixteen papers describing 11 studies were included (7 randomized control trials (RCT), 2 pre-post, 2 case-control). Meta-analysis showed that COPD-DM led to hospitalization savings of €1060 (95% CI: €2040 to €80) per patient per year and savings in total healthcare utilization of €898 (95% CI: €1566 to €231) (excl. operating costs). In these health economic studies small but positive results on health outcomes were found, such as the St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, which decreased with 1.7 points (95% CI: 0.5-2.9). There was great variability in DM interventions-, study- and patient-characteristics. There were indications that DM showed greater savings in studies with: severe COPD patients, patients with a history of exacerbations, RCT study design, high methodological quality, few different professions involved in the program, and study setting outside Europe. COPD-DM programs were found to have favourable effects on both health outcomes and costs, but there is considerable heterogeneity depending on patient-, intervention-, and study-characteristics.

  4. The health economic impact of disease management programs for COPD: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is insufficient evidence of the cost-effectiveness of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Disease Management (COPD-DM) programs. The aim of this review is to evaluate the economic impact of COPD-DM programs and investigate the relation between the impact on healthcare costs and health outcomes. We also investigated the impact of patient-, intervention, and study-characteristics. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review to identify cost-effectiveness studies of COPD-DM. Where feasible, results were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis and explorative subgroup analyses were performed. Results Sixteen papers describing 11 studies were included (7 randomized control trials (RCT), 2 pre-post, 2 case–control). Meta-analysis showed that COPD-DM led to hospitalization savings of €1060 (95% CI: €2040 to €80) per patient per year and savings in total healthcare utilization of €898 (95% CI: €1566 to €231) (excl. operating costs). In these health economic studies small but positive results on health outcomes were found, such as the St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, which decreased with 1.7 points (95% CI: 0.5-2.9). There was great variability in DM interventions-, study- and patient-characteristics. There were indications that DM showed greater savings in studies with: severe COPD patients, patients with a history of exacerbations, RCT study design, high methodological quality, few different professions involved in the program, and study setting outside Europe. Conclusions COPD-DM programs were found to have favourable effects on both health outcomes and costs, but there is considerable heterogeneity depending on patient-, intervention-, and study-characteristics. PMID:23819836

  5. The effects of two workplace weight management programs and weight loss on health care utilization and costs

    PubMed Central

    Østbye, Truls; Stroo, Marissa; Eisenstein, Eric L.; Dement, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Compare the impact of two worksite weight management programs, WM (education) and WM+ (education plus counseling), on health care utilization and costs. Secondarily, compare the intervention groups to an observational control group of obese workers. Finally, evaluate the impact of actual weight loss on these outcomes. Methods Estimate the change in the WM and WM+ intervention groups. Using propensity score adjustment compare the two intervention groups with the observational control group; and compare those who lost weight with those who did not. Results No significant differences between the two intervention groups, or between these intervention groups and the observational control group. Those who lost weight reduced their overall health care costs. Conclusion To achieve weight loss and associated morbidity reductions, more extensive and intensive interventions, with more attention to motivation and compliance, are required. PMID:26849260

  6. Quantifying Differences in Health Care Consumption for the Management of Multiple Sclerosis Within Privately and Publicly Insured Health Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Terrie; Fay, Monica; Iyer, Ravi; Wells, Wendy; Pill, Michael W

    2016-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and debilitating disease of the central nervous system that affects more than 570,000 persons in the United States and 2.3 million worldwide. Since most individuals experience initial symptoms between the ages of 20 and 40 years, MS can have a significant effect on health care consumption, quality of life, productivity, and employment over the long-term disease course. Opportunities exist to better understand how benefit design and other nonclinical factors can affect health care delivery and associated costs. To observe and report variances in health care consumed for the treatment of MS in patients enrolled in privately (commercial) and publicly (Medicaid) funded health insurance programs. In a retrospective analysis using Havas Gemini's proprietary MS Benchmarks Disease-Modeling Process and IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims and Longitudinal Prescriptions databases, integrated medical and pharmacy claims data were analyzed to select patients with a diagnosis of MS during the 2012 calendar year. Comorbidities were determined using ICD-9-CM codes present on medical claims. Prescription drug use was evaluated by pharmacy claims and drug-specific billing codes. 19,984 patients with MS were identified-18,269 from commercial payers and 1,715 from Medicaid. Although total annual costs related to the care of MS for the groups reflected a relatively small difference ($31,107 commercial; $33,344 Medicaid), costs associated with specific service categories varied greatly. Pharmacy costs were considerably less in the Medicaid group; however, inpatient and emergency room costs were as much as 5 times higher. Overall use of disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) in the Medicaid group was seen in 32.5% of patients and 52.1% in the commercial patient group. Thus, lower pharmacy costs in the Medicaid group were possibly related to lesser use of DMTs among that group of patients. This analysis illustrates that notable variances exist in consumption

  7. MOVE: weight management program across the veterans health administration: patient- and facility-level predictors of utilization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health care systems initiating major behavioral health programs often face challenges with variable implementation and uneven patient engagement. One large health care system, Veterans Health Administration (VHA), recently initiated the MOVE!® Weight Management Program, but it is unclear if veterans most in need of MOVE!® services are accessing them. The purpose of this study was to examine patient and facility factors associated with MOVE!® utilization (defined as 1 or more visits) across all VHA facilities. Methods Using national administrative data in a retrospective cohort study of eligible overweight (25 < = body mass index (BMI) < 30 and at least one obesity associated comorbidity) and obese (BMI > =30) VHA outpatients, we examined variation in and predictors of MOVE!® utilization in fiscal year (FY) 2010 using generalized linear mixed models. Results 4.39% (n = 90,230) of all eligible overweight and obese patients using VHA services utilized MOVE!® services at least once in FY 2010. Facility-level MOVE! Utilization rates ranged from 0.05% to 16%. Veterans were more likely to have at least one MOVE!® visit if they had a higher BMI, were female, unmarried, younger, a minority, or had a psychiatric or obesity-related comorbidity. Conclusions Although substantial variation exists across VHA facilities in MOVE!® utilization rates, Veterans most in need of obesity management services were more likely to access MOVE!®, although at a low level. However, there may still be many Veterans who might benefit but are not accessing these services. More research is needed to examine the barriers and facilitators of MOVE!® utilization, particularly in facilities with unusually high and low reach. PMID:24325730

  8. [Business activity in medicine: economic analysis of medical support programs and characteristics of management in business risks in health care system (problems and perspectives)].

    PubMed

    Poliachenko, Iu V; Dynnik, O B; Kishinets, A D; Zalesskiĭ, V N

    2005-06-01

    Current scientific data on the assessment of cost expenditure on the realization of programs to assist medically patients with cardiological, oncological, rheumatologic and other diseases were analyzed. Peculiarities of the management of business risks were considered in the article. It was concluded that the management of business risks in health care system should be improved.

  9. Program Management Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawadiak, Yuri; Wong, Alan; Maluf, David; Bell, David; Gurram, Mohana; Tran, Khai Peter; Hsu, Jennifer; Yagi, Kenji; Patel, Hemil

    2007-01-01

    The Program Management Tool (PMT) is a comprehensive, Web-enabled business intelligence software tool for assisting program and project managers within NASA enterprises in gathering, comprehending, and disseminating information on the progress of their programs and projects. The PMT provides planning and management support for implementing NASA programmatic and project management processes and requirements. It provides an online environment for program and line management to develop, communicate, and manage their programs, projects, and tasks in a comprehensive tool suite. The information managed by use of the PMT can include monthly reports as well as data on goals, deliverables, milestones, business processes, personnel, task plans, monthly reports, and budgetary allocations. The PMT provides an intuitive and enhanced Web interface to automate the tedious process of gathering and sharing monthly progress reports, task plans, financial data, and other information on project resources based on technical, schedule, budget, and management criteria and merits. The PMT is consistent with the latest Web standards and software practices, including the use of Extensible Markup Language (XML) for exchanging data and the WebDAV (Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning) protocol for collaborative management of documents. The PMT provides graphical displays of resource allocations in the form of bar and pie charts using Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Application (VBA) libraries. The PMT has an extensible architecture that enables integration of PMT with other strategic-information software systems, including, for example, the Erasmus reporting system, now part of the NASA Integrated Enterprise Management Program (IEMP) tool suite, at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The PMT data architecture provides automated and extensive software interfaces and reports to various strategic information systems to eliminate duplicative human entries and minimize data integrity

  10. Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, Cheryl

    The Health Promotion Program began with establishment of a one-credit course in health promotion and wellness and the training of family practice residents at the Mountain Area Health Education Center to serve as lab leaders in the course. The course later became part of the university's general education requirements. In addition, a health…

  11. Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, Cheryl

    The Health Promotion Program began with establishment of a one-credit course in health promotion and wellness and the training of family practice residents at the Mountain Area Health Education Center to serve as lab leaders in the course. The course later became part of the university's general education requirements. In addition, a health…

  12. Impact of a weight management program on health-related quality of life in overweight adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald A; Rejeski, Jack; Lang, Wei; Van Dorsten, Brent; Fabricatore, Anthony N; Toledo, Katie

    2009-01-26

    Inconsistent findings have been reported regarding improved health-related quality of life (HRQOL) after weight loss. We tested the efficacy of a weight management program for improving HRQOL in overweight or obese adults diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes mellitus. We conducted a randomized multisite clinical trial at 16 outpatient research centers with 2 treatment arms and blinded measurements at baseline and the end of year 1. A total of 5145 participants (mean [SD] age, 58.7 [6.9] years; mean [SD] body mass index [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared], 36.0 [5.9]; 59.5% women; 63.1% white) were randomized to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or to diabetes support and education (DSE). Main outcome measures included the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey physical component summary (PCS) and mental health component summary (MCS) scores and Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) scores. Baseline mean (SD) scores were 47.9 (7.9) for PCS, 54.0 (8.1) for MCS, and 5.7 (5.0) for BDI-II. Improved HRQOL was demonstrated by the PCS and BDI-II scores (P < .001) in the ILI arm compared with the DSE arm. The largest effect was observed for the PCS score (difference, -2.91; 99% confidence interval, -3.44 to -2.37). The greatest HRQOL improvement occurred in participants with the lowest baseline HRQOL levels. Mean (SD) changes in weight (ILI, -8.77 [8.2] kg and DSE, -0.86 [5.0] kg), improved fitness, and improved physical symptoms mediated treatment effects associated with the BDI-II and PCS. Overweight adults diagnosed as having type 2 diabetes experienced significant improvement in HRQOL by enrolling in a weight management program that yielded significant weight loss, improved physical fitness, and reduced physical symptoms. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00017953.

  13. Acquisition-Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.; Vann, A. Vernon; Jones, Richard H.; Rew, William E.

    1987-01-01

    NASA Acquisition Management Subsystem (AMS) program integrated NASA-wide standard automated-procurement-system program developed in 1985. Designed to provide each NASA installation with procurement data-base concept with on-line terminals for managing, tracking, reporting, and controlling contractual actions and associated procurement data. Subsystem provides control, status, and reporting for various procurement areas. Purpose of standardization is to decrease costs of procurement and operation of automatic data processing; increases procurement productivity; furnishes accurate, on-line management information and improves customer support. Written in the ADABAS NATURAL.

  14. Acquisition-Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, Don E.; Vann, A. Vernon; Jones, Richard H.; Rew, William E.

    1987-01-01

    NASA Acquisition Management Subsystem (AMS) program integrated NASA-wide standard automated-procurement-system program developed in 1985. Designed to provide each NASA installation with procurement data-base concept with on-line terminals for managing, tracking, reporting, and controlling contractual actions and associated procurement data. Subsystem provides control, status, and reporting for various procurement areas. Purpose of standardization is to decrease costs of procurement and operation of automatic data processing; increases procurement productivity; furnishes accurate, on-line management information and improves customer support. Written in the ADABAS NATURAL.

  15. Health Programs for Veterans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and friends with qualified, caring VA responders Weight Management The MOVE! program: helping veterans lose weight, keep it off and improve ... Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required Button ...

  16. Determining Barriers and Facilitators Associated With Willingness to Use a Personal Health Information Management System to Support Worksite Wellness Programs.

    PubMed

    Neyens, David M; Childers, Ashley Kay

    2016-01-05

    Purpose . To determine the barriers and facilitators associated with willingness to use personal health information management (PHIM) systems to support an existing worksite wellness program (WWP). Design . The study design involved a Web-based survey. Setting . The study setting was a regional hospital. Subjects . Hospital employees comprised the study subjects. Measures . Willingness, barriers, and facilitators associated with PHIM were measured. Analysis . Bivariate logit models were used to model two binary dependent variables. One model predicted the likelihood of believing PHIM systems would positively affect overall health and willingness to use. Another predicted the likelihood of worrying about online security and not believing PHIM systems would benefit health goals. Results . Based on 333 responses, believing PHIM systems would positively affect health was highly associated with willingness to use PHIM systems (p < .01). Those comfortable online were 7.22 times more willing to use PHIM systems. Participants in exercise-based components of WWPs were 3.03 times more likely to be willing to use PHIM systems. Those who worried about online security were 5.03 times more likely to believe PHIM systems would not help obtain health goals. Conclusions . Comfort with personal health information online and exercise-based WWP experience was associated with willingness to use PHIM systems. However, nutrition-based WWPs did not have similar effects. Implementation barriers relate to technology anxiety and trust in security, as well as experience with specific WWP activities. Identifying differences between WWP components and addressing technology concerns before implementation of PHIM systems into WWPs may facilitate improved adoption and usage.

  17. Intelligent Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Deidre E.; Trevino, Luis; Watson, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems for aerospace vehicles, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) at Marshall Space Flight Center has performed a pilot study on IVHM principals which integrates researched IVHM technologies in support of Integrated Intelligent Vehicle Management (IIVM). IVHM is the process of assessing, preserving, and restoring system functionality across flight and ground systems (NASA NGLT 2004). The framework presented in this paper integrates advanced computational techniques with sensor and communication technologies for spacecraft that can generate responses through detection, diagnosis, reasoning, and adapt to system faults in support of INM. These real-time responses allow the IIVM to modify the affected vehicle subsystem(s) prior to a catastrophic event. Furthermore, the objective of this pilot program is to develop and integrate technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Recent investments in avionics, health management, and controls have been directed towards IIVM. As this concept has matured, it has become clear the INM requires the same sensors and processing capabilities as the real-time avionics functions to support diagnosis of subsystem problems. New sensors have been proposed, in addition, to augment the avionics sensors to support better system monitoring and diagnostics. As the designs have been considered, a synergy has been realized where the real-time avionics can utilize sensors proposed for diagnostics and prognostics to make better real-time decisions in response to detected failures. IIVM provides for a single system allowing modularity of functions and hardware across the vehicle. The framework that supports IIVM consists of 11 major on-board functions necessary to fully manage a space vehicle maintaining crew safety and mission

  18. Intelligent Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Deidre E.; Trevino, Luis; Watson, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    As a part of the overall goal of developing Integrated Vehicle Health Management systems for aerospace vehicles, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) at Marshall Space Flight Center has performed a pilot study on IVHM principals which integrates researched IVHM technologies in support of Integrated Intelligent Vehicle Management (IIVM). IVHM is the process of assessing, preserving, and restoring system functionality across flight and ground systems (NASA NGLT 2004). The framework presented in this paper integrates advanced computational techniques with sensor and communication technologies for spacecraft that can generate responses through detection, diagnosis, reasoning, and adapt to system faults in support of INM. These real-time responses allow the IIVM to modify the affected vehicle subsystem(s) prior to a catastrophic event. Furthermore, the objective of this pilot program is to develop and integrate technologies which can provide a continuous, intelligent, and adaptive health state of a vehicle and use this information to improve safety and reduce costs of operations. Recent investments in avionics, health management, and controls have been directed towards IIVM. As this concept has matured, it has become clear the INM requires the same sensors and processing capabilities as the real-time avionics functions to support diagnosis of subsystem problems. New sensors have been proposed, in addition, to augment the avionics sensors to support better system monitoring and diagnostics. As the designs have been considered, a synergy has been realized where the real-time avionics can utilize sensors proposed for diagnostics and prognostics to make better real-time decisions in response to detected failures. IIVM provides for a single system allowing modularity of functions and hardware across the vehicle. The framework that supports IIVM consists of 11 major on-board functions necessary to fully manage a space vehicle maintaining crew safety and mission

  19. Program management model study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connelly, J. J.; Russell, J. E.; Seline, J. R.; Sumner, N. R., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Two models, a system performance model and a program assessment model, have been developed to assist NASA management in the evaluation of development alternatives for the Earth Observations Program. Two computer models were developed and demonstrated on the Goddard Space Flight Center Computer Facility. Procedures have been outlined to guide the user of the models through specific evaluation processes, and the preparation of inputs describing earth observation needs and earth observation technology. These models are intended to assist NASA in increasing the effectiveness of the overall Earth Observation Program by providing a broader view of system and program development alternatives.

  20. Health care engineering management.

    PubMed

    Jarzembski, W B

    1980-01-01

    Today, health care engineering management is merely a concept of dreamers, with most engineering decisions in health care being made by nonengineers. It is the purpose of this paper to present a rationale for an integrated hospital engineering group, and to acquaint the clinical engineer with some of the salient features of management concepts. Included are general management concepts, organization, personnel management, and hospital engineering systems.

  1. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  2. Strengthening Mental Health Programs for Secondary School Students with High Support Needs: A Framework for Effective School Case Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Terry

    2005-01-01

    MindMatters Plus (MM+) is a program that focuses on building the capacity of secondary schools to meet the needs of students who have high support needs in the area of mental health. A necessity to supplement this work with specific strategies and processes allied to the delivery of mental health programs in secondary schools was identified.…

  3. Continuing Education for the Health Professions. Developing, Managing, and Evaluating Programs for Maximum Impact on Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Joseph S., Ed.; And Others

    Advice on making continuing education (CE) responsive to the practice needs of professionals in medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, and public health is provided in 16 chapters. Attention is directed to: establishing realistic goals, tailoring programs to specific needs, recruiting subject matter experts, evaluating programs and…

  4. Strengthening Mental Health Programs for Secondary School Students with High Support Needs: A Framework for Effective School Case Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Terry

    2005-01-01

    MindMatters Plus (MM+) is a program that focuses on building the capacity of secondary schools to meet the needs of students who have high support needs in the area of mental health. A necessity to supplement this work with specific strategies and processes allied to the delivery of mental health programs in secondary schools was identified.…

  5. A physical examination of health care's readiness for a total quality management program: a case study.

    PubMed

    Weeks, B; Helms, M M; Ettkin, L P

    1995-11-01

    Initiating a total quality management (TQM) effort can be a time-consuming and costly effort for a hospital. Perceptions of management and employees are important in initiating TQM because people function as if perceptions are fact. Assessing these perceptions and determining the levels of readiness or resistance to change are important steps in reducing costs, thus increasing organizational ability to address proactively challenges to the implementation and ultimate success of a TQM effort. Key assessment criteria are discussed including a comparison of management and employee perceptions in one hospital.

  6. Navy Occupational Health Information Management System (NOHIMS). Medical Exam Scheduling Module. Program Maintenance Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    a one indicates that it is not 6-12 .0 " MAG: A pointer to an employee’s agency * MASB : A pointer to the asbestos program * MC: A count of an...V, PL K c, sun I- " MAG: A pointer to an agency " MAGE: An employee’s age " MASB : A pointer to the asbestos program * MCL: A Clinic file entry number...routine T2MRE3 uses the following variables: * Ml: An employee’s name as an index * MASB : A pointer to the asbestos program * MCO: The zero node of a

  7. [Impact analysis on the health management programs among community-based 0-36-month-olds on their growth and development].

    PubMed

    Yang, Huimin; Xiao, Feng; Yin, Delu; Li, Ruili; Xin, Qianqian; Zheng, Xiaoguo; Yin, Tao; Wang, Lihong; Cui, Mingming; Xu, Qi; Chen, Bowen

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the impact of implementation on health management programs among the community-based 0-36-month-olds regarding their growth and development. 18 Monitoring Bodies in 8 pilot areas were selected to enroll this study, using a multistage stratified cluster sampling method. All the children aged 0 to 36 months were followed, according to the health management specification, and their health archives were collected. A total of 13 464 children were involved in the specified management program with a total of 59 648 person-time under follow-up, with 54.26% of them were boys. Results from the multi-layer linear model indicated that the average height of children in the specified management group was higher than that in the non-standardized management group. Children in the specification management group, their weight gain had also been more effectively controlled. At the same time, with the increasing number of follow-ups according to the specification, the prevalence rates of under weight, stunt, emaciation and overweight were all significantly decreased (P < 0.05). The implementation of the community-based programs on 0-36-month-olds regarding their health management specification had improved children's growth and development.

  8. Quality Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    According to {section} 35.32, Quality Management Program,'' of 10 CFR Part 35, Medical Use of Byproduct Material,'' applicants or licensees, as applicable, are required to establish a quality management (QM) program. This regulatory guide provides guidance to licensees and applicants for developing policies and procedures for the QM program. This guide does not restrict or limit the licensee from using other guidance that may be equally useful in developing a QM program, e.g., information available from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations or the American College of Radiology. Any information collection activities mentioned in this regulatory guide are contained as requirements in 10 CFR Part 35, which provides the regulatory basis for this guide. This information collection requirements in 10 CFR Part 35 have been cleared under OMB Clearance No. 3150-0010.

  9. Public health financial management competencies.

    PubMed

    Honoré, Peggy A; Costich, Julia F

    2009-01-01

    The absence of appropriate financial management competencies has impeded progress in advancing the field of public health finance. It also inhibits the ability to professionalize this sector of the workforce. Financial managers should play a critical role by providing information relevant to decision making. The lack of fundamental financial management knowledge and skills is a barrier to fulfilling this role. A national expert committee was convened to examine this issue. The committee reviewed standards related to financial and business management practices within public health and closely related areas. Alignments were made with national standards such as those established for government chief financial officers. On the basis of this analysis, a comprehensive set of public health financial management competencies was identified and examined further by a review panel. At a minimum, the competencies can be used to define job descriptions, assess job performance, identify critical gaps in financial analysis, create career paths, and design educational programs.

  10. Waste Management Program management plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    As the prime contractor to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) provides comprehensive waste management services to all contractors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) through the Waste Management (WM) Program. This Program Management Plan (PMP) provides an overview of the Waste Management Program objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. This document will be reviewed at least annually and updated as needed to address revisions to the Waste Management`s objectives, organization and management practices, and scope of work. Waste Management Program is managed by LMITCO Waste Operations Directorate. The Waste Management Program manages transuranic, low-level, mixed low-level, hazardous, special-case, and industrial wastes generated at or transported to the INEEL.

  11. Perceived needs for the information communication technology (ICT)-based personalized health management program, and its association with information provision, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and decisional conflict in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jin Ah; Chang, Yoon Jung; Shin, Aesun; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Young Whan; Kim, Young Tae; Jeong, Seoung-Yong; Yoon, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yoon Jun; Heo, Daesuk; Kim, Tae-You; Oh, Do-Youn; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Hak Jae; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kang, Keon Wook; Kim, Ju Han; Yun, Young Ho

    2017-01-05

    The use of information communication technology (ICT)-based tailored health management program can have significant health impacts for cancer patients. Information provision, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and decision conflicts were analyzed for their relationship with need for an ICT-based personalized health management program in Korean cancer survivors. The health program needs of 625 cancer survivors from two Korean hospitals were analyzed in this cross-sectional study. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors related to the need for an ICT-based tailored health management system. Association of the highest such need with medical information experience, HRQOL, and decision conflicts was determined. Furthermore, patient intentions and expectations for a web- or smartphone-based tailored health management program were investigated. Cancer survivors indicated high personalized health management program needs. Patients reporting the highest need included those with higher income (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.70; 95% [confidence interval] CI, 1.10-2.63), those who had received enough information regarding helping themselves (aOR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.09-2.66), and those who wished to receive more information (aOR, 1.59; 95% CI, 0.97-2.61). Participants with cognitive functioning problems (aOR, 2.87; 95%CI, 1.34-6.17) or appetite loss (aOR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.07-2.93) indicated need for a tailored health care program. Patients who perceived greater support from the decision-making process also showed the highest need for an ICT-based program (aOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.30-0.82). We found that higher income, information provision experience, problematic HRQOL, and decisional conflicts are significantly associated with the need for an ICT-based tailored self-management program. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Toward utilization of data for program management and evaluation: quality assessment of five years of health management information system data in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Nisingizwe, Marie Paul; Iyer, Hari S.; Gashayija, Modeste; Hirschhorn, Lisa R.; Amoroso, Cheryl; Wilson, Randy; Rubyutsa, Eric; Gaju, Eric; Basinga, Paulin; Muhire, Andrew; Binagwaho, Agnès; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Background Health data can be useful for effective service delivery, decision making, and evaluating existing programs in order to maintain high quality of healthcare. Studies have shown variability in data quality from national health management information systems (HMISs) in sub-Saharan Africa which threatens utility of these data as a tool to improve health systems. The purpose of this study is to assess the quality of Rwanda's HMIS data over a 5-year period. Methods The World Health Organization (WHO) data quality report card framework was used to assess the quality of HMIS data captured from 2008 to 2012 and is a census of all 495 publicly funded health facilities in Rwanda. Factors assessed included completeness and internal consistency of 10 indicators selected based on WHO recommendations and priority areas for the Rwanda national health sector. Completeness was measured as percentage of non-missing reports. Consistency was measured as the absence of extreme outliers, internal consistency between related indicators, and consistency of indicators over time. These assessments were done at the district and national level. Results Nationally, the average monthly district reporting completeness rate was 98% across 10 key indicators from 2008 to 2012. Completeness of indicator data increased over time: 2008, 88%; 2009, 91%; 2010, 89%; 2011, 90%; and 2012, 95% (p<0.0001). Comparing 2011 and 2012 health events to the mean of the three preceding years, service output increased from 3% (2011) to 9% (2012). Eighty-three percent of districts reported ratios between related indicators (ANC/DTP1, DTP1/DTP3) consistent with HMIS national ratios. Conclusion and policy implications Our findings suggest that HMIS data quality in Rwanda has been improving over time. We recommend maintaining these assessments to identify remaining gaps in data quality and that results are shared publicly to support increased use of HMIS data. PMID:25413722

  13. [Disease management programs from the statutory health insurance physicians' point of view ].

    PubMed

    Spies, Hans-Friedrich

    2003-06-01

    The advantage of DMPs is that they can be used to define target criteria that are legally binding and thus allow for the control of core issues of our health care system. Legal security is to be established by evidence-based guidelines. At present, however, DMPs are still being dominated by economic aspects. From the point of view of the associations of statutory health insurance physicians, further criticism relates both to the transferral of highly sensitive data to health insurance funds and the remuneration for medical services in respect of DMPs. At least, extra-budgetary allotments are claimed after a transitional phase. And finally, the considerable administrative efforts involved are pointed out.

  14. Managing transitional work--program foundation.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Patricia B

    2004-08-01

    A comprehensive TWP is a critical element in any disability management effort. The program must be developed just as any successful worksite program is: with management support, teamwork, a coordinator, written policies and procedures, effective marketing, and communications. In addition, the program must be evaluated and continuously improved. A successful program will contribute to the location's bottom line as well as improve the health of employees.

  15. Geography Undergraduate Program Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estaville, Lawrence E.; Brown, Brock J.; Caldwell, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Vision and mission statements are the foundation for the types of undergraduate degrees departments confer as well as other types of academic programs such as pre-major, certificate, and distance education curricula. Critical to each department should be careful administration of course selections and offerings and management of academic majors,…

  16. Evaluation of an mHealth Medication Regimen Self-Management Program for African American and Hispanic Uncontrolled Hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Tatiana M; McGillicuddy, John; Mueller, Martina; Brunner-Jackson, Brenda; Favella, April; Anderson, Ashley; Torres, Magaly; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Treiber, Frank A

    2015-11-17

    African Americans and Hispanics have disproportionate rates of uncontrolled essential hypertension (EH) compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Medication non-adherence (MNA) is the leading modifiable behavior to improved blood pressure (BP) control. The Smartphone Medication Adherence Stops Hypertension (SMASH) program was developed using a patient-centered, theory-guided, iterative design process. Electronic medication trays provided reminder signals, and Short Message Service [SMS] messaging reminded subjects to monitor BP with Bluetooth-enabled monitors. Motivational and reinforcement text messages were sent to participants based upon levels of adherence. Thirty-eight African-American (18) and Hispanic (20) uncontrolled hypertensives completed clinic-based anthropometric and resting BP evaluations prior to randomization, and again at months 1, 3 and 6. Generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM) revealed statistically significant time-by-treatment interactions (p < 0.0001) indicating significant reductions in resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) for the SMASH group vs. the standard care (SC) control group across all time points. 70.6% of SMASH subjects vs. 15.8% of the SC group reached BP control (< 140/90 mmH) at month 1 (p < 0.001). At month 6, 94.4% of the SMASH vs. 41.2% of the SC group exhibited controlled BP (p < 0.003). Our findings provide encouraging evidence that efficacious mHealth, chronic disease, medical regimen, self-management programs can be developed following principles of patient-centered, theory-guided design.

  17. Evaluation of an mHealth Medication Regimen Self-Management Program for African American and Hispanic Uncontrolled Hypertensives

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Tatiana M.; McGillicuddy, John; Mueller, Martina; Brunner-Jackson, Brenda; Favella, April; Anderson, Ashley; Torres, Magaly; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    African Americans and Hispanics have disproportionate rates of uncontrolled essential hypertension (EH) compared to Non-Hispanic Whites. Medication non-adherence (MNA) is the leading modifiable behavior to improved blood pressure (BP) control. The Smartphone Medication Adherence Stops Hypertension (SMASH) program was developed using a patient-centered, theory-guided, iterative design process. Electronic medication trays provided reminder signals, and Short Message Service [SMS] messaging reminded subjects to monitor BP with Bluetooth-enabled monitors. Motivational and reinforcement text messages were sent to participants based upon levels of adherence. Thirty-eight African-American (18) and Hispanic (20) uncontrolled hypertensives completed clinic-based anthropometric and resting BP evaluations prior to randomization, and again at months 1, 3 and 6. Generalized linear mixed modeling (GLMM) revealed statistically significant time-by-treatment interactions (p < 0.0001) indicating significant reductions in resting systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) for the SMASH group vs. the standard care (SC) control group across all time points. 70.6% of SMASH subjects vs. 15.8% of the SC group reached BP control (< 140/90 mmH) at month 1 (p < 0.001). At month 6, 94.4% of the SMASH vs. 41.2% of the SC group exhibited controlled BP (p < 0.003). Our findings provide encouraging evidence that efficacious mHealth, chronic disease, medical regimen, self-management programs can be developed following principles of patient-centered, theory-guided design. PMID:26593951

  18. Integrated control and health management. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Wilfried A.; Hayden, Warren R.

    1988-01-01

    To insure controllability of the baseline design for a 7500 pound thrust, 10:1 throttleable, dual expanded cycle, Hydrogen-Oxygen, orbit transfer rocket engine, an Integrated Controls and Health Monitoring concept was developed. This included: (1) Dynamic engine simulations using a TUTSIM derived computer code; (2) analysis of various control methods; (3) Failure Modes Analysis to identify critical sensors; (4) Survey of applicable sensors technology; and, (5) Study of Health Monitoring philosophies. The engine design was found to be controllable over the full throttling range by using 13 valves, including an oxygen turbine bypass valve to control mixture ratio, and a hydrogen turbine bypass valve, used in conjunction with the oxygen bypass to control thrust. Classic feedback control methods are proposed along with specific requirements for valves, sensors, and the controller. Expanding on the control system, a Health Monitoring system is proposed including suggested computing methods and the following recommended sensors: (1) Fiber optic and silicon bearing deflectometers; (2) Capacitive shaft displacement sensors; and (3) Hot spot thermocouple arrays. Further work is needed to refine and verify the dynamic simulations and control algorithms, to advance sensor capabilities, and to develop the Health Monitoring computational methods.

  19. Parent Report of Child's Health-Related Quality of Life after a Primary-Care-Based Weight Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Schetzina, Karen E.; McBee, Matthew T.; Maphis, Laura; Fulton-Robinson, Hazel; Ho, Ai-Leng; Tudiver, Fred; Wu, Tiejian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been recognized as an important target and health outcome in obesity research. The current study aimed to examine HRQoL in overweight or obese children after a 10-week primary-care–based weight management program, Parent-Led Activity and Nutrition for Healthy Living, in southern Appalachia. Methods: Sixty-seven children (ages 5–12 years) and their caregivers were recruited from four primary care clinics, two of which were randomized to receive the intervention. Caregivers in the intervention groups received two brief motivational interviewing visits and four group sessions led by providers as well as four phone follow-ups with research staff. Caregivers completed the PedsQL and demographic questionnaires at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postintervention. Child height and weight were collected to determine standardized BMI. Results: Caregivers of children receiving the weight control intervention reported no statistically significant improvements in child total HRQoL, as compared to the control group, across the course of treatment (β=0.178; 95% confidence interval, −0.681, 1.037; p=0.687). Additionally, no statistically significant improvements were found across other HRQoL domains. Conclusions: Future studies examining HRQoL outcomes in primary care may consider treatment dose as well as methodological factors, such as utilization of multiple informants and different measures, when designing studies and interpreting outcomes. PMID:24152081

  20. The Health and Recovery Peer (HARP) Program: a peer-led intervention to improve medical self-management for persons with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Druss, Benjamin G; Zhao, Liping; von Esenwein, Silke A; Bona, Joseph R; Fricks, Larry; Jenkins-Tucker, Sherry; Sterling, Evelina; Diclemente, Ralph; Lorig, Kate

    2010-05-01

    Persons with serious mental illnesses (SMI) have elevated rates of comorbid medical conditions, but may also face challenges in effectively managing those conditions. The study team developed and pilot-tested the Health and Recovery Program (HARP), an adaptation of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for mental health consumers. A manualized, six-session intervention, delivered by mental health peer leaders, helps participants become more effective managers of their chronic illnesses. A pilot trial randomized 80 consumers with one or more chronic medical illness to either the HARP program or usual care. At six month follow-up, participants in the HARP program had a significantly greater improvement in patient activation than those in usual care (7.7% relative improvement vs. 5.7% decline, p=0.03 for group *time interaction), and in rates of having one or more primary care visit (68.4% vs. 51.9% with one or more visit, p=0.046 for group *time interaction). Intervention advantages were observed for physical health related quality of life (HRQOL), physical activity, medication adherence, and, and though not statistically significant, had similar effect sizes as those seen for the CDSMP in general medical populations. Improvements in HRQOL were largest among medically and socially vulnerable subpopulations. This peer-led, medical self-management program was feasible and showed promise for improving a range of health outcomes among mental health consumers with chronic medical comorbidities. The HARP intervention may provide a vehicle for the mental health peer workforce to actively engage in efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality among mental health consumers. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Management Education in Public Health: Further Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Darr, Kurt J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowing and applying the basic management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling, as well as their permutations and combinations, are vital to effective delivery of public health services. Presently, graduate programs that prepare public health professionals neither emphasize teaching management theory, nor its application. This deficit puts those who become managers in public health and those they serve at a distinct disadvantage. This deficit can be remedied by enhanced teaching of management subjects PMID:26673475

  2. Environmental health program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  3. Effectiveness of Telebehavioral Health Program Nurse Case Managers (NCM): Data Collection Tools and the Process for NCM-Sensitive Outcome Measures.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Judy; Cohen, Roslyn; Bice-Stephens, Wynona

    2014-01-01

    As a part of our nation's pursuit of improvements in patient care outcomes, continuity of care, and cost containment, the case manager has become a vital member on interdisciplinary teams and in health care agencies. Telebehavioral health programs, as a relatively new method of delivering behavioral health care, have recently begun to incorporate case management into their multidisciplinary teams. To determine the efficacy and efficiency of healthcare programs, program managers are charged with the determination of the outcomes of the care rendered to patient populations. However, programs that use telehealth methods to deliver care have unique structures in place that impact ability to collect outcome data. A military medical center that serves the Pacific region developed surveys and processes to distribute, administer, and collect information about a telehealth environment to obtain outcome data for the nurse case manager. This report describes the survey development and the processes created to capture nurse case manager outcomes. Additionally, the surveys and processes developed in this project for measuring outcomes may be useful in other settings and disciplines.

  4. Medication therapy disease management: Geisinger's approach to population health management.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laney K; Greskovic, Gerard; Grassi, Dante M; Graham, Jove; Sun, Haiyan; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Murray, Michael F; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Nathanson, Douglas C; Wright, Eric A; Evans, Michael A

    2017-09-15

    Pharmacists' involvement in a population health initiative focused on chronic disease management is described. Geisinger Health System has cultivated a culture of innovation in population health management, as highlighted by its ambulatory care pharmacy program, the Medication Therapy Disease Management (MTDM) program. Initiated in 1996, the MTDM program leverages pharmacists' pharmacotherapy expertise to optimize care and improve outcomes. MTDM program pharmacists are trained and credentialed to manage over 16 conditions, including atrial fibrillation (AF) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Over a 15-year period, Geisinger Health Plan (GHP)-insured patients with AF whose warfarin therapy was managed by the MTDM program had, on average, 18% fewer emergency department (ED) visits and 18% fewer hospitalizations per year than GHP enrollees with AF who did not receive MTDM services, with 23% lower annual total care costs. Over a 2-year period, GHP-insured patients with MS whose pharmacotherapy was managed by pharmacists averaged 28% fewer annual ED visits than non-pharmacist-managed patients; however, the mean annual total care cost was 21% higher among MTDM clinic patients. The Geisinger MTDM program has evolved over 20 years from a single pharmacist-run anticoagulation clinic into a large program focused on managing the health of an ever-growing population. Initial challenges in integrating pharmacists into the Geisinger patient care framework as clinical experts were overcome by demonstrating the MTDM program's positive impact on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluating the impact of a disease management program for chronic complex conditions at two large northeast health plans using a control group methodology.

    PubMed

    Schwerner, Henry; Mellody, Timothy; Goldstein, Allan B; Wansink, Daryl; Sullivan, Virginia; Yelenik, Stephan N; Charlton, Warwick; Lloyd, Kelley; Courtemanche, Ted

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to observe trends in payer expenditures for plan members with one of 14 chronic, complex conditions comparing one group with a disease management program specific to their condition (the intervention group) and the other with no specific disease management program (the control group) for these conditions. The authors used payer claims and membership data to identify members eligible for the program in a 12-month baseline year (October 2001 to September 2002) and a subsequent 12-month program year (October 2002 to September 2003). Two payers were analyzed: one health plan with members primarily in New Jersey (AmeriHealth New Jersey [AHNJ]), where the disease management program was offered, and one affiliated large plan with members primarily in the metro Philadelphia area, where the program was not offered. The claims payment policy for both plans is identical. Intervention and control groups were analyzed for equivalence. The analysis was conducted in both groups over identical time periods. The intervention group showed statistically significant (p < 0.01) differences in total paid claims trend and expenditures when compared to the control group. Intervention group members showed a reduction in expenditures of -8%, while control group members showed an increase of +10% over identical time periods. Subsequent analyses controlling for outliers and product lines served to confirm the overall results. The disease management program is likely responsible for the observed difference between the intervention and control group results. A well-designed, targeted disease management program offered by a motivated, supportive health plan can play an important role in cost improvement strategies for members with complex, chronic conditions.

  6. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

    SciTech Connect

    Gravois, Melanie

    2007-06-27

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.

  7. Effect of management, marketing, and certified health programs on the sale price of beef calves sold through a livestock video auction service from 1995 through 2009.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Jon T; King, Michael E; Grotelueschen, Dale M; Rogers, Glenn M; Stokka, Gerald S

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate and update the previously quantified effects of management, marketing, and certified health programs on the sale price of beef calves sold through a livestock video auction service. Longitudinal study. 41,657 lots representing 5,042,272 beef calves sold from 1995 through 2009. Data describing each lot of beef calves marketed from 1995 through 2009 by a livestock video auction service were obtained from sale catalogues. For each year of the study, multiple regression analysis was used to quantify the effect of management, marketing, and certified health programs on sale price. Sale date, base sale weight, quadratic effect of base weight, sex of calf, region of origin, breed description, inclusion in a certified health program, and number of calves in the lot significantly affected sale price for every year of the study. Variation in body weight, flesh score, and number of days between sale and delivery date had significant effects on price in most of the years; frame score and calves with horns affected price in 7 of 15 years; age and source verification influenced sale price in every year since source verification was introduced in 2005; and the auction service's progressive genetics program increased price during the 1 year that program was available. Some management, marketing, and certified health initiatives have consistently increased the sale price of beef calves, and producers can increase the price of their calves by implementing these practices.

  8. Report of an HIV clinic-based pain management program and utilization of health status and health service by HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ahashta; Condon, Kathleen DiGangi; Mapas-Dimaya, Ann Celeste; Schrager, Judith; Grossberg, Robert; Gonzalez, Rosalyn; O'Mahony, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Current reports on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pain are limited to epidemiological data on neuropathic pain in HIV and most studies were conducted before the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Complex pain was reported to be highly prevalent and associated with advanced disease. The authors conducted a retrospective review of the medical records of 81 patients from the Center for Positive Living (CPL) at Montefiore Medical Center who were newly referred to a pain management program in 2006 to identify the potential benefits of integrating a pain management team into the care of persons living with HIV and etiologies of pain. A standardized chart abstraction tool was used to capture clinical data. Data related to health service utilization and viral outcomes were obtained from the clinical information systems. The most common pain diagnoses were multiple syndromes, degenerative disc disease or spinal stenosis, and neuropathy. There was a decrease in emergency room utilization in the 12 months following an initial pain management appointment (p < 0.0001) and an increase in use of primary care (p = 0.0017). The use of adjuvant medications increased after intake into the pain clinic (p < 0.0001). Having an opioid dose in excess of 200 mg/d oral morphine equivalents and maintenance of each palliative care and infectious disease clinic appointment were inversely associated with viral loads in excess of 75 copies: odds ratio (OR) = 0.21 (95% confidence interval/CI], 0.11-0.44), OR = 0.77 (95% CI, 0.68-0.86), and 0.94 (95% CI, 0.93-0.99), respectively. The decrease in emergency room visits and increase in use of adjuvant analgesics and compliance with primary care and nonmedication approaches for the management of pain in the 12 months subsequent to initial palliative/pain clinic appointments highlight potential improved quality of care associated with the integration of a pain management team into the primary care of persons living with HIV

  9. Routine Immunization Consultant Program in Nigeria: A Qualitative Review of a Country-Driven Management Approach for Health Systems Strengthening.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Meghan; Wonodi, Chizoba

    2016-03-01

    Since 2002, the Nigerian government has deployed consultants to states to provide technical assistance for routine immunization (RI). RI consultants are expected to play a role in supportive supervision of health facility staff, capacity building, advocacy, and monitoring and evaluation. We conducted a retrospective review of the RI consultant program's strengths and weaknesses in 7 states and at the national level from June to September 2014 using semi-structured interviews and online surveys. Participants included RI consultants, RI program leaders, and implementers purposively drawn from national, state, and local government levels. Thematic analysis was used to analyze qualitative data from the interviews, which were triangulated with results from the quantitative surveys. At the time of data collection, 23 of 36 states and the federal capital territory had an RI consultant. Of the 7 states visited during the study, only 3 states had present and visibly working consultants. We conducted 84 interviews with 101 participants across the 7 states and conducted data analysis on 70 interviews (with 82 individuals) that had complete data. Among the full sample of interview respondents (N = 101), most (66%) were men with an average age of 49 years (±5.6), and the majority were technical officers (63%) but a range of other roles were also represented, including consultants (22%), directors (13%), and health workers (2%). Fifteen consultants and 44 program leaders completed the online surveys. Interview data from the 3 states with active RI consultants indicated that the consultants' main contribution was supportive supervision at the local level, particularly for collecting and using RI data for decision making. They also acted as effective advocates for RI funding. In states without an RI consultant, gaps were highlighted in data management capacity and in monitoring of RI funds. Program design strengths: the broad terms of reference and autonomy of the consultants

  10. Physical fitness and health education program at NASA Headquarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angotti, Cathy

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: policy procedures to enter the NASA Headquarters Physical Fitness and Health Program; eligibility; TDY eligibility; health promotions offered; and general facility management.

  11. The acceptability and outcomes of a peer- and health-professional-led Stanford self-management program for Vietnam veterans with alcohol misuse and their partners.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Jill; Battersby, Malcolm W; Pols, Rene G

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acceptability of peer- and health-professional-led self-management education using the Stanford Program with Australian veterans and their partners. The 6-week program taught problem-solving and decision-making skills to activate healthful behaviors, including action-planning and goal-setting. The evaluation included a participant and facilitator postprogram questionnaire; group interview; and alcohol, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression, anger, relationship, and quality-of-life measures as part of a randomized controlled study. Participants included 25 male veterans with comorbid alcohol dependency, psychiatric and medical conditions, and 18 female partners (n = 43), 61.5% of who reported a chronic condition. The primary outcome was a self-reported improvement in self-management of their conditions in 69% of participants, with another 22.2% reporting that their confidence to self-manage had improved. There was an improvement in all measures at 9 months. The program resulted in improvements in lifestyle and confidence in self-management for Vietnam veterans, a cohort difficult to engage in healthy behaviors. Most participants were also accompanied by their partners. The program is a valuable resource for providing self-management education to veterans with alcohol dependency and various chronic conditions and needs to be considered in the suite of rehabilitation programs available to Defense Force personnel, veterans, and their partners. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Education review: diversity and opportunity in health management systems and health information management.

    PubMed

    Begler, K H

    1995-05-01

    Innovative methods for managing health care information are critical to solving the problems posed by our nation's health care system. The Department of Health Information Sciences at the John G. Rangos, Sr. School of Health Sciences at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh has created baccalaureate and master's degree programs in health management systems that respond to a need for the redesign and management of the cultural and technologic infrastructure necessary to create more efficient, highly effective, and better informed health care organizations.

  13. Hazardous materials management and control program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory--health protection.

    PubMed

    Ketchen, E; Porter, W

    1981-12-01

    Maintaining reasonable control of all hazardous materials used in a large research laboratory can be a formidable task. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a Hazardous Material Coordinator for Health Protection (HMC-Hlth) and a Hazardous Material Coordinator for Environmental Protection (HMC-Env) control hazardous materials from acquisition to disposal. The HMC-Hlth, a member of the Industrial Hygiene Department, is responsible for control of the purchase and use of hazardous materials. If the material has not had a hazard evaluation, the user is required to contact the HMC-Hlth to find out if the material is hazardous before ordering it. If the material is hazardous, the user must get permission from his divisional representative to purchase it. The user is required to fill out Part 2 of a Hazardous Material Control Card (HMCC), describing the proposed use and location of the material and to return HMCC to the HMC-Hlth. This allows the Industrial Hygiene Department to evaluate the use of the materials and to take air samples as needed. Part 1 of the HMCC also contains computer printed information on the hazards.

  14. Waste management program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Current information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant are reported. Process and equipment development studies are considered as well as surveillance and maintenance, waste concentration, low level effluent waste, waste tank evaluation, and tank replacement/waste transfer (formerly waste tank retirement). Criteria for the selection of sites for storage of waste forms produced in the Defense Waste Processing Facility are described.

  15. Health Management Guide. Disease management.

    PubMed

    Harrison, S; Hunter, D; Fairfield, G; Cole, A

    1996-01-01

    Disease management has been described as a comprehensive, integrated approach to care and reimbursement based on the natural course of a disease. It requires a management approach which brings together research evidence, best practice and inter-professional and inter-agency working. Starting with the ideal of continuity of care for individual patients, it implies structured co-ordination of care over time and across primary, secondary and tertiary settings. The appeal of disease management is that it promises reduced costs, combined with increased quality of care and patient satisfaction. But the concept is open to different definitions and interpretations and its effectiveness in improving UK healthcare is still largely untested. This Health Management Guide removes the mystique behind disease management and puts it in the context of existing knowledge and practice. Treating it as a concept, rather than a specific technique, it distinguishes between its different potential applications, offers practical guidance on implementation, and reports on how NHS organisations are taking it forward.

  16. Integrated Financial Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pho, Susan

    2004-01-01

    Having worked in the Employees and Commercial Payments Branch of the Financial Management Division for the past 3 summers, I have seen the many changes that have occurred within the NASA organization. As I return each summer, I find that new programs and systems have been adapted to better serve the needs of the Center and of the Agency. The NASA Agency has transformed itself the past couple years with the implementation of the Integrated Financial Management Program (IFMP). IFMP is designed to allow the Agency to improve its management of its Financial, Physical, and Human Resources through the use of multiple enterprise module applications. With my mentor, Joseph Kan, being the branch chief of the Employees and Commercial Payments Branch, I have been exposed to several modules, such as Travel Manager, WebTads, and Core Financial/SAP, which were implemented in the last couple of years under the IFMP. The implementation of these agency-wide systems has sometimes proven to be troublesome. Prior to IFMP, each NASA Center utilizes their own systems for Payroll, Travel, Accounts Payable, etc. But with the implementation of the Integrated Financial Management Program, all the "legacy" systems had to be eliminated. As a result, a great deal of enhancement and preparation work is necessary to ease the transformation from the old systems to the new. All this work occurs simultaneously; for example, e-Payroll will "go live" in several months, but a system like Travel Manager will need to have information upgraded within the system to meet the requirements set by Headquarters. My assignments this summer have given me the opportunity to become involved with such work. So far, I have been given the opportunity to participate in projects resulting from a congressional request, several bankcard reconciliations, updating routing lists for Travel Manager, updating the majordomo list for Travel Manager approvers and point of contacts, and a NASA Headquarters project involving

  17. Routine Immunization Consultant Program in Nigeria: A Qualitative Review of a Country-Driven Management Approach for Health Systems Strengthening

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Meghan; Wonodi, Chizoba

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Since 2002, the Nigerian government has deployed consultants to states to provide technical assistance for routine immunization (RI). RI consultants are expected to play a role in supportive supervision of health facility staff, capacity building, advocacy, and monitoring and evaluation. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the RI consultant program’s strengths and weaknesses in 7 states and at the national level from June to September 2014 using semi-structured interviews and online surveys. Participants included RI consultants, RI program leaders, and implementers purposively drawn from national, state, and local government levels. Thematic analysis was used to analyze qualitative data from the interviews, which were triangulated with results from the quantitative surveys. Findings: At the time of data collection, 23 of 36 states and the federal capital territory had an RI consultant. Of the 7 states visited during the study, only 3 states had present and visibly working consultants. We conducted 84 interviews with 101 participants across the 7 states and conducted data analysis on 70 interviews (with 82 individuals) that had complete data. Among the full sample of interview respondents (N = 101), most (66%) were men with an average age of 49 years (±5.6), and the majority were technical officers (63%) but a range of other roles were also represented, including consultants (22%), directors (13%), and health workers (2%). Fifteen consultants and 44 program leaders completed the online surveys. Interview data from the 3 states with active RI consultants indicated that the consultants’ main contribution was supportive supervision at the local level, particularly for collecting and using RI data for decision making. They also acted as effective advocates for RI funding. In states without an RI consultant, gaps were highlighted in data management capacity and in monitoring of RI funds. Program design strengths: the broad terms

  18. Health supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Rolf; Gallagher, Pat

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * The actual application of supply chain practice and disciplines required for service delivery improvement within the current health environment. * A rationale for the application of Supply Chain Management (SCM) approaches to the Health sector. * The tools and methods available for supply chain analysis and benchmarking. * Key supply chain success factors.

  19. Process evaluation of the Living Green, Healthy and Thrifty (LiGHT) web-based child obesity management program: combining health promotion with ecology and economy.

    PubMed

    Jogova, Maria; Song, Joshua Eun-Soo; Campbell, Audrey Clare; Warbuton, Darren; Warshawski, Tom; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    To conduct a process evaluation of the Living Green, Healthy and Thrifty (LiGHT) program, a novel virtual child obesity management program that combines health promotion with ecology and economy (Phase 1). We carried out a mixed methods process evaluation involving qualitative and quantitative data collection in 3 phases: among 3 child-parent units, (group 1) that informed program development; 9 child-parent units (group 2) that tested the draft program and further aided program refinement; and 17 child-parent units (group 3) for a 4-week pilot of the program. In the program pilot, we assessed participants' knowledge and readiness to change pre- and postintervention and explored perceptions of the program. Participants generally felt that the online format for program delivery was convenient and accessible, the content was practical, and the integration of health-environment-economy was well received. Many parents also appreciated the involvement of the family. However, the lack of visual appeal and overabundance of text was identified as a challenge, and children/youth in particular requested assurance that their personal information (e.g. weight) was not seen by their parents. The online method of program delivery holds the unique challenge of requiring special efforts to create a sense of personal connection and community. The presence of a "Way-finder" to assist participants and discussion boards/forums are potential solutions. The LiGHT online weight management program offers an accessible, convenient weight management resource that children and families appreciate for its availability, broader educational scope, and practicality. Outcome evaluation of LiGHT will be carried out in Phase 2 of the project. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Drivers for change: Western Australia Patient Blood Management Program (WA PBMP), World Health Assembly (WHA) and Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and Availability (ACBSA).

    PubMed

    Farmer, Shannon L; Towler, Simon C; Leahy, Michael F; Hofmann, Axel

    2013-03-01

    Patient blood management is now high on national and international health-system agendas. Serious supply challenges as a result of changing population dynamics, escalating cost of blood, ongoing safety challenges and questions about transfusion efficacy and outcomes are necessitating change in transfusion practice. Numerous initiatives are underway to bring about change, including the institution of comprehensive patient blood management programmes. In 2008, the Western Australia Department of Health initiated a 5-year project to implement a comprehensive health-system-wide Patient Blood Management Program with the aim of improving patient outcomes while reducing costs. Clinically, the Program was structured on the three pillars of patient blood management, namely (1) optimising the patient's own red cell mass, (2) minimising blood loss and (3) harnessing and optimising the patient-specific anaemia reserve. It employs multiple strategies to bring about a cultural change from a blood-product focus to a patient focus. This Program was undertaken in a State that already had one of the lowest red blood cell issuance rates per 1000 population in the developed world (30.47 red blood cell units per 1000 population). The Program identified reasons and drivers for practice change. From financial years 2008-09 to 2011-12, issuance has progressively decreased in Western Australia to 27.54 units per 1000. During the same years, despite increasing activity, total issuance of red blood cells to the entire State decreased from 70,103 units to 65,742. Nationally and internationally, other initiatives are underway to bring about change and implement patient blood management. The World Health Assembly in May 2010 adopted resolution WHA63.12 endorsing patient blood management and its three-pillar application. The United States Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and Availability met in 2011 to consider the implications of this resolution and its implementation.

  1. Program audit, A management tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. J.

    1971-01-01

    Program gives in-depth view of organizational performance at all levels of the management structure, and provides means by which managers can effectively and efficiently evaluate adequacy of management direction, policies, and procedures.

  2. Concept Development for Software Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riecks, Jung; Storm, Walter; Hollingsworth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) under NASA contract NNL06AA08B, delivery order NNL07AB06T. The Concept Development for Software Health Management (CDSHM) program was a NASA funded effort sponsored by the Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project, one of the four pillars of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. The CD-SHM program focused on defining a structured approach to software health management (SHM) through the development of a comprehensive failure taxonomy that is used to characterize the fundamental failure modes of safety-critical software.

  3. Understanding potential uptake of a proposed mHealth program to support caregiver home management of childhood illness in a resource-poor setting: a qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Tirza Areli; Martin, Holly; Volpicelli, Kathryn; Frasso, Rosemary; Díaz Arroyo, Elsa Cecilia; Gozzer, Ernesto; Buttenheim, Alison M

    2017-01-01

    Extensive uptake of mobile phones offers an unprecedented opportunity to improve global healthcare delivery, especially among underserved populations. Mobile health (mHealth) has been increasingly recognized as a promising approach to addressing challenges in global maternal-child health and may play an important role in accelerating progress towards improved outcomes. However, more evidence guiding development of mHealth interventions is needed. The current study explores factors that may support or hinder adoption and use of a proposed mHealth intervention to improve caregiver home management of common childhood illnesses in order to shape program development. Elicitation interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 25 mothers recruited from a larger cluster-randomized survey sample in the Cono Norte region of Arequipa, Peru. Interview data were analyzed in Spanish to preserve important cultural nuances. Thematic analysis revealed potential facilitators of and barriers to uptake of the proposed mHealth program. Potential facilitators of caregiver participation include opportunity to engage in two-way communication with healthcare providers, development of instrumental and support knowledge to care for sick children, and healthcare challenges faced in a resource-poor community. Potential barriers include preference for in-person healthcare visits, program cost, text messaging abilities, and concern around program legitimacy. This study underscores the potential for mHealth to improve global healthcare delivery in the area of maternal-child health. It demonstrates that mHealth interventions can meet the needs of vulnerable populations by offering novel approaches to promoting evidence-based care. This in-depth understanding of factors that may influence participation and use of this proposed mHealth program will help shape development of the intervention in this community.

  4. Understanding potential uptake of a proposed mHealth program to support caregiver home management of childhood illness in a resource-poor setting: a qualitative evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Tirza Areli; Martin, Holly; Volpicelli, Kathryn; Frasso, Rosemary; Díaz Arroyo, Elsa Cecilia; Gozzer, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Background Extensive uptake of mobile phones offers an unprecedented opportunity to improve global healthcare delivery, especially among underserved populations. Mobile health (mHealth) has been increasingly recognized as a promising approach to addressing challenges in global maternal-child health and may play an important role in accelerating progress towards improved outcomes. However, more evidence guiding development of mHealth interventions is needed. The current study explores factors that may support or hinder adoption and use of a proposed mHealth intervention to improve caregiver home management of common childhood illnesses in order to shape program development. Methods Elicitation interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 25 mothers recruited from a larger cluster-randomized survey sample in the Cono Norte region of Arequipa, Peru. Interview data were analyzed in Spanish to preserve important cultural nuances. Results Thematic analysis revealed potential facilitators of and barriers to uptake of the proposed mHealth program. Potential facilitators of caregiver participation include opportunity to engage in two-way communication with healthcare providers, development of instrumental and support knowledge to care for sick children, and healthcare challenges faced in a resource-poor community. Potential barriers include preference for in-person healthcare visits, program cost, text messaging abilities, and concern around program legitimacy. Conclusions This study underscores the potential for mHealth to improve global healthcare delivery in the area of maternal-child health. It demonstrates that mHealth interventions can meet the needs of vulnerable populations by offering novel approaches to promoting evidence-based care. This in-depth understanding of factors that may influence participation and use of this proposed mHealth program will help shape development of the intervention in this community. PMID:28607905

  5. Harvest Health: Translation of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program for Older African Americans in a Senior Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Chernett, Nancy L.; Harris, Lynn Fields; Palmer, Delores; Hopkins, Paul; Dennis, Marie P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the translation of K. R. Lorig and colleagues' Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for delivery in a senior center and evaluate pre-post benefits for African American participants. Design and Methods: Modifications to the CDSMP included a name change; an additional introductory session; and course augmentations…

  6. Harvest Health: Translation of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program for Older African Americans in a Senior Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitlin, Laura N.; Chernett, Nancy L.; Harris, Lynn Fields; Palmer, Delores; Hopkins, Paul; Dennis, Marie P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the translation of K. R. Lorig and colleagues' Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) for delivery in a senior center and evaluate pre-post benefits for African American participants. Design and Methods: Modifications to the CDSMP included a name change; an additional introductory session; and course augmentations…

  7. Developing a Performance Management System for a Federal Public Health Program: The Ryan White CARE ACT Titles I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Jennifer; Marconi, Katherine; Mannle, Thomas E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an approach to introducing performance measurement into a large federal health program, the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act, in response to the government Performance and Results Act. Also discusses characteristics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic that present unique challenges for performance measurement. (SLD)

  8. Developing a Performance Management System for a Federal Public Health Program: The Ryan White CARE ACT Titles I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Jennifer; Marconi, Katherine; Mannle, Thomas E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Describes an approach to introducing performance measurement into a large federal health program, the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act, in response to the government Performance and Results Act. Also discusses characteristics of the HIV/AIDS epidemic that present unique challenges for performance measurement. (SLD)

  9. Urban-Rural Differences in the Effect of a Medicare Health Promotion and Disease Self-Management Program on Physical Function and Health Care Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Wamsley, Brenda; Liebel, Diane; Dixon, Denise; Eggert, Gerald; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent health promotion and disease self-management intervention on physical function and health care expenditures among Medicare beneficiaries. To determine if these outcomes vary by urban or rural residence. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from a 22-month randomized controlled trial of a health…

  10. Urban-Rural Differences in the Effect of a Medicare Health Promotion and Disease Self-Management Program on Physical Function and Health Care Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Hongdao; Wamsley, Brenda; Liebel, Diane; Dixon, Denise; Eggert, Gerald; Van Nostrand, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a multicomponent health promotion and disease self-management intervention on physical function and health care expenditures among Medicare beneficiaries. To determine if these outcomes vary by urban or rural residence. Design and Methods: We analyzed data from a 22-month randomized controlled trial of a health…

  11. Estimating the return on investment from a health risk management program offered to small Colorado-based employers.

    PubMed

    Goetzel, Ron Z; Tabrizi, Maryam; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Benevent, Richele; Brockbank, Claire V S; Stinson, Kaylan; Trotter, Margo; Newman, Lee S

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether changes in health risks for workers in small businesses can produce medical and productivity cost savings. A 1-year pre- and posttest study tracked changes in 10 modifiable health risks for 2458 workers at 121 Colorado businesses that participated in a comprehensive worksite health promotion program. Risk reductions were entered into a return-on-investment (ROI) simulation model. Reductions were recorded in 10 risk factors examined, including obesity (-2.0%), poor eating habits (-5.8%), poor physical activity (-6.5%), tobacco use (-1.3%), high alcohol consumption (-1.7%), high stress (-3.5%), depression (-2.3%), high blood pressure (-0.3%), high total cholesterol (-0.9%), and high blood glucose (-0.2%). The ROI model estimated medical and productivity savings of $2.03 for every $1.00 invested. Pooled data suggest that small businesses can realize a positive ROI from effective risk reduction programs.

  12. X-33/RLV System Health Management/Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouyos, William; Wangu, Srimal

    1998-01-01

    To reduce operations costs, Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVS) must include highly reliable robust subsystems which are designed for simple repair access with a simplified servicing infrastructure, and which incorporate expedited decision-making about faults and anomalies. A key component for the Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) RLV system used to meet these objectives is System Health Management (SHM). SHM incorporates Vehicle Health Management (VHM), ground processing associated with the vehicle fleet (GVHM), and Ground Infrastructure Health Management (GIHM). The primary objective of SHM is to provide an automated and paperless health decision, maintenance, and logistics system. Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company, is leading the design, development, and integration of the SHM system for RLV and for X-33 (a sub-scale, sub-orbit Advanced Technology Demonstrator). Many critical technologies are necessary to make SHM (and more specifically VHM) practical, reliable, and cost effective. This paper will present the X-33 SHM design which forms the baseline for the RLV SHM, and it will discuss applications of advanced technologies to future RLVs. In addition, this paper will describe a Virtual Design Environment (VDE) which is being developed for RLV. This VDE will allow for system design engineering, as well as program management teams, to accurately and efficiently evaluate system designs, analyze the behavior of current systems, and predict the feasibility of making smooth and cost-efficient transitions from older technologies to newer ones. The RLV SHM design methodology will reduce program costs, decrease total program life-cycle time, and ultimately increase mission success.

  13. X-33/RLV System Health Management/Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouyos, William; Wangu, Srimal

    1998-01-01

    To reduce operations costs, Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVS) must include highly reliable robust subsystems which are designed for simple repair access with a simplified servicing infrastructure, and which incorporate expedited decision-making about faults and anomalies. A key component for the Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) RLV system used to meet these objectives is System Health Management (SHM). SHM incorporates Vehicle Health Management (VHM), ground processing associated with the vehicle fleet (GVHM), and Ground Infrastructure Health Management (GIHM). The primary objective of SHM is to provide an automated and paperless health decision, maintenance, and logistics system. Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company, is leading the design, development, and integration of the SHM system for RLV and for X-33 (a sub-scale, sub-orbit Advanced Technology Demonstrator). Many critical technologies are necessary to make SHM (and more specifically VHM) practical, reliable, and cost effective. This paper will present the X-33 SHM design which forms the baseline for the RLV SHM, and it will discuss applications of advanced technologies to future RLVs. In addition, this paper will describe a Virtual Design Environment (VDE) which is being developed for RLV. This VDE will allow for system design engineering, as well as program management teams, to accurately and efficiently evaluate system designs, analyze the behavior of current systems, and predict the feasibility of making smooth and cost-efficient transitions from older technologies to newer ones. The RLV SHM design methodology will reduce program costs, decrease total program life-cycle time, and ultimately increase mission success.

  14. Decline in mortality with the Belize Integrated Patient-Centred Country Wide Health Information System (BHIS) with embedded program management.

    PubMed

    Graven, Michael; Allen, Peter; Smith, Ian; MacDonald, Noni E

    2013-10-01

    Belize deployed a country-wide fully integrated patient centred health information system with eight embedded disease management algorithms and simple analytics in 2007 for $4 (Cad)/citizen. This study evaluated BHIS uptake by health care workers, and pre and post BHIS deployment mortality in selected areas and public health care expenditures. BHIS encounter data were compared to encounter data from required Ministry of Health reports from licensed health care entities. De-identified vital statistics death data for the eight BHIS protocol disease domains and three non-protocol domains were compared from 2005 to 2011. Belize population data came from the Statistical Institute of Belize (2005-2009) and from Belize census (2010) and estimate (2011). Public health system expenditures were compared by fiscal years (2000-2012). BHIS captured over 90% healthcare encounters by year one, 95% by year two. Mortality rates decreased in the eight BHIS protocol domains (each 2005 vs. 2011, all p<0.02) vs. an increase or little change in the three domains without protocols. Hypertension related deaths dropped from 1st cause of death in 2003 to 9th by 2010. Public expenditures on healthcare steadily rose until 2009 but then declined slightly for the next 3 years. For modest investment, BHIS was well accepted nationwide and following deployment, mortality in the eight BHIS disease management algorithm domains declined significantly and expenditures on public healthcare stabilized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A comprehensive approach to corporate health management.

    PubMed

    Dalton, B A; Harris, J S

    1991-03-01

    The Northern Telecom Inc. Health, Safety and Environment program is an integrated, cross-functional approach to the management of health and health-related risks. We describe the key structural elements of the program and some preliminary data using survey and insurance claims data to follow changes in health-risk factors and diagnosis-specific costs during 5 years of operation of this comprehensive safety, industrial hygiene, primary care, disease prevention, and health promotion program. A pilot study demonstrated significant improvements in risk factors, health service use, and health-related costs. On a company-wide basis, there have been similar changes. We compare these results to published data and discuss possible reasons for the improvements in risks and costs. We conclude that a comprehensive information and skill-building program aimed at management as well as employees and dependents generates synergistic cost-beneficial change.

  16. Farm and Family Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This teacher's guide contains four units for the farm and family management program, a three-year educational program through which farm families have the opportunity to participate in group and individualized instruction. The program is intended to help provide basic farm and home management information to farm families to meet the changes of the…

  17. Management Internship Program: A Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabezensky, Ferne; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examines the Maricopa Community College District's management internship program, detailing the history and operation of the program. Describes program eligibility criteria, the intern's role as Vice Chancellor for Human Services, the provision of a graduate course in management, the rotation of assignments, intern projects, and evaluation.…

  18. Vehicle health management technology needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Jones, W. G.

    1992-03-01

    Background material on vehicle health management (VHM) and health monitoring/control is presented. VHM benefits are described and a list of VHM technology needs that should be pursued is presented. The NASA funding process as it impacts VHM technology funding is touched upon, and the VHM architecture guidelines for generic launch vehicles are described. An example of a good VHM architecture, design, and operational philosophy as it was conceptualized for the National Launch System program is presented. Consideration is given to the Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group's role in VHM, earth-to-orbit, and space vehicle avionics technology development considerations, and some actual examples of VHM benefits for checkout are given.

  19. Vehicle health management technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Jones, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Background material on vehicle health management (VHM) and health monitoring/control is presented. VHM benefits are described and a list of VHM technology needs that should be pursued is presented. The NASA funding process as it impacts VHM technology funding is touched upon, and the VHM architecture guidelines for generic launch vehicles are described. An example of a good VHM architecture, design, and operational philosophy as it was conceptualized for the National Launch System program is presented. Consideration is given to the Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group's role in VHM, earth-to-orbit, and space vehicle avionics technology development considerations, and some actual examples of VHM benefits for checkout are given.

  20. Vehicle health management technology needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Jones, W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Background material on vehicle health management (VHM) and health monitoring/control is presented. VHM benefits are described and a list of VHM technology needs that should be pursued is presented. The NASA funding process as it impacts VHM technology funding is touched upon, and the VHM architecture guidelines for generic launch vehicles are described. An example of a good VHM architecture, design, and operational philosophy as it was conceptualized for the National Launch System program is presented. Consideration is given to the Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group's role in VHM, earth-to-orbit, and space vehicle avionics technology development considerations, and some actual examples of VHM benefits for checkout are given.

  1. The employer's case for health management.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Christopher H

    2006-01-01

    Employers' past solutions to rising health benefit costs--adopting managed care strategies, cost shifting to employees and reducing benefits-are no longer effectively controlling costs and are depressing the value of health benefits for employee recruitment and retention. An alternative strategy is to implement health management approaches that improve the health status of employees. These programs reduce medical costs and have a documented positive impact on workers' compensation, disability costs, absenteeism and productivity. Further, this approach is complementary to health care consumerism as a strategy for health improvement and benefit cost reduction and results in improved employee health, outlook and satisfaction.

  2. Impact of a hypertension management/health promotion program on commercial driver's license employees of a self-insured utility company.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Robert S; Richerson, Gerald T; Hadker, Nandini; Greene, Beth L; Brown, T Michelle; Foster, Talia S; Turner, Beverly H; Skrepnek, Samantha H; Doyle, Joseph J

    2008-03-01

    Federal regulations governing transportation safety disqualify commercial drivers with persistent uncontrolled hypertension. We sought to determine whether a hypertension management and health promotion program designed for commercial drivers improved blood pressure (BP) outcomes among drivers employed by a self-insured utility company. This retrospective study examined the employment-related medical examinations of 501 randomly selected commercial drivers for measurements of BP, height, and weight taken before and after the intervention. After the program, significantly fewer employees had uncontrolled hypertension according to the Department of Transportation hypertension guidelines (17.2% vs 26.1%, P < 0.01). This improvement was consistent across subgroups defined by diabetes, obesity, and use of antihypertensive medication. An education program improved control of BP among commercial drivers, improving their health and safety, and reducing the number at high risk of medical disqualification.

  3. Impact of a chronic disease self-management program on health care utilization in rural communities: a retrospective cohort study using linked administrative data.

    PubMed

    Jaglal, Susan B; Guilcher, Sara J T; Hawker, Gillian; Lou, Wendy; Salbach, Nancy M; Manno, Michael; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2014-05-01

    Internationally, chronic disease self-management programs (CDSMPs) have been widely promoted with the assumption that confident, knowledgeable patients practicing self-management behavior will experience improved health and utilize fewer healthcare resources. However, there is a paucity of published data supporting this claim and the majority of the evidence is based on self-report. We used a retrospective cohort study using linked administrative health data. Data from 104 tele-CDSMP participants from 13 rural and remote communities in the province of Ontario, Canada were linked to administrative databases containing emergency department (ED) and physician visits and hospitalizations. Patterns of health care utilization prior to and after participation in the tele-CDSMP were compared. Poisson Generalized Estimating Equations regression was used to examine the impact of the tele-CDSMP on health care utilization after adjusting for covariates. There were no differences in patterns of health care utilization before and after participating in the tele-CDSMP. Among participants ≤ 66 years, however, there was a 34% increase in physician visits in the 12 months following the program (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.11-1.61) and a trend for decreased ED visits in those >66 years (OR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.33-1.06). This is the first study to examine health care use following participation in the CDSMP in a Canadian population and to use administrative data to measure health care utilization. Similar to other studies that used self-report measures to evaluate health care use we found no differences in health care utilization before and after participation in the CDSMP. Future research needs to confirm our findings and examine the impact of the CDSMP on health care utilization in different age groups to help to determine whether these interventions are more effective with select population groups.

  4. Crisis prevention management: a program to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint in an inpatient mental health setting.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Maureen; Taylor, Karin; Parks, Joyce

    2009-03-01

    The use of seclusion and restraint in the treatment of mentally ill patients is a highly controversial and potentially dangerous practice. A group of direct care psychiatric nurses in a large urban teaching hospital created an evidenced-based performance improvement program that resulted in a decrease in the use of seclusion and restraint. No additional funds were required to develop this program. The public health prevention model was the framework utilized. Early results show a 75% reduction in the use of seclusion and restraint with no increase in patient or staff injuries since its implementation.

  5. Can a disease-specific education program augment self-management skills and improve Health-Related Quality of Life in people with hip or knee osteoarthritis?

    PubMed

    Osborne, Richard H; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Ackerman, Ilana N

    2006-11-30

    Patient education and self-management programs are offered in many countries to people with chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis (OA). The most well-known is the disease-specific Stanford Arthritis Self-Management Program (ASMP). While Australian and international clinical guidelines promote the concept of self-management for OA, there is currently little evidence to support the use of the ASMP. Several meta-analyses have reported that arthritis self-management programs had minimal or no effect on reducing pain and disability. However, previous studies have had methodological shortcomings including the use of outcome measures which do not accurately reflect program goals. Additionally, limited cost-effectiveness analyses have been undertaken and the cost-utility of the program has not been explored. This study is a randomised controlled trial to determine the efficacy (in terms of Health-Related Quality of Life and self-management skills) and cost-utility of a 6-week group-based Stanford ASMP for people with hip or knee OA. Six hundred participants referred to an orthopaedic surgeon or rheumatologist for hip or knee OA will be recruited from outpatient clinics at 2 public hospitals and community-based private practices within 2 private hospital settings in Victoria, Australia. Participants must be 18 years or over, fluent in English and able to attend ASMP sessions. Exclusion criteria include cognitive dysfunction, previous participation in self-management programs and placement on a waiting list for joint replacement surgery or scheduled joint replacement.Eligible, consenting participants will be randomised to an intervention group (who receive the ASMP and an arthritis self-management book) or a control group (who receive the book only). Follow-up will be at 6 weeks, 3 months and 12 months using standardised self-report measures. The primary outcome is Health-Related Quality of Life at 12 months, measured using the Assessment of Quality of Life instrument

  6. Space radiation health program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Radiation Health Program intends to establish the scientific basis for the radiation protection of humans engaged in the exploration of space, with particular emphasis on the establishment of a firm knowledge base to support cancer risk assessment for future planetary exploration. This document sets forth the technical and management components involved in the implementation of the Space Radiation Health Program, which is a major part of the Life Sciences Division (LSD) effort in the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). For the purpose of implementing this program, the Life Sciences Division supports scientific research into the fundamental mechanisms of radiation effects on living systems and the interaction of radiation with cells, tissues, and organs, and the development of instruments and processes for measuring radiation and its effects. The Life Sciences Division supports researchers at universities, NASA field centers, non-profit research institutes and national laboratories; establishes interagency agreements for cooperative use and development of facilities; and conducts a space-based research program using available and future spaceflight vehicles.

  7. Environment, safety and health, management and organization compliance assessment, West Valley Demonstration Program, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    An Environment, Safety and Health Tiger Team'' Assessment was conducted at the West Valley Demonstration Project. The Tiger Team was chartered to conduct an onsite, independent assessment of WVDP's environment, safety and health (ES H) programs to assure compliance with applicable Federal and State laws, regulations, and standards, and Department of Energy Orders. The objective is to provide to the Secretary of Energy the following information: current ES H compliance status of each facility; specific noncompliance items; root causes'' for noncompliance items; evaluation of the adequacy of ES H organization and resources (DOE and contractor) and needed modifications; and where warranted, recommendations for addressing identified problem areas.

  8. An Operational Safety and Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhorchak, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes safety/health program activities at Research Triangle Institute (North Carolina). These include: radioisotope/radiation and hazardous chemical/carcinogen use, training, monitoring, disposal; chemical waste management; air monitoring and analysis; medical program; fire safety/training, including emergency planning; Occupational Safety and…

  9. Overview of the Forest Health Monitoring Program

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Mangold

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Forest Health Monitoring Program (FHM), a partnership among the USDA Forest Service, State Foresters, universities, and the USDI Bureau of Land Management. The purpose of FHM is to annually assess the condition of the Nation's forested ecosystems in a standardized way. There are four components of the program-Detection...

  10. Overview of the forest health monitoring program

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Mangold

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Forest Health Monitoring Program (FHM), a partnership among the USDA Forest Service, State Foresters, universities, and the USDI Bureau of Land Management. The purpose of FHM is to annually assess the condition of the nation's forested ecosystems in a standardized way. There are four components of the program - Detection...

  11. An Operational Safety and Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhorchak, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes safety/health program activities at Research Triangle Institute (North Carolina). These include: radioisotope/radiation and hazardous chemical/carcinogen use, training, monitoring, disposal; chemical waste management; air monitoring and analysis; medical program; fire safety/training, including emergency planning; Occupational Safety and…

  12. MANAGING THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMMING EFFORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUMMLER, GEARY A.; AND OTHERS

    THE COMPENDIUM OF CASE HISTORIES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS DESCRIBES ATTEMPTS BY GRADUATES OF A PROGRAMING WORKSHOP TO SOLVE MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS IN THEIR OWN ORGANIZATIONS. AREAS OF DISCUSSION ARE--BEHAVIORAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT, THE PROGRAMING PROCESS, CONTRACT (CUSTOM-MADE) PROGRAMS,…

  13. MANAGING THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMMING EFFORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RUMMLER, GEARY A.; AND OTHERS

    THE COMPENDIUM OF CASE HISTORIES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS DESCRIBES ATTEMPTS BY GRADUATES OF A PROGRAMING WORKSHOP TO SOLVE MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS IN THEIR OWN ORGANIZATIONS. AREAS OF DISCUSSION ARE--BEHAVIORAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT, THE PROGRAMING PROCESS, CONTRACT (CUSTOM-MADE) PROGRAMS,…

  14. Cybersecurity Challenges for Program Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    41 Defense AT&L: September–October 2014 Cybersecurity Challenges for Program Managers Steve Mills n Rob Goldsmith Mills is a former program...University. Goldsmith is a systems engineer and currently the Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center Cybersecurity Lead at...Redstone Arsenal, Ala. Cybersecurity threats to Department of De-fense (DoD) acquisi-tion programs are both challenging and com- plex. Program managers (PMs

  15. Formative evaluation of a proposed mHealth program for childhood illness management in a resource-limited setting in Peru.

    PubMed

    Calderón, T A; Martin, H; Volpicelli, K; Diaz, C; Gozzer, E; Buttenheim, A M

    2015-08-01

    To conduct a formative evaluation of a proposed mobile health (mHealth) program designed to educate caregivers about management of common childhood illnesses. A cluster-randomized sample (n = 220) of mothers in Cono Norte, Arequipa, Peru with at least one child under five completed an iPad-based survey. This descriptive study examined trends in mobile phone ownership and feasibility of and interest in mHealth across sociodemographic categories. Fisher's exact tests were used to evaluate associations. Univariate logistic regression models were fitted to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Of 220 participants, 82.3% and 95.0% reported mobile phone ownership and access, respectively. Ownership was significantly associated with educational level (P = 0.031); however, even among mothers with the lowest education, ownership approached 80%. Educational level and age, respectively, were associated with the ability to open (P < 0.001; P < 0.001), read (P < 0.001; P < 0.001), write (P < 0.001; P < 0.001), and send (P = 0.006; P = 0.047) text messages. Over 85% of mothers were interested in using their mobile phones to receive health advice for their child and to seek help during illness. Regression analyses revealed that ability to use a mobile phone was positively associated with the mother's intention to participate in the mHealth program. The study findings confirm widespread access to mobile phones and sufficient ability to utilize text messaging within this population of caregivers. In addition to access and feasibility, high levels of interest in using mobile phones for health-related purposes suggest the potential value associated with an mHealth program designed to improve childhood illness management in this community.

  16. Efficacy of a pilot Internet-based weight management program (H.E.A.L.T.H.) and longitudinal physical fitness data in Army Reserve soldiers.

    PubMed

    Newton, Robert L; Han, Hongmei; Stewart, Tiffany M; Ryan, Donna H; Williamson, Donald A

    2011-09-01

    The primary aims of this article are to describe the utilization of an Internet-based weight management Web site [Healthy Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle Training Headquarters (H.E.A.L.T.H.)] over a 12-27 month period and to describe concurrent weight and fitness changes in Army Reserve soldiers. The H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site was marketed to Army Reserve soldiers via a Web site promotion program for 27 months (phase I) and its continued usage was observed over a subsequent 12-month period (phase II). Web site usage was obtained from the H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site. Weight and fitness data were extracted from the Regional Level Application Software (RLAS). A total of 1499 Army Reserve soldiers registered on the H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site. There were 118 soldiers who returned to the H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site more than once. Registration rate reduced significantly following the removal of the Web site promotion program. During phase I, 778 Army Reserve soldiers had longitudinal weight and fitness data in RLAS. Men exceeding the screening table weight gained less weight compared with men below it (p < .007). Percentage change in body weight was inversely associated with change in fitness scores. The Web site promotion program resulted in 52% of available Army Reserve soldiers registering onto the H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site, and 7.9% used the Web site more than once. The H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site may be a viable population-based weight and fitness management tool for soldier use. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  17. Efficacy of a Pilot Internet-Based Weight Management Program (H.E.A.L.T.H.) and Longitudinal Physical Fitness Data in Army Reserve Soldiers

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Robert L; Han, Hongmei; Stewart, Tiffany M; Ryan, Donna H; Williamson, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Background The primary aims of this article are to describe the utilization of an Internet-based weight management Web site [Healthy Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle Training Headquarters (H.E.A.L.T.H.)] over a 12–27 month period and to describe concurrent weight and fitness changes in Army Reserve soldiers. Methods The H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site was marketed to Army Reserve soldiers via a Web site promotion program for 27 months (phase I) and its continued usage was observed over a subsequent 12-month period (phase II). Web site usage was obtained from the H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site. Weight and fitness data were extracted from the Regional Level Application Software (RLAS). Results A total of 1499 Army Reserve soldiers registered on the H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site. There were 118 soldiers who returned to the H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site more than once. Registration rate reduced significantly following the removal of the Web site promotion program. During phase I, 778 Army Reserve soldiers had longitudinal weight and fitness data in RLAS. Men exceeding the screening table weight gained less weight compared with men below it (p < .007). Percentage change in body weight was inversely associated with change in fitness scores. Conclusions The Web site promotion program resulted in 52% of available Army Reserve soldiers registering onto the H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site, and 7.9% used the Web site more than once. The H.E.A.L.T.H. Web site may be a viable population-based weight and fitness management tool for soldier use. PMID:22027327

  18. Hanford Environmental Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    DeFigh-Price, C.

    1989-09-01

    The Hanford Environmental Management Program (HEMP) was established in November 1986 by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has been assigned responsibility to manage this program. The program`s goal is to integrate environmental activities such as reporting and planning and to facilitate compliance with environmental regulations. This document describes the scope of work funded by this program for Fiscal Year (FY) 1990, presents the prioritized tasks covered, the management structure in place and the assessment allocation methodology used to determine the FY 1990 assessments. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Nurse managed occupational health centers: an overview.

    PubMed

    Wachs, J E

    1997-10-01

    1. Nurse managed centers provide clients with direct access to professional nursing care. 2. Lillian Wald, Mary Breckenridge, and Margaret Sanger established nurse managed centers at the beginning of this century. 3. Primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention programs and services are based on the mission, outcomes, staffing, and financing of the occupational health center. 4. Essential parameters for comprehensively evaluating an occupational health nurse managed center include, client outcomes, client satisfaction, and cost-benefit.

  20. FLUOR HANFORD SAFETY MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    GARVIN, L. J.; JENSEN, M. A.

    2004-04-13

    This document summarizes safety management programs used within the scope of the ''Project Hanford Management Contract''. The document has been developed to meet the format and content requirements of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses''. This document provides summary descriptions of Fluor Hanford safety management programs, which Fluor Hanford nuclear facilities may reference and incorporate into their safety basis when producing facility- or activity-specific documented safety analyses (DSA). Facility- or activity-specific DSAs will identify any variances to the safety management programs described in this document and any specific attributes of these safety management programs that are important for controlling potentially hazardous conditions. In addition, facility- or activity-specific DSAs may identify unique additions to the safety management programs that are needed to control potentially hazardous conditions.

  1. Flight crew health stabilization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooley, B. C.; Mccollum, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The flight crew health stabilization program was developed to minimize or eliminate the possibility of adverse alterations in the health of flight crews during immediate preflight, flight, and postflight periods. The elements of the program, which include clinical medicine, immunology, exposure prevention, and epidemiological surveillance, are discussed briefly. No crewmember illness was reported for the missions for which the program was in effect.

  2. Estimating the Return on Investment From a Health Risk Management Program Offered to Small Colorado-Based Employers

    PubMed Central

    Goetzel, Ron Z.; Tabrizi, Maryam; Henke, Rachel Mosher; Benevent, Richele; Brockbank, Claire v. S.; Stinson, Kaylan; Trotter, Margo; Newman, Lee S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether changes in health risks for workers in small businesses can produce medical and productivity cost savings. Methods A 1-year pre- and posttest study tracked changes in 10 modifiable health risks for 2458 workers at 121 Colorado businesses that participated in a comprehensive worksite health promotion program. Risk reductions were entered into a return-on-investment (ROI) simulation model. Results Reductions were recorded in 10 risk factors examined, including obesity (−2.0%), poor eating habits (−5.8%), poor physical activity (−6.5%), tobacco use (−1.3%), high alcohol consumption (−1.7%), high stress (−3.5%), depression (−2.3%), high blood pressure (−0.3%), high total cholesterol (−0.9%), and high blood glucose (−0.2%). The ROI model estimated medical and productivity savings of $2.03 for every $1.00 invested. Conclusions Pooled data suggest that small businesses can realize a positive ROI from effective risk reduction programs. PMID:24806569

  3. Appraisal and evaluation of the workshop instruction program for untrained health sciences library managers in Region VIII: 1976-1978.

    PubMed

    Gadzikowski, C

    1982-04-01

    A study was conducted to determine whether the basic skills workshop offered by the Midcontinental Regional Medical Library Program from 1976 through 1978 should be revised. Results indicated that a majority of workshop participants were library managers in hospitals with under 200 beds. Workshop attendance was most helpful in libraries where new services were initiated after the workshop, although existing services (particularly interlibrary loan) were noticeably improved. Cataloging was considered to be the most useful workshop topic by former participants. Increased emphasis on administrative functions and on the provision of reference services was recommended.

  4. Volunteer Management Support Program Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    This handbook is intended to serve as a guide for governing the operation and management of the Volunteer Management Support Program (VMSP). Outlined in the section on program guidelines are the structure and operations of the VMSP. The remainder of the guide, which deals with volunteer guidelines, explains VMSP volunteer responsibilities,…

  5. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Amending program manager's management... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1017 Amending program manager's management specifications. (a... specifications; or (2) The program manager applies for the amendment of any management specifications, and the...

  6. Measuring and Tracking Education Program Implementation: The Minnesota Heart Health Program Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnegan, John R., Jr.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on efforts by the Minnesota Heart Health Program to develop a system that permitted tracking educational program contacts, its implementation, and its use to make management decisions about program activities. (JOW)

  7. Measuring and Tracking Education Program Implementation: The Minnesota Heart Health Program Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnegan, John R., Jr.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reports on efforts by the Minnesota Heart Health Program to develop a system that permitted tracking educational program contacts, its implementation, and its use to make management decisions about program activities. (JOW)

  8. Competency Identification, Evaluation & Improvement for Corporate Health Program Fitness Specialists: Health Education Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golaszewski, Thomas; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The Xerox Corporation's Health Management Program (XHMP), designed to maintain and improve employee fitness, is described. Competencies specific to the health educator function of the fitness specialist, who assists XHMP clients in their fitness programs, are outlined. (CJ)

  9. The Effect of Stress Management Program Using Cognitive Behavior Approach on Mental Health of the Mothers of the Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Zarei, Shekufe; Alavi Shooshtari, Ali; Vossoughi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in children. Objectives: The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management program using cognitive behavior approach on mental health of the mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Patients and Methods: In this interventional study, 90 mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were randomly allocated into three intervention, placebo, and control groups. The general health questionnaire was used to measure mental health. Besides, stress was assessed through the depression-anxiety-stress scale. The two instruments were completed at baseline, immediately after, and one month after the intervention by the mothers. Afterwards, within group comparisons were made using one-sample repeated measurement ANOVA. One-way ANOVA was used for inter group comparisons. Mothers in the placebo group only participated in meetings to talk and express feelings without receiving any interventions. Results: At the baseline, no significant difference was found among the three groups regarding the means of stress, anxiety, depression, and mental health. However, a significant difference was observed in the mean score of stress immediately after the intervention (P = 0.033). The results also showed a significant difference among the three groups regarding the mean score of mental health (P < 0.001). One month after the intervention, the mean difference of mental health score remained significant only in the intervention group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The study findings confirmed the effectiveness of stress management program utilizing cognitive behavior approach in mental health of the mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:26199709

  10. The Effect of Stress Management Program Using Cognitive Behavior Approach on Mental Health of the Mothers of the Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Zarei, Shekufe; Alavi Shooshtari, Ali; Vossoughi, Mehrdad

    2015-06-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in children. The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of stress management program using cognitive behavior approach on mental health of the mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In this interventional study, 90 mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder were randomly allocated into three intervention, placebo, and control groups. The general health questionnaire was used to measure mental health. Besides, stress was assessed through the depression-anxiety-stress scale. The two instruments were completed at baseline, immediately after, and one month after the intervention by the mothers. Afterwards, within group comparisons were made using one-sample repeated measurement ANOVA. One-way ANOVA was used for inter group comparisons. Mothers in the placebo group only participated in meetings to talk and express feelings without receiving any interventions. At the baseline, no significant difference was found among the three groups regarding the means of stress, anxiety, depression, and mental health. However, a significant difference was observed in the mean score of stress immediately after the intervention (P = 0.033). The results also showed a significant difference among the three groups regarding the mean score of mental health (P < 0.001). One month after the intervention, the mean difference of mental health score remained significant only in the intervention group (P < 0.001). The study findings confirmed the effectiveness of stress management program utilizing cognitive behavior approach in mental health of the mothers of the children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  11. GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.

    SciTech Connect

    PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

    2002-05-31

    THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

  12. The Ramathibodi Community Health Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buri, Prem; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The Ramathibodi Faculty of Medicine in Bangkok, Thailand, has developed a teaching and research program in community health aimed at brining the institution into close association with the health needs of the country. (Editor)

  13. Lessons from a community-based mHealth diabetes self-management program: "it's not just about the cell phone".

    PubMed

    Katz, Richard; Mesfin, Tsega; Barr, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Cell phone-assisted self-management of diabetes offers a new approach to improving chronic care; however, introducing this new technology presents many challenges to a health care team. The George Washington University-District of Columbia Cell Phone Diabetes Project enrolled 32 patients with Type 2 diabetes from a community clinic using patients' cell phones connected to the Well Doc Diabetes Manager System with monitoring by case managers and monthly reports to primary care providers. Despite monetary incentives (cell phone rebates), dropout rate was high (50%), because of lack of use or inability to afford low-cost cell phone service. Active patients had sustained system use with improved diabetes standard-of-care goals and reduced hospitalizations and emergency department visits. On the basis of this pilot program, the authors assessed the multiple links in the chain (patients, case managers, primary care providers, support staff, medical record systems, disease management software, cell phones) that affect the success of a mHealth chronic care strategy.

  14. Joint Program Management Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    program examples include the Joint Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (JTUAV), Joint Lethal Strike (JLS), V22 Osprey , Joint Sur- veillance Target Attack...military departments, are also con- sidered Components in their own right. In most joint programs, a “lead” Component is designated to cen- trally...all program direction and funding has single source Single-Component program; interest from other Component(s) manifested by their designation of a

  15. Migrant Health - Legislation and Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    The Public Health Service Act was amended in 1962 to authorize grants to establish family health service clinics for domestic agricultural migratory workers and to improve the health conditions of these workers and their families. Approximately 100 programs currently provide migrant health services. As a result of the low level of funding of these…

  16. Assessment of proximal outcomes of self-management programs: translation and psychometric evaluation of a German version of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ™).

    PubMed

    Schuler, Michael; Musekamp, Gunda; Faller, Hermann; Ehlebracht-König, Inge; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Kirchhof, Roland; Bengel, Jürgen; Nolte, Sandra; Osborne, Richard H; Schwarze, Monika

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the translation, cultural adaption, and psychometric evaluation of a German version of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ™), a widely used generic instrument assessing a wide range of proximal outcomes of self-management programs. The translation was carried out according to international standards and included forward and backward translations. Comprehensibility and content validity were tested using cognitive interviews with 10 rehabilitation inpatients. Psychometric properties were examined in rehabilitation inpatients (n = 1,202) with a range of chronic conditions. Factorial validity was assessed using confirmatory factor analysis; concurrent validity was explored by correlations with comparator scales. The items of the German heiQ™ were well understood by rehabilitation inpatients. The structure of the eight heiQ™ scales was replicated after minor adjustment. heiQ™ scales had higher correlations with comparator scales with similar constructs, particularly mental health concepts than with physical health. Moreover, all heiQ™ scales differentiated between individuals across different levels of depression. The German heiQ™ is comprehensible for German-speaking patients suffering from different types of chronic conditions; it assesses relevant outcomes of self-management programs in a reliable and valid manner. Further studies involving its practical application are warranted.

  17. On Management Matters: Why We Must Improve Public Health Management Through Action: Comment on "Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health".

    PubMed

    Willacy, Erika; Bratton, Shelly

    2015-09-30

    Public health management is a pillar of public health practice. Only through effective management can research, theory, and scientific innovation be translated into successful public health action. With this in mind, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed an innovative program called Improving Public Health Management for Action (IMPACT) which aims to address this critical need by building an effective cadre of public health managers to work alongside scientists to prepare for and respond to disease threats and to effectively implement public health programs. IMPACT is a 2-year, experiential learning program that provides fellows with the management tools and opportunities to apply their new knowledge in the field, all while continuing to serve the Ministry of Health (MoH). IMPACT will launch in 2016 in 2 countries with the intent of expanding to additional countries in future years resulting in a well-trained cadre of public health managers around the world.

  18. Communicating Risk to Program Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, C. Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Program Managers (PM) can protect program resources and improve chances of success by anticipating, understanding and managing risks. Understanding the range of potential risks helps one to avoid or manage the risks. A PM must choose which risks to accept to reduce fire fighting, must meet the expectations of stakeholders consistently, and avoid falling into costly "black holes" that may open. A good risk management process provides the PM more confidence to seize opportunities save money, meet schedule, even improve relationships with people important to the program. Evidence of managing risk and sound internal controls can mean better support from superiors for the program by building a trust and reputation from being on top of issues. Risk managers have an obligation to provide the PM with the best information possible to allow the benefits to be realized (Small Business Consortium, 2004). The Institute for Chartered Accountants in England and Wales sees very important benefits for companies in providing better information about what they do to assess and manage key business risks. Such information will: a) provide practical forward-looking information; b) reduce the cost of capital; c) encourage better risk management; and d) improve accountability for stewardship, investor protection and the usefulness of financial reporting. We are particularly convinced that enhanced risk reporting will help listed companies obtain capital at the lowest possible cost (The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England &Wales, June 2002). Risk managers can take a significant role in quantifying the success of their department and communicating those figures to executive (program) management levels while pushing for a broader risk management role. Overall, risk managers must show that risk management work matters in the most crucial place-the bottom line- as they prove risk management can be a profit center (Sullivan, 2004).

  19. Wildlife Management Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, M.B.

    1992-08-01

    This report details activities in administering Savannah River Site public lands for wildlife management. Accomplishments in administering hunts, gathering biological data, and in coordinating land use are described.

  20. Physician use of disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Wholey, Douglas R; Michail, Nina; Christianson, Jon; Knutson, David

    2005-02-01

    This paper examines differences in availability, use, and perceived usefulness of disease management programs as reported by generalist and specialist physicians functioning as primary care providers in health plans. Implications of these differences are discussed in terms of the three types of purchasers: private insurers, Medicare, and Medicaid. The design is a cross-sectional mail and telephone mixed-mode survey. The data come from 23 health plans in five states (Florida, New York, Colorado, Pennsylvania, and Washington), including six metropolitan areas: Seattle, New York City, Miami, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and Denver. The study participants are 1,244 generalist and specialist physicians who contracted with health plans as primary care providers. They were drawn from a 2001 mail and telephone survey of 2,105 generalist and 1,693 specialist physicians serving commercial, Medicaid, and Medicare patients. Physician responses about use of disease management for their patients in the health plan and how useful they thought it was were regressed on physician, physician organization, and physician-health plan relationship characteristics. While generalist physicians are likely to report having disease management programs available and using them, specialists vary greatly in their response to the disease management programs. In contrast to physicians associated with commercial plans, implementation of disease management programs among physicians associated with Medicaid plans varied across states. Primary care providers trained in generalist areas of practice are more likely than specialists functioning as primary care providers to report that disease management programs are available and to use them. They also find them more useful than do specialists.

  1. New developments concerning health care financial management.

    PubMed

    Drati, Nathan; Kleiner, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Managed care has become one of the leading developments in health care financial management, but ignorance and confusion surround its meaning and origins. Managed care seeks to reduced costs and increase profits while maintaining quality, yet the evidence that it is able to achieve these aims is mixed. The following analysis is a review of the events leading to the establishment of managed care and what it has become. Various terms and health care organizations involved in managed care are identified, with emphasis placed on the strengths and weaknesses of managed care programs. This analysis is performed to gain insight and better understanding of the direction health care financial management is headed in the 21st century.

  2. A review and analysis of the clinical- and cost-effectiveness studies of comprehensive health promotion and disease management programs at the worksite: 1998-2000 update.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, K R

    2001-01-01

    This article is the fifth in a series of critical reviews of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness studies of comprehensive, multifactorial health promotion and disease management programs conducted in worksites. As with the previous reviews, the purpose of this article is to review and assess the randomized control trials that have focused on both clinical and cost outcomes of worksite health promotion and disease management programs. For this current review, a new category of quasi-experimental studies has been added because this represents a major new trend in such interventions over the last 2 years. Comprehensive worksite programs are those that provide an ongoing, integrated program of health promotion and disease prevention that integrates specific components into a coherent, ongoing program that is consistent with corporate objectives and includes program evaluations of both clinical and cost outcomes. A comprehensive search was conducted using a multistage process that included MEDLINE, ERIC, ADI, EDGAR, CARL, Inform, and Lexis-Nexis databases and direct inquiries to worksite researchers. The search identified 27 new studies to which the following inclusion criteria were applied: research conducted in the United States; results published in English; methodological quality of nonexperimental (pre- and postmeasures but no comparison group); quasi-experimental to randomized control trials; and both clinical and cost outcomes. Exclusion criteria were studies outside of the United States; non-English publications; and clinical or cost outcomes only. Fifteen studies remained for this review. FINDINGS EXTRACTION METHODS: Findings extraction and analysis of the 15 studies was done by extracting the relevant population, intervention design, clinical results, and cost outcomes from the published article. As in previous reviews, findings are summarized in a table format that extracts and describes each study by the following: (1) study author(s); (2

  3. Environmental Management Science Program Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This program summary book is a compendium of project summaries submitted by principal investigators in the Environmental Management Science Program and Environmental Management/Energy Research Pilot Collaborative Research Program (Wolf-Broido Program). These summaries provide information about the most recent project activities and accomplishments. All projects will be represented at the workshop poster sessions, so you will have an opportunity to meet with the researchers. The projects will be presented in the same order at the poster session as they are presented in this summary book. Detailed questions about an individual project may be directed to the investigators involved.

  4. Programmed environment management of confined microsocieties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emurian, Henry H.

    1988-01-01

    A programmed environment is described that assists the implementation and management of schedules governing access to all resources and information potentially available to members of a confined microsociety. Living and work schedules are presented that were designed to build individual and group performance repertoires in support of study objectives and sustained adaptation by participants. A variety of measurement requirements can be programmed and standardized to assure continuous assessment of the status and health of a confined microsociety.

  5. A Critical Examination of the Use of Trained Health Coaches to Decrease the Metabolic Syndrome for Participants of a Community-Based Diabetes Prevention and Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Shawley, Samantha; Ingels, John Spencer; Stewart, Jonathan; Misra, Ranjita

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the United States poses major challenge to the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Furthermore, when this is viewed in other components of the metabolic syndrome (i.e., the burden of high cholesterol and hypertension), the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome continues to rise in the USA continued challenge is how to deal with this epidemic from a medical and public health standpoint. Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) is a unique approach and offers a novel perspective for answering this challenge. A critical set of goals for CBPR is to address health disparities and social inequalities while getting community members engaged in all aspects of the research process. Utilizing the West Virginia Diabetes Prevention and Management Program and trained Health Coaches as a model, we discuss topics of consideration related to CBPR, involving trained health coaches, optimizing early adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors, and enhancing participation. Through careful project planning and design, questions regarding disparities increasing susceptibility and preventive efforts within the community can be addressed successfully. These topics are part of a broader integration of theories such as participatory research, community engagement, and outcomes measurement. The understanding of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of the metabolic syndrome can help frame an appropriate strategy for establishing long-term community-wide changes that promote health. In order to continue to improve investigations for preventing the metabolic syndrome, it will be necessary to have aggressive efforts at the individual and population level for developing culturally sensitive programs that start early and are sustainable in practical environments such as the workplace. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss practical considerations related to project design, implementation, and how to measure effectiveness in regards to

  6. A Critical Examination of the Use of Trained Health Coaches to Decrease the Metabolic Syndrome for Participants of a Community-Based Diabetes Prevention and Management Program.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Shawley, Samantha; Ingels, John Spencer; Stewart, Jonathan; Misra, Ranjita

    2016-01-01

    The epidemic of obesity and diabetes in the United States poses major challenge to the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Furthermore, when this is viewed in other components of the metabolic syndrome (i.e., the burden of high cholesterol and hypertension), the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome continues to rise in the USA continued challenge is how to deal with this epidemic from a medical and public health standpoint. Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) is a unique approach and offers a novel perspective for answering this challenge. A critical set of goals for CBPR is to address health disparities and social inequalities while getting community members engaged in all aspects of the research process. Utilizing the West Virginia Diabetes Prevention and Management Program and trained Health Coaches as a model, we discuss topics of consideration related to CBPR, involving trained health coaches, optimizing early adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors, and enhancing participation. Through careful project planning and design, questions regarding disparities increasing susceptibility and preventive efforts within the community can be addressed successfully. These topics are part of a broader integration of theories such as participatory research, community engagement, and outcomes measurement. The understanding of the pathophysiology and epidemiology of the metabolic syndrome can help frame an appropriate strategy for establishing long-term community-wide changes that promote health. In order to continue to improve investigations for preventing the metabolic syndrome, it will be necessary to have aggressive efforts at the individual and population level for developing culturally sensitive programs that start early and are sustainable in practical environments such as the workplace. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss practical considerations related to project design, implementation, and how to measure effectiveness in regards to

  7. Acceptability of contingency management among clinicians and clients within a co-occurring mental health and substance use treatment program.

    PubMed

    Srebnik, Debra; Sugar, Andrea; Coblentz, Patrick; McDonell, Michael G; Angelo, Frank; Lowe, Jessica M; Ries, Richard K; Roll, John

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence supports the effectiveness of contingency management (CM) for addictions treatment among individuals with co-occurring serious mental illness (SMI). Addiction treatment for people with SMI generally occurs within community mental health centers (CMHCs) and it is not known whether CM is acceptable within this context. Client views regarding CM are also unknown. This study is the first to describe CM acceptability among CMHC clinicians, and the first to explore client views. Clinician-level predictors of CM acceptability are also examined. This study examined views about CM among 80 clinicians and 29 clients within a CMHC within the context of a concurrent CM study. Three-quarters of clinicians reported they would use CM if funding were available. Clinicians and clients affirmed that incentives enhance abstinence motivation. Clinician CM acceptability was related to greater years of experience, and identifying as an addictions or co-occurring disorders counselor, more than a mental health clinician. The findings provide preliminary evidence that CMHC clinicians, serving clients with addictions and complicating SMI, and client participants in CM, view CM as motivating and a positive tool to facilitate recovery. As an evidence-based intervention, CM warrants further efforts toward funding and dissemination in CMHCs. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. NPS TINYSCOPE Program Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor CPT - Comprehensive Performance Test CRC - Cyclic Redundancy Check DME - Data Management Element DoD...greater than five centimeters in diameter in the low earth orbit environment. Kinetic impacts with debris objects could potentially be fatal to the...establishing a command and telemetry link with the ground station for every spacecraft contact. 4.4.4 Data Management Element ( DME ) TR-271 The DME shall

  9. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  10. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  11. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  12. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an MTMP as described in...

  13. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an MTMP as described in...

  14. Prevention through health risk management.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G M

    1992-08-01

    Risk can lead to catastrophe. Risk-management systems are highly effective in preventing the catastrophes of fire, earthquakes, and work-site injuries. No such effective systems are present to prevent health and social problems. A practical, cost-effective system to manage risk in children is being developed by the nonprofit Arizona Health Evaluation and Longevity Planning (HELP) Foundation. Information regarding such risk is collected in the school setting. This voluntary information comes from the administration, the school nurse, physical fitness testing, blood testing by the local hospital, self-esteem instruments, and parent, teacher, and child questionnaires. The HELP Foundation then develops an individual child and class risk profile that is presented to the teacher, school nurse, principal, and parent. Those involved with each child then prioritize, plan, and implement programs and activities to manage the identified risk(s). Risks is tracked throughout the child's school career by periodic reassessment. Evaluation of change in problem outcome will be a natural extension of the process.

  15. A mixed methods inquiry: How dairy farmers perceive the value(s) of their involvement in an intensive dairy herd health management program.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Erling; Enevoldsen, Carsten

    2008-12-18

    Research has been scarce when it comes to the motivational and behavioral sides of farmers' expectations related to dairy herd health management programs. The objectives of this study were to explore farmers' expectations related to participation in a health management program by: 1) identifying important ambitions, goals and subjective well-being among farmers, 2) submitting those data to a quantitative analysis thereby characterizing perspective(s) of value added by health management programs among farmers; and 3) to characterize perceptions of farmers' goals among veterinarians. The subject was initially explored by means of literature, interviews and discussions with farmers, herd health management consultants and researchers to provide an understanding (a concourse) of the research entity. The concourse was then broken down into 46 statements. Sixteen Danish dairy farmers and 18 veterinarians associated with one large nationwide veterinary practice were asked to rank the 46 statements that defined the concourse. Next, a principal component analysis was applied to identify correlated statements and thus families of perspectives between respondents. Q-methodology was utilized to represent each of the statements by one row and each respondent by one column in the matrix. A subset of the farmers participated in a series of semi-structured interviews to face validate the concourse and to discuss subjects like animal welfare, veterinarians' competences as experienced by the farmers and time constraints in the farmers' everyday life. Farmers' views could be described by four families of perspectives: Teamwork, Animal welfare, Knowledge dissemination, and Production. Veterinarians believed that farmers' primary focus was on production and profit, however, farmers' valued teamwork and animal welfare more. The veterinarians in this study appear to focus too much on financial performance and increased production when compared to most of the participating farmers

  16. Making Technology Ready: Integrated Systems Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Oliver, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper identifies work needed by developers to make integrated system health management (ISHM) technology ready and by programs to make mission infrastructure ready for this technology. This paper examines perceptions of ISHM technologies and experience in legacy programs. Study methods included literature review and interviews with representatives of stakeholder groups. Recommendations address 1) development of ISHM technology, 2) development of ISHM engineering processes and methods, and 3) program organization and infrastructure for ISHM technology evolution, infusion and migration.

  17. Quality in occupational health care: management's view.

    PubMed

    Callahan, E W

    1994-04-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a continual improvement process that requires common sense, education and training, and the ability to communicate and work as part of a team. TQM can improve all aspects of a business, including health, safety, and environmental functions. Physicians and nonphysician managers can use TQM to identify and respond to customer needs and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of programs. Examples of TQM to improve medical programs have included (1) an Audit Program that assesses medical programs and provides specific measurements ("metrics") of medical programs, and (2) a team that developed an Alternative Return-to-Work Program, which now assists in early rehabilitation of injured employees. In addition to expecting its physicians to be knowledgeable, fair, and objective, management expects them to use and understand TQM principles.

  18. Revitalizing school health programs worldwide.

    PubMed

    Benzian, Habib

    2010-10-01

    Each year, the Shils Fund recognizes outstanding activities that help improve oral health. The program is named in memory of Dr. Edward B. Shils, who led the Dental Manufacturers of America and Dental Dealers of America for more than 50 years. A 2010 Shils Award will be given to an innovative school health initiative called Fit For Schools Program (FFSP) in the Philippines. Such recognition in the US indicates the lessons that can be learned from a program initially tailored for another country. Health in a highly industrialized nation can be enhanced by heeding the FFSP principles used to craft an effective health promotion initiative. This evidence-based intervention is not exclusively an oral health initiative; it is an integration with other evidence-based health interventions and models a sustainable public-private partnership to advance positive health outcomes in socially responsible entrepreneurial ways. As the editor of this column in Compendium, I wish to applaud both leaders of FFSP: Dr. Habib Benzian and Dr. Bella Monse. The following article was written by the senior advisor, Dr. Benzian, who modestly refers to the program's receipt of another award from the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program, and the World Health Organization in 2009. To my knowledge, the presentation of that award was the first time a health promotion project led by dentists has ever received such high-level global recognition and was one of three projects so recognized for innovative solutions to global health in that year.

  19. Evaluation of an Education and Training Program to Prevent and Manage Patients’ Violence in a Mental Health Setting: A Pretest-Posttest Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Guay, Stéphane; Goncalves, Jane; Boyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Workplace violence can lead to serious consequences for victims, organizations, and society. Most workplace violence prevention programs aim to train staff to better recognize and safely manage at-risk situations. The Omega education and training program was developed in Canada in 1999, and has since been used to teach healthcare and mental health workers the skills needed to effectively intervene in situations of aggression. The present study was designed to assess the impact of Omega on employee psychological distress, confidence in coping, and perceived exposure to violence. This program was offered to 105 employees in a psychiatric hospital in Montreal, Canada. Eighty-nine of them accepted to participate. Questionnaires were completed before the training, after a short period of time (M = 109 days) and at follow-up (M = 441 days). Repeated-measures ANOVAs and Cohen’s d effect sizes were calculated. Results demonstrated statistically significant improvements in short-term and follow-up posttest scores of psychological distress, confidence in coping, and in levels of exposure to violence. This study is one of very few to demonstrate the positive impact of this training program. Further research is needed to understand how to improve the effectiveness of the program, especially among participants resistant to change. PMID:27490582

  20. Evaluation of an Education and Training Program to Prevent and Manage Patients' Violence in a Mental Health Setting: A Pretest-Posttest Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Guay, Stéphane; Goncalves, Jane; Boyer, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Workplace violence can lead to serious consequences for victims, organizations, and society. Most workplace violence prevention programs aim to train staff to better recognize and safely manage at-risk situations. The Omega education and training program was developed in Canada in 1999, and has since been used to teach healthcare and mental health workers the skills needed to effectively intervene in situations of aggression. The present study was designed to assess the impact of Omega on employee psychological distress, confidence in coping, and perceived exposure to violence. This program was offered to 105 employees in a psychiatric hospital in Montreal, Canada. Eighty-nine of them accepted to participate. Questionnaires were completed before the training, after a short period of time (M = 109 days) and at follow-up (M = 441 days). Repeated-measures ANOVAs and Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated. Results demonstrated statistically significant improvements in short-term and follow-up posttest scores of psychological distress, confidence in coping, and in levels of exposure to violence. This study is one of very few to demonstrate the positive impact of this training program. Further research is needed to understand how to improve the effectiveness of the program, especially among participants resistant to change.

  1. Multi-Dimensional Program Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    111[. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS -I963-A - R.. -- f W ______ES W mc"i 2- 0 UNCLAS I SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF THIS...let’s pass them out. * A good idea for teaching interface in Project/Program Management. * Hard to keep program objectives foremost in PM’s mind

  2. Designing a disease management program: a collaboration.

    PubMed

    Gorman, R Scott; Edwards, Fredrick; Frey, Keith

    2002-05-01

    Designing a disease management program is a complex process that can involve a variety of clinical, professional, and research skills. This paper describes a collaborative effort by Mayo Health Plan Arizona and the Mayo Clinic Scottsdale Family Medicine Residency program. Using an evidence-based approach to hypertension management, resident physicians acquired skills in three of the six core competency areas required for future physicians as defined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, Chicago. Resident involvement and feedback for this pilot curriculum were positive and the residents were confident in the skills they developed.

  3. Illinois' nonpoint source management program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Illinois Nonpoint Source (NPS) Management Program (Program) describes the statewide authorities that give the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) responsibility to develop and implement this Program. It provides a brief summary of the results of the States' NPS assessment as reported in the Illinois Water Quality Report. Included are eleven sections correlated to NPS pollution sources, or to an area of water pollution protection initiatives. These sections outline goals and objectives to be implemented in Illinois to abate NPS pollution, when possible the sections include a descriptive narrative. Included in the Program, is the process or mechanism which Illinois uses to prioritize and fund future projects. Finally, this Program identifies the federal programs that the IEPA currently reviews for consistency with statewide goals and objectives. Revisions to the Program will be made in accordance with state and federal program changes and as needed.

  4. Health system responsiveness and chronic disease care - What is the role of disease management programs? An analysis based on cross-sectional survey and administrative claims data.

    PubMed

    Röttger, Julia; Blümel, Miriam; Linder, Roland; Busse, Reinhard

    2017-07-01

    Health system responsiveness is an important aspect of health systems performance. The concept of responsiveness relates to the interpersonal and contextual aspects of health care. While disease management programs (DMPs) aim to improve the quality of health care (e.g. by improving the coordination of care), it has not been analyzed yet whether these programs improve the perceived health system responsiveness. Our study aims to close this gap by analyzing the differences in the perceived health system responsiveness between DMP-participants and non-participants. We used linked survey- and administrative claims data from 7037 patients with coronary heart disease in Germany. Of those, 5082 were enrolled and 1955 were not enrolled in the DMP. Responsiveness was assessed with an adapted version of the WHO responsiveness questionnaire in a postal survey in 2013. The survey covered 9 dimensions of responsiveness and included 17 items for each, GP and specialist care. Each item had five answer categories (very good - very bad). We handled missing values in the covariates by multiple imputation and applied propensity score matching (PSM) to control for differences between the two groups (DMP/non-DMP). We used Wilcoxon-signed-rank and McNemar test to analyze differences regarding the reported responsiveness. The PSM led to a matched and well balanced sample of 1921 pairs. Overall, DMP-participants rated the responsiveness of care more positive. The main difference was found for the coordination of care at the GP, with 62.0% of 1703 non-participants reporting a "good" or "very good" experience, compared to 69.1% of 1703 participants (p < 0.001). The results of our study indicate an overall high responsiveness for CHD-care, as well for DMP-participants as for non-participants. Yet, the results also clearly indicate that there is still a need to improve the coordination of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A Program Management Framework for Facilities Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The challenge faced by senior facility leaders is not how to execute a single project, but rather, how to successfully execute a large program consisting of hundreds of projects. Senior facilities officers at universities, school districts, hospitals, airports, and other organizations with extensive facility inventories, typically manage project…

  6. Behavioral Health Program Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveton, Lauren B.

    2006-01-01

    The project goal is to develop behavioral health prevention and maintenance system for continued crew health, safety, and performance for exploration missions. The basic scope includes a) Operationally-relevant research related to clinical cognitive and behavioral health of crewmembers; b) Ground-based studies using analog environments (Antarctic, NEEMO, simulations, and other testbeds; c) ISS studies (ISSMP) focusing on operational issues related to behavioral health outcomes and standards; d) Technology development activities for monitoring and diagnostic tools; and e) Cross-disciplinary research (e.g., human factors and habitability research, skeletal muscle, radiation).

  7. Aircrew team management program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerison, Charles; Mccann, Dick; Davies, Rod

    1987-01-01

    The key features of the Aircrew Team Management Workshop which was designed for and in consultation with Trans Australia Airlines are outlined. Five major sections are presented dealing with: (1) A profile of the airline and the designers; (2) Aircrew consultation and involvement; (3) Educational design and development; (4) Implementation and instruction; and (5) Evaluation and assessment. These areas are detailed.

  8. Changes in Weight Loss, Health Behaviors, and Intentions among 400 Participants Who Dropped out from an Insurance-Sponsored, Community-Based Weight Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Zizzi, Sam J.; Lima Fogaca, Jana; Sheehy, Tammy; Welsh, Myia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of weight management research is based on data from randomized controlled studies conducted in clinical settings. As these findings are translated into community-based settings, additional research is needed to understand patterns of lifestyle change and dropout. The purpose of this study was to examine reasons for and consequences associated with dropout (or removal) from an insurance-funded weight management program. Using a mixed methods approach with objectively measured changes in body weight and attendance along with quantitative and qualitative survey data, patterns of intention and behavior change were explored. The results from a sample of 400 respondents support the idea that there are both positive and negative consequences of program participation. Overall, 1 in 5 respondents lost a clinically significant amount of weight during the program (>5% of baseline body weight) and 1 in 3 experienced a positive consequence, while only 6% expressed a negative outcome of participation. Additionally, nearly 90% of all of the consequences that emerged from the data were positive. Attitude change was a major theme, including positive health intentions, perceived success, learning skills, and new appreciation of exercise. PMID:27413546

  9. Natural Resources Management Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-24

    Program, activity, or opportunity dependent on the natural environment. Examples are hunting, fishing, trapping, picnick- ing, birdwatching , off-road...fair market value. d. Planned forest products sales shall continue on land reported as excess until actual disposal or transfer occurs. When forested

  10. Impact of a disease-management program on symptom burden and health-related quality of life in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and their care partners.

    PubMed

    Lindell, Kathleen Oare; Olshansky, Ellen; Song, Mi-Kyung; Zullo, Thomas G; Gibson, Kevin F; Kaminski, Naftali; Hoffman, Leslie A

    2010-01-01

    Patients were recruited from the Dorothy P. and Richard P. Simmons Center for Interstitial Lung Disease, located within the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis results in scarring of the lung and respiratory failure, and has a median survival of 3 to 5 years from the time of diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and their care partners could be more optimally managed by a disease-management intervention entitled "Program to Reduce Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Symptoms and Improve Management," which nurses delivered using the format of a support group. We hypothesized that participation would improve perceptions of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and decrease symptom burden. Subjects were 42 participants randomized to an experimental (10 patient/care partner dyads) or control (11 patient/care partner dyads) group. Experimental group participants attended the 6-week program, and controls received usual care. Before and after the program, all participants completed questionnaires designed to assess symptom burden and HRQoL. Patients and care partners in the intervention group were also interviewed in their home to elicit information on their experience after participating in the Program to Reduce Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Symptoms and Improve Management. After the intervention, experimental group patients rated their HRQoL less positively (P = .038) and tended to report more anxiety (P = .077) compared with controls. Care partners rated their stress at a lower level (P = .018) compared with controls. Course evaluations were uniformly positive. Post-study qualitative interviews with experimental group participants suggested benefits not exemplified by these scores. Patient participants felt less isolated, were able to put their disease into perspective, and valued participating in research and helping others. Further exploration of the impact of disease-management

  11. Rising out-of-pocket costs in disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Chernew, Michael E; Rosen, Allison B; Fendrick, A Mark

    2006-03-01

    To document the rise in copayments for patients in disease management programs and to call attention to the inherent conflicts that exist between these 2 approaches to benefit design. Data from 2 large health plans were used to compare cost sharing in disease management programs with cost sharing outside of disease management programs. The copayments charged to participants in disease management programs usually do not differ substantially from those charged to other beneficiaries. Cost sharing and disease management result in conflicting approaches to benefit design. Increasing copayments may lead to underuse of recommended services, thereby decreasing the clinical effectiveness and increasing the overall costs of disease management programs. Policymakers and private purchasers should consider the use of targeted benefit designs when implementing disease management programs or redesigning cost-sharing provisions. Current information systems and health services research are sufficiently advanced to permit these benefit designs.

  12. The Athletic Health Care and Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Stephen G.; Schlotfeldt, John D.; Foley, Wayne E.

    1985-01-01

    The Athletic Health Care and Training Program was developed to meet the educational, organizational and record-keeping needs of the interscholastic athletic program of the Seattle Public Schools. The program components were the education of coaches, school nurses and student trainers; development of a centralized training room; implementation of written procedures, and establishment of a record-keeping system. At the end of the three-year study period, schools involved in the program were better prepared to handle emergencies than were control schools. Schools involved in the program were found to have an injury-recognition rate comparable to that previously reported for high schools that had athletic trainers, a rate substantially higher than that in the control schools. The experimental schools were judged to have managed these injuries satisfactorily 95% of the time, compared with a satisfactory management rate of 14% for the control schools. PMID:3993012

  13. Ethics in Program Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    trading scandal , and a plethora of large corporate scandals involving companies like Enron , Tyco, and WorldCom. Troubling scandals have emerged...management Dr. Owen C. Gadeken The defense acquisition community, as well as society at large, seems to continually experience highly visible ethics scandals ...way they are led. It seems that every few years, the defense acquisition community is rocked by a highly visible ethics scandal . The latest involves Ms

  14. Program and Project Management Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Cassandra D.

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a framework and system architecture for integrating program and project management tools that may be applied consistently throughout Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to optimize planning, cost estimating, risk management, and project control. Project management methodology used in building interactive systems to accommodate the needs of the project managers is applied as a key component in assessing the usefulness and applicability of the framework and tools developed. Research for the project included investigation and analysis of industrial practices, KSC standards, policies, and techniques, Systems Management Office (SMO) personnel, and other documented experiences of project management experts. In addition, this project documents best practices derived from the literature as well as new or developing project management models, practices, and techniques.

  15. Feasibility of community-based screening for cardiovascular disease risk in an ethnic community: the South Asian Cardiovascular Health Assessment and Management Program (SA-CHAMP)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background South Asian Canadians experience disproportionately high rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The goal of this qualitative study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a sustainable, culturally adapted, community-based CVD risk factor screening program for this population. Methods South Asians (≥ 45 years) in Calgary, Alberta underwent opportunistic cardiovascular risk factor screening by lay trained volunteers at local religious facilities. Those with elevated blood pressure (BP) or ≥ 1 risk factor underwent point of care cholesterol testing, 10-year CVD risk calculation, counseling, and referral to family physicians and local culturally tailored chronic disease management (CDM) programs. Participants were invited for re-screening and were surveyed about health system follow-up, satisfaction with the program and suggestions for improvement. Changes in risk factors from baseline were estimated using McNemar’s test (proportions) and paired t-tests (continuous measures). Results Baseline assessment was completed for 238 participants (median age 64 years, 51% female). Mean TC, HDL and TC/HDL were 5.41 mmol/L, 1.12 mmol/L and 4.7, respectively. Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressures (mmHg) were 129 and 75 respectively. Blood pressure and TC/HDL ratios exceeded recommended targets in 36% and 58%, respectively, and 76% were at high risk for CVD. Ninety-nine participants (47% female) attended re-screening. 82% had accessed health care providers, 22% reported medication changes and 3.5% had attended the CDM programs. While BP remained unchanged, TC and TC/HDL decreased and HDL increased significantly (mean differences: -0.52 mmol/L, -1.04 and +0.07 mmol/L, respectively). Participants were very satisfied (80%) or satisfied (20%) with the project. Participants suggested screening sessions and CDM programs be more accessible by: delivering evening or weekends programs at more sites, providing transportation, offering

  16. Generation: A Corporate-Sponsored Retiree Health Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlach, Andrew E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes Generation, geriatric clinic program for one company's retirees and dependents. Describes program's multidisciplinary team approach to health and psychosocial assessment, medication review, retiree advisors, health promotion programs, and case management services. Notes that, in addition to traditional medical care, participants receive…

  17. Generation: A Corporate-Sponsored Retiree Health Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharlach, Andrew E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes Generation, geriatric clinic program for one company's retirees and dependents. Describes program's multidisciplinary team approach to health and psychosocial assessment, medication review, retiree advisors, health promotion programs, and case management services. Notes that, in addition to traditional medical care, participants receive…

  18. [Empowerment and health promotion programming].

    PubMed

    Laverack, G

    2008-12-01

    Health promotion often presents a tension between "bottom up" and "top down" programming. "Bottom-up" is associated with community empowerment and begins on issues of concern to particular groups or individuals and regards an increase in overall control as an important element of the health outcome. "Top-down" is associated with disease prevention efforts and begins by seeking to involve beneficiaries on issues defined by health agencies. It regards improvements in health behaviours or bio-medical indicators as the important outcome and community empowerment is viewed simply as a means to the end of health behaviour change. The tension between these two approaches is not unresolvable, and this article presents a framework, the "parallel-track", intended to assist health promotion practitioners to systematically accommodate community empowerment goals within "top-down" health programming.

  19. [Health management in private health insurance].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D J; Schilling, M K

    2000-09-01

    German private health insurance faces new challenges. The classical tools of cost containment are no longer sufficient to keep up with ever increasing expenses for health care, and international competitors with managed care experience from their home markets are on the point of entering business in Germany. Although the American example of managed care is not fully compatible with customer demands and state regulations, some elements of this approach will gradually be introduced. First agreements were signed with networks or individual preferred providers in outpatient care and rehabilitation medicine. Insurance companies become more and more interested in supporting evidence based guidelines and programmes for disease and case management. The pros and cons of various other health management tools are discussed against the specific background of the quite unique German health care system.

  20. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    PubMed Central

    Shoffstall-Cone, Sarah; Williard, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Background In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska's Tribal Health Organizations (THO) developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA) Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities. PMID:23984306

  1. Developing a Management Curriculum for a Cytotechnology Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maureen E.

    This study reviewed the literature in the field of health care management, particularly that which pertains to the management of the clinical laboratory. The research cited should help cytotechnology educators in planning a management curriculum and developing program objectives to train cytotechnologists in management. The report is an annotated…

  2. Developing a Management Curriculum for a Cytotechnology Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Maureen E.

    This study reviewed the literature in the field of health care management, particularly that which pertains to the management of the clinical laboratory. The research cited should help cytotechnology educators in planning a management curriculum and developing program objectives to train cytotechnologists in management. The report is an annotated…

  3. [Mental health in the family health program].

    PubMed

    Souza, Aline de Jesus Fontineli; Matias, Gina Nogueira; Gomes, Kenia de Fátima Alencar; Parente, Adriana da Cunha Menezes

    2007-01-01

    A descriptive study whose objective was to identify the education and actions of the nurse in Mental Health (MH), in the Family Health Program. The sample consisted of 134 acting nurses at the Family Health Program in Teresina, Piauí The results show that 95.5% don't have the specified education in MH. Of those interviewed, 97% state that there are patients, in their assigned areas, that need this type of care. The referenced actions were home visits (60%) appointments (27.7%), referrals (21.5%), medication delivery (15.4%), inactivity (14.6%), ambulatory service (7.7%), community therapy (5.4%) and casework (0.8%). Methods and strategies of public policies related to this area should be revisited and instituted in order to (re)direct ways of reform in the actions and services of mental health.

  4. Pricing specialty carve-outs and disease management programs under managed care.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, K T

    1997-01-01

    The drive toward improved efficiency and effectiveness in health care has spawned disease management programs to address the needs of patients with certain conditions. These programs parallel traditional case management programs in monitoring patients, but disease management differs from case management in early assessment of patient risk, with proactive clinical interventions and educational efforts. The most comprehensive programs include a coordinated delivery system that can be "carved out" from other health care benefits. Pricing disease management can benefit from the analysis of detailed, disease-specific and community-specific data from public or private sources.

  5. Managing Newborn Health in the Global Community

    PubMed Central

    Foege, William

    2001-01-01

    The largest health disparities in the world are found in maternal and neonatal mortality figures between the industrialized countries and the poorest sections of the poorest countries. Young lives would be saved if the skills and knowledge that have been accumulated by health workers aroundthe world could be readily applied. The problems reside with lack of management resources rather than lack of scientific knowledge. The Healthy Newborn: A Reference Manual for Program Managersis a graduate course in management aimed at providing health to newborns and healthy newborns to communities. PMID:11574306

  6. An Operating Environmental Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipana, J. G.; Masters, R. L.; Winter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some concepts of an operational program for medical and environmental health are outlined. Medical services of this program are primarily concerned with emergency care, laboratory examinations, advice to private physician with patient permission, medical monitoring activities, and suggestions for treatment or control of the malfunction.

  7. An Operating Environmental Health Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipana, J. G.; Masters, R. L.; Winter, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some concepts of an operational program for medical and environmental health are outlined. Medical services of this program are primarily concerned with emergency care, laboratory examinations, advice to private physician with patient permission, medical monitoring activities, and suggestions for treatment or control of the malfunction.

  8. 76 FR 1441 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  9. 78 FR 24756 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health System. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring...

  10. 75 FR 2549 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Health Care Affiliates. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  11. 76 FR 17139 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will...

  12. Analysis of environment, safety, and health (ES{ampersand}H) management systems for Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Neglia, A. V., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a summary analysis and comparison of various environment, safety, and health (ES&H) management systems required of, or suggested for use by, the Departrnent of Energy Defense Programs` sites. The summary analysis is provided by means of a comparison matrix, a set of Vean diagrams that highlights the focus of the systems, and an `End Gate` filter diagram that integrates the three Vean diagrams. It is intended that this paper will act as a starting point for implementing a particular system or in establishing a comprehensive site-wide integrated ES&H management system. Obviously, the source documents for each system would need to be reviewed to assure proper implementation of a particular system. The matrix compares nine ES&H management systems against a list of elements generated by identifying the unique elements of all the systems. To simplify the matrix, the elements are listed by means of a brief title. An explanation of the matrix elements is provided in Attachment 2 entitled, `Description of System Elements.` The elements are categorized under the Total Quality Management (TQM) `Plan, Do, Check, Act` framework with the added category of `Policy`. (The TQM concept is explained in the `DOE Quality Management implementation Guidelines,` July 1997 (DOE/QM- 0008)). The matrix provides a series of columns and rows to compare the unique elements found in each of the management systems. A `V` is marked if the element is explicitly identified as part of the particular ES&H management system. An `X` is marked if the element is not found in the particular ES&H management system, or if it is considered to be inadequately addressed. A `?` is marked if incorporation of the element is not clear. Attachment I provides additional background information which explains the justification for the marks in the matrix cells. Through the Vean diagrams and the `End Gate` filter in Section 3, the paper attempts to pictorially display the focus of

  13. 78 FR 54256 - Health Careers Opportunity Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Careers Opportunity Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Noncompetitive Program...

  14. [Community Health Agent: status adapted with Family Health Program reality?].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Karina Tonini; Saliba, Nemre Adas; Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Arcieri, Renato Moreira; Carvalho, Maria de Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    This study analyses the status and work reality of Community Health Agents, with the purpose of contributing to the improvement of the Brazilian Health System (SUS) in small cities. It was discussed aspects related to their participation in the team of the Family Health Program (PSF) and their interaction with the community. It was observed a lack of motivation and experience, which compromises the quality of Agents performance in the community. It is known that these findings are reflex and consequence of an established context. It is necessary the team rethink their practice, specially the managers, having always as a fundament the principles that guide the SUS and PSF.

  15. The financial health of global health programs.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Winston; Bazemore, Andrew; Mishori, Ranit; Diller, Philip; Bardella, Inis; Chang, Newton

    2014-10-01

    No studies have examined how established global health (GH) programs have achieved sustainability. The objective of this study was to describe the financial status of GH programs. In this cross-sectional survey of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's Group on Global Health, we assessed each program's affiliation, years of GH activities, whether or not participation was formalized, time spent on GH, funding, and anticipated funding. We received 31 responses (30% response rate); 55% were affiliated with residencies, 29% were affiliated with medical schools, 16% were affiliated with both, and 68% had formalized programs. Respondents spent 19% full-time equivalent (FTE) on GH and used a mean of 3.3 funding sources to support GH. Given a mean budget of $28,756, parent institutions provided 50% while 15% was from personal funds. Twenty-six percent thought their funding would increase in the next 2 years. Compared to residencies, medical school respondents devoted more time (26% FTE versus 13% FTE), used more funding categories (4.7 versus 2.2), and anticipated funding increases (42.8% versus 12.0%). Compared to younger programs (? 5 years), respondents from older programs (> 5 years) devoted more time (25% FTE versus 16% FTE) and used more funding categories (3.8 versus 2.9). Compared to those lacking formal programs, respondents from formalized programs were less likely to use personal funds (19% versus 60%). This limited descriptive study offers insight into the financial status of GH programs. Despite institutional support, respondents relied on personal funds and were pessimistic about future funding.

  16. Hazardous Materials Management Program Report- 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2005-06-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the SNL/CA Hazardous Materials Management Program for a given calendar year. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. The 2005 program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  17. Efficiency of the Austrian disease management program for diabetes mellitus type 2: a historic cohort study based on health insurance provider’s routine data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Austrian diabetes disease management program (DMP) was introduced in 2007 in order to improve health care delivery for diabetics via the promotion of treatment according to guidelines. Considering the current low participation rates in the DMP and the question of further promotion of the program, it is of particular interest for health insurance providers in Austria to assess whether enrollment in the DMP leads to differences in the pattern of the provision of in- and outpatient services, as well as to the subsequent costs in order to determine overall program efficiency. Methods Historic cohort study comparing average annual levels of in- and outpatient health services utilization and its associated costs for patients enrolled and not enrolled in the DMP before (2006) and 2 years after (2009) the implementation of the program in Austria. Data on the use of services and data on costs were extracted from the records of the Austrian Social Insurance Institution for Business. 12,199 persons were identified as diabetes patients treated with anti-diabetic medication or anti-diabetics with insulin throughout the study period. 314 diabetics were enrolled in the DMP. Results Patients enrolled in the diabetes DMP received a more evolved pattern of outpatient care, featuring higher numbers of services provided by general practitioners and specialists (79 vs. 62), more diagnostic services (22 vs. 15) as well as more services provided by outpatient care centers (9 vs. 6) in line with increased levels of participation in medical assessments as recommended by the treatment guideline in 2009. Hospitalization was lower for DMP patients spending 3.75 days in hospital, as compared to 6.03 days for diabetes patients in regular treatment. Overall, increases in costs of care and medication throughout the study period were lower for enrolled patients (€ 718 vs. € 1.684), resulting in overall costs of € 5,393 p.c. for DMP patients and € 6,416 p.c. for the

  18. Efficiency of the Austrian disease management program for diabetes mellitus type 2: a historic cohort study based on health insurance provider's routine data.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Herwig; Hoess, Victoria; Mueller, Michael

    2012-06-29

    The Austrian diabetes disease management program (DMP) was introduced in 2007 in order to improve health care delivery for diabetics via the promotion of treatment according to guidelines. Considering the current low participation rates in the DMP and the question of further promotion of the program, it is of particular interest for health insurance providers in Austria to assess whether enrollment in the DMP leads to differences in the pattern of the provision of in- and outpatient services, as well as to the subsequent costs in order to determine overall program efficiency. Historic cohort study comparing average annual levels of in- and outpatient health services utilization and its associated costs for patients enrolled and not enrolled in the DMP before (2006) and 2 years after (2009) the implementation of the program in Austria. Data on the use of services and data on costs were extracted from the records of the Austrian Social Insurance Institution for Business. 12,199 persons were identified as diabetes patients treated with anti-diabetic medication or anti-diabetics with insulin throughout the study period. 314 diabetics were enrolled in the DMP. Patients enrolled in the diabetes DMP received a more evolved pattern of outpatient care, featuring higher numbers of services provided by general practitioners and specialists (79 vs. 62), more diagnostic services (22 vs. 15) as well as more services provided by outpatient care centers (9 vs. 6) in line with increased levels of participation in medical assessments as recommended by the treatment guideline in 2009. Hospitalization was lower for DMP patients spending 3.75 days in hospital, as compared to 6.03 days for diabetes patients in regular treatment. Overall, increases in costs of care and medication throughout the study period were lower for enrolled patients (€ 718 vs. € 1.684), resulting in overall costs of € 5,393 p.c. for DMP patients and € 6,416 p.c. for the control group in 2009. Seen from a

  19. Impact of a Program for the Management of Aggressive Behaviors on Seclusion and Restraint Use in Two High-Risk Units of a Mental Health Institute.

    PubMed

    Geoffrion, Steve; Goncalves, Jane; Giguère, Charles-Édouard; Guay, Stéphane

    2017-05-13

    The Omega Program for the Management of Aggressive Behaviors aims to reduce patients' dangerous behaviors, towards themselves or others, and to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint (S/R). A previous study in a Mental Health Institute (Montreal, Canada) showed that implementing this program allowed employees of the intensive care and emergency units to gain confidence in coping with patients' aggressions and to reduce their psychological distress. The present study, conducted in the same high-risk units, assesses the effect of the program on S/R use. We hypothesize that the incidence and duration of S/R should diminish significantly following the implementation of the program in both units. This naturalistic, prospective study covered archival data between April 2010 and July 2014. Pre-training data (April 2010-December 2011) were compared to data during training (January 2012-October 2012) and to post-training data (November 2012-July 2014) for both units. In the intensive care unit, we confirmed an increase of both mean daily number and duration of S/R by admissions in pre-training, followed by a decrease during the training and post-training. In the emergency unit, a decreasing trend is seen during the entire period thus suggesting that the decrease in S/R may be independent of the training. These findings suggest that Omega is a promising intervention program to use in an intensive care unit. However, a more global approach, including institutional changes in culture and attitude, can be important factors to develop to increase the positive outcomes.

  20. Indoor Air Quality Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD.

    In an effort to provide Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) management guidance, Anne Arundel County Public Schools was selected by the Maryland State Department of Education to develop a program that could be used by other school systems. A major goal was to produce a handbook that was "user friendly." Hence, its contents are a mix of history,…

  1. Indoor Air Quality Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Annapolis, MD.

    In an effort to provide Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) management guidance, Anne Arundel County Public Schools was selected by the Maryland State Department of Education to develop a program that could be used by other school systems. A major goal was to produce a handbook that was "user friendly." Hence, its contents are a mix of history,…

  2. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Inspections: A Guide for Shipyard Managers and Employees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-29

    facility inspections relating either to environmental (e.g. clean air, clean water, hazardous waste) or occupational safety and health (hereafter...occurring, or has recently occurred. The outline is devoted primarily to issues raised by federal environmental and occupational safety and health statutes

  3. Assessment of time management attitudes among health managers.

    PubMed

    Sarp, Nilgun; Yarpuzlu, Aysegul Akbay; Mostame, Fariba

    2005-01-01

    These days, working people are finding it difficult to manage their time, get more done at work, and find some balance in their work and personal lives. Successful time management is often suggested to be a product of organizing skills, however, what works for one person may not work for others. Context current competence assessment formats for physicians, health professionals, and managers during their training years reliably test core knowledge and basic skills. However, they may underemphasize some important domains of professional medical practice. Thus, in addition to assessments of basic skills, new formats that assess clinical reasoning, expert judgment, management of ambiguity, professionalism, time management, learning strategies, and teamwork to promise a multidimensional assessment while maintaining adequate reliability and validity in classic health education and health care institutional settings are needed to be worked on. It should be kept in mind that institutional support, reflection, and mentoring must accompany the development of assessment programs. This study was designed to describe the main factors that consume time, effective hours of work, time management opportunities, and attitudes and behaviors of health professionals and managers on time management concept through assessment by the assessment tool Time Management Inquiry Form (TMIQ-F). The study was conducted at the State Hospital, Social Security Hospital, and University Hospital at Kirikkale, Turkey between October 1999 and January 2000, including 143 subjects defined as medical managers and medical specialists. According to the results, a manager should give priority to the concept of planning, which may be counted among the efficient time management techniques, and educate him/herself on time management.

  4. Health Applications for Corporate Health Management.

    PubMed

    Steigner, Guido; Doarn, Charles R; Schütte, Michael; Matusiewicz, David; Thielscher, Christian

    2017-05-01

    Many corporate organizations around the world are looking at new ways to improve the health and well-being of their employees. Many have begun to use m-health approaches and unique applications (apps) to provide assistance. In Germany, both m-health and occupational health management (OHM) are growing quickly. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination-apps usage in OHM-is growing as well. We studied the usage of health apps in large corporations for health management of employed individuals. To understand the environment in Germany, a two-part study was conducted. First, an extensive literature search was done and second, interviews were conducted with 12 of the 20 biggest companies' health management representatives. Using key search terms, 5,445 peer-reviewed journal articles traced with German databases and on PubMed were reviewed. Interestingly and somewhat surprising to the authors, none of them covered our specific topic. Interviews were conducted with 60% of the companies indicated. Only 3 out of 12 companies use apps. Four companies are piloting apps. With one exception, apps cover well-known areas such as food coaching, physical motion, smoking cessation, stress prevention, and other health-related subjects. One app used sensors in work clothing to prevent unhealthy motion. With a few exceptions, there has been no evaluation of the utility and utilization of apps. Current app usage in corporate health management in Germany is surprisingly low. Apps need to be better evaluated. Main obstacles-which could be resolved in the future-are legal restrictions (especially on data security), the lack of company-owned smart phones, misfit of apps and corporate health strategy, a lack of app evaluation, and high app prices.

  5. A comprehensive assessment of National Health Program Guidelines in Canada: management review and redirections. Guidelines developed under the auspices of the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Advisory Committee on Institutional and Medical Services (ACIMS).

    PubMed

    Caro, D H

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive audit of the Health Program Guidelines in Canada was undertaken between January and September 1992. This review examined the strategic effectiveness and operational efficiency of the guidelines developed under the auspices of the Federal, Provincial and Territorial Advisory Committee on Institutional and Medical Services (ACIMS). To assess the perceived management utility of the guidelines, over 185 structured mail questionnaires were sent to a random representative sample of health care managers stratified by type of health-related organization and Canadian province and territory. With a response rate of over 80.5%, a profile of management perceptions of the need for the current Program Guidelines was created. In tandem an internal review of the efficiency and effectiveness of the design and development of the Guidelines was conducted using over 45 structured interviews with key informants. Both components of the comprehensive audit provided the basis of report recommendations that are relevant to the Canadian health system community.

  6. Best practices in evaluating worksite health promotion programs.

    PubMed

    Grossmeier, Jessica; Terry, Paul E; Cipriotti, Aldo; Burtaine, Jeffrey E

    2010-01-01

    Program evaluation is generally recognized as a "best practice" activity for worksite health promotion programs. The importance of "best practice" worksite health promotion programming is increasing with the stakes anticipated by health care reform. Volvo's health promotion activities are used as an example of "best practice" programming with a particular focus on creating a dashboard of evaluation metrics that can meet the accountability needs of senior management. The role of a comprehensive evaluation framework using nine components is explored along with reasonable expectations for program outcomes. Finally, stakeholder utility from the evaluation approach is explored.

  7. Development and Evaluation of Digital Game-Based Training for Managers to Promote Employee Mental Health and Reduce Mental Illness Stigma at Work: Quasi-Experimental Study of Program Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Sabine Elisabeth; Birner, Ulrich Walter; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Nowak, Dennis; Sabariego, Carla

    2017-08-04

    To counteract the negative impact of mental health problems on business, organizations are increasingly investing in mental health intervention measures. However, those services are often underused, which, to a great extent, can be attributed to fear of stigmatization. Nevertheless, so far only a few workplace interventions have specifically targeted stigma, and evidence on their effectiveness is limited. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital game-based training program for managers to promote employee mental health and reduce mental illness stigma at work. We describe the empirical development of Leadership Training in Mental Health Promotion (LMHP), a digital game-based training program for leaders. A 1-group pre-post design and a 3-month follow-up were used for training evaluation. We applied multilevel growth models to investigate change over time in the dependent variables knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions to promote employee mental health in 48 managers of a global enterprise in the United Kingdom. Participants were mainly male (44/48, 92%) and ranged in age from 32 to 58 (mean 46.0, SD 7.2) years. We found a positive impact of the Web-based training program on managers' knowledge of mental health and mental illness (P<.001), on attitudes toward people with mental health problems (P<.01), and on their self-efficacy to deal with mental health situations at work (P<.001), with the exception of intentions to promote employee mental health, which was initially high. Results provide first evidence of the effectiveness of LMHP to positively affect managers' skills to promote employee mental health at work. Furthermore, the high rate of participation in LMHP (48/54, 89%) supports the use of digital game-based interventions to increase user engagement and user experience in mental health programs at work.

  8. Psychological and Physiological Effects of a Stress Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Robert J.; Munz, David C.

    Interest in health promotion has resulted in various programs designed to enhance health and prevent disease through changes in lifestyles. The effects of a widely used stress management program were analyzed in two studies. In the first study, office employees in treatment (N=21) and control (N=24) groups were administered the State-Trait Anxiety…

  9. Psychological and Physiological Effects of a Stress Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Robert J.; Munz, David C.

    Interest in health promotion has resulted in various programs designed to enhance health and prevent disease through changes in lifestyles. The effects of a widely used stress management program were analyzed in two studies. In the first study, office employees in treatment (N=21) and control (N=24) groups were administered the State-Trait Anxiety…

  10. Developing an Information and Records Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Juli G.; Kartis, Alexia M.

    1984-01-01

    The need for information controls for college records management programs and the elements of program organization, planning, and management are discussed. Conditions at institutions that indicate a flaw in information control are identified, along with the benefits of a sound records management program. The management of an information and…

  11. Sport Management Graduate Programs: Characteristics of Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ming; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the characteristics that enable graduate sport management programs to achieve their objectives. Surveys of sport management educators found they agreed on 11 characteristics that indicated a sport management program's effectiveness. Respondents believed an effective program should produce sport managers, not…

  12. Developing an Information and Records Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Juli G.; Kartis, Alexia M.

    1984-01-01

    The need for information controls for college records management programs and the elements of program organization, planning, and management are discussed. Conditions at institutions that indicate a flaw in information control are identified, along with the benefits of a sound records management program. The management of an information and…

  13. Risk Management Programs for Defense Acquisition Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    The audit objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of risk management programs for Defense acquisition systems. Specifically, we determined whether DoD risk management policies and procedures for Defense acquisition systems were effectively implemented and what impact risk management programs bad on reducing program risks and costs. We also reviewed management controls as they applied to the audit objectives.

  14. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    This new collection of papers on aerospace management issues contains a history of NASA program and project management, some lessons learned in the areas of management and budget from the Space Shuttle Program, an analysis of tools needed to keep large multilayer programs organized and on track, and an update of resources for NASA managers. A wide variety of opinions and techniques are presented.

  15. Military Occupational Health Surveillance Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Responses were received from 37 HSC medical treatment facilities (100%) regarding their occupational health surveillance programs. The occupational ...personnel determined to be potentially exposed to occupational or job- related hazards, medical surveillance programs are limited, if available at all. An...exposed to occupational or job-related hazards would require more adequate staffing to provide the services. Identification of personnel at risk could be

  16. Training for Better Management: Avante Zambézia, PEPFAR and Improving the Quality of Administrative Services Comment on "Implementation of a Health Management Mentoring Program: Year-1 Evaluation of Its Impact on Health System Strengthening in Zambézia Province, Mozambique".

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Sandra K; Rutherford, George W; Horvath, Hacsi

    2015-07-23

    The United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) emphasizes health systems strengthening as a cornerstone of programmatic success. Health systems strengthening, among other things, includes effective capacity building for clinical care, administrative management and public health practice. Avante Zambézia is a district-level in-service training program for administrative staff. It is associated with improved accounting practices and human resources and transportation management but not monitoring and evaluation. We discuss other examples of successful administrative training programs that vary in the proportion of time that is spent learning on the job and the proportion of time spent in classrooms. We suggest that these programs be more rigorously evaluated so that lessons learned can be generalized to other countries and regions. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  17. 75 FR 21001 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Cornerstone Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be transferring...

  18. 75 FR 73110 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Room AIDS Ministry, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will transfer...

  19. Integrating end-of-life care with disease management programs: a new role for case managers.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A

    2001-03-01

    Case managers are crucial to any well-designed disease management program. However, in the progressive course of serious illness, patients, their families, and MCOs need the skills of case manager more than ever to help them through end-of-life care choices. The author describes what case managers will need in their "toolbox" to provide insight to these health plan members.

  20. Disease management programs for the underserved.

    PubMed

    Horswell, Ronald; Butler, Michael K; Kaiser, Michael; Moody-Thomas, Sarah; McNabb, Shannon; Besse, Jay; Abrams, Amir

    2008-06-01

    Disease management has become an important tool for improving population patient outcomes. The Louisiana State University Health Care Services Division (HCSD) has used this tool to provide care to a largely uninsured population for approximately 10 years. Eight programs currently exist within the HCSD focusing on diabetes, asthma, congestive heart failure, HIV, cancer screening, smoking cessation, chronic kidney disease, and diet, exercise, and weight control. These programs operate at hospital and clinic sites located in 8 population centers throughout southern Louisiana. The programs are structured to be managed at the system level with a clinical expert for each area guiding the scope of the program and defining new goals. Care largely adheres to evidence-based guidelines set forth by professional organizations. To monitor quality of care, indicators are defined within each area and benchmarked to achieve the most effective measures in our population. For example, hemoglobin A1c levels have shown improvements with nearly 54% of the population <7.0%. To support these management efforts, HCSD utilizes an electronic data repository that allows physicians to track patient labs and other tests as well as reminders. To ensure appropriate treatment, patients are able to enroll in the Medication Assistance program. This largely improves adherence to medications for those patients unable to afford them otherwise.

  1. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Program Portfolio Management 2008

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for program portfolio management, including the program portfolio management process, program analysis, performance assessment, stakeholder interactions, and cross-cutting issues.

  2. Health supervision visits among SSI-eligible children in the D.C. Medicaid program: a comparison of enrollees in fee-for-service and partially capitated managed care.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jean M; Gaskin, Darrell J; Kozma, Chahira

    2008-01-01

    Managed care plans that involve some form of capitation may have adverse effects on children with special health care needs because the financial incentives to control costs may result in under-treatment and restrict access to expensive services and specialty providers. Proponents highlight the advantages of a managed care model, including case management and coordination of services. In light of this debate, only a few state Medicaid programs have implemented a managed care option for children with special health care needs. This study evaluates the effects of plan choice (partially capitated managed care versus fee-for-service) on whether children with disabilities eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and enrolled in the District of Columbia's Medicaid program are in compliance with the guidelines for health supervision visits established by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Our findings, based on five years of claims data, show that SSI-eligible children with disabilities enrolled in a partially capitated managed care plan are significantly more likely to be in compliance with the AAP guidelines for health supervision visits compared to their fee-for-service counterparts. Moreover, we find that selection due to unobservable characteristics does not significantly bias the estimated program effects.

  3. Overview of the Tribal Waste Management Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA’s Tribal Waste Management Program encourages environmentally sound waste management practices that promote resource conservation through recycling, recovery, reduction, clean up, and elimination of waste.

  4. Health Occupations Extended Campus Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likhite, Vivek

    A Health Occupations Program designed as an integrated science course offers students at Evanston Township High School (Illinois) an opportunity to master science skills, content, and laboratory techniques while working and studying within local hospitals (the Evanston Hospital and St. Francis Hospital) as well as within their high school…

  5. Impact Evaluation of a System-Wide Chronic Disease Management Program on Health Service Utilisation: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Billot, Laurent; Corcoran, Kate; McDonald, Alina; Powell-Davies, Gawaine; Feyer, Anne-Marie

    2016-06-01

    The New South Wales Health (NSW Health) Chronic Disease Management Program (CDMP) delivers interventions to adults at risk of hospitalisation for five target chronic conditions that respond well to ambulatory care: diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease. The intervention consists of two main components: (1) care coordination across sectors (acute, ambulatory, and community care from both public and private sectors) and clinical specialties, facilitated by program care coordinators, and (2) health coaching including management of lifestyle risk factors and medications and self-management. These components were broadly prescribed by the head office of NSW Health, which funded the program, and were implemented by regional health services (local health districts) in ways that best suited their own history, environment, workforce, and patient need. We used a propensity-matched cohort study to evaluate health service utilisation after enrolment in the CDMP. The evaluation cohort included 41,303 CDMP participants enrolled between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013 who experienced at least one hospital admission or emergency department (ED) presentation for a target condition in the 12 mo preceding enrolment. Potential controls were selected from patients not enrolled in the CDMP but experiencing at least one hospital admission or ED presentation over the same period. Each CDMP patient in the evaluation cohort was matched to one control using 1:1 propensity score matching. The primary outcome was avoidable hospitalisations. Secondary outcomes included avoidable readmissions, avoidable bed days, unplanned hospitalisations, unplanned readmissions, unplanned bed days, ED presentations, and all-cause death. The primary analysis consisted of 30,057 CDMP participants and 30,057 matched controls with a median follow-up of 15 mo. Of those, 25,638 (85.3%) and 25,597 (85.2%) were alive by the end of

  6. Does diabetes disease management save money and improve outcomes? A report of simultaneous short-term savings and quality improvement associated with a health maintenance organization-sponsored disease management program among patients fulfilling health employer data and information set criteria.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Jaan; Shull, Robert; Tomcavage, Janet; Girolami, Sabrina; Lawton, Nadine; Harris, Ronald

    2002-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of disease management programs on medical costs for patients with diabetes. This study compared health care costs for patients who fulfilled health employer data and information set (HEDIS) criteria for diabetes and were in a health maintenance organization (HMO)-sponsored disease management program with costs for those not in disease management. We retrospectively examined paid health care claims and other measures of health care use over 2 years among 6,799 continuously enrolled Geisinger Health Plan patients who fulfilled HEDIS criteria for diabetes. Two groups were compared: those who were enrolled in an opt-in disease management program and those who were not enrolled. We also compared HEDIS data on HbA(1c) testing, percent not in control, lipid testing, diabetic eye screening, and kidney disease screening. All HEDIS measures were based on a hybrid method of claims and chart audits, except for percent not in control, which was based on chart audits only. Of 6,799 patients fulfilling HEDIS criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes, 3,118 (45.9%) patients were enrolled in a disease management program (program), and 3,681 (54.1%) were not enrolled (nonprogram). Both groups had similar male-to-female ratios, and the program patients were 1.4 years younger than the nonprogram patients. Per member per month paid claims averaged 394.62 dollars for program patients compared with 502.48 dollars for nonprogram patients (P < 0.05). This difference was accompanied by lower inpatient health care use in program patients (mean of 0.12 admissions per patient per year and 0.56 inpatient days per patient per year) than in nonprogram patients (0.16 and 0.98, P < 0.05 for both measures). Program patients experienced fewer emergency room visits (0.49 per member per year) than nonprogram patients (0.56) but had a higher number of primary care visits (8.36 vs. 7.78, P < 0.05 for both measures). Except for emergency room visits, these differences

  7. Disaster Management: Mental Health Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Math, Suresh Bada; Nirmala, Maria Christine; Moirangthem, Sydney; Kumar, Naveen C.

    2015-01-01

    Disaster mental health is based on the principles of ‘preventive medicine’ This principle has necessitated a paradigm shift from relief centered post-disaster management to a holistic, multi-dimensional integrated community approach of health promotion, disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. This has ignited the paradigm shift from curative to preventive aspects of disaster management. This can be understood on the basis of six ‘R’s such as Readiness (Preparedness), Response (Immediate action), Relief (Sustained rescue work), Rehabilitation (Long term remedial measures using community resources), Recovery (Returning to normalcy) and Resilience (Fostering). Prevalence of mental health problems in disaster affected population is found to be higher by two to three times than that of the general population. Along with the diagnosable mental disorders, affected community also harbours large number of sub-syndromal symptoms. Majority of the acute phase reactions and disorders are self-limiting, whereas long-term phase disorders require assistance from mental health professionals. Role of psychotropic medication is very limited in preventing mental health morbidity. The role of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in mitigating the mental health morbidity appears to be promising. Role of Psychological First Aid (PFA) and debriefing is not well-established. Disaster management is a continuous and integrated cyclical process of planning, organising, coordinating and implementing measures to prevent and to manage disaster effectively. Thus, now it is time to integrate public health principles into disaster mental health. PMID:26664073

  8. Disease Management, Case Management, Care Management, and Care Coordination: A Framework and a Brief Manual for Care Programs and Staff.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Osman I

    2016-01-01

    With the changing landscape of health care delivery in the United States since the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2010, health care organizations have struggled to keep pace with the evolving paradigm, particularly as it pertains to population health management. New nomenclature emerged to describe components of the new environment, and familiar words were put to use in an entirely different context. This article proposes a working framework for activities performed in case management, disease management, care management, and care coordination. The author offers standard working definitions for some of the most frequently used words in the health care industry with the goal of increasing consistency for their use, especially in the backdrop of the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services offering a "chronic case management fee" to primary care providers for managing the sickest, high-cost Medicare patients. Health care organizations performing case management, care management, disease management, and care coordination. Road map for consistency among users, in reporting, comparison, and for success of care management/coordination programs. This article offers a working framework for disease managers, case and care managers, and care coordinators. It suggests standard definitions to use for disease management, case management, care management, and care coordination. Moreover, the use of clear terminology will facilitate comparing, contrasting, and evaluating all care programs and increase consistency. The article can improve understanding of care program components and success factors, estimate program value and effectiveness, heighten awareness of consumer engagement tools, recognize current state and challenges for care programs, understand the role of health information technology solutions in care programs, and use information and knowledge gained to assess and improve care programs to design the "next generation" of programs.

  9. Managed occupational health care in an HMO.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, A; Marino, G

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the efforts of an HMO to improve its delivery of occupational health services. Customer needs identification, occupational health structure, data systems, case management, clinical guidelines, and quality management are outlined. Our experience suggests that high-quality occupational health services can be integrated into managed care systems thereby offering cost-effective care to large numbers of workers. Comparing 1991 to 1995, physician authorization of total disability days was reduced 17.9% per disability case (p < .0001). Based on July 1994 to June 1995 Oregon State Accident Insurance Fund (SAIF Corporation) data, HMO average total claim cost was $916/claim representing respectively, a 21% and a 20% reduced cost compared to two PPO model programs (MCO 00 and MCO 01). Patient satisfaction data indicated that 90% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the physician they saw. The savings appear to be due to cost-effective treatment and rapid return to work.

  10. Home audit program: management manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Many public power systems have initiated home energy audit programs in response to the requests of their consumers. The manual provides smaller public power systems with the information and specific skills needed to design and develop a program of residential energy audits. The program is based on the following precepts: locally owned public systems are the best, and in many cases the only agencies available to organize and coordinate energy conservation programs in many smaller communities; consumers' rights to energy conservation information and assistance should not hinge on the size of the utility that serves them; in the short run, public power systems of all sizes should offer residential energy conservation assistance to their consumers, because such assistance is desirable, necessary, and in the public interest; and in the long run, such programs will complement national energy goals and will produce economic benefits for both consumers and the public power system. A detailed description of home audit program planning, organization, and management are given. (MCW)

  11. Intelligent Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Figueroa, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) is the management of data, information, and knowledge (DIaK) with the purposeful objective of determining the health of a system (Management: storage, distribution, sharing, maintenance, processing, reasoning, and presentation). Presentation discusses: (1) ISHM Capability Development. (1a) ISHM Knowledge Model. (1b) Standards for ISHM Implementation. (1c) ISHM Domain Models (ISHM-DM's). (1d) Intelligent Sensors and Components. (2) ISHM in Systems Design, Engineering, and Integration. (3) Intelligent Control for ISHM-Enabled Systems

  12. Total quality management in the delivery of public health services: a focus on North Carolina WIC programs.

    PubMed

    Green, C G; Harrison, M; Henderson, K; Lenihan, A

    1998-09-01

    Principles of quality improvement have been successfully implemented in the for-profit sector of the United States economy. The purpose of this study is to test the use of quality improvement strategies including development of leadership skills, a focus on internal quality, ongoing training and staff development, and efficient use of resources in the delivery of services in the public sector. The emphasis of this study is strategies for improving the delivery of nutrition education and supplemental foods to high-risk women, infants, and children through a federally funded program called WIC.

  13. Managed consumerism in health care.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  14. Health Risk Management for Bioenvironmental Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Health Risk Management ( HRM ). HRM is a decision-making process to evaluate and...4.1 Health Risk Management Interface HRM and RM decisions are based on operations and scenarios; therefore, an HRA may provide a COA that interferes... health risk estimate HRM health risk management OEH occupational and environmental health PH Public Health PPE personal protective

  15. Case Study of American Healthways' Diabetes Disease Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Pope, James E.; Hudson, Laurel R.; Orr, Patty M.

    2005-01-01

    Disease management has been defined as a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications for populations with conditions in which patient self-care efforts are significant (Disease Management Association of America, 2005). The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the diabetes disease management program offered by American Healthways (AMHC) and highlight recently reported results of this program (Villagra, 2004a; Espinet et al., 2005). PMID:17288077

  16. Effects of a Hypertension Management Program by Seongcheon Primary Health Care Post in South Korea: An Analysis of Changes in the Level of Knowledge of Hypertension in the Period from 2004 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, In Han; Kim, Sang-A; Park, Woong-Sub

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a hypertension management program provided by a primary health care post located in a distant rural area in South Korea on the level of knowledge of hypertension. The panel data consisted of a total of 319 people or the entire population aged above 40 years of five villages located in…

  17. Effects of a Hypertension Management Program by Seongcheon Primary Health Care Post in South Korea: An Analysis of Changes in the Level of Knowledge of Hypertension in the Period from 2004 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, In Han; Kim, Sang-A; Park, Woong-Sub

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a hypertension management program provided by a primary health care post located in a distant rural area in South Korea on the level of knowledge of hypertension. The panel data consisted of a total of 319 people or the entire population aged above 40 years of five villages located in…

  18. DoD Pest Management Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-24

    Pest Management Program,’ to revise policy and procedures for the...DoD Pest Management Program; authorizes the publication of DoD 4150.7-R, ’DoD Pest Management Program,’ and DoD 4150.7-M, ’Plan for Certification of...DoD directive 5025.1, ’Department of Defense Directives System,’ and cancels reference (c) Defense Environmental Quality Program Policy Memorandum (DEQPPM) 80-10, ’Department of Defense Pest Management

  19. Management of a coordinated parts program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The organization of the management of a parts program is discussed. The organizational structure faced by the parts manager and the advantages and disadvantages of managing a coordinated parts program are analyzed. The reliable operation of an instrument is the key to the success of the mission, together with the management of the parts program. The analysis led to the conclusion that the setting up of the decision support model will aid the parts manager in the decision making and the process control.

  20. Environmental Restoration Program Management Control Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This Management Control Plan has been prepared to define the Energy Systems approach to managing its participation in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program in a manner consistent with DOE/ORO 931: Management Plan for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge, Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; and the Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Contract Management Plan (CMP). This plan discusses the systems, procedures, methodology, and controls to be used by the program management team to attain these objectives.

  1. Financing geriatric programs in community health centers.

    PubMed Central

    Yeatts, D E; Ray, S; List, N; Duggar, B

    1991-01-01

    There are approximately 600 Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs) providing preventive and primary health care services principally to medically underserved rural and urban areas across the United States. The need to develop geriatric programs within C/MHCs is clear. Less clear is how and under what circumstances a comprehensive geriatric program can be adequately financed. The Health Resources and Services Administration of the Public Health Service contracted with La Jolla Management Corporation and Duke University Center on Aging to identify successful techniques for obtaining funding by examining 10 "good practice" C/MHC geriatric programs. The results from this study indicated that effective techniques included using a variety of funding sources, maintaining accurate cost-per-user information, developing a marketing strategy and user incentives, collaborating with the area agency on aging and other community organizations, and developing special services for the elderly. Developing cost-per-user information allowed for identifying appropriate "drawing card" services, negotiating sound reimbursement rates and contracts with other providers, and assessing the financial impact of changing service mixes. A marketing strategy was used to enhance the ability of the centers to provide a comprehensive package of services. Collaboration with the area agency on aging and other community organizations and volunteers in the aging network was found to help establish referral networks and subsequently increase the number of elderly patients served. Finally, development of special services for the elderly, such as adult day care, case management, and health education, was found to increase program visibility, opportunities to work with the network of services for the aging, and clinical utilization. PMID:1908588

  2. 30 CFR 401.12 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program management. 401.12 Section 401.12 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR STATE WATER RESEARCH INSTITUTE PROGRAM Application and Management Procedures § 401.12 Program management. (a) Upon approval of each fiscal...

  3. 30 CFR 401.12 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program management. 401.12 Section 401.12 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR STATE WATER RESEARCH INSTITUTE PROGRAM Application and Management Procedures § 401.12 Program management. (a) Upon approval of each fiscal...

  4. 30 CFR 401.12 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Program management. 401.12 Section 401.12 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR STATE WATER RESEARCH INSTITUTE PROGRAM Application and Management Procedures § 401.12 Program management. (a) Upon approval of each fiscal...

  5. 20 CFR 638.800 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Program management. 638.800 Section 638.800... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.800 Program management. (a) The Job Corps Director shall establish and use internal program management procedures...

  6. 76 FR 34124 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Program Management Committee. DATES: The...

  7. 75 FR 29811 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Program Management Committee. DATES: The...

  8. 76 FR 11847 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Program Management Committee. DATES: The...

  9. 76 FR 58077 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Program Management Committee. DATES: The...

  10. 30 CFR 401.12 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program management. 401.12 Section 401.12 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR STATE WATER RESEARCH INSTITUTE PROGRAM Application and Management Procedures § 401.12 Program management. (a) Upon approval of each fiscal year's...

  11. 14 CFR 1214.1706 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program management. 1214.1706 Section 1214... Participants § 1214.1706 Program management. The Associate Administrator for Space Flight is responsible for program management under the direction of the Committee chairperson. ...

  12. 76 FR 27743 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Program Management Committee. DATES: The...

  13. 75 FR 71182 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Program Management Committee. DATES: The...

  14. 30 CFR 402.13 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program management. 402.13 Section 402.13... WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Application, Evaluation, and Management Procedures § 402.13 Program management. (a) After the conclusion of negotiations, the USGS will transmit a grant or...

  15. 75 FR 9017 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Program Management Committee. DATES: The...

  16. 75 FR 52590 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee meeting. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the public of a meeting of the RTCA Program Management Committee. DATES: The...

  17. 20 CFR 638.800 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program management. 638.800 Section 638.800... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.800 Program management. (a) The Job Corps Director shall establish and use internal program management procedures sufficient...

  18. 20 CFR 638.800 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program management. 638.800 Section 638.800... TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.800 Program management. (a) The Job Corps Director shall establish and use internal program management procedures sufficient...

  19. 30 CFR 401.12 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program management. 401.12 Section 401.12 Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR STATE WATER RESEARCH INSTITUTE PROGRAM Application and Management Procedures § 401.12 Program management. (a) Upon approval of each fiscal year's...

  20. Managing Requirements for Acquisition Program Affordability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-14

    to buy weapon systems at a lower cost and higher quality by leveraging commercial technology. He also directed program managers (PMs) and... Managing Requirements for Acquisition Program Affordability by Colonel James O. Winbush, Jr. United States Army...2011 to 11-04-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Managing Requirements for Acquisition Program Affordability 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  1. Gamification and geospatial health management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortley, David

    2014-06-01

    Sensor and Measurement technologies are rapidly developing for many consumer applications which have the potential to make a major impact on business and society. One of the most important areas for building a sustainable future is in health management. This opportunity arises because of the growing popularity of lifestyle monitoring devices such as the Jawbone UP bracelet, Nike Fuelband and Samsung Galaxy GEAR. These devices measure physical activity and calorie consumption and, when visualised on mobile and portable devices, enable users to take more responsibility for their personal health. This presentation looks at how the process of gamification can be applied to develop important geospatial health management applications that could not only improve the health of nations but also significantly address some of the issues in global health such as the ageing society and obesity.

  2. Directory of Health Education Programs for Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Kansas City. Center on Rural Elderly.

    Health education programs for older adults can be an efficient and cost-effective way to meet the challenge of a healthy old age. This directory describes 36 health education programs for the rural elderly in the areas of comprehensive programs, mental health, nutrition, physical health (including exercise), medication, safety, and health…

  3. Migrant Education Health Program 1990. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    The Colorado Migrant Education Program and the Colorado Migrant Health Program (CMHP) together plan and implement a comprehensive health program for migrant summer school students on a yearly basis. This report provides statistical data about the health status of the migrant students and the health services provided to them during the 1990…

  4. New Careers in the Indian Health Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    The Indian Health Service program has enabled large numbers of American Indians to play a significant role in the design and delivery of health services to their communities. The Indian Health Service provides training programs in various health-related areas. These programs have provided many Indians their first opportunity for employment, while…

  5. 3 CFR - State Children's Health Insurance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State Children's Health Insurance Program... Insurance Program Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services The State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) encourages States to provide health coverage for uninsured children in...

  6. 40 CFR 130.11 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program management. 130.11 Section 130... PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT § 130.11 Program management. (a) State agencies may apply for grants under sections 106, 205(j) and 205(g) to carry out water quality planning and management activities. Interstate...

  7. A Program on Hazardous Waste Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kummler, Ralph H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Provides an overview of the "Hazardous Waste Management Graduate Certificate" program at Wayne State University. Describes four required courses and nine optional courses. Discusses the development of a Master program and the curriculum of the Master program. (YP)

  8. 30 CFR 402.13 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Application, Evaluation, and Management Procedures § 402... these programs. (c) Contracts. Administrative requirements for performance of research contracts will...

  9. 30 CFR 402.13 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Application, Evaluation, and Management Procedures § 402... these programs. (c) Contracts. Administrative requirements for performance of research contracts will...

  10. 30 CFR 402.13 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Application, Evaluation, and Management Procedures § 402... these programs. (c) Contracts. Administrative requirements for performance of research contracts will...

  11. 30 CFR 402.13 - Program management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WATER-RESOURCES RESEARCH PROGRAM AND THE WATER-RESOURCES TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Application, Evaluation, and Management Procedures § 402... these programs. (c) Contracts. Administrative requirements for performance of research contracts will...

  12. Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program and Department of Defense (DoD) demonstration project; and other miscellaneous changes. Office of Personnel Management. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-06-08

    OPM is issuing a final regulation to implement the portion of the Defense Authorization Act for 1999 that establishes authority for a demonstration project under which certain Medicare and other eligible DoD beneficiaries can enroll in health benefit plans in certain geographic areas under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program. The demonstration project will run for a period of three years from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2002. This regulation specifies only the requirements that differ from existing FEHB Program regulations because of unique aspects of the demonstration project. This regulation also makes other miscellaneous changes to the Federal Employees Health Benefits Acquisition Regulations.

  13. Functions and Positions of Corporate Occupational Health Managers in Company-Wide Occupational Health Management.

    PubMed

    Mori, Koji; Nagata, Tomohisa; Kajiki, Shigeyuki; Hino, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Masako

    2013-08-21

    Objectives: It has become necessary for Japanese corporations to manage occupational health (OH) programs consistently throughout their organizations. Corporations need to clarify their health policies, develop standardized programs, assign OH staff, and ensure that they communicate with each other. To realize such conditions, many occupational physicians (OPs), who have the skills to lead corporation-wide OH activities, are now being assigned to head offices of corporations and referred to as corporate OH managers. However, there has been no research to date in Japan on their actual situation and function. We conducted an interview study of corporate OH managers to clarify their functions and positions in corporations. Subjects and Methods: We conducted semi-structural interviews with 14 corporate OH managers in large corporations employing more than 5,000 workers and multiple OPs. Interview scripts were coded to identify their functions as corporate OH managers and the context of their positions within corporate-wide OH management systems. Results: Five contexts were suggested. 1) Corporate OH managers played central roles in developing corporate health policies, standards and plans. 2) Head office department managers who supervised the sites distributed the policies and standards, and corporate OH managers instructed site OPs and OH staff. 3) In some corporations, corporate OH managers participated in the evaluation process of OH programs as part of occupational safety and health management systems or business audits. 4) Corporate OH managers led communications among OPs and OH staff by facilitating corporate OH meetings, and provided technical training. 5) Corporate OH managers in positions that enabled them to report directly or indirectly to decision makers (i.e., directors in charge) on human resource issues. Discussion: The results of this study suggest that companies that promote consistent company-wide OH programs also utilized the professional knowledge

  14. Development and Evaluation of Digital Game-Based Training for Managers to Promote Employee Mental Health and Reduce Mental Illness Stigma at Work: Quasi-Experimental Study of Program Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Birner, Ulrich Walter; Oberhauser, Cornelia; Nowak, Dennis; Sabariego, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Background To counteract the negative impact of mental health problems on business, organizations are increasingly investing in mental health intervention measures. However, those services are often underused, which, to a great extent, can be attributed to fear of stigmatization. Nevertheless, so far only a few workplace interventions have specifically targeted stigma, and evidence on their effectiveness is limited. Objective The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital game-based training program for managers to promote employee mental health and reduce mental illness stigma at work. Methods We describe the empirical development of Leadership Training in Mental Health Promotion (LMHP), a digital game-based training program for leaders. A 1-group pre-post design and a 3-month follow-up were used for training evaluation. We applied multilevel growth models to investigate change over time in the dependent variables knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions to promote employee mental health in 48 managers of a global enterprise in the United Kingdom. Participants were mainly male (44/48, 92%) and ranged in age from 32 to 58 (mean 46.0, SD 7.2) years. Results We found a positive impact of the Web-based training program on managers’ knowledge of mental health and mental illness (P<.001), on attitudes toward people with mental health problems (P<.01), and on their self-efficacy to deal with mental health situations at work (P<.001), with the exception of intentions to promote employee mental health, which was initially high. Conclusions Results provide first evidence of the effectiveness of LMHP to positively affect managers’ skills to promote employee mental health at work. Furthermore, the high rate of participation in LMHP (48/54, 89%) supports the use of digital game-based interventions to increase user engagement and user experience in mental health programs at work. PMID:28778839

  15. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  16. Total quality management program planning

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, P.T.; Spence, K.

    1994-05-01

    As government funding grows scarce, competition between the national laboratories is increasing dramatically. In this era of tougher competition, there is no for resistance to change. There must instead be a uniform commitment to improving the overall quality of our products (research and technology) and an increased focus on our customers` needs. There has been an ongoing effort to bring the principles of total quality management (TQM) to all Energy Systems employees to help them better prepare for future changes while responding to the pressures on federal budgets. The need exists for instituting a vigorous program of education and training to an understanding of the techniques needed to improve and initiate a change in organizational culture. The TQM facilitator is responsible for educating the work force on the benefits of self-managed work teams, designing a program of instruction for implementation, and thus getting TQM off the ground at the worker and first-line supervisory levels so that the benefits can flow back up. This program plan presents a conceptual model for TQM in the form of a hot air balloon. In this model, there are numerous factors which can individually and collectively impede the progress of TQM within the division and the Laboratory. When these factors are addressed and corrected, the benefits of TQM become more visible. As this occurs, it is hoped that workers and management alike will grasp the ``total quality`` concept as an acceptable agent for change and continual improvement. TQM can then rise to the occasion and take its rightful place as an integral and valid step in the Laboratory`s formula for survival.

  17. Solid Waste Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, D.R.

    1990-08-01

    The objective of the Solid Waste Management Program Plan (SWMPP) is to provide a summary level comprehensive approach for the storage, treatment, and disposal of current and future solid waste received at the Hanford Site (from onsite and offsite generators) in a manner compliant with current and evolving regulations and orders (federal, state, and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)). The Plan also presents activities required for disposal of selected wastes currently in retrievable storage. The SWMPP provides a central focus for the description and control of cost, scope, and schedule of Hanford Site solid waste activities, and provides a vehicle for ready communication of the scope of those activities to onsite and offsite organizations. This Plan represents the most complete description available of Hanford Site Solid Waste Management (SWM) activities and the interfaces between those activities. It will be updated annually to reflect changes in plans due to evolving regulatory requirements and/or the SWM mission. 8 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. The Program Sustainability Assessment Tool: a new instrument for public health programs.

    PubMed

    Luke, Douglas A; Calhoun, Annaliese; Robichaux, Christopher B; Elliott, Michael B; Moreland-Russell, Sarah

    2014-01-23

    Public health programs can deliver benefits only if they are able to sustain programs, policies, and activities over time. Although numerous sustainability frameworks and models have been developed, there are almost no assessment tools that have demonstrated reliability or validity or have been widely disseminated. We present the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool (PSAT), a new and reliable instrument for assessing the capacity for program sustainability of various public health and other programs. A measurement development study was conducted to assess the reliability of the PSAT. Program managers and staff (n = 592) representing 252 public health programs used the PSAT to rate the sustainability of their program. State and community-level programs participated, representing 4 types of chronic disease programs: tobacco control, diabetes, obesity prevention, and oral health. The final version of the PSAT contains 40 items, spread across 8 sustainability domains, with 5 items per domain. Confirmatory factor analysis shows good fit of the data with the 8 sustainability domains. The subscales have excellent internal consistency; the average Cronbach's α is 0.88, ranging from 0.79 to 0.92. Preliminary validation analyses suggest that PSAT scores are related to important program and organizational characteristics. The PSAT is a new and reliable assessment instrument that can be used to measure a public health program's capacity for sustainability. The tool is designed to be used by researchers, evaluators, program managers, and staff for large and small public health programs.

  19. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well-being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data. This report was prepared by the Education Division/FE, Office of Human Resources and Education.

  20. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gans, Gary (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA's objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  1. University Program Management Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    As basic policy, NASA believes that colleges and universities should be encouraged to participate in the nation's space and aeronautics program to the maximum extent practicable. Indeed, universities are considered as partners with government and industry in the nation's aerospace program. NASA' objective is to have them bring their scientific, engineering, and social research competence to bear on aerospace problems and on the broader social, economic, and international implications of NASA's technical and scientific programs. It is expected that, in so doing, universities will strengthen both their research and their educational capabilities to contribute more effectively to the national well being. This annual report is one means of documenting the NASA-university relationship, frequently denoted, collectively, as NASA's University Program. This report is consistent with agency accounting records, as the data is obtained from NASA's Financial and Contractual Status (FACS) System, operated by the Financial Management Division and the Procurement Office. However, in accordance with interagency agreements, the orientation differs from that required for financial or procurement purposes. Any apparent discrepancies between this report and other NASA procurement or financial reports stem from the selection criteria for the data.

  2. Health management program: factors influencing completion of therapy with high-dose interferon alfa-2b for high-risk melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Levesque, N.; Mitchinson, K.; Lawrie, D.; Fedorak, L.; MacDonald, D.; Normand, C.; Pouliot, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the 1-year observational, multicentre, open-label study reported here was to identify factors influencing adherence to high-dose interferon alfa-2b adjuvant therapy in patients at high risk of recurrence following surgical excision of malignant melanoma. The study was carried out in 23 tertiary-care centres across Canada. The 225 patients enrolled in the study all had malignant melanoma that was surgically excised and that required adjuvant treatment with interferon alfa-2b. Of these patients, 64% were men. Mean age was 51.7 years. All patients received interferon alfa-2b treatment during a 4-week induction phase (20 MU/m2 intravenously 5 days per week) followed by a 48-week maintenance phase (10 MU/m2 subcutaneously 3 days per week). Oncology nurses reviewed side-effect management with the patients before the induction and maintenance phases. Patients were provided with daily diaries, comprehensive educational materials, and ongoing nursing support. Data on side effects and discontinuations were obtained from patient interviews and diaries. The main outcome measurements were related to treatment discontinuation: rate, timing, reason, and prevention. Of the 225 patients, 75 (33.3%) discontinued interferon during the induction phase, and 58 (25.8%) discontinued during the maintenance phase. The main reasons for discontinuation were adverse events (58%) and disease progression (26%). Patients with a daily fluid intake greater than 1.5 L were more likely to complete therapy than were those with an intake less than 1.5 L (64% vs. 36%, p < 0.0001). Of 225 patients enrolled in the interferon alfa-2b health management program, 41% completed the 1-year treatment course. Higher fluid intake (>1.5 L daily) was associated with increased adherence to therapy. PMID:18317583

  3. Managing Evaluation in a Federal Public Health Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooley, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    The author, a federal manager who leads development and maintenance of evaluation for specific public health programs at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, tells the story of developing an evaluation unit in the Office on Smoking and Health. Lessons about managing evaluation, including his practices and related principles, are…

  4. Health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of Dominican women with lymphoedema of the leg: implications for lymphoedema management programs

    PubMed Central

    Person, Bobbie; Addiss, David G; Bartholomew, L Kay; Meijer, Cecilia; Pou, Victor; van den Borne, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Background In the Dominican Republic, a Latin American country with filariasis-endemic areas, more than 63,000 people have lymphatic filariasis and more than 400,000 people are at risk of future infection. In this paper, we explore the health beliefs, health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices of women with lymphoedema in filariasis-endemic areas to better understand the needs of women when developing lymphoedema morbidity control programs. Methods Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews of 28 women, 3 focus group discussions with 28 women, field notes and photographs. Results Women described exhaustive and expensive attempts at seeking a cure for their lymphoedema. Family members were influential in providing women with initial care seeking referrals to indigenous healers credited with influence over physical, mental, spiritual and supernatural properties of illness. When indigenous treatments proved to be ineffectual, the women sought care from trained healthcare providers. Most healthcare providers incorrectly diagnosed the edema, failed to adequately treat and meet the needs of women and were viewed as expensive. Most women resorted to self-prescribing injectable, oral, or topical antibiotics along with oral analgesics as a standard practice of self-care. Conclusion Healthcare providers must understand a woman's cultural perspectives of illness, her natural networks of support and referral, her behavioural practices of care-seeking and self-care and the financial burden of seeking care. In the culture of the Dominican Republic family members and traditional healthcare providers are influential advisors on initial health-seeking behaviors and self-care practices. For this reason family-oriented interventions, support groups for women and their families, community education and training on simple, low cost lymphoedema management techniques for indigenous healers are viable ways to influence the early detection, diagnosis and

  5. [Institutional support as a fundamental aspect for joint management in primary health care: the experience of a program in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Casanova, Angela Oliveira; Teixeira, Mirna Barros; Montenegro, Elyne

    2014-11-01

    This article presents reflections regarding the concepts and praxis of a new feature for health care and management, namely institutional support. It is seen as a management tool for enhancing quality of care, which has the potential to reformulate the hierarchical and authoritarian practices of health coordination and planning. Institutional support is a trigger for change that can enhance the autonomy, accountability, collective practices and new relationships between managers, professionals and users of the health system. These assumptions are aligned with the concepts of comprehensive and participatory Primary Health Care (PHC), which lead us to the conclusion that matricial and institutional support are processes that generate new models of health care and management. To appreciate the modus operandi of this feature, the Teias Escola Manguinhos/ENSP/Fiocruz experience is presented as a case study, one of the main pillars of which is the adoption of institutional support as a strategy for joint accountability and participative management of PHC in a community in the city of Rio de Janeiro.

  6. Medicines management in mental health.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Austyn; Barron, Derek

    This article provides evidence to suggest that mental health nurses may not be as competent in medicines management as they believe themselves to be. A psychological model of skills awareness is used throughout the article to offer a theoretical explanation of this putative deficit and provide discussion of the possible causes. Training directed towards improving medicines management skills will be introduced. Training such as this is essential if mental health nurses are to offer the best care to those in receipt of their services and make best use of the opportunities provided by prescribing legislation.

  7. An evaluation of Washington's Medicaid disease-management program.

    PubMed

    Lind, Alice; Kaplan, Louise

    2007-10-01

    In 2002, Washington State Medicaid implemented a disease-management program for clients with diagnoses of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and diabetes. The program represented a unique attempt to manage disabled clients in a fee-for-services environment, and at its onset, was one of the first statewide programs in the United States. This article reviews the effectiveness of the program based on the results from two independent evaluations. Results of cost-savings measurements and health outcomes are presented for each of the conditions. These results were used to make program changes, which began in 2007.

  8. 1998 Environmental Management Science Program Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    The Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) is a collaborative partnership between the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Science (DOE-SC), and the Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to sponsor basic environmental and waste management related research. Results are expected to lead to reduction of the costs, schedule, and risks associated with cleaning up the nation's nuclear complex. The EMSP research portfolio addresses the most challenging technical problems of the EM program related to high level waste, spent nuclear fuel, mixed waste, nuclear materials, remedial action, decontamination and decommissioning, and health, ecology, or risk. The EMSP was established in response to a mandate from Congress in the fiscal year 1996 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act. Congress directed the Department to ''provide sufficient attention and resources to longer-term basic science research which needs to be done to ultimately reduce cleanup costs, develop a program that takes advantage of laboratory and university expertise, and seek new and innovative cleanup methods to replace current conventional approaches which are often costly and ineffective''. This mandate followed similar recommendations from the Galvin Commission to the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board. The EMSP also responds to needs identified by National Academy of Sciences experts, regulators, citizen advisory groups, and other stakeholders.

  9. Management Education in Public Health: Further Considerations Comment on "Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health".

    PubMed

    Darr, Kurt J

    2015-08-25

    Knowing and applying the basic management functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling, as well as their permutations and combinations, are vital to effective delivery of public health services. Presently, graduate programs that prepare public health professionals neither emphasize teaching management theory, nor its application. This deficit puts those who become managers in public health and those they serve at a distinct disadvantage. This deficit can be remedied by enhanced teaching of management subjects. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  10. Schedule Management Competencies for Department of Defense Program Managers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    professionalism of their procurement workforce. Models identifying the competencies required of DoD program managers could provide valuable information for ...considered "valuable" to practicing program managers. A complete list of the medians and percentages can be found in Appendix E . Research Question 2... method for providing the standard skills necessary to manage programs. Education and training programs are therefore essential to ensure professionals

  11. The Program Sustainability Assessment Tool: A New Instrument for Public Health Programs

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Annaliese; Robichaux, Christopher B.; Elliott, Michael B.; Moreland-Russell, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Public health programs can deliver benefits only if they are able to sustain programs, policies, and activities over time. Although numerous sustainability frameworks and models have been developed, there are almost no assessment tools that have demonstrated reliability or validity or have been widely disseminated. We present the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool (PSAT), a new and reliable instrument for assessing the capacity for program sustainability of various public health and other programs. Methods A measurement development study was conducted to assess the reliability of the PSAT. Program managers and staff (n = 592) representing 252 public health programs used the PSAT to rate the sustainability of their program. State and community-level programs participated, representing 4 types of chronic disease programs: tobacco control, diabetes, obesity prevention, and oral health. Results The final version of the PSAT contains 40 items, spread across 8 sustainability domains, with 5 items per domain. Confirmatory factor analysis shows good fit of the data with the 8 sustainability domains. The subscales have excellent internal consistency; the average Cronbach’s α is 0.88, ranging from 0.79 to 0.92. Preliminary validation analyses suggest that PSAT scores are related to important program and organizational characteristics. Conclusion The PSAT is a new and reliable assessment instrument that can be used to measure a public health program’s capacity for sustainability. The tool is designed to be used by researchers, evaluators, program managers, and staff for large and small public health programs. PMID:24456645

  12. Health promotion programs sponsored by California employers.

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, J E; Breslow, L

    1983-01-01

    A survey of California employers with more than 100 employees at one or more sites was undertaken to determine: 1) the nature and extent of health promotion activities; 2) plans for continuation and/or expansion of these activities; 3) plans for initiation of new activities; and 4) the relationship between reported health promotion activities and other characteristics of employers. Of 511 employers with whom interviews were attempted, 49 possible respondents could not be reached and 38 respondents refused to be interviewed, leaving 424 or 83 per cent. Almost one-half of the sites where interviews were conducted had fewer than 200 employees. A total of 332 (78.3 per cent) of employers offered one or more health promotion activities. The most frequent activities provided were accident prevention (64.9 per cent) and CPR (52.8 per cent) with other frequent programs including alcohol/drug abuse (18.6 per cent), mental health counseling (18.4 per cent), stress management (13.0 per cent), fitness (11.6 per cent), hypertension screening (10.1 per cent), and smoking cessation (8.3 per cent). Employers with at least one activity averaged 2.8 activities. The likelihood of having health promotion activities increased with company size. Establishment of new programs appeared to accelerate rapidly in recent years. PMID:6837818

  13. Health Services Research and Development: the Veterans Administration Program.

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmidt, P G

    1986-01-01

    Health expenditures are rising inexorably; health status shows relatively little gain; technological possibilities are outstripping our ability or willingness to provide a commensurate level of resources. Clinical and administrative managers face increasingly difficult choices among alternative interventions in attempting to resolve these problems. If health services research is to succeed as a tool for assisting these decisions, clinicians, administrators, and researchers must view it as an integral part of management. This paper describes this concept of health services research and its implementation by the VA HSR&D Service, results from 1981 to date, and future directions. Four programs implement the Service's system to make relevant, valid information accessible to VA staff who can use it to improve veterans' health care: Investigator-Initiated Research (IIR) Program; HSR&D Field Program, which implements the Service's mission in various local areas VA-wide; Special Projects Program, responsive to system-wide issues, including technology assessment and transfer; and Resources Program, the Service's own management system. The Service's impact on improving veterans health care is already apparent. However, the true value of the HSR&D system will become apparent only in the 1990s, after the capacity for conducting health services research has been built and integrated fully with clinical and administrative practice. The VA, the nation's largest health care system, has a unique opportunity to demonstrate how health services research can improve health care. PMID:3081467

  14. Developing a Capstone Course within a Health Informatics Program

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, Gary; Cata, Teuta; Cole, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the ongoing development of a health informatics capstone program in a Midwest university from the hiring of a program coordinator to the development of a capstone course, through initial student results. University health informatics programs require a strong academic program to be successful but also require a spirited program coordinator to manage resources and organize an effective capstone course. This is particularly true of health informatics master's programs that support health industry career fields, whereby employers can locate and work with a pool of qualified applicants. The analysis of students’ logs confirms that students’ areas of focus and concern are consistent with course objectives and company work requirements during the work-study portion of the student capstone project. The article further discusses lessons learned and future improvements to be made in the health informatics capstone course. PMID:22783150

  15. Germany's Disease Management Program: Improving Outcomes in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kottmair, Stefan; Frye, Christian; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J.

    2005-01-01

    Hospital admissions among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are a major contributor to health care costs. A comprehensive disease management program for CHF was developed for private and statutory health insurance companies in order to improve health outcomes and reduce rehospitalization rates and costs. The program comprises care calls, written training material, telemetric monitoring, and health reports. Currently, 909 members from six insurance companies are enrolled. Routine evaluation, based on medical data warehouse software, demonstrates benefits in terms of improved health outcomes and processes of care. Economical evaluation of claims data indicates significant cost savings in a pre/post study design. PMID:17288080

  16. Germany's disease management program: improving outcomes in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kottmair, Stefan; Frye, Christian; Ziegenhagen, Dieter J

    2005-01-01

    Hospital admissions among patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are a major contributor to health care costs. A comprehensive disease management program for CHF was developed for private and statutory health insurance companies in order to improve health outcomes and reduce rehospitalization rates and costs. The program comprises care calls, written training material, telemetric monitoring, and health reports. Currently, 909 members from six insurance companies are enrolled. Routine evaluation, based on medical data warehouse software, demonstrates benefits in terms of improved health outcomes and processes of care. Economical evaluation of claims data indicates significant cost savings in a pre/post study design.

  17. The Status of Health Promotion Programs at the Worksite--A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcotte, Brian; Price, James H.

    1983-01-01

    Employers are realizing that worksite health programs which help prevent illness or accidents cost less than does rehabilitation of employees. Corporate health programs that involve hypertension screening, physical fitness, alcohol and drug abuse assistance, and stress management are described. (PP)

  18. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This volume is the third in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the attitude of the program manager, program control and performance measurement, risk management, cost plus award fee contracting, lessons learned from the development of the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer (FIRAS), small projects management, and age distribution of NASA scientists and engineers. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  19. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Francis T. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This volume is the third in an ongoing series on aerospace project management at NASA. Articles in this volume cover the attitude of the program manager, program control and performance measurement, risk management, cost plus award fee contracting, lessons learned from the development of the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer (FIRAS), small projects management, and age distribution of NASA scientists and engineers. A section on resources for NASA managers rounds out the publication.

  20. Issues in NASA program and project management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This volume is the eighth in an ongoing series addressing current topics and lessons learned in NASA program and project management. Articles in this volume cover the following topics: (1) power sources for the Galileo and Ulysses Missions; (2) managing requirements; (3) program control of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission; (4) project management method; (5) career development for project managers; and (6) resources for NASA managers.

  1. Disease management in the alternate-site health care setting.

    PubMed

    Lima, H A

    1998-03-01

    The role of pharmacies that specialize in the treatment of specific chronic diseases in the alternate-site health care setting is discussed. The optimal use of medications through disease management programs can improve patient outcomes and lower overall health care costs. The increase in disease management programs has spawned the growth of disease-specific pharmacies in the home care and other alternate-site health care settings. These pharmacies usually operate from a single location or are regionalized operations that deliver pharmaceutical products to patients throughout the United States. The pharmacies employ clinicians who specialize in a particular disease. These clinicians conduct comprehensive patient education programs, drug-use review, and compliance monitoring. Disease management pharmacies focus on chronic, expensive diseases; costs related to inventory, equipment, and storage can be very high. Many disease management pharmacies are involved in preferred-distribution or closed-distribution arrangements with pharmaceutical manufacturers. Pharmacists involved in disease management programs routinely send compliance information about their patients to pharmaceutical companies, managed care organizations, or prescribing physicians. Disease management pharmacies act as advocates for patients with particular chronic diseases. Various foundations and patient advocacy and research groups have created their own disease management pharmacies. Disease management has also reached the community pharmacy practice setting. Pharmacies specializing in the treatment of specific chronic diseases in the alternate-site health care setting can improve health care and promote efficient use of health care dollars.

  2. Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.

    2010-01-01

    This document establishes the policy and procedures for the HSP and is authorized through the Director, Johnson Space Center (JSC). This document delineates the medical operations requirements for the HSP. The HSP goals are accomplished through an awareness campaign and procedures such as limiting access to flight crewmembers, medical screening, and controlling flight crewmember activities. NASA's Human Space Flight Program uses strategic risk mitigation to achieve mission success while protecting crew health and safety. Infectious diseases can compromise crew health and mission success, especially in the immediate preflight period. The primary purpose of the Flight Crew Health Stabilization Program (HSP) is to mitigate the risk of occurrence of infectious disease among astronaut flight crews in the immediate preflight period. Infectious diseases are contracted through direct person-to-person contact, and through contact with infectious material in the environment. The HSP establishes several controls to minimize crew exposure to infectious agents. The HSP provides a quarantine environment for the crew that minimizes contact with potentially infectious material. The HSP also limits the number of individuals who come in close contact with the crew. The infection-carrying potential of these primary contacts (PCs) is minimized by educating them in ways to avoid infections and avoiding contact with the crew if they are or may be sick. The transmission of some infectious diseases can be greatly curtailed by vaccinations. PCs are strongly encouraged to maintain updated vaccinations.

  3. Managing to enhance soil health

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Healthy soils are critical for meeting current and future societal demands. Management strategies that protect the soil against erosion, build soil organic matter and promote nutrient cycling are ways to enhance soil health. Keeping soils covered and judicious use of agrochemicals are akin to us “hu...

  4. Migrant Education Health Program, 1985. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Health, Denver.

    During 1985 the Colorado Migrant Education Program and the Colorado Migrant Health Program provided a comprehensive health program for students enrolled in migrant summer schools. A total of 1,889 migrant children through age 21 (60% between 5 and 10 years of age) received health screening and physical assessment, referral for diagnosis and…

  5. Repository-Based Software Engineering Program: Working Program Management Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Repository-Based Software Engineering Program (RBSE) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored program dedicated to introducing and supporting common, effective approaches to software engineering practices. The process of conceiving, designing, building, and maintaining software systems by using existing software assets that are stored in a specialized operational reuse library or repository, accessible to system designers, is the foundation of the program. In addition to operating a software repository, RBSE promotes (1) software engineering technology transfer, (2) academic and instructional support of reuse programs, (3) the use of common software engineering standards and practices, (4) software reuse technology research, and (5) interoperability between reuse libraries. This Program Management Plan (PMP) is intended to communicate program goals and objectives, describe major work areas, and define a management report and control process. This process will assist the Program Manager, University of Houston at Clear Lake (UHCL) in tracking work progress and describing major program activities to NASA management. The goal of this PMP is to make managing the RBSE program a relatively easy process that improves the work of all team members. The PMP describes work areas addressed and work efforts being accomplished by the program; however, it is not intended as a complete description of the program. Its focus is on providing management tools and management processes for monitoring, evaluating, and administering the program; and it includes schedules for charting milestones and deliveries of program products. The PMP was developed by soliciting and obtaining guidance from appropriate program participants, analyzing program management guidance, and reviewing related program management documents.

  6. X-33/RLV System Health Management/ Vehicle Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbos, Raymond J.; Mouyos, William

    1998-01-01

    To reduce operations cost, the RLV must include the following elements: highly reliable, robust subsystems designed for simple repair access with a simplified servicing infrastructure and incorporating expedited decision making about faults and anomalies. A key component for the Single Stage to Orbit (SSTO) RLV System used to meet these objectives is System Health Management (SHM). SHM deals with the vehicle component- Vehicle Health Management (VHM), the ground processing associated with the fleet (GVHM) and the Ground Infrastructure Health Management (GIHM). The objective is to provide an automated collection and paperless health decision, maintenance and logistics system. Many critical technologies are necessary to make the SHM (and more specifically VHM) practical, reliable and cost effective. Sanders is leading the design, development and integration of the SHM system for RLV and X-33 SHM (a sub-scale, sub-orbit Advanced Technology Demonstrator). This paper will present the X-33 SHM design which forms the baseline for RLV SHM. This paper will also discuss other applications of these technologies.

  7. Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program and Department of Defense (DoD) demonstration project. Office of Personnel Management. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-06-02

    OPM is issuing a final regulation to implement the portion of the National Defense Authorization Act for 1999 that establishes authority for a demonstration project under which certain Medicare and other eligible DoD beneficiaries can enroll in health benefit plans in certain geographic areas under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program. The demonstration project will run for a period of three years from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2002. This regulation specifies only the requirements that differ from existing FEHB Program regulations because of unique aspects of the demonstration project.

  8. Implementing a farmers' market incentive program: perspectives on the New York City Health Bucks Program.

    PubMed

    Payne, Gayle Holmes; Wethington, Holly; Olsho, Lauren; Jernigan, Jan; Farris, Rosanne; Walker, Deborah Klein

    2013-08-29

    One strategy for lowering the prevalence of obesity is to increase access to and affordability of fruits and vegetables through farmers' markets. However, little has been documented in the literature on the implementation of such efforts. To address this gap, the Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) sponsored an evaluation of the New York City Health Bucks program, a farmers' market coupon incentive program intended to increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables in underserved neighborhoods while supporting local farmers. We conducted a process evaluation of Health Bucks program implementation. We interviewed 6 farmer/vendors, 3 market managers, and 4 program administrators, and collected data on site at 86 farmers' markets, including surveys of 81 managers and 141 farmer/vendors on their perspectives on promotion and redemption of the incentive coupons; knowledge and attitudes regarding the program; experiences with markets and products; and facilitators and barriers to program participation. Results indicate that respondents view Health Bucks as a positive program model. Farmers' market incentive coupon programs like Health Bucks are one strategy to address the problem of obesity and were associated with higher fruit and vegetable access and purchases in low-income communities. This evaluation identified some areas for improving implementation of the Health Bucks program. Farmers' market incentive programs like Health Bucks may be one avenue to increase access to and affordability of fruits and vegetables among low-income persons. Further research is needed to assess the potential effects of these programs on access and health outcomes.

  9. Efficient management of cardiovascular risk screening programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Carol

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Health Unit, located on-site at the the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), is responsible for the implementation of the Center's Employee Environmental and Occupational Health Program. The Health Unit, Health Physics (HP), and Industrial Hygiene (IH) staffs collaborate to provide quality service to the employees at GSFC. The Health Unit staff identifies, evaluates, and ensures the control of occupational hazards on the Center. In the past, components of the Industrial Hygiene Program have included the Industrial Hygiene Health Hazard Identification Program (IHHIP), the Hearing Conservation Program (HCP), the Hazard Communication Program, and the bi-annual fume hood survey. More recently, the Environmental Health Unit has expanded its services by adding the Ergonomics Program. Various aspects of the Ergonomics Program are discussed.

  10. Putting Management Capacity Building at the Forefront of Health Systems Strengthening: Comment on "Management Matters: A Leverage Point for Health Systems Strengthening in Global Health".

    PubMed

    Yeager, Valerie A; Bertrand, Jane

    2015-10-26

    The current limited focus on management in global health activities is highly problematic given the amounts of financial and human resources that are pouring into health system strengthening interventions and the complexity of clinical operations across settings. By ensuring that public health and healthcare practitioners in domestic and international settings receive management training in their educational programs and that we build management capacity among individuals already in the health workforce, we can begin to prepare for more effective health systems strengthening efforts. Rigorous evaluation of health systems strengthening and the impact of management capacity building is crucial to building evidence for the field.

  11. First German Disease Management Program for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    The first disease management program contract for breast cancer in Germany was signed in 2002 between the Association of Regional of Physicians in North-Rhine and the statutory health insurance companies in Rhineland. At the heart of this unique breast cancer disease management program is a patient-centered network of health care professionals. The program's main objectives are: (1) to improve the quality of treatment and post-operative care for breast cancer patients, (2) to provide timely information and consultation empowering the patient to participate in decisionmaking, (3) to improve the interface between inpatient and outpatient care, and (4) to increase the number of breast-conserving surgeries. PMID:17288079

  12. Online Health Communities and Chronic Disease Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Willis, Erin; Royne, Marla B

    2017-03-01

    This research uses content analysis (N = 1,960) to examine the computer-mediated communication within online health communities for evidence of chronic disease self-management behaviors, including the perceived benefits and perceived barriers to participating in such behaviors. Online health communities act as informal self-management programs led by peers with the same chronic disease through the exchange of health information. Online health communities provide opportunities for health behavior change messages to educate and persuade regarding chronic disease self-management behaviors.

  13. 14 CFR 91.1017 - Amending program manager's management specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amending program manager's management... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Fractional... specifications will set a reasonable period (but not less than 7 days) within which the program manager...

  14. Waste Management Technician Partnership Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Donna

    This final report for Columbia Basin College's waste management technician partnership program outlines 4 objectives: (1) develop at least 4 waste management competency-based curriculum modules; (2) have 50 participants complete at least 1 module; (3) have 100 participants complete a training and/or certification program and 200 managers complete…

  15. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  16. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  17. 76 FR 74842 - RTCA Program Management Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration RTCA Program Management Committee AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Program Management Committee... Management Committee DATES: The meeting will be held December 13, 2011, from 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. ADDRESSES...

  18. Program Management Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Program Management Collection, which covers the topics of Assessment, Learning Disabilities, and Program Improvement. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic Skills, Program Management,…

  19. Early Childhood Health--Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Lawrence S.

    The Maimonides Early Childhood Health-Mental Health Prevention and Treatment Program is described. The program provides a broad range of preventive services to children who are five years of age and younger. Services are organized into Post-Natal and Pre-School Programs. The Post-Natal Program offers group education and counseling, individual…

  20. 75 FR 32797 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health... Area Primary Health Care, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will be...

  1. 75 FR 53701 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ...-53702] [FR Doc No: 2010-21836] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Health Center Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of Non-competitive Replacement Awards to Sunset Park Health Council, Inc. SUMMARY: The Health Resources...

  2. Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

  3. Workplace Participatory Occupational Health/Health Promotion Program: Facilitators and Barriers Observed in Three Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Flum, Marian; Kotejoshyer, Rajashree; Fleishman, Jane; Henning, Robert; Punnett, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Nursing home employees experience high physical and psychosocial workloads, resulting in poor health outcomes. An occupational health/health promotion program, designed to facilitate employee participation, was initiated in three nursing homes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate facilitators and barriers of the program after 3-year implementation. Focus groups with employees and in-depth interviews with top and middle managers were conducted. The Social Ecological Model was used to organize the evaluation. Facilitators and barriers were reported from both managers' and employees' perspectives, and were categorized as intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and corporate level. Management support, financial resources, and release time for participation were identified as the three most important factors. Supports from multiple levels including both human and environment, and managers and employees, are important for a successful participatory occupational health/health promotion program. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(6), 34-42.].

  4. Estimating clinical and economic impact in case management programs.

    PubMed

    Fetterolf, Donald; Holt, Albert E; Tucker, Travis; Khan, Nazmul

    2010-04-01

    Case management programs are commonly offered by health plans, hospitals, freestanding case management vendors, and others to various purchasers of these services. Case management programs are materially different from standard medical management or disease management programs in a number of ways. The patients have complex medical conditions combined with many other variables that tend to increase their costs and patterns of utilization. Purchasers of case management services frequently demand some form of performance guarantees as evidence that these case management programs are reducing utilization and medical costs. Inherent challenges of high variation in clinical and cost characteristics of the case management population make it difficult to develop standard return on investment performance guarantees. There are, however, other methodologies and statistical approaches to measure and evaluate program performance. We seek to outline major limiting issues that differentiate case management financial impact analyses from other clinical programs, and to define a framework for beginning a dialogue between suppliers and purchasers of these services to create a program value proposition.

  5. Leadership and globalization: research in health management education.

    PubMed

    West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo; Filerman, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The impact of globalization on graduate health care management education is evident, yet challenging to quantify. The Commission on Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) recently authorized two research studies to gather specific information and answer important questions about accredited graduate programs in the USA and Canada. Two surveys provided the most comprehensive data impacting international health management education efforts by 70 programs. An inventory was made of 22 countries; information was compiled on 21 accrediting or quality improvement organizations. Observations on leadership and the demand for qualified health care professionals is discussed in terms of accreditation, certification, competency models, outcome assessment, improving quality, and the impact of globalization on higher education.

  6. Achieving Success in Small Business: A Self-Instruction Program for Small Business Owner-Managers. Assessing the Health of Your Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This self-instructional module on assessing the health of your business is the eleventh in a set of twelve modules designed for small business owner-managers. The competency for this module is to assess the financial condition of your business. Provided are information sections (key business records, balance sheet and profit and loss statements,…

  7. Total quality management -- Remedial actions planning program

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, J.L.; Horne, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the management approach being taken within the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP) Support Contractor Office (SCO) to ensure quality of services in a highly competitive waste management environment. An overview is presented of the contractor support role assigned to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) national program for managing hazardous waste. The HAZWRAP SCO mission, organizational structure, and major programs are outlined, with emphasis on waste management planning for the DOE Work for Others (WFO) Program. The HAZWRAP SCO provides waste management technical support, via interagency agreements between DOE and various Department of Defense (DOD) agencies for DOD sponsors planning remedial response actions. The remainder of the paper focuses on how the concept of Total Quality Management is applied to the HAZWRAP Remedial Actions Planning (RAP) Program. The management challenge is to achieve quality on a ''system'' basis where all functional elements of program management synergistically contribute to the total quality of the effort. The quality assurance (QA) program requirements applied to the RAP Program and its subcontractors are discussed. The application of management principles in the areas of program management, procurement, and QA to achieve total quality is presented. 3 refs.

  8. Management of Youth Rehabilitation Programs. Program Audit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geizer, Bernard P., Ed.

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of New York State's Division for Youth (DFY) rehabilitation programs, which range from secure facilities to residential homes. The goals of the evaluation were to assess the level of expenditures for facility operation and use, to determine the scope of programs and the extent to which they meet…

  9. A Review and Analysis of the Clinical- and Cost-Effectiveness Studies of Comprehensive Health Promotion and Disease Management Programs at the Worksite: 1998-2000 Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Kenneth R.

    2001-01-01

    Reviewed clinical- and cost-effectiveness studies, including quasi-experimental studies, of comprehensive, multifactorial worksite health promotion programs. Searching such sources as MEDLINE, ERIC, and ADI identified 15 studies. Results suggest that providing individualized risk reduction for high- risk employees within the context of…

  10. The Undergraduate Program in the Administration of Health Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneeweiss, Stephen M.

    On July 1, 1968, Ithaca College launched an experimental undergraduate program aimed at alleviating the chronic shortage of well trained administrators at the middle management level in hospitals, nursing homes and other public and private patient care health facilities. A brief description is provided in this announcement of the program's…

  11. UPMC MyHealth: managing the health and costs of U.S. healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Michael D; Peele, Pamela B; Keyser, Donna J; Liu, Yushu; Doyle, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Workplace wellness programs hold promise for managing the health and costs of the U.S. workforce. These programs have not been rigorously tested in healthcare worksites. To evaluate the impact of MyHealth on the health and costs of UPMC healthcare workers. Five-year observational study conducted in 2013 with subgroup analyses and propensity-matched pair comparisons to more accurately interpret program effects. UPMC, an integrated health care delivery and financing system headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Participants included 13,627 UPMC employees who were continuously enrolled in UPMC-sponsored health insurance during the study period and demonstrated participation in MyHealth by completing a Health Risk Assessment in both 2007 and 2011, as well as 4,448 other healthcare workers employed outside of UPMC who did not participate in the program. A comprehensive wellness, prevention, and chronic disease management program that ties achievement of health and wellness requirements to receipt of an annual credit on participants' health insurance deductible. Health-risk levels, medical, pharmacy, and total healthcare costs, and Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set performance rates for prevention and chronic disease management. Significant improvements in health-risk status and increases in use of preventive and chronic disease management services were observed in the intervention group. Although total healthcare costs increased significantly, reductions in costs were significant for those who moved from higher- to the lowest-risk levels. The contrast differences in costs between reduced- and maintained-risk groups was also significant. Matched pair comparisons provided further evidence of program effects on observed reductions in costs and improvements in prevention, but not improvements in chronic disease management. Incorporating incentivized health management strategies in employer-sponsored health insurance benefit designs can serve as a useful

  12. Global health training in ophthalmology residency programs.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Peter G; Feldman, Brad H; Lauer, Andreas K; Paul Chan, Robison V; Sun, Grace

    2015-01-01

    To assess current global health education and international electives in ophthalmology residency programs and barriers to global health implementation in ophthalmology resident education. A web-based survey regarding participation in global health and international electives was emailed to residency program directors at 116 accredited ophthalmology residency programs via an Association of University Professors in Ophthalmology (AUPO) residency program director listserv. Fifty-nine (51%) ophthalmology residency program directors responded. Thirty-seven program directors (63%) said global health was important to medical students when evaluating residency programs. Thirty-two program directors (55%) reported developing international electives. Reported barriers to resident participation in international electives were: 1) insufficient financial support, 2) inadequate resident coverage at home, and 3) lack of ACGME approval for international electives. Program directors requested more information about resident international electives, funding, and global ophthalmology educational resources. They requested ACGME recognition of international electives to facilitate resident participation. More than half (54%) of program directors supported international electives for residents. This survey demonstrates that program directors believe global health is an important consideration when medical students evaluate training programs. Despite perceived barriers to incorporating global health opportunities into residency training, program directors are interested in development of global health resources and plan to further develop global health opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrating Cybersecurity into the Program Management Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-13

    Integrating Cybersecurity into the Program Management Organization The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of The MITRE...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Integrating Cybersecurity into the Program Management Organization...All rights reserved. Outline  The Cybersecurity threat  Laws, regulations, policy, and guidance  Cybersecurity and the Program Manager

  14. Adaptive Management Implementation: Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Trinity River Restoration Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wittler, R.; McBain, S.; Stalnaker, C.; Bizier, P.; DeBarry, P.

    2003-01-01

    Two adaptive management programs, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP) and the Trinity River Restoration Program (TRRP) are examined. In both cases, the focus is on managing the aquatic and riparian systems downstream of a large dam and water supply project. The status of the two programs, lessons learned by the program managers and the Adaptive Environmental Assessment and Management (AEAM) evolution of the TRRP are discussed. The Trinity River illustrates some of the scientific uncertainities that a program faces and the ways the program evolves from concept through implementation.

  15. Material Management Program Can Attract Local Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magad, Eugene L.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the material management certificate and the associate in applied science degree programs at William Rainey Harper College, Palatine, Illinois. Material management functions include purchasing, production control, inventory control, material handling, warehousing, packaging, computer applications, and transportation. (MF)

  16. Material Management Program Can Attract Local Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magad, Eugene L.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the material management certificate and the associate in applied science degree programs at William Rainey Harper College, Palatine, Illinois. Material management functions include purchasing, production control, inventory control, material handling, warehousing, packaging, computer applications, and transportation. (MF)

  17. Effectiveness of yoga program in the management of diabetes using community health workers in the urban slums of Bangalore city: A non-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dasappa, Hemavathi; Fathima, Farah Naaz; Prabhakar, Rugmani

    2016-01-01

    Trial Design: Nonrandomized controlled trial. Methods: Nonrandomized controlled trial. This was an interventional study that was conducted in 4 slums of Bengaluru. Of the 256 diabetes participants, only 109 people agreed to participate in the program. Of 109 people, 52 people agreed to participate in the intervention (agreed to learn and practice Yoga) while the remaining 57 people were assigned to nonintervention group. Randomization and blinding could not be done. Objective and Outcome: The study was conducted with objective of assessing the effectiveness of Yoga, Pranayama, and Sudarshan Kriya in the community-based management of diabetes mellitus. The primary outcome variable was Hb1Ac and secondary outcome variables were systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), adherence to medication, and changes in lifestyle. Results: The study was conducted for 40 days. Community health workers made a total of 6 visits during the study. All the 109 participants were available for weekly follow-up. There were no drop outs among the study population. Statistically significant change was seen in the consumption of vegetable (χ2 = 15.326, P < 0.005), fruits (χ2 = 16.207, P < 0.005), salty food (χ2 = 14.823, P < 0.005), bakery food (χ2 = 10.429, P < 0.005) and fried food (χ2 = 15.470, P < 0.005), adherence to metformin (χ2 = 41.780, P < 0.005) and other medication(χ2 = 21.871, P < 0.005) and proportion of patients with DBP under control (χ2 = 9.396, P < 0.005) and proportion of people with glucose random blood sugar under control (χ2 = 29.693, P < 0.005) between the two groups following the intervention. Statistically significant change was also seen in the proportion of people with SBP/DBP ≤140/90 (χ2 = 10.635, P < 0.005) between the two groups. Conclusion: The Yoga program was successful in improving dietary practices and medication adherence and in increasing the proportion of diabetics and hypertensive patients under control. PMID:28217594

  18. The role of health-risk appraisals in disease management.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Laurel R; Pope, James E

    2006-02-01

    Managed care organizations and disease management vendors often find themselves in the position of responding to employers who want to administer a health-risk appraisal (HRA) without committing to implementation of a comprehensive health promotion program. The assumption appears to be that information on health risks is sufficient to motivate employees to change their health behaviors in order to reduce estimated health risks. A review of the relevant literature does not substantiate the efficacy of a stand-alone HRA for motivating behavior change. The challenge is to engage employers in informed conversations on what works in health promotion and achieve cost-effective benefits.

  19. Cost Management Competencies for Department of Defense Program Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    Posner .................................................................................................... 22 Cadbury -Schweppes...Posner’s Problems and Skills .............................................................................. . 23 8. Cadbury -Schweppes Model...goals make organizational skills critical. Cadbury -Schweppes Cadbury -Schweppes conducted an extensive research program involving program manager

  20. Consideration of an applied model of public health program infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Lavinghouze, René; Snyder, Kimberly; Rieker, Patricia; Ottoson, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Systemic infrastructure is key to public health achievements. Individual public health program infrastructure feeds into this larger system. Although program infrastructure is rarely defined, it needs to be operationalized for effective implementation and evaluation. The Ecological Model of Infrastructure (EMI) is one approach to defining program infrastructure. The EMI consists of 5 core (Leadership, Partnerships, State Plans, Engaged Data, and Managed Resources) and 2 supporting (Strategic Understanding and Tactical Action) elements that are enveloped in a program's context. We conducted a literature search across public health programs to determine support for the EMI. Four of the core elements were consistently addressed, and the other EMI elements were intermittently addressed. The EMI provides an initial and partial model for understanding program infrastructure, but additional work is needed to identify evidence-based indicators of infrastructure elements that can be used to measure success and link infrastructure to public health outcomes, capacity, and sustainability.