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Sample records for health outcomes survey

  1. Evaluating outcomes of care and targeting quality improvement using Medicare health outcomes survey data.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Sonya E

    2012-01-01

    The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) provides a rich source of outcomes data on the Medicare Advantage (MA) program for the US Department of Health and Human Services, managed care organizations participating in Medicare, quality improvement organizations, and health services researchers working to improve quality of care for Medicare enrollees. Since 1998, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has collected longitudinal functional status information to assess the performance of Medicare managed care organizations. This introduction reviews the goals of the HOS program, how the HOS supports health care reform, and outlines recent HOS studies exploring data applications for monitoring outcomes and implementing quality improvement activities.

  2. International Differences in Multiple Sclerosis Health Outcomes and Associated Factors in a Cross-sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Grace D; Mahkawnghta, Awng Shar; Jelinek, Pia L; De Livera, Alysha M; Weiland, Tracey J; Brown, Chelsea R; Taylor, Keryn L; Neate, Sandra L; Jelinek, George A; Marck, Claudia H

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a major cause of disability and poor quality of life (QOL). Previous studies have shown differences in MS health outcomes between countries. This study aimed to examine the associations between international regions and health outcomes in people with MS. Self-reported data were taken from the Health Outcomes and Lifestyle In a Sample of people with Multiple Sclerosis online survey collected in 2012. The 2,401 participants from 37 countries were categorized into three regions: Australasia, Europe, and North America. Differences were observed between regions in disability, physical and mental health QOL, fatigue, and depression, but most of these disappeared after adjusting for sociodemographic, disease, and lifestyle factors in multivariable regression models. However, adjusted odds for disability were higher in Europe [odds ratio (OR): 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.28 to 3.67] and North America (OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.51) compared to Australasia. There may be other unmeasured factors that vary between regions, including differences in access and quality of healthcare services, determining disability in MS. When assessing differences in MS health outcomes, lifestyle factors and medication use should be taken into consideration.

  3. Cesarean delivery outcomes from the WHO global survey on maternal and perinatal health in Africa.

    PubMed

    Shah, Archana; Fawole, Bukola; M'imunya, James Machoki; Amokrane, Faouzi; Nafiou, Idi; Wolomby, Jean-José; Mugerwa, Kidza; Neves, Isilda; Nguti, Rosemary; Kublickas, Marius; Mathai, Matthews

    2009-12-01

    To assess the association between cesarean delivery rates and pregnancy outcomes in African health facilities. Data were obtained from all births over 2-3 months in 131 facilities. Outcomes included maternal deaths, severe maternal morbidity, fresh stillbirths, and neonatal deaths and morbidity. Median cesarean delivery rate was 8.8% among 83439 births. Cesarean deliveries were performed in only 95 (73%) facilities. Facility-specific cesarean delivery rates were influenced by previous cesarean, pre-eclampsia, induced labor, referral status, and higher health facility classification scores. Pre-eclampsia increased the risks of maternal death, fresh stillbirths, and severe neonatal morbidity. Adjusted emergency cesarean delivery rate was associated with more fresh stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and severe neonatal morbidity--probably related to prolonged labor, asphyxia, and sepsis. Adjusted elective cesarean delivery rate was associated with fewer perinatal deaths. Use of cesarean delivery is limited in the African health facilities surveyed. Emergency cesareans, when performed, are often too late to reduce perinatal deaths.

  4. Second-stage non-response in the Swiss health survey: determinants and bias in outcomes.

    PubMed

    Volken, Thomas

    2013-02-23

    Unit non-response occurs in sample surveys when a target subject does not respond to a survey. Potential implications are decreased power, increased standard error, and non-response bias. The objective of this study was to assess the factors associated with participation in a written survey (MSHS) of subjects who had previously participated in the Swiss Health Survey (SHS) and to evaluate to what extent non-participation could impact the estimation of various MSHS health outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the factors associated with MSHS participation (n=14,393) by eligible SHS participants (n=17,931). Crude participation rates and the adjusted odds ratios of participation (OR) were reported. In order to report potential bias in MSHS outcomes, the average age-standardized and sex-specific outcome values in non-participants were predicted based on several different linear regression models which had been previously fitted on MSHS participants. Adjusting for all other variables, women (OR=1.63) as compared with men, subjects with a secondary (OR=1.48) or tertiary education (OR=1.76) as compared with those with primary education, white-collar workers (high level non-manual workers OR=1.29, medium and low level non-manual workers OR=1.26 and OR=1.25 respectively) as compared with unskilled manual workers, Swiss nationals (OR=1.60) as compared to non-Swiss, and subjects with very good or good self-rated health (OR=1.35) were more likely to participate in the MSHS. People who work full-time were less likely to participate than those without paid work (OR=0.76). There were no statistically significant differences in the likelihood of participation between rural and urban areas, different geographic regions of Switzerland and household income quartiles.Except for myocardial infarction, all age-standardized and sex-specific average outcomes (influenza vaccination, arthrosis, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, depression, mastery, and sense of

  5. Relationship between commuting and health outcomes in a cross-sectional population survey in southern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The need for a mobile workforce inevitably means that the length of the total work day (working and traveling time) will increase, but the health effects of commuting have been surprisingly little studied apart from perceived stress and the benefits of physically active commuting. Methods We used data from two cross-sectional population-based public health surveys performed in 2004 and 2008 in Scania, Sweden (56% response rate). The final study population was 21, 088 persons aged 18-65, working > 30 h/week. Duration (one-way) and mode of commuting were reported. The outcomes studied were perceived poor sleep quality, everyday stress, low vitality, mental health, self-reported health, and absence from work due to sickness during the past 12 months. Covariates indicating socioeconomic status and family situation, overtime, job strain and urban/rural residency were included in multivariate analyses. Subjects walking or cycling to work < 30 min were used as a reference category. Results Monotonous relations were found between duration of public transport commuting and the health outcomes. For the category commuting > 60 min odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 1.2 - 1.6 for the different outcomes. For car commuting, the relationships were concave downward or flat, with increasing subjective health complaints up to 30-60 min (ORs ranging from 1.2 - 1.4), and lower ORs in the > 60 min category. A similar concave downward relationship was observed for sickness absence, regardless of mode of transport. Conclusions The results of this study are concordant with the few earlier studies in the field, in that associations were found between commutation and negative health outcomes. This further demonstrates the need to consider the negative side-effects of commuting when discussing policies aimed at increasing the mobility of the workforce. Studies identifying population groups with increased susceptibility are warranted. PMID:22039952

  6. Media Use and Health Outcomes in Adolescents: Findings from a Nationally Representative Survey

    PubMed Central

    Casiano, Hygiea; Kinley, D. Jolene; Katz, Laurence Y.; Chartier, Mariette J.; Sareen, Jitender

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Examine the association between quantity of media use and health outcomes in adolescents. Method: Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted with the Canadian Community Health Survey 1.1 (youth aged 12–19 (n=9137)) to determine the association between hours of use of television/videos, video games, and computers/Internet, and health outcomes including depression, alcohol dependence, binge drinking, suicidal ideation, help-seeking behaviour, risky sexual activity, and obesity. Results: Obesity was associated with frequent television/video use (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 1.10). Depression and risky sexual behaviour were less likely in frequent video game users (AOR 0.87 and 0.73). Binge drinking was less likely in frequent users of video games (AOR 0.92) and computers/Internet (AOR 0.90). Alcohol dependence was less likely in frequent computer/Internet users (AOR 0.89). Conclusions: Most health outcomes, except for obesity, were not associated with using media in youth. Further research into the appropriate role of media will help harness its full potential. PMID:23133464

  7. Racism, health status, and birth outcomes: results of a participatory community-based intervention and health survey.

    PubMed

    Carty, Denise C; Kruger, Daniel J; Turner, Tonya M; Campbell, Bettina; DeLoney, E Hill; Lewis, E Yvonne

    2011-02-01

    Many community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships address social determinants of health as a central consideration. However, research studies that explicitly address racism are scarce in the CBPR literature, and there is a dearth of available community-generated data to empirically examine how racism influences health disparities at the local level. In this paper, we provide results of a cross-sectional, population-based health survey conducted in the urban areas of Genesee and Saginaw Counties in Michigan to assess how a sustained community intervention to reduce racism and infant mortality influenced knowledge, beliefs, and experiences of racism and to explore how perceived racism is associated with self-rated health and birth outcomes. We used ANOVA and regression models to compare the responses of intervention participants and non-participants as well as African Americans and European Americans (N = 629). We found that intervention participants reported greater acknowledgment of the enduring and differential impact of racism in comparison to the non-intervention participants. Moreover, survey analyses revealed that racism was associated with health in the following ways: (1) experiences of racial discrimination predicted self-rated physical health, mental health, and smoking status; (2) perceived racism against one's racial group predicted lower self-rated physical health; and (3) emotional responses to racism-related experiences were marginally associated with lower birth-weight births in the study sample. Our study bolsters the published findings on perceived racism and health outcomes and highlights the usefulness of CBPR and community surveys to empirically investigate racism as a social determinant of health.

  8. Perceived Outcomes of Public Health Privatization: A National Survey of Local Health Department Directors

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Christopher; Marx, John; Ricci, Edmund

    2001-01-01

    Almost three quarters of the nation's local health departments (LHDs) have privatized some services. About half of LHD directors who privatized services reported cost savings and half reported that privatization had facilitated their performance of the core public health functions. Expanded access to services was the most commonly reported positive outcome. Of those privatizing, over two-fifths of LHDs reported a resulting increase in time devoted to management. Yet, one-third of directors reported difficulty monitoring and controlling services that have been contracted out. Communicable disease services was cited most often as a service that should not be privatized. There is a pervasive concern that by contracting out services, health departments can lose the capacity to respond to disease outbreaks and other crises. PMID:11286093

  9. Defining sustainability outcomes of health programs: Illustrations from an on-line survey.

    PubMed

    Scheirer, Mary Ann; Hartling, Gretchen; Hagerman, Diane

    2008-11-01

    Evaluative research for questions of program sustainability has expanded substantially in recent years, but definitional issues remain. This paper presents definitions for four different types of sustainability as potential outcomes of health programs. We then illustrate these definitions with descriptive findings from an on-line survey to "look back" at the extent and types of sustainability that occurred among 48 community-based projects that had received short-term funding from a foundation-funded health program in New Jersey. We found that large percentages of respondents reported positively to each of four types of sustainability measures-maintaining program activities, continuing to serve substantial numbers of clients, building and sustaining collaborative structures, and maintaining attention to the ideas underlying the projects by disseminating them to others. Strengths and limitations of this methodology for future evaluation are also discussed.

  10. Long Term Outcomes in Children with Congenital Heart Disease: National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Razzaghi, Hilda; Oster, Matthew; Reefhuis, Jennita

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the extent of long-term morbidity in children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Study Design We used data from the 1997–2011 National Health Interview Survey to study long-term outcomes in children aged 0–17 years with CHD. Parents were asked whether their child was diagnosed with CHD. We assessed comorbidities including autism/autism spectrum disorders (ASD); healthcare utilization including number of emergency room visits; and daily life aspects including number of days of school missed. These outcomes were compared for children with and without reports of CHD using odds ratios and chi-squared statistics. Results Our study included 420 children with and 180,048 children without reports of CHD; with no significant differences in age and sex. The odds of reporting worse health and greater than 10 days of school/daycare missed in the last year were three times as high for children with CHD compared to children without CHD. Children aged 2–17 with CHD were more likely than children without CHD to have had a diagnosis of ASD (crude odds ratio [OR]: 4.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9–11.0), or intellectual disability (OR: 9.1, 95% CI: 5.4–15.4). The prevalence of emergency room, home, and doctors' visits were significantly higher in children with CHD compared to those without CHD. Conclusions Reported adverse outcomes were higher in children with congenital heart disease. These findings, particularly those regarding neurodevelopmental outcomes, may be helpful for parents, healthcare providers, and others in assessing the specific needs of children and teenagers with CHD. PMID:25304924

  11. Quantifying the utility of taking pills for preventing adverse health outcomes: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Robert; Pignone, Michael P; Sheridan, Stacey L; Viera, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The utility value attributed to taking pills for prevention can have a major effect on the cost-effectiveness of interventions, but few published studies have systematically quantified this value. We sought to quantify the utility value of taking pills used for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Central North Carolina. Participants 708 healthcare employees aged 18 years and older. Primary and secondary outcomes Utility values for taking 1 pill/day, assessed using time trade-off, modified standard gamble and willingness-to-pay methods. Results Mean age of respondents was 43 years (19–74). The majority of the respondents were female (83%) and Caucasian (80%). Most (80%) took at least 2 pills/day. Mean utility values for taking 1 pill/day using the time trade-off method were: 0.9972 (95% CI 0.9962 to 0.9980). Values derived from the standard gamble and willingness-to-pay methods were 0.9967 (0.9954 to 0.9979) and 0.9989 (95% CI 0.9986 to 0.9991), respectively. Utility values varied little across characteristics such as age, sex, race, education level or number of pills taken per day. Conclusions The utility value of taking pills daily in order to prevent an adverse CVD health outcome is approximately 0.997. PMID:25967985

  12. Active parent consent for health surveys with urban middle school students: processes and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Secor-Turner, Molly; Sieving, Renee; Widome, Rachel; Plowman, Shari; Vanden Berk, Eric

    2010-02-01

    To achieve high participation rates and a representative sample, active parent consent procedures require a significant investment of study resources. The purpose of this article is to describe processes and outcomes of utilizing active parent consent procedures with sixth-grade students from urban, ethnically diverse, economically disadvantaged K-8 public schools involved in an evaluation of a middle school service-learning program. As part of the evaluation of the Lead Peace-Plus service-learning program, active parent consent was obtained for participation in school-based health surveys conducted with sixth graders in 3 schools. To achieve acceptable rates of parent permission, we employed multiple procedures including regular communication with school staff, incentives for involved schools and teachers, a multipronged approach for reaching parents, and direct encouragement of students to return forms through repeated classroom visits, individual and classroom incentives. We used Fisher's exact tests to compare selected characteristics among students whose parents weren't reached, those whose parents refused, and those whose parents consented to survey participation. We achieved a parent response rate of 94.6% among sixth-grade students. No significant differences in student gender, race/ethnicity, school, or free/reduced lunch status were identified across parent consent status groups. Rates of absenteeism were significantly higher (p = .03) among students whose parents weren't reached compared to other groups. Employing a multifaceted active parent consent campaign can result in high rates of parental response with limited sampling bias among an urban, ethnically diverse and economically disadvantaged group of middle school students.

  13. Asthma outcomes in children and adolescents with multiple morbidities: Findings from the National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minal R; Leo, Harvey L; Baptist, Alan P; Cao, Yanyun; Brown, Randall W

    2015-06-01

    More Americans are managing multiple chronic conditions (MCCs), and trends are particularly alarming in youth. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and distribution of 9 chronic conditions in children and adolescents with and without asthma, and adverse asthma outcomes associated with having MCCs. Cross-sectional interview data from the National Health Interview Survey were analyzed (N = 66,790) between 2007 and 2012 in youth 0 to 17 years of age. Bivariate analysis methods and multivariate generalized linear regression were used to examine associations. Five percent of children with asthma had 1 or more coexisting health conditions. The prevalence of 1 or more comorbidities was greater among those with asthma than those without (5.07% [95% CI: 4.5-5.6] vs. 2.73% [95% CI: 2.6-2.9]). Those with asthma were twice as likely to have co-occurring hypertension (prevalence ratio [PR] = 2.2 [95% CI: 1.5-3.2]) and arthritis (PR = 2.7 [95% CI: 1.8-4.0]) compared with those without asthma. Every additional chronic condition with asthma was associated with a greater likelihood of an asthma attack (PR = 1.1 [95% CI: 1.0-1.2]), all-cause emergency department visits (PR = 1.3 [95% CI: 1.1-1.5]), and missed school days (PR = 2.3 [95% CI: 1.7-3.2]). Children and adolescents with asthma in the US who suffer from MCCs have increased asthma symptoms, missed school days, and all-cause emergency department visits. Further research on optimal management strategies for this group is needed. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing the Representativeness of Population-Sampled Health Surveys Through Linkage to Administrative Data on Alcohol-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Emma; Leyland, Alastair H.; McCartney, Gerry; White, Ian R.; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Rutherford, Lisa; Graham, Lesley; Gray, Linsay

    2014-01-01

    Health surveys are an important resource for monitoring population health, but selective nonresponse may impede valid inference. This study aimed to assess nonresponse bias in a population-sampled health survey in Scotland, with a focus on alcohol-related outcomes. Nonresponse bias was assessed by examining whether rates of alcohol-related harm (i.e., hospitalization or death) and all-cause mortality among respondents to the Scottish Health Surveys (from 1995 to 2010) were equivalent to those in the general population, and whether the extent of any bias varied according to sociodemographic attributes or over time. Data from consenting respondents (aged 20–64 years) to 6 Scottish Health Surveys were confidentially linked to death and hospitalization records and compared with general population counterparts. Directly age-standardized incidence rates of alcohol-related harm and all-cause mortality were lower among Scottish Health Survey respondents compared with the general population. For all years combined, the survey-to-population rate ratios were 0.69 (95% confidence interval: 0.61, 0.76) for the incidence of alcohol-related harm and 0.89 (95% confidence interval: 0.83, 0.96) for all-cause mortality. Bias was more pronounced among persons residing in more deprived areas; limited evidence was found for regional or temporal variation. This suggests that corresponding underestimation of population rates of alcohol consumption is likely to be socially patterned. PMID:25227767

  15. Does Parental Health Mediate the Relationship between Parental Uninsurance and Insured Children's Health Outcomes? Evidence from a U.S. National Survey.

    PubMed

    Akobirshoev, Ilhom; Bowser, Diana; Parish, Susan L; Thomas, Cindy; Bachman, Sara S

    2017-03-02

    Although the United States has made great strides in ensuring near universal health care access for children, the health insurance coverage gap between children and their parents remains high. This study analyzed aggregated data from the 2006-2013 National Health Interview Survey to investigate the direct relationships between parental uninsurance and children's health outcomes. Authors explored how parental health mediates the relationship between parents' health and children's health outcomes. Results suggest that insured children of uninsured parents have worse health status and are at higher risk of asthma, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, developmental delays, learning disabilities, and mental disabilities compared with insured children of insured parents. Parental health mediated this relationship. These findings illuminate the pathway between parental uninsurance and child health outcomes and suggest that policies that provide health insurance coverage to both children and their parents may improve both parental health and children's health outcomes. This study fills an important gap in the literature related to how parental uninsurance affects children's health outcomes mediated by the impact of uninsurance on parental health.

  16. Comparing Selected Measures of Health Outcomes and Health-Seeking Behaviors in Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese Communities of Chicago: Results from Local Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lucy; Magee, Matthew; Cheung, William; Simon, Melissa; LaBreche, Amanda; Liu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    We describe how local community organizations partnered to conduct a survey in the Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese populations of Chicago to compare health outcomes and assess progress toward Healthy People 2010 goals. Interviews were conducted with 380 randomly selected Chinese adults through door-to-door sampling, and with 250 Cambodian adults and 150 Vietnamese adults through respondent-driven sampling. Data on 14 key health outcomes are described for this analysis. The three surveyed communities were generally poorer, less educated, more often foreign-born, and had less English proficiency than Asians nationally. There were few significant variations among the three populations, but there were notable differences in the burden of tuberculosis, obesity, diabetes, and arthritis. Insurance coverage and cancer-screening utilization were also significantly lower than for US Asians. Health information about Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese populations in Chicago are available for the first time and serve as baseline data for community interventions. Findings highlight important health concerns for these populations and have implications for funders and policy makers in allocating resources, setting health priorities, and addressing health disparities. PMID:20625846

  17. Comparing selected measures of health outcomes and health-seeking behaviors in Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese communities of Chicago: results from local health surveys.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ami M; Guo, Lucy; Magee, Matthew; Cheung, William; Simon, Melissa; LaBreche, Amanda; Liu, Hong

    2010-09-01

    We describe how local community organizations partnered to conduct a survey in the Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese populations of Chicago to compare health outcomes and assess progress toward Healthy People 2010 goals. Interviews were conducted with 380 randomly selected Chinese adults through door-to-door sampling, and with 250 Cambodian adults and 150 Vietnamese adults through respondent-driven sampling. Data on 14 key health outcomes are described for this analysis. The three surveyed communities were generally poorer, less educated, more often foreign-born, and had less English proficiency than Asians nationally. There were few significant variations among the three populations, but there were notable differences in the burden of tuberculosis, obesity, diabetes, and arthritis. Insurance coverage and cancer-screening utilization were also significantly lower than for US Asians. Health information about Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese populations in Chicago are available for the first time and serve as baseline data for community interventions. Findings highlight important health concerns for these populations and have implications for funders and policy makers in allocating resources, setting health priorities, and addressing health disparities.

  18. Sex Education, First Sex and Sexual Health Outcomes in Adulthood: Findings from a Nationally Representative Sexual Health Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Ashling; Boduszek, Daniel; Kelleher, Caroline; McBride, Orla; Morgan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between school sex education and sexual health behaviours at first sex and later in adulthood, using nationally representative data. Respondents were adults from the 2010 Irish Contraception and Crisis Pregnancy Survey, a cross-sectional survey designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating…

  19. Sex Education, First Sex and Sexual Health Outcomes in Adulthood: Findings from a Nationally Representative Sexual Health Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Ashling; Boduszek, Daniel; Kelleher, Caroline; McBride, Orla; Morgan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between school sex education and sexual health behaviours at first sex and later in adulthood, using nationally representative data. Respondents were adults from the 2010 Irish Contraception and Crisis Pregnancy Survey, a cross-sectional survey designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and behaviours relating…

  20. Towards Horizon 2020: challenges and advances for clinical mental health research - outcome of an expert survey.

    PubMed

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Os, Jim; Knappe, Susanne; Schumann, Gunter; Vieta, Eduard; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lewis, Shôn W; Elfeddali, Iman; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Linszen, Donald; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Haro, Josep Maria

    2014-01-01

    The size and increasing burden of disease due to mental disorders in Europe poses substantial challenges to its population and to the health policy of the European Union. This warrants a specific research agenda concerning clinical mental health research as one of the cornerstones of sustainable mental health research and health policy in Europe. The aim of this research was to identify the top priorities needed to address the main challenges in clinical research for mental disorders. The research was conducted as an expert survey and expert panel discussion during a scientific workshop. Eighty-nine experts in clinical research and representing most European countries participated in this survey. Identified top priorities were the need for new intervention studies, understanding the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of mechanisms of disease, and research in the field of somatic-psychiatric comorbidity. The "subjectivity gap" between basic neuroscience research and clinical reality for patients with mental disorders is considered the main challenge in psychiatric research, suggesting that a shift in research paradigms is required. Innovations in clinical mental health research should bridge the gap between mechanisms underlying novel therapeutic interventions and the patient experience of mental disorder and, if present, somatic comorbidity. Clinical mental health research is relatively underfunded and should receive specific attention in Horizon 2020 funding programs.

  1. Avatar Web-Based Self-Report Survey System Technology for Public Health Research: Technical Outcome Results and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Savel, Craig; Mierzwa, Stan; Gorbach, Pamina M; Souidi, Samir; Lally, Michelle; Zimet, Gregory; Interventions, Aids

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a specific Web-based self-report data collection system that was developed for a public health research study in the United States. Our focus is on technical outcome results and lessons learned that may be useful to other projects requiring such a solution. The system was accessible from any device that had a browser that supported HTML5. Report findings include: which hardware devices, Web browsers, and operating systems were used; the rate of survey completion; and key considerations for employing Web-based surveys in a clinical trial setting.

  2. Avatar Web-Based Self-Report Survey System Technology for Public Health Research: Technical Outcome Results and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Savel, Craig; Mierzwa, Stan; Gorbach, Pamina M.; Souidi, Samir; Lally, Michelle; Zimet, Gregory; Interventions, AIDS

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a specific Web-based self-report data collection system that was developed for a public health research study in the United States. Our focus is on technical outcome results and lessons learned that may be useful to other projects requiring such a solution. The system was accessible from any device that had a browser that supported HTML5. Report findings include: which hardware devices, Web browsers, and operating systems were used; the rate of survey completion; and key considerations for employing Web-based surveys in a clinical trial setting. PMID:28149445

  3. Questions About Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening Knowledge, Practice, and Outcomes: A Review of Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed

    Viens, Laura; Perin, Doug; Senkomago, Virginia; Neri, Antonio; Saraiya, Mona

    2017-05-01

    United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals and the World Health Organization's Global Monitoring Framework support a strong global commitment to reducing the high burden of cervical and breast cancers among low- and middle-income countries. Strategies include vaccination, screening, and early diagnosis. Population-based surveys, such as those conducted by the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) Program, can collect the information needed to guide cancer control efforts in a standardized comparable manner. We identified and evaluated the breadth of breast and cervical cancer screening information that was collected by the DHS from 1984 through 2015. Then, we determined if these surveys currently provide the specific and measurable data about both the quantity and quality of cancer screening needed to guide national efforts to reduce the overall effects of cervical and breast cancers. We searched the DHS website to identify surveys conducted between the start of the DHS Program in 1984 and November 2015 that included questions about breast and cervical cancer screening. The relevant questions were extracted from the questionnaire, translated into English, and grouped by themes. Of the 90 countries where DHS surveys have been implemented, cervical cancer screening questions were included in 22 countries (24.4%) and breast cancer screening questions in 18 countries (20.0%). The common themes identified were disease knowledge, screening knowledge, screening practice, and screening outcomes. Most countries with survey questionnaires available for review addressed at least one aspect of screening practice (88.9% of cervical and 87.5% of breast), although few countries queried knowledge and outcomes. Questions that assess varied aspects of breast and cervical cancer screening have been incorporated into relatively few DHS surveys. The themes identified could guide the design of a standard set of questions for use in future population-based surveys and enable evaluation

  4. The Desired Learning Outcomes of School-Based Nutrition/Physical Activity Health Education: A Health Literacy Constructed Delphi Survey of Finnish Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormshaw, Michael James; Kokko, Sami Petteri; Villberg, Jari; Kannas, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to utilise the collective opinion of a group of Finnish experts to identify the most important learning outcomes of secondary-level school-based health education, in the specific domains of physical activity and nutrition. Design/ Methodology/ Approach: The study uses a Delphi survey technique to collect the…

  5. The Desired Learning Outcomes of School-Based Nutrition/Physical Activity Health Education: A Health Literacy Constructed Delphi Survey of Finnish Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormshaw, Michael James; Kokko, Sami Petteri; Villberg, Jari; Kannas, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to utilise the collective opinion of a group of Finnish experts to identify the most important learning outcomes of secondary-level school-based health education, in the specific domains of physical activity and nutrition. Design/ Methodology/ Approach: The study uses a Delphi survey technique to collect the…

  6. The Demographic Assessment for Health Literacy (DAHL): a new tool for estimating associations between health literacy and outcomes in national surveys.

    PubMed

    Hanchate, Amresh D; Ash, Arlene S; Gazmararian, Julie A; Wolf, Michael S; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2008-10-01

    To impute limited health literacy from commonly measured socio-demographic data and to compare it to the Short-Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) for estimating the influence of limited health literacy on health status in the elderly. The Prudential Medicare Study assesses the S-TOFHLA score, leading to a "reference standard" classification of 25% of people with inadequate literacy; the National Health Interview Survey has no such assessment. We estimated a regression of S-TOFHLA on sex, age, years of schooling, and race/ethnicity in The Prudential Medicare Study data to derive a Demographic Assessment for Health Literacy (DAHL) score, and imputed inadequate literacy to the 25% with the lowest DAHL scores. Using regression, we then examined associations between several health status measures (including hypertension, diabetes, physical and mental SF-12) and inadequate literacy (imputed or test-based). Estimates of association using imputed inadequate literacy closely approximate those obtained using S-TOFHLA-based inadequate literacy for most outcomes examined. As few population surveys measure health literacy, the DAHL, a readily calculated health literacy proxy score, may be useful for expanding the scope of health literacy research in national survey data.

  7. Evaluating Health Education Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patty, Willard W.

    2001-01-01

    This 1949 paper considers the evaluation of health education outcomes. It describes the nature of health education, discusses whether it is possible to measure all health education outcomes, then examines how to evaluate student health habits and skills, health attitudes, and health knowledge. It concludes that it is important to evaluate health…

  8. Current practice of glucocorticoid replacement therapy and patient-perceived health outcomes in adrenal insufficiency - a worldwide patient survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim was to survey current practice in glucocorticoid replacement therapy and self-perceived health outcomes in patients with adrenal insufficiency. Methods Participants were recruited via patient organizations to respond anonymously to a web-based survey developed by clinical experts. Unique entries were set up for each patient organization enabling geographical localization of the entries. Results 1245 participants responded (primary adrenal insufficiency: 84%; secondary adrenal insufficiency: 11%; unsure: 5%). Therapies included hydrocortisone (75%), prednisone/prednisolone (11%), cortisone acetate (6%) and dexamethasone (4%). Dosing regimens were once daily (10%), twice daily (42%), thrice daily (32%) or other (17%). Compromised subjective health necessitating changes to physical activity or social-, work- or family life was reported by 64% of the participants. 40% of the participants reported absence from work/school in the last 3 months. Irrespective of diagnosis, 76% were concerned about long-term side-effects of therapy, mainly osteoporosis (78%), obesity (64%) and cardiovascular morbidity (46%). 38% of the participants had been hospitalized in the last year. Conclusions Glucocorticoid replacement therapy among the respondents consisted primarily of hydrocortisone administered twice or thrice daily. A majority reported impact of their disease or treatment on subjective health requiring alterations in e.g. physical activity or family life. Three quarters reported concerns about long-term side-effects of the treatment. These data demonstrate - from the patients' perspective - a need for improvement in the management of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:22695167

  9. Incidence and outcomes of uterine rupture among women with prior caesarean section: WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health

    PubMed Central

    Motomura, Kenichiro; Ganchimeg, Togoobaatar; Nagata, Chie; Ota, Erika; Vogel, Joshua P.; Betran, Ana Pilar; Torloni, Maria Regina; Jayaratne, Kapila; Jwa, Seung Chik; Mittal, Suneeta; Dy Recidoro, Zenaida; Matsumoto, Kenji; Fujieda, Mikiya; Nafiou, Idi; Yunis, Khalid; Qureshi, Zahida; Souza, Joao Paulo; Mori, Rintaro

    2017-01-01

    Caesarean section (CS) is increasing globally, and women with prior CS are at higher risk of uterine rupture in subsequent pregnancies. However, little is known about the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of uterine rupture in women with prior CS, especially in developing countries. To investigate this, we conducted a secondary analysis of the World Health Organization Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health, which included data on delivery from 359 facilities in 29 countries. The incidence of uterine rupture among women with at least one prior CS was 0.5% (170/37,366), ranging from 0.2% in high-Human Development Index (HDI) countries to 1.0% in low-HDI countries. Factors significantly associated with uterine rupture included giving birth in medium- or low-HDI countries (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.0 and 3.88, respectively), lower maternal educational level (≤6 years) (AOR 1.71), spontaneous onset of labour (AOR 1.62), and gestational age at birth <37 weeks (AOR 3.52). Women with uterine rupture had significantly higher risk of maternal death (AOR 4.45) and perinatal death (AOR 33.34). Women with prior CS, especially in resource-limited settings, are facing higher risk of uterine rupture and subsequent adverse outcomes. Further studies are needed for prevention/management strategies in these settings. PMID:28281576

  10. Different outcomes for different health measures in immigrants: evidence from a longitudinal analysis of the National Population Health Survey (1994-2006).

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh; Quesnel-Vallee, Amelie; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Tousignant, Pierre; Lynch, John

    2012-02-01

    The response of immigrants to new societies is dynamic. There may be an initial period of happiness followed by peaks of stressful periods. These reactions along with socio-economic changes are likely to influence their health, which may start converging towards the average health of the host population. We used a longitudinal analysis to assess the differences in health outcomes (mental health and self-rated health), separately in men and women, in Canadian born and immigrants over a 12-year period (and the associated socio-economic factors). We used random effects logistic regression models for evaluation of these health outcomes in 3,081 men and 4,187 women from the National Population Health Survey (1994/95 to 2006/07). After adjusting for all the covariates, non-white immigrants were less likely to have severe psychological distress compared with the Canadian born individuals [odds ratio (OR) Men: 0.49, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.24-1.00, Women-OR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.32-0.92]. Immigrant women (white and non-white) were more likely to rate their health as poor through this 12-year period than the Canadian born women (White-OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.17-2.64; Non-white-OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.01-3.28). Immigrants in the lowest income adequacy category reported higher psychological distress and poorer health than those in the highest income categories. We did not find any significant differences in the mental health and self-rated health of Canadian men and white male immigrants throughout this 12-year period. Though, non-white immigrant women were less likely to have severe psychological distress through this 12 year period, they were the ones most likely to rate their health as poor.

  11. Same-Sex and Different-Sex Parent Households and Child Health Outcomes: Findings from the National Survey of Children's Health.

    PubMed

    Bos, Henny M W; Knox, Justin R; van Rijn-van Gelderen, Loes; Gartrell, Nanette K

    2016-04-01

    Using the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health data set, we compared spouse/partner relationships and parent-child relationships (family relationships), parenting stress, and children's general health, emotional difficulties, coping behavior, and learning behavior (child outcomes) in households of same-sex (female) versus different-sex continuously coupled parents with biological offspring. We assessed whether associations among family relationships, parenting stress, and child outcomes were different in the 2 household types. Parental and child characteristics were matched for 95 female same-sex parent and 95 different-sex parent households with children 6 to 17 years old. One parent per household was interviewed by telephone. Multivariate analyses of variance and multiple linear regressions were conducted. No differences were observed between household types on family relationships or any child outcomes. Same-sex parent households scored higher on parenting stress (95% confidence interval = 2.03-2.30) than different-sex parent households (95% confidence interval = 1.76-2.03), p = .006. No significant interactions between household type and family relationships or household type and parenting stress were found for any child outcomes. Children with female same-sex parents and different-sex parents demonstrated no differences in outcomes, despite female same-sex parents reporting more parenting stress. Future studies may reveal the sources of this parenting stress.

  12. Severe maternal outcomes and their predictors among Pakistani women in the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Syeda B; Batool, Afshan; Emanuel, Angela; Khan, Arif T; Bhutta, Shireen

    2015-04-01

    To determine the incidence of, and the demographic and obstetric factors associated with, severe maternal outcome (SMO) among women presenting at healthcare facilities in Pakistan. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 16 healthcare facilities across Pakistan that had been selected for the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn health. The hospital records of women who delivered at a participating facility or were admitted with SMO (defined as maternal death or near miss) within 7 days of delivery/abortion were reviewed for a period of 2-3 months in 2011. The incidence of SMO, its associated demographic and obstetric characteristics, and the influence of various maternal health interventions were assessed. Among 13 175 included women, 132 (1.0%) had an SMO (94 [0.7%] near miss and 38 [0.3%] died). The maternal mortality ratio was 299 deaths per 100 000 live births. Major causes of SMO included postpartum hemorrhage (64 [48.5%] women), hypertensive disorders (34 [25.8%]), and ruptured uterus (9 [6.8]). Illiteracy, anemia, and several obstetric complications (e.g. eclampsia) were significant contributors. Improving education, nutrition, and uniform implementation of obstetric care protocols are needed for better maternal and neonatal health in Pakistan. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Active Parent Consent for Health Surveys with Urban Middle School Students: Processes and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secor-Turner, Molly; Sieving, Renee; Widome, Rachel; Plowman, Shari; Vanden Berk, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Background: To achieve high participation rates and a representative sample, active parent consent procedures require a significant investment of study resources. The purpose of this article is to describe processes and outcomes of utilizing active parent consent procedures with sixth-grade students from urban, ethnically diverse, economically…

  14. Active Parent Consent for Health Surveys with Urban Middle School Students: Processes and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secor-Turner, Molly; Sieving, Renee; Widome, Rachel; Plowman, Shari; Vanden Berk, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Background: To achieve high participation rates and a representative sample, active parent consent procedures require a significant investment of study resources. The purpose of this article is to describe processes and outcomes of utilizing active parent consent procedures with sixth-grade students from urban, ethnically diverse, economically…

  15. The labour market, psychosocial outcomes and health conditions in cancer survivors: protocol for a nationwide longitudinal survey 2 and 5 years after cancer diagnosis (the VICAN survey).

    PubMed

    Bouhnik, Anne-Deborah; Bendiane, Marc-Karim; Cortaredona, Sebastien; Sagaon Teyssier, Luis; Rey, Dominique; Berenger, Cyril; Seror, Valerie; Peretti-Watel, Patrick

    2015-03-24

    Today, a growing need exists for greater research into cancer survivorship, focusing on different spheres of the day-to-day life of diagnosed patients. This article describes the design and implementation of VICAN (VIe après le CANcer), a national survey on French cancer survivors. The target population included patients aged 18-82, diagnosed with cancer between January and June 2010, and registered in one of the three main French Health Insurance Schemes. It was restricted to 12 tumour sites. Sampling was stratified using a non-proportional allocation, based on age at diagnosis (18-52 and 53-82) and tumour site. Data were collected from telephone interviews with patients 2 and 5 years after diagnosis, a medical survey completed by the physician who initiated cancer treatment, and information from the national medicoadministrative database on reimbursement data and hospital discharge records. First data collection, 2 years after diagnosis, occurred between March and December 2012. Second data collection, 5 years after diagnosis, will be conducted in 2015. Analyses will be conducted on various outcomes: quality of life, health status and psychosocial conditions, with a particular focus on the impact of cancer diagnosis on the labour market. The variety of measurements included in the survey will enable us to control a wide range of factors. The methodology of the VICAN survey was approved by three national ethics commissions. Results of the study will be disseminated through national and international research conferences, and in articles published in international peer-reviewed journals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Functional status and quality of life among breast cancer survivors with heart failure: results of the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jordan M; Davis, Matthew A; Barton, Debra L; Janz, Nancy K; Pressler, Susan J; Friese, Christopher R

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this population-based study was to examine health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and functional status among breast cancer survivors with heart failure. We examined Medicare Health Outcomes Survey data from women aged 65 and older diagnosed with breast cancer in the past 5 years. Surveys were linked to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registries. Each woman identified with self-reported heart failure (n = 239) was matched to controls without heart failure (n = 685) using propensity scores. The Short Form-36/Veterans Rand-12 measured eight domains of HRQOL. Functional status impairment was measured by limitations in six activities of daily living (ADLs). Linear models estimated associations between heart failure status and HRQOL. Logistic regression models estimated odds ratios for associations between heart failure and ADL impairment. We examined associations for the total study population and subgroups stratified by cancer stage. Among all study participants, heart failure was associated with significant deficits in every HRQOL domain and impairment in all ADLs (p < 0.01, ORs ranged from 1.74 to 2.47). After stratification by cancer stage, heart failure was associated with physical HRQOL deficits across all cancer stages (physical function, vitality, general health) and mental HRQOL deficits only in women with stage I/II cancer (role-emotional, social function). Women with early stage cancer experienced the greatest HRQOL deficits associated with heart failure. Heart failure in breast cancer survivors is associated with substantial HRQOL deficits and functional status impairment, particularly in early stage cancer. Tailored interventions are needed to improve physical function and mental wellbeing in this high-risk population.

  17. Likely Health Outcomes for Untreated Acute Febrile Illness in the Tropics in Decision and Economic Models; A Delphi Survey

    PubMed Central

    Lubell, Yoel; Staedke, Sarah G.; Greenwood, Brian M.; Kamya, Moses R.; Molyneux, Malcolm; Newton, Paul N.; Reyburn, Hugh; Snow, Robert W.; D'Alessandro, Umberto; English, Mike; Day, Nick; Kremsner, Peter; Dondorp, Arjen; Mbacham, Wilfred; Dorsey, Grant; Owusu-Agyei, Seth; Maitland, Kathryn; Krishna, Sanjeev; Newton, Charles; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Taylor, Terrie; von Seidlein, Lorenz; White, Nicholas J.; Binka, Fred; Mills, Anne; Whitty, Christopher J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Modelling is widely used to inform decisions about management of malaria and acute febrile illnesses. Most models depend on estimates of the probability that untreated patients with malaria or bacterial illnesses will progress to severe disease or death. However, data on these key parameters are lacking and assumptions are frequently made based on expert opinion. Widely diverse opinions can lead to conflicting outcomes in models they inform. Methods and Findings A Delphi survey was conducted with malaria experts aiming to reach consensus on key parameters for public health and economic models, relating to the outcome of untreated febrile illnesses. Survey questions were stratified by malaria transmission intensity, patient age, and HIV prevalence. The impact of the variability in opinion on decision models is illustrated with a model previously used to assess the cost-effectiveness of malaria rapid diagnostic tests. Some consensus was reached around the probability that patients from higher transmission settings with untreated malaria would progress to severe disease (median 3%, inter-quartile range (IQR) 1–5%), and the probability that a non-malaria illness required antibiotics in areas of low HIV prevalence (median 20%). Children living in low transmission areas were considered to be at higher risk of progressing to severe malaria (median 30%, IQR 10–58%) than those from higher transmission areas (median 13%, IQR 7–30%). Estimates of the probability of dying from severe malaria were high in all settings (medians 60–73%). However, opinions varied widely for most parameters, and did not converge on resurveying. Conclusions This study highlights the uncertainty around potential consequences of untreated malaria and bacterial illnesses. The lack of consensus on most parameters, the wide range of estimates, and the impact of variability in estimates on model outputs, demonstrate the importance of sensitivity analysis for decision models employing

  18. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  19. Pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes: a secondary analysis of the World Health Organization Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Abalos, E; Cuesta, C; Carroli, G; Qureshi, Z; Widmer, M; Vogel, J P; Souza, J P

    2014-03-01

    To assess the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and related severe complications, identify other associated factors and compare maternal and perinatal outcomes in women with and without these conditions. Secondary analysis of the World Health Organization Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health (WHOMCS) database. Cross-sectional study implemented at 357 health facilities conducting 1000 or more deliveries annually in 29 countries from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. All women suffering from any hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, the intrapartum or early postpartum period in the participating hospitals during the study period. We calculated the proportion of the pre-specified outcomes in the study population and their distribution according to hypertensive disorders' severity. We estimated the association between them and maternal deaths, near-miss cases, and severe maternal complications using a multilevel logit model. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Potentially life-threatening conditions among maternal near-miss cases, maternal deaths and cases without severe maternal outcomes. Overall, 8542 (2.73%) women suffered from hypertensive disorders. Incidences of pre-eclampsia, eclampsia and chronic hypertension were 2.16%, 0.28% and 0.29%, respectively. Maternal near-miss cases were eight times more frequent in women with pre-eclampsia, and increased to up to 60 times more frequent in women with eclampsia, when compared with women without these conditions. The analysis of this large database provides estimates of the global distribution of the incidence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. The information on the most frequent complications related to pre-eclampsia and eclampsia could be of interest to inform policies for health systems organisation. © 2014 RCOG The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  20. Socioeconomic disparities in tobacco-related health outcomes across racial/ethnic groups in the United States: National Health Interview Survey 2010.

    PubMed

    Margerison-Zilko, Claire; Cubbin, Catherine

    2013-06-01

    Existing research documents strong inverse socioeconomic gradients in current smoking and lung cancer morbidity and mortality; these gradients appear stronger among non-Hispanic Whites and Blacks compared with Hispanics. We sought to examine a broader range of outcomes across the tobacco use continuum, examining socioeconomic gradients separately among the 3 largest racial/ethnic groups in the United States. We used data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (n = 17,284) Cancer Control Supplement to calculate prevalences and means for outcomes across the tobacco use continuum by educational attainment and income separately among non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic/Latino, and non-Hispanic White adults. Findings demonstrate that current smoking, age at initiation, cigarettes per day, years quit, and secondhand smoke all exhibit strong inverse educational gradients and moderately strong inverse income gradients, especially among Whites and Blacks. Hispanics/Latinos generally have more favorable outcomes along the tobacco use continuum and less evident socioeconomic gradients. Educational attainment is strongly associated with indicators across the tobacco use continuum among non-Hispanic Whites and Blacks. More research is needed to determine whether policies and programs to increase educational attainment may also reduce tobacco-related health disparities.

  1. Complementary feeding practices and child growth outcomes in Haiti: an analysis of data from Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed

    Heidkamp, Rebecca A; Ayoya, Mohamed Ag; Teta, Ismael Ngnie; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Marhone, Joseline Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The Haitian National Nutrition Policy identifies the promotion of optimal complementary feeding (CF) practices as a priority action to prevent childhood malnutrition. We analysed data from the nationally representative 2005-2006 Haiti Demographic Health Survey using the World Health Organization 2008 infant and young child feeding indicators to describe feeding practices among children aged 6-23 months and thus inform policy and programme planning. Multivariate regression analyses were used to identify the determinants of CF practices and to examine their association with child growth outcomes. Overall, 87.3% of 6-8-month-olds received soft, solid or semi-solid foods in the previous 24 h. Minimum dietary diversity (MDD), minimum meal frequency (MMF) and minimum acceptable diet (MAD) were achieved in 29.2%, 45.3% and 17.1% of children aged 6-23 months, respectively. Non-breastfed children were more likely to achieve MDD than breastfed children of the same age (37.3% vs. 25.8%; P < 0.001). The proportion of children achieving MMF varied significantly by age (P < 0.001). Children with overweight mothers were more likely to achieve MDD, MMF and MAD [odds ratio (OR) 2.08, P = 0.012; OR 1.81, P = 0.02; and OR 2.4, P = 0.01, respectively] than children of normal weight mothers. Odds of achieving MDD and MMF increased with household wealth. Among mothers with secondary or more education, achieving MDD or MAD was significantly associated with lower mean weight-for-age z-score and height-for-age z-score (P-value <0.05 for infants and young child feeding indicator × maternal education interaction). CF practices were mostly inadequate and contributed to growth faltering among Haitian children 6-23 months old.

  2. Do associations between employee self-reported organizational assessments and attitudinal outcomes change over time? An analysis of four Veterans Health Administration surveys using structural equation modelling.

    PubMed

    Das, Sonali; Chen, Ming-Hui; Warren, Nicholas; Hodgson, Michael

    2011-12-01

    This paper evaluates relationships between healthcare employees' perceptions of three hospital organizational constructs (Leadership, Support and Resources), and their assessment of two employee-related outcomes (employee satisfaction and retention) and two patient-related outcomes (patient satisfaction and quality of care). Using four all-employee surveys conducted by the Veterans Health Administration in the United States between 1997 and 2006, we examine the strength of these relationships and their changes over time. Exposure and outcome measures are employee-assessed in all the surveys. Because it can accommodate both latent and measured variables into the model, Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) is used to capture and quantify the relationship structure. The aim of the project is to identify possible intervention foci. The analyses revealed that employee-related outcomes are improved by increases in Leadership and Support, and, not surprisingly, the outcome variable of employee satisfaction reduced turnover intention. The employee assessed patient-related outcomes of satisfaction and quality of care were most improved by increases in Resources. Results also indicate that the three organizational constructs and the web of associations characterized by SEM underwent changes over the study period, perhaps in relation to changes in VHA policy emphases, changes in survey wording and other possible unmeasured factors. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Educational outcomes associated with childhood obesity in the United States: cross-sectional results from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health.

    PubMed

    Carey, Felicia R; Singh, Gopal K; Brown, H Shelton; Wilkinson, Anna V

    2015-07-27

    Past research examining the effects of childhood obesity has largely focused on its projected effects into adulthood. However, there is emerging evidence that childhood obesity may have more immediate effects on school-related outcomes. We examine a range of educational attainment indicators to examine the possible pathway between obesity status and academic performance, while investigating the proximal effects of childhood obesity on health and utilization of health services, and whether these variables attenuate the relationship between obesity status and educational outcomes. Data for the current study come from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health, which details the impacts of childhood obesity on a range of outcomes among a nationally representative sample of children and adolescents aged 10-17 years (N=45,255). Educational outcomes (school absences, school problems, repeating a grade and school engagement) were modeled by logistic regression as a function of BMI, overall health status, health care utilization, and a range of sociodemographic variables. BMI status was significantly associated with all educational outcomes (p<0.001 for all), overall health status (p<0.001), and health care utilization (p=0.016). Prior to adjustment for covariates, obese children were significantly more likely to have school absences and school problems, to repeat a grade, and to have lower school engagement than non-overweight children. After adjustment for sociodemographic and health/healthcare variables, these outcomes remained significant for all but repeating a grade. The odds of having school problems, repeating a grade, and low school engagement that were associated with obesity were attenuated by the addition of sociodemographic variables into the model, while the addition of health and health care variables in the model decreased the odds of school absences. This study provides evidence that increased weight status in children is associated with poorer

  4. Educational outcomes associated with childhood obesity in the United States: cross-sectional results from the 2011–2012 National Survey of Children’s Health

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Past research examining the effects of childhood obesity has largely focused on its projected effects into adulthood. However, there is emerging evidence that childhood obesity may have more immediate effects on school-related outcomes. We examine a range of educational attainment indicators to examine the possible pathway between obesity status and academic performance, while investigating the proximal effects of childhood obesity on health and utilization of health services, and whether these variables attenuate the relationship between obesity status and educational outcomes. Methods Data for the current study come from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health, which details the impacts of childhood obesity on a range of outcomes among a nationally representative sample of children and adolescents aged 10-17 years (N=45,255). Educational outcomes (school absences, school problems, repeating a grade and school engagement) were modeled by logistic regression as a function of BMI, overall health status, health care utilization, and a range of sociodemographic variables. Results BMI status was significantly associated with all educational outcomes (p<0.001 for all), overall health status (p<0.001), and health care utilization (p=0.016). Prior to adjustment for covariates, obese children were significantly more likely to have school absences and school problems, to repeat a grade, and to have lower school engagement than non-overweight children. After adjustment for sociodemographic and health/healthcare variables, these outcomes remained significant for all but repeating a grade. The odds of having school problems, repeating a grade, and low school engagement that were associated with obesity were attenuated by the addition of sociodemographic variables into the model, while the addition of health and health care variables in the model decreased the odds of school absences. Conclusions This study provides evidence that increased weight status

  5. Towards Horizon 2020: challenges and advances for clinical mental health research – outcome of an expert survey

    PubMed Central

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Os, Jim; Knappe, Susanne; Schumann, Gunter; Vieta, Eduard; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lewis, Shôn W; Elfeddali, Iman; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Linszen, Donald; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Haro, Josep Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The size and increasing burden of disease due to mental disorders in Europe poses substantial challenges to its population and to the health policy of the European Union. This warrants a specific research agenda concerning clinical mental health research as one of the cornerstones of sustainable mental health research and health policy in Europe. The aim of this research was to identify the top priorities needed to address the main challenges in clinical research for mental disorders. Methods The research was conducted as an expert survey and expert panel discussion during a scientific workshop. Results Eighty-nine experts in clinical research and representing most European countries participated in this survey. Identified top priorities were the need for new intervention studies, understanding the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of mechanisms of disease, and research in the field of somatic-psychiatric comorbidity. The “subjectivity gap” between basic neuroscience research and clinical reality for patients with mental disorders is considered the main challenge in psychiatric research, suggesting that a shift in research paradigms is required. Conclusion Innovations in clinical mental health research should bridge the gap between mechanisms underlying novel therapeutic interventions and the patient experience of mental disorder and, if present, somatic comorbidity. Clinical mental health research is relatively underfunded and should receive specific attention in Horizon 2020 funding programs. PMID:25061300

  6. Sexual Orientation, Adult Connectedness, Substance Use, and Mental Health Outcomes Among Adolescents: Findings From the 2009 New York City Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    PubMed Central

    Seil, Kacie S.; Desai, Mayur M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined associations between identifying as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) and lacking a connection with an adult at school on adolescent substance use and mental health outcomes including suicidality. Methods. We analyzed data from the 2009 New York City Youth Risk Behavior Survey (n = 8910). Outcomes of interest included alcohol use, marijuana use, illicit drug use, depressive symptomatology, suicide ideation, and suicide attempt. Results. The prevalence of each outcome was significantly higher among LGB adolescents than heterosexual adolescents and among those who lacked an adult connection at school than among those who did have such a connection. Even when LGB adolescents had an adult connection at school, their odds of most outcomes were significantly higher than for heterosexual adolescents. Those LGB adolescents who lacked a school adult connection had the poorest outcomes (about 45% reported suicide ideation; 31% suicide attempt). Conclusions. Adolescents who are LGB, particularly those who lack a connection with school adults, are at high risk for substance use and poorer mental health outcomes. Interventions should focus on boosting social support and improving outcomes for this vulnerable group. PMID:25121812

  7. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  8. The Personal Health Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Frederick C.

    1978-01-01

    The Personal Health Survey (PHS) is a 200-item inventory designed to sample symptomatology as subjective experiences from the 12 principal domains of organ system and psychophysiological functioning. This study investigates the factorial validity of the empirically constructed scales. (Author)

  9. Ethnic discrimination prevalence and associations with health outcomes: data from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of secondary school students in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reported ethnic discrimination is higher among indigenous and minority adult populations. There is a paucity of nationally representative prevalence studies of ethnic discrimination among adolescents. Experiencing ethnic discrimination has been associated with a range of adverse health outcomes. NZ has a diverse ethnic population. There are health inequalities among young people from Māori and Pacific ethnic groups. Methods 9107 randomly selected secondary school students participated in a nationally representative cross-sectional health and wellbeing survey conducted in 2007. The prevalence of ethnic discrimination by health professionals, by police, and ethnicity-related bullying were analysed. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between ethnic discrimination and six health/wellbeing outcomes: self-rated health status, depressive symptoms in the last 12 months, cigarette smoking, binge alcohol use, feeling safe in ones neighbourhood, and self-rated school achievement. Results There were significant ethnic differences in the prevalences of ethnic discrimination. Students who experienced ethnic discrimination were less likely to report excellent/very good/good self-rated general health (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.39, 0.65), feel safe in their neighbourhood (OR 0.48; 95% CI 0.40, 0.58), and more likely to report an episode of binge drinking in the previous 4 weeks (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.45, 2.17). For all these outcomes the odds ratios for the group who were 'unsure' if they had experienced ethnic discrimination were similar to those of the 'yes' group. Ethnicity stratified associations between ethnic discrimination and the depression, cigarette smoking, and self-rated school achievement are reported. Within each ethnic group participants reporting ethnic discrimination were more likely to have adverse outcomes for these three variables. For all three outcomes the direction and size of the association between experience of ethnic discrimination

  10. Food Insecurity And Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Craig; Ziliak, James P

    2015-11-01

    Almost fifty million people are food insecure in the United States, which makes food insecurity one of the nation's leading health and nutrition issues. We examine recent research evidence of the health consequences of food insecurity for children, nonsenior adults, and seniors in the United States. For context, we first provide an overview of how food insecurity is measured in the country, followed by a presentation of recent trends in the prevalence of food insecurity. Then we present a survey of selected recent research that examined the association between food insecurity and health outcomes. We show that the literature has consistently found food insecurity to be negatively associated with health. For example, after confounding risk factors were controlled for, studies found that food-insecure children are at least twice as likely to report being in fair or poor health and at least 1.4 times more likely to have asthma, compared to food-secure children; and food-insecure seniors have limitations in activities of daily living comparable to those of food-secure seniors fourteen years older. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) substantially reduces the prevalence of food insecurity and thus is critical to reducing negative health outcomes.

  11. Health hackathons: theatre or substance? A survey assessment of outcomes from healthcare-focused hackathons in three countries

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Madeline; Garg, Priya; Steel, Alexis; Mehta, Sahil; Data, Santorino; Petersen, Rebecca; Guarino, Anthony J; Bailey, Elizabeth; Bangsberg, David R

    2017-01-01

    Background Healthcare-focused hackathons are 48-hour platforms intended to accelerate novel medical technology. However, debate exists about how much they contribute to medical technology innovation. The Consortium for Affordable Medical Technologies (CAMTech) has developed a three-pronged model to maximise their effectiveness. To gauge the success of this model, we examined follow-up outcomes. Methods Outcomes of 12 hackathons from 2012 to 2015 in India, Uganda and the USA were measured using emailed surveys. To minimise response bias, non-responding teams were coded as having made no progress. Results 331 individuals provided information on 196 of 356 projects (55.1% response rate), with no difference in responses from teams participating in different countries (Cramer's V=0.09, p=0.17). 30.3% of projects had made progress after a mean of 12.2 months. 88 (24.7%) teams had initiated pilot testing, with 42 (11.8%) piloting with care providers and 24 (6.7%) with patients. Overall, 97 teams (8.1 per hackathon) drafted business plans, 22 (1.8 per hackathon) had filed patents on their innovations and 15 (1.3 per hackathon) had formed new companies. Teams raised US$64.08 million in funding (average US$5.34 million per hackathon; median award size of $1800). In addition, 108 teams (30.3%) reported at least one member working on additional technologies with people they met at a hackathon. Individual confidence to address medical technology challenges was significantly increased after attending (t(1282)=192.77, p 0.001). Conclusion CAMTech healthcare hackathons lead to consistent output with respect to medical technology innovation, including clinical trials, business plan development, securing investment capital/funding and new company formation. PMID:28250965

  12. Overview of abortion cases with severe maternal outcomes in the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health: a descriptive analysis.

    PubMed

    Dragoman, M; Sheldon, W R; Qureshi, Z; Blum, J; Winikoff, B; Ganatra, B

    2014-03-01

    To summarise individual and institutional characteristics of abortion-related severe maternal outcomes reported at health facilities. Secondary analysis of data from the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health. 85 health facilities in 23 countries. 322 women with abortion-related severe maternal outcomes. Frequency distributions and comparisons of differences in characteristics between cases of maternal near miss and death using Fisher's exact tests of association. Individual and institutional characteristics and frequencies of potentially life-threatening conditions, and interventions provided to women with severe maternal outcomes, maternal near miss, and maternal death. Most women with abortion-related severe maternal outcomes (SMOs) were 20-34 years old (65.2%), married or cohabitating (92.3%), parous (84.2%), and presented with abortions resulting from pregnancies at less than 14 weeks of gestation (67.1%). The women who died were younger, more frequently without a partner, and had abortions at ≥14 weeks of gestation, compared with women with maternal near miss (MNM). Curettage was the most common mode of uterine evacuation. The provision of blood products and therapeutic antibiotics were the most common other interventions recorded for all women with abortion-related SMOs; those who died more frequently had antibiotics, laparotomy, and hysterectomy, compared with women with MNM. Although haemorrhage was the most common cause of abortion-related SMO, infection (alone and in combination with haemorrhage) was the most common cause of death. This analysis affirms a number of previously observed characteristics of women with abortion-related severe morbidity and mortality, despite the fact that facility-based data on abortion-related SMO suffers a number of limitations. © 2014 RCOG The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  13. Inclusion of mobile phone numbers into an ongoing population health survey in New South Wales, Australia: design, methods, call outcomes, costs and sample representativeness.

    PubMed

    Barr, Margo L; van Ritten, Jason J; Steel, David G; Thackway, Sarah V

    2012-11-22

    In Australia telephone surveys have been the method of choice for ongoing jurisdictional population health surveys. Although it was estimated in 2011 that nearly 20% of the Australian population were mobile-only phone users, the inclusion of mobile phone numbers into these existing landline population health surveys has not occurred. This paper describes the methods used for the inclusion of mobile phone numbers into an existing ongoing landline random digit dialling (RDD) health survey in an Australian state, the New South Wales Population Health Survey (NSWPHS). This paper also compares the call outcomes, costs and the representativeness of the resultant sample to that of the previous landline sample. After examining several mobile phone pilot studies conducted in Australia and possible sample designs (screening dual-frame and overlapping dual-frame), mobile phone numbers were included into the NSWPHS using an overlapping dual-frame design. Data collection was consistent, where possible, with the previous years' landline RDD phone surveys and between frames. Survey operational data for the frames were compared and combined. Demographic information from the interview data for mobile-only phone users, both, and total were compared to the landline frame using χ2 tests. Demographic information for each frame, landline and the mobile-only (equivalent to a screening dual frame design), and the frames combined (with appropriate overlap adjustment) were compared to the NSW demographic profile from the 2011 census using χ2 tests. In the first quarter of 2012, 3395 interviews were completed with 2171 respondents (63.9%) from the landline frame (17.6% landline only) and 1224 (36.1%) from the mobile frame (25.8% mobile only). Overall combined response, contact and cooperation rates were 33.1%, 65.1% and 72.2% respectively. As expected from previous research, the demographic profile of the mobile-only phone respondents differed most (more that were young, males, Aboriginal

  14. Breastfeeding practices and child growth outcomes in Haiti: an analysis of data from Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed

    Heidkamp, Rebecca; Ayoya, Mohamed Ag; Teta, Ismael Ngnie; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Marhone, Joseline Pierre

    2015-10-01

    Haiti's national nutrition policy prioritises breastfeeding, but limited data are available to inform strategy. We examined national trends in early initiation of breastfeeding (ErIBF) and exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) over a 10-year period using data from three Haitian Demographic and Health Surveys (1994-1995, 2000 and 2005-2006). We used multivariate regression methods to identify determinants of ErIBF and EBF in the 2005-2006 data set and to examine relationships to growth. There was no change in ErIBF across surveys [1994-1995: 36.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 29.9-43.9; 2000: 49.4%, 95% CI 44.1-54.8; 2005-2006: 43.8%, 95% CI 40.5-47.1]. EBF among 0-5-month-olds increased sharply (1994-18995: 1.1%, 95% CI 0.4-3.2; 2000: 22.4%, 95% CI 16.5-29.5; 2005-2006: 41.2%, 95% CI 35.4-47.2). The proportion of breastfeeding children 0-5 months who received soft, solid or semi-solid foods decreased (1994-1995: 68.5%, 95% CI 57.3-77.9; 2000: 46.3%, 95% CI 39.3-53.4; 2005-2006: 30.9%, 95% CI 25.9-36.5). Child age at time of survey [odds ratio (OR) 1.73; P = 0.027], lower maternal education (OR = 2.14, P = 0.004) and residence in the Artibonite Department (OR 0.31; P = 0.001) were associated with ErIBF among children 0-23 months. Age group and department were significant predictors of EBF among children 0-5 months. ErIBF was associated with higher weight-for-age z-scores [effect size (ES) 0.22; P = 0.033] and height-for-age z-scores (ES 0.20; P = 0.044). There was no statistically significant relationship between EBF and growth. The 10-year ErIBF and EBF trends in Haiti echo global and regional trends. ErIBF and EBF are related practices but with different determinants in the Haitian context. These differences have implications for intervention delivery. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Health Outcomes in Individuals with Problem and Pathological Gambling: An Analysis of the 2014 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Survey System (BRFSS).

    PubMed

    Van Patten, Ryan; Weinstock, Jeremiah; McGrath, Andrew B

    2017-09-01

    Problem and pathological gambling refers to subclinical and clinical levels of maladaptive gambling, respectively, and is associated with specific sociodemographic characteristics as well as a number of poor health outcomes. We examined such demographic, physical health, mental health, and health-related behaviors in a sample of 7045 low-risk gamblers and 244 problem/pathological gamblers. Participants completed the 2014 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System telephone survey. Using the National Opinion Research Center's Diagnostic Screen for Gambling Disorders-CLiP, participants were categorized as either "problem/pathological gamblers" or "low-risk gamblers." Problem/pathological gamblers were younger, more likely to be male, of ethnic minority status, unmarried, and of lower education than low-risk gamblers. No physical health variables differentiated the groups but problem/pathological gamblers reported experiencing significantly more adverse childhood experiences and engaging in significantly more tobacco and alcohol use compared to low-risk gamblers. Moreover, gender moderated relationships between gambling group and several of the alcohol use variables such that male problem/pathological gamblers exhibited greater alcohol use behavior than male low-risk gamblers but no such relationship was present in females. Overall, this study expands the current knowledgebase on disordered gambling and highlights the need to assess disordered gambling in public health samples. Clinical implications are discussed.

  16. Impact of caring for persons with Alzheimer's disease or dementia on caregivers' health outcomes: findings from a community based survey in Japan.

    PubMed

    Goren, Amir; Montgomery, William; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Nakamura, Tomomi; Ueda, Kaname

    2016-06-10

    This study assessed how family caregivers for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or dementia in Japan differed from non-caregivers in characteristics and health outcomes (i.e., comorbidities, health-related quality of life [HRQoL], productivity, and resource use). Caregivers were hypothesized to experience significantly poorer outcomes than non-caregivers. Data were combined from the 2012 and 2013 National Health and Wellness Survey in Japan (n = 60000). Caregivers for adult relatives with AD or dementia were compared with non-caregivers on: comorbidities (including Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) cutoff scores suggesting presence/absence of major depressive disorder (MDD)), Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI), SF-36v2-based HRQoL, and healthcare resource utilization. Sociodemographic characteristics, health characteristics and behaviors, and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores were compared across groups. Propensity matching, based on scores generated from a logistic regression predicting caregiving, was used to match caregivers with non-caregivers with similar likelihood of being caregivers. Bivariate comparisons across matched groups served to estimate outcomes differences due to caregiving. Among 55060 respondents, compared with non-caregivers (n = 53758), caregivers (n = 1302) were older (52.6 vs. 47.5 years), more frequently female (53 % vs. 49 %), married/partnered, frequent alcohol drinkers, current smokers, exercisers, and not employed, and they averaged higher CCI scores (0.37 vs. 0.14), all p < 0.05. Propensity scores incorporated sex, age, body mass index (BMI), exercise, alcohol, smoking, marital status, CCI, insured status, education, employment, income, and children in household. A greedy matching algorithm produced 1297 exact matches, excluding 5 non-matched caregivers. Health utilities scores were significantly lower among caregivers (0.724) vs. non-caregivers (0.764), as were SF-36v2 Physical and Mental

  17. The Fit for School Health Outcome Study - a longitudinal survey to assess health impacts of an integrated school health programme in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Monse, Bella; Benzian, Habib; Naliponguit, Ella; Belizario, Vincente; Schratz, Alexander; van Palenstein Helderman, Wim

    2013-03-21

    Child health in many low- and middle-income countries lags behind international goals and affects children's education, well-being, and general development. Large-scale school health programmes can be effective in reducing preventable diseases through cost-effective interventions. This paper outlines the baseline and 1-year results of a longitudinal health study assessing the impact of the Fit for School Programme in the Philippines. A longitudinal 4-year cohort study was conducted in the province of Camiguin, Mindanao (experimental group); an external concurrent control group was studied in Gingoog, Mindanao. The study has three experimental groups: group 1-daily handwashing with soap, daily brushing with fluoride toothpaste, biannual deworming with 400 mg albendazole (Essential Health Care Program [EHCP]); group 2-EHCP plus twice-a-year access to school-based Oral Urgent Treatment; group 3-EHCP plus weekly toothbrushing with high-fluoride concentration gel. A non-concurrent internal control group was also included. Baseline data on anthropometric indicators to calculate body mass index (BMI), soil-transmitted helminths (STH) infection in stool samples, and dental caries were collected in August 2009 and August 2010. Data were analysed to assess validity of the control group design, baseline, and 1-year results. In the cohort study, 412 children were examined at baseline and 341 1 year after intervention. The baseline results were in line with national averages for STH infection, BMI, and dental caries in group 1 and the control groups. Children lost to follow-up had similar baseline characteristics in the experimental and control groups. After 1 year, group 1 showed a significantly higher increase in mean BMI and lower prevalence of moderate to heavy STH infection than the external concurrent control group. The increases in caries and dental infections were reduced but not statistically significant. The results for groups 2 and 3 will be reported separately

  18. Allergy-related outcomes in relation to serum IgE: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Salo, Päivi M; Calatroni, Agustin; Gergen, Peter J; Hoppin, Jane A; Sever, Michelle L; Jaramillo, Renee; Arbes, Samuel J; Zeldin, Darryl C

    2011-05-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2006 was the first population-based study to investigate levels of serum total and allergen-specific IgE in the general US population. We estimated the prevalence of allergy-related outcomes and examined relationships between serum IgE levels and these outcomes in a representative sample of the US population. Data for this cross-sectional analysis were obtained from NHANES 2005-2006. Study subjects aged 6 years and older (n = 8086) had blood taken for measurement of total IgE and 19 specific IgE levels against common aeroallergens, including Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Bermuda grass, birch, oak, ragweed, Russian thistle, rye grass, cat dander, cockroach, dog dander, dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus), mouse and rat urine proteins, and selected foods (egg white, cow's milk, peanut, and shrimp). Serum samples were analyzed for total and allergen-specific IgE by using the Pharmacia CAP System. Information on allergy-related outcomes and demographics was collected by questionnaire. In NHANES 2005-2006, 6.6% reported current hay fever, and 23.5% had current allergies. Allergy-related outcomes increased with increasing total IgE levels (adjusted odds ratios for a 10-fold increase in total IgE level of 1.86 [95% CI, 1.44-2.41] for hay fever and 1.64 [95% CI, 1.41-1.91] for allergies). Increased levels of plant-, pet-, and mold-specific IgE contributed independently to allergy-related symptoms. The greatest increase in odds was observed for hay fever and plant-specific IgE (adjusted odds ratio, 4.75; 95% CI, 3.83-5.88). In the US population self-reported allergy symptoms are most consistently associated with increased levels of plant-, pet-, and mold-specific IgE. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Impact of different scoring algorithms applied to multiple-mark survey items on outcome assessment: an in-field study on health-related knowledge.

    PubMed

    Domnich, A; Panatto, D; Arata, L; Bevilacqua, I; Apprato, L; Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D

    2015-01-01

    Health-related knowledge is often assessed through multiple-choice tests. Among the different types of formats, researchers may opt to use multiple-mark items, i.e. with more than one correct answer. Although multiple-mark items have long been used in the academic setting - sometimes with scant or inconclusive results - little is known about the implementation of this format in research on in-field health education and promotion. A study population of secondary school students completed a survey on nutrition-related knowledge, followed by a single- lecture intervention. Answers were scored by means of eight different scoring algorithms and analyzed from the perspective of classical test theory. The same survey was re-administered to a sample of the students in order to evaluate the short-term change in their knowledge. In all, 286 questionnaires were analyzed. Partial scoring algorithms displayed better psychometric characteristics than the dichotomous rule. In particular, the algorithm proposed by Ripkey and the balanced rule showed greater internal consistency and relative efficiency in scoring multiple-mark items. A penalizing algorithm in which the proportion of marked distracters was subtracted from that of marked correct answers was the only one that highlighted a significant difference in performance between natives and immigrants, probably owing to its slightly better discriminatory ability. This algorithm was also associated with the largest effect size in the pre-/post-intervention score change. The choice of an appropriate rule for scoring multiple- mark items in research on health education and promotion should consider not only the psychometric properties of single algorithms but also the study aims and outcomes, since scoring rules differ in terms of biasness, reliability, difficulty, sensitivity to guessing and discrimination.

  20. Thai physicians health survey.

    PubMed

    Wattanasirichaigoon, Somkiat; Ruksakom, Hansa; Polboon, Navapun; Sithisarankul, Pornchai; Visanuyothin, Taweesin

    2004-10-01

    Physicians often conduct research on other occupations' health or general populations' health, but their health has hardly been studied systematically. The authors conducted a cross-sectional descriptive survey on 440 physicians systematically selected from their medical license numbers. The response rate was 86.4% (380 out of 440). Two-hundred and twenty-nine were male, and 151 were female. Their average age was 40.8 years (range: 22-74). Most of them were Buddhists (93.9%), specialists (64.2%), married only once and still lived with their spouses (59.5%), and concurrently practiced medicine (95.5%). Their overall satisfaction as physicians was 60.2% high, and 37.2% moderate. Their average sleep time was 6-8 hours per night for 58.9%. Most had eye problems (74.9%) and most were refractive errors such as myopia. Most (63.8%) of them did not have any prevalent diseases. Whereas those who had diseases had (in order) allergy, hypertension, asthma, diabetes, and cancer. Their current illnesses included respiratory tract infection. Most physicians did not smoke (94.2%) nor drink alcohol (70.5%). Most of them were not vegetarians (60.4%), did not eat fast food (99.2%). Interestingly, 41.4% of them were accounted for spending less than twice per week for exercise. As expected, 23.7% of them were exposed to blood, 14.5% to respiratory tract secretion, and 13.7% to pus/secretion from wounds. This study serves as a basis for health promotion approach to medical community and does create awareness of health among Thai physicians.

  1. Associations between source of information about sex and sexual health outcomes in Britain: findings from the third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3)

    PubMed Central

    Macdowall, Wendy; Jones, Kyle G; Clifton, Soazig; Copas, Andrew J; Mercer, Catherine H; Palmer, Melissa J; Lewis, Ruth; Datta, Jessica; Mitchell, Kirstin R; Field, Nigel; Sonnenberg, Pam; Johnson, Anne M; Wellings, Kaye

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine variation in source of information about sexual matters by sociodemographic factors, and associations with sexual behaviours and outcomes. Design Cross-sectional probability sample survey. Setting British general population. Participants 3408 men and women, aged 17–24 years, interviewed from 2010–2012 for third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles. Main outcome measures Main source of information (school, a parent, other); age and circumstances of first heterosexual intercourse; unsafe sex and distress about sex in past year; experience of sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnoses, non-volitional sex or abortion (women only) ever. Results Citing school was associated with younger age, higher educational level and having lived with both parents. Citing a parent was associated, in women, with lower educational level and having lived with one parent. Relative to other sources, citing school was associated with older age at first sex (adjusted HR 0.73 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.83) men, 0.73 (0.65 to 0.82) women), lower likelihood of unsafe sex (adjusted OR 0.58 (0.44 to 0.77) men, 0.69 (0.52 to 0.91) women) and previous STI diagnosis (0.55 (0.33 to 0.91) men, 0.58 (0.43 to 0.80) women) and, in women, with lower likelihood of lack of sexual competence at first sex; and experience of non-volitional sex, abortion and distress about sex. Citing a parent was associated with lower likelihood of unsafe sex (0.53 (0.28 to 1.00) men; 0.69 (0.48 to 0.99) women) and, in women, previous STI diagnosis. Conclusions Gaining information mainly from school was associated with lower reporting of a range of negative sexual health outcomes, particularly among women. Gaining information mainly from a parent was associated with some of these, but fewer cited parents as a primary source. The findings emphasise the benefit of school and parents providing information about sexual matters and argue for a stronger focus on the needs of men. PMID:25743154

  2. Are there differences in the health outcomes of mothers in Europe and East-Asia? A cross-cultural health survey.

    PubMed

    Mautner, Eva; Ashida, Chie; Greimel, Elfriede; Lang, Uwe; Kolman, Christina; Alton, Daniela; Inoue, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate differences in quality of life outcomes and depression of mothers in East-Asia and Central Europe. 170 women in Japan and 226 women in Austria with children between 3 and 5 answered the same cross-culturally validated questionnaires. The Quality of Life Questionnaire from the WHO (WHOQOL-Bref), the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13), a Social Support Scale (MSPSS), and questions on gender orientation were used. In all dimensions of QOL (physical, psychological, social, and environmental) Japanese women had lower QOL scores compared to Austrian mothers (P < 001). Seven percent of women in both countries experienced major depression. In both countries sense of coherence, experienced stress level, satisfaction with income, social support, and gender roles had an influence on QOL and depressive symptoms. Mothers in Japan consider life events less comprehensible, manageable, and meaningful and experience less support. Consequently, creating an environment where fathers could be more involved in child rearing and mothers have more opportunities to choose between life styles and working and social environments would improve QOL not only in Japanese mothers but also in other countries all over the world.

  3. Allergy-related outcomes in relation to serum IgE: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Päivi M.; Calatroni, Agustin; Gergen, Peter J.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Sever, Michelle L.; Jaramillo, Renee; Arbes, Samuel J.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005–2006 was the first population-based study to investigate levels of serum total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in the general US population. Objective We estimated prevalence of allergy-related outcomes and examined relationships between serum IgE levels and these outcomes in a representative sample of the US population. Methods Data for this cross-sectional analysis were obtained from the NHANES 2005–2006. Study subjects aged 6 years and older (N=8086) had blood taken for measurement of total IgE and 19 specific IgEs against common aeroallergens, including Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Bermuda grass, birch, oak, ragweed, Russian thistle, rye grass, cat dander, cockroach, dog dander, dust mite (Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus), mouse and rat urine proteins; and selected foods (egg white, cow’s milk, peanut, and shrimp). Serum samples were analyzed for total and allergen-specific IgEs using the Pharmacia CAP System. Information on allergy-related outcomes and demographics was collected by questionnaire. Results In the NHANES 2005–2006, 6.6% reported current hay fever and 23.5% suffered from current allergies. Allergy-related outcomes increased with increasing total IgE (adjusted ORs for a 10-fold increase in total IgE =1.86, 95% CI:1.44–2.41 for hay fever and 1.64, 95% CI: 1.41–1.91 for allergies). Elevated levels of plant-, pet-, and mold-specific IgEs contributed independently to allergy-related symptoms. The greatest increase in odds was observed for hay fever and plant-specific IgEs (adjusted OR=4.75, 95% CI:3.83–5.88). Conclusion In the US population, self-reported allergy symptoms are most consistently associated with elevated levels of plant-, pet-, and mold-specific IgEs. PMID:21320720

  4. Health outcomes of bereavement.

    PubMed

    Stroebe, Margaret; Schut, Henk; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2007-12-08

    In this Review, we look at the relation between bereavement and physical and mental health. Although grief is not a disease and most people adjust without professional psychological intervention, bereavement is associated with excess risk of mortality, particularly in the early weeks and months after loss. It is related to decrements in physical health, indicated by presence of symptoms and illnesses, and use of medical services. Furthermore, bereaved individuals report diverse psychological reactions. For a few people, mental disorders or complications in the grieving process ensue. We summarise research on risk factors that increase vulnerability of some bereaved individuals. Diverse factors (circumstances of death, intrapersonal and interpersonal variables, ways of coping) are likely to co-determine excesses in ill-health. We also assess the effectiveness of psychological intervention programmes. Intervention should be targeted at high-risk people and those with complicated grief or bereavement-related depression and stress disorders.

  5. Examining the Link between Education Related Outcomes and Student Health Risk Behaviours among Canadian Youth: Data from the 2006 National Youth Smoking Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathammavong, Ratsamy; Leatherdale, Scott T.; Ahmed, Rashid; Griffith, Jane; Nowatzki, Janet; Manske, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether student tobacco, alcohol, marijuana use, and sedentary behaviour were associated with the educational outcomes of health-related absenteeism, truancy, and academic motivation in a nationally representative sample of Canadian youth. Descriptive analyses indicate a high proportion of students missed school due to health,…

  6. Revisiting the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results Cancer Registry and Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (SEER-MHOS) Linked Data Resource for Patient-Reported Outcomes Research in Older Adults with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kent, Erin E; Malinoff, Rochelle; Rozjabek, Heather M; Ambs, Anita; Clauser, Steven B; Topor, Marie A; Yuan, Gigi; Burroughs, James; Rodgers, Anne B; DeMichele, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians are increasingly recognizing the value of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data to better characterize people's health and experiences with illness and care. Considering the rising prevalence of cancer in adults aged 65 and older, PRO data are particularly relevant for older adults with cancer, who often require complex cancer care and have additional comorbid conditions. A data linkage between the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (MHOS) was created through a partnership between the National Cancer Institute and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that created the opportunity to examine PROs in Medicare Advantage enrollees with and without cancer. The December 2013 linkage of SEER-MHOS data included the linked data for 12 cohorts, bringing the number of individuals in the linked data set to 95,723 with cancer and 1,510,127 without. This article reviews the features of the resource and provides information on some descriptive characteristics of the individuals in the data set (health-related quality of life, body mass index, fall risk management, number of unhealthy days in the past month). Individuals without (n=258,108) and with (n=3,440) cancer (1,311 men with prostate cancer, 982 women with breast cancer, 689 with colorectal cancer, 458 with lung cancer) were included in the current descriptive analysis. Given increasing longevity, advances in effective therapies and earlier detection, and population growth, the number of individuals aged 65 and older with cancer is expected to reach more than 12 million by 2020. SEER-MHOS provides population-level, self-reported, cancer registry-linked data for person-centered surveillance research on this growing population.

  7. Evaluating Curricular Influence on Preparation for Practice, Career Outcomes, and Job Satisfaction: Results from an Alumni Survey of a 40-Year Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tammy Jorgensen; Reid, Joan A.; Henry, Ryan G.; Dixon, Charlotte G.; Wright, Tennyson J.

    2013-01-01

    Alumni of a Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE)-accredited graduate rehabilitation counselor education (RCE) program were surveyed to evaluate career outcomes, job satisfaction, licensure and certification rates, client populations served, and RCE program satisfaction and effectiveness. Results indicate a high level of satisfaction with the…

  8. Evaluating Curricular Influence on Preparation for Practice, Career Outcomes, and Job Satisfaction: Results from an Alumni Survey of a 40-Year Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Tammy Jorgensen; Reid, Joan A.; Henry, Ryan G.; Dixon, Charlotte G.; Wright, Tennyson J.

    2013-01-01

    Alumni of a Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE)-accredited graduate rehabilitation counselor education (RCE) program were surveyed to evaluate career outcomes, job satisfaction, licensure and certification rates, client populations served, and RCE program satisfaction and effectiveness. Results indicate a high level of satisfaction with the…

  9. Population-based survey methods to quantify associations between human rights violations and health outcomes among internally displaced persons in eastern Burma.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Luke C; Richards, Adam K; Lee, Catherine I; Suwanvanichkij, Voravit; Maung, Cynthia; Mahn, Mahn; Beyrer, Chris; Lee, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Case reports of human rights violations have focused on individuals' experiences. Population-based quantification of associations between rights indicators and health outcomes is rare and has not been documented in eastern Burma. We describe the association between mortality and morbidity and the household-level experience of human rights violations among internally displaced persons in eastern Burma. Mobile health workers in conflict zones of eastern Burma conducted 1834 retrospective household surveys in 2004. Workers recorded data on vital events, mid-upper arm circumference of young children, malaria parasitaemia status of respondents and household experience of various human rights violations during the previous 12 months. Under-5 mortality was 218 (95% confidence interval 135 to 301) per 1000 live births. Almost one-third of households reported forced labour (32.6%). Forced displacement (8.9% of households) was associated with increased child mortality (odds ratio = 2.80), child malnutrition (odds ratio = 3.22) and landmine injury (odds ratio = 3.89). Theft or destruction of the food supply (reported by 25.2% of households) was associated with increased crude mortality (odds ratio = 1.58), malaria parasitaemia (odds ratio = 1.82), child malnutrition (odds ratio = 1.94) and landmine injury (odds ratio = 4.55). Multiple rights violations (14.4% of households) increased the risk of child (incidence rate ratio = 2.18) and crude (incidence rate ratio = 1.75) mortality and the odds of landmine injury (odds ratio = 19.8). Child mortality risk was increased more than fivefold (incidence rate ratio = 5.23) among families reporting three or more rights violations. Widespread human rights violations in conflict zones in eastern Burma are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. Population-level associations can be quantified using standard epidemiological methods. This approach requires further validation and refinement elsewhere.

  10. A profile of New Zealand 'Asian' participants of the 2008/09 Adult National Nutrition Survey: focus on dietary habits, nutrient intakes and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Parackal, Sherly M; Smith, Claire; Parnell, Winsome Ruth

    2015-04-01

    To investigate similarities and differences in dietary habits, nutrient intakes and health outcomes of South Asians (SA) and East and South-East Asians (ESEA) and the New Zealand European and Other (NZEO) group, and to examine differences within 'Asian' subgroups according to duration of residence. Nutrient intake data from 24 h diet recalls and data from the dietary habits questionnaire, anthropometry and biochemical analyses from the cross-sectional 2008/09 Adult National Nutrition Survey in New Zealand were compared for participants categorized as SA, ESEA and NZEO. Adults aged 15 years and older (n 2995). New Zealand households. SA were more likely to 'never' eat red meat in comparison to NZEO (P<0.001) and among females also in comparison to ESEA (P<0.05). Intakes of fats and some micronutrients (riboflavin, vitamin B6, B12, Se) were lower among SA than NZEO (P<0.05). Lower intakes of Zn and vitamin B12 were reported by SA females compared with ESEA and NZEO females (P<0.05). A higher percentage of SA were obese using ethnic-specific cut-offs, had lower indices of Fe status and reported diagnosed diabetes compared with NZEO and ESEA. Recent SA male migrants had higher intakes of β-carotene, vitamin C and Ca compared with long-term migrants (P<0.05). The results of the present study indicate that dietary habits, nutrient intakes, blood profile and body size differ significantly between Asian subgroups. It also provides some evidence for changes in dietary intakes according to duration of residence especially for SA males.

  11. Measuring Quality of Healthcare Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes from Routine Data: a Seven-nation Survey Conducted by the IMIA Primary Health Care Working Group.

    PubMed

    Hinton, W; Liyanage, H; McGovern, A; Liaw, S-T; Kuziemsky, C; Munro, N; de Lusignan, S

    2017-08-01

    Background: The Institute of Medicine framework defines six dimensions of quality for healthcare systems: (1) safety, (2) effectiveness, (3) patient centeredness, (4) timeliness of care, (5) efficiency, and (6) equity. Large health datasets provide an opportunity to assess quality in these areas. Objective: To perform an international comparison of the measurability of the delivery of these aims, in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from large datasets. Method: We conducted a survey to assess healthcare outcomes data quality of existing databases and disseminated this through professional networks. We examined the data sources used to collect the data, frequency of data uploads, and data types used for identifying people with T2DM. We compared data completeness across the six areas of healthcare quality, using selected measures pertinent to T2DM management. Results: We received 14 responses from seven countries (Australia, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Turkey and the UK). Most databases reported frequent data uploads and would be capable of near real time analysis of healthcare quality.The majority of recorded data related to safety (particularly medication adverse events) and treatment efficacy (glycaemic control and microvascular disease). Data potentially measuring equity was less well recorded. Recording levels were lowest for patient-centred care, timeliness of care, and system efficiency, with the majority of databases containing no data in these areas. Databases using primary care sources had higher data quality across all areas measured. Conclusion: Data quality could be improved particularly in the areas of patient-centred care, timeliness, and efficiency. Primary care derived datasets may be most suited to healthcare quality assessment. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.

  12. Prevalence and Mental Health Outcomes of Homicide Survivors in a Representative US Sample of Adolescents: Data from the 2005 National Survey of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheingold, Alyssa A.; Zinzow, Heidi; Hawkins, Alesia; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Each homicide leaves behind several friends and family members, or homicide survivors. However, limited information is available on the impact of homicide on adolescent survivors. The purpose of the current study was to identify the prevalence of homicide survivorship and to determine mental health outcomes within a sample of US…

  13. Prevalence and Mental Health Outcomes of Homicide Survivors in a Representative US Sample of Adolescents: Data from the 2005 National Survey of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheingold, Alyssa A.; Zinzow, Heidi; Hawkins, Alesia; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Each homicide leaves behind several friends and family members, or homicide survivors. However, limited information is available on the impact of homicide on adolescent survivors. The purpose of the current study was to identify the prevalence of homicide survivorship and to determine mental health outcomes within a sample of US…

  14. Population‐based survey methods to quantify associations between human rights violations and health outcomes among internally displaced persons in eastern Burma

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Luke C; Richards, Adam K; Lee, Catherine I; Suwanvanichkij, Voravit; Maung, Cynthia; Mahn; Beyrer, Chris; Lee, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    Background Case reports of human rights violations have focused on individuals' experiences. Population‐based quantification of associations between rights indicators and health outcomes is rare and has not been documented in eastern Burma. Objective We describe the association between mortality and morbidity and the household‐level experience of human rights violations among internally displaced persons in eastern Burma. Methods Mobile health workers in conflict zones of eastern Burma conducted 1834 retrospective household surveys in 2004. Workers recorded data on vital events, mid‐upper arm circumference of young children, malaria parasitaemia status of respondents and household experience of various human rights violations during the previous 12 months. Results Under‐5 mortality was 218 (95% confidence interval 135 to 301) per 1000 live births. Almost one‐third of households reported forced labour (32.6%). Forced displacement (8.9% of households) was associated with increased child mortality (odds ratio = 2.80), child malnutrition (odds ratio = 3.22) and landmine injury (odds ratio = 3.89). Theft or destruction of the food supply (reported by 25.2% of households) was associated with increased crude mortality (odds ratio = 1.58), malaria parasitaemia (odds ratio = 1.82), child malnutrition (odds ratio = 1.94) and landmine injury (odds ratio = 4.55). Multiple rights violations (14.4% of households) increased the risk of child (incidence rate ratio = 2.18) and crude (incidence rate ratio = 1.75) mortality and the odds of landmine injury (odds ratio = 19.8). Child mortality risk was increased more than fivefold (incidence rate ratio = 5.23) among families reporting three or more rights violations. Conclusions Widespread human rights violations in conflict zones in eastern Burma are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. Population‐level associations can be quantified using standard

  15. International and Interdisciplinary Identification of Health Care Transition Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fair, Cynthia; Cuttance, Jessica; Sharma, Niraj; Maslow, Gary; Wiener, Lori; Betz, Cecily; Porter, Jerlym; McLaughlin, Suzanne; Gilleland-Marchak, Jordan; Renwick, Amy; Naranjo, Diana; Jan, Sophia; Javalkar, Karina; Ferris, Maria

    2016-03-01

    There is a lack of agreement on what constitutes successful outcomes for the process of health care transition (HCT) among adolescent and young adults with special health care needs. To present HCT outcomes identified by a Delphi process with an interdisciplinary group of participants. A Delphi method involving 3 stages was deployed to refine a list of HCT outcomes. This 18-month study (from January 5, 2013, of stage 1 to July 3, 2014, of stage 3) included an initial literature search, expert interviews, and then 2 waves of a web-based survey. On this survey, 93 participants from outpatient, community-based, and primary care clinics rated the importance of the top HCT outcomes identified by the Delphi process. Analyses were performed from July 5, 2014, to December 5, 2014. Health care transition outcomes of adolescents and young adults with special health care needs. Importance ratings of identified HCT outcomes rated on a Likert scale from 1 (not important) to 9 (very important). The 2 waves of surveys included 117 and 93 participants as the list of outcomes was refined. Transition outcomes were refined by the 3 waves of the Delphi process, with quality of life being the highest-rated outcome with broad agreement. The 10 final outcomes identified included individual outcomes (quality of life, understanding the characteristics of conditions and complications, knowledge of medication, self-management, adherence to medication, and understanding health insurance), health services outcomes (attending medical appointments, having a medical home, and avoidance of unnecessary hospitalization), and a social outcome (having a social network). Participants indicated that different outcomes were likely needed for individuals with cognitive disabilities. Quality of life is an important construct relevant to HCT. Future research should identify valid measures associated with each outcome and further explore the role that quality of life plays in the HCT process. Achieving

  16. An international survey of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) policies and the effects of these policies on costs, utilization, and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Andrea L; Stafinski, Tania; Menon, Devidas

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare existing policies regarding access to 7 assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) and to examine the effects of these policies on costs, utilization, and health outcomes in 14 countries and 2 Canadian provinces based on publicly available information. A systematic review of publicly available information from peer-reviewed literature (using biomedical and social science databases) and grey literature (e.g., health ministry websites, health technology assessment agency websites, etc.) was performed. ARTs services permitted or funded vary across jurisdictions. The goals and eligibility restrictions (e.g., on maternal age, number of embryos transferred, and number of cycles) defined in ARTs policies also vary across jurisdictions. Studies on the impact of such policies have primarily been retrospective and focused on short-term service utilization. Nevertheless, they suggest that the policies have achieved specific outcomes, such as reductions in multiple births and in costs to payers. Based on the evidence reviewed, policies aimed at reducing public coverage of ARTs or restricting the number of embryos transferred have achieved these goals. However, their effects on maternal and infant health outcomes have not been well explored. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Validation of the National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Survey as a Quality-of-Life Instrument for Patients with Malignant Brain Tumors and Their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Romero, Melissa M; Flood, Lisa Sue; Gasiewicz, Nanci K; Rovin, Richard; Conklin, Samantha

    2015-12-01

    At present there is a lack of well-validated surveys used to measure quality of life in patients with malignant brain tumors and their caregivers. The main objective of this pilot study was to validate the National Institutes of Health Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (NIH PROMIS) survey for use as a quality-of-life measure in this population. This article presents the rationale for using the NIH PROMIS instrument as a quality-of-life measure for patients with malignant brain tumors and their caregivers.

  18. [New outcome rates for random sampling telephone surveys].

    PubMed

    Guilbert, P; Beltzer, N; Gautier, A; Warszawski, J; Riandey, B

    2011-04-01

    Survey non-response rates are important quality indicators. Refusal rates can induce non-response bias in health survey estimates. However, comparisons across surveys highlight inconsistencies in the use of survey outcome categories and in the calculation of response rates. In this paper we discuss the relevance of these indicators and suggest other survey quality indicators. Outcome rates from two French random-digit dialing (RDD) telephone surveys are compared : the Nicolle survey on infectious diseases of 4112 individuals conducted in 2006, and the HIV knowledge, attitude, belief and practices (KABP) survey of 5071 individuals in 2004. Based on the same protocol, we describe in details the way the two RDD samples were drawn and how non-response rates were estimated. Non-response rates were different: 36% in Nicolle survey and 18% in KABP survey. However, the quantity of telephone numbers required to obtain one interview was higher in the KABP survey: 2.8 telephone numbers versus 2.1 in the Nicolle survey. The participation rates, aggregating together refusals, break-off and non-reachable numbers, were equivalent for the two surveys. This result occurred because of a greater proportion of unreached calls in the KABP surveys, which is not integrated into the non-response rates commonly used. Survey non-response rate is insufficient to estimate the quality of a survey. The need for other indicators has been previously stressed in the literature, notably with the adoption and utilization of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) standard definitions of four indicators. But these indicators are quite complex for evaluating non-response bias between surveys. In addition to the classical refusal rate, two other indicators are proposed in this paper: participation rate (number of complete interviews divided by the number of eligible and of unknown eligibility units) and a liking contact rate (number of unreachable units because of a long absence

  19. A Navajo health consumer survey.

    PubMed

    Stewart, T; May, P; Muneta, A

    1980-12-01

    The findings of a health consumer survey of 309 Navajo families in three areas of the Navajo Reservation are reported. The survey shows that access to facilities and lack of safe water and sanitary supplies are continuing problems for these families. The families show consistent use of Indian Health Service providers, particularly nurses, pharmacists and physicians, as well as traditional Navajo medicine practitioners. Only incidental utilization of private medical services is reported. Extended waiting times and translation from English to Navajo are major concerns in their contacts with providers. A surprisingly high availability of third-party insurance is noted. Comparisons are made between this data base and selected national and regional surveys, and with family surveys from other groups assumed to be disadvantaged in obtaining health care. The comparisons indicate somewhat lower utilization rates and more problems in access to care for this Navajo sample. The discussion suggests that attitudes regarding free health care eventually may be a factor for Navajo people and other groups, that cultural considerations are often ignored or accepted as truisms in delivering care, and that the Navajo Reservation may serve as a unique microcosm of health care in the U.S.

  20. Associations between health culture, health behaviors, and health-related outcomes: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yingnan; Gao, Junling; Dai, Junming; Zheng, Pinpin

    2017-01-01

    Background To examine the associations between demographic characteristics, health behaviors, workplace health culture, and health-related outcomes in Chinese workplaces. Methods A total of 1508 employees from 10 administrative offices and 6 enterprises were recruited for a cross-sectional survey. Self-administered questionnaires mainly addressed demographic characteristics, health behaviors, workplace health culture, and health-related outcomes including self-rated health, mental health, and happiness. Results The proportion of participants who reported good health-related outcomes was significantly higher in those working in administrative offices than those working in enterprises. The result of the potential factors related to self-rated health (SRH), mental health, and happiness by logistic regression analyses showed that age and income were associated with SRH; type of workplace, age, smoking, and health culture at the workplace level were associated with mental health; and beneficial health effects of direct leadership was positively associated with happiness. Moreover, there were some similar results among 3 multivariate regression models. Firstly, good SRH (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.744), mental health (OR = 1.891), and happiness (OR = 1.736) were more common among highly physically active participants compared with those physical inactive. Furthermore, passive smoking was negatively correlated with SRH (OR = 0.686), mental health (OR = 0.678), and happiness (OR = 0.616), while health culture at the individual level was positively correlated with SRH (OR = 1.478), mental health (OR = 1.654), and happiness (OR = 2.916). Conclusions The present study indicated that workplace health culture, health behaviors, and demographic characteristics were associated with health-related outcomes. Furthermore, individual health culture, physical activity, and passive smoking might play a critical role in workplace health promotion. PMID:28746400

  1. Associations between health culture, health behaviors, and health-related outcomes: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yingnan; Gao, Junling; Dai, Junming; Zheng, Pinpin; Fu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    To examine the associations between demographic characteristics, health behaviors, workplace health culture, and health-related outcomes in Chinese workplaces. A total of 1508 employees from 10 administrative offices and 6 enterprises were recruited for a cross-sectional survey. Self-administered questionnaires mainly addressed demographic characteristics, health behaviors, workplace health culture, and health-related outcomes including self-rated health, mental health, and happiness. The proportion of participants who reported good health-related outcomes was significantly higher in those working in administrative offices than those working in enterprises. The result of the potential factors related to self-rated health (SRH), mental health, and happiness by logistic regression analyses showed that age and income were associated with SRH; type of workplace, age, smoking, and health culture at the workplace level were associated with mental health; and beneficial health effects of direct leadership was positively associated with happiness. Moreover, there were some similar results among 3 multivariate regression models. Firstly, good SRH (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.744), mental health (OR = 1.891), and happiness (OR = 1.736) were more common among highly physically active participants compared with those physical inactive. Furthermore, passive smoking was negatively correlated with SRH (OR = 0.686), mental health (OR = 0.678), and happiness (OR = 0.616), while health culture at the individual level was positively correlated with SRH (OR = 1.478), mental health (OR = 1.654), and happiness (OR = 2.916). The present study indicated that workplace health culture, health behaviors, and demographic characteristics were associated with health-related outcomes. Furthermore, individual health culture, physical activity, and passive smoking might play a critical role in workplace health promotion.

  2. Prevalence and mental health outcomes of homicide survivors in a representative US sample of adolescents: data from the 2005 National Survey of Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Rheingold, Alyssa A; Zinzow, Heidi; Hawkins, Alesia; Saunders, Benjamin E; Kilpatrick, Dean G

    2012-06-01

      Each homicide leaves behind several friends and family members, or homicide survivors. However, limited information is available on the impact of homicide on adolescent survivors. The purpose of the current study was to identify the prevalence of homicide survivorship and to determine mental health outcomes within a sample of US adolescent survivors.   A nationally representative sample of American adolescents (N = 3,614) between the ages of 12 and 17 completed structured telephone interviews assessing homicide survivorship and mental health consequences including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, drug use, and alcohol abuse.   Reported prevalence within this sample of losing a loved one to criminal homicide was 9%, losing a loved one to vehicular homicide was 7%, and losing a loved one to both types of homicide was 2%. Logistic regression analyses found that adolescents who reported being homicide survivors were significantly more likely to report depression, drug use, and alcohol abuse after controlling for demographic factors and other violence exposure.   If the results from this study are generalizable to the US population, roughly 1 in 5 American adolescents may be impacted by homicide. Further, adolescents exposed to such a loss are at increased risk for mental health sequelae. Results suggest that greater attention needs to be paid to address the needs of these often underserved victims. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2011 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  3. Patterns and Outcomes of Induction of Labour in Africa and Asia: A Secondary Analysis of the WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Neonatal Health

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Joshua P.; Souza, João Paulo; Gülmezoglu, A. Metin

    2013-01-01

    Background Labour induction should be performed where benefit outweighs potential harm, however epidemiology of induction in lower-income countries is not well described. We used the WHO Global Survey dataset to describe the epidemiology and outcomes of labour induction in 192,538 deliveries in 253 facilities across 16 countries in Africa and Asia. Methods Data was analyzed separately for Africa and Asia. Prevalence of indications, methods, success and characteristics associated with labour induction were determined. Multilevel logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between induction (with medical indication and elective) and maternal/perinatal outcomes. Results Induction accounted for 4.4% (Africa) and 12.1% (Asia) of deliveries. Oxytocin alone was the most common method (45.9% and 37.5%) and success rates were generally over 80%. Medically indicated inductions were associated with increased adjusted odds of Apgar <7 at 5 minutes, low birthweight, NICU admission and fresh stillbirth in both regions. The odds of caesarean section in Africa were reduced (Adj OR 0.61, 95%CI 0.42–0.88). Elective induction was associated with increased adjusted odds of NICU (Africa) and ICU (Asia) admissions. Discussion Induction was generally less common than in higher-income countries. Prostaglandin use was uncommon despite evidence supporting use. Induction for medical indications may be associated with poorer outcomes due to maternal baseline risks. Despite one-third of elective inductions occurring at <39 weeks, the risk of maternal, fetal and neonatal mortality was not elevated following elective inductions. PMID:23755259

  4. Sample selection may bias the outcome of an adolescent mental health survey: results from a five-year follow-up of 4171 adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kekkonen, V; Kivimäki, P; Valtonen, H; Hintikka, J; Tolmunen, T; Lehto, S M; Laukkanen, E

    2015-02-01

    The representativeness of the data is one of the main issues in evaluating the significance of research findings. Dropping out is common in adolescent mental health research, and may distort the results. Nevertheless, very little is known about the types of systematic bias that may affect studies in a) the informed consent phase and b) later in follow-up phases. The authors addressed this gap in knowledge in a five-year follow-up study on a sample of adolescents aged 13-18 years. The data were collected using self-report questionnaires. The baseline sample consisted of 4171 adolescents, 1827 (43.8%) of whom gave consent to be contacted for a follow-up survey, but only 797 (19.1%) participated in the follow-up. Binary logistic regression models were used to explain the participation. Young age, female gender, a high number of hobbies, good performance at school in the native language and general subjects, family disintegration such as divorce, high parental employment, and symptoms of depression and anxiety were associated with both consent and participation. However, the effect of mental health aspects was smaller than the effect of age and gender. This study confirmed the possibility of systematic selection bias by adolescents' sociodemographic characteristics. The representativeness of the study sample might have been improved by more intense recruitment strategies. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence and Mental Health Outcomes of Homicide Survivors in a Representative U.S. Sample of Adolescents: Data from the 2005 National Survey of Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Rheingold, Alyssa A.; Zinzow, Heidi; Hawkins, Alesia; Saunders, Benjamin E.; Kilpatrick, Dean G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Each homicide leaves behind several friends and family members, or homicide survivors. However, limited information is available on the impact of homicide on adolescent survivors. The purpose of the current study was to identify the prevalence of homicide survivorship and to determine mental health outcomes within a sample of U.S. adolescent survivors. Methods A nationally representative sample of American adolescents (N=3,614) between the ages of 12–17 completed structured telephone interviews assessing homicide survivorship and mental health consequences including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, drug use, and alcohol abuse. Results Reported prevalence within this sample of losing a loved one to criminal homicide was 9%, losing a loved one to vehicular homicide was 7%, and losing a loved one to both types of homicide was 2%. Logistic regression analyses found that adolescents who reported being homicide survivors were significantly more likely to report depression, drug use, and alcohol abuse after controlling for demographic factors and other violence exposure. Conclusions If the results from this study are generalizable to the US population, roughly 1 in 5 American adolescents may be impacted by homicide. Further, adolescents exposed to such a loss are at increased risk for mental health sequalae. Results suggest that greater attention needs to be paid to address the needs of these often underserved victims. PMID:22211367

  6. Meaningful health outcomes for paediatric neurodisability: Stakeholder prioritisation and appropriateness of patient reported outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher; Janssens, Astrid; Shilling, Valerie; Allard, Amanda; Fellowes, Andrew; Tomlinson, Richard; Williams, Jane; Thompson Coon, Jo; Rogers, Morwenna; Beresford, Bryony; Green, Colin; Jenkinson, Crispin; Tennant, Alan; Logan, Stuart

    2015-06-25

    Health services are increasingly focused on measuring and monitoring outcomes, particularly those that reflect patients' priorities. To be meaningful, outcomes measured should be valued by patients and carers, be consistent with what health professionals seek to achieve, and be robust in terms of measurement properties. The aim of this study was (i) to seek a shared vision between families and clinicians regarding key aspects of health as outcomes, beyond mortality and morbidity, for children with neurodisability, and (ii) to appraise which multidimensional patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) could be used to assess salient health domains. Relevant outcomes were identified from (i) qualitative research with children and young people with neurodisability and parent carers, (ii) Delphi survey with health professionals, and (iii) systematic review of PROMs. The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health provided a common language to code aspects of health. A subset of stakeholders participated in a prioritisation meeting incorporating a Q-sorting task to discuss and rank aspects of health. A total of 33 pertinent aspects of health were identified. Fifteen stakeholders from the qualitative and Delphi studies participated in the prioritisation meeting: 3 young people, 5 parent carers, and 7 health professionals. Aspects of health that emerged as more important for families and targets for health professionals were: communication, emotional wellbeing, pain, sleep, mobility, self-care, independence, mental health, community and social life, behaviour, toileting and safety. Whilst available PROMs measure many aspects of health in the ICF, no single PROM captures all the key domains prioritised as for children and young people with neurodisability. The paucity of scales for assessing communication was notable. We propose a core suite of key outcome domains for children with neurodisability that could be used in evaluative research, audit and as

  7. Work characteristics as predictors of correctional supervisors’ health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Buden, Jennifer C.; Dugan, Alicia G.; Namazi, Sara; Huedo-Medina, Tania B.; Cherniack, Martin G.; Faghri, Pouran D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined associations among health behaviors, psychosocial work factors, and health status. Methods Correctional supervisors (n=157) completed a survey that assessed interpersonal and organizational views on health. Chi-square and logistic regressions were used to examine relationships among variables. Results Respondents had a higher prevalence of obesity and comorbidities compared to the general U.S. adult population. Burnout was significantly associated with nutrition, physical activity, sleep duration, sleep quality, diabetes, and anxiety/depression. Job meaning, job satisfaction and workplace social support may predict health behaviors and outcomes. Conclusions Correctional supervisors are understudied and have poor overall health status. Improving health behaviors of middle-management employees may have a beneficial effect on the health of the entire workforce. This paper demonstrates the importance of psychosocial work factors that may contribute to health behaviors and outcomes. PMID:27483335

  8. A Medicare current beneficiary survey-based investigation of alternative primary care models in nursing homes: functional ability and health status outcomes.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Lisa M; Van Etten, Deborah; Lee, A James; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Remington, Ruth; Gautam, Ramraj; Gore, Rebecca J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed how the health status and functioning of Medicare beneficiaries residing in nursing homes varies systematically with nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs) providing primary care services. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the 2006, 2007, and 2008 Medicare Current Beneficiary Surveys. The study sample included 433 participant-year observations within one of three cohorts: (a) medical doctor (MD)-only, those who received primary care services exclusively from a physician; (b) MD-dominant, those who received some primary care services from an NP or PA, but those visits accounted for less than one half of total primary care visits; and (c) NP/PA-dominant, those who received more than one half of their primary care visits from an NP or PA. Participants in the MD-only cohort had significantly less orientation and independence in activities of daily living compared to participants in the NP/PA-dominant cohort. Other study variables did not vary significantly by practice model. Although the study provides some evidence that NP/PA involvement is associated with improved functioning, it is premature to draw strong inferences. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. National health surveys and health policy: impact of the Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Surveys and the Reproductive Health Surveys.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T S; Tulloch-Reid, M K; Gordon-Strachan, G; Hamilton, P; Wilks, R J

    2012-07-01

    Over the last six decades, comprehensive national health surveys have become important data-gathering mechanisms to inform countries on their health status and provide information for health policy and programme planning. Developing countries have only recently begun such surveys and Jamaica has been at the forefront of this effort. Jamaica's Reproductive Health Surveys and programme response to their findings have resulted in an almost 50% reduction infertility rates over three decades as well as a 40% reduction in unmet contraceptive needs and a 40% reduction in unplanned pregnancies over the last two decades. The Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Surveys have served to reinforce the major burden that non-communicable diseases place on the society and the extent to which these are driven by unhealthy lifestyles. These surveys have shown that obesity, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidaemia affect approximately 50%, 25%, 10% and 10% of the adult population, respectively. These surveys have documented low rates of treatment and control for these chronic non-communicable diseases despite two major policy initiatives, the National Programme for the Promotion of Healthy Lifestyles and the creation of the National Health Fund which subsidizes healthcare provision for chronic diseases. In order to maximize the uptake of the findings of future surveys into effective health policy, there will need to be effective collaborations between academia, policy-makers, regional and international health agencies, non-government organizations and civil society. Such collaborations should take into account the social, political and economic issues, thus ensuring a more comprehensive approach to health policy and result in improvement of the nation's health status and by extension national development.

  10. Young women's reproductive health survey.

    PubMed

    Lewis, H

    1987-08-12

    A survey of reproductive health issues was conducted on 15 year old Hutt Valley secondary school girls by means of a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The prevalence of sexual intercourse in the sample was 29%. Sixteen percent of the sexually active respondents used no method of contraception. Knowledge of reproductive health facts and contraception was poor both amongst sexually experienced and inexperienced respondents. Twenty-six percent relied on peers for this information, with mothers, teachers and books being other important sources cited. Respondents requested more information on sexually transmitted diseases, contraception and sexual relationships. Most would like this information more readily accessible. Preferred sources of information mentioned were: parents, books, films/videos, family planning clinics and friends.

  11. Child Health and Young Adult Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Janet; Stabile, Mark; Manivong, Phongsack; Roos, Leslie L.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown a strong connection between birth weight and future outcomes. We ask how health problems after birth affect outcomes using data from public health insurance records for 50,000 children born between 1979 and 1987 in the Canadian province of Manitoba. We compare children to siblings born an average of three years apart. We find…

  12. Child Health and Young Adult Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Janet; Stabile, Mark; Manivong, Phongsack; Roos, Leslie L.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown a strong connection between birth weight and future outcomes. We ask how health problems after birth affect outcomes using data from public health insurance records for 50,000 children born between 1979 and 1987 in the Canadian province of Manitoba. We compare children to siblings born an average of three years apart. We find…

  13. Health and Economic Outcomes in the Alumni of the Wounded Warrior Project: 2010-2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    future survey results. WWP has requested that RAND focus on outcomes relating to mental health and resiliency (strategic objective 1), physical health ...strategic objectives and placed mental health and economic out- comes above outcomes related to physical health . Therefore, strategic objective 2 was a...and tool to help cope with feelings of stress or emotional or mental health outcomes , as measured by self-report. 1c Decrease the percentage of

  14. The National Adolescent Student Health Survey: Survey Replication Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Health Association, Kent, OH.

    The National Adolescent Student Health Survey (NASHS), initiated in 1985, is conducted to examine the health-related knowledge, practices, and attitudes of the nation's youth in the following health areas: AIDS; Nutrition; Consumer Health; Sexually Transmitted Disease; Drug and Alcohol Use; Suicide; Injury Prevention; and Violence. Findings…

  15. Low health literacy and health outcomes: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Nancy D; Sheridan, Stacey L; Donahue, Katrina E; Halpern, David J; Crotty, Karen

    2011-07-19

    Approximately 80 million Americans have limited health literacy, which puts them at greater risk for poorer access to care and poorer health outcomes. To update a 2004 systematic review and determine whether low health literacy is related to poorer use of health care, outcomes, costs, and disparities in health outcomes among persons of all ages. English-language articles identified through MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Cochrane Library databases and hand-searching (search dates for articles on health literacy, 2003 to 22 February 2011; for articles on numeracy, 1966 to 22 February 2011). Two reviewers independently selected studies that compared outcomes by differences in directly measured health literacy or numeracy levels. One reviewer abstracted article information into evidence tables; a second reviewer checked information for accuracy. Two reviewers independently rated study quality by using predefined criteria, and the investigative team jointly graded the overall strength of evidence. 96 relevant good- or fair-quality studies in 111 articles were identified: 98 articles on health literacy, 22 on numeracy, and 9 on both. Low health literacy was consistently associated with more hospitalizations; greater use of emergency care; lower receipt of mammography screening and influenza vaccine; poorer ability to demonstrate taking medications appropriately; poorer ability to interpret labels and health messages; and, among elderly persons, poorer overall health status and higher mortality rates. Poor health literacy partially explains racial disparities in some outcomes. Reviewers could not reach firm conclusions about the relationship between numeracy and health outcomes because of few studies or inconsistent results among studies. Searches were limited to articles published in English. No Medical Subject Heading terms exist for identifying relevant studies. No evidence concerning oral health literacy (speaking and listening skills) and outcomes was found

  16. Integrating Work and Family: Women's Health Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killien, Marcia

    An exploratory study examined the relationship between individual, family, and work variables and working mothers' health. The study also investigated the relationship between health management strategies and health. A cross-sectional survey design was used to gather data from 85 women who were married, employed 20 hours a week or more, and had…

  17. Environmental conditions and reproductive health outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental exposures range across multiple domains to affect human health. In an effort to learn how environmental factors combine to contribute to health outcomes we constructed a multiple environmental domain index (MEDI) for use in health research. We used principal compone...

  18. Environmental conditions and reproductive health outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental exposures range across multiple domains to affect human health. In an effort to learn how environmental factors combine to contribute to health outcomes we constructed a multiple environmental domain index (MEDI) for use in health research. We used principal compone...

  19. Client Outcome Evaluation in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Outcome evaluation assesses the results or benefits of mental health services received by clients or communities by comparing descriptive data on the mental health status of clients at different points in time. It aids clinicians and managers in planning programs and managing clinical services. A mental health center should establish goal-oriented…

  20. Factors Influencing Health-Related Internet Activities and Their Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Young; Choi, Jounghwa; Noh, Ghee-Young

    2016-11-01

    This study explores why people participate in health-related Internet activities and what the potential impacts of such activities are. Specifically, this study examines how trust in health information (i.e., from a physician and from the Internet) determines individuals' health-related Internet activities and whether this use subsequently improves outcomes such as discussion with doctors about online health information and satisfaction with health care. Findings from a Web-based survey in South Korea indicated that trust in health information from doctors decreased communication activities, whereas trust in online health information increased both communication and information activities. Both communication and information activities increased discussions with doctors about online health information, which subsequently led to satisfaction with health care.

  1. Adolescent health and adult labor market outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lundborg, Petter; Nilsson, Anton; Rooth, Dan-Olof

    2014-09-01

    Whereas a large literature has shown the importance of early life health for adult socioeconomic outcomes, there is little evidence on the importance of adolescent health. We contribute to the literature by studying the impact of adolescent health status on adult labor market outcomes using a unique and large-scale dataset covering almost the entire population of Swedish males. We show that most types of major conditions have long-run effects on future outcomes, and that the strongest effects result from mental conditions. Including sibling fixed effects or twin pair fixed effects reduces the magnitudes of the estimates, but they remain substantial.

  2. Integrated Employee Occupational Health and Organizational-Level Registered Nurse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mohr, David C; Schult, Tamara; Eaton, Jennifer Lipkowitz; Awosika, Ebi; McPhaul, Kathleen M

    2016-05-01

    The study examined organizational culture, structural supports, and employee health program integration influence on registered nurse (RN) outcomes. An organizational health survey, employee health clinical operations survey, employee attitudes survey, and administration data were collected. Multivariate regression models examined outcomes of sick leave, leave without pay, voluntary turnover, intention to leave, and organizational culture using 122 medical centers. Lower staffing ratios were associated with greater sick leave, higher turnover, and intention to leave. Safety climate was favorably associated with each of the five outcomes. Both onsite employee occupational health services and a robust health promotion program were associated with more positive organizational culture perceptions. Findings highlight the positive influence of integrating employee health and health promotion services on organizational health outcomes. Attention to promoting employee health may benefit organizations in multiple, synergistic ways.

  3. Caesarean section without medical indications is associated with an increased risk of adverse short-term maternal outcomes: the 2004-2008 WHO Global Survey on Maternal and Perinatal Health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is worldwide debate about the appropriateness of caesarean sections performed without medical indications. In this analysis, we aim to further investigate the relationship between caesarean section without medical indication and severe maternal outcomes. Methods This is a multicountry, facility-based survey that used a stratified multistage cluster sampling design to obtain a sample of countries and health institutions worldwide. A total of 24 countries and 373 health facilities participated in this study. Data collection took place during 2004 and 2005 in Africa and the Americas and during 2007 and 2008 in Asia. All women giving birth at the facility during the study period were included and had their medical records reviewed before discharge from the hospital. Univariate and multilevel analysis were performed to study the association between each group's mode of delivery and the severe maternal and perinatal outcome. Results A total of 286,565 deliveries were analysed. The overall caesarean section rate was 25.7% and a total of 1.0 percent of all deliveries were caesarean sections without medical indications, either due to maternal request or in the absence of other recorded indications. Compared to spontaneous vaginal delivery, all other modes of delivery presented an association with the increased risk of death, admission to ICU, blood transfusion and hysterectomy, including antepartum caesarean section without medical indications (Adjusted Odds Ratio (Adj OR), 5.93, 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI), 3.88 to 9.05) and intrapartum caesarean section without medical indications (Adj OR, 14.29, 95% CI, 10.91 to 18.72). In addition, this association is stronger in Africa, compared to Asia and Latin America. Conclusions Caesarean sections were associated with an intrinsic risk of increased severe maternal outcomes. We conclude that caesarean sections should be performed when a clear benefit is anticipated, a benefit that might compensate for the

  4. Outcome Assessment in Aphasia: A Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Threats, Travis T.; Kagan, Aura

    2005-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in attention to the measurement of ''outcomes'' after speech-language intervention for adult aphasia. Consumers, speech-language pathologists (SLPs), and funding sources desire evidence of therapy outcomes that improve communication and enhance the quality of life for people with aphasia. While many assessment…

  5. Outcome Assessment in Aphasia: A Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons-Mackie, Nina; Threats, Travis T.; Kagan, Aura

    2005-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in attention to the measurement of ''outcomes'' after speech-language intervention for adult aphasia. Consumers, speech-language pathologists (SLPs), and funding sources desire evidence of therapy outcomes that improve communication and enhance the quality of life for people with aphasia. While many assessment…

  6. Disaggregated data to improve child health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The District Health Information System was developed in South Africa to collect aggregated routine data from public health facilities. In Amajuba District, KwaZulu-Natal, ward-based data collection has been initiated to facilitate improved responsiveness to community health needs and improve health outcomes and patient satisfaction. Aim To assess the application of the municipal ward-based health data in the decision-making process to improve child health outcomes. Setting The study was conducted in 25 primary health care service sites in Amajuba. Methods A cross-sectional mixed methods’ approach was used. The study population comprised operational managers, professional nurses, ward-based outreach team leaders and supervisors. Quantitative data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire and analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were collected using focus group discussions and analysed using thematic analysis. Results Of the 131 respondents, 83 (67.5%) provided targeted child interventions to a certain or a large extent to improve child health outcomes, but only 74 (57.4%) respondents reported using municipal ward-based health data to a certain or large extent in order to inform their decisions. This discrepancy indicates poor utilisation of local health information for decision-making. Conclusion The study showed that municipal ward-based health data are not fully utilised for making informed decisions to improve child health outcomes. It is imperative to inculcate a culture of evidence-informed decisions that leads to provision of targeted interventions in order to mitigate the challenge of scarcity of resources and to improve child health outcomes. PMID:28155323

  7. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NHIS collects data on a broad range of health topics through personal household interviews. The results of NHIS provide data to track health status, health care access, and progress toward achieving national health objectives.

  8. Health literacy and health outcomes in diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Al Sayah, Fatima; Majumdar, Sumit R; Williams, Beverly; Robertson, Sandy; Johnson, Jeffrey A

    2013-03-01

    Low health literacy is considered a potential barrier to improving health outcomes in people with diabetes and other chronic conditions, although the evidence has not been previously systematically reviewed. To identify, appraise, and synthesize research evidence on the relationships between health literacy (functional, interactive, and critical) or numeracy and health outcomes (i.e., knowledge, behavioral and clinical) in people with diabetes. English-language articles that addressed the relationship between health literacy or numeracy and at least one health outcome in people with diabetes were identified by two reviewers through searching six scientific databases, and hand-searching journals and reference lists. Seven hundred twenty-three citations were identified and screened, 196 were considered, and 34 publications reporting data from 24 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Consistent and sufficient evidence showed a positive association between health literacy and diabetes knowledge (eight studies). There was a lack of consistent evidence on the relationship between health literacy or numeracy and clinical outcomes, e.g., A1C (13 studies), self-reported complications (two studies), and achievement of clinical goals (one study); behavioral outcomes, e.g., self-monitoring of blood glucose (one study), self-efficacy (five studies); or patient-provider interactions (i.e., patient-physician communication, information exchange, decision-making, and trust), and other outcomes. The majority of the studies were from US primary care setting (87.5 %), and there were no randomized or other trials to improve health literacy. Low health literacy is consistently associated with poorer diabetes knowledge. However, there is little sufficient or consistent evidence suggesting that it is independently associated with processes or outcomes of diabetes-related care. Based on these findings, it may be premature to routinely screen for low health

  9. Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Services, Olympia.

    The 1992 Washington State Survey of Adolescent Health Behaviors (WSSAHB) was created to collect information regarding a variety of adolescent health behaviors among students in the state of Washington. It expands on two previous administrations of a student tobacco, alcohol, and other drug survey and includes questions about medical care, safety,…

  10. Employer Survey in the Health Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bounds, Stuart M.

    In order to obtain information on the current and future job market for 12 health technology occupations, a random sample of area physicians and 100% of 9 distinct types of health occupations employers were surveyed. The major employers, hospitals and nursing homes, were interviewed by college nursing faculty; all other employers were surveyed by…

  11. Estimating health expenditure shares from household surveys

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Benjamin PC; Hanlon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To quantify the effects of household expenditure survey characteristics on the estimated share of a household’s expenditure devoted to health. Methods A search was conducted for all country surveys reporting data on health expenditure and total household expenditure. Data on total expenditure and health expenditure were extracted from the surveys to generate the health expenditure share (i.e. fraction of the household expenditure devoted to health). To do this the authors relied on survey microdata or survey reports to calculate the health expenditure share for the particular instrument involved. Health expenditure share was modelled as a function of the survey’s recall period, the number of health expenditure items, the number of total expenditure items, the data collection method and the placement of the health module within the survey. Data exists across space and time, so fixed effects for territory and year were included as well. The model was estimated by means of ordinary least squares regression with clustered standard errors. Findings A one-unit increase in the number of health expenditure questions was accompanied by a 1% increase in the estimated health expenditure share. A one-unit increase in the number of non-health expenditure questions resulted in a 0.2% decrease in the estimated share. Increasing the recall period by one month was accompanied by a 6% decrease in the health expenditure share. Conclusion The characteristics of a survey instrument examined in the study affect the estimate of the health expenditure share. Those characteristics need to be accounted for when comparing results across surveys within a territory and, ultimately, across territories. PMID:23825879

  12. Functional Health Literacy and Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varekojis, Sarah M.; Miller, Larry; Schiller, M. Rosita; Stein, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the relationship between functional health literacy level and smoking cessation outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: Participants in an inpatient smoking cessation program in a mid-western city in the USA were enrolled and the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults was administered while the…

  13. Functional Health Literacy and Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varekojis, Sarah M.; Miller, Larry; Schiller, M. Rosita; Stein, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the relationship between functional health literacy level and smoking cessation outcomes. Design/methodology/approach: Participants in an inpatient smoking cessation program in a mid-western city in the USA were enrolled and the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults was administered while the…

  14. Fukushima Health Management Survey and Related Issues.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, Seiji; Abe, Masafumi

    2017-03-01

    After the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident occurred. The Fukushima prefectural government decided to launch the Fukushima Health Management Survey; Fukushima Medical University was entrusted to design and implement the survey. The survey process and development is described from the standpoint of its background and aim. An overview of the basic survey and 4 detailed surveys is briefly provided. Issues related to the survey are discussed from the perspective of supporting the Fukushima residents.

  15. Outcome-based health equity across different social health insurance schemes for the elderly in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoting; Wong, Hung; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-14

    Against the achievement of nearly universal coverage for social health insurance for the elderly in China, a problem of inequity among different insurance schemes on health outcomes is still a big challenge for the health care system. Whether various health insurance schemes have divergent effects on health outcome is still a puzzle. Empirical evidence will be investigated in this study. This study employs a nationally representative survey database, the National Survey of the Aged Population in Urban/Rural China, to compare the changes of health outcomes among the elderly before and after the reform. A one-way ANOVA is utilized to detect disparities in health care expenditures and health status among different health insurance schemes. Multiple Linear Regression is applied later to examine the further effects of different insurance plans on health outcomes while controlling for other social determinants. The one-way ANOVA result illustrates that although the gaps in insurance reimbursements between the Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) and the other schemes, the New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) and Urban Residents Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) decreased, out-of-pocket spending accounts for a larger proportion of total health care expenditures, and the disparities among different insurances enlarged. Results of the Multiple Linear Regression suggest that UEBMI participants have better self-reported health status, physical functions and psychological wellbeing than URBMI and NCMS participants, and those uninsured. URBMI participants report better self-reported health than NCMS ones and uninsured people, while having worse psychological wellbeing compared with their NCMS counterparts. This research contributes to a transformation in health insurance studies from an emphasis on the opportunity-oriented health equity measured by coverage and healthcare accessibility to concern with outcome-based equity composed of health expenditure and health

  16. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled health-outcomes survey of the effect of botulinum toxin type a injections on quality of life and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Steven H; Arkins, John P; Patel, Amit B; Gal, Thomas J

    2010-12-01

    Although studies show that botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) can positively influence one's first impression, little research has been conducted to measure the effect that BoNTA has on mental well-being. To determine the effects that BoNTA injections for the treatment of facial wrinkles had on quality of life (QOL) and self-esteem. One hundred participants received treatment with BoNTA or placebo saline in this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled survey. All participants completed a health outcomes survey consisting of Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form and Heatherton and Polivy State Self-Esteem measurements before injection and 2 weeks and 3 months after injection. Statistically significant improvements (p<.05) in participants treated with BoNTA were observed in answers to QOL questions regarding physical health, mood, household activities, overall life satisfaction, body satisfaction, self-consciousness, intellect, self-worth, appearance, comprehension, weight satisfaction, attractiveness, and sense of well-being. Increases in overall self-esteem and appearance-, social-, and performance-related self-esteem were observed in participants treated with BoNTA. Our findings showed that BoNTA injections result in improvements in QOL and self-esteem. In addition, BoNTA-naïve participants demonstrate greater improvements in QOL and self-esteem than participants previously exposed to BoNTA. Moreover, BoNTA-familiar participants demonstrated sustained improvement in QOL and self-esteem relative to BoNTA-naïve participants, even when injected with placebo. © 2010 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  17. Measuring Student Satisfaction from the Student Outcomes Survey. Technical Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fieger, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Student Outcomes Survey is an annual national survey of vocational education and training (VET) students. Since 1995, participants have been asked to rate their satisfaction with different aspects of their training, grouped under three main themes: teaching, assessment, and generic skills and learning experiences. While the composition of the…

  18. [Comparative evaluation of health services outcomes].

    PubMed

    Agabiti, Nera; Davoli, Marina; Fusco, Danilo; Stafoggia, Massimo; Perucci, Carlo A

    2011-01-01

    This introductory guide represents an operative tool to conduct epidemiological studies in the area of comparative outcomes evaluation. It is based on the experience of epidemiological research in this field conducted in Italy within national (BPAC-Esiti del bypass aortocoronarico, Progetto mattoni outcome, Progetto Progressi) or regional (P.Re.Val.E. Programma Regionale di Valutazione degli Esiti, Lazio) health care outcomes projects and the National outcome programme. This guide is aimed to all those interested in conducting or interpreting health care outcomes studies within different levels of the Italian NHS. It gives an introductory description of the operative steps to build outcome indicators and to perform comparative analyses, with the general objective of measuring and promoting improvement in health care. A specific emphasis is given to the use of routinely collected health care databases that have found widespread use for epidemiological purposes. This guide has two parts: part A includes an introduction and comments on critical methodological points, part B shows three example of epidemiological studies (A. Complications after cholecystectomy: comparison between two surgical techniques, B. 30-day mortality after acute myocardial infarction: comparison among hospitals, C. 30-day mortality after acute myocardial infarction: comparison between time periods). The online version of this guide is organised as a hypertext as practical instrument of appraisal.

  19. The capacity for health promotion survey.

    PubMed

    Maujean, Annick; Kendall, Elizabeth; Ehrlich, Carolyn; Kisely, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to develop and examine the psychometric properties of the Capacity for Health Promotion Survey designed to assess the practice of health promotion in the area of severe mental illness. Seven hundred and eighty-five health professionals in Queensland, Australia, completed the survey. A principal component analysis was used to assess the factor structure of the scale and investigations of internal consistency, interitem correlation and item-discriminant validity were conducted to establish the reliability and validity of the survey. The final survey is a 22-item scale comprising five subscales: Beliefs about Behavior Change, Intention to Promote Health, Health Promotion Skills, Effectiveness of Health Promotion and Health Promoting Norms. The survey demonstrated satisfactory internal consistency for the five subscales. Items were more strongly correlated within their own subscales than with other subscales, providing evidence of discriminant validity. The Capacity for Health Promotion Survey is a psychometrically sound measure to assess the practice of health promotion in the area of severe mental illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. School outcomes of children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Christopher B; Bevans, Katherine B; Riley, Anne W; Crespo, Richard; Louis, Thomas A

    2011-08-01

    To examine the associations between having a special health care need and school outcomes measured as attendance, student engagement, behavioral threats to achievement, and academic achievement. A total of 1457 children in the fourth through sixth grades from 34 schools in 3 school districts and their parents provided survey data; parents completed the Children With Special Health Care Needs Screener. School records were abstracted for attendance, grades, and standardized achievement test scores. Across 34 schools, 33% of children screened positive for special health care needs. After adjusting for sociodemographic and school effects, children with special health care needs had lower motivation to do well in school, more disruptive behaviors, and more frequent experiences as a bully victim. They experienced significantly lower academic achievement, as measured by grades, standardized testing, and parental-assessed academic performance. These findings were observed for children who qualified as having a special health care need because they had functional limitations attributed to a chronic illness or a behavioral health problem but not for those who qualified only because they took prescription medications. Specific subgroups of children with special health care needs are at increased risk for poor school outcomes. Health and school professionals will need to collaborate to identify these children early, intervene with appropriate medical and educational services, and monitor long-term outcomes.

  1. Treatment for Osteoporosis among Women in Japan: Associations with Patient Characteristics and Patient-Reported Outcomes in the 2008–2011 Japan National Health and Wellness Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jennifer A.; Fujiwara, Saeko

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify characteristics associated with treatment for osteoporosis among women aged 50 years and older in Japan and to explore differences among patients according to treatment regimen. Data were provided by a large annual survey representative of Japanese aged 18 and older; all measures were by self-report. Women aged 50 and older who reported diagnosed osteoporosis (N = 900) were compared based on current treatment status using bivariate statistics and logistic regression. Approximately 1 in 3 women in this study reporting diagnosed osteoporosis were currently untreated. Factors associated with current treatment for osteoporosis included having ≥1 physician visit in the prior 6 months (OR = 5.4, P < 0.001), self-rated moderate or severe osteoporosis (OR = 2.8, P < 0.001), completion of menopause (OR = 1.6, P < 0.05), and family history of osteoporosis (OR = 1.5, P < 0.05), while longer duration of osteoporosis diagnosis (OR = 0.9, P < 0.05) and arthritis (OR = 0.7, P < 0.05) were associated with lower odds of treatment. These findings suggest that diagnosed patients are not being actively managed in the longer term, and efforts need to be made to ensure that patients stay engaged with their healthcare providers. PMID:25587485

  2. Cannabis use in people with severe mental illness: The association with physical and mental health--a cohort study. A Pharmacotherapy Monitoring and Outcome Survey study.

    PubMed

    Bruins, Jojanneke; Pijnenborg, Marieke G H M; Bartels-Velthuis, Agna A; Visser, Ellen; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Bruggeman, Richard; Jörg, Frederike

    2016-04-01

    In the general population cannabis use is associated with better cardiometabolic outcomes. Patients with severe mental illness frequently use cannabis, but also present increased cardiometabolic risk factors. We explore the association between cannabis use and cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with severe mental illness. A total of 3169 patients with severe mental illness from a Dutch cohort were included in the study. The association of cannabis use with body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, glycated hemoglobin and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale was examined with separate univariate AN(C)OVA. Changes in metabolic risk factors and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were examined after a follow-up interval of 9-24 months, for patients who continued, discontinued, started or were never using cannabis between the two assessments. Cannabis users at baseline had lower body mass index, smaller waist circumference, lower diastolic blood pressure, and more severe psychotic symptoms than non-users. Patients who discontinued their cannabis use after the first assessment had a greater increase in body mass index, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure and triglyceride concentrations than other patients, and the severity of their psychotic symptoms had decreased more compared to continued users and non-users. Extra attention should be paid to the monitoring and treatment of metabolic parameters in patients who discontinue their cannabis use. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Physical activity and health outcomes: evidence from Canada.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Brad R; McLeod, Logan; Ruseski, Jane E

    2014-01-01

    Health production models include participation in physical activity as an input. We investigate the relationship between participation in physical activity and health using a bivariate probit model. Participation is identified with an exclusion restriction on a variable reflecting sense of belonging to the community. Estimates based on data from Cycle 3.1 of the Canadian Community Health Survey indicate that participation in physical activity reduces the reported incidence of diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, asthma, and arthritis as well as being in fair or poor health. Increasing the intensity above the moderate level and frequency of participation in physical activity appears to have a diminishing marginal impact on adverse health outcomes. Our results provide support for guidelines about engaging in exercise regularly to achieve health benefits. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Rachel E.; Boulos, David; Garber, Bryan G.; Jetly, Rakesh; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey (CFMHS) collected detailed information on mental health problems, their impacts, occupational and nonoccupational determinants of mental health, and the use of mental health services from a random sample of 8200 serving personnel. The objective of this article is to provide a firm scientific foundation for understanding and interpreting the CFMHS findings. Methods: This narrative review first provides a snapshot of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF), focusing on 2 key determinants of mental health: the deployment of more than 40,000 personnel in support of the mission in Afghanistan and the extensive renewal of the CAF mental health system. The findings of recent population-based CAF mental health research are reviewed, with a focus on findings from the very similar mental health survey done in 2002. Finally, key aspects of the methods of the 2013 CFMHS are presented. Results: The findings of 20 peer-reviewed publications using the 2002 mental health survey data are reviewed, along with those of 25 publications from other major CAF mental health research projects executed over the past decade. Conclusions: More than a decade of population-based mental health research in the CAF has provided a detailed picture of its mental health and use of mental health services. This knowledge base and the homology of the 2013 survey with the 2002 CAF survey and general population surveys in 2002 and 2012 will provide an unusual opportunity to use the CFMHS to situate mental health in the CAF in a historical and societal perspective. PMID:27270738

  5. Occupant Perceptions and a Health Outcome in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Mingjie; Kim, Yang-Seon; Srebric, Jelena

    2015-11-02

    Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) in commercial buildings, such as retail stores, can affect employee satisfaction, productivity, and health. This study administered an IEQ survey to retail employees and found correlations between measured IEQ parameters and the survey responses. The survey included 611 employees in 14 retail stores located in Pennsylvania (climate zone 5A) and Texas (climate zone 2A). The survey questionnaire featured ratings of different aspects of IEQ, including thermal comfort, lighting and noise level, indoor smells, overall cleanness, and environmental quality. Simultaneously with the survey, on-site physical measurements were taken to collect data of relative humidity levels, air exchange rates, dry bulb temperatures, and contaminant concentrations. This data was analyzed using multinomial logit regression with independent variables being the measured IEQ parameters, employees’ gender, and age. This study found that employee perception of stuffy smells is related to formaldehyde and PM10 concentrations. Furthermore, the survey also asked the employees to report an annual frequency of common colds as a health indicator. The regression analysis showed that the cold frequency statistically correlates with the measured air exchange rates, outdoor temperatures, and indoor PM concentrations. Overall, the air exchange rate is the most influential parameter on the employee perception of the overall environmental quality and self-reported health outcome.

  6. Exploring models for the roles of health systems' responsiveness and social determinants in explaining universal health coverage and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Nicole Britt; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2016-01-01

    Intersectoral perspectives of health are present in the rhetoric of the sustainable development goals. Yet its descriptions of systematic approaches for an intersectoral monitoring vision, joining determinants of health, and barriers or facilitators to accessing healthcare services are lacking. To explore models of associations between health outcomes and health service coverage, and health determinants and health systems responsiveness, and thereby to contribute to monitoring, analysis, and assessment approaches informed by an intersectoral vision of health. The study is designed as a series of ecological, cross-country regression analyses, covering between 23 and 57 countries with dependent health variables concentrated on the years 2002-2003. Countries cover a range of development contexts. Health outcome and health service coverage dependent variables were derived from World Health Organization (WHO) information sources. Predictor variables representing determinants are derived from the WHO and World Bank databases; variables used for health systems' responsiveness are derived from the WHO World Health Survey. Responsiveness is a measure of acceptability of health services to the population, complementing financial health protection. Health determinants' indicators - access to improved drinking sources, accountability, and average years of schooling - were statistically significant in particular health outcome regressions. Statistically significant coefficients were more common for mortality rate regressions than for coverage rate regressions. Responsiveness was systematically associated with poorer health and health service coverage. With respect to levels of inequality in health, the indicator of responsiveness problems experienced by the unhealthy poor groups in the population was statistically significant for regressions on measles vaccination inequalities between rich and poor. For the broader determinants, the Gini mattered most for inequalities in child

  7. Outcome mapping for health system integration

    PubMed Central

    Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

    2013-01-01

    Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care. PMID:23526058

  8. Outcome mapping for health system integration.

    PubMed

    Tsasis, Peter; Evans, Jenna M; Forrest, David; Jones, Richard Keith

    2013-01-01

    Health systems around the world are implementing integrated care strategies to improve quality, reduce or maintain costs, and improve the patient experience. Yet few practical tools exist to aid leaders and managers in building the prerequisites to integrated care, namely a shared vision, clear roles and responsibilities, and a common understanding of how the vision will be realized. Outcome mapping may facilitate stakeholder alignment on the vision, roles, and processes of integrated care delivery via participative and focused dialogue among diverse stakeholders on desired outcomes and enabling actions. In this paper, we describe an outcome-mapping exercise we conducted at a Local Health Integration Network in Ontario, Canada, using consensus development conferences. Our preliminary findings suggest that outcome mapping may help stakeholders make sense of a complex system and foster collaborative capital, a resource that can support information sharing, trust, and coordinated change toward integration across organizational and professional boundaries. Drawing from the theoretical perspectives of complex adaptive systems and collaborative capital, we also outline recommendations for future outcome-mapping exercises. In particular, we emphasize the potential for outcome mapping to be used as a tool not only for identifying and linking strategic outcomes and actions, but also for studying the boundaries, gaps, and ties that characterize social networks across the continuum of care.

  9. Health expenditures, health outcomes and the role of good governance.

    PubMed

    Farag, Marwa; Nandakumar, A K; Wallack, Stanley; Hodgkin, Dominic; Gaumer, Gary; Erbil, Can

    2013-03-01

    This paper examines the relationship between country health spending and selected health outcomes (infant mortality and child mortality), using data from 133 low and middle-income countries for the years 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2006. Health spending has a significant effect on reducing infant and under-5 child mortality with an elasticity of 0.13 to 0.33 for infant mortality and 0.15 to 0.38 for under-5 child mortality in models estimated using fixed effects methods (depending on models employed). Government health spending also has a significant effect on reducing infant and child mortality and the size of the coefficient depends on the level of good governance achieved by the country, indicating that good governance increases the effectiveness of health spending. This paper contributes to the new evidence pointing to the importance of investing in health care services and the importance of governance in improving health outcomes.

  10. Risk Factors and Adverse Perinatal Outcomes among Term and Preterm Infants Born Small-for-Gestational-Age: Secondary Analyses of the WHO Multi-Country Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Erika; Ganchimeg, Togoobaatar; Morisaki, Naho; Vogel, Joshua P.; Pileggi, Cynthia; Ortiz-Panozo, Eduardo; Souza, João P.; Mori, Rintaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Small for gestational age (SGA) is not only a major indicator of perinatal mortality and morbidity, but also the morbidity risks in later in life. We aim to estimate the association between the birth of SGA infants and the risk factors and adverse perinatal outcomes among twenty-nine countries in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia in 359 health facilities in 2010–11. Methods We analysed facility-based, cross-sectional data from the WHO Multi-country Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health. We constructed multilevel logistic regression models with random effects for facilities and countries to estimate the risk factors for SGA infants using country-specific birthweight reference standards in preterm and term delivery, and SGA’s association with adverse perinatal outcomes. We compared the risks and adverse perinatal outcomes with appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants categorized by preterm and term delivery. Results A total of 295,829 singleton infants delivered were analysed. The overall prevalence of SGA was highest in Cambodia (18.8%), Nepal (17.9%), the Occupied Palestinian Territory (16.1%), and Japan (16.0%), while the lowest was observed in Afghanistan (4.8%), Uganda (6.6%) and Thailand (9.7%). The risk of preterm SGA infants was significantly higher among nulliparous mothers and mothers with chronic hypertension and preeclampsia/eclampsia (aOR: 2.89; 95% CI: 2.55–3.28) compared with AGA infants. Higher risks of term SGA were observed among sociodemographic factors and women with preeclampsia/eclampsia, anaemia and other medical conditions. Multiparity (> = 3) (AOR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.83–0.92) was a protective factor for term SGA. The risk of perinatal mortality was significantly higher in preterm SGA deliveries in low to high HDI countries. Conclusion Preterm SGA is associated with medical conditions related to preeclampsia, but not with sociodemographic status. Term SGA is associated with sociodemographic status and

  11. Pregnancy and Birth Survey of the Fukushima Health Management Survey.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kayoko; Goto, Aya; Ota, Misao; Yasumura, Seiji; Fujimori, Keiya

    2017-03-01

    The Pregnancy and Birth Survey was started by Fukushima Medical University as part of the Fukushima Health Management Survey in 2011 in order to assess the physical and mental health of mothers and provide parenting support (telephone counseling) for those in need. The present study reviewed the major findings from 4 annual surveys conducted from 2011 to 2014. Overall proportions of preterm deliveries, low birth weight infants, and congenital anomalies in the first year were almost the same as those in national surveillance data. The prevalence of depressive symptoms among the mothers held steady at about 25% over the 4 years. Regarding the content of parenting counseling, the proportion of mothers who voiced concerns about radiation decreased each year. This survey should be continued to provide support to mothers in Fukushima.

  12. The Cardiff health survey: teaching survey methodology by participation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, P A; Charny, M

    1987-01-01

    Medical students were taught survey methodology by participating in all phases of a large community survey. The survey examined health beliefs, knowledge and behaviour in a sample of 5150 people drawn from the electoral register of the City of Cardiff. The study achieved several educational objectives for the medical students: they met well people in their own homes and had an opportunity to get to know a community; by taking part in a study from the initial phases to the conclusion they could appreciate the context of the theoretical teaching they were being given concurrently in their undergraduate course; they learnt to analyse raw data and produce reports; and they gained insights into the health knowledge, behaviour, attitudes and beliefs of a population. In addition, the survey produced a substantial quantity of valuable data which staff and students are analysing and intend to publish.

  13. Health and school outcomes during children's transition into adolescence.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Christopher B; Bevans, Katherine B; Riley, Anne W; Crespo, Richard; Louis, Thomas A

    2013-02-01

    Normative biopsychosocial stressors that occur during entry into adolescence can affect school performance.As a set of resources for adapting to life's challenges, good health may buffer a child from these potentially harmful stressors. This study examined the associations between health (measured as well-being, functioning, symptoms, and chronic conditions) and school outcomes among children aged 9-13 years in 4th-8th grades. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 1,479 children from 34 schools followed from 2006 to 2008. Survey data were obtained from children and their parents, and school records were abstracted. Measures of child self-reported health were dichotomized to indicate presence of a health asset. Outcomes included attendance, grade point average, state achievement test scores, and child-reported school engagement and teacher connectedness. Both the transition into middle school and puberty had independent negative influences on school outcomes. Chronic health conditions that affected children's functional status were associated with poorer academic achievement. The number of health assets that a child possessed was positively associated with school outcomes. Low levels of negative stress experiences and high physical comfort had positive effects on teacher connectedness, school engagement, and academic achievement, whereas bullying and bully victimization negatively affected these outcomes. Children with high life satisfaction were more connected with teachers, more engaged in schoolwork, and earned higher grades than those who were less satisfied. As children enter adolescence, good health may buffer them from the potentially negative effects of school and pubertal transitions on academic success. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Purchasing population health: aligning financial incentives to improve health outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Kindig, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the concept of population health, including its definition, measurement, and determinants, and to suggest an approach for aligning financial incentives toward this goal. DATA SOURCE, STUDY DESIGN, DATA EXTRACTION. Literature review, policy analysis PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The article presents the argument that a major reason for our slow progress toward health outcome improvement is that there is no operational definition of population health and that financial incentives are not aligned to this goal. Current attempts at process measures as indicators of quality or outcome are not adequate for the task. It is suggested that some measure of health-adjusted life expectancy be adopted for this purpose, and that integrated delivery systems and other agents responsible for nonmedical determinants be rewarded for improvement in this measure. This will require the development of an investment portfolio across the determinants of health based on relative marginal return to health, with horizontal integration strategies across sectoral boundaries. A 20-year three-phase development strategy is proposed, including components of research and acceptance, integrated health system implementation, and cross-sectoral integration. CONCLUSIONS: The U.S. healthcare system is a $1 trillion industry without a definition of its product. Until population outcome measures are developed and rewarded for, we will not solve the twenty-first century challenge of maximizing health outcome improvement for the resources available. Images Figure 1 PMID:9618669

  15. HOUSEHOLD NUCLEATION, DEPENDENCY AND CHILD HEALTH OUTCOMES IN GHANA.

    PubMed

    Annim, Samuel Kobina; Awusabo-Asare, Kofi; Amo-Adjei, Joshua

    2015-09-01

    This study uses three key anthropometric measures of nutritional status among children (stunting, wasting and underweight) to explore the dual effects of household composition and dependency on nutritional outcomes of under-five children in Ghana. The objective is to examine changes in household living arrangements of under-five children to explore the interaction of dependency and nucleation on child health outcomes. The concept of nucleation refers to the changing structure and composition of household living arrangements, from highly extended with its associated socioeconomic system of production and reproduction, social behaviour and values, towards single-family households - especially the nuclear family, containing a husband and wife and their children alone. A negative relationship between levels of dependency, as measured by the number of children in the household, and child health outcomes is premised on the grounds that high dependency depletes resources, both tangible and intangible, to the disadvantage of young children. Data were drawn from the last four rounds of the Ghana Demographic and Health Surveys (GDHSs), from 1993 to 2008, for the first objective - to explore changes in household composition. For the second objective, the study used data from the 2008 GDHS. The results show that, over time, households in Ghana have been changing towards nucleation. The main finding is that in households with the same number of dependent children, in nucleated households children under age 5 have better health outcomes compared with children under age 5 in non-nucleated households. The results also indicate that the effect of dependency on child health outcomes is mediated by household nucleation and wealth status and that, as such, high levels of dependency do not necessarily translate into negative health outcomes for children under age 5, based on anthropometric measures.

  16. Multidisciplinary eHealth Survey Evaluation Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karras, Bryant T.; Tufano, James T.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development process of an evaluation framework for describing and comparing web survey tools. We believe that this approach will help shape the design, development, deployment, and evaluation of population-based health interventions. A conceptual framework for describing and evaluating web survey systems will enable the…

  17. Organizational climate and health care outcomes.

    PubMed

    MacDavitt, Kathryn; Chou, Shin-Shang; Stone, Patricia W

    2007-11-01

    Relationships between organizational climate-which reflects the employees' perception of the organizational culture and is easily measured through employee questionnaires-and patient and employee outcomes were examined in a literature review. A systematic search was conducted, with the review limited to primary research published between January 1995 and June 2007. An integrative model of organizational climate was used to guide the search and organize evidence. Twenty studies, all cross-sectional in design, were identified. Samples ranged from 632 clinicians in 3 hospitals to almost 250,000 providers in 168 hospitals. Most researchers studied nurses in hospitals, but other providers were also surveyed. Perceptions of processes such as scheduling practices, collaboration, and autonomy were associated with nurse outcomes (for example, job satisfaction, turnover, occupational safety). There was some evidence that aspects of organizational climate were associated with patient outcomes, but the results were inconsistent. Measurement of the organizational climate factors and outcomes varied across studies. The evidence that organizational climate influences nurse outcomes is more robust than is the evidence that it influences patient outcomes. The findings underscore the importance of promoting a positive organizational climate.

  18. Mode and timing of twin delivery and perinatal outcomes in low- and middle-income countries: a secondary analysis of the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Ganchimeg, T; Morisaki, N; Vogel, J P; Cecatti, J G; Barrett, J; Jayaratne, K; Mittal, S; Ortiz-Panozo, E; Souza, J P; Crowther, C; Ota, E; Mori, R

    2014-03-01

    To describe the mode and timing of delivery of twin pregnancies at ≥34 weeks of gestation and their association with perinatal outcomes. Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study. Twin deliveries at ≥34 weeks of gestation from 21 low- and middle-income countries participating in the WHO Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health. Descriptive analysis and effect estimates using multilevel logistic regression. Stillbirth, perinatal mortality, and neonatal near miss (use of selected life saving interventions at birth). The average length of gestation at delivery was 37.6 weeks. Of all twin deliveries, 16.8 and 17.6% were delivered by caesarean section before and after the onset of labour, respectively. Prelabour caesarean delivery was associated with older maternal age, higher institutional capacity and wealth of the country. Compared with spontaneous vaginal delivery, lower risks of neonatal near miss (adjusted odds ratio, aOR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 0.44-0.94) were found among prelabour caesarean deliveries. A lower risk of early neonatal mortality (aOR 0.12; 95% CI 0.02-0.56) was also observed among prelabour caesarean deliveries with nonvertex presentation of the first twin. The week of gestation with the lowest rate of prospective fetal death varied by fetal presentation: 37 weeks for vertex-vertex; 39 weeks for vertex-nonvertex; and 38 weeks for a nonvertex first twin. The prelabour caesarean delivery rate among twins varied largely between countries, probably as a result of overuse of caesarean delivery in wealthier countries and limited access to caesarean delivery in low-income countries. Prelabour delivery may be beneficial when the first twin is nonvertex. International guidelines for optimal twin delivery methods are needed. © 2014 RCOG The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  19. The RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0.

    PubMed

    Hays, R D; Sherbourne, C D; Mazel, R M

    1993-10-01

    Recently, Ware and Sherbourne published a new short-form health survey, the MOS 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), consisting of 36 items included in long-form measures developed for the Medical Outcomes Study. The SF-36 taps eight health concepts: physical functioning, bodily pain, role limitations due to physical health problems, role limitations due to personal or emotional problems, general mental health, social functioning, energy/fatigue, and general health perceptions. It also includes a single item that provides an indication of perceived change in health. The SF-36 items and scoring rules are distributed by MOS Trust, Inc. Strict adherence to item wording and scoring recommendations is required in order to use the SF-36 trademark. The RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0 (distributed by RAND) includes the same items as those in the SF-36, but the recommended scoring algorithm is somewhat different from that of the SF-36. Scoring differences are discussed here and new T-scores are presented for the 8 multi-item scales and two factor analytically-derived physical and mental health composite scores.

  20. Reproductive aging, menopause, and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Stovall, Dale W

    2010-08-01

    Changes in ovarian hormone production may affect numerous health outcomes including vasomotor symptoms, cardiovascular disease (CVD), osteoporosis, cognition, depression, mood disorders, sexual function, and vaginal atrophy. We will compare age-related changes to those associated with reproductive aging and menopause and the effects of estrogen therapy on selected health outcomes. Hormone therapy (HT) reduces frequency and severity of hot flashes, prevents bone loss and osteoporotic fractures, and relieves vaginal atrophy. Nonhormone therapy trials with antidepressants or gabapentin for hot flash relief are promising. To date, clinical trial data are insufficient to recommend the use of HT for prevention or treatment of CVD, mood disorders, cognition, or sleep disorders. For some disease states, such as CVD and cognition, a "critical time window" has been proposed but not proven, such that estrogen use early in the menopause transition may be beneficial while estrogen use later in life would lead to increased health risks.

  1. Hispanic Health Care Survey of Southeastern Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvasnica, Barbara; And Others

    The results of a study on the health care needs and utilization patterns of Hispanic (primarily Mexican American) families in southeastern Wisconsin are presented in this report. The methodology of the study, which included two surveys in a 9 county area, is described. Findings of the two studies, one focusing on health services utilization by…

  2. Ethical Issues in School Health: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Glenn E.; Jose, Nancy

    1983-01-01

    The need for a code of ethics for health educators is discussed, and results of a survey of school health educators' opinions on curriculum-related ethical issses are reported. Ethical issues of concern include use of scare tactics, efforts to change behavior and attitudes, and appropriate subject matter. (PP)

  3. California Community Colleges Health Services Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Chuck

    In 1990, a telephone survey was conducted of health services offered by California's community colleges. Statewide, 42 of the 71 districts in California levied a health service fee, 18 districts offered services without charge, and 11 offered no service. Districts operating programs collected an average of $15.81 in student fees per credit average…

  4. [Current situation of health surveys in Spain].

    PubMed

    Requena, María Luisa; Suárez, Mónica; Pérez, Óscar

    2013-01-01

    To describe the evolution of health interview surveys in Spain (as of 01/01/2012), whether national or regional, its main characteristics and methodology, and in the case of general health surveys (GHIS), its contents. An adapted version of Eurostat quality control template European Health Interview Survey Technical and Methodological Report was filled in by those responsible for GHIS in each region (autonomous communities) and at the national level. The first part (11 questions) gathers general information about health surveys, both GHIS and surveys targeted to specific populations or health problems (SHIS). The second part (109 questions) asks about methodological characteristics of most recent GHIS. 1) regional or supra-regional scope; 2) for the second part, GHIS currently active series. Quality control was performed using double data entry and validated by informants.100 HIS were identified. 16 were GHIS and 84 SHIS. 32 (38%) of the latter were national and 52 (62%) regional. Nutrition 21 (25%), drug use 10 (12%), opinion polls 7 (9%) and dental health 7 (9%) were the most frequent topics in SHIS. Highest GHIS density was reached after year 2000, with several surveys on field at a time (mode=3). 11 GHIS (2 national, 9 regional) met inclusion criteria for the second part. All complied with general quality benchmarks. Few differences were observed in content.GHIS show more similarities than differences in objectives, methods and content. Rationalization and harmonization are needed. Physical activity, alcohol consumption, quality of life and mental health instruments are not yet consensual. Valid and comparable data are required on health status and its determinants to inform health policy.

  5. Survey of health planning proposals.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, R S

    1994-02-01

    It is important that physicians participate in the debate and planning process that will ultimately guide how we reform the way health care is financed and delivered in the United States. Herein is offered a perspective on the problem, one which is not necessarily appreciated by health planners. While we deliver the best quality of care in the world to most of our population, our system has been severely criticized because we fail to provide for access to a substantial minority of our population. Additionally, the cost of the product is considerably greater than that in comparable countries. Attempts to control costs without diminishing quality have introduced expensive complexities into our system without any real success in cutting costs. Several proposals have been advanced to address the issues of cost and access. One of these is a single payer system, common in Europe and Canada, whereby a single agent or group of agents finances all health care through universal rules and means. A system operating in Hawaii is a simple employer mandate to provide health insurance. A uniquely American plan is the Jackson Hole Plan or Managed Competition (now called "Managed Cooperation"). This system is currently popular among national health planners, and involves a defined minimum managed health plan offered by various groups of providers to employees and individuals through health plan purchasing cooperatives. This plan is interesting, but has not been implemented in any jurisdiction, and it is not certain it would accomplish its goals in practice since it is difficult to predict behavior of all parties to such a system.

  6. Linkages among reproductive health, maternal health, and perinatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Lassi, Zohra S; Blanc, Ann; Donnay, France

    2010-12-01

    Some interventions in women before and during pregnancy may reduce perinatal and neonatal deaths, and recent research has established linkages of reproductive health with maternal, perinatal, and early neonatal health outcomes. In this review, we attempted to analyze the impact of biological, clinical, and epidemiologic aspects of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes through an elucidation of a biological framework for linking reproductive, maternal and newborn health (RHMNH); care strategies and interventions for improved perinatal and neonatal health outcomes; public health implications of these linkages and implementation strategies; and evidence gaps for scaling up such strategies. Approximately 1000 studies (up to June 15, 2010) were reviewed that have addressed an impact of reproductive and maternal health interventions on perinatal and neonatal outcomes. These include systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and stand-alone experimental and observational studies. Evidences were also drawn from recent work undertaken by the Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG), the interconnections between maternal and newborn health reviews identified by the Global Alliance for Prevention of Prematurity and Stillbirth (GAPPS), as well as relevant work by the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health. Our review amply demonstrates that opportunities for assessing outcomes for both mothers and newborns have been poorly realized and documented. Most of the interventions reviewed will require more greater-quality evidence before solid programmatic recommendations can be made. However, on the basis of our review, birth spacing, prevention of indoor air pollution, prevention of intimate partner violence before and during pregnancy, antenatal care during pregnancy, Doppler ultrasound monitoring during pregnancy, insecticide-treated mosquito nets, birth and newborn care preparedness via community-based intervention

  7. Previous Violent Events and Mental Health Outcomes in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Puac-Polanco, Victor D.; Lopez-Soto, Victor A.; Kohn, Robert; Xie, Dawei; Richmond, Therese S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed a probability sample of Guatemalans to determine if a relationship exists between previous violent events and development of mental health outcomes in various sociodemographic groups, as well as during and after the Guatemalan Civil War. Methods. We used regression modeling, an interaction test, and complex survey design adjustments to estimate prevalences and test potential relationships between previous violent events and mental health. Results. Many (20.6%) participants experienced at least 1 previous serious violent event. Witnessing someone severely injured or killed was the most common event. Depression was experienced by 4.2% of participants, with 6.5% experiencing anxiety, 6.4% an alcohol-related disorder, and 1.9% posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Persons who experienced violence during the war had 4.3 times the adjusted odds of alcohol-related disorders (P < .05) and 4.0 times the adjusted odds of PTSD (P < .05) compared with the postwar period. Women, indigenous Maya, and urban dwellers had greater odds of experiencing postviolence mental health outcomes. Conclusions. Violence that began during the civil war and continues today has had a significant effect on the mental health of Guatemalans. However, mental health outcomes resulting from violent events decreased in the postwar period, suggesting a nation in recovery. PMID:25713973

  8. Previous violent events and mental health outcomes in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Puac-Polanco, Victor D; Lopez-Soto, Victor A; Kohn, Robert; Xie, Dawei; Richmond, Therese S; Branas, Charles C

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed a probability sample of Guatemalans to determine if a relationship exists between previous violent events and development of mental health outcomes in various sociodemographic groups, as well as during and after the Guatemalan Civil War. We used regression modeling, an interaction test, and complex survey design adjustments to estimate prevalences and test potential relationships between previous violent events and mental health. Many (20.6%) participants experienced at least 1 previous serious violent event. Witnessing someone severely injured or killed was the most common event. Depression was experienced by 4.2% of participants, with 6.5% experiencing anxiety, 6.4% an alcohol-related disorder, and 1.9% posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Persons who experienced violence during the war had 4.3 times the adjusted odds of alcohol-related disorders (P < .05) and 4.0 times the adjusted odds of PTSD (P < .05) compared with the postwar period. Women, indigenous Maya, and urban dwellers had greater odds of experiencing postviolence mental health outcomes. Violence that began during the civil war and continues today has had a significant effect on the mental health of Guatemalans. However, mental health outcomes resulting from violent events decreased in the postwar period, suggesting a nation in recovery.

  9. Does health insurance ensure equitable health outcomes? An analysis of hospital services usage in urban India.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mousumi; Husain, Zakir

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and the usage of in-patient services, and analyze the impact of introducing health insurance in India - a major developing country with poor health outcomes. In contrast to results of similar works undertaken for developed countries, our results reveal that the positive relation between usage of in-patient services and SES persists even in the presence of health insurance. This implies that health insurance is unable to eliminate the inequities in accessing healthcare services that stem from disparities in SES. In fact, insurance aggravates inequity in the healthcare market. The study is based on unit-level data from the 2005-06 Morbidity and Health Care Survey undertaken by National Sample Survey Organization.

  10. Organizational climate and occupational health outcomes in hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patricia W; Du, Yunling; Gershon, Robyn R M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine relationships between organizational climate (OC) factors and occupational health outcomes (lost workdays, musculoskeletal injury, blood and body fluid exposures, injuries, and burnout) among hospital-based nurses. Measures were obtained through a self-administered, anonymous survey distributed in 13 New York City hospitals. Multivariate models appropriate for clustered data were developed. These analyses controlled for nurse and employment characteristics. Independent effects of OC factors were examined. Surveys from 2047 predominantly registered nurses were obtained (response rate 50%). More than 75% reported lost workdays due to illness in the previous 4-month period and over one third reported experiencing some type of injury. OC factors were independently associated with injuries and measures of burnout (P < or = 0.05). OC is significantly associated with the health and well-being of hospital nurses.

  11. A Study of Global Health Elective Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Christiana M.; Tran, Tony; Silverman, Melanie; Palfrey, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To identify the effects of global health electives over a decade in a pediatric residency program. Methods: This was an anonymous email survey of the Boston Combined Residency alumni funded for global health electives from 2002 to 2011. A test for trend in binomial proportions and logistic regression were used to document associations between elective and participant characteristics and the effects of the electives. Qualitative data were also analyzed. Results: Of the 104 alumni with available email addresses, 69 (66%) responded, describing 94 electives. Elective products included 27 curricula developed, 11 conference presentations, and 7 academic publications. Thirty-two (46%) alumni continued global health work. Previous experience, previous travel to the site, number of global electives, and cumulative global elective time were associated with postresidency work in global health or with the underserved. Conclusions: Resident global electives resulted in significant scholarship and teaching and contributed to long-term career trajectories. PMID:28229096

  12. Health literacy and kidney transplant outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kazley, Abby S; Hund, Jessica Jordan; Simpson, Kit N; Chavin, Ken; Baliga, Prabhakar

    2015-03-01

    Kidney disease is a common disease that is best treated through kidney transplant. The kidney transplant process is complex and can be difficult to navigate and most likely requires an adequate amount of health literacy. To assess the relationship between health literacy and transplant outcomes, including whether a patient was listed for or received a transplant. A cross-sectional study measuring patients' health literacy and transplant outcomes. Participants from a single transplant center were invited to participate if they were referred to the center for transplant and spoke English. Of the 92 patients, 30 (33%) were in the vascular access clinic, 31 (34%) were posttransplant, and 31 (34%) were pretransplant. Health literacy was measured by using 3 tools: Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy of Medicine-Transplant (REALM-T), Newest Vital Sign (NVS), and Decision-Making Capacity Assessment Tool (DMCAT). Two dichotomous variables: whether the patient was listed for transplant and/or received a transplant. Descriptive and univariate statistics were calculated. Six logistic regression models were used to test for a correlation between each of the tools and patients' likelihood to be listed for and/or receive a transplant. Fifty-three patients (58%) were formally listed for a transplant, and 36 (39%) received a transplant. The REALM-T, NVS, and DMCAT each significantly predicted whether or not a patient was listed for transplant (odds ratios, 1.044, 1.672, and 1.408). The NVS and DMCAT significantly predicted whether a patient received a transplant (odds ratios, 1.667 and 1.256). Health literacy is a positive and significant predictor of transplant outcomes. Clinicians should take assessments of health literacy into account when speaking to patients about kidney transplant.

  13. Assessment of residency program outcomes via alumni surveys

    PubMed Central

    Lüer, Sonja; Aebi, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Background One trend in medical education is outcomes-oriented training. Outcomes usually refer to individuals’ acquisition of competencies, for example, during training in residency programs. However, little is known about outcomes of these programs. In order to fill this gap, human resource (HR) data were analyzed and alumni of a pediatric residency program were surveyed at the Department of Pediatrics, Bern University Hospital, Switzerland. Methods Residency program outcomes (demographics, career choices, part-time or full-time work status, competencies, feedback) were assessed through in-house HR databases, publicly available data on the Internet (physician directory and practice homepages), and 2 alumni surveys (S1, S2). Results In all, 109 alumni met the inclusion criteria. Retention rate at the hospital was low (14%). Forty-six alumni (42%) in private practice were eligible for alumni surveys. Response rates were 87% (S1) and 61% (S2). Time intervals between 2 career decisions (selecting specialty of pediatrics vs selecting setting of private practice) varied widely (late-training decision to enter private practice). Mean employment level in private practice was 60% (range 20%–100%). Most valued rotation was emergency medicine; most desired competencies in future colleagues were the ability to work in a team, proficiency in pediatrics, and working economically. Conclusion A broadened view on outcomes – beyond individuals’ competency acquisition – provides informative insights into a training program, can allow for informed program updates, and guide future program development. PMID:28490914

  14. Socioeconomic status, race, and COPD health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, Mark D.; Blanc, Paul D.; Omachi, Theodore A.; Yelin, Edward H.; Sidney, Stephen; Katz, Patricia P.; Ackerson, Lynn M.; Sanchez, Gabriela; Tolstykh, Irina; Iribarren, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Background Although COPD is a common cause of death and disability, little is known about the effects of socioeconomic status (SES) and race-ethnicity on health outcomes. Methods We aimed to determine the independent impacts of SES and race-ethnicity on COPD severity status, functional limitations, and acute exacerbations of COPD among patients with access to health care. Data were used from the FLOW cohort study of 1,202 Kaiser Permanente Northern California Medical Care Plan members with COPD. Results Lower educational attainment and household income were consistently related to greater disease severity, poorer lung function, and greater physical functional limitations in cross-sectional analysis. Black race was associated with greater COPD severity, but these differences were no longer apparent after controlling for SES variables and other covariates (comorbidities, smoking, body mass index, and occupational exposures). Both lower education and income were independently related to a greater prospective risk of acute COPD exacerbation (HR 1.5; 95% CI 1.01 to 2.1; and HR 2.1; 95% CI 1.4 to 3.4, respectively). Conclusion Low SES is a risk factor for a broad array of adverse COPD health outcomes. Clinicians and disease management programs should consider SES as a key patient-level marker of risk for poor outcomes. PMID:19854747

  15. Preferences for health outcomes and cost-utility analysis.

    PubMed

    Torrance, G W

    1997-05-01

    Economic evaluation of health programs consists of the comparative analysis of alternative courses of action in terms of both costs and consequences. The five analytic techniques are cost-consequence analysis, cost-minimization analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, cost-utility analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. Although all techniques have the same objective of informing decision making in the health programs, they come from different theoretic backgrounds and relate differently to the discipline of economics. Cost-utility analysis formally incorporates the measured preferences of individuals for the health outcome consequences of the alternative programs. The individuals may be actual patients who are experiencing or have experienced the outcomes, or they may be a representative sample of the community, many of whom may someday face the outcomes. The health outcomes, at the most general level, consist of changes in the quantity and quality of life; that is, changes in mortality and morbidity. Changes in quantity of life are measured with mortality; changes in quality of life are measured with health-related quality-of-life instruments. Utilities represent a particular approach to the measurement of health-related quality of life that is founded on a well specified theory and provides an interval scale metric. Changes in quantity of life, as measured in years, can be combined with changes in quality of life, as measured in utilities, to determine the number of quality-adjusted life years gained by a particular health program. This can be compared with the incremental cost of the program to determine the cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Utilities may be measured directly on patients or other respondents by means of techniques such as visual analog scaling, standard gamble, or time trade-off. Utilities may be determined indirectly by means of a preference-weighted multi-attribute health status classification system such as the health utilities index

  16. Patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and health outcomes among COPD phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Ramey, Felicia C; Gupta, Shaloo; DiBonaventura, Marco daCosta

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent literature has suggested that emphysema and chronic bronchitis, traditionally considered to be entities overlapping within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may be distinct disorders. Few studies have examined the differences in patient characteristics and health outcomes between these conditions. This study examined whether COPD phenotypes represent distinct patient populations, in a large nationally representative US sample. Methods: Data were obtained from the 2010 US National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS). NHWS respondents (n = 75,000) were categorized as a COPD phenotype based on their self-reported diagnosis of COPD only (n = 970), emphysema only (n = 399), or chronic bronchitis only (n = 2071). Phenotypes were compared on demographics, health characteristics, treatment patterns, health outcomes, work productivity, and resource use. Variables were compared using Chi-square and analysis of variance tests for categorical and continuous outcomes, respectively. Health outcomes were also examined using regression modeling, controlling for demographic and health characteristic covariates. Results: Patients with chronic bronchitis were significantly younger (51.38 years versus 63.24 years for COPD versus 63.30 years for emphysema, P < 0.05) and more likely to be employed (46.98% versus 23.81% for COPD versus 28.33% for emphysema, P < 0.05). Relative to the other phenotypes, patients with chronic bronchitis were also significantly more likely to be female, nonwhite, and to exercise currently (all P < 0.05), and were significantly less likely to be a current or former smoker (P < 0.05). Controlling for demographic and health characteristics, patients self-identified as having COPD only reported significantly worse physical quality of life (adjusted mean 36.69) and health utilities (adjusted mean 0.65) and significantly more absenteeism (adjusted mean 7.08%), presenteeism (adjusted mean 30.73%), overall work impairment (adjusted mean

  17. Post-disaster reproductive health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Marianne E; Williams, Amy M; Robertson, McKaylee; Horney, Jennifer; Hsia, Jason

    2013-07-01

    We examined methodological issues in studies of disaster-related effects on reproductive health outcomes and fertility among women of reproductive age and infants in the United States (US). We conducted a systematic literature review of 1,635 articles and reports published in peer-reviewed journals or by the government from January 1981 through December 2010. We classified the studies using three exposure types: (1) physical exposure to toxicants; (2) psychological trauma; and (3) general exposure to disaster. Fifteen articles met our inclusion criteria concerning research focus and design. Overall studies pertained to eight different disasters, with most (n = 6) focused on the World Trade Center attack. Only one study examined pregnancy loss, i.e., occurrence of spontaneous abortions post-disaster. Most studies focused on associations between disaster and adverse birth outcomes, but two studies pertained only to post-disaster fertility while another two examined it in addition to adverse birth outcomes. In most studies disaster-affected populations were assumed to have experienced psychological trauma, but exposure to trauma was measured in only four studies. Furthermore, effects of both physical exposure to toxicants and psychological trauma on disaster-affected populations were examined in only one study. Effects on birth outcomes were not consistently demonstrated, and study methodologies varied widely. Even so, these studies suggest an association between disasters and reproductive health and highlight the need for further studies to clarify associations. We postulate that post-disaster surveillance among pregnant women could improve our understanding of effects of disaster on the reproductive health of US pregnant women.

  18. Post-Disaster Reproductive Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Zotti, Marianne E.; Williams, Amy M.; Robertson, McKaylee; Horney, Jennifer; Hsia, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We examined methodological issues in studies of disaster-related effects on reproductive health outcomes and fertility among women of reproductive age and infants in the United States (US). We conducted a systematic literature review of 1,635 articles and reports published in peer-reviewed journals or by the government from January 1981 through December 2010. We classified the studies using three exposure types: (1) physical exposure to toxicants; (2) psychological trauma; and (3) general exposure to disaster. Fifteen articles met our inclusion criteria concerning research focus and design. Overall studies pertained to eight different disasters, with most (n = 6) focused on the World Trade Center attack. Only one study examined pregnancy loss, i.e., occurrence of spontaneous abortions post-disaster. Most studies focused on associations between disaster and adverse birth outcomes, but two studies pertained only to post-disaster fertility while another two examined it in addition to adverse birth outcomes. In most studies disaster-affected populations were assumed to have experienced psychological trauma, but exposure to trauma was measured in only four studies. Furthermore, effects of both physical exposure to toxicants and psychological trauma on disaster-affected populations were examined in only one study. Effects on birth outcomes were not consistently demonstrated, and study methodologies varied widely. Even so, these studies suggest an association between disasters and reproductive health and highlight the need for further studies to clarify associations. We postulate that post-disaster surveillance among pregnant women could improve our understanding of effects of disaster on the reproductive health of US pregnant women. PMID:22752348

  19. Demographic and health surveys: a profile.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Daniel J; Neuman, Melissa; Finlay, Jocelyn E; Subramanian, S V

    2012-12-01

    Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) are comparable nationally representative household surveys that have been conducted in more than 85 countries worldwide since 1984. The DHS were initially designed to expand on demographic, fertility and family planning data collected in the World Fertility Surveys and Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys, and continue to provide an important resource for the monitoring of vital statistics and population health indicators in low- and middle-income countries. The DHS collect a wide range of objective and self-reported data with a strong focus on indicators of fertility, reproductive health, maternal and child health, mortality, nutrition and self-reported health behaviours among adults. Key advantages of the DHS include high response rates, national coverage, high quality interviewer training, standardized data collection procedures across countries and consistent content over time, allowing comparability across populations cross-sectionally and over time. Data from DHS facilitate epidemiological research focused on monitoring of prevalence, trends and inequalities. A variety of robust observational data analysis methods have been used, including cross-sectional designs, repeated cross-sectional designs, spatial and multilevel analyses, intra-household designs and cross-comparative analyses. In this profile, we present an overview of the DHS along with an introduction to the potential scope for these data in contributing to the field of micro- and macro-epidemiology. DHS datasets are available for researchers through MEASURE DHS at www.measuredhs.com.

  20. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates.

  1. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Occupational Health Outcomes in Canada.

    PubMed

    Li, Anson Kc; Nowrouzi-Kia, Behdin

    2017-04-01

    Research suggests that diabetes mellitus (DM) has a negative impact on employment and workplace injury, but there is little data within the Canadian context. To determine if DM has an impact on various occupational health outcomes using the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). CCHS data between 2001 and 2014 were used to assess the relationships between DM and various occupational health outcomes. The final sample size for the 14-year study period was 505 606, which represented 159 432 239 employed Canadians aged 15-75 years during this period. We found significant associations between people with diabetes and their type of occupation (business, finance, administration: 2009, p=0.002; 2010, p=0.002; trades, transportation, equipment: 2008, p=0.025; 2011, p=0.002; primary industry, processing, manufacturing, utility: 2013, p=0.018), reasons for missing work (looking for work: 2001, p=0.024; school or education: 2003, p=0.04; family responsibilities: 2014, p=0.015; other reasons: 2001, p<0.001; 2003, p<0.001; 2010, p=0.015), the number of work days missed (2010, 3 days, p=0.033; 4 days, p=0.038; 11 days, p<0.001; 24 days, p<0.001), and work-related injuries (traveling to and from work: 2014, p=0.003; working at a job or business: 2009, p=0.021; 2014, p=0.001). DM is associated with various occupational health outcomes, including work-related injury, work loss productivity, and occupation type. This allows stakeholders to assess the impact of DM on health outcomes in workplace.

  2. Health impact assessment – A survey on quantifying tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fehr, Rainer; Mekel, Odile C.L.; Fintan Hurley, J.; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2016-02-15

    Integrating human health into prospective impact assessments is known to be challenging. This is true for both approaches: dedicated health impact assessments (HIA) as well as inclusion of health into more general impact assessments. Acknowledging the full range of participatory, qualitative, and quantitative approaches, this study focuses on the latter, especially on computational tools for quantitative health modelling. We conducted a survey among tool developers concerning the status quo of development and availability of such tools; experiences made with model usage in real-life situations; and priorities for further development. Responding toolmaker groups described 17 such tools, most of them being maintained and reported as ready for use and covering a wide range of topics, including risk & protective factors, exposures, policies, and health outcomes. In recent years, existing models have been improved and were applied in new ways, and completely new models emerged. There was high agreement among respondents on the need to further develop methods for assessment of inequalities and uncertainty. The contribution of quantitative modeling to health foresight would benefit from building joint strategies of further tool development, improving the visibility of quantitative tools and methods, and engaging continuously with actual and potential users. - Highlights: • A survey investigated computational tools for health impact quantification. • Formal evaluation of such tools has been rare. • Handling inequalities and uncertainties are priority areas for further development. • Health foresight would benefit from tool developers and users forming a community. • Joint development strategies across computational tools are needed.

  3. Health Physics Enrollents and Degrees Survey, 2006 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2007-03-31

    This annual survey collects 2006 data on the number of health physics degrees awarded as well as the number of students enrolled in health physics academic programs. Thirty universities offer health physics degrees; all responded to the survey.

  4. Denver American Indian Mental Health Needs Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 374 Denver American Indians, mostly unemployed and low-income, examined substance abuse, psychological problems, and personal trauma for self and household; Native community mental health problems (including youth problems); counselor preferences; opinions about school testing of American Indian children; and Native community needs for…

  5. Colorado Health Occupations Manpower Survey, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Employment, Denver. Research and Analysis Section.

    This study was conducted to supply information for vocational education planners concerning the employment needs of the health services industry in Colorado. It should also provide some indication of the demand for trained workers in the occupations surveyed by coordinating expected company expansion and replacement needs with the number to be…

  6. The role of school health centers in health care access and client outcomes.

    PubMed

    Soleimanpour, Samira; Geierstanger, Sara P; Kaller, Shelly; McCarter, Virginia; Brindis, Claire D

    2010-09-01

    We describe the impact of school health centers in Alameda County, California, on adolescents' access to care and their mental and physical health outcomes. We used a multimethod evaluation of 12 school health centers to track data on clients (n=7410), services, and provider-reported outcomes; client pre-post surveys (n=286); and student focus groups (n=105 participants). School health centers were the most commonly reported source of medical (30%), family planning (63%), and counseling (31%) services for clients. Mental health providers reported significant improvements (P<.05) from baseline to follow-up in clients' presenting concerns and resiliency factors. Medical providers and clients also reported general improvements in reproductive health, particularly in the use of birth control other than condoms. Student focus group participants noted that school health centers helped improve access to services students might not seek out otherwise, particularly counseling and family planning services. Furthermore, students noted that they liked school health centers because of their confidentiality, free services, convenience, and youth-friendly staff. School health centers increase access to care and improve mental health, resiliency, and contraceptive use.

  7. The Role of School Health Centers in Health Care Access and Client Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Geierstanger, Sara P.; Kaller, Shelly; McCarter, Virginia; Brindis, Claire D.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We describe the impact of school health centers in Alameda County, California, on adolescents' access to care and their mental and physical health outcomes. Methods. We used a multimethod evaluation of 12 school health centers to track data on clients (n = 7410), services, and provider-reported outcomes; client pre–post surveys (n = 286); and student focus groups (n = 105 participants). Results. School health centers were the most commonly reported source of medical (30%), family planning (63%), and counseling (31%) services for clients. Mental health providers reported significant improvements (P < .05) from baseline to follow-up in clients' presenting concerns and resiliency factors. Medical providers and clients also reported general improvements in reproductive health, particularly in the use of birth control other than condoms. Student focus group participants noted that school health centers helped improve access to services students might not seek out otherwise, particularly counseling and family planning services. Furthermore, students noted that they liked school health centers because of their confidentiality, free services, convenience, and youth-friendly staff. Conclusions. School health centers increase access to care and improve mental health, resiliency, and contraceptive use. PMID:20634445

  8. The Impact of Health Information Exchange on Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hincapie, A.; Warholak, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Healthcare professionals, industry and policy makers have identified Health Information Exchange (HIE) as a solution to improve patient safety and overall quality of care. The potential benefits of HIE on healthcare have fostered its implementation and adoption in the United States. However,there is a dearth of publications that demonstrate HIE effectiveness. The purpose of this review was to identify and describe evidence of HIE impact on healthcare outcomes. Methods A database search was conducted. The inclusion criteria included original investigations in English that focused on a HIE outcome evaluation. Two independent investigators reviewed the articles. A qualitative coding approach was used to analyze the data. Results Out of 207 abstracts retrieved, five articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 3 were randomized controlled trials, 1 involved retrospective review of data, and 1 was a prospective study. We found that HIE benefits on healthcare outcomes are still sparsely evaluated, and that among the measurements used to evaluate HIE healthcare utilization is the most widely used. Conclusions Outcomes evaluation is required to give healthcare providers and policy-makers evidence to incorporate in decision-making processes. This review showed a dearth of HIE outcomes data in the published peer reviewed literature so more research in this area is needed. Future HIE evaluations with different levels of interoperability should incorporate a framework that allows a detailed examination of HIE outcomes that are likely to positively affect care. PMID:23616891

  9. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey: The First National Survey of State Health Agency Employees

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, Katie; Leider, Jonathon P.; Harper, Elizabeth; Castrucci, Brian C.; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Liss-Levinson, Rivka; Jarris, Paul E.; Hunter, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Public health practitioners, policy makers, and researchers alike have called for more data on individual worker's perceptions about workplace environment, job satisfaction, and training needs for a quarter of a century. The Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) was created to answer that call. Objective: Characterize key components of the public health workforce, including demographics, workplace environment, perceptions about national trends, and perceived training needs. Design: A nationally representative survey of central office employees at state health agencies (SHAs) was conducted in 2014. Approximately 25 000 e-mail invitations to a Web-based survey were sent out to public health staff in 37 states, based on a stratified sampling approach. Balanced repeated replication weights were used to account for the complex sampling design. Setting and Participants: A total of 10 246 permanently employed SHA central office employees participated in PH WINS (46% response rate). Main Outcome Measures: Perceptions about training needs; workplace environment and job satisfaction; national initiatives and trends; and demographics. Results: Although the majority of staff said they were somewhat or very satisfied with their job (79%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 78-80), as well as their organization (65%; 95% CI, 64-66), more than 42% (95% CI, 41-43) were considering leaving their organization in the next year or retiring before 2020; 4% of those were considering leaving for another job elsewhere in governmental public health. The majority of public health staff at SHA central offices are female (72%; 95% CI, 71-73), non-Hispanic white (70%; 95% CI, 69-71), and older than 40 years (73%; 95% CI, 72-74). The greatest training needs include influencing policy development, preparing a budget, and training related to the social determinants of health. Conclusions: PH WINS represents the first nationally representative survey of SHA employees. It

  10. Korea Community Health Survey Data Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang Wha; Ko, Yun Sil; Kim, Yoo Jin; Sung, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Hyo Jin; Choi, Hyung Yun; Sung, Changhyun; Jeong, Eunkyeong

    2015-06-01

    In 2008, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated the first nationwide survey, Korea Community Health Survey (KCHS), to provide data that could be used to plan, implement, monitor, and evaluate community health promotion and disease prevention programs. This community-based cross-sectional survey has been conducted by 253 community health centers, 35 community universities, and 1500 interviewers. The KCHS standardized questionnaire was developed jointly by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff, a working group of health indicators standardization subcommittee, and 16 metropolitan cities and provinces with 253 regional sites. The questionnaire covers a variety of topics related to health behaviors and prevention, which is used to assess the prevalence of personal health practices and behaviors related to the leading causes of disease, including smoking, alcohol use, drinking and driving, high blood pressure control, physical activity, weight control, quality of life (European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, European Quality of Life-Visual Analogue Scale, Korean Instrumental Activities of Daily Living ), medical service, accident, injury, etc. The KCHS was administered by trained interviewers, and the quality control of the KCHS was improved by the introduction of a computer-assisted personal interview in 2010. The KCHS data allow a direct comparison of the differences of health issues among provinces. Furthermore, the provinces can use these data for their own cost-effective health interventions to improve health promotion and disease prevention. For users and researchers throughout the world, microdata (in the form of SAS files) and analytic guidelines can be downloaded from the KCHS website (http://KCHS.cdc.go.kr/) in Korean.

  11. Long-Term Refugee Health: Health Behaviors and Outcomes of Cambodian Refugee and Immigrant Women.

    PubMed

    Nelson-Peterman, Jerusha L; Toof, Robin; Liang, Sidney L; Grigg-Saito, Dorcas C

    2015-12-01

    Refugees in the United States have high rates of chronic disease. Both long-term effects of the refugee experience and adjustment to the U.S. health environment may contribute. While there is significant research on health outcomes of newly resettled refugees and long-term mental health experiences of established refugees, there is currently little information about how the combined effects of the refugee experience and the U.S. health environment are related to health practices of refugees in the years and decades after resettlement. We examined cross-sectional survey data for Cambodian refugee and immigrant women 35 to 60 years old (n = 160) from an established refugee community in Lowell, Massachusetts, to examine the potential contributors to health behaviors and outcomes among refugees and immigrants postresettlement. In our representative sample, we found that smoking and betel nut use were very low (4% each). Fewer than 50% of respondents walked for at least 10 minutes on 2 or more days/week. Using World Health Organization standards for overweight/obese for Asians, 73% of respondents were overweight/obese and 56% were obese, indicating increased risk of chronic disease. Depression was also high in this sample (41%). In multivariate models, higher acculturation and age were associated with walking more often; lower education and higher acculturation were related to higher weight; and being divorced/separated or widowed and being older were related to higher risk of depression. The interrelated complex of characteristics, health behaviors, and health outcomes of refugees merits a multifaceted approach to health education and health promotion for long-term refugee health. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  12. Physical activity: health outcomes and importance for public health policy.

    PubMed

    Haskell, William L; Blair, Steven N; Hill, James O

    2009-10-01

    This manuscript presents a brief summary of the substantial data supporting an inverse relationship between the amount of habitual physical activity performed and a variety of negative health outcomes throughout the lifespan. It points out that despite these data a large segment of the US population remain insufficiently active resulting in a high population attributable risk for chronic disease due to inactivity. The accumulated data support the need for more comprehensive health promoting physical activity policies and programs, especially for the economically and socially disadvantaged and medically underserved.

  13. Pregnancy outcomes in women on hemodialysis: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Barta, Valerie; Thakkar, Jyotsana; Sakhiya, Vipulbhai; Miller, Ilene

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Pregnancy occurs among 1–7% of women on chronic dialysis. Experience regarding pregnancy and dialysis originates from anecdotal reports, case series and surveys. This survey updates the US nephrologists’ experience with pregnancy on hemodialysis (HD) over the past 5 years. We evaluated maternal and fetal outcomes, certain practice patterns such as dialysis regimens utilized and nephrologist knowledge and comfort level when caring for a pregnant patient on HD. Methods. An anonymous Internet-based 23-question survey was e-mailed to end-stage renal disease Networks of America program directors for forwarding to practicing nephrologists. Results. A total of 196 nephrologists responded to the survey, reporting >187 pregnancies. Of the respondents, 45% had cared for pregnant females on HD and 78% of pregnancies resulted in live births. In 44% of the pregnancies a diagnosis of preeclampsia was made. There were no maternal deaths. Nephrologists most commonly prescribe 4–4.5 h of HD 6 days/week for pregnant women on dialysis. Women dialyzed cumulatively for >20 h/week were 2.2 times more likely to develop preeclampsia than those who received ≤20 h of HD per week. Conclusion. Providing intensive HD is a common treatment approach when dialyzing pregnant women. Maternal and fetal outcomes can be improved. There is a trend toward better live birthrates with more intense HD. Whether more cumulative hours of dialysis per week increases the risk of preeclampsia needs to be further investigated. PMID:28396746

  14. Exploring models for the roles of health systems’ responsiveness and social determinants in explaining universal health coverage and health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bonsel, Gouke J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intersectoral perspectives of health are present in the rhetoric of the sustainable development goals. Yet its descriptions of systematic approaches for an intersectoral monitoring vision, joining determinants of health, and barriers or facilitators to accessing healthcare services are lacking. Objective To explore models of associations between health outcomes and health service coverage, and health determinants and health systems responsiveness, and thereby to contribute to monitoring, analysis, and assessment approaches informed by an intersectoral vision of health. Design The study is designed as a series of ecological, cross-country regression analyses, covering between 23 and 57 countries with dependent health variables concentrated on the years 2002–2003. Countries cover a range of development contexts. Health outcome and health service coverage dependent variables were derived from World Health Organization (WHO) information sources. Predictor variables representing determinants are derived from the WHO and World Bank databases; variables used for health systems’ responsiveness are derived from the WHO World Health Survey. Responsiveness is a measure of acceptability of health services to the population, complementing financial health protection. Results Health determinants’ indicators – access to improved drinking sources, accountability, and average years of schooling – were statistically significant in particular health outcome regressions. Statistically significant coefficients were more common for mortality rate regressions than for coverage rate regressions. Responsiveness was systematically associated with poorer health and health service coverage. With respect to levels of inequality in health, the indicator of responsiveness problems experienced by the unhealthy poor groups in the population was statistically significant for regressions on measles vaccination inequalities between rich and poor. For the broader determinants, the

  15. Exploring models for the roles of health systems' responsiveness and social determinants in explaining universal health coverage and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Nicole Britt; Bonsel, Gouke J

    2016-01-01

    Background Intersectoral perspectives of health are present in the rhetoric of the sustainable development goals. Yet its descriptions of systematic approaches for an intersectoral monitoring vision, joining determinants of health, and barriers or facilitators to accessing healthcare services are lacking. Objective To explore models of associations between health outcomes and health service coverage, and health determinants and health systems responsiveness, and thereby to contribute to monitoring, analysis, and assessment approaches informed by an intersectoral vision of health. Design The study is designed as a series of ecological, cross-country regression analyses, covering between 23 and 57 countries with dependent health variables concentrated on the years 2002-2003. Countries cover a range of development contexts. Health outcome and health service coverage dependent variables were derived from World Health Organization (WHO) information sources. Predictor variables representing determinants are derived from the WHO and World Bank databases; variables used for health systems' responsiveness are derived from the WHO World Health Survey. Responsiveness is a measure of acceptability of health services to the population, complementing financial health protection. Results Health determinants' indicators - access to improved drinking sources, accountability, and average years of schooling - were statistically significant in particular health outcome regressions. Statistically significant coefficients were more common for mortality rate regressions than for coverage rate regressions. Responsiveness was systematically associated with poorer health and health service coverage. With respect to levels of inequality in health, the indicator of responsiveness problems experienced by the unhealthy poor groups in the population was statistically significant for regressions on measles vaccination inequalities between rich and poor. For the broader determinants, the Gini

  16. Assessing the potential to combine attitude tracking and health campaign evaluation surveys.

    PubMed

    Hollier, Lauren P; Pettigrew, Simone; Minto, Carolyn; Slevin, Terry; Strickland, Mark

    2016-04-06

    Issue addressed: Online surveys are becoming increasingly popular in health research because of the low cost and fast completion time. A large proportion of online survey costs are allocated to setup and administration expenses, which suggests that conducting fewer, longer surveys would be a cost-effective approach. The current study assessed whether the incorporation of a health campaign evaluation survey within a longitudinal attitudes and behaviours tracking survey produced different outcomes compared with the separate administration of the evaluation survey.Methods: Data were collected via an online panel, with 688 respondents completing the combined survey and 657 respondents completing the evaluation-only survey. Regression analyses were conducted to examine whether survey type was related to the campaign evaluation results.Results: Those who completed the combined survey perceived the campaign advertisement to be more personally relevant than those completing the evaluation-only survey. There were no differences in results relating to campaign awareness and reported behavioural change as a result of campaign exposure.Conclusions: There were minimal differences between results obtained from combining an attitude/behaviour tracking survey with a campaign evaluation survey. Any priming or order effects were limited to respondents' cognitive responses to the advertisement.So what?: The results suggest that health practitioners with limited resources available for tracking and evaluation research may be able to maximise outcomes by administering fewer, longer surveys.

  17. Social surveys and health policy implications for national health insurance.

    PubMed Central

    Aday, L A; Andersen, R; Anderson, O W

    1977-01-01

    The authors explore the utility of applying social survey data (a) to evaluate the impact of existing health programs and (b) to rank-order priorities concerning future health care policies. Based on national survey data from 1963, 1970, and 1976, they concluded that although Medicare and Medicaid have enabled more people to see a physician than ever before, a large proportion of the population still registers dissatisfaction with the health care they received--particularly with respect to their out-of-pocket costs for obtaining it. However, national health insurance options favored by the majority of the population--particularly those who can best afford the cost of care--suggest preferences for programs that incorporate some mix of existing modes of financing rather than those that provide for substantial restructuring of the current system. PMID:337340

  18. Tracking Psychosocial Health in Adults with Epilepsy—Estimates from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kobau, R; Cui, W; Kadima, N; Zack, MM; Sajatovic, M; Kaiboriboon, K; Jobst, B

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study provides population-based estimates of psychosocial health among U.S. adults with epilepsy from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey. Methods Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the prevalence of the following measures of psychosocial health among adults with and those without epilepsy: 1) the Kessler-6 scale of Serious Psychological Distress; 2) cognitive limitation; the extent of impairments associated with psychological problems; and work limitation; 3) Social participation; and 4) the Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System Global Health scale. Results Compared with adults without epilepsy, adults with epilepsy, especially those with active epilepsy, reported significantly worse psychological health, more cognitive impairment, difficulty in participating in some social activities, and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Conclusions These disparities in psychosocial health in U.S. adults with epilepsy serve as baseline national estimates of their HRQOL, consistent with Healthy People 2020 national objectives on HRQOL. PMID:25305435

  19. School as a Determinant for Health Outcomes--A Structural Equation Model Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike; Freeman, John; Kokonyei, Gyongyi; Thomas, Christiane A.; Erhart, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether students' perceptions of their school environment and their adjustment to school are associated with health outcomes across gender and age groups. Design/methodology/approach: Data from the cross-sectional international Health Behavior in School-aged Children Survey of the year 2002…

  20. Neighbourhood social capital: measurement issues and associations with health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mackenbach, J D; Lakerveld, J; van Lenthe, F J; Kawachi, I; McKee, M; Rutter, H; Glonti, K; Compernolle, S; De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Feuillet, T; Oppert, J-M; Nijpels, G; Brug, J

    2016-01-01

    We compared ecometric neighbourhood scores of social capital (contextual variation) to mean neighbourhood scores (individual and contextual variation), using several health-related outcomes (i.e. self-rated health, weight status and obesity-related behaviours). Data were analysed from 5,900 participants in the European SPOTLIGHT survey. Factor analysis of the 13-item social capital scale revealed two social capital constructs: social networks and social cohesion. The associations of ecometric and mean neighbourhood-level scores of these constructs with self-rated health, weight status and obesity-related behaviours were analysed using multilevel regression analyses, adjusted for key covariates. Analyses using ecometric and mean neighbourhood scores, but not mean neighbourhood scores adjusted for individual scores, yielded similar regression coefficients. Higher levels of social network and social cohesion were not only associated with better self-rated health, lower odds of obesity and higher fruit consumption, but also with prolonged sitting and less transport-related physical activity. Only associations with transport-related physical activity and sedentary behaviours were associated with mean neighbourhood scores adjusted for individual scores. As analyses using ecometric scores generated the same results as using mean neighbourhood scores, but different results when using mean neighbourhood scores adjusted for individual scores, this suggests that the theoretical advantage of the ecometric approach (i.e. teasing out individual and contextual variation) may not be achieved in practice. The different operationalisations of social network and social cohesion were associated with several health outcomes, but the constructs that appeared to represent the contextual variation best were only associated with two of the outcomes.

  1. The Trojan Lifetime Champions Health Survey: Development, Validity, and Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, Shawn C.; Romano, Russell; Scholefield, Robin M.; Schroeder, E. Todd; Azen, Stanley P.; Salem, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Context Self-report questionnaires are an important method of evaluating lifespan health, exercise, and health-related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes among elite, competitive athletes. Few instruments, however, have undergone formal characterization of their psychometric properties within this population. Objective To evaluate the validity and reliability of a novel health and exercise questionnaire, the Trojan Lifetime Champions (TLC) Health Survey. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting A large National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants A total of 63 university alumni (age range, 24 to 84 years), including former varsity collegiate athletes and a control group of nonathletes. Intervention(s) Participants completed the TLC Health Survey twice at a mean interval of 23 days with randomization to the paper or electronic version of the instrument. Main Outcome Measure(s) Content validity, feasibility of administration, test-retest reliability, parallel-form reliability between paper and electronic forms, and estimates of systematic and typical error versus differences of clinical interest were assessed across a broad range of health, exercise, and HRQL measures. Results Correlation coefficients, including intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) for continuous variables and κ agreement statistics for ordinal variables, for test-retest reliability averaged 0.86, 0.90, 0.80, and 0.74 for HRQL, lifetime health, recent health, and exercise variables, respectively. Correlation coefficients, again ICCs and κ, for parallel-form reliability (ie, equivalence) between paper and electronic versions averaged 0.90, 0.85, 0.85, and 0.81 for HRQL, lifetime health, recent health, and exercise variables, respectively. Typical measurement error was less than the a priori thresholds of clinical interest, and we found minimal evidence of systematic test-retest error. We found strong evidence of content validity, convergent

  2. Health care providers' training, perceptions, and practices regarding stress and health outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Avey, Holly; Matheny, Kenneth B.; Robbins, Anna; Jacobson, Terry A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to assess health care providers' training, perceptions, and practices regarding stress and health outcomes, a survey was administered to primary care providers in the outpatient medical clinics of a southeastern urban hospital serving a predominantly African-American indigent population. One-hundred-fifty-one of 210 providers (72%) responded. Forty-two percent of respondents reported receiving no instruction regarding stress and health outcomes during their medical/professional education. While 90% believed stress management was "very" or "somewhat" effective in improving health outcomes, 45% "rarely" or "never" discussed stress management with their patients. Respondents were twice as likely to believe that counseling patients about smoking, nutrition, or exercise was more important than counseling them about stress. Seventy-six percent lacked confidence in their ability to counsel patients about stress. The majority of respondents (57%) "rarely" or "never" practiced stress reduction techniques themselves. Belief in the importance of stress counseling, its effectiveness in improving health, and confidence in one's ability to teach relaxation techniques were all related to the probability that providers would counsel patients regarding stress. There is a need for curriculum reform that emphasizes new knowledge about stress and disease, new skills in stress reduction, and more positive beliefs about mind/body medicine and its integration into the existing health care structure. PMID:14527051

  3. US Valuation of Health Outcomes Measured Using the PROMIS-29

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Benjamin M.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Brown, Paul M.; Cella, David; Hays, Ron D.; Lipscomb, Joseph; Pickard, A. Simon; Revicki, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Health valuation studies enhance economic evaluations of treatments by estimating the value of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS) includes a 29-item short-form HRQOL measure, the PROMIS-29. Methods To value PROMIS-29 responses on a quality-adjusted life year (QALY) scale, we conducted a national survey (N=7557) using quota sampling based on the US 2010 Census. Based on 541 paired comparisons with over 350 responses each, pair-specific probabilities were incorporated into a weighted least-squared estimator. Results All losses in HRQoL influenced choice; however, respondents valued losses in physical function, anxiety, depression, sleep, and pain more than those in fatigue and social functioning. Conclusions This paper introduces a novel approach to valuing HRQoL for economic evaluations using paired comparisons and provides a tool to translate PROMIS-29 responses into QALYs. PMID:25498780

  4. Prevalence of Suicide Risk Factors and Suicide-Related Outcomes in the National Mental Health Study, Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posada-Villa, Jose; Camacho, Juan Camilo; Valenzuela, Jose Ignacio; Arguello, Arturo; Cendales, Juan Gabriel; Fajardo, Roosevelt

    2009-01-01

    A community survey in 4,426 adults was undertaken as part of the World Mental Health Survey Initiative reporting the prevalence and risk factors for suicide-related outcomes in Colombia. Lifetime prevalence estimates of suicide ideation, plans, attempts, and risk factors for suicide-related outcomes were assessed. Retrospective reports of…

  5. Impact of endoscopic sinus surgery on global health perception: an outcomes study.

    PubMed

    Winstead, W; Barnett, S N

    1998-11-01

    The Medical Outcome Study Short-Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36) was used to prospectively assess outcomes after endoscopic sinus surgery. Our study found that chronic rhinosinusitis has a significant adverse impact on patient-perceived functional status and quality of life. Endoscopic sinus surgery resulted in statistically significant improvement in both disease-specific symptoms and patient-perceived global health status at 6 and 12 months of follow-up. The SF-36 is recommended for use as the global health monitor in outcomes evaluation for chronic rhinosinusitis.

  6. Virtual reality for health care: a survey.

    PubMed

    Moline, J

    1997-01-01

    This report surveys the state of the art in applications of virtual environments and related technologies for health care. Applications of these technologies are being developed for health care in the following areas: surgical procedures (remote surgery or telepresence, augmented or enhanced surgery, and planning and simulation of procedures before surgery); medical therapy; preventive medicine and patient education; medical education and training; visualization of massive medical databases; skill enhancement and rehabilitation; and architectural design for health-care facilities. To date, such applications have improved the quality of health care, and in the future they will result in substantial cost savings. Tools that respond to the needs of present virtual environment systems are being refined or developed. However, additional large-scale research is necessary in the following areas: user studies, use of robots for telepresence procedures, enhanced system reality, and improved system functionality.

  7. Human and animal health surveys among pastoralists.

    PubMed

    Schelling, E; Greter, H; Kessely, H; Abakar, M F; Ngandolo, B N; Crump, L; Bold, B; Kasymbekov, J; Baljinnyam, Z; Fokou, G; Zinsstag, J; Bonfoh, B; Hattendorf, J; Béchir, M

    2016-11-01

    Valid human and livestock health surveys, including longitudinal follow-up, are feasible among mobile pastoralists and provide fundamental information to agencies for interventions that are responsive to realities and effective in addressing the needs of pastoralists. However, pastoralists are often excluded from studies, surveillance systems and health programmes. The occurrence of preventable and treatable diseases such as perinatal tetanus, measles and tuberculosis are indicative of limited access to health providers and information. It is difficult for health services to include effective outreach with their available financial and human resources. One consequence is that maternal mortality rates among pastoralists are unacceptably high. Environmental determinants such as the quality of water and the pasture ecosystems further influence the morbidity of pastoralists. In the Sahel, the nutritional status of pastoralist children is seasonally better than that of settled children; but pastoralist women tend to have higher acute malnutrition rates. Pastoralist women are more vulnerable than men to exclusion from health services for different context-specific reasons. Evidence-based control measures can be assessed in cluster surveys with simultaneous assessments of health among people and livestock, where data on costs of disease and interventions are also collected. These provide important arguments for governmental and non-governmental agencies for intervention development. New, integrated One Health surveillance systems making use of mobile technology and taking into account local concepts and the experiences and priorities of pastoralist communities, combined with sound field data, are essential to develop and provide adapted human and animal health services that are inclusive for mobile pastoralist communities and allow them to maintain their mobile way of life.

  8. Inhalation Incidents and Respiratory Health: Results From the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Mirabelli, Maria C.; Olivieri, Mario; Kromhout, Hans; Norbäck, Dan; Radon, Katja; Torén, Kjell; van Sprundel, Marc; Villani, Simona; Zock, Jan-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background Inhalation incidents are an important cause of acute respiratory symptoms, but little is known about how these incidents affect chronic respiratory health. Methods We assessed reported inhalation incidents among 3,763 European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) participants with and without cough, phlegm, asthma, wheezing or bronchial hyperresponsiveness. We then examined whether inhalation incidents during the 9-year ECRHS follow-up period were associated with a new onset of any of these respiratory outcomes among 2,809 participants who were free of all five outcomes at the time of the baseline ECRHS survey. Results Inhalation incidents were reported by 5% of participants, with higher percentages reported among individuals with asthma-related outcomes at the time of the baseline survey. Among participants without symptoms at baseline, our analyses generated non-statistically significant elevated estimates of the risk of cough, phlegm, asthma and wheezing and a non-statistically significant inverse estimate of the risk of bronchial hyperresponsiveness among participants who reported an inhalation incident compared to those without such an event reported. Discussion Our findings provide limited evidence of an association between inhalation incidents and asthma-related symptoms. These data could be affected by differences in the reporting of inhalation incidents according to symptom status at the time of the baseline survey; they should thus be interpreted with caution. PMID:18942122

  9. Comparative optimism for severity of negative health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hevey, D; French, D P

    2012-01-01

    People tend to be comparatively optimistic (i.e., believe that negative outcomes are less likely for themselves than for typical others) regarding their susceptibility to negative health outcomes. The present study investigates the extent to which perceptions of the severity of these health outcomes show similar comparative optimism. A student sample (study 1; N = 200) and a healthy non-student adult sample (study 2; N = 257) completed self-report measures of susceptibility, severity, worry, control and experience in relation to negative health outcomes. Participants in both studies demonstrated significant levels of comparative optimism for both perceived likelihood and severity of health outcomes. Comparative optimism concerning severity was very strongly associated (r = 0.85 to 0.89) with comparative optimism concerning susceptibility. In addition to being comparatively optimistic over their chances of experiencing negative health outcomes, people are also comparatively optimistic regarding how severe the health outcomes will be.

  10. Multiple Pathways Linking Racism to Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harrell, Camara Jules P.; Burford, Tanisha I.; Cage, Brandi N.; Nelson, Travette McNair; Shearon, Sheronda; Thompson, Adrian; Green, Steven

    2012-01-01

    This commentary discusses advances in the conceptual understanding of racism and selected research findings in the social neurosciences. The traditional stress and coping model holds that racism constitutes a source of aversive experiences that, when perceived by the individual, eventually lead to poor health outcomes. Current evidence points to additional psychophysiological pathways linking facets of racist environments with physiological reactions that contribute to disease. The alternative pathways emphasize prenatal experiences, subcortical emotional neural circuits, conscious and preconscious emotion regulation, perseverative cognitions, and negative affective states stemming from racist cognitive schemata. Recognition of these pathways challenges change agents to use an array of cognitive and self-controlling interventions in mitigating racism’s impact. Additionally, it charges policy makers to develop strategies that eliminate deep-seated structural aspects of racism in society. PMID:22518195

  11. The Association of Changes in Local Health Department Resources With Changes in State-Level Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Sandra B.; Mays, Glen P.; Ricketts, Thomas C.; Davis, Mary V.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the association between changes in local health department (LHD) resource levels with changes in health outcomes via a retrospective cohort study. We measured changes in expenditures and staffing reported by LHDs on the 1997 and 2005 National Association of County and City Health Officials surveys and assessed changes in state-level health outcomes with the America's Health Rankings reports for those years. We used pairwise correlation and multivariate regression to analyze the association of changes in LHD resources with changes in health outcomes. Increases in LHD expenditures were significantly associated with decreases in infectious disease morbidity at the state level (P = .037), and increases in staffing were significantly associated with decreases in cardiovascular disease mortality (P = .014), controlling for other factors. PMID:20558799

  12. Workforce implications of injury among home health workers: evidence from the National Home Health Aide Survey.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Kim, Jungyoon; Brannon, Diane; Leroy, Hannes; Jablonski, Rita

    2012-08-01

     The direct care workforce continues to rank as one of the most frequently injured employee groups in North America. Occupational health and safety studies have shown that workplace injuries translate into negative outcomes for workers and their employers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Organization of Work and Occupational Safety and Health framework is used to examine (a) relationships between injuries and work outcomes as reported by home health aides (HHAs) and (b) the likely efficacy of employee training and supervisor support in reducing worker risk for injury.   Data for this analysis were drawn from the 2007 National Home Health Aide Survey, a nationally representative survey. Ordinary least squares regression and multinomial logistic regression were used to examine relationships between worker injury and (a) worker outcomes and (b) organizational outcomes and to examine ratings of training and supervisory support relative to risk of injury.   Injured aides had lower job satisfaction, higher turnover intent, and poor employment and care quality perceptions. HHA perceptions of poor training and poor supervisory support were significantly related to higher risk for workplace injuries.   The current study suggests that workplace training has an important role in helping reduce direct care worker injuries, thereby decreasing organizational expenses related to injury, such as workers' compensation, sick time, and turnover. The NIOSH Organization of Work and Occupational Safety and Health framework offers a mechanism by which occupational health and safety interventions may be derived to reduce incidents of injury.

  13. National Survey of Yoga Practitioners: Mental and Physical Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Alyson; Friedmann, Erika; Bevans, Margaret; Thomas, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives to describe yoga practice and health characteristics of individuals who practice yoga, and to explore their beliefs regarding the effects of their yoga practice on their health. Design a cross-sectional design with anonymous online surveys Setting 4307 randomly selected individuals from 15 US Iyengar yoga studios (n = 18,160), representing 41 states; 1087 individuals responded, with 1045 (24.3%) surveys completed. Outcome Measures Freiberg Mindfulness Inventory, Mental Health Continuum (subjective well-being), Multi-factor Screener (diet), PROMIS sleep disturbance, fatigue, and social support, International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Results Age: 19 to 87 years (M = 51.7 ± 11.7), 84.2% female, 89.2% white, 87.4% well educated (≥ bachelor’s degree). Mean years of yoga practice = 11.4 (± 7.5). BMI = 12.1–49.4 (M = 23.1 ± 3.9). Levels of obesity (4.9%), smoking (2%), and fruit and vegetable consumption (M = 6.1 ± 1.1) were favorable compared to national norms. 60% reported at least one chronic/serious health condition, yet most reported very good (46.3%) or excellent (38.8%) general health. Despite high levels of depression (24.8 %), nearly all were moderately mentally healthy (55.2%) or flourishing (43.8%). Participants agreed yoga improved: energy (84.5%), happiness (86.5%), social relationships (67%), sleep (68.5%), and weight (57.3%), and beliefs did not differ substantially according to race or gender. The more they practiced yoga, whether in years or in amount of class or home practice, the higher their odds of believing yoga improved their health. Conclusions Individuals who practice yoga are not free of health concerns, but most believe their health improved because of yoga. Yoga might be beneficial for a number of populations including elderly women and those with chronic health conditions. PMID:23876562

  14. [Health services access survey for Colombian households].

    PubMed

    Arrivillaga, Marcela; Aristizabal, Juan Carlos; Pérez, Mauricio; Estrada, Victoria Eugenia

    The aim of this study was to design and validate a health services access survey for households in Colombia to provide a methodological tool that allows the country to accumulate evidence of real-life access conditions experienced by the Colombian population. A validation study with experts and a pilot study were performed. It was conducted in the municipality of Jamundi, located in the department of Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Probabilistic, multistage and stratified cluster sampling was carried out. The final sample was 215 households. The survey was composed of 63 questions divided into five modules: socio-demographic profile of the head of the household or adult informant, household socioeconomic profile, access to preventive services, access to curative and rehabilitative services and household out of pocket expenditure. In descriptive terms, the promotion of preventive services only reached 44%; the use of these services was always highest among children younger than one year old and up to the age of ten. The perceived need for emergency medical care and hospitalisation was between 82% and 85%, but 36% perceived the quality of care to be low or very low. Delays were experienced in medical visits with GPs and specialists. The designed survey is valid, relevant and representative of access to health services in Colombia. Empirically, the pilot showed institutional weaknesses in a municipality of the country, indicating that health coverage does not in practice mean real and effective access to health services. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Workplace Violence in Mental Health: A Victorian Mental Health Workforce Survey.

    PubMed

    Tonso, Michael A; Prematunga, Roshani Kanchana; Norris, Stephen J; Williams, Lloyd; Sands, Natisha; Elsom, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    The international literature suggests workplace violence in mental health settings is a significant issue, yet little is known about the frequency, nature, severity and health consequences of staff exposure to violence in Australian mental health services. To address this gap, we examined these aspects of workplace violence as reported by mental health services employees in Victoria, Australia. The project used a cross-sectional, exploratory descriptive design. A random sample of 1600 Health and Community Services Union members were invited to complete a survey investigating exposure to violence in the workplace, and related psychological health outcomes. Participants comprised employees from multiple disciplines including nursing, social work, occupational therapy, psychology and administration staff. A total of 411 members responded to the survey (26% response rate). Of the total sample, 83% reported exposure to at least one form of violence in the previous 12 months. The most frequently reported form of violence was verbal abuse (80%) followed by physical violence (34%) and then bullying/mobbing (30%). Almost one in three victims of violence (33%) rated themselves as being in psychological distress, 54% of whom reported being in severe psychological distress. The more forms of violence to which victims were exposed, the greater the frequency of reports of psychological distress. Workplace violence is prevalent in mental health facilities in Victoria. The nature, severity and health impact of this violence represents a serious safety concern for mental health employees. Strategies must be considered and implemented by healthcare management and policy makers to reduce and prevent violence.

  16. [Acknowledgement and satisfaction survey on mental health].

    PubMed

    Pedraza, María S; Noriega, Nicolás H

    2015-01-01

    Knowing patients opinion about mental healthcare services is highly important in clinical daily work settings, especially in the interior regions of the country. Since information on the subject is very scarce, gathering further data would be helpful to design active policies in this field. With this aim in mind, a work team composed of a Psychologist and an Immunologist of the city of Villa Marí in Córdoba, Argentina, conducted a survey to enquire about the population's knowledge regarding mental health care services and their degree of satisfaction. This survey was done using a database from a healthcare consultancy, and data collection was carried out by means of electronic mails, which contained mostly closed questions. Two conclusions were drawn as relevant information; the first one was that only 1% of the subjects answered the survey, which would reveal little interest in it. The second conclusion was that, in spite of the investigators assumptions, most of the population surveyed (over 50%), had thorough knowledge of the use of mental healthcare services.

  17. Analyzing the outcomes of health promotion practices.

    PubMed

    Pereira Lima, Vera Lucia Góes; Arruda, José Maria; Barroso, Maria Auxiliadora Bessa; Lobato Tavares, Maria de Fátima; Ribeiro Campos, Nora Zamith; Zandonadil, Regina Celi Moreira Basílio; da Rocha, Rosa Maria; Parreira, Clélia Maria de Souza Ferreira; Cohen, Simone Cynamon; Kligerman, Débora Cynamon; Sperandio, Ana Maria Girotti; Correa, Carlos Roberto Silveira; Serrano, Miguel Malo

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on health promotion (HP) outcomes, illustrated through evaluation of case studies and identification of strategies which have contributed to their success and sustainability. Evaluation research and practice in three distinct sceneries are discussed: (i) institutional and governmental agencies; (ii) communities in the "Manguinhos Complex" and Nova Iguaqu Municipality, and (iii) building of potentially healthy municipality networks. The effectiveness of a social program in a health promotion perspective was based in the "School for Parents" program, undertaken by the First Court of Childhood and Youth of Rio de Janeiro, between 2001 and 2004. The analysis was grounded in the monitoring of 48 parents in charge of children under 18, who were victims of abuse, violence or negligence, and social exclusion, most of all. The study's objectives were: illustrating the evidence of effectiveness of health promotion, discussing the concept of HP effectiveness under macro unfavorable conditions, and identifying strategies that foster sustainability of results. Institutional resources included a multi-professional staff, multidisciplinary approaches, participatory workshops, family case management, partnership with public and private institutions, and volunteer and civil society sponsorship of the families. Evaluation was based on social impact indicators, and psychosocial and contextual determinants. Evaluation methods included program monitoring and quantitative-qualitative methods, through a longitudinal evaluation of 3 years, including one year post program. The evaluation showed highly favorable results concerning "family integration', "quality of family relations" and "human rights mobilization". Unsatisfactory results such as "lack of access to formal employment" are likely related to structural factors and the need for new public policies in areas such as education, professional training, housing, and access to formal employment. The training process

  18. The Kaiser Family Foundation Community Health Promotion Grants Program: findings from an outcome evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, E H; Wickizer, T M; Cheadle, A; Psaty, B M; Koepsell, T D; Diehr, P; Curry, S J; Von Korff, M; Anderman, C; Beery, W L; Pearson, D C; Perrin, E B

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from an outcome evaluation of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation's Community Health Promotion Grants Program (CHPGP) in the West, which represented a major community-based initiative designed to promote improved health by changing community norms, environmental conditions, and individual behavior in 11 western communities. METHODS: The evaluation design: 14 randomly assigned intervention and control communities, 4 intervention communities selected on special merit, and 4 matched controls. Data for the outcome evaluation were obtained from surveys, administered every two years at three points in time, of community leaders and representative adults and adolescents, and from specially designed surveys of grocery stores. Outcomes for each of the 11 intervention communities were compared with outcomes in control communities. RESULTS: With the exception of two intervention communities-a largely Hispanic community and a Native American reservation-we found little evidence of positive changes in the outcomes targeted by the 11 intervention communities. The programs that demonstrated positive outcomes targeted dietary behavior and adolescent substance abuse. CONCLUSIONS: Improvement of health through community-based interventions remains a critical public health challenge. The CHPGP, like other prominent community-based initiatives, generally failed to produce measurable changes in the targeted health outcomes. Efforts should focus on developing theories and methods that can improve the design and evaluation of community-based interventions. PMID:10966086

  19. Health Outcome after Major Trauma: What Are We Measuring?

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Karen; Cole, Elaine; Playford, E. Diane; Grill, Eva; Soberg, Helene L.; Brohi, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Importance Trauma is a global disease and is among the leading causes of disability in the world. The importance of outcome beyond trauma survival has been recognised over the last decade. Despite this there is no internationally agreed approach for assessment of health outcome and rehabilitation of trauma patients. Objective To systematically examine to what extent outcomes measures evaluate health outcomes in patients with major trauma. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL (from 2006–2012) were searched for studies evaluating health outcome after traumatic injuries. Study selection and data extraction Studies of adult patients with injuries involving at least two body areas or organ systems were included. Information on study design, outcome measures used, sample size and outcomes were extracted. The World Health Organisation International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) were used to evaluate to what extent outcome measures captured health impacts. Results 34 studies from 755 studies were included in the review. 38 outcome measures were identified. 21 outcome measures were used only once and only five were used in three or more studies. Only 6% of all possible health impacts were captured. Concepts related to activity and participation were the most represented but still only captured 12% of all possible concepts in this domain. Measures performed very poorly in capturing concepts related to body function (5%), functional activities (11%) and environmental factors (2%). Conclusion Outcome measures used in major trauma capture only a small proportion of health impacts. There is no inclusive classification for measuring disability or health outcome following trauma. The ICF may provide a useful framework for the development of a comprehensive health outcome measure for trauma care. PMID:25051353

  20. Sexual Victimization and Reproductive Health Outcomes in Urban Youth

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Maria; Clum, Gretchen; Roche, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective.— Adolescents and adults with a history of sexual victimization (SV) are at increased risk of engaging in sexual risk behaviors. This study seeks to examine race- and gender-based differences in SV as well as the association between SV and reproductive health outcomes (pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections [STIs]) among young adults from an urban community with high rates of both outcomes. Methods.— This study used cross-sectional data from the Young Adult Survey of the Baltimore Prevention Program's intervention trials. Participants initially enrolled as first graders were interviewed for the Young Adult Survey as they entered adulthood. A total of 1698 participants were asked about SV, pregnancy, and STIs. Data were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results.— History of SV did not vary by racial background, but female participants were more likely to report SV than their male peers. Results for models predicting STIs revealed a significant interaction between gender and SV. Adolescent girls who reported a SV were significantly more likely to have an STI than adolescent girls who did not report victimization. Both adolescent boys and girls who reported SV were more likely to report involvement in a pregnancy. Conclusions.— Youth in urban communities with a history of SV are far more likely than those without victimization histories to have a pregnancy or STI before young adulthood. Further research is needed to explore the mediators of these outcomes and the value of sexual safety and child protection programs for pregnancy and STI prevention in urban environments. PMID:17660104

  1. Different types of housing and respiratory health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wen Qi; Sanderson, Wayne T; Browning, Steven R; Mannino, David M

    2017-09-01

    Evidence has shown that housing conditions may substantially influence the health of residents. Different types of housing have different structures and construction materials, which may affect indoor environment and housing conditions. This study aimed to investigate whether people living in different types of housing have different respiratory health outcomes. The data from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used for the analyses. The types of housing included houses, townhouses, apartments, and mobile homes. Respiratory symptoms included wheezing, coughing, sputum, and dyspnea; respiratory diseases included asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Multiple logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) after adjustment for potential confounding factors. A total of 11,785 participants aged 40 years and older were included in the analyses. Compared with those living in single family houses, participants living in mobile homes were more likely to have respiratory conditions, the OR (95% CI) was 1.38 (1.13-1.69) for wheezing, and 1.49 (1.25-1.78) for dyspnea; whereas participants living in apartments were less likely to have respiratory conditions, the OR (95% CI) was 0.58 (0.36-0.91) for chronic bronchitis, and 0.69 (0.49-0.97) for COPD. Compared with living in single family houses, living in mobile home was associated with worse, whereas living in apartments was associated with better, respiratory health outcomes. Further research is needed to better understand the underlying mechanisms and prevent adverse respiratory effects associated with living in mobile homes.

  2. Public Health Staff Development Needs in Informatics: Findings From a National Survey of Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Chester, Kelley; Shah, Gulzar H.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Public health practice is information-intensive and information-driven. Public health informatics is a nascent discipline, and most public health practitioners lack necessary skills in this area. Objective: To describe the staff development needs of local health departments (LHDs) related to informatics. Design: Data came from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, conducted by Georgia Southern University in collaboration with the National Association of County & City Health Officials. Participants: A total of 324 LHDs from all 50 states completed the survey (response rate: 50%). Main Outcome Measure(s): Outcome measures included LHDs' specific staff development needs related to informatics. Predictors of interest included jurisdiction size and governance type. Results: Areas of workforce development and improvement in informatics staff of LHDs included using and interpreting quantitative data, designing and running reports from information systems, using and interpreting qualitative data, using statistical or other analytical software, project management, and using geographical information systems. Significant variation in informatics training needs exists depending on the size of the LHD population and governance type. Conclusion: Substantial training needs exist for LHDs across many areas of informatics ranging from very basic to specialized skills and are related to the size of LHD population and governance type. PMID:27684619

  3. Nutrition, gut microbiota and child health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Videhult, Frida Karlsson; West, Christina E

    2016-05-01

    Diet is one of the main drivers of the composition and function of the gut microbiota. The scope of this review is to summarize recent studies assessing the role of gut microbiota in clinical pediatric conditions and to review studies using nutritional approaches to favorably modify the gut microbiota to improve health outcomes in children. New studies underscore that breastfeeding and infant diet impact the gut microbiome and metagenome. A comprehensive study using metagenomic shotgun sequencing, suggests that the cessation of breastfeeding rather than the introduction of solid foods, drives the functional maturation of the infant gut microbiome toward an adult-like state. There is further support for the view that a disturbed early gut microbiota is implicated in allergic and autoimmune diseases. New studies using prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics in various pediatric disorders have yielded promising results, yet the evidence for specific guidelines on their use is still low. Intestinal dysbiosis is associated with several pediatric disorders but a cause-effect relationship remains to be clearly demonstrated in most conditions. Future studies using new systems biology approaches are anticipated to provide further insight into the functional capacities of the gut microbiome and its establishment in childhood. This may then lay the ground for improved treatment and prevention strategies targeting the gut microbiota.

  4. Resilience Mediates the Longitudinal Relationships Between Social Support and Mental Health Outcomes in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Koelmel, Emily; Hughes, Abbey J; Alschuler, Kevin N; Ehde, Dawn M

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the longitudinal relationships between social support and subsequent mental health outcomes in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), and to examine resilience as a mediator between social support and subsequent mental health outcomes in this population. Observational, longitudinal cohort study. Participants were assessed at 4 time points over 12 months in the context of a previously reported randomized controlled trial. Telephone-based measures administered to community-based participants. Individuals (N=163) with MS and 1 or more of the following symptoms: depression, fatigue, and pain. Not applicable. Mental health outcomes included (1) depressive symptomatology, assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9; (2) anxious symptomatology, assessed using the short form of the Emotional Distress-Anxiety Scale from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System; and (3) general mental health status, assessed using the Mental Component Summary score from the Short Form-8 Health Survey. Resilience was assessed using the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. At any given time, social support from significant others, family members, and friends was significantly associated with subsequent mental health outcomes for all 3 measures assessed (all P values <.05). Resilience measured concomitantly with social support significantly mediated the relationships between social support and subsequent mental health outcomes. After controlling for resilience, most of the direct relationships between social support and mental health outcomes were no longer significant. There are significant longitudinal relationships between social support, resilience, and mental health outcomes for people with MS. Given the mediating role of resilience in supporting better mental health outcomes, future clinical research and practice may benefit from an emphasis on resilience-focused psychological interventions. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation

  5. Survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health survey participation: results of a statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Timothy J; Jenkins, Sarah M; Anderson, Kari J; Davern, Michael E

    2008-12-01

    To determine the survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health-related survey participation. From July 21, 2005, through October 25, 2005, we conducted a mixed-mode mail and telephone survey of 1636 noninstitutionalized Minnesota residents aged 18 years or older. The overall response rate was 49%. We examined the unadjusted effect of each independent variable on the likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys using univariate logistic regression and discerned the relative contribution of the different variables with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Respondents were asked to complete an average of 4.5 different surveys in the year before the current survey; approximately a quarter of the respondents perceived these surveys to be burdensome. The likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys was negatively related to good health status, a busy schedule, and perceptions that the surveys were too long. Respondents were more than twice as likely to indicate that they would participate in a future health-related survey if they knew the organization doing the survey. For health-related surveys, investigators should remain mindful of people's busy schedules and keep their surveys as short as possible. Further research is needed to clarify whether the decision to participate in a survey hinges more on knowing the organization paying to have a survey performed (the sponsor) or the survey vendor collecting the data.

  6. Religion/spirituality and adolescent health outcomes: a review.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Sian; Zebracki, Kathy; Rosenthal, Susan L; Tsevat, Joel; Drotar, Dennis

    2006-04-01

    Religion/spirituality is important to adolescents, is usually considered a protective factor against a host of negative health outcomes, and is often included in adolescent health outcomes research. Previous reviews of the relationship among spirituality, religion, and adolescent health have been limited by scope, focusing primarily on distal aspects of religion/spirituality (e.g., attendance at religious services). We reviewed the literature examining proximal domains of religion/spirituality (e.g., spiritual coping) in adolescent health outcomes research. Constructs such as spiritual coping and religious decision-making were the ones most often studied and were generally positively associated with health outcomes. Measurement of proximal domains, associations of proximal domains with health outcomes, methodological issues and recommendations for future research were covered in this review.

  7. Transfer of information from personal health records: a survey of veterans using My HealtheVet.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Carolyn L; Zulman, Donna M; Nazi, Kim M; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Woods, Susan S; Hogan, Timothy P; Weaver, Frances M; McInnes, Keith

    2012-03-01

    Personal health records provide patients with ownership of their health information and allow them to share information with multiple healthcare providers. However, the usefulness of these records relies on patients understanding and using their records appropriately. My HealtheVet is a Web-based patient portal containing a personal health record administered by the Veterans Health Administration. The goal of this study was to explore veterans' interest and use of My HealtheVet to transfer and share information as well as to identify opportunities to increase veteran use of the My HealtheVet functions. Two waves of data were collected in 2010 through an American Customer Satisfaction Index Web-based survey. A random sample of veterans using My HealtheVet was invited to participate in the survey conducted on the My HealtheVet portal through a Web-based pop-up browser window. Wave One results (n=25,898) found that 41% of veterans reported printing information, 21% reported saving information electronically, and only 4% ever sent information from My HealtheVet to another person. In Wave Two (n=18,471), 30% reported self-entering medication information, with 18% sharing this information with their Veterans Affairs (VA) provider and 9.6% sharing with their non-VA provider. Although veterans are transferring important medical information from their personal health records, increased education and awareness are needed to increase use. Personal health records have the potential to improve continuity of care. However, more research is needed on both the barriers to adoption as well as the actual impact on patient health outcomes and well-being.

  8. Geographical Disparities in the Health of Iranian Women: Health Outcomes, Behaviors, and Health-care Access Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Bayati, Mohsen; Feyzabadi, Vahid Yazdi; Rashidian, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Background: Women's health is a key factor affecting the health of the whole population. Tackling inequality in determinants of health is recognized as the main path toward reducing the inequality in health outcomes. This study aimed to analyze the provincial inequality in determinants of women's health and health care in Iran. Methods: Using the Moss's model (2002) as a comprehensive framework of determinants of women's health, including “geopolitical environment,” “culture, norms, sanctions,” “women's roles in reproduction and production,” “health-related mediators,” and “health outcome” categories, we chose 13 indicators. Afterward, using data sources including the Iranian Multiple Indicators of Demographics and Health Survey, the National Organization for Civil Registration, and Statistics Centre of Iran, we analyzed provincial inequality in these indicators in Iran (2011). Gini coefficient and Lorenz curve were used for measuring inequality. Results: Gini coefficients calculated as follows; life satisfaction level (0.027), literate women (0.398), women with proper knowledge about HIV/AIDS prevention (0.483), unemployed women (0.380), women without an income (0.384), women who use at least one type of mass media (0.389), women who used computer or internet (0.467), women who had received pregnancy care from a skill birth attendant (SBA) (0.420), women who had delivered with the help of an SBA (0.426), women who currently smoke cigarettes (0.603), women who currently consume hookah (0.561), women with at least one chronic disease (0.438), and women's deaths in 2010 and 2011 (0.393 and 0.359, respectively). Conclusions: We found large provincial disparities in determinants of women's health in Iran. Determinants such as lifestyle, health behavior, health knowledge, and health-care services availability should be considered by health policymakers in addressing the inequality in women's health at a provincial level. PMID:28348721

  9. 42 CFR 460.202 - Participant health outcomes data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Participant health outcomes data. 460.202 Section 460.202 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.202 Participant...

  10. 42 CFR 460.202 - Participant health outcomes data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Participant health outcomes data. 460.202 Section 460.202 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.202 Participant...

  11. 42 CFR 460.202 - Participant health outcomes data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Participant health outcomes data. 460.202 Section 460.202 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.202 Participant...

  12. 42 CFR 460.202 - Participant health outcomes data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Participant health outcomes data. 460.202 Section 460.202 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) Data Collection, Record Maintenance, and Reporting § 460.202 Participant...

  13. Risk of Negative Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Statewide Population-Based Survey.

    PubMed

    Whiteneck, Gale G; Cuthbert, Jeffery P; Corrigan, John D; Bogner, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the rates of negative outcomes associated with all severities of traumatic brain injury (TBI), treated in all settings or not treated at all, in comparison to the general population. Coloradoans without injury, with injury but no TBI, with mild TBI but no loss of consciousness (LOC), mild TBI with LOC, moderate TBI, or severe TBI. Statewide population-based survey. Computer-assisted, modified Ohio State University TBI Identification Method; Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and National Health Interview Survey questions; Satisfaction with Life Scale; and postconcussive symptoms. Up to 42.5% of participants reported a lifetime history of at least 1 TBI. Multiple negative outcomes were found to increase in prevalence in a stepwise fashion in association with greater TBI severity, with the clearest patterns observed for disability, poor life satisfaction, and impaired memory. Traumatic brain injury was found to be associated with disability and other negative outcomes in a general population survey. This study does not allow us to examine the proximate causes of disability, but it suggests that TBI may serve to both cause disability directly and exacerbate the influence of other etiologies. These relations should be examined in subsequent studies.

  14. Outcomes Assessment Planning: An Overview with Applications in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Ava M.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of the process of outcomes assessment and examples of its application in professional health science education. Provides a background for other articles in this issue describing ongoing activities in outcomes assessment in veterinary education and for programs considering developing a plan. Focuses on health professions…

  15. Problem-Based Learning: Outcomes Evidence from the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Mark A.; Dast, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, problem-based learning (PBL) has become a major force in health professions education and even in the broader educational world. This article focuses on the outcomes that have been found from using PBL in the health professions based on at least 20 reviews done since 1990. The outcomes identified in these reviews are…

  16. Intimate Partner Violence, PTSD, and Adverse Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Mary Ann; Green, Bonnie L.; Kaltman, Stacey I.; Roesch, Darren M.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Krause, Elizabeth D.

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of adverse health outcomes related to intimate partner violence (IPV) is well documented. Yet we know little about the pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Research concerning the psychological, biological, neurological, behavioral, and physiological alterations following exposure to IPV--many of which are associated…

  17. Outcomes Assessment Planning: An Overview with Applications in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, Ava M.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a brief overview of the process of outcomes assessment and examples of its application in professional health science education. Provides a background for other articles in this issue describing ongoing activities in outcomes assessment in veterinary education and for programs considering developing a plan. Focuses on health professions…

  18. Intimate Partner Violence, PTSD, and Adverse Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Mary Ann; Green, Bonnie L.; Kaltman, Stacey I.; Roesch, Darren M.; Zeffiro, Thomas A.; Krause, Elizabeth D.

    2006-01-01

    The high prevalence of adverse health outcomes related to intimate partner violence (IPV) is well documented. Yet we know little about the pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Research concerning the psychological, biological, neurological, behavioral, and physiological alterations following exposure to IPV--many of which are associated…

  19. Smoking and occupation from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    McCurdy, S; Sunyer, J; Zock, J; Anto, J; Kogevinas, M; European, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: Smoking is among the most important personal and modifiable risk factors for adverse health outcomes. The workplace offers a potentially effective venue for tobacco prevention programmes; identifying occupational groups with high smoking prevalence may assist in targeting such programmes. Aims: To examine smoking prevalence among occupational groups in the European Union. Methods: The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS), a cross sectional health survey conducted in 1992–93, was used to examine smoking prevalence by occupation among 14 565 subjects from 30 centres in 14 participating countries. Results: There was an approximately twofold range in smoking prevalence by occupation. For occupational groups with at least 50 subjects, the highest smoking prevalence was seen in metal making and treating for men (54.3%) and cleaners for women (50.7%). Increased smoking prevalence by occupation persisted after adjustment for age, country, and age at completion of education. Smoking was also increased among occupations with high exposure to mineral dust and gas or fumes. Conclusions: Smoking rates vary significantly by occupation. Prevention efforts in the workplace should focus on occupations with high smoking prevalence and large employment bases. PMID:12937184

  20. The China Health and Nutrition Survey, 1989-2011.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Zhai, F Y; Du, S F; Popkin, B M

    2014-01-01

    The China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) began in 1989 with the goal of creating a multilevel method of data collection from individuals and households and their communities to understand how the wide-ranging social and economic changes in China affect a wide array of nutrition and health-related outcomes. Initiated with a partial sample in 1989, the full survey runs from 1991 to 2011, and this issue documents the CHNS history. The CHNS cohort includes new household formation and replacement communities and households; all household members are studied. Furthermore, in-depth community data are collected. The sample began with eight provinces and added a ninth, Heilongjiang, in 1997 and three autonomous cities, Beijing, Shanghai, and Chongqing, in 2011. The in-depth community contextual measures have allowed us to create a unique measure of urbanicity that captures major dimensions of modernization across all 288 communities currently in the CHNS sample. The standardized, validated urbanicity measure captures the changes in 12 dimensions: population density; economic activity; traditional markets; modern markets; transportation infrastructure; sanitation; communications; housing; education; diversity; health infrastructure; and social services. Each is based on numerous measures applicable to each dimension. They are used jointly and separately in hundreds of studies.

  1. The Icatibant Outcome Survey: treatment of laryngeal angioedema attacks

    PubMed Central

    Aberer, Werner; Bouillet, Laurence; Caballero, Teresa; Maurer, Marcus; Fabien, Vincent; Zanichelli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Objective To characterize the management and outcomes of life-threatening laryngeal attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) treated with icatibant in the observational Icatibant Outcome Survey (NCT01034969) registry. Methods This retrospective analysis was based on data from patients with HAE type I/II who received healthcare professional-administered or self-administered icatibant to treat laryngeal attacks between September 2008 and May 2013. Results Twenty centers in seven countries contributed data. Overall, 42 patients with HAE experienced 67 icatibant-treated laryngeal attacks. Icatibant was self-administered for 62.3% of attacks (healthcare professional-administered, 37.7%). One icatibant injection was used for 87.9% of attacks, with rescue or concomitant medication used for 9.0%. The median time to treatment was 2.0 h (n=31 attacks) and the median time to resolution was 6.0 h (n=35 attacks). Conclusions This analysis describes successful use of icatibant for the treatment of laryngeal HAE attacks in a real-world setting. PMID:27116379

  2. Linking Cultural Competence to Functional Life Outcomes in Mental Health Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Georgia; Falzarano, Pamela; Butkus, Michael; Zeman, Lori; Vershave, Judy; Arfken, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Minorities in the United States have well-documented health disparities. Cultural barriers and biases by health care providers may contribute to lower quality of services which may contribute to these disparities. However, evidence linking cultural competency and health outcomes is lacking. This study, part of an ongoing quality improvement effort, tested the mediation hypothesis that patients' perception of provider cultural competency indirectly influences patients' health outcomes through process of care. Data were from patient satisfaction surveys collected in seven mental health clinics (n=94 minority patients). Consistent with our hypothesis, patients' perception of clinicians' cultural competency was indirectly associated with patients' self-reported improvements in social interactions, improvements in performance at work or school, and improvements in managing life problems through the patients' experience of respect, trust, and communication with the clinician. These findings indicate that process of care characteristics during the clinical encounter influence patients' perceptions of clinicians' cultural competency and affect functional outcomes.

  3. Relationship Between Leapfrog Safe Practices Survey and Outcomes in Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Glance, Laurent G.; Dick, Andrew W.; Osler, Turner M.; Wayne Meredith, J.; Stone, Patricia W.; Li, Yue; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between hospital self-reported compliance with the National Quality Forum patient safety practices and trauma outcomes in a nationally representative sample of level I and level II trauma centers. Design Retrospective cohort study using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Setting Level I and level II trauma centers. Patients Trauma patients. Main Outcome Measures Multivariate logistic regression models were estimated to examine the association between clinical outcomes (in-hospital mortality and hospital-associated infections) and the National Quality Forum patient safety practices. We controlled for patient demographic characteristics, injury severity, mechanism of injury, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics. Results The total score on the Leapfrog Safe Practices Survey was not associated with either mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–1.06) or hospital-associated infections (1.03; 0.82–1.29). Full implementation of computerized physician order entry was not associated with reduced mortality (aOR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.75–1.42) or with a lower risk of hospital-associated infections (0.94; 0.57–1.56). Full implementation of intensive care unit physician staffing was also not predictive of mortality (aOR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.90–1.28) or of hospital-associated infections (1.04; 0.76–1.42). Conclusion In this nationally representative sample of level I and level II trauma centers, we were unable to detect evidence that hospitals reporting better compliance with the National Quality Forum patient safety practices had lower mortality or a lower incidence of hospital-associated infections. PMID:22006876

  4. Racial Disparities in Health Outcomes After Spinal Cord Injury: Mediating Effects of Education and Income

    PubMed Central

    Krause, James S; Broderick, Lynne E; Saladin, Lisa K; Broyles, Joy

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate heath disparities as a function of race and gender and the extent to which socioeconomic factors mediate disparities among participants with spinal cord injury. Design: Survey methodology. Cross-sectional data. Setting: A large Southeastern specialty hospital. Participants: There were 1,342 participants in the current analysis, all of whom were identified from patient records. There were 3 inclusion criteria: (a) traumatic SCI, (b) at least 18 years of age at the time of study, and (c) injury duration of more than 1 year. Main outcome measures: Six outcomes were measured, including 3 general outcomes (self-ratings, days impacted by poor health, days impacted by poor mental health) and 3 that reflect utilization of services (hospitalizations, days hospitalized, and nonroutine physician visits in the past 2 years). Results: Results of multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) indicated significant main effects for both race and gender. Follow-up tests identified racial disparities on 3 of the 6 outcomes, whereas gender disparities were observed for a single outcome. Years of education and household income mediated interrelationships between race and health (but not gender) as racial disparities disappeared after consideration of these factors. Conclusions: These findings suggest the need to work more diligently to promote better health outcomes among African Americans and to further investigate how socioeconomic factors and access to health care related to diminished health outcomes among African Americans with spinal cord injury. PMID:16572561

  5. Health of US veterans of 1991 Gulf War: a follow-up survey in 10 years.

    PubMed

    Kang, Han K; Li, Bo; Mahan, Clare M; Eisen, Seth A; Engel, Charles C

    2009-04-01

    To assess periodically the health status of a cohort of 1991 Gulf War veterans by comparing various health outcomes with those of their military peers who were not deployed to the Gulf. We conducted a follow-up health survey to collect health information among population-based samples of 30,000 veterans (15,000 Gulf War veterans and 15,000 Gulf Era veterans) using a structured questionnaire. Gulf veterans reported significantly higher rates of unexplained multi-symptom illness, chronic fatigue syndrome-like illness, posttraumatic stress disorder, functional impairment, health care utilization, a majority of selected physical conditions and all mental disorders queried during the survey than did Gulf Era veteran controls. Fourteen years after deployment, 1991 Gulf War veterans continue to report a higher prevalence of many adverse health outcomes, compared with Gulf Era veterans.

  6. A simulation model for improving learner and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aebersold, Michelle; Titler, Marita G

    2014-09-01

    Simulation has become a necessary and integral part of education for prelicensure and ongoing education of health care practitioners. To guide this process, the Simulation Model for Improving Learner and Health Outcomes (SMILHO) model provides a framework to design the experience from a science of learning approach and links it to learner and health outcomes to add to the knowledge base. Much work has been done in this area, and the SMILHO model will support the future work needed to continue to create effective simulation-based learning experiences and move research from knowledge and skill evaluation to learner and health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacteriological survey of sixty health foods.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, W H; Wilson, C R; Poelma, P L; Romero, A; Mislivec, P B

    1979-01-01

    A bacteriological survey was performed on 1,960 food samples encompassing 60 types of health foods available in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. No consistent bacteriological distinction (aerobic plate counts, total coliform and fecal coliform most probable numbers) was observed between foods labeled as organic (raised on soil with compost or nonchemical fertilizer and without application of pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides) and their counterpart food types bearing no such label. Types and numbers of samples containing Salmonella were: sunflower seeds, 4; soy flour, 3; soy protein powder, 2; soy milk powder, 1; dried active yeast, 1; brewers' years, 1; rye flour, 1; brown rice, 1; and alfalfa seeds,1. The occurrence of this pathogen in three types of soybean products should warrant further investigation of soybean derivatives as potentially significant sources of Salmonella. PMID:572198

  8. Bacteriological survey of sixty health foods.

    PubMed

    Andrews, W H; Wilson, C R; Poelma, P L; Romero, A; Mislivec, P B

    1979-03-01

    A bacteriological survey was performed on 1,960 food samples encompassing 60 types of health foods available in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. No consistent bacteriological distinction (aerobic plate counts, total coliform and fecal coliform most probable numbers) was observed between foods labeled as organic (raised on soil with compost or nonchemical fertilizer and without application of pesticides, fungicides, and herbicides) and their counterpart food types bearing no such label. Types and numbers of samples containing Salmonella were: sunflower seeds, 4; soy flour, 3; soy protein powder, 2; soy milk powder, 1; dried active yeast, 1; brewers' years, 1; rye flour, 1; brown rice, 1; and alfalfa seeds,1. The occurrence of this pathogen in three types of soybean products should warrant further investigation of soybean derivatives as potentially significant sources of Salmonella.

  9. School-Based Health Care State Policy Survey. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) surveys state public health and Medicaid offices every three years to assess state-level public policies and activities that promote the growth and sustainability of school-based health services. The FY2011 survey found 18 states (see map below) reporting investments explicitly dedicated…

  10. Role of Video Games in Improving Health-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Primack, Brian A.; Carroll, Mary V.; McNamara, Megan; Klem, Mary Lou; King, Brandy; Rich, Michael O.; Chan, Chun W.; Nayak, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Context Video games represent a multibillion-dollar industry in the U.S. Although video gaming has been associated with many negative health consequences, it may also be useful for therapeutic purposes. The goal of this study was to determine whether video games may be useful in improving health outcomes. Evidence acquisition Literature searches were performed in February 2010 in six databases: the Center on Media and Child Health Database of Research, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Reference lists were hand-searched to identify additional studies. Only RCTs that tested the effect of video games on a positive, clinically relevant health consequence were included. Study selection criteria were strictly defined and applied by two researchers working independently. Study background information (e.g., location, funding source), sample data (e.g., number of study participants, demographics), intervention and control details, outcomes data, and quality measures were abstracted independently by two researchers. Evidence synthesis Of 1452 articles retrieved using the current search strategy, 38 met all criteria for inclusion. Eligible studies used video games to provide physical therapy, psychological therapy, improved disease self-management, health education, distraction from discomfort, increased physical activity, and skills training for clinicians. Among the 38 studies, a total of 195 health outcomes were examined. Video games improved 69% of psychological therapy outcomes, 59% of physical therapy outcomes, 50% of physical activity outcomes, 46% of clinician skills outcomes, 42% of health education outcomes, 42% of pain distraction outcomes, and 37% of disease self-management outcomes. Study quality was generally poor; for example, two thirds (66%) of studies had follow-up periods of <12 weeks, and only 11% of studies blinded researchers. Conclusions There is potential promise for video games to improve

  11. Occupational exposures and health outcomes among Latina hotel cleaners.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin Jerrie; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Hatzudis, Kiki; Sönmez, Sevil

    2014-01-01

    The poor working conditions of Latina hotel cleaners render them particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards that lead to adverse health outcomes. This article presents a comprehensive review of occupational risks (including physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial risk factors) and health outcomes (including musculoskeletal disorders, respiratory diseases, dermatological diseases and allergies, and psychological disorders) for Latina hotel cleaners, within their unique sociocultural contexts. Preventive interventions for improving Latina hotel cleaners' work and health conditions are recommended.

  12. Survey of Ambient Air Pollution Health Risk Assessment Tools.

    PubMed

    Anenberg, Susan C; Belova, Anna; Brandt, Jørgen; Fann, Neal; Greco, Sue; Guttikunda, Sarath; Heroux, Marie-Eve; Hurley, Fintan; Krzyzanowski, Michal; Medina, Sylvia; Miller, Brian; Pandey, Kiran; Roos, Joachim; Van Dingenen, Rita

    2016-09-01

    Designing air quality policies that improve public health can benefit from information about air pollution health risks and impacts, which include respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and premature death. Several computer-based tools help automate air pollution health impact assessments and are being used for a variety of contexts. Expanding information gathered for a May 2014 World Health Organization expert meeting, we survey 12 multinational air pollution health impact assessment tools, categorize them according to key technical and operational characteristics, and identify limitations and challenges. Key characteristics include spatial resolution, pollutants and health effect outcomes evaluated, and method for characterizing population exposure, as well as tool format, accessibility, complexity, and degree of peer review and application in policy contexts. While many of the tools use common data sources for concentration-response associations, population, and baseline mortality rates, they vary in the exposure information source, format, and degree of technical complexity. We find that there is an important tradeoff between technical refinement and accessibility for a broad range of applications. Analysts should apply tools that provide the appropriate geographic scope, resolution, and maximum degree of technical rigor for the intended assessment, within resources constraints. A systematic intercomparison of the tools' inputs, assumptions, calculations, and results would be helpful to determine the appropriateness of each for different types of assessment. Future work would benefit from accounting for multiple uncertainty sources and integrating ambient air pollution health impact assessment tools with those addressing other related health risks (e.g., smoking, indoor pollution, climate change, vehicle accidents, physical activity). © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  13. Beyond Trauma: Post-resettlement Factors and Mental Health Outcomes Among Latino and Asian Refugees in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kim, Isok

    2016-08-01

    War-related traumas impact refugees' mental health. Recent literature suggests that structural and sociocultural factors related to the resettlement also become critical in shaping refugees' mental health. So far, there is limited empirical evidence to support this claim among resettled refugees. Resettlement contextual factors that influence mental health outcomes were examined using Latino and Asian refugees (n = 656) from a nationally representative survey. Linear and logistic regressions predicted factors associated with the study's outcomes (self-reported mental health, mood disorders, and anxiety disorders). Post-resettlement traumas were significantly associated with mental health outcomes, but pre-resettlement traumas were not. Unemployment, everyday discrimination, and limited English were significantly associated with mental health outcomes among both Latino and Asian refugees. The outcomes indicate that resettlement contextual factors have a significant association with refugees' mental health. Therefore, future studies with refugees must pay closer attention to structural and sociocultural factors after resettlement.

  14. A score for measuring health risk perception in environmental surveys.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Alessandro; Nguyen, Giang; Rava, Marta; Braggion, Marco; Grassi, Mario; Zanolin, Maria Elisabetta

    2015-09-15

    In environmental surveys, risk perception may be a source of bias when information on health outcomes is reported using questionnaires. Using the data from a survey carried out in the largest chipboard industrial district in Italy (Viadana, Mantova), we devised a score of health risk perception and described its determinants in an adult population. In 2006, 3697 parents of children were administered a questionnaire that included ratings on 7 environmental issues. Items dimensionality was studied by factor analysis. After testing equidistance across response options by homogeneity analysis, a risk perception score was devised by summing up item ratings. Factor analysis identified one latent factor, which we interpreted as health risk perception, that explained 65.4% of the variance of five items retained after scaling. The scale (range 0-10, mean ± SD 9.3 ± 1.9) had a good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.87). Most subjects (80.6%) expressed maximum risk perception (score = 10). Italian mothers showed significantly higher risk perception than foreign fathers. Risk perception was higher for parents of young children, and for older parents with a higher education, than for their counterparts. Actual distance to major roads was not associated with the score, while self-reported intense traffic and frequent air refreshing at home predicted higher risk perception. When investigating health effects of environmental hazards using questionnaires, care should be taken to reduce the possibility of awareness bias at the stage of study planning and data analysis. Including appropriate items in study questionnaires can be useful to derive a measure of health risk perception, which can help to identify confounding of association estimates by risk perception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Virginia agricultural health and safety survey.

    PubMed

    Mariger, S C; Grisso, R D; Perumpral, J V; Sorenson, A W; Christensen, N K; Miller, R L

    2009-01-01

    This comprehensive study was conducted primarily to identify the common causes of agricultural injuries on active Virginia farms and to identify hazardous agricultural operations, exposure duration, and injuries associated with each hazardous operation. In addition, the influences of factors such as general health status of farmers, age, weight, and alcohol and tobacco use on injury were examined. This information will be used for the development of educational programs that will improve the safety of agricultural operations. The sample selected for the study included farms of 28 ha or more, operating on a full- or part-time basis. This stipulation was to ensure that all farms in the sample are active and that participants generated a major portion of their income from the farm. Of the 26,000 farms meeting this requirement, 1,650 were selected to participate in the study. A survey instrument was mailed to the farmers selected to collect the information needed for meeting the established objectives of the study. Approximately 19% of the surveys were returned. In terms of percentage injuries, livestock handling was the primary cause. This was followed by working in elevated locations, operating and repairing agricultural machinery, and heavy lifting. The activities carried out most frequently by the participants were: operating farm tractors, operating trucks/automobiles, using hand and power tools, and working with agricultural chemicals. The overall injury rate was 5.6 injuries per 100,000 h. The exposure to agricultural hazards appeared to have minimal or no effect on the health status of Virginia farmers. Farm workers in the 45 to 64 age group sustained the most injuries. Older, more experienced farmers reported fewer injuries because of limited exposure to hazards and work experience. The average age of Virginia farmers surveyed was 60. This is expected to rise because most respondents reported no plans to retire during the next five years. Based on the results

  16. Occupational health survey of farm workers by camp health aides.

    PubMed

    Cameron, L; Lalich, N; Bauer, S; Booker, V; Bogue, H O; Samuels, S; Steege, A L

    2006-05-01

    Little is known about the magnitude of occupational health problems among migrant farm workers. A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted in two migrant farm worker communities: Homestead, Florida, and Kankakee, Illinois. Camp Health Aides (CHAs) interviewed 425 workers about job tasks, personal protective equipment (PPE), field sanitation, work exposures, and selected health conditions. Limited provision of personal protective equipment was reported among those reporting early re-entry tasks: 35% in Kankakee and 42% in Homestead were provided gloves, and 22% in Homestead and 0% in Kankakee were provided protective clothing. About two-thirds were provided toilet facilities and water for hand-washing. Workers reported high prevalences of health conditions consistent with exposure to ergonomic hazards and pesticides. The prevalence of back pain in the past 12 months was 39% in Homestead and 24% in Kankakee. Among Homestead participants, 35% experienced eye symptoms, while 31% reported skin symptoms. These symptoms were less prevalent among Kankakee participants (16% for both eye and skin symptoms). Specific areas of concern included back pain associated with heavy lifting and ladder work; eye and skin irritation associated with fertilizer application tasks and with working in fields during or after spraying of chemicals, especially early re-entry of sprayed fields; and skin irritation associated with a lack of access to hand-washing facilities. In both Kankakee and Homestead, better adherence to safety standards is needed, as well as greater efforts to implement solutions that are available to help prevent work-related musculoskeletal problems.

  17. Developing a household survey tool for health equity: A practical guide in Islamic Republic of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Beheshtian, Maryam; Khosravi, Ardeshir; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Malekafzali, Hossein; Bonakdar Esfahani, Shirin; Hosseiny Ghavamabad, Leila; Aghamohammadi, Saeideh; Nouri, Mahnaz; Kazemi, Elaheh; Zakeri, Mohammadreza; Sagha, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: An obvious gradient in health outcomes has been implicated in many evidences relating to social and economic factors. Proper data are requested to convince policy-makers calling for intersectoral action for health. Recently, I.R. of Iran has come up with 52 health equity indicators to monitor health equity through the country. Conducting regular surveys on 14 out of 52 national health equity indicators is needed to provide a basis for the health inequality analysis through the country. We aimed to introduce a survey tool and its related protocols on health equity indicators. Methods: This study was conducted through addressing the literature and expertise of health and demographic surveys at the national and international levels. Also, we conducted technical and consultative committee meetings, a final consensus workshop and a pilot study to finalize the survey tool. Results: We defined the study design, sampling method, reliable questionnaires and instructions, data collection and supervision procedure. We also defined the data analysis protocol on health equity indicators, generated from non-routine data. Conclusion: A valid and reliable tool, which could be employed at the national and sub-national levels, was designed to measure health equity in Iran. Policy-makers can use this survey tool to generate useful information and evidence to design appropriate required intervention and reduce health inequality across the country. PMID:26913268

  18. Associations of Military Divorce with Mental, Behavioral, and Physical Health Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    detectable negative effects on deployability or military attrition. Attention should be given to those recently divorced regarding mental health and substance abuse treatment and prevention strategies....There is a paucity of data on the associations of recent divorce on the health and military outcomes of service members during the recent conflicts...Participants of the Millennium Cohort Study who were divorced between baseline and follow-up surveys were compared with those who remained married

  19. Province-level income inequality and health outcomes in Canadian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Quon, Elizabeth C; McGrath, Jennifer J

    2015-03-01

    To examine the effects of provincial income inequality (disparity between rich and poor), independent of provincial income and family socioeconomic status, on multiple adolescent health outcomes. Participants (aged 12-17 years; N = 11,899) were from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. Parental education, household income, province income inequality, and province mean income were measured. Health outcomes were measured across a number of domains, including self-rated health, mental health, health behaviors, substance use behaviors, and physical health. Income inequality was associated with injuries, general physical symptoms, and limiting conditions, but not associated with most adolescent health outcomes and behaviors. Income inequality had a moderating effect on family socioeconomic status for limiting conditions, hyperactivity/inattention, and conduct problems, but not for other outcomes. Province-level income inequality was associated with some physical and mental health outcomes in adolescents, which has research and policy implications for this age-group. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Province-Level Income Inequality and Health Outcomes in Canadian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of provincial income inequality (disparity between rich and poor), independent of provincial income and family socioeconomic status, on multiple adolescent health outcomes. Methods Participants (aged 12–17 years; N = 11,899) were from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. Parental education, household income, province income inequality, and province mean income were measured. Health outcomes were measured across a number of domains, including self-rated health, mental health, health behaviors, substance use behaviors, and physical health. Results Income inequality was associated with injuries, general physical symptoms, and limiting conditions, but not associated with most adolescent health outcomes and behaviors. Income inequality had a moderating effect on family socioeconomic status for limiting conditions, hyperactivity/inattention, and conduct problems, but not for other outcomes. Conclusions Province-level income inequality was associated with some physical and mental health outcomes in adolescents, which has research and policy implications for this age-group. PMID:25324533

  1. Self-reported health outcomes associated with green-renovated public housing among primarily elderly residents.

    PubMed

    Breysse, Jill; Dixon, Sherry L; Jacobs, David E; Lopez, Jorge; Weber, William

    2015-01-01

    Assess the benefits of green renovation on self-reported health of primarily elderly residents of a low-income public housing apartment building. Using questions from the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey, we interviewed residents at baseline and 1 year after green renovation of their 101-unit building in Mankato, Minnesota, comparing self-reported mental and physical health outcomes of 2 sets of residents (all-ages: median, 66 years, n = 40; elder: median, 72 years, n = 22) with outcomes for 2 same-aged low-income Minnesota comparison groups taken from Medicare Health Outcomes Survey participants (n = 40 and 572, respectively). Mankato apartment building residents. Green renovation including building envelope restoration; new heating, electrical, and ventilation systems; air sealing; new insulation and exterior cladding; window replacement; Energy-Star fixtures and appliances; asbestos and mold abatement; apartment gut retrofits; low volatile organic chemical and moisture-resistant materials; exercise enhancements; and indoor no-smoking policy. Self-reported health status including Activities of Daily Living and Veteran's Rand 12 (VR-12) survey results; housing condition visual assessment; indoor environmental sampling; and building performance testing. The all-ages study group's mental health improved significantly more than the comparison group's mental health on the basis of mean number of good mental health days in the past month (P = .026) and mean VR-12 mental component score (P = .023). Sixteen percent fewer all-ages study group people versus 8% more comparison group people reported falls (P = .055). The elder study group's 9% improvement in general physical health was not statistically significantly better than the elder comparison group's decline (6%) (P = 0.094). Significantly fewer people in the all-ages group reported smoke in their apartments because of tobacco products (20% vs 0%, P = .005), likely reflecting the new no-smoking policy. Green healthy

  2. A review of national health surveys in India.

    PubMed

    Dandona, Rakhi; Pandey, Anamika; Dandona, Lalit

    2016-04-01

    Several rounds of national health surveys have generated a vast amount of data in India since 1992. We describe and compare the key health information gathered, assess the availability of health data in the public domain, and review publications resulting from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), the District Level Household Survey (DLHS) and the Annual Health Survey (AHS). We highlight issues that need attention to improve the usefulness of the surveys in monitoring changing trends in India's disease burden: (i) inadequate coverage of noncommunicable diseases, injuries and some major communicable diseases; (ii) modest comparability between surveys on the key themes of child and maternal mortality and immunization to understand trends over time; (iii) short time intervals between the most recent survey rounds; and (iv) delays in making individual-level data available for analysis in the public domain. We identified 337 publications using NFHS data, in contrast only 48 and three publications were using data from the DLHS and AHS respectively. As national surveys are resource-intensive, it would be prudent to maximize their benefits. We suggest that India plan for a single major national health survey at five-year intervals in consultation with key stakeholders. This could cover additional major causes of the disease burden and their risk factors, as well as causes of death and adult mortality rate estimation. If done in a standardized manner, such a survey would provide useable and timely data to inform health interventions and facilitate assessment of their impact on population health.

  3. Differences in mental health outcomes by acculturation status following a major urban disaster.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard E; Boscarino, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies have assessed the association between acculturation and psychological outcomes following a traumatic event. Some suggest that low acculturation is associated with poorer health outcomes, while others show no differences or that low acculturation is associated with better outcomes. One year after the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, we surveyed a multi-ethnic population of New York City adults (N= 2,368). We assessed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depression, panic attack, anxiety symptoms, and general physical and mental health status. We classified study respondents into "low," "moderate," or "high" acculturation, based on survey responses. Bivariate results indicated that low acculturation individuals were more likely to experience negative life events, have low social support, and less likely to have pre-disaster mental health disorders. Those in the low acculturation group were also more likely to experience post-disaster perievent panic attacks, have higher anxiety, and have poorer mental health status. However, using logistic regression to control for confounding, and adjusting for multiple comparisons, we found that none of these outcomes were associated with acculturation status. Thus, our study suggests that acculturation was not associated with mental health outcomes following a major traumatic event.

  4. Functional health outcomes as a measure of health care quality for Medicare beneficiaries.

    PubMed Central

    Bierman, A S; Lawrence, W F; Haffer, S C; Clancy, C M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS), a new quality measure in the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set, is designed to assess physical and mental functional health outcomes of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare+Choice organizations. We discuss the rationale for the HOS measure together with methodologic challenges in its use and interpretation, using descriptive data from the baseline Medicare HOS to illustrate some of these challenges. DATA SOURCES/STUDY DESIGN: The 1999 Cohort 2 Medicare HOS baseline data were used for a cross-sectional descriptive analysis. A random sample of 1,000 beneficiaries from each health plan with a Medicare+Choice contract was surveyed (N = 156,842; 282 organizations included in these analyses) . PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The HOS measure is designed to assess a previously unmeasured dimension of quality. Plan-level variation was seen across all baseline measures of sociodemographic characteristics and illness burden. At the individual level socioeconomic position as measured by educational attainment was strongly associated with functional status. The least educated beneficiaries had the highest burden of illness on all measures examined, and there was a consistent and significant gradient in health and functional status across all levels of education. In analyses stratified by race and ethnicity, socioeconomic gradients in f un ct ion persist ed. CONCLUSIONS Despite limitations, by focusing at t en t ion on the need to improve functional health out comes among elderly Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare+Choice, the HOS can serve as an important new tool to support efforts to improve health care quality. The HOS provides valuable information at the federal, state, and health plan levels that can be used to identify, prioritize, and evaluate quality improvement interventions and monitor progress for the program overall as well as for vulnerable subgroups. To interpret the HOS as a quality measure

  5. Cusp catastrophe model: a nonlinear model for health outcomes in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ding-Geng Din; Lin, Feng; Chen, Xinguang Jim; Tang, Wan; Kitzman, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Although health outcomes may have fundamentally nonlinear relationships with relevant behavioral, psychological, cognitively, or biological predictors, most analytical models assume a linear relationship. Furthermore, some health outcomes may have multimodal distributions, but most statistical models in common use assume a unimodal, normal distribution. Suitable nonlinear models should be developed to explain health outcomes. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of a cusp catastrophe model for examining health outcomes and to present an example using grip strength as an indicator of a physical functioning outcome to illustrate how the technique may be used. Results using linear regression, nonlinear logistic model, and the cusp catastrophe model were compared. Data from 935 participants from the Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) were analyzed. The outcome was grip strength; executive function and the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 were predictor variables. Grip strength was bimodally distributed. On the basis of fit and model selection criteria, the cusp model was superior to the linear model and the nonlinear logistic regression model. The cusp catastrophe model identified interleukin-6 as a significant asymmetry factor and executive function as a significant bifurcation factor. The cusp catastrophe model is a useful alternative for explaining the nonlinear relationships commonly seen between health outcome and its predictors. Considerations for the use of cusp catastrophe model in nursing research are discussed and recommended.

  6. Cusp Catastrophe Model: A Nonlinear Model for Health Outcomes in Nursing Research

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ding-Geng(Din); Lin, Feng; Chen, Xinguang (Jim); Tang, Wan; Kitzman, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Background Although health outcomes may have fundamentally nonlinearly relationships with relevant behavioral, psychological, cognitively, or biological predictors, most analytical models assume a linear relationship. Further, some health outcomes may have multimodal distributions but most statistical models in commun use assume a unimodal, normal distribution. Suitable nonlinear models should be developed to explain health outcomes. Objective The aim of this study is to provide an overview of a cusp catastrophe model for examining health outcomes, and to present an example using grip strength as an indicator of a physical functioning outcome to illustrate how the technique may be used. Results using linear regression, nonlinear logistic model and the cusp catastrophe model were compared. Methods Data from 935 participants from the Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) were analyzed. The outcome was grip strength; executive function (EF) and the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) were predictor variables. Results Grip strength was bimodally distributed. Based on fit and model selection criteria, the cusp model was superior to the linear model and the nonlinear logistic regression model. The cusp catastrophe model identified IL-6 as a significant asymmetry factor and EF as a significant bifurcation factor. Conclusion The cusp catastrophe model is a useful alternative for for explaining the nonlinear relationships commonly seen between health outcome and its predictors. Considerations for the use of cusp catastrophe model in nursing research are discussed and recommended. PMID:24785249

  7. A Standard Set of Value-Based Patient-Centered Outcomes for Breast Cancer: The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wee Loon; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Stowell, Caleb; Allison, Kim H; Benn, Karen E; Browne, John P; Cooter, Rodney D; Delaney, Geoff P; Duhoux, Francois P; Ganz, Patricia A; Hancock, Patricia; Jagsi, Reshma; Knaul, Felicia M; Knip, Anne M; Koppert, Linetta B; Kuerer, Henry M; McLaughin, Sarah; Mureau, Marc A M; Partridge, Ann H; Reid, Dereesa Purtell; Sheeran, Lisa; Smith, Thomas J; Stoutjesdijk, Mark J; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Wengström, Yvonne; Yip, Cheng-Har; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-12-29

    A major challenge in value-based health care is the lack of standardized health outcomes measurements, hindering optimal monitoring and comparison of the quality of health care across different settings globally. The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) assembled a multidisciplinary international working group, comprised of 26 health care providers and patient advocates, to develop a standard set of value-based patient-centered outcomes for breast cancer (BC). The working group convened via 8 teleconferences and completed a follow-up survey after each meeting. A modified 2-round Delphi method was used to achieve consensus on the outcomes and case-mix variables to be included. Patient focus group meetings (8 early or metastatic BC patients) and online anonymized surveys of 1225 multinational BC patients and survivors were also conducted to obtain patients' input. The standard set encompasses survival and cancer control, and disutility of care (eg, acute treatment complications) outcomes, to be collected through administrative data and/or clinical records. A combination of multiple patient-reported outcomes measurement (PROM) tools is recommended to capture long-term degree of health outcomes. Selected case-mix factors were recommended to be collected at baseline. The ICHOM will endeavor to achieve wide buy-in of this set and facilitate its implementation in routine clinical practice in various settings and institutions worldwide.

  8. The association of food insecurity with health outcomes for adults with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Debra L

    2017-04-01

    Adults with disabilities are more likely to live in households that are food insecure and are more likely to experience health disparities than adults without disabilities. Research examining the intersection of food insecurity and health outcomes for adults with disabilities has so far been lacking, however. The research presented here tests whether living in a food insecure household is associated with poorer self-reported health and mental health and different health care utilization, controlling for disability status and other sociodemographic characteristics. Multivariate regression analyses are conducted using linked data from the 2011 National Health Interview Survey and the 2012 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey. Adults with and without disabilities who live in food insecure households have higher odds of reporting fair or poor health or mental health in either the current year or the subsequent year. Health care utilization patterns differ for adults who are food insecure as well, both within and across years. Efforts to address health disparities among adults with disabilities should consider the possible additional impact of food insecurity on health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 42 CFR 460.202 - Participant health outcomes data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 460.202 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE... outcomes data. (a) A PACE organization must establish and maintain a health information system...

  10. Assuring quality health care outcomes: lessons learned from car dealers?

    PubMed Central

    Dimsdale, Joel E

    2017-01-01

    Health care systems want quality but struggle to find the right tools because, typically, they track quality in only one or two ways. Because of the complexity of health care, high quality will emerge only when health care systems employ multiple approaches, including, importantly, patient-reported outcome perspectives. Sustained changes are unlikely to emerge in the absence of such multipronged interventions. PMID:28123314

  11. Impact of Health Literacy on Longitudinal Asthma Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Carol A; Rincon, Melina

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND The impact of health literacy on longitudinal asthma outcomes is not known. OBJECTIVES To measure the association between health literacy and asthma outcomes and to assess how health literacy affects outcomes through covariates. DESIGN Longitudinal cohort. PATIENTS One hundred and seventy-five adult asthma patients. MEASUREMENTS Independent variables measured at enrollment included demographic and asthma characteristics, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, and asthma knowledge. Health literacy was measured with the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Outcomes were Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire and SF-36 scores and emergency department utilization for asthma measured every 3 to 6 months for 2 years. The effects of health literacy on outcomes and interactions between health literacy and covariates were measured with multivariable models. RESULTS The mean age of study participants was 42 years, and 83% were women. Less health literacy was associated with worse quality of life, worse physical function, and more emergency department utilization for asthma over 2 years (P ≤.05 for all comparisons). In multivariable analysis, health literacy did not remain statistically significant with any of the outcomes. Although the magnitude of its effect on emergency department utilization remained relatively intact, its effects on quality of life and functional status became attenuated with the sequential addition of covariates, particularly asthma knowledge. CONCLUSIONS Less health literacy was associated with poor longitudinal asthma outcomes. This relationship was both direct and indirect through effects on other independent variables, particularly patients' knowledge of asthma and self-management. Efforts to improve asthma outcomes should focus on improving literacy skills that are required to learn, understand, and implement effective self-management. PMID:16881939

  12. Behavioral Health Outcomes Among Adults: Associations With Individual and Community-Level Economic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Laura J; Han, Beth; Dowd, William N; Cowell, Alexander J; Forman-Hoffman, Valerie L; Davies, M Christine; Colpe, Lisa J

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between state and local economic conditions and serious psychological distress, substance use disorders, and mental health service utilization among adults in the United States. Using data from 21,100 adults who responded to the 2008-2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a nationally representative survey of the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population living in households, the study used multivariate methods to examine associations between selected macroeconomic conditions and behavioral health outcomes. Living in states in the top three quartiles for serious mortgage delinquency rate and in counties in the top three quartiles for unemployment rate was associated with a lower likelihood of using mental health services among individuals experiencing serious psychological distress (adjusted relative risk [ARR]=.54, .52, and .73, and ARR=.58, .62, and .71, respectively, versus quartile 1). Individual-level characteristics were the primary predictors associated with higher odds of having substance use disorders or experiencing serious psychological distress, but macroeconomic variables were not statistically significant predictors of these outcomes. Both individual-level socioeconomic characteristics and population-level macroeconomic conditions were associated with behavioral health outcomes. Prevalence of serious psychological distress and substance use disorders and use of mental health services varied by economic measure. The findings suggest that access to and availability of mental health services for individuals experiencing serious psychological distress may be more challenging for those who do not have health insurance or who reside in regions with higher rates of mortgage foreclosures or higher rates of unemployment.

  13. Public Health Staff Development Needs in Informatics: Findings From a National Survey of Local Health Departments.

    PubMed

    Massoudi, Barbara L; Chester, Kelley; Shah, Gulzar H

    2016-01-01

    Public health practice is information-intensive and information-driven. Public health informatics is a nascent discipline, and most public health practitioners lack necessary skills in this area. To describe the staff development needs of local health departments (LHDs) related to informatics. Data came from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, conducted by Georgia Southern University in collaboration with the National Association of County & City Health Officials. A total of 324 LHDs from all 50 states completed the survey (response rate: 50%). Outcome measures included LHDs' specific staff development needs related to informatics. Predictors of interest included jurisdiction size and governance type. Areas of workforce development and improvement in informatics staff of LHDs included using and interpreting quantitative data, designing and running reports from information systems, using and interpreting qualitative data, using statistical or other analytical software, project management, and using geographical information systems. Significant variation in informatics training needs exists depending on the size of the LHD population and governance type. Substantial training needs exist for LHDs across many areas of informatics ranging from very basic to specialized skills and are related to the size of LHD population and governance type.

  14. Selection within households in health surveys

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Maria Cecilia Goi Porto; Escuder, Maria Mercedes Loureiro; Claro, Rafael Moreira; da Silva, Nilza Nunes

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the efficiency and accuracy of sampling designs including and excluding the sampling of individuals within sampled households in health surveys. METHODS From a population survey conducted in Baixada Santista Metropolitan Area, SP, Southeastern Brazil, lowlands between 2006 and 2007, 1,000 samples were drawn for each design and estimates for people aged 18 to 59 and 18 and over were calculated for each sample. In the first design, 40 census tracts, 12 households per sector, and one person per household were sampled. In the second, no sampling within the household was performed and 40 census sectors and 6 households for the 18 to 59-year old group and 5 or 6 for the 18 and over age group or more were sampled. Precision and bias of proportion estimates for 11 indicators were assessed in the two final sets of the 1000 selected samples with the two types of design. They were compared by means of relative measurements: coefficient of variation, bias/mean ratio, bias/standard error ratio, and relative mean square error. Comparison of costs contrasted basic cost per person, household cost, number of people, and households. RESULTS Bias was found to be negligible for both designs. A lower precision was found in the design including individuals sampling within households, and the costs were higher. CONCLUSIONS The design excluding individual sampling achieved higher levels of efficiency and accuracy and, accordingly, should be first choice for investigators. Sampling of household dwellers should be adopted when there are reasons related to the study subject that may lead to bias in individual responses if multiple dwellers answer the proposed questionnaire. PMID:24789641

  15. A health survey of radiologic technologists

    SciTech Connect

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Mandel, J.S.; Doody, M.M.; Yoder, R.C.; McGowan, R. )

    1992-01-15

    A health survey of more than 143,000 radiologic technologists is described. The population was identified from the 1982 computerized files of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, which was established in 1926. Inactive members were traced to obtain current addresses or death notifications. More than 6000 technologists were reported to have died. For all registrants who were alive when located, a detailed 16-page questionnaire was sent, covering occupational histories, medical conditions, and other personal and lifestyle characteristics. Nonrespondents were contacted by telephone to complete an abbreviated questionnaire. More than 104,000 responses were obtained. Most technologists were female (76%), white (93%), and employed for an average of 12 years; 37% attended college, and approximately 50% never smoked cigarettes. Radiation exposure information was sought from employer records and commercial dosimetry companies. Technologists employed for the longest times had the highest estimated cumulative exposures, with approximately 9% with exposures greater than 5 cGy. There was a high correlation between cumulative occupational exposure and personal exposure to medical radiographs, related, in part, to the association of both factors with attained age. It is interesting that 10% of all technologists allowed others to practice taking radiographs on them during their training. Nearly 4% of the respondents reported having some type of cancer, mainly of the skin (1517), breast (665), and cervix (726). Prospective surveys will monitor cancer mortality rates through use of the National Death Index and cancer incidence through periodic mailings of questionnaires. This is the only occupational study of radiation employees who are primarily women and should provide new information on the possible risks associated with relatively low levels of exposure.

  16. Sexual Violence Among Youth in New Mexico: Risk and Resiliency Factors That Impact Behavioral Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Reed, Danielle; Reno, Jessica; Green, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated a relationship between history of forced sex and poor behavioral health outcomes. The objectives of this study were to describe this relationship among high school students and to explore the impact of resiliency factors. Using data from the 2013 New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey, we found that history of forced sex was associated with negative behavioral health outcomes for males and females, regardless of sexual orientation and disability status. Furthermore, the presence of a caring adult at home appeared to reduce the risk of substance abuse and suicidality among students with and without a history of forced sex.

  17. A lifetime experience of violence and adverse reproductive outcomes: findings from population surveys in India.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, K; Agrawal, N R; Poudel, K C; Jimba, M

    2012-06-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health issue that threatens the reproductive health of women. Despite a growing demand for research on the potential threat of IPV in relation to adverse reproductive outcomes, there have been no population-based studies of India. The current study analyzed the National Family Health Survey 3, which contained detailed information on types of violence in relation to the single question of pregnancy outcomes. The dataset was used to assess the association between a lifetime experience of IPV and terminated pregnancies among married Indian women. Multiple logistic regression analysis was then used to assess the association between these variables, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics. Results showed that 39.6% of Indian women have experienced violence by their husbands, while 18.3% of women have terminated a pregnancy during their lifetimes. The odds ratio of a terminated pregnancy among women who had experienced any type of partner violence was 1.62 (95% CI (confidence interval) = 1.51-1.73). All combinations of violence except a combination of emotional and sexual violence were associated with an increased risk of a terminated pregnancy. These results suggest that prevention of IPV would reduce the high incidence of terminated pregnancies, thus improving maternal health in India.

  18. Deconstructing race and ethnicity: implications for measurement of health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Manly, Jennifer J

    2006-11-01

    A crucial issue for health researchers is how to measure health and health-related behaviors across racial/ethnic groups. This commentary outlines an approach that involves the deconstruction of race/ethnicity, which clarifies the independent influences of acculturation, quality of education, socioeconomic class, and racial socialization on outcomes of interest. Research on the influence of these variables on health outcomes in general, and cognitive test performance specifically, is presented. This research indicates that when variables such as quality of education, wealth, and perceived racism are taken into account, the effect of race/ethnicity on health outcomes is greatly reduced. In other words, race/ethnicity serves as a proxy for these more meaningful variables, and explicit measurement of these constructs will improve research of health within majority and minority ethnic groups.

  19. A core outcome set for neonatal abstinence syndrome: study protocol for a systematic review, parent interviews and a Delphi survey.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Lauren E; Jansson, Lauren M; Moulsdale, Wendy; Pereira, Jodi; Simpson, Sarah; Guttman, Astrid; Allegaert, Karel; Askie, Lisa; Roukema, Henry; Lacaze, Thierry; Davis, Jonathan M; Finnegan, Loretta; Williamson, Paula; Offringa, Martin

    2016-11-08

    The prevalence of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is increasing globally resulting in an increased incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes and health system costs. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of NAS prevention and management strategies is very weak and further research initiatives are critically needed to support meta-analysis and clinical practice guidelines. In NAS research, the choice of outcomes and the use of valid, responsive and feasible measurement instruments are crucial. There is currently no consensus and evidence-based core outcome set (COS) for NAS. The development of the NAS-COS will include five stages led by an international Multidisciplinary Steering Committee: (1) qualitative interviews with parents/families and a systematic review (SR) to identify items for inclusion in a COS. The SR will also identify participants for the Delphi survey, (2) a three-round Delphi survey to gain expert opinion on the importance of health outcomes influencing NAS management decisions, (3), a consensus meeting to finalize the items and definitions with experts and COS users, (4) feasibility and pilot testing, development of the COS and explanatory document and (5) implementation planning. Since standardized outcome measurement and reporting will improve NAS clinical research consistency, efficacy and impact, this COS will reflect the minimum set of health outcomes which should be measured in trials evaluating interventions for preventing or treating NAS.

  20. Can States Simultaneously Improve Health Outcomes and Reduce Health Outcome Disparities?

    PubMed

    Kindig, David; Lardinois, Nicholas; Chatterjee, Debanjana

    2016-08-25

    Reducing racial health disparities is often stated as a population health goal, but specific targets for such improvement are seldom set. It is often assumed that improving overall health outcomes will be linked to disparity reduction, but this is not necessarily the case. We compared the annual change from 1999 through 2013 in combined-race (black and white) mortality with the annual change in absolute and relative racial mortality disparities for US states. Median annual improvement in combined-race mortality was 1.08% per year. Annual overall mortality rate reductions ranged from 0.24% per year in Oklahoma to 1.83% per year in Maryland. For disparities, the median for the black-white absolute gap was 3.60% per year, and the median for the relative black-to-white ratio was 1.19% per year. There was no significant correlation between the combined-race measure and either the absolute (0.03) or relative disparity measure reductions (-0.17). For mortality in US states over a recent period, improvement in the population mean and disparity reduction do not usually occur together. The disparity reduction rates observed may provide realistic guidance for public and private policy makers in setting goals for reducing population health disparity and creating investment priorities. As a starting point for discussion, the observed national median annual percentage improvement of 1.1 per year combined, 3.6% per year absolute gap reduction, and 1.2% per year relative gap reduction would be modest and reasonable goals.

  1. Dollar for Dollar: Racial and ethnic inequalities in health and health-related outcomes among persons with very high income.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kanetha B; Thorpe, Roland J; LaVeist, Thomas A

    2017-03-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in health have been well-documented, and low SES is widely considered to be a driver of this relationship. However, the race-social class-health interrelationship is complex, as several studies have found race disparities between racial/ethnic minorities and whites at middle- income levels. Research on higher income persons is complicated by the lack of data for persons with incomes about $75,000. Most national datasets collect income data in categories with the highest income category being $75,000 and above. In our study, we examined racial/ethnic disparities in health status and behaviors among persons of very high income, reported income of $175,000 or above per year. Data are from the Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys (MEPS). Our findings revealed health disparities in 10 of the 16 health-related outcomes selected. African Americans were most dissimilar to whites at this income and with disadvantages on 6 health outcomes relative to whites. While results also showed some disparities for Asian Americans and Hispanic Americans relative to whites, these groups were advantaged, relative to whites on several health outcomes. Our findings indicate that income does not fully explain racial/ethnic disparities in health. Most public interventions are targeted to low income persons. However, public health interventions should target minority individuals of very high income as well, especially African Americans.

  2. Review of Clinical Mental Health Counseling Process and Outcome Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kevin R.

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes important advances in clinical knowledge regarding mental health counseling processes and outcomes of treatment as appeared in four major journals in 1994. Findings are summarized by topic and implications for practice are provided. Delineates current lines of inquiry. (EMK)

  3. Impact of Hurricane Exposure on Reproductive Health Outcomes, Florida, 2004.

    PubMed

    Grabich, Shannon C; Robinson, Whitney R; Konrad, Charles E; Horney, Jennifer A

    2017-08-01

    Prenatal hurricane exposure may be an increasingly important contributor to poor reproductive health outcomes. In the current literature, mixed associations have been suggested between hurricane exposure and reproductive health outcomes. This may be due, in part, to residual confounding. We assessed the association between hurricane exposure and reproductive health outcomes by using a difference-in-difference analysis technique to control for confounding in a cohort of Florida pregnancies. We implemented a difference-in-difference analysis to evaluate hurricane weather and reproductive health outcomes including low birth weight, fetal death, and birth rate. The study population for analysis included all Florida pregnancies conceived before or during the 2003 and 2004 hurricane season. Reproductive health data were extracted from vital statistics records from the Florida Department of Health. In 2004, 4 hurricanes (Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne) made landfall in rapid succession; whereas in 2003, no hurricanes made landfall in Florida. Overall models using the difference-in-difference analysis showed no association between exposure to hurricane weather and reproductive health. The inconsistency of the literature on hurricane exposure and reproductive health may be in part due to biases inherent in pre-post or regression-based county-level comparisons. We found no associations between hurricane exposure and reproductive health. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:407-411).

  4. Adolescence as a gateway to adult health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Dennis

    2013-06-01

    Adolescence has long been regarded as a transition from childhood to adulthood. More recently it is become a concern of those wishing to avoid adverse health outcomes during middle and late adulthood. Most of this effort has been focused on behavioural risk factors such as tobacco and excessive alcohol use, physical exercise habits, dietary habits, as well as sexual and injury-related behaviours. The concern is that these habits are established during adolescence, continue into adulthood, and come to constitute ongoing risk factors for adverse health outcomes during middle and late adulthood. There is good reason to criticize this approach. These behaviours are themselves shaped by adolescents' living and working conditions and even then constitute a small proportion of the variance predicting adverse health outcomes during adulthood. More complex models of how adolescence serves as a gateway to adult health outcomes are presented. These are the socio-environmental, public policy, and political economy approaches. The argument is made that adolescence is a period during which public policy plays an especially important role in predicting future health outcomes. Yet, these public policies influence health all across the life span with adolescence providing only one of many important periods during which public policy shapes health prospects during middle and later adulthood. Ultimately one should consider a range of approaches ranging from the behavioural to the political to examine how adolescence serves as a gateway towards future adult prospects. An Adolescent Gateway Towards Adult Health Model is provided to assist in this process.

  5. Health sciences library building projects: 1995 survey.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, L

    1996-07-01

    The Medical Library Association's fifth annual survey of recent health sciences library building projects identified twenty-five libraries planning, expanding, or constructing new library facilities. None of the fifteen new library projects are free standing structures; however, several occupy a major portion of the project space. Ten projects involve renovation of or addition to existing space. Information regarding size, cost of project, type of construction, completion date, and other factual data was provided for twelve projects. The remaining identified projects are in pre-design or early-design stages, or are awaiting funding approval. Library building projects for three hospital libraries, three academic medical libraries, and an association library are described. Each illustrates how considerations of economics and technology are changing the traditional library model from a centrally stored information depository housing a wide range of information under one roof where users come to the information, into an electronic model gradually shifting from investment in the physical presence of resources to investment in creating work space for creditible information specialists who help in-house and distanced users to obtain information electronically from any place and at any time. This new model includes a highly skilled library team to manage, filter, and package the information to users trained by these resident experts.

  6. Integrated worker health protection and promotion programs: overview and perspectives on health and economic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pronk, Nicolaas P

    2013-12-01

    To describe integrated worker health protection and promotion (IWHPP) program characteristics, to discuss the rationale for the integration of occupational safety and health and worksite health promotion programs, and to summarize what is known about the impact of these programs on health and economic outcomes. A descriptive assessment of the current state of the IWHPP field and a review of studies on the effectiveness of IWHPP programs on health and economic outcomes were undertaken. Sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found for IWHPP programs when health outcomes were considered. Impact on productivity-related outcomes is considered promising, but inconclusive, whereas insufficient evidence was found for health care expenditures. Existing evidence supports an integrated approach in terms of health outcomes but will benefit significantly from research designed to support the business case for employers of various company sizes and industry types.

  7. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  8. Outcomes Assessment in Accredited Health Information Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dorine

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use and perceived usefulness of outcomes assessment methods in health information management programs. Additional characteristics of the outcomes assessment practices were recognized. The findings were evaluated for significant differences in results based on age of the program, type of institution,…

  9. Function or outcomes based performance for public health systems?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This commentary considers the merits of exploring different public health delivery systems among developed countries to consider which models are most effective. It challenges the conventional focus on delivery of services or functions and asks why we are not primarily interested in delivery of better public health outcomes for our populations. Achieving these outcomes requires the commitment of all sectors of our respective communities and the deployment of a range of delivery systems tailored to the national political and cultural context. PMID:23181476

  10. Treatment beliefs, health behaviors and their association with treatment outcome in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    von Arx, Lill-Brith Wium; Gydesen, Helge; Skovlund, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Objective While the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is growing, it is increasingly well recognized that treatment outcomes in primary care practice are often suboptimal. The aim of this study is to examine the extent to which treatment beliefs and health behaviors predict diabetes health outcome as measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, blood pressure, and lipid profile. Research design and methods This was a large-scale cross-sectional, registry-based study involving a well-defined type 2 diabetes population, in the county of Funen, Denmark. Registry data were combined with a 27-item self-reported survey administered to all insulin-treated people in the registry (n=3160). The survey was constructed to operationalize key concepts of diabetes management, diabetes treatment beliefs, and health behaviors. Results In total, 1033 respondents answered the survey. The majority of treatment beliefs and health behaviors examined were predictors of glycemic control and, to a large extent, lipid profile. Absence from, or a low frequency of, self-measured blood glucose, non-adherence to general medical advice and the prescribed treatment, a low primary care utilization, and perceived low treatment efficacy were factors positively associated with HbA1c levels, s-cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein. Conversely, infrequent self-measured blood glucose was associated with a significantly higher likelihood of having a blood pressure below 130/80 mm Hg. Perceived low treatment efficacy was the only health belief associated with poorer levels of health outcome other than HbA1c. Conclusions Health behaviors were stronger predictors for health outcomes than treatment beliefs. Self-reported adherence to either the treatment regimen or general medical advice most consistently predicted both glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:27110367

  11. Comparing two survey methods of measuring health-related indicators: Lot Quality Assurance Sampling and Demographic Health Surveys.

    PubMed

    Anoke, Sarah C; Mwai, Paul; Jeffery, Caroline; Valadez, Joseph J; Pagano, Marcello

    2015-12-01

    Two common methods used to measure indicators for health programme monitoring and evaluation are the demographic and health surveys (DHS) and lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS); each one has different strengths. We report on both methods when utilised in comparable situations. We compared 24 indicators in south-west Uganda, where data for prevalence estimations were collected independently for the two methods in 2011 (LQAS: n = 8876; DHS: n = 1200). Data were stratified (e.g. gender and age) resulting in 37 comparisons. We used a two-sample two-sided Z-test of proportions to compare both methods. The average difference between LQAS and DHS for 37 estimates was 0.062 (SD = 0.093; median = 0.039). The average difference among the 21 failures to reject equality of proportions was 0.010 (SD = 0.041; median = 0.009); among the 16 rejections, it was 0.130 (SD = 0.010, median = 0.118). Seven of the 16 rejections exhibited absolute differences of <0.10, which are clinically (or managerially) not significant; 5 had differences >0.10 and <0.20 (mean = 0.137, SD = 0.031) and four differences were >0.20 (mean = 0.261, SD = 0.083). There is 75.7% agreement across the two surveys. Both methods yield regional results, but only LQAS provides information at less granular levels (e.g. the district level) where managerial action is taken. The cost advantage and localisation make LQAS feasible to conduct more frequently, and provides the possibility for real-time health outcomes monitoring. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Acculturation and a Potential Relationship with Oral Health Outcomes Among Somali Refugees in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Hunter-Adams, Jo; Cochran, Jennifer; Laird, Lance D; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Geltman, Paul L

    2017-08-31

    This paper explores the relationship between acculturation and oral health in a study of Somali refugees. This cross-sectional survey included structured surveys and dental examinations of a convenience sample of 439 Somali adults living in Massachusetts. Associations between an acculturation scale and: (1) lifetime history of caries and (2) access to oral health services were calculated. In bivariate analyses, many individual questions in the scale were associated with outcomes. In multivariate analysis, speaking English (OR 0.5, CI 0.28-0.84) was associated with better access to, and utilization of, dental health services while reading American books and newspapers in English was associated with increased lifetime history of dental disease (OR 2.6, CI 1.1-6.0). As specific elements of acculturation have different relationships with oral health among Somali refugees, a summary acculturation scale may have limited utility. Ongoing efforts to remove language barriers may improve oral health.

  13. Measuring teamwork in health care settings: a review of survey instruments.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Melissa A; Nembhard, Ingrid M; Edmondson, Amy C

    2015-04-01

    Teamwork in health care settings is widely recognized as an important factor in providing high-quality patient care. However, the behaviors that comprise effective teamwork, the organizational factors that support teamwork, and the relationship between teamwork and patient outcomes remain empirical questions in need of rigorous study. To identify and review survey instruments used to assess dimensions of teamwork so as to facilitate high-quality research on this topic. We conducted a systematic review of articles published before September 2012 to identify survey instruments used to measure teamwork and to assess their conceptual content, psychometric validity, and relationships to outcomes of interest. We searched the ISI Web of Knowledge database, and identified relevant articles using the search terms team, teamwork, or collaboration in combination with survey, scale, measure, or questionnaire. We found 39 surveys that measured teamwork. Surveys assessed different dimensions of teamwork. The most commonly assessed dimensions were communication, coordination, and respect. Of the 39 surveys, 10 met all of the criteria for psychometric validity, and 14 showed significant relationships to nonself-report outcomes. Evidence of psychometric validity is lacking for many teamwork survey instruments. However, several psychometrically valid instruments are available. Researchers aiming to advance research on teamwork in health care should consider using or adapting one of these instruments before creating a new one. Because instruments vary considerably in the behavioral processes and emergent states of teamwork that they capture, researchers must carefully evaluate the conceptual consistency between instrument, research question, and context.

  14. Worksite Health Promotion Activities. 1992 National Survey. Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

    The survey reported in this document examined worksite health promotion and disease prevention activities in 1,507 private worksites in the United States. Specificlly, the survey assessed policies, practices, services, facilities, information, and activities sponsored by employers to improve the health of their employees, and assessed health…

  15. HARRISBURG TRI-COUNTY HEALTH MANPOWER SURVEY REPORT. PRELIMINARY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RATNER, MURIEL

    THE HARRISBURG AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE COOPERATED WITH TWO HOSPITALS IN A SURVEY OF THE AREA'S NEEDS FOR HEALTH TECHNICIANS. DATA, COLLECTED BY QUESTIONNAIRE SURVEYS OF DOCTORS AND DENTISTS AND BY INTERVIEWS WITH ADMINISTRATORS OF HOSPITALS, NURSING HOMES AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS, INDICATED THAT (1) A 60-PERCENT INCREASE IN HEALTH MNAPOWER…

  16. Survey on Continuing Education Needs for Health Professionals: Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    The report documents the results of a 1967 survey of health professionals in the four-State Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) Mountain States Regional Medical Program (MS/RMP). Addressed to health professionals in each of the four States--Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Wyoming--the survey focuses primarily on the…

  17. Factors influencing the effectiveness of mailed health surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, G H; Longmate, J; Branch, L G

    1992-01-01

    The authors investigated sources of bias in health surveys by examining responses to their 1989 questionnaire mailed to 1,255 Massachusetts men who were eligible for dental care provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. After a maximum of three mailings and one telephone call to nonrespondents, a total of 1,049 veterans had responded out of 1,228 finally determined to be eligible, a response rate of 85 percent. The investigators found that small differences in univariate estimates would have occurred had the field phase been terminated after the first mailing, which had a response rate of 61 percent. To evaluate multivariate distributions, they duplicated their previously published logistic regression model for sources of dental care, using only those who responded to the first and second mailings. Although model fits would have been substantively the same had the field phase been terminated after the first or the second mailings, analysis of parameter estimates and their statistical significances suggested bias that would have led to different substantive conclusions, in some instances. Another potential source of bias in surveys was found to be item omission. Fifty-eight percent of respondents answered all 46 survey questions, and 90 percent answered at least 91 percent of the questions. Fewer questions were answered by those whose responses were received last, but trends regarding missing data by age or education were not statistically significant. Although the survey using this methodology met all objectives, subject nonresponses, the ineligibility of potential respondents, item nonresponses, and skewed distributions of outcome variables combined to reduce the statistical power to detect differences among groups or to alter the analysis of the differences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1410240

  18. [Colombia. Prevalence, Demography and Health Survey 1990].

    PubMed

    1991-06-01

    Colombia's 1990 Survey of Prevalence, Demography, and Health (EPDS) was intended to provide data on the total population and on the status of women's and children's health for use in planning and in formulating health and family planning policy. 7412 household interviews and 8647 individual interviews with women aged 15-49 years were completed. This document provides a brief description of the questionnaire, sample design, data processing, and survey results. More detailed works on each topic are expected to follow. After weighing, 74.8% of respondents were urban and 25.2% rural. 3.2% were illiterate, 36.6% had some primary education, 50.2% had secondary educations, and 9.9% had high higher educations. Among all respondents and respondents currently in union respectively, 98.2% and 997% knew some contraceptive method, 94.1% and 97.9% knew some source of family planning, 57.6% and 86.0% had ever used a method, and 39.9% and 66.1% were currently using a method. Among all respondents and respondents currently in union respectively, 52.2% and 78.9% had ever used a modern method and 33.0% and 54.6% were currently using a modern method. Among women in union, 14.1% currently used pills, 12.4% IUDs, 2.2% injectables, 1.7% vaginal methods, 2.9% condoms, 20.9% female sterilization, .5% vasectomy, 11.5% some tradition method, 6.1% periodic abstinence, 4.8% withdrawal, and .5% others. Equal proportions of rural and urban women were sterilized. The prevalence of female sterilization declined with education and increased with family size. Modern methods were used by 57.5% of urban and 47.7% of rural women, 44.0% of illiterate women, 51.8% of women with primary and 57.8% with secondary educations. Among women in union, 10.9% wanted a child soon, 19.7% wanted 1 eventually, 3.6% were undecided, 42.6% did not want 1, 21.4% were sterilized, and 1.2% were infertile. Among women giving birth in the past 5 years, the proportion having antitetanus vaccinations increased from 39% in 1986

  19. Religion, Poverty, and Politics: Their Impact on Women's Reproductive Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Richard; Wissner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to explore the relationship(s) between U.S. states of selected social determinants of health (SDH) and three women's reproductive health outcomes including abortion, teen births, and infant mortality rates (IMR). The data from multiple population surveys were used to establish on a state-by-state basis, the interactions between selected SDH (religion, voting patterns, child poverty, and GINI) and their policy effects on three women's reproductive health outcomes (abortion, teen births, and IMRs) using publicly available national databases. Child poverty rates and the GINI coefficient were analyzed. Religiosity information was obtained from the Pew Forum's surveys. Voting results were collected from the 2008 congressional and presidential races and were used as proxy measures for conservative- versus liberal-leaning policies and policy makers. Using multiple regression analysis, higher IMRs were associated with higher religiosity scores. Lower abortion rates were associated with voting conservatively and higher income inequality. Higher teen birth rates were associated with higher child poverty rates and voting conservatively. This study shows that selected SDH may have substantial impacts on women's reproductive health outcomes at the state level. Significant inequalities exist between liberal and conservative states that affect women's health outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. HRM and its effect on employee, organizational and financial outcomes in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Brenda; Steijn, Bram; Tummers, Lars; Lankhaar, Marcel; Poerstamper, Robbert-Jan; van Beek, Sandra

    2014-06-17

    One of the main goals of Human Resource Management (HRM) is to increase the performance of organizations. However, few studies have explicitly addressed the multidimensional character of performance and linked HR practices to various outcome dimensions. This study therefore adds to the literature by relating HR practices to three outcome dimensions: financial, organizational and employee (HR) outcomes. Furthermore, we will analyze how HR practices influence these outcome dimensions, focusing on the mediating role of job satisfaction. This study uses a unique dataset, based on the 'ActiZ Benchmark in Healthcare', a benchmark study conducted in Dutch home care, nursing care and care homes. Data from autumn 2010 to autumn 2011 were analyzed. In total, 162 organizations participated during this period (approximately 35% of all Dutch care organizations). Employee data were collected using a questionnaire (61,061 individuals, response rate 42%). Clients were surveyed using the Client Quality Index for long-term care, via stratified sampling. Financial outcomes were collected using annual reports. SEM analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses. It was found that HR practices are - directly or indirectly - linked to all three outcomes. The use of HR practices is related to improved financial outcomes (measure: net margin), organizational outcomes (measure: client satisfaction) and HR outcomes (measure: sickness absence). The impact of HR practices on HR outcomes and organizational outcomes proved substantially larger than their impact on financial outcomes. Furthermore, with respect to HR and organizational outcomes, the hypotheses concerning the full mediating effect of job satisfaction are confirmed. This is in line with the view that employee attitudes are an important element in the 'black box' between HRM and performance. The results underscore the importance of HRM in the health care sector, especially for HR and organizational outcomes. Further analyses of HRM

  1. HRM and its effect on employee, organizational and financial outcomes in health care organizations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the main goals of Human Resource Management (HRM) is to increase the performance of organizations. However, few studies have explicitly addressed the multidimensional character of performance and linked HR practices to various outcome dimensions. This study therefore adds to the literature by relating HR practices to three outcome dimensions: financial, organizational and employee (HR) outcomes. Furthermore, we will analyze how HR practices influence these outcome dimensions, focusing on the mediating role of job satisfaction. Methods This study uses a unique dataset, based on the ‘ActiZ Benchmark in Healthcare’, a benchmark study conducted in Dutch home care, nursing care and care homes. Data from autumn 2010 to autumn 2011 were analyzed. In total, 162 organizations participated during this period (approximately 35% of all Dutch care organizations). Employee data were collected using a questionnaire (61,061 individuals, response rate 42%). Clients were surveyed using the Client Quality Index for long-term care, via stratified sampling. Financial outcomes were collected using annual reports. SEM analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses. Results It was found that HR practices are - directly or indirectly - linked to all three outcomes. The use of HR practices is related to improved financial outcomes (measure: net margin), organizational outcomes (measure: client satisfaction) and HR outcomes (measure: sickness absence). The impact of HR practices on HR outcomes and organizational outcomes proved substantially larger than their impact on financial outcomes. Furthermore, with respect to HR and organizational outcomes, the hypotheses concerning the full mediating effect of job satisfaction are confirmed. This is in line with the view that employee attitudes are an important element in the ‘black box’ between HRM and performance. Conclusion The results underscore the importance of HRM in the health care sector, especially for HR and

  2. Brief 75 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2014 Data

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-03-05

    The 2014 survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2013 and August 31, 2014. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2014. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major.

  3. Brief 73 Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2013 Data

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2014-02-15

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2012 and August 31, 2013. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2013. Twenty-two academic programs were included in the survey universe, with all 22 programs providing data. Since 2009, data for two health physics programs located in engineering departments are also included in the nuclear engineering survey. The enrollments and degrees data includes students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major.taoi_na

  4. Health equity in the New Zealand health care system: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In all countries people experience different social circumstances that result in avoidable differences in health. In New Zealand, Māori, Pacific peoples, and those with lower socioeconomic status experience higher levels of chronic illness, which is the leading cause of mortality, morbidity and inequitable health outcomes. Whilst the health system can enable a fairer distribution of good health, limited national data is available to measure health equity. Therefore, we sought to find out whether health services in New Zealand were equitable by measuring the level of development of components of chronic care management systems across district health boards. Variation in provision by geography, condition or ethnicity can be interpreted as inequitable. Methods A national survey of district health boards (DHBs) was undertaken on macro approaches to chronic condition management with detail on cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke and diabetes. Additional data from expert informant interviews on program reach and the cultural needs of Māori and Pacific peoples was sought. Survey data were analyzed on dimensions of health equity relevant to strategic planning and program delivery. Results are presented as descriptive statistics and free text. Interviews were transcribed and NVivo 8 software supported a general inductive approach to identify common themes. Results Survey responses were received from the majority of DHBs (15/21), some PHOs (21/84) and 31 expert informants. Measuring, monitoring and targeting equity is not systematically undertaken. The Health Equity Assessment Tool is used in strategic planning but not in decisions about implementing or monitoring disease programs. Variable implementation of evidence-based practices in disease management and multiple funding streams made program implementation difficult. Equity for Māori is embedded in policy, this is not so for other ethnic groups or

  5. Efficiency of workplace surveys conducted by Finnish occupational health services.

    PubMed

    Savinainen, Minna; Oksa, Panu

    2011-07-01

    In Finland, workplace surveys are used to identify and assess health risks and problems caused by work and make suggestions for continuous improvement of the work environment. With the aid of the workplace survey, occupational health services can be tailored to a company. The aims of this study were to determine how occupational health professionals gather data via the workplace survey and the effect survey results have on companies. A total of 259 occupational health nurses and 108 occupational health physicians responded to the questionnaire: 84.2% were women and 15.8% were men. The mean age of the respondents was 48.8 years (range, 26 to 65 years). Usually occupational health nurses and foremen and sometimes occupational health physicians and occupational safety and health representatives initiate the workplace survey. More than 90% of the surveys were followed by action proposals, and about 50% of these were implemented. The proposals implemented most often concerned personal protective equipment and less often leadership. Survey respondents should have both the opportunity and the authority to affect resources, the work environment, work arrangements, and tools. Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital for cost-effectively solving today's complex problems at workplaces around the globe. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Attributions to dental and diabetes health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kneckt, M C; Syrjälä, A M; Knuuttila, M L

    2000-03-01

    Previous studies have proposed common psychological factors between oral health behavior and diabetes self-care. The aim here was to describe and analyse more comprehensively the relationships between dental and diabetes health behavior on the basis of attribution theory. The likeness between subjects' own assessments, similarities of the causes given to success and failure, and the predictive power of own dental assessments concerning the metabolic balance of diabetes were studied. The research population was composed of 149 IDDM patients. Data were collected by means of a quantitative questionnaire, a clinical oral examination and from patient records. It was found that from the patients reporting success with avoiding gingivitis 82% also reported success with metabolic status and they also had lower mean HbA1c levels than patients assessing failure with gingivitis. There were some correlations between causes of failure: not bothering to clean approximal surfaces correlated with non-adherence to diabetes treatment instructions, and laziness as the cause of caries correlated with non-adherence to diabetes treatment instructions and with poor motivation for diabetes care. It can be concluded that there are some common determinants for both dental health behavior and diabetes self-care. This connection should be taken into account in health education by health care professionals.

  7. Associations between healthy lifestyles and health outcomes among older Koreans.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Jiyoung; Lee, Seungah H; Kim, Hae-Young

    2016-06-01

    Healthy lifestyles have been found to be positively associated with physical and mental health outcomes in later life. Although multiple health behaviors have the potential to enhance health among older adults, little is known about a multiple behavior approach. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between multiple healthy lifestyles and health outcomes among Korean older adults. The study sample consisted of 3844 Korean older adults aged 65 years and older from a cross-section sample being followed in the nationally representative dataset, the 2012 Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Healthy lifestyles included non-smoking, normal drinking, physical activity and normal weight. Adjusting for covariates (age, sex, marital status, education, household income and having chronic condition), a multivariate logistic regression was carried out to examine self-rated health, disability, cognitive impairment and depression as four individual health outcomes. Compared with respondents with no healthy lifestyle factors, respondents with at least one healthy lifestyle factor had better self-rated health, respondents with at least two healthy lifestyle factors had reduced risk of disability, and respondents with at least three healthy lifestyle factors had reduced risk of cognitive impairment. Interestingly, having just two or three healthy lifestyle factor was associated with reduced risk of depression. These results suggest that older Koreans with more healthy lifestyles are healthier than those with less healthy lifestyles. Also, the association between multiple healthy lifestyle factors and health outcomes is different by specific health outcome, showing different mechanisms between multiple healthy lifestyle factors and each health outcome. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2015; ●●: ●●-●●. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  8. 2011 Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    to be sociable (33.4%). The most commonly ES-8 Executive Summary to the 2011 Health Related Behaviors Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel 20...standards and current best practices in the field of survey research. Although the target population and the topics addressed in the 2011 HRB were...enlisted, active duty military personnel to identify any items or survey instructions that were unclear. It is a best practice to pretest the survey

  9. 75 FR 32191 - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples: Guidelines for Proposals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Health and Nutrition Examination...: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of periodic surveys... Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease...

  10. Comparison of commonly used orthopaedic outcome measures using palm-top computers and paper surveys.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Khaled J; Radosevich, David M; Kassim, Rida A; Moussa, Mohamed; Dykes, Darrell; Bottolfson, Helena; Gioe, Terence J; Robinson, Harry

    2002-11-01

    Measuring patient-perceived outcomes following orthopaedic procedures have become an important component of clinical research and patient care. General and disease-specific outcomes measures have been developed and applied in orthopaedics to assess the patients' perceived health status. Unfortunately, paper-based, self-administered instruments remain inefficient for collecting data because of: (a) missing data (b) respondent error, and (c) the costs to administer and enter data. To study the comparability of palm-top computer devices and paper-pencil self-administered questionnaires in the collection of health-related quality of life (HRQL) information from patients. The comparability of administering HRQL questionnaires using palm-top computer and traditional paper-based forms was tested in a sample of 96 patients with complaints of hip and/or knee pain. Each patient completed mailed versions of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS), 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), and Western Ontario and McMasters University Arthritis Index (WOMAC) three weeks prior to presenting to clinic. At the clinic they were asked to complete the same outcomes measures using the palm-top computer or a paper-and-pencil version. In the analysis, scale distributions, floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency and retest reliability of scales were compared across the two data collection methods. Because the baseline characteristics of the groups were not strictly comparable according to age, the data were analyzed for the entire sample and stratified according to age. Few statistically significant differences were found for the means, variances and intra-class correlation coefficients between the methods of administration. While the scale distribution between the two methods was comparable, the internal consistency of the scales was dissimilar. Administration of HRQL questionnaires using portable palm-top computer devices has the potential advantage of decreased cost and convenience. These data

  11. Present status of known and possible outcomes in neurosurgery: a survey of outcome assessment.

    PubMed

    Tirakotai, Wuttipong; Lapanich, Saranya; Riegel, Thomas; Hellwig, Dieter; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Celik, Ilhan

    2007-07-01

    In the area of health care research, quality of life (QoL) is considered as a diagnostic tool for problem-oriented care of postoperative cancer patients. The aim of this study was to assess the attitude of neurosurgeons towards the different outcome measurements. This prospective study was conducted between the 15(th) and 18th of June 2005 during the third world conference of the International Study Group on Neuroendoscopy (ISGNE) in Marburg, Germany. Copies of the questionnaire that was generated for this purpose were distributed to the participants from all over the world. Respondents were asked to return the completed questionnaire to the registration/information desk. The acquired data from the questionnaires were transferred to Excel spreadsheet. Only data from completely filled out questionnaires were included in the descriptive and explorative analysis. Forty of the 150 questionnaires that were distributed were complete without missing values and mistakes. Data from these 40 questionnaires were used for analysis. Sixty eight percent (27:40) of the neurosurgeons considered mortality as the first or the second rank of outcome measurement, whereas morbidity was also found to be the other important outcome measurement (the first or the second rank of outcome measurement) in 45% (18:40) of the neurosurgeons. Improved QoL was considered as the third or the fourth priority of outcome measurement in 53% (22:40) of the respondents. Although from these data, it may be difficult to infer that there is a real transfer of QoL concept from the scientific theory and the measurement level into clinical application. However, this may reflect a change in attitude of the surgeon. Besides disseminating new QoL concepts through publication and information technology, an implementation of this contemporary concept would provide a postoperative neurosurgical patient an optimal and rapid therapy according to the disclosed problems in the somatic, psychological, and social domains

  12. An assessment of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to evaluate malaria outcome indicators: extending malaria indicator surveys

    PubMed Central

    Biedron, Caitlin; Pagano, Marcello; Hedt, Bethany L; Kilian, Albert; Ratcliffe, Amy; Mabunda, Samuel; Valadez, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    Background Large investments and increased global prioritization of malaria prevention and treatment have resulted in greater emphasis on programme monitoring and evaluation (M&E) in many countries. Many countries currently use large multistage cluster sample surveys to monitor malaria outcome indicators on a regional and national level. However, these surveys often mask local-level variability important to programme management. Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) has played a valuable role for local-level programme M&E. If incorporated into these larger surveys, it would provide a comprehensive M&E plan at little, if any, extra cost. Methods The Mozambique Ministry of Health conducted a Malaria Indicator Survey (MIS) in June and July 2007. We applied LQAS classification rules to the 345 sampled enumeration areas to demonstrate identifying high- and low-performing areas with respect to two malaria program indicators—‘household possession of any bednet’ and ‘household possession of any insecticide-treated bednet (ITN)’. Results As shown by the MIS, no province in Mozambique achieved the 70% coverage target for household possession of bednets or ITNs. By applying LQAS classification rules to the data, we identify 266 of the 345 enumeration areas as having bednet coverage severely below the 70% target. An additional 73 were identified with low ITN coverage. Conclusions This article demonstrates the feasibility of integrating LQAS into multistage cluster sampling surveys and using these results to support a comprehensive national, regional and local programme M&E system. Furthermore, in the recommendations we outlined how to integrate the Large Country-LQAS design into macro-surveys while still obtaining results available through current sampling practices. PMID:20139435

  13. An assessment of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to evaluate malaria outcome indicators: extending malaria indicator surveys.

    PubMed

    Biedron, Caitlin; Pagano, Marcello; Hedt, Bethany L; Kilian, Albert; Ratcliffe, Amy; Mabunda, Samuel; Valadez, Joseph J

    2010-02-01

    Large investments and increased global prioritization of malaria prevention and treatment have resulted in greater emphasis on programme monitoring and evaluation (M&E) in many countries. Many countries currently use large multistage cluster sample surveys to monitor malaria outcome indicators on a regional and national level. However, these surveys often mask local-level variability important to programme management. Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) has played a valuable role for local-level programme M&E. If incorporated into these larger surveys, it would provide a comprehensive M&E plan at little, if any, extra cost. The Mozambique Ministry of Health conducted a Malaria Indicator Survey (MIS) in June and July 2007. We applied LQAS classification rules to the 345 sampled enumeration areas to demonstrate identifying high- and low-performing areas with respect to two malaria program indicators-'household possession of any bednet' and 'household possession of any insecticide-treated bednet (ITN)'. As shown by the MIS, no province in Mozambique achieved the 70% coverage target for household possession of bednets or ITNs. By applying LQAS classification rules to the data, we identify 266 of the 345 enumeration areas as having bednet coverage severely below the 70% target. An additional 73 were identified with low ITN coverage. This article demonstrates the feasibility of integrating LQAS into multistage cluster sampling surveys and using these results to support a comprehensive national, regional and local programme M&E system. Furthermore, in the recommendations we outlined how to integrate the Large Country-LQAS design into macro-surveys while still obtaining results available through current sampling practices.

  14. Health literacy interventions and outcomes: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Berkman, Nancy D; Sheridan, Stacey L; Donahue, Katrina E; Halpern, David J; Viera, Anthony; Crotty, Karen; Holland, Audrey; Brasure, Michelle; Lohr, Kathleen N; Harden, Elizabeth; Tant, Elizabeth; Wallace, Ina; Viswanathan, Meera

    2011-03-01

    To update a 2004 systematic review of health care service use and health outcomes related to differences in health literacy level and interventions designed to improve these outcomes for individuals with low health literacy. Disparities in health outcomes and effectiveness of interventions among different sociodemographic groups were also examined. We searched MEDLINE®, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Library, PsychINFO, and the Educational Resources Information Center. For health literacy, we searched using a variety of terms, limited to English and studies published from 2003 to May 25, 2010. For numeracy, we searched from 1966 to May 25, 2010. We used standard Evidence-based Practice Center methods of dual review of abstracts, full-text articles, abstractions, quality ratings, and strength of evidence grading. We resolved disagreements by consensus. We evaluated whether newer literature was available for answering key questions, so we broadened our definition of health literacy to include numeracy and oral (spoken) health literacy. We excluded intervention studies that did not measure health literacy directly and updated our approach to evaluate individual study risk of bias and to grade strength of evidence. We included good- and fair-quality studies: 81 studies addressing health outcomes (reported in 95 articles including 86 measuring health literacy and 16 measuring numeracy, of which 7 measure both) and 42 studies (reported in 45 articles) addressing interventions. Differences in health literacy level were consistently associated with increased hospitalizations, greater emergency care use, lower use of mammography, lower receipt of influenza vaccine, poorer ability to demonstrate taking medications appropriately, poorer ability to interpret labels and health messages, and, among seniors, poorer overall health status and higher mortality. Health literacy level potentially mediates disparities between blacks and

  15. Weight and mental health status in Massachusetts, National Survey of Children's Health, 2007.

    PubMed

    Lu, Emily; Dayalu, Rashmi; Diop, Hafsatou; Harvey, Elizabeth M; Manning, Susan E; Uzogara, Stella G

    2012-12-01

    This study explores how weight status is related to mental health status among Massachusetts children, aged 10-17 years. We used data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health to examine the association between weight status (body mass index-for-age) and parent-reported mental health status among Massachusetts children (N = 827). Multivariable log binomial regression was performed to calculate the adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) of three mental health outcomes (behavioral, emotional, and social) as related to weight status, after controlling for covariates including physical activity, sex, race/ethnicity, maternal education, poverty status, special health needs, and neighborhood safety. Almost one-third (32.5 %) of Massachusetts children were either overweight or obese. Sex was a significant effect modifier of the association between weight status and negative emotions. After stratifying by sex and controlling for covariates, the relationship between weight status and negative emotions remained significant among girls (aPR = 1.8, 95 % CI 1.3-2.6). Children who did not exercise at all were significantly more likely to exhibit negative behaviors (aPR = 1.3, 95 % CI 1.0-1.6), negative emotions (boys' aPR = 3.3, 95 % CI 1.6-6.9; girls' aPR = 2.6, 95 % CI 1.5-4.5), and fewer social skills (aPR = 1.9, 95 % CI 1.3-2.9) than those who exercised at least 20 min every day of the week. Overweight/obese children, especially girls, were more likely than children of normal weight to have parent-reported negative emotions, suggesting an association between weight status and mental health. Lower levels of physical activity were associated with negative mental health outcomes, supporting the benefits of physical activity for all children.

  16. Using core competencies to build an evaluative framework: outcome assessment of the University of Guelph Master of Public Health program.

    PubMed

    Britten, Nicole; Wallar, Lauren E; McEwen, Scott A; Papadopoulos, Andrew

    2014-07-31

    Master of Public Health programs have been developed across Canada in response to the need for graduate-level trained professionals to work in the public health sector. The University of Guelph recently conducted a five-year outcome assessment using the Core Competencies for Public Health in Canada as an evaluative framework to determine whether graduates are receiving adequate training, and identify areas for improvement. A curriculum map of core courses and an online survey of University of Guelph Master of Public Health graduates comprised the outcome assessment. The curriculum map was constructed by evaluating course outlines, assignments, and content to determine the extent to which the Core Competencies were covered in each course. Quantitative survey results were characterized using descriptive statistics. Qualitative survey results were analyzed to identify common themes and patterns in open-ended responses. The University of Guelph Master of Public Health program provided a positive learning environment in which graduates gained proficiency across the Core Competencies through core and elective courses, meaningful practicums, and competent faculty. Practice-based learning environments, particularly in collaboration with public health organizations, were deemed to be beneficial to students' learning experiences. The Core Competencies and graduate surveys can be used to conduct a meaningful and informative outcome assessment. We encourage other Master of Public Health programs to conduct their own outcome assessments using a similar framework, and disseminate these results in order to identify best practices and strengthen the Canadian graduate public health education system.

  17. Using core competencies to build an evaluative framework: outcome assessment of the University of Guelph Master of Public Health program

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Master of Public Health programs have been developed across Canada in response to the need for graduate-level trained professionals to work in the public health sector. The University of Guelph recently conducted a five-year outcome assessment using the Core Competencies for Public Health in Canada as an evaluative framework to determine whether graduates are receiving adequate training, and identify areas for improvement. Methods A curriculum map of core courses and an online survey of University of Guelph Master of Public Health graduates comprised the outcome assessment. The curriculum map was constructed by evaluating course outlines, assignments, and content to determine the extent to which the Core Competencies were covered in each course. Quantitative survey results were characterized using descriptive statistics. Qualitative survey results were analyzed to identify common themes and patterns in open-ended responses. Results The University of Guelph Master of Public Health program provided a positive learning environment in which graduates gained proficiency across the Core Competencies through core and elective courses, meaningful practicums, and competent faculty. Practice-based learning environments, particularly in collaboration with public health organizations, were deemed to be beneficial to students’ learning experiences. Conclusions The Core Competencies and graduate surveys can be used to conduct a meaningful and informative outcome assessment. We encourage other Master of Public Health programs to conduct their own outcome assessments using a similar framework, and disseminate these results in order to identify best practices and strengthen the Canadian graduate public health education system. PMID:25078124

  18. Social Media and Patient Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To provide a review of the current excellent research published in the field of Consumer Health Informatics. Method We searched MEDLINE® and WEB OF SCIENCE® databases for papers published in 2013 in relation with Consumer Health Informatics. The authors identified 16 candidate best papers, which were then reviewed by four reviewers. Results Five out of the 16 candidate papers were selected as best papers. One paper presents the key features of a system to automate the collection of web-based social media content for subsequent semantic annotation. This paper emphasizes the importance of mining social media to collect novel data from which new findings in drug abuse research were uncovered. The second paper presents a practical method to predict how a community structure would impact the spreading of information within the community. The third paper presents a method for improving the quality of online health communities. The fourth presents a new social network to allow the monitoring of the evolution of individuals’ health status and diagnostic deficiencies, difficulties or barriers in rehabilitation. The last paper reports on teenage patients’ perception on privacy and social media. Conclusion Selected papers not only show the value of using social media in the medical field but how to use these media to detect emergent diseases or risks, inform patients, promote disease prevention, and follow patients’ opinion on healthcare resources. PMID:25123742

  19. Survey of research activity among multidisciplinary health professionals.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Andrea P; Roberts, Shelley; Baker, Mark J; Keijzers, Gerben; Young, Jessica; Stapelberg, N J Chris; Crilly, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe the research activities being undertaken by health service employees within one Australian health service and explore their experiences with undertaking research.Methods The present mixed-methods study was conducted across one health service in Queensland, Australia, and included a cross-sectional online survey and interviews with healthcare service employees. The anonymous survey was a self-administered online questionnaire, distributed to all 6121 employees at the health service via email, asking about research activity and engagement. Willing participants were also interviewed on their perceptions and experiences with research and capacity building.Results In all, 151 participants responded to the survey and 22 participated in interviews. Three-quarters of respondents reported actively participating in research over the past 6 years and several research outputs, such as publications, conference presentations and competitive grant funding, were displayed. Four concepts emerged from interview findings, namely collaborative partnerships, skilled mentorship, embedding research and organisational support, which represented the overall theme 'opportunities for a research-infused health service'.Conclusion Employees of the health service recognised the importance of research and had a range of research skills, knowledge and experience. They also identified several opportunities for building research capacity in this service.What is known about the topic? Building research capacity among healthcare professionals is important for enabling the conduct of high-quality research in healthcare institutions. However, building research capacity is complex and influenced by the uniqueness of organisational context. In order to successfully build research capacity among employees at any health service, current research activity, skills and experience, as well as staff perceptions around building research capacity in that

  20. The Kaiser Permanente Northern California Adult Member Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Nancy; Lin, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) Member Health Survey (MHS) is used to describe sociodemographic and health-related characteristics of the adult membership of this large, integrated health care delivery system to monitor trends over time, identify health disparities, and conduct research. Objective To provide an overview of the KPNC MHS and share findings that illustrate how survey statistics and data have been and can be used for research and programmatic purposes. Methods The MHS is a large-scale, institutional review board-approved survey of English-speaking KPNC adult members. The confidential survey has been conducted by mail triennially starting in 1993 with independent age-sex and geographically stratified random samples, with an option for online completion starting in 2005. The full survey sample and survey data are linkable at the individual level to Health Plan and geocoded data. Respondents are assigned weighting factors for their survey year and additional weighting factors for analysis of pooled survey data. Results Statistics from the 1999, 2002, 2005, 2008, and 2011 surveys show trends in sociodemographic and health-related characteristics and access to the Internet and e-mail for the adult membership aged 25 to 79 years and for 6 age-sex subgroups. Pooled data from the 2008 and 2011 surveys show many significant differences in these characteristics across the 5 largest race/ethnic groups in KPNC (non-Hispanic whites, blacks, Latinos, Filipinos, and Chinese). Conclusion The KPNC MHS has yielded unique insights and provides an opportunity for researchers and public health organizations outside of KPNC to leverage our survey-generated statistics and collaborate on epidemiologic and health services research studies. PMID:27548806

  1. The Kaiser Permanente Northern California Adult Member Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nancy; Lin, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) Member Health Survey (MHS) is used to describe sociodemographic and health-related characteristics of the adult membership of this large, integrated health care delivery system to monitor trends over time, identify health disparities, and conduct research. To provide an overview of the KPNC MHS and share findings that illustrate how survey statistics and data have been and can be used for research and programmatic purposes. The MHS is a large-scale, institutional review board-approved survey of English-speaking KPNC adult members. The confidential survey has been conducted by mail triennially starting in 1993 with independent age-sex and geographically stratified random samples, with an option for online completion starting in 2005. The full survey sample and survey data are linkable at the individual level to Health Plan and geocoded data. Respondents are assigned weighting factors for their survey year and additional weighting factors for analysis of pooled survey data. Statistics from the 1999, 2002, 2005, 2008, and 2011 surveys show trends in sociodemographic and health-related characteristics and access to the Internet and e-mail for the adult membership aged 25 to 79 years and for 6 age-sex subgroups. Pooled data from the 2008 and 2011 surveys show many significant differences in these characteristics across the 5 largest race/ethnic groups in KPNC (non-Hispanic whites, blacks, Latinos, Filipinos, and Chinese). The KPNC MHS has yielded unique insights and provides an opportunity for researchers and public health organizations outside of KPNC to leverage our survey-generated statistics and collaborate on epidemiologic and health services research studies.

  2. Cultural Competence and Children's Mental Health Service Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancoske, Ronald J.; Lewis, Marva L.; Bowers-Stephens, Cheryll; Ford, Almarie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between clients' perception of cultural competency of mental health providers and service outcomes. A study was conducted of a public children's mental health program that used a community-based, systems of care approach. Data from a subsample (N = 111) of families with youths (average age 12.3) and primarily…

  3. Cultural Competence and Children's Mental Health Service Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancoske, Ronald J.; Lewis, Marva L.; Bowers-Stephens, Cheryll; Ford, Almarie

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the relationships between clients' perception of cultural competency of mental health providers and service outcomes. A study was conducted of a public children's mental health program that used a community-based, systems of care approach. Data from a subsample (N = 111) of families with youths (average age 12.3) and primarily…

  4. Smokefree legislation: a review of health and economic outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Ellen J

    2010-12-01

    Smokefree legislation is a powerful public health intervention. Despite progress in smokefree legislation, over half of U.S. adults remain unprotected by comprehensive smokefree legislation. This paper reviews the scientific literature on health and economic outcome studies of smokefree legislation from the past decade, 2000 to early 2010, using MEDLINE and key search terms: smoking, smoking cessation, smoking/legislation and jurisprudence, smoking cessation/legislation and jurisprudence, and health policy. There is a wealth of research showing the health benefits to entire populations when communities implement comprehensive smokefree laws and/or regulations. These laws improve the health of hospitality workers and the general population by improving indoor air quality, reducing acute myocardial infarctions and asthma exacerbations, and improving infant and birth outcomes. Some studies report reduced smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption and improved cessation outcomes after smokefree legislation. In addition to the health benefits, economic studies confirm that smokefree laws do not adversely affect business revenues or operating costs. While there is an abundance of smokefree policy outcomes research showing both the health and economic impacts of smokefree legislation, these outcomes may have more to do with implementation effectiveness than adoption, especially among subpopulations. An emerging body of literature documents not only that disparities in health protections remain among subpopulations, but that health outcomes of smokefree legislation may vary by gender, race/ethnicity, SES, and age. Further research is needed on implementation effectiveness of smokefree legislation and differential effects on subpopulations. Copyright © 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Toward improved public health outcomes from urban nature.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Danielle F; Lin, Brenda B; Bush, Robert; Gaston, Kevin J; Dean, Julie H; Barber, Elizabeth; Fuller, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities.

  6. Toward Improved Public Health Outcomes From Urban Nature

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Robert; Gaston, Kevin J.; Dean, Julie H.; Barber, Elizabeth; Fuller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    There is mounting concern for the health of urban populations as cities expand at an unprecedented rate. Urban green spaces provide settings for a remarkable range of physical and mental health benefits, and pioneering health policy is recognizing nature as a cost-effective tool for planning healthy cities. Despite this, limited information on how specific elements of nature deliver health outcomes restricts its use for enhancing population health. We articulate a framework for identifying direct and indirect causal pathways through which nature delivers health benefits, and highlight current evidence. We see a need for a bold new research agenda founded on testing causality that transcends disciplinary boundaries between ecology and health. This will lead to cost-effective and tailored solutions that could enhance population health and reduce health inequalities. PMID:25602866

  7. [Socioeconomic differentials in health and health related behaviors: findings from the Korea Youth Panel Survey].

    PubMed

    Khang, Young-Ho; Cho, Sung-Il; Yang, Seungmi; Lee, Moo-Song

    2005-11-01

    This study examined the socioeconomic differentials for the health and health related behaviors among South Korean middle school students. A nationwide cross-sectional interview survey of 3,449 middle school second-grade students and their parents was conducted using a stratified multi-stage cluster sampling method. The response rate was 93.3%. The socioeconomic position indicators were based on self-reported information from the students and their parents: parental education, father's occupational class, monthly family income, out-of-pocket expenditure for education, housing ownership, educational expectations, educational performance and the perceived economic hardships. The outcome variables that were measured were also based on the self-reported information from the students. The health measures included self-rated health conditions, psychological or mental problems, the feelings of loneliness at school, the overall satisfaction of life and the perceived level of stress. The health related behaviors included were smoking, alcohol drinking, sexual intercourse, violence, bullying and verbal and physical abuse by parents. Socioeconomic differences for the health and health related behaviors were found among the eighth grade boys and girls of South Korea. However, the pattern varied with gender, the socioeconomic position indicators and the outcome measures. The prevalence rates of the overall dissatisfaction with life for both genders differed according to most of the eight socioeconomic position indicators. All the health measures were significantly different according to the perceived economic hardship. However, the socioeconomic differences in the self-rated health conditions and the psychosocial or mental problems were not clear. The students having higher socioeconomic position tended to be a perpetrator of bullying while those students with lower socioeconomic position were more likely to be a victim. The perceived economic hardships predicted the health

  8. Child Social Exclusion Risk and Child Health Outcomes in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Itismita; Edvardsson, Martin; Abello, Annie; Eldridge, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between the risk of child social exclusion, as measured by the Child Social Exclusion (CSE) index and its individual domains, and child health outcomes at the small area level in Australia. The CSE index is Australia's only national small-area index of the risk of child social exclusion. It includes five domains that capture different components of social exclusion: socio-economic background, education, connectedness, housing and health services. The paper used data from the National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM), University of Canberra for the CSE Index and its domains and two key Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) data sources for the health outcome measures: the National Hospital Morbidity Database and the National Mortality Database. The results show positive associations between rates of both of the negative health outcomes: potentially preventable hospitalisations (PPH) and avoidable deaths, and the overall risk of child social exclusion as well as with the index domains. This analysis at the small-area level can be used to identify and study areas with unexpectedly good or bad health outcomes relative to their estimated risk of child social exclusion. We show that children's health outcomes are worse in remote parts of Australia than what would be expected solely based on the CSE index. The results of this study suggest that developing composite indices of the risk of child social exclusion can provide valuable guidance for local interventions and programs aimed at improving children's health outcomes. They also indicate the importance of taking a small-area approach when conducting geographic modelling of disadvantage.

  9. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Methods Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. Results The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties. PMID:27227131

  10. Integrated Worker Health Protection and Promotion Programs: Overview and Perspectives on Health and Economic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pronk, Nicolaas P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe integrated worker health protection and promotion (IWHPP) program characteristics, to discuss the rationale for integration of OSH and WHP programs, and to summarize what is known about the impact of these programs on health and economic outcomes. Methods A descriptive assessment of the current state of the IWHPP field and a review of studies on the effectiveness of IWHPP programs on health and economic outcomes. Results Sufficient evidence of effectiveness was found for IWHPP programs when health outcomes are considered. Impact on productivity-related outcomes is considered promising, but inconclusive, whereas insufficient evidence was found for health care expenditures. Conclusions Existing evidence supports an integrated approach in terms of health outcomes but will benefit significantly from research designed to support the business case for employers of various company sizes and industry types. PMID:24284747

  11. Measuring the health of the Indian elderly: evidence from National Sample Survey data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Comparable health measures across different sets of populations are essential for describing the distribution of health outcomes and assessing the impact of interventions on these outcomes. Self-reported health (SRH) is a commonly used indicator of health in household surveys and has been shown to be predictive of future mortality. However, the susceptibility of SRH to influence by individuals' expectations complicates its interpretation and undermines its usefulness. Methods This paper applies the empirical methodology of Lindeboom and van Doorslaer (2004) to investigate elderly health in India using data from the 52nd round of the National Sample Survey conducted in 1995-96 that includes both an SRH variable as well as a range of objective indicators of disability and ill health. The empirical testing was conducted on stratified homogeneous groups, based on four factors: gender, education, rural-urban residence, and region. Results We find that region generally has a significant impact on how women perceive their health. Reporting heterogeneity can arise not only from cut-point shifts, but also from differences in health effects by objective health measures. In contrast, we find little evidence of reporting heterogeneity due to differences in gender or educational status within regions. Rural-urban residence does matter in some cases. The findings are robust with different specifications of objective health indicators. Conclusions Our exercise supports the thesis that the region of residence is associated with different cut-points and reporting behavior on health surveys. We believe this is the first paper that applies the Lindeboom-van Doorslaer methodology to data on the elderly in a developing country, showing the feasibility of applying this methodology to data from many existing cross-sectional health surveys. PMID:21080940

  12. A review of national health surveys in India

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anamika; Dandona, Lalit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several rounds of national health surveys have generated a vast amount of data in India since 1992. We describe and compare the key health information gathered, assess the availability of health data in the public domain, and review publications resulting from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), the District Level Household Survey (DLHS) and the Annual Health Survey (AHS). We highlight issues that need attention to improve the usefulness of the surveys in monitoring changing trends in India’s disease burden: (i) inadequate coverage of noncommunicable diseases, injuries and some major communicable diseases; (ii) modest comparability between surveys on the key themes of child and maternal mortality and immunization to understand trends over time; (iii) short time intervals between the most recent survey rounds; and (iv) delays in making individual-level data available for analysis in the public domain. We identified 337 publications using NFHS data, in contrast only 48 and three publications were using data from the DLHS and AHS respectively. As national surveys are resource-intensive, it would be prudent to maximize their benefits. We suggest that India plan for a single major national health survey at five-year intervals in consultation with key stakeholders. This could cover additional major causes of the disease burden and their risk factors, as well as causes of death and adult mortality rate estimation. If done in a standardized manner, such a survey would provide useable and timely data to inform health interventions and facilitate assessment of their impact on population health. PMID:27034522

  13. Coordination between child welfare agencies and mental health service providers, children's service use, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Wells, Rebecca; Hillemeier, Marianne M

    2009-06-01

    Interorganizational relationships (IORs) between child welfare agencies and mental health service providers may facilitate mental health treatment access for vulnerable children. This study investigates whether IORs are associated with greater use of mental health services and improvement in mental health status for children served by the child welfare system. This was a longitudinal analysis of data from a 36-month period in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW). The sample consisted of 1,613 children within 75 child welfare agencies who were 2 years or older and had mental health problems at baseline. IOR intensity was measured as the number of coordination approaches between each child welfare agency and mental health service providers. Separate weighted multilevel logistic regression models tested associations between IORs and service use and outcomes, respectively. Agency-level factors accounted for 9% of the variance in the probability of service use and 12% of mental health improvement. Greater intensity of IORs was associated with higher likelihood of both service use and mental health improvement. Having greater numbers of ties with mental health providers may help child welfare agencies improve children's mental health service access and outcomes. Policymakers should develop policies and initiatives to encourage a combination of different types of organizational ties between child welfare and mental health systems. For instance, information sharing at the agency level in addition to coordination at the case level may improve the coordination necessary to serve these vulnerable children.

  14. Nutritionists’ Health Study cohort: a web-based approach of life events, habits and health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Isis Tande; de Almeida-Pititto, Bianca; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-communicable chronic diseases (NCCDs) represent a burden for public health. Alongside the established cardiometabolic risk factors such as high blood pressure and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism, living habits and nutritional status at different stages of life are seen as contributors to this scenario. Gut microbiota composition and subclinical inflammation have been pointed out as underlying mechanisms of NCCDs. Studies involving health professionals have brought relevant contributions to the knowledge about risk factors. Technological advances facilitate data collection and analysis for big samples. A web-based survey addressed to collect data from a cohort study, which is able to identify NCCDs risk factors, is highly desirable. The objective of the Brazilian Nutritionists’ Health Study (NutriHS) is to gather online information on early life events, daily habits, emergent cardiometabolic risk factors and health outcomes of a specific subset of the Brazilian population. Methods and analysis NutriHS, developed at the School of Public Health—University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, is a research initiative that enrols undergraduates of nutrition courses from Brazilian universities and graduated volunteers. A web-based self-administered system was designed to collect health-related data. After fulfilling online questionnaires (socioeconomic, early life events and lifestyle data), participants are invited to a clinical visit for physical examination and laboratory procedures (blood sampling, faeces collection and body composition). At a 3-year interval, they will be invited to repeat similar procedures. Ethics and dissemination The NutriHS research protocol was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee and is providing promising data which contribute to the understanding of pathophysiological links between early life events, body composition, gut microbiota, and inflammatory and metabolic risk profile. The combination of a friendly tool

  15. Asian American Field Survey: Re-Analysis of Health Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Karen L.; So, Alvin

    Data from the Asian American Field Survey of 1973 were examined to determine health problems, methods of seeking and paying for health services, health insurance coverage, and frequency of medical examinations among Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, Korean, and Samoan families in the United States. The analysis indicated that the Chinese reported the…

  16. Examining the Role of Patient Experience Surveys in Measuring Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hays, Ron D.; Lehrman, William G.; Rybowski, Lise; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Cleary, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Patient care experience surveys evaluate the degree to which care is patient-centered. This article reviews the literature on the association between patient experiences and other measures of health care quality. Research indicates that better patient care experiences are associated with higher levels of adherence to recommended prevention and treatment processes, better clinical outcomes, better patient safety within hospitals, and less health care utilization. Patient experience measures that are collected using psychometrically sound instruments, employing recommended sample sizes and adjustment procedures, and implemented according to standard protocols are intrinsically meaningful and are appropriate complements for clinical process and outcome measures in public reporting and pay-for-performance programs. PMID:25027409

  17. Subthreshold posttraumatic stress disorder in the world health organization world mental health surveys.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Katie A; Koenen, Karestan C; Friedman, Matthew J; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron; Karam, Elie G; Shahly, Victoria; Stein, Dan J; Hill, Eric D; Petukhova, Maria; Alonso, Jordi; Andrade, Laura Helena; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Borges, Guilherme; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia E; Mladenova, Maya; Posada-Villa, Jose; Scott, Kate M; Takeshima, Tadashi; Kessler, Ronald C

    2015-02-15

    Although only a few people exposed to a traumatic event (TE) develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), symptoms that do not meet full PTSD criteria are common and often clinically significant. Individuals with these symptoms sometimes have been characterized as having subthreshold PTSD, but no consensus exists on the optimal definition of this term. Data from a large cross-national epidemiologic survey are used in this study to provide a principled basis for such a definition. The World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys administered fully structured psychiatric diagnostic interviews to community samples in 13 countries containing assessments of PTSD associated with randomly selected TEs. Focusing on the 23,936 respondents reporting lifetime TE exposure, associations of approximated DSM-5 PTSD symptom profiles with six outcomes (distress-impairment, suicidality, comorbid fear-distress disorders, PTSD symptom duration) were examined to investigate implications of different subthreshold definitions. Although consistently highest outcomes for distress-impairment, suicidality, comorbidity, and PTSD symptom duration were observed among the 3.0% of respondents with DSM-5 PTSD rather than other symptom profiles, the additional 3.6% of respondents meeting two or three of DSM-5 criteria B-E also had significantly elevated scores for most outcomes. The proportion of cases with threshold versus subthreshold PTSD varied depending on TE type, with threshold PTSD more common following interpersonal violence and subthreshold PTSD more common following events happening to loved ones. Subthreshold DSM-5 PTSD is most usefully defined as meeting two or three of DSM-5 criteria B-E. Use of a consistent definition is critical to advance understanding of the prevalence, predictors, and clinical significance of subthreshold PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cadmium, Environmental Exposure, and Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Satarug, Soisungwan; Garrett, Scott H.; Sens, Mary Ann; Sens, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We provide an update of the issues surrounding health risk assessment of exposure to cadmium in food. Data sources We reviewed epidemiologic studies published between 2004 and 2009 concerning the bioavailability of cadmium in food, assessment of exposure, and body burden estimate, along with exposure-related effects in nonoccupationally exposed populations. Data extraction and synthesis Bioavailability of ingested cadmium has been confirmed in studies of persons with elevated dietary exposure, and the findings have been strengthened by the substantial amounts of cadmium accumulated in kidneys, eyes, and other tissues and organs of environmentally exposed individuals. We hypothesized that such accumulation results from the efficient absorption and systemic transport of cadmium, employing multiple transporters that are used for the body’s acquisition of calcium, iron, zinc, and manganese. Adverse effects of cadmium on kidney and bone have been observed in environmentally exposed populations at frequencies higher than those predicted from models of exposure. Increasing evidence implicates cadmium in the risk of diseases that involve other tissues and organ systems at cadmium concentrations that do not produce effects on bone or renal function. Conclusions Population data raise concerns about the validity of the current safe intake level that uses the kidney as the sole target in assessing the health risk from ingested cadmium. The data also question the validity of incorporating the default 5% absorption rate in the threshold-type risk assessment model, known as the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI), to derive a safe intake level for cadmium. PMID:20123617

  19. Occupational outcomes in soldiers hospitalized with mental health problems

    PubMed Central

    Fear, Nicola T.; Greenberg, Neil; Hull, Lisa; Wessely, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the longer term occupational outcome in UK military personnel who require hospital-based treatment for mental health problems. Aims To examine the documented occupational outcomes following hospital-based treatment for mental health problems within the British Army. Methods Hospital admission records were linked to occupational outcome data from a database used for personnel administration. Results A total of 384 records were identified that were then linked to occupational outcome after an episode of hospitalization. Seventy-four per cent of those admitted to hospital with mental health problems were discharged from the Army prematurely, and 73% of the discharges occurred in the first year following hospitalization. Discharge from the Army was associated with holding a junior rank, completing <5 years military service, having a combat role, being male and receiving community mental health team treatment prior to admission. Conclusions Hospitalization for a mental health problem in a military context is associated with a low rate of retention in service. Outcome was not influenced greatly by duration of hospital stay; however, those who reported receiving individual rather than group-based therapy while in hospital appeared to do better. PMID:19666961

  20. Children with Special Health Care Needs in CHIP: Access, Use, and Child and Family Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zickafoose, Joseph S; Smith, Kimberly V; Dye, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To assess how the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) affects outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). We used data from a survey of parents of recent and established CHIP enrollees conducted from January 2012 through March 2013 as part of a congressionally mandated evaluation of CHIP. We identified CSHCN in the sample using the Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative's CSHCN screener. We compared the health care experiences of established CHIP enrollees to the pre-enrollment experiences of previously uninsured and privately insured recent CHIP enrollees, controlling for observable characteristics. Parents of 4142 recent enrollees and 5518 established enrollees responded to the survey (response rates, 46% recent enrollees and 51% established enrollees). In the 10 survey states, about one-fourth of CHIP enrollees had a special health care need. Compared to being uninsured, parents of CSHCN who were established CHIP enrollees reported greater access to and use of medical and dental care, less difficulty meeting their child's health care needs, fewer unmet needs, and better dental health status for their child. Compared to having private insurance, parents of CSHCN who were established CHIP enrollees reported similar levels of access to and use of medical and dental care and unmet needs, and less difficulty meeting their child's health care needs. CHIP has significant benefits for eligible CSHCN and their families compared to being uninsured and appears to have some benefits compared to private insurance. Copyright © 2015 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Benchmarks for health expenditures, services and outcomes in Africa during the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Peters, D H; Elmendorf, A E; Kandola, K; Chellaraj, G

    2000-01-01

    There is limited information on national health expenditures, services, and outcomes in African countries during the 1990s. We intend to make statistical information available for national level comparisons. National level data were collected from numerous international databases, and supplemented by national household surveys and World Bank expenditure reviews. The results were tabulated and analysed in an exploratory fashion to provide benchmarks for groupings of African countries and individual country comparison. There is wide variation in scale and outcome of health care spending between African countries, with poorer countries tending to do worse than wealthier ones. From 1990-96, the median annual per capita government expenditure on health was nearly US$ 6, but averaged US$ 3 in the lowest-income countries, compared to US$ 72 in middle-income countries. Similar trends were found for health services and outcomes. Results from individual countries (particularly Ethiopia, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire and Gabon) are used to indicate how the data can be used to identify areas of improvement in health system performance. Serious gaps in data, particularly concerning private sector delivery and financing, health service utilization, equity and efficiency measures, hinder more effective health management. Nonetheless, the data are useful for providing benchmarks for performance and for crudely identifying problem areas in health systems for individual countries.

  2. Benchmarks for health expenditures, services and outcomes in Africa during the 1990s.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, D. H.; Elmendorf, A. E.; Kandola, K.; Chellaraj, G.

    2000-01-01

    There is limited information on national health expenditures, services, and outcomes in African countries during the 1990s. We intend to make statistical information available for national level comparisons. National level data were collected from numerous international databases, and supplemented by national household surveys and World Bank expenditure reviews. The results were tabulated and analysed in an exploratory fashion to provide benchmarks for groupings of African countries and individual country comparison. There is wide variation in scale and outcome of health care spending between African countries, with poorer countries tending to do worse than wealthier ones. From 1990-96, the median annual per capita government expenditure on health was nearly US$ 6, but averaged US$ 3 in the lowest-income countries, compared to US$ 72 in middle-income countries. Similar trends were found for health services and outcomes. Results from individual countries (particularly Ethiopia, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire and Gabon) are used to indicate how the data can be used to identify areas of improvement in health system performance. Serious gaps in data, particularly concerning private sector delivery and financing, health service utilization, equity and efficiency measures, hinder more effective health management. Nonetheless, the data are useful for providing benchmarks for performance and for crudely identifying problem areas in health systems for individual countries. PMID:10916913

  3. Socioeconomic Status and Health Communication Inequalities in Japan: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshiki; Nishiuchi, Hiromu; Hayashi, Hana; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2012-01-01

    Background Considerable evidence suggests that communication inequality is one potential mechanism linking social determinants, particularly socioeconomic status, and health inequalities. This study aimed to examine how dimensions of health communication outcomes (health information seeking, self-efficacy, exposure, and trust) are patterned by socioeconomic status in Japan. Methods Data of a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of 2,455 people aged 15–75 years in Japan were used for secondary analysis. Measures included socio-demographic characteristics, subjective health, recent health information seeking, self-efficacy in seeking health information, and exposure to and trust in health information from different media. Results A total of 1,311 participants completed the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 53.6%. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that education and household income, but not employment, were significantly associated with health information seeking and self-efficacy. Socioeconomic status was not associated with exposure to and trust in health information from mass media, but was significantly associated with health information from healthcare providers and the Internet. Conclusion Health communication outcomes were patterned by socioeconomic status in Japan thus demonstrating the prevalence of health communication inequalities. Providing customized exposure to and enhancing the quality of health information by considering social determinants may contribute to addressing social disparities in health in Japan. PMID:22808229

  4. Labour market outcomes of public health graduates: evidence from Australia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ian W; Awofeso, Niyi

    2014-09-01

    Little information is available on the public health workforce. This study contributes to the gap in the literature and examines the demographic characteristics, career destinations and earnings of Masters in Public Health (MPH) graduates in Australia, using data from the 1999-2009 waves of the Graduate Destination Survey. It was found that public health graduates had a high amount of female representation and very low proportions of indigenous representation. Public health graduates experienced a relatively low unemployment rate and 85% were employed within 120 days of graduation. However, close to half of the graduates did not work in the health industry or in health-related roles. The mean salaries of public health graduates working in public health roles were relatively low compared to those in other occupations, but they had a range comparable to that observed for public health professionals in the USA and were higher than those of other Masters graduates in some other health fields. The results indicate strong demand and positive employment prospects for public health graduates in Australia. Strategies to target recruitment and/or retention of female or indigenous graduates in the public health workforce should be a priority. Mapping of public health graduate destinations and employment prospects should might be prioritised, given its strong potential to facilitate workforce planning and provide potential public health workers with more comprehensive career trajectories. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

  5. National Surveys of Population Health: Big Data Analytics for Mobile Health Monitors.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Bruce R

    2015-12-01

    At the core of the healthcare crisis is fundamental lack of actionable data. Such data could stratify individuals within populations to predict which persons have which outcomes. If baselines existed for all variations of all conditions, then managing health could be improved by matching the measuring of individuals to their cohort in the population. The scale required for complete baselines involves effective National Surveys of Population Health (NSPH). Traditionally, these have been focused upon acute medicine, measuring people to contain the spread of epidemics. In recent decades, the focus has moved to chronic conditions as well, which require smaller measures over longer times. NSPH have long utilized quality of life questionnaires. Mobile Health Monitors, where computing technologies eliminate manual administration, provide richer data sets for health measurement. Older technologies of telephone interviews will be replaced by newer technologies of smartphone sensors to provide deeper individual measures at more frequent timings across larger-sized populations. Such continuous data can provide personal health records, supporting treatment guidelines specialized for population cohorts. Evidence-based medicine will become feasible by leveraging hundreds of millions of persons carrying mobile devices interacting with Internet-scale services for Big Data Analytics.

  6. National Surveys of Population Health: Big Data Analytics for Mobile Health Monitors

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Bruce R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract At the core of the healthcare crisis is fundamental lack of actionable data. Such data could stratify individuals within populations to predict which persons have which outcomes. If baselines existed for all variations of all conditions, then managing health could be improved by matching the measuring of individuals to their cohort in the population. The scale required for complete baselines involves effective National Surveys of Population Health (NSPH). Traditionally, these have been focused upon acute medicine, measuring people to contain the spread of epidemics. In recent decades, the focus has moved to chronic conditions as well, which require smaller measures over longer times. NSPH have long utilized quality of life questionnaires. Mobile Health Monitors, where computing technologies eliminate manual administration, provide richer data sets for health measurement. Older technologies of telephone interviews will be replaced by newer technologies of smartphone sensors to provide deeper individual measures at more frequent timings across larger-sized populations. Such continuous data can provide personal health records, supporting treatment guidelines specialized for population cohorts. Evidence-based medicine will become feasible by leveraging hundreds of millions of persons carrying mobile devices interacting with Internet-scale services for Big Data Analytics. PMID:26858915

  7. Health Status of Older US Workers and Nonworkers, National Health Interview Survey, 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Kachan, Diana; Fleming, Lora E; Christ, Sharon; Muennig, Peter; Prado, Guillermo; Tannenbaum, Stacey L; Yang, Xuan; Caban-Martinez, Alberto J; Lee, David J

    2015-09-24

    Many US workers are increasingly delaying retirement from work, which may be leading to an increase in chronic disease at the workplace. We examined the association of older adults' health status with their employment/occupation and other characteristics. National Health Interview Survey data from 1997 through 2011 were pooled for adults aged 65 or older (n = 83,338; mean age, 74.6 y). Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to estimate the association of socioeconomic factors and health behaviors with 4 health status measures: 1) self-rated health (fair/poor vs good/very good/excellent); 2) multimorbidity (≤1 vs ≥2 chronic conditions); 3) multiple functional limitations (≤1 vs ≥2); and 4) Health and Activities Limitation Index (HALex) (below vs above 20th percentile). Analyses were stratified by sex and age (young-old vs old-old) where interactions with occupation were significant. Employed older adults had better health outcomes than unemployed older adults. Physically demanding occupations had the lowest risk of poor health outcomes, suggesting a stronger healthy worker effect: service workers were at lowest risk of multiple functional limitations (odds ratio [OR], 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.95); and blue-collar workers were at lowest risk of multimorbidity (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.74-0.97) and multiple functional limitation (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.98). Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanic whites to report fair/poor health (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.52-1.73) and lowest HALex quintile (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.13-1.30); however, they were less likely to report multimorbidity (OR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.73-0.83) or multiple functional limitations (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.77-0.88). A strong association exists between employment and health status in older adults beyond what can be explained by socioeconomic factors (eg, education, income) or health behaviors (eg, smoking). Disability accommodations in the workplace could encourage employment

  8. Healthy sex and sexual health: new directions for studying outcomes of sexual health.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitz, Eva S; Vasilenko, Sara A

    2014-01-01

    Sexual behavior is an important aspect of adolescent development with implications for well-being. These chapters highlight important perspectives on studying sexual health from a normative, developmental perspective, such as viewing a range of sexual behaviors as life events; considering potentially positive physical health, mental health, social health, and identity outcomes; examining both intraindividual and interindividual differences in outcomes; recognizing the romantic relationship context of sexual behavior; and understanding how sexual media may impact sexual health outcomes. We suggest new directions for studying sexual health outcomes, such as studying behaviors beyond vaginal sex and condom use, new methodologies such as latent class analysis, sophisticated longitudinal designs, and collection and analysis of dyadic data. We recommend research on populations underrepresented in sexual health research such as late adolescents who do not attend traditional universities and adolescents from ethnic/racial minorities. Finally, we consider future directions for sexuality education and prevention efforts.

  9. Resilience in Adolescence, Health, and Psychosocial Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brody, Gene H; Yu, Tianyi; Miller, Gregory E; Chen, Edith

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to determine whether black adolescents from disadvantaged backgrounds who have an unrelenting determination to succeed would, as adults, show "skin-deep resilience" by faring well in psychosocial domains but also show a heightened chance of having a chronic disease, specifically type 2 diabetes. Secondary data analyses were executed with the use of waves 1 and 4 of the US Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). At wave 1, when participants were age 16, data were obtained on a behavioral style termed "striving." Striving includes high aspirations, unwavering persistence, investment in education, and avoidance of activities that sidetrack success. At wave 4, when participants were age 29, college graduation, personal income, symptoms of depression, and type 2 diabetes status were assessed. Black and non-Hispanic white youth who displayed striving during adolescence evinced, at age 29, a higher likelihood of college graduation, greater personal income, and fewer symptoms of depression than did nonstrivers. Among black participants, the findings were consistent with the "skin-deep resilience" pattern for type 2 diabetes. High-striving black adolescents in the most disadvantaged families had a greater likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes during adulthood than did similar high-striving black adolescents living in more privileged families. The skin-deep resilience pattern did not emerge among non-Hispanic white participants. This study is the first to show that an unrelenting determination to succeed among black adolescents from disadvantaged backgrounds forecasts an elevated risk of developing type 2 diabetes during adulthood. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. Are low income patients receiving the benefits of electronic health records? A statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew J; Harootunian, Gevork; Johnson, William G

    2013-06-01

    There are concerns that physicians serving low-income, Medicaid patients, in the United States are less likely to adopt electronic health records and, if so, that Medicaid patients will be denied the benefits from electronic health record use. This study seeks to determine whether physicians treating Medicaid patients were less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Physician surveys completed during physicians' license renewal process in Arizona were merged with the physician licensing data and Medicaid administrative claims data. Survey responses were received from 50.7 percent (6,780 out of 13,380) of all physicians practicing in Arizona. Physician survey responses were used to identify whether the physician used electronic health records and the degree to which the physician exchanged electronic health records with other health-care providers. Medicaid claims data were used to identify which physicians provided health care to Medicaid beneficiaries. The primary outcome of interest was whether Medicaid providers were more or less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate average marginal effects. In multivariate analysis, physicians with 20 or more Medicaid patients during the survey cycle were 4.1 percent more likely to use an electronic health record and 5.2 percent more likely to be able to transmit electronic health records to at least one health-care provider outside of their practice. These effects increase in magnitude when the analysis is restricted to solo practice physicians This is the first study to find a pro-Medicaid gap in electronic health record adoption suggesting that the low income patients served by Arizona's Health Care Cost Containment System are not at a disadvantage with regard to electronic health record access and that Arizona's model of promoting electronic health record adoption merits further study.

  11. Identifying and assessing strategies for evaluating the impact of mobile eye health units on health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shiwan; Turner, Angus; Tan, Irene; Muir, Josephine

    2017-08-14

    To identify and assess strategies for evaluating the impact of mobile eye health units on health outcomes. Systematic literature review. Worldwide. Peer-reviewed journal articles that included the use of a mobile eye health unit. Journal articles were included if outcome measures reflected an assessment of the impact of a mobile eye health unit on health outcomes. Six studies were identified with mobile services offering diabetic retinopathy screening (three studies), optometric services (two studies) and orthoptic services (one study). This review identified and assessed strategies in existing literature used to evaluate the impact of mobile eye health units on health outcomes. Studies included in this review used patient outcomes (i.e. disease detection, vision impairment, treatment compliance) and/or service delivery outcomes (i.e. cost per attendance, hospital transport use, inappropriate referrals, time from diabetic retinopathy photography to treatment) to evaluate the impact of mobile eye health units. Limitations include difficulty proving causation of specific outcome measures and the overall shortage of impact evaluation studies. Variation in geographical location, service population and nature of eye care providers limits broad application. © 2017 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  12. Functional Health Literacy, Chemotherapy Decisions, and Patient Outcomes within a Cohort of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Evan L.; Martin, Christopher; DeWalt, Darren A.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Functional health literacy—including the ability to read or understand medication labels, physician instructions, and educational materials—is essential for self-management of chronic diseases and preventive health behaviors. Cancer patients with low health literacy may be at greater risk for worse care and outcomes. Methods We assessed health literacy using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) in 347 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients nested within a prospective observational study of system, provider, and patient characteristics influencing cancer outcomes. Results We found that having adequate health literacy increased the chances that Stage III/IV patients received chemotherapy (odds ratio [OR] = 3.29, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.23, 8.80) but had no effect on cancer stage at diagnosis or vital status at last observation during post-enrollment follow-up. Examining survey responses among Stage III and IV patients, we found no differences by health literacy status regarding patient beliefs and preferences about chemotherapy, nor in patients’ roles in deciding whether to receive chemotherapy. Conclusions Patients with lower health literacy were less likely to receive chemotherapy compared with patients with higher health literacy. Clearer communication around such key healthcare decisions may lead to less disparities by health literacy level. PMID:25504283

  13. Residential Proximity to Environmental Hazards and Adverse Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Maantay, Juliana A.; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2011-01-01

    How living near environmental hazards contributes to poorer health and disproportionate health outcomes is an ongoing concern. We conducted a substantive review and critique of the literature regarding residential proximity to environmental hazards and adverse pregnancy outcomes, childhood cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses, end-stage renal disease, and diabetes. Several studies have found that living near hazardous wastes sites, industrial sites, cropland with pesticide applications, highly trafficked roads, nuclear power plants, and gas stations or repair shops is related to an increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Government agencies should consider these findings in establishing rules and permitting and enforcement procedures to reduce pollution from environmentally burdensome facilities and land uses. PMID:22028451

  14. High Intensity Interval Training for Maximizing Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger-Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    2017-04-03

    Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes. The primary objective of this review is to discuss how aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as compared to moderate continuous training may maximize outcomes, and to provide practical advices for successful clinical and home-based HIIT.

  15. It Gets Better: Resolution of Internalized Homophobia over Time and Associations with Positive Health Outcomes among MSM

    PubMed Central

    Herrick, Amy L.; Stall, Ron; Chmiel, Joan S.; Guadamuz, Thomas E.; Penniman, Typhanye; Shoptaw, Steven; Ostrow, David; Plankey, Michael w.

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities research among gay and bisexual men has focused primarily on risk and deficits. However, a focus on resiliencies within this population may greatly benefit health promotion. We describe a pattern of resilience (internalized homophobia (IHP) resolution) over the life-course and its associations with current health outcomes. 1,541 gay and bisexual men from the Multi-Center AIDS Cohort study, an ongoing prospective study of the natural and treated histories of HIV, completed a survey about life-course events thought to be related to health. The majority of men resolved IHP over time independent of demographics. Men who resolved IHP had significantly higher odds of positive health outcomes compared to those who did not. These results provide evidence of resilience among participants that is associated with positive health outcomes. Understanding resiliencies and incorporating them into interventions may help to promote health and well-being among gay and bisexual men. PMID:23283578

  16. It gets better: resolution of internalized homophobia over time and associations with positive health outcomes among MSM.

    PubMed

    Herrick, Amy L; Stall, Ron; Chmiel, Joan S; Guadamuz, Thomas E; Penniman, Typhanye; Shoptaw, Steven; Ostrow, David; Plankey, Michael W

    2013-05-01

    Health disparities research among gay and bisexual men has focused primarily on risk and deficits. However, a focus on resiliencies within this population may greatly benefit health promotion. We describe a pattern of resilience (internalized homophobia (IHP) resolution) over the life-course and its associations with current health outcomes. 1,541 gay and bisexual men from the Multi-Center AIDS Cohort study, an ongoing prospective study of the natural and treated histories of HIV, completed a survey about life-course events thought to be related to health. The majority of men resolved IHP over time independent of demographics. Men who resolved IHP had significantly higher odds of positive health outcomes compared to those who did not. These results provide evidence of resilience among participants that is associated with positive health outcomes. Understanding resiliencies and incorporating them into interventions may help to promote health and well-being among gay and bisexual men.

  17. Integrating Data Collection Into Office Work Flow and Electronic Health Records for Clinical Outcomes Research.

    PubMed

    Colaianni, C Alessandra; Levesque, Patricia A; Lindsay, Robin W

    2017-09-14

    Meticulous collection of clinical outcomes metrics in patients undergoing elective surgery is important to ensure quality care; it is also increasing in importance as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services moves to tie reimbursement to outcomes and insurance approval. This study assesses a systematic method for gathering preoperative and postoperative data on patients with nasal obstruction who undergo functional septorhinoplasty that was developed at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. The electronic database was initiated in July 2013, patients continue to be actively enrolled, and follow-up data continue to be collected. This procedure represents a systematic method for the initial visit evaluation, collection of patient-reported outcome measures, documentation of surgical management, and follow-up of patients. For consistency and ease of data collection, as well as data interpretation, this method is integrated into a RedCap survey database and the institution's electronic health record system. During the 4 years that this process has been in place, outcomes data have been collected on more than 1000 patients at 7 time points to create an institutional database. This system allows the tracking of patients' outcomes data and the mining of the institutional database for future research. As Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services moves from a volume-driven health care model to a value-driven health care model, demonstration of measurable outcomes in patients undergoing elective surgery will be of paramount importance.

  18. Frequency of yoga practice predicts health: results of a national survey of yoga practitioners.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alyson; Friedmann, Erika; Bevans, Margaret; Thomas, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Background. Yoga shows promise as a therapeutic intervention, but relationships between yoga practice and health are underexplored. Purpose. To examine the relationship between yoga practice and health (subjective well-being, diet, BMI, smoking, alcohol/caffeine consumption, sleep, fatigue, social support, mindfulness, and physical activity). Methods. Cross-sectional, anonymous internet surveys distributed to 4307 randomly selected from 18,160 individuals at 15 US Iyengar yoga studios; 1045 (24.3%) surveys completed. Results. Mean age 51.7 (± 11.7) years; 84.2% female. Frequency of home practice favorably predicted (P < .001): mindfulness, subjective well-being, BMI, fruit and vegetable consumption, vegetarian status, sleep, and fatigue. Each component of yoga practice (different categories of physical poses, breath work, meditation, philosophy study) predicted at least 1 health outcome (P < .05). Conclusions. Home practice of yoga predicted health better than years of practice or class frequency. Different physical poses and yoga techniques may have unique health benefits.

  19. Readiness for meaningful use of health information technology and patient centered medical home recognition survey results.

    PubMed

    Shin, Peter; Sharac, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Determine the factors that impact HIT use and MU readiness for community health centers (CHCs). The HITECH Act allocates funds to Medicaid and Medicare providers to encourage the adoption of electronic health records (EHR), in an effort to improve health care quality and patient outcomes, and to reduce health care costs. We surveyed CHCs on their Readiness for Meaningful Use (MU) of Health Information Technology (HIT) and Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Recognition, then we combined responses with 2009 Uniform Data System data to determine which factors impact use of HIT and MU readiness. Nearly 70% of CHCs had full or partial EHR adoption at the time of survey. Results are presented for centers with EHR adoption, by the length of time that their EHR systems have been in operation.

  20. The Healthy People 2010 outcomes for the care of children with special health care needs: an effective national policy for meeting mental health care needs?

    PubMed

    Spears, Amanda P

    2010-05-01

    To assess the effectiveness of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's (MCHB) Six Core Outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) as indicators in measuring the degree to which mental health care needs are met. This study analyzes data from the 2001 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs for 9,748 CSHCN who needed mental health care. Bivariate and logistic analyses were employed to investigate the impact of the MCHB's Six Core Outcomes on the probability of having an unmet need for mental health services. Of the 2.3 million CSHCN in the U.S. who needed mental health care in 2001, almost one-fifth did not receive all of the mental health services that they needed. Ultimately, eight Outcomes and sub-categories of Outcomes were considered. Sixty-one percent of CSHCN with a need for mental health care had care that fulfills six of the eight considered Outcomes. Logistic analysis indicates that individual fulfillment of each of the Core Outcomes and fulfillment of additional Outcomes have a significant association with reducing the probability of having an unmet mental health care need for CSHCN. This study is the first attempt to apply the Six Core Outcomes to meeting the needs for mental health care among CSHCN. Estimates of unmet need for mental health care suggest that efforts can be made to improve access for CSHCN. The initial estimates generated by this study indicate that the MCHB Outcomes are important in meeting children's mental health needs and are important indicators for informing MCHB policy.

  1. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Outcomes Among American Indians in Oklahoma: the THRIVE Study.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Wetherill, Marianna; Hearod, Jordan; Jacob, Tvli; Salvatore, Alicia L; Cannady, Tamela; Grammar, Mandy; Standridge, Joy; Fox, Jill; Spiegel, Jennifer; Wiley, AnDina; Noonan, Carolyn; Buchwald, Dedra

    2016-12-06

    Limited available data document higher prevalences of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and health outcomes among American Indians (AIs) compared to other racial/ethnic groups. As part of a randomized control trial to improve tribal food and physical activity environments, our tribal-academic partnership surveyed a cross-sectional sample of American Indian adults (n = 513) to assess the prevalence of type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, tobacco use, physical activity, and vegetable and fruit intake. Surveys were collected from April through May 2015. We used logistic regression to examine the association between CVD-related risk factors and health outcomes. The prevalence of CVD-related outcomes was high, ranging from 25% for diabetes to 75% for low vegetable intake. The prevalence of diabetes, obesity, and hypertension tended to be higher among participants with any tobacco use compared to no tobacco use, but findings were not statistically significant. The prevalence of diabetes (prevalence ratio 2.1, 95% CI 1.4-3.2) and obesity (prevalence ratio 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-1.8) was higher among participants with low physical activity levels compared to recommended physical activity levels. CVD risk factors and health outcomes persist among American Indians even as some risks (e.g., smoking) appear to be stabilizing or even declining in the general US population. Efforts to include American Indians in national health surveys, implement broad reaching environmental and policy interventions, and address the social determinants of health are critical to the elimination of these disparities.

  2. Mental health outcomes among vulnerable residents after Hurricane Sandy: implications for disaster research and planning.

    PubMed

    Boscarino, Joseph A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Adams, Richard E; Figley, Charles R; Solhkhah, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate mental health outcomes among New Jersey shore residents with health impairments and disabilities after Hurricane Sandy. Six months following Hurricane Sandy, a cross-sectional survey of 200 adults residing in beach communities directly exposed to the storm located in Monmouth County, NJ, was conducted. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, mental health service use, and medication use. The average age of residents surveyed was 59 years (SD = 13.7) and 52.5 percent (95% CI = 45.5-59.4) reported recent hospitalizations, physical limitations, fair to poor health status, multiple chronic health conditions, or physical disabilities. A total of 14.5 percent (95% CI = 10.2-20.1) of residents screened positive for PTSD and 6.0 percent (95% CI = 3.1-10.2) met criteria for depression 6 months after Sandy. In addition, 20.5 percent (95% CI = 15.4-26.7) sought some type of professional counseling after Sandy and 30.5 percent (95% CI = 24.5-37.3) experienced PTSD symptoms, depression, sought professional mental health support, or used psychotropic medications. In multivariate analyses, the best predictors of mental health and service use were having sleep problems, suicidal thoughts, moderate or severe pain, and having high exposure hurricane-related events. Analyses also suggested that noncollege graduates were more likely to receive mental health services (OR = 3.10, p = 0.009), while women were less likely to have depression (OR = 0.12, p = 0.038). Having physical impairments and health conditions were not directly related to adverse mental health outcomes following Sandy, but having sleep problems, pain, or suicidal thoughts were. Further research is needed to assess the health status of community residents with serious health impairments over time following disasters.

  3. Population health outcome models in suicide prevention policy.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Frances L

    2014-09-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death in the U.S. and results in immense suffering and significant cost. Effective suicide prevention interventions could reduce this burden, but policy makers need estimates of health outcomes achieved by alternative interventions to focus implementation efforts. To illustrate the utility of health outcome models to help in achieving goals defined by the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention's Research Prioritization Task Force. The approach is illustrated specifically with psychotherapeutic interventions to prevent suicide reattempt in emergency department settings. A health outcome model using decision analysis with secondary data was applied to estimate suicide attempts and deaths averted from evidence-based interventions. Under optimal conditions, the model estimated that over 1 year, implementing evidence-based psychotherapeutic interventions in emergency departments could decrease the number of suicide attempts by 18,737, and if offered over 5 years, it could avert 109,306 attempts. Over 1 year, the model estimated 2,498 fewer deaths from suicide, and over 5 years, about 13,928 fewer suicide deaths. Health outcome models could aid in suicide prevention policy by helping focus implementation efforts. Further research developing more sophisticated models of the impact of suicide prevention interventions that include a more complex understanding of suicidal behavior, longer time frames, and inclusion of additional outcomes that capture the full benefits and costs of interventions would be helpful next steps. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Adverse staff health outcomes associated with endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Gutterman, Elane; Jorgensen, Lindsay; Mitchell, Amber; Fua, Sherry

    2013-01-01

    There are occupational challenges associated with cleaning, disinfecting, storing, and transporting flexible endoscopes. Although the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set standards to protect the safety of health workers in the United States, the standards are not specific to endoscope reprocessing, and the general standards that are in place are not fully implemented. Furthermore, adverse staff outcomes may not be fully preventable. To assess the evidence for adverse outcomes in staff associated with endoscope reprocessing, a literature review was performed in the PubMed database for articles on this topic published between Jan. 1, 2007 and March 7, 2012. Eight studies were identified, mainly European, which reported numerous adverse outcomes to healthcare personnel associated with endoscope reprocessing including respiratory ailments and physical discomfort. More scientifically rigorous studies are required to comprehensively describe adverse health outcomes in personnel engaged in reprocessing, particularly in the United States, and examine whether increased automation of the reprocessing process leads to decreased adverse health outcomes for staff.

  5. Dietary Behaviors in Psoriasis: Patient-Reported Outcomes from a U.S. National Survey.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ladan; Danesh, Melissa J; Lee, Kristina M; Beroukhim, Kevin; Farahnik, Benjamin; Ahn, Richard S; Yan, Di; Singh, Rasnik K; Nakamura, Mio; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson

    2017-06-01

    Psoriasis patients demonstrate high interest in the role of diet on their skin condition. However, data are lacking to describe dietary interventions among psoriasis patients and associated outcomes. This study aims to identify common dietary habits, interventions and perceptions among patients with psoriasis, and to examine patient-reported skin outcomes in response to these interventions. We administered a 61-question survey to the National Psoriasis Foundation membership asking psoriasis patients about dietary habits, modifications, skin responses, and perceptions. A total of 1206 psoriasis patients responded to the survey. Compared to age- and sex-matched controls, psoriasis patients consumed significantly less sugar, whole grain fiber, dairy, and calcium (p < 0.001), while consuming more fruits, vegetables, and legumes (p < 0.01). Eighty-six percent of respondents reported use of a dietary modification. The percentage of patients reporting skin improvement was greatest after reducing alcohol (53.8%), gluten (53.4%), nightshades (52.1%), and after adding fish oil/omega-3 (44.6%), vegetables (42.5%), and oral vitamin D (41%). Specific diets with the most patients reporting a favorable skin response were Pagano (72.2%), vegan (70%), and Paleolithic (68.9%). Additionally, 41.8% of psoriasis respondents reported that a motivation for attempting dietary changes was to improve overall health. This national survey is among the first to report the dietary behaviors of patients with psoriasis. The data provided from this large cohort may benefit patients and clinicians as they discuss the role of diet in managing both psoriasis and associated cardiometabolic comorbidities.

  6. Health Literacy as a Social Determinant of Health in Asian American Immigrants: Findings from a Population-Based Survey in California.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Yun; Rhee, Taeho Greg; Kim, Nam Keol; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2015-08-01

    Asian American immigrants have a lower level of health literacy than non-Latino whites, but their level of health literacy and its impact on health outcomes may differ among subgroups. We investigated the level of health literacy across five subgroups of Asian American immigrants and explored the association between health literacy and self-rated health status and symptoms of depression. We utilized a cross-sectional survey research design and a population-based sampling strategy using the 2007 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). We sampled 30,615 non-Latino whites and 3,053 Asian American immigrants (1,058 Chinese, 598 Koreans, 534 Filipinos, 416 South Asians, and 447 Vietnamese). We used two questions as proxy measures to assess the level of health literacy in non-Latino whites and in both aggregated and disaggregated Asian American immigrant groups. We then investigated the effect of health literacy on two main health outcomes: self-rated health status and depression symptoms. The level of health literacy varied across the five subgroups of Asian American immigrants. Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese groups had the lowest levels of health literacy, while Filipinos showed the highest level. Health literacy was positively correlated with health status in Chinese and Korean immigrants, and negatively correlated with depression symptoms in Korean and South Asian immigrants. We found heterogeneity in health literacy among Asian American immigrants and found that health literacy had varying associations with health outcomes. The aggregated Asian American immigrant group results may mask the true health disparities that each Asian American immigrant group faces. Koreans were the only group found to have a significant association between the proxy for health literacy and both health outcomes. Further research is needed to better understand the causes of heterogeneity and to investigate health literacy as a critical determinant of immigrant health.

  7. Challenges and Innovations in Surveying the Governmental Public Health Workforce.

    PubMed

    Leider, Jonathon P; Shah, Gulzar; Rider, Nikki; Beck, Angela; Castrucci, Brian C; Harris, Jenine K; Sellers, Katie; Varda, Danielle; Ye, Jiali; Erwin, Paul C; Brownson, Ross C

    2016-11-01

    Surveying governmental public health practitioners is a critical means of collecting data about public health organizations, their staff, and their partners. A greater focus on evidence-based practices, practice-based systems research, and evaluation has resulted in practitioners consistently receiving requests to participate in myriad surveys. This can result in a substantial survey burden for practitioners and declining response rates for researchers. This is potentially damaging to practitioners and researchers as well as the field of public health more broadly. We have examined recent developments in survey research, especially issues highly relevant for public health practice. We have also proposed a process by which researchers can engage with practitioners and practitioner groups on research questions of mutual interest.

  8. Challenges and Innovations in Surveying the Governmental Public Health Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gulzar; Rider, Nikki; Beck, Angela; Castrucci, Brian C.; Harris, Jenine K.; Sellers, Katie; Varda, Danielle; Ye, Jiali; Erwin, Paul C.; Brownson, Ross C.

    2016-01-01

    Surveying governmental public health practitioners is a critical means of collecting data about public health organizations, their staff, and their partners. A greater focus on evidence-based practices, practice-based systems research, and evaluation has resulted in practitioners consistently receiving requests to participate in myriad surveys. This can result in a substantial survey burden for practitioners and declining response rates for researchers. This is potentially damaging to practitioners and researchers as well as the field of public health more broadly. We have examined recent developments in survey research, especially issues highly relevant for public health practice. We have also proposed a process by which researchers can engage with practitioners and practitioner groups on research questions of mutual interest. PMID:27715307

  9. The Saskatchewan rural health study: an application of a population health framework to understand respiratory health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Respiratory disease can impose a significant burden on the health of rural populations. The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study (SRHS) is a new large prospective cohort study of ages 6 and over currently being conducted in farming and non-farming communities to evaluate potential health determinants associated with respiratory outcomes in rural populations. In this article, we describe the rationale and methodology for the adult component. The study is being conducted over 5 years (2009–15) in two phases, baseline and longitudinal. The baseline survey consists of two components, adults and children. The adult component consists of a questionnaire-based evaluation of individual and contextual factors of importance to respiratory health in two sub populations (a Farm Cohort and a Small Town Cohort) of rural families in Saskatchewan Rural Municipalities (RMs). Clinical studies of lung function and allergy tests are being conducted on selected sub-samples of the two cohorts based on the positive response to the last question on the baseline questionnaire: “Would you be willing to be contacted about having breathing and/or allergy tests at a nearby location?”. We adopted existing population health theory to evaluate individual factors, contextual factors, and principal covariates on the outcomes of chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and obstructive sleep apnea. Findings Of the RMs selected to participate, 32 (89%) out of 36 RMs and 15 (94%) out of 16 small towns within the RMs agreed to participate. Using the mail out survey method developed by Dillman, we obtained completed questionnaires from 4264 households (8261 individuals). We obtained lung function measurements on 1609 adults, allergy skin test information on 1615 adults; both measurements were available on 1549 adults. We observed differences between farm and non-farm rural residents with respect to individual, contextual factors and covariates. Discussion There are

  10. Smoking and Adverse Maternal and Child Health Outcomes in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Numerous studies from high-income countries document the causal relationship between cigarette smoking during pregnancy and adverse maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes. Less research has been conducted in low and middle income countries, but a burgeoning literature can be found for Brazil. Methods: We review Brazilian studies of the prevalence of maternal smoking, the relative risk of smoking-attributable adverse MCH outcomes, and present new estimates for these outcomes, using the attributable fraction method. Results: We found that Brazilian studies of the relative risks of smoking-attributable adverse MCH outcomes were broadly consistent with previous reviews. Based on a comparison of maternal smoking over time, smoking during pregnancy has declined by about 50% over the last 20 years in Brazil. For 2008, we estimate that 5,352 cases of spontaneous abortion, 10,929 cases of preterm birth, 20,717 cases of low birth weight, and 29 cases of sudden infant death syndrome are attributable to maternal smoking. Between 1989 and 2008, the percent of smoking-attributable adverse MCH outcomes in Brazil was at least halved. Conclusions: The results show that over a 20-year period, during which Brazil implemented numerous effective tobacco control measures, the country experienced a dramatic decrease in both maternal smoking prevalence and smoking-attributable adverse MCH outcomes. Countries that implement effective tobacco control measures can expect to reduce both maternal smoking and adverse MCH outcomes, thereby improving the public health. PMID:23873977

  11. ADHD and Health Services Utilization in the National Health Interview Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuffe, Steven P.; Moore, Charity G.; McKeown, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Describe the general health, comorbidities and health service use among U.S. children with ADHD. Method: The 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) contained the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; used to determine probable ADHD), data on medical problems, overall health, and health care utilization. Results: Asthma…

  12. ADHD and Health Services Utilization in the National Health Interview Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuffe, Steven P.; Moore, Charity G.; McKeown, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Describe the general health, comorbidities and health service use among U.S. children with ADHD. Method: The 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) contained the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; used to determine probable ADHD), data on medical problems, overall health, and health care utilization. Results: Asthma…

  13. A Systematic Review of Personality Disorders and Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L.; Whalen, Diana J.; Layden, Brianne K.; Chapman, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    Personality disorders have been associated with a wide swath of adverse health outcomes and correspondingly high costs to healthcare systems. To date, however, there has not been a systematic review of the literature on health conditions among individuals with personality disorders. The primary aim of this article is to review research documenting the associations between personality disorders and health conditions. A systematic review of the literature revealed 78 unique empirical English-language peer-reviewed articles examining the association of personality disorders and health outcomes over the past 15 years. Specifically, we reviewed research examining the association of personality disorders with sleep disturbance, obesity, pain conditions, and other chronic health conditions. In addition, we evaluated research on candidate mechanisms underlying health problems in personality disorders and potential treatments for such disorders. Results underscore numerous deleterious health outcomes associated with PD features and PD diagnoses, and suggest potential biological and behavioural factors that may account for these relations. Guidelines for future research in this area are discussed. PMID:26456998

  14. Driving: A Road to Unhealthy Lifestyles and Poor Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ding; Gebel, Klaus; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Bauman, Adrian E.; Merom, Dafna

    2014-01-01

    Background Driving is a common part of modern society, but its potential effects on health are not well understood. Purpose The present cross-sectional study (n = 37,570) examined the associations of driving time with a series of health behaviors and outcomes in a large population sample of middle-aged and older adults using data from the Social, Economic, and Environmental Factor Study conducted in New South Wales, Australia, in 2010. Methods Multiple logistic regression was used in 2013 to examine the associations of usual daily driving time with health-related behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep) and outcomes (obesity, general health, quality of life, psychological distress, time stress, social functioning), adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics. Results Findings suggested that longer driving time was associated with higher odds for smoking, insufficient physical activity, short sleep, obesity, and worse physical and mental health. The associations consistently showed a dose-response pattern and more than 120 minutes of driving per day had the strongest and most consistent associations with the majority of outcomes. Conclusion This study highlights driving as a potential lifestyle risk factor for public health. More population-level multidisciplinary research is needed to understand the mechanism of how driving affects health. PMID:24911017

  15. Paths to Success: Optimal and Equitable Health Outcomes for All

    PubMed Central

    Rust, George; Levine, Robert S.; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne; Baltrus, Peter; Ye, Jiali; Mack, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    U.S. health disparities are real, pervasive, and persistent, despite dramatic improvements in civil rights and economic opportunity for racial and ethnic minority and lower socioeconomic groups in the United States. Change is possible, however. Disparities vary widely from one community to another, suggesting that they are not inevitable. Some communities even show paradoxically good outcomes and relative health equity despite significant social inequities. A few communities have even improved from high disparities to more equitable and optimal health outcomes. These positive-deviance communities show that disparities can be overcome and that health equity is achievable. Research must shift from defining the problem (including causes and risk factors) to testing effective interventions, informed by the natural experiments of what has worked in communities that are already moving toward health equity. At the local level, we need multi-dimensional interventions designed in partnership with communities and continuously improved by rapid-cycle surveillance feedback loops of community-level disparities metrics. Similarly coordinated strategies are needed at state and national levels to take success to scale. We propose ten specific steps to follow on a health equity path toward optimal and equitable health outcomes for all Americans. PMID:22643550

  16. Study protocol for the Fukushima Health Management Survey.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, Seiji; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi; Akashi, Makoto; Kodama, Kazunori; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-01-01

    The accidents that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 have resulted in long-term, ongoing anxiety among the residents of Fukushima, Japan. Soon after the disaster, Fukushima Prefecture launched the Fukushima Health Management Survey to investigate long-term low-dose radiation exposure caused by the accident. Fukushima Medical University took the lead in planning and implementing this survey. The primary purposes of this survey are to monitor the long-term health of residents, promote their future well-being, and confirm whether long-term low-dose radiation exposure has health effects. This report describes the rationale and implementation of the Fukushima Health Management Survey. This cohort study enrolled all people living in Fukushima Prefecture after the earthquake and comprises a basic survey and 4 detailed surveys. The basic survey is to estimate levels of external radiation exposure among all 2.05 million residents. It should be noted that internal radiation levels were estimated by Fukushima Prefecture using whole-body counters. The detailed surveys comprise a thyroid ultrasound examination for all Fukushima children aged 18 years or younger, a comprehensive health check for all residents from the evacuation zones, an assessment of mental health and lifestyles of all residents from the evacuation zones, and recording of all pregnancies and births among all women in the prefecture who were pregnant on 11 March. All data have been entered into a database and will be used to support the residents and analyze the health effects of radiation. The low response rate (<30%) to the basic survey complicates the estimation of health effects. There have been no cases of malignancy to date among 38 114 children who received thyroid ultrasound examinations. The importance of mental health care was revealed by the mental health and lifestyle survey and the pregnancy and birth survey. This long

  17. Study Protocol for the Fukushima Health Management Survey

    PubMed Central

    Yasumura, Seiji; Hosoya, Mitsuaki; Yamashita, Shunichi; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi; Akashi, Makoto; Kodama, Kazunori; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2012-01-01

    Background The accidents that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant after the Great East Japan Earthquake on 11 March 2011 have resulted in long-term, ongoing anxiety among the residents of Fukushima, Japan. Soon after the disaster, Fukushima Prefecture launched the Fukushima Health Management Survey to investigate long-term low-dose radiation exposure caused by the accident. Fukushima Medical University took the lead in planning and implementing this survey. The primary purposes of this survey are to monitor the long-term health of residents, promote their future well-being, and confirm whether long-term low-dose radiation exposure has health effects. This report describes the rationale and implementation of the Fukushima Health Management Survey. Methods This cohort study enrolled all people living in Fukushima Prefecture after the earthquake and comprises a basic survey and 4 detailed surveys. The basic survey is to estimate levels of external radiation exposure among all 2.05 million residents. It should be noted that internal radiation levels were estimated by Fukushima Prefecture using whole-body counters. The detailed surveys comprise a thyroid ultrasound examination for all Fukushima children aged 18 years or younger, a comprehensive health check for all residents from the evacuation zones, an assessment of mental health and lifestyles of all residents from the evacuation zones, and recording of all pregnancies and births among all women in the prefecture who were pregnant on 11 March. All data have been entered into a database and will be used to support the residents and analyze the health effects of radiation. Conclusions The low response rate (<30%) to the basic survey complicates the estimation of health effects. There have been no cases of malignancy to date among 38 114 children who received thyroid ultrasound examinations. The importance of mental health care was revealed by the mental health and lifestyle survey and the pregnancy

  18. Comparison of Select Health Outcomes by Deployment Health Assessment Completion.

    PubMed

    Luse, Tina M; Slosek, Jean; Rennix, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) requires service members to complete regular health assessments for identification of deployment-related physical/behavioral issues and environmental/occupational exposures. Compliance among active duty Department of the Navy personnel varies; however, and the impact of incomplete assessments on generalizability of results is unclear. This study examines the differences between Navy and Marine Corps service members who completed both the Post-Deployment Health Assessment and Post-Deployment Health Reassessment (n = 9,452) as compared to service members who never attempted either form (n = 5,603) in fiscal year 2010. Deployment rosters, assessments, and clinical data were analyzed to determine certified assessment completion rates and incidence of certain health conditions in these populations. Only 38.9% of applicable personnel met the completion and certification criteria for the required assessments. Service members who did not complete the forms were distinctly different demographically and at increased risk for psychotropic drug use, post-traumatic stress disorder diagnosis, and traumatic brain injury diagnosis following deployment. The prevailing assumption that the risk of adverse health effects on operational forces can be estimated using the population that completed the required assessments is incorrect, and the true operational impact and medical burden of these conditions may be underestimated.

  19. "The Health Educator" Readership Survey, 2011: Reporting the Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Kadi; Ogletree, Roberta J.; Liefer, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    Readership surveys can help editors assess satisfaction with a journal as well as identify potential modifications to be made. The editorial staff of "The Health Educator" conducted an online readership survey in the summer of 20 11. After a five-week data solicitation and collection period, a total of 504 Eta Sigma Gamma (ESG) members responded.…

  20. French Frigate Shoals reef health survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Coles, Steve L.; Rameyer, Robert

    2002-01-01

    French Frigate Shoals consists of a large (31 nm) fringing reef partially enclosing a lagoon. A basalt pinnacle (La Perouse Pinnacle) arises approximately halfway between the two ends of the arcs of the fringing reefs. Tern Island is situated at the northern end of the lagoon and is surrounded by a dredged ship channel. The lagoon becomes progressively shallower from west to east and harbors a variety of marine life including corals, fish, marine mammals, and sea turtles (Amerson 1971). In 2000, an interagency survey of the northwestern Hawaiian Islands was done to document the fauna and flora in FFS (Maragos and Gulko, 2002). During that survey, 38 stations were examined, and 41 species of stony corals were documented, the most of any of the NW Hawaiian islands (Maragos and Gulko 2002). In some of these stations, corals with abnormalities were observed. The present study aimed to expand on the 2000 survey to evaluate the lesions in areas where they were documented.

  1. The National Health Educator Job Analysis 2010: process and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Eva I; Caro, Carla M; Lysoby, Linda; Auld, M Elaine; Smith, Becky J; Muenzen, Patricia M

    2012-12-01

    The National Health Educator Job Analysis 2010 was conducted to update the competencies model for entry- and advanced-level health educators. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used. Structured interviews, focus groups, and a modified Delphi technique were implemented to engage 59 health educators from diverse work settings and experience levels in a seven-step instrument development process. An online survey was then completed by 1,022 practicing health educators. Survey participants used 4-point ordinal scales to rank subcompetencies by frequency of use and importance and related knowledge items by cognitive levels based on the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy. Composite scores were calculated and subgroup comparisons conducted to validate 223 subcompetencies at entry (162), advanced-1 (42), and advanced-2 (19) levels of practice, along with 113 knowledge items. Advanced-level versus entry-level competencies and a comparison with the Competency Update Project model of 2006 are discussed. Implications and recommendations for the profession are provided.

  2. New Mexico Adolescent Health Risks Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antle, David

    To inform students of health risks (posed by behavior, environment, and genetics) and provide schools with collective risk appraisal information as a basis for planning/evaluating health and wellness initiatives, New Mexico administered the Teen Wellness Check in 1985 to 1,573 ninth-grade students from 7 New Mexico public schools. Subjects were…

  3. Health sciences library building projects, 1998 survey.

    PubMed

    Bowden, V M

    1999-10-01

    Twenty-eight health sciences library building projects are briefly described, including twelve new buildings and sixteen additions, remodelings, and renovations. The libraries range in size from 2,144 square feet to 190,000 gross square feet. Twelve libraries are described in detail. These include three hospital libraries, one information center sponsored by ten institutions, and eight academic health sciences libraries.

  4. New Mexico Adolescent Health Risks Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antle, David

    To inform students of health risks (posed by behavior, environment, and genetics) and provide schools with collective risk appraisal information as a basis for planning/evaluating health and wellness initiatives, New Mexico administered the Teen Wellness Check in 1985 to 1,573 ninth-grade students from 7 New Mexico public schools. Subjects were…

  5. Social determinants of health--a question of social or economic capital? Interaction effects of socioeconomic factors on health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ahnquist, Johanna; Wamala, Sarah P; Lindstrom, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Social structures and socioeconomic patterns are the major determinants of population health. However, very few previous studies have simultaneously analysed the "social" and the "economic" indicators when addressing social determinants of health. We focus on the relevance of economic and social capital as health determinants by analysing various indicators. The aim of this paper was to analyse independent associations, and interactions, of lack of economic capital (economic hardships) and social capital (social participation, interpersonal and political/institutional trust) on various health outcomes. Data was derived from the 2009 Swedish National Survey of Public Health, based on a randomly selected representative sample of 23,153 men and 28,261 women aged 16-84 year, with a participation rate of 53.8%. Economic hardships were measured by a combined economic hardships measure including low household income, inability to meet expenses and lacking cash reserves. Social capital was measured by social participation, interpersonal (horizontal) trust and political (vertical/institutional trust) trust in parliament. Health outcomes included; (i) self-rated health, (i) psychological distress (GHQ-12) and (iii) musculoskeletal disorders. Results from multivariate logistic regression show that both measures of economic capital and low social capital were significantly associated with poor health status, with only a few exceptions. Significant interactive effects measured as synergy index were observed between economic hardships and all various types of social capital. The synergy indices ranged from 1.4 to 2.3. The present study adds to the evidence that both economic hardships and social capital contribute to a range of different health outcomes. Furthermore, when combined they potentiate the risk of poor health.

  6. Factor structure of the Mental Health Statistics Improvement Program (MHSIP) Family and Youth satisfaction surveys.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Alan B; Temple, Judith M

    2013-07-01

    Two studies of the Mental Health Statics Improvement Project (MHSIP) Family and Youth consumer satisfaction surveys factor structure and psychometrics were conducted. In study 1, the 2002-2006 Youth Services Survey for Families (N = 6,007) was administered to parents of children receiving services, and in study 2, the 2002-2004 Youth Services Survey (N = 1,718) was administered to children age 12-18 receiving services. Factor analyses across both studies found five factors that strongly supported the hypothesized scale domains of outcomes, satisfaction, cultural sensitivity, participation, and access. Scales based on these factors had good reliability with an average coefficient alpha of 0.85. The average convergent validity correlation between scale scores from the parent and child surveys was r = 0.62. Overall, the results supported the structure, reliability, and validity of the surveys.

  7. The California Health Interview Survey 2001: translation of a major survey for California's multiethnic population.

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Ninez A.; Lavarreda, Shana Alex; Yen, Wei; Brown, E. Richard; DiSogra, Charles; Satter, Delight E.

    2004-01-01

    The cultural and linguistic diversity of the U.S. population presents challenges to the design and implementation of population-based surveys that serve to inform public policies. Information derived from such surveys may be less than representative if groups with limited or no English language skills are not included. The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), first administered in 2001, is a population-based health survey of more than 55,000 California households. This article describes the process that the designers of CHIS 2001 underwent in culturally adapting the survey and translating it into an unprecedented number of languages: Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, and Khmer. The multiethnic and multilingual CHIS 2001 illustrates the importance of cultural and linguistic adaptation in raising the quality of population-based surveys, especially when the populations they intend to represent are as diverse as California's. PMID:15219795

  8. [National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012: design and coverage].

    PubMed

    Romero-Martínez, Martín; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Franco-Núñez, Aurora; Villalpando, Salvador; Cuevas-Nasu, Lucía; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Rivera-Dommarco, Juan Ángel

    2013-01-01

    To describe the design and population coverage of the National Health and Nutrition Survey 2012 (NHNS 2012). The design of the NHNS 2012 is reported, as a probabilistic population based survey with a multi-stage and stratified sampling, as well as the sample inferential properties, the logistical procedures, and the obtained coverage. Household response rate for the NHNS 2012 was 87%, completing data from 50,528 households, where 96 031 individual interviews selected by age and 14,104 of ambulatory health services users were also obtained. The probabilistic design of the NHNS 2012 as well as its coverage allowed to generate inferences about health and nutrition conditions, health programs coverage, and access to health services. Because of their complex designs, all estimations from the NHNS 2012 must use the survey design: weights, primary sampling units, and stratus variables.

  9. National Natality Survey/National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS)

    Cancer.gov

    The survey provides data on socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of mothers, prenatal care, pregnancy history, occupational background, health status of mother and infant, and types and sources of medical care received.

  10. Organizational climate and employee mental health outcomes: A systematic review of studies in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Bronkhorst, Babette; Tummers, Lars; Steijn, Bram; Vijverberg, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the high prevalence of mental health problems among health care workers has given rise to great concern. The academic literature suggests that employees' perceptions of their work environment can play a role in explaining mental health outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the literature in order to answer the following two research questions: (1) how does organizational climate relate to mental health outcomes among employees working in health care organizations and (2) which organizational climate dimension is most strongly related to mental health outcomes among employees working in health care organizations? Four search strategies plus inclusion and quality assessment criteria were applied to identify and select eligible studies. As a result, 21 studies were included in the review. Data were extracted from the studies to create a findings database. The contents of the studies were analyzed and categorized according to common characteristics. Perceptions of a good organizational climate were significantly associated with positive employee mental health outcomes such as lower levels of burnout, depression, and anxiety. More specifically, our findings indicate that group relationships between coworkers are very important in explaining the mental health of health care workers. There is also evidence that aspects of leadership and supervision affect mental health outcomes. Relationships between communication, or participation, and mental health outcomes were less clear. If health care organizations want to address mental health issues among their staff, our findings suggest that organizations will benefit from incorporating organizational climate factors in their health and safety policies. Stimulating a supportive atmosphere among coworkers and developing relationship-oriented leadership styles would seem to be steps in the right direction.

  11. Use of Outcome Measures in Managing Neck Pain: An International Multidisciplinary Survey

    PubMed Central

    MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, David M; Côté, Pierre; Santaguida, P. Lina; Gross, Anita; Carlesso, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the outcome measures practice patterns in the neck pain management of various health disciplines. Methods: A survey of 381 clinicians treating patients with neck pain was conducted. Results: Respondents were more commonly male (54%) and either chiropractors (44%) or physiotherapists (32%). The survey was international (24 countries with Canada having the largest response (44%)). The most common assessment was a single-item pain assessment (numeric or visual analog) used by 75% of respondents. Respondents sometimes or routinely used the Neck Disability Index (49%), the Patient Specific Functional Scale (28%), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (32%). Work status was recorded in terms of time lost by more than 50% of respondents, but standardized measures of work limitations or functional capacity testing were rarely used. The majority of respondents never used fear of movement, psychological distress, quality of life, participation measures, or global ratings of change (< 10% routinely use). Use of impairment measurers was prevalent, but the type selected was variable. Quantitative sensory testing was used sometimes or routinely by 53% of respondents, whereas 26% never used it. Ratings of segmental joint mobility were commonly used to assess motion (44% routinely use), whereas 66% of respondents never used inclinometry. Neck muscle strength, postural alignment and upper extremity coordination were assessed sometimes or routinely by a majority of respondents (>56%). With the exception of numeric pain ratings and verbal reporting of work status, all outcomes measures were less frequently used by physicians. Years of practice did not affect practice patterns, but reimbursement did affect selection of some outcome measures. Conclusions: Few outcome measures are routinely used to assess patients with neck pain other than a numeric pain rating scale. A comparison of practice patterns to current evidence suggessts overutilization of

  12. A Consensus Set of Outcomes for Parkinson's Disease from the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Paul; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Kelley, Thomas A; Antonini, Angelo; Dodel, Richard; Hagell, Peter; Marras, Connie; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Mehta, Shyamal H; Odin, Per; Chaudhuri, Kallol Ray; Weintraub, Daniel; Wilson, Bil; Uitti, Ryan J

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that is expected to double in prevalence due to demographic shifts. Value-based healthcare is a proposed strategy to improve outcomes and decrease costs. To move towards an actual value-based health care system, condition-specific outcomes that are meaningful to patients are essential. Propose a global consensus standard set of outcome measures for PD. Established methods for outcome measure development were applied, as outlined and used previously by the International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM). An international group, representing both patients and experts from the fields of neurology, psychiatry, nursing, and existing outcome measurement efforts, was convened. The group participated in six teleconferences over a six-month period, reviewed existing data and practices, and ultimately proposed a standard set of measures by which patients should be tracked, and how often data should be collected. The standard set applies to all cases of idiopathic PD, and includes assessments of motor and non-motor symptoms, ability to work, PD-related health status, and hospital admissions. Baseline demographic and clinical variables are included to enable case mix adjustment. The Standard Set is now ready for use and pilot testing in the clinical setting. Ultimately, we believe that using the set of outcomes proposed here will allow clinicians and scientists across the world to document, report, and compare PD-related outcomes in a standardized fashion. Such international benchmarks will improve our understanding of the disease course and allow for identification of 'best practices', ultimately leading to better informed treatment decisions.

  13. Measurement of sexual health in the U.S.: an inventory of nationally representative surveys and surveillance systems.

    PubMed

    Ivankovich, Megan B; Leichliter, Jami S; Douglas, John M

    2013-01-01

    To identify opportunities within nationally representative surveys and surveillance systems to measure indicators of sexual health, we reviewed and inventoried existing data systems that include variables relevant to sexual health. We searched for U.S. nationally representative surveys and surveillance systems that provided individual-level sexual health data. We assessed the methods of each data system and catalogued them by their measurement of the following domains of sexual health: knowledge, communication, attitudes, service access and utilization, sexual behaviors, relationships, and adverse health outcomes. We identified 18 U.S.-focused, nationally representative data systems: six assessing the general population, seven focused on special populations, and five addressing health outcomes. While these data systems provide a rich repository of information from which to assess national measures of sexual health, they present several limitations. Most importantly, apart from data on service utilization, routinely gathered, national data are currently focused primarily on negative aspects of sexual health (e.g., risk behaviors and adverse health outcomes) rather than more positive attributes (e.g., healthy communication and attitudes, and relationship quality). Nationally representative data systems provide opportunities to measure a broad array of domains of sexual health. However, current measurement gaps indicate the need to modify existing surveys, where feasible and appropriate, and develop new tools to include additional indicators that address positive domains of sexual health of the U.S. population across the life span. Such data can inform the development of effective policy actions, services, prevention programs, and resource allocation to advance sexual health.

  14. Food insecurity is associated with adverse health outcomes among human infants and toddlers.

    PubMed

    Cook, John T; Frank, Deborah A; Berkowitz, Carol; Black, Maureen M; Casey, Patrick H; Cutts, Diana B; Meyers, Alan F; Zaldivar, Nieves; Skalicky, Anne; Levenson, Suzette; Heeren, Tim; Nord, Mark

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. Household Food Security Scale, developed with federal support for use in national surveys, is an effective research tool. This study uses these new measures to examine associations between food insecurity and health outcomes in young children. The purpose of this study was to determine whether household food insecurity is associated with adverse health outcomes in a sentinel population ages < or = 36 mo. We conducted a multisite retrospective cohort study with cross-sectional surveys at urban medical centers in 5 states and Washington DC, August 1998-December 2001. Caregivers of 11,539 children ages < or = 36 mo were interviewed at hospital clinics and emergency departments (ED) in central cities. Outcome measures included child's health status, hospitalization history, whether child was admitted to hospital on day of ED visit (for subsample interviewed in EDs), and a composite growth-risk variable. In this sample, 21.4% of households were food insecure (6.8% with hunger). In a logistic regression, after adjusting for confounders, food-insecure children had odds of "fair or poor" health nearly twice as great [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.66-2.18], and odds of being hospitalized since birth almost a third larger (AOR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.16-1.48) than food-secure children. A dose-response relation appeared between fair/poor health status and severity of food insecurity. Effect modification occurred between Food Stamps and food insecurity; Food Stamps attenuated (but did not eliminate) associations between food insecurity and fair/poor health. Food insecurity is associated with health problems for young, low-income children. Ensuring food security may reduce health problems, including the need for hospitalizations.

  15. Improving health care outcomes through geriatric rehabilitation. Conference summary.

    PubMed

    Lohr, K N

    1997-06-01

    The Boston Working Group on Improving Health Care Outcomes Through Geriatric Rehabilitation was structured around four major themes: (1) defining disability or disablement; (2) the patient's experience of the processes and outcomes of care; (3) the role and value of clinical practice guidelines; and (4) the need for casemix and severity or risk adjustment procedures and measures. These discussions produced opening statements of policy or empiric issues and recommendations about the best means of demonstrating the benefits of geriatric rehabilitation and, in particular, how to measure, ensure, and improve the quality of rehabilitation services, especially for the elderly. This article summarizes the reports from the work groups and identifies some common themes. Critical points include: (1) the need to define and describe geriatric rehabilitation better for nonexperts in the health field and for patients and consumers in general; (2) the need for more research to link rehabilitation processes with measurable and clinically important outcomes; (3) the breadth and depth of domains of processes and outcomes of care that ideally could and should be measured; and (4) the need to reach many audiences with a clear message about the importance of geriatric rehabilitation in ensuring high quality of care and good health status and functional outcomes for all elderly patients.

  16. How physical therapists can strategically effect health outcomes for older adults with limited health literacy.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Katherine; Hawthorne, Kelly; Frownfelter, Donna

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is the physical therapist's key in guiding patients to a healthier future. When considering patient education, it is important to note that barriers such as limited health literacy can alter the effectiveness of teaching strategies. Health literacy is the ability to comprehend health information and use that information to make informed decisions about one's health and medical care, thus giving individuals the knowledge and skills to optimally function and navigate in the health care environment. While millions of Americans have marginalized literacy skills, older adults aged 65 years and older represent the largest group with compromised general literacy skills in the United States, which significantly contribute to limited health literacy skills. Limited health literacy can have negative consequences on health outcomes due to a lack of knowledge of healthy lifestyle choices, preventative services, disease etiology and management, being able to locate and access appropriate health care services, and carrying out self-care tasks. In addition, limited health literacy increases the risk of hospitalization, the overall cost of health care, and mortality rates. This article includes (1) the definition of health literacy, (2) the prevalence and consequences of limited health literacy, (3) signs of limited health literacy, (4) health literacy screening and assessment tools, (5) intervention strategies, and (6) implications for physical therapist education. PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EBSCOHost were searched for articles published from 1990 to 2010 with the descriptors: health literacy, older adults, patient education, functional health literacy, health literacy outcomes, health literacy assessment, and health literacy interventions. Limited health literacy affects millions of Americans and plays a significant role in reduced health outcomes for patients. Through patient education and targeted intervention strategies, physical therapists can assist

  17. The Effects of World War II on Economic and Health Outcomes across Europe.

    PubMed

    Kesternich, Iris; Siflinger, Bettina; Smith, James P; Winter, Joachim K

    2014-03-01

    We investigate long-run effects of World War II on socio-economic status and health of older individuals in Europe. We analyze data from SHARELIFE, a retrospective survey conducted as part of SHARE in Europe in 2009. SHARELIFE provides detailed data on events in childhood during and after the war for over 20,000 individuals in 13 European countries. We construct several measures of war exposure-experience of dispossession, persecution, combat in local areas, and hunger periods. Exposure to war and more importantly to individual-level shocks caused by the war significantly predicts economic and health outcomes at older ages.

  18. The Effects of World War II on Economic and Health Outcomes across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kesternich, Iris; Siflinger, Bettina; Smith, James P.; Winter, Joachim K.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate long-run effects of World War II on socio-economic status and health of older individuals in Europe. We analyze data from SHARELIFE, a retrospective survey conducted as part of SHARE in Europe in 2009. SHARELIFE provides detailed data on events in childhood during and after the war for over 20,000 individuals in 13 European countries. We construct several measures of war exposure—experience of dispossession, persecution, combat in local areas, and hunger periods. Exposure to war and more importantly to individual-level shocks caused by the war significantly predicts economic and health outcomes at older ages. PMID:24850973

  19. Oral health activities of U.S. children: results of a national health interview survey.

    PubMed

    Gift, H C; Newman, J F

    1992-10-01

    Data from the 1989 National Health Interview Survey show oral health activities for U.S. children aged 2-17. Key population subgroups neither received optimal preventive care nor visited a dentist regularly.

  20. Impact of Caregiver Literacy on Children's Oral Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth; Lee, Jessica Y.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Vann, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of primary caregivers’ literacy with children's oral health outcomes. Design We performed a cross-sectional study of children ages six and younger who presented for an initial dental appointment in the teaching clinics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry. Caregiver literacy was measured using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (REALD-30). The outcome measures included oral health knowledge, oral health behaviors, primary caregiver's reports of their child's oral health status, and the clinical oral health status of the child as determined by a clinical exam completed by trained, calibrated examiners. Results Among the 106 caregiver/child dyads enrolled, 59% of the children were male, 52% were white, and 86% caregivers were the biological mothers. The bivariate results showed no significant relationships between literacy and oral health knowledge (p=0.16) and behaviors (p=0.24); however, there was an association between literacy and oral health status (p<0.05). The multivariate analysis controlled for race, and income; this analysis revealed a significant relationship between caregiver literacy scores and clinical oral health status as determined using a standardized clinical exam. Caregivers of children with mild to moderate treatment needs were more likely to have higher REALD-30 scores than those with severe treatment needs (OR=1.14; 95%CI 1.05:1.25, p=0.003). Conclusions Caregiver literacy is significantly associated with children's dental disease status. PMID:20547644

  1. Impact of hospital atmosphere on perceived health care outcome.

    PubMed

    Narang, Ritu; Polsa, Pia; Soneye, Alabi; Fuxiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare service quality studies primarily examine the relationships between patients' perceived quality and satisfaction with healthcare services, clinical effectiveness, service use, recommendations and value for money. These studies suggest that patient-independent quality dimensions (structure, process and outcome) are antecedents to quality. The purpose of this paper is to propose an alternative by looking at the relationship between hospital atmosphere and healthcare quality with perceived outcome. Data were collected from Finland, India, Nigeria and the People's Republic of China. Regression analysis used perceived outcome as the dependent variable and atmosphere and healthcare service quality as independent variables. Findings - Results showed that atmosphere and healthcare service quality have a statistically significant relationship with patient perceived outcomes. The sample size was small and the sampling units were selected on convenience; thus, caution must be exercised in generalizing the findings. The study determined that service quality and atmosphere are considered significant for developing and developed nations. This result could have significant implications for policy makers and service providers developing healthcare quality and hospital atmosphere. Studies concentrate on healthcare outcome primarily regarding population health status, mortality, morbidity, customer satisfaction, loyalty, quality of life, customer behavior and consumption. However, the study exposes how patients perceive their health after treatment. Furthermore, the authors develop the healthcare service literature by considering atmosphere and perceived outcome.

  2. Examining effects of food insecurity and food choices on health outcomes in households in poverty.

    PubMed

    Lombe, Margaret; Nebbitt, Von Eugene; Sinha, Aakanksha; Reynolds, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Evidence documenting effects of food assistance programs, household food insecurity, and nutrition knowledge on health outcomes is building. Using data from a sub-sample of adults who are 185% of the poverty line from the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (N = 2,171), we examine whether household food insecurity, food stamp take-up, and use of informal food supports are associated with health risk among low-income households. Findings indicate that while nutrition knowledge provides protection against health risk in food secure households, the health benefits of nutrition knowledge were not evident in food insecure households. We discuss these findings in light of current policy and practice interventions that recognize the importance of providing healthy, affordable food options for food insecure households.

  3. Burnout and Engagement: Relative Importance of Predictors and Outcomes in Two Health Care Worker Samples.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Zachary L; Holcombe, Kyla J; McCluney, Courtney L; Fisher, Gwenith G; McGonagle, Alyssa K; Friebe, Susan J

    2016-06-09

    This study's purpose was twofold: first, to examine the relative importance of job demands and resources as predictors of burnout and engagement, and second, the relative importance of engagement and burnout related to health, depressive symptoms, work ability, organizational commitment, and turnover intentions in two samples of health care workers. Nurse leaders (n = 162) and licensed emergency medical technicians (EMTs; n = 102) completed surveys. In both samples, job demands predicted burnout more strongly than job resources, and job resources predicted engagement more strongly than job demands. Engagement held more weight than burnout for predicting commitment, and burnout held more weight for predicting health outcomes, depressive symptoms, and work ability. Results have implications for the design, evaluation, and effectiveness of workplace interventions to reduce burnout and improve engagement among health care workers. Actionable recommendations for increasing engagement and decreasing burnout in health care organizations are provided.

  4. Survey of new 2007 and 2011 Cochrane reviews found 37% of prespecified outcomes not reported.

    PubMed

    Smith, Valerie; Clarke, Mike; Williamson, Paula; Gargon, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    To survey the outcomes used in Cochrane Reviews, as part of our work within the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials Initiative. A descriptive survey of Cochrane Reviews, divided by Cochrane Review Group (CRG), published in full for the first time in 2007 and 2011. Outcomes specified in the methods section of each review and outcomes reported in the results section of each review were of interest, in this exploration of the common use of outcomes and core outcome sets (COS). Seven hundred eighty-eight reviews, specifying 6,127 outcomes, were included. When we excluded specified outcomes from the 86 reviews that did not include any studies, we found that 1,996 (37%) specified outcomes were not reported. Of the 361 new reviews with studies from 2011, 113 (31%) had a "summary of findings" table (SoF). Fifteen broad outcome categories were identified and used to manage the outcome data. We found consistency in the use of these categories across CRGs but inconsistency in outcomes within these categories. COS have been used rarely in Cochrane Reviews, but the introduction of SoF makes the development and application of COS timelier than ever. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Individual Factors Predicting Mental Health Court Diversion Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhaaff, Ashley; Scott, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined which individual factors predict mental health court diversion outcome among a sample of persons with mental illness participating in a postcharge diversion program. Method: The study employed secondary analysis of existing program records for 419 persons with mental illness in a court diversion program. Results:…

  6. School Nurse Case Management: Achieving Health and Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonaiuto, Maria M.

    2007-01-01

    Educators and health care professionals alike understand that healthy students are likely to be successful learners. The goal of school nurse case management is to support students so that they are ready to learn. This article describes the outcomes of a 4-year process improvement project designed to show the impact of school nurse case management…

  7. Individual Factors Predicting Mental Health Court Diversion Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhaaff, Ashley; Scott, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined which individual factors predict mental health court diversion outcome among a sample of persons with mental illness participating in a postcharge diversion program. Method: The study employed secondary analysis of existing program records for 419 persons with mental illness in a court diversion program. Results:…

  8. Democracy, Performance, and Outcomes in Interdisciplinary Health Care Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coopman, Stephanie J.

    2001-01-01

    Examines interdisciplinary health care teams, focusing on perceptions of team processes and their relationship to assessments of team performance and individual outcomes. Suggests that hospice interdisciplinary teams are perceived by their members as only somewhat democratic in the practice of decision making. (SG)

  9. The Digital Divide and Health Outcomes: A Teleretinal Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Kathleen Kihmm

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to understand, explore and describe the digital divide and the relationship between technology utilization and health outcomes. Diabetes and diabetic eye disease was used as the real-life context for understanding change and exploring the digital divide. As an investigational framework, a telemedicine…

  10. Stress Carry-Over and College Student Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Daphne E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using a stress carry-over perspective, this study examines the relationship between stress stemming from school and family domains and physical and mental health outcomes. Methods: The study sample included 268 undergraduate men and women from a Midwestern university. Participants completed an anonymous online questionnaire. OLS…

  11. School Nurse Case Management: Achieving Health and Educational Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonaiuto, Maria M.

    2007-01-01

    Educators and health care professionals alike understand that healthy students are likely to be successful learners. The goal of school nurse case management is to support students so that they are ready to learn. This article describes the outcomes of a 4-year process improvement project designed to show the impact of school nurse case management…

  12. Stress Carry-Over and College Student Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Daphne E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using a stress carry-over perspective, this study examines the relationship between stress stemming from school and family domains and physical and mental health outcomes. Methods: The study sample included 268 undergraduate men and women from a Midwestern university. Participants completed an anonymous online questionnaire. OLS…

  13. The Digital Divide and Health Outcomes: A Teleretinal Imaging Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Kathleen Kihmm

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to understand, explore and describe the digital divide and the relationship between technology utilization and health outcomes. Diabetes and diabetic eye disease was used as the real-life context for understanding change and exploring the digital divide. As an investigational framework, a telemedicine…

  14. Health sciences library building projects, 1998 survey.

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, V M

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-eight health sciences library building projects are briefly described, including twelve new buildings and sixteen additions, remodelings, and renovations. The libraries range in size from 2,144 square feet to 190,000 gross square feet. Twelve libraries are described in detail. These include three hospital libraries, one information center sponsored by ten institutions, and eight academic health sciences libraries. Images PMID:10550027

  15. Health literacy and outcomes among patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Pamela N; Shetterly, Susan M; Clarke, Christina L; Bekelman, David B; Chan, Paul S; Allen, Larry A; Matlock, Daniel D; Magid, David J; Masoudi, Frederick A

    2011-04-27

    Little is known about the effects of low health literacy among patients with heart failure, a condition that requires self-management and frequent interactions with the health care system. To evaluate the association between low health literacy and all-cause mortality and hospitalization among outpatients with heart failure. Retrospective cohort study conducted at Kaiser Permanente Colorado, an integrated managed care organization. Outpatients with heart failure were identified between January 2001 and May 2008, were surveyed by mail, and underwent follow-up for a median of 1.2 years. Health literacy was assessed using 3 established screening questions and categorized as adequate or low. Responders were excluded if they did not complete at least 1 health literacy question or if they did not have at least 1 year of enrollment prior to the survey date. All-cause mortality and all-cause hospitalization. Of the 2156 patients surveyed, 1547 responded (72% response rate). Of 1494 included responders, 262 (17.5%) had low health literacy. Patients with low health literacy were older, of lower socioeconomic status, less likely to have at least a high school education, and had higher rates of coexisting illnesses. In multivariable Cox regression, low health literacy was independently associated with higher mortality (unadjusted rate, 17.6% vs 6.3%; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.97 [95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.97]; P = .001) but not hospitalization (unadjusted rate, 30.5% vs 23.2%; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.05 [95% confidence interval, 0.8-1.37]; P = .73). Among patients with heart failure in an integrated managed care organization, low health literacy was significantly associated with higher all-cause mortality.

  16. Race-Ethnicity and Health Trajectories: Tests of Three Hypotheses across Multiple Groups and Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tyson H.; O'Rand, Angela M.; Adkins, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial-ethnic disparities in static levels of health are well documented. Less is known about racial-ethnic differences in age trajectories of health. The few studies on this topic have examined only single health outcomes and focused on black-white disparities. This study extends prior research by using a life course perspective, panel data from…

  17. Long-Term Refugee Health: Health Behaviors and Outcomes of Cambodian Refugee and Immigrant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson-Peterman, Jerusha L.; Toof, Robin; Liang, Sidney L.; Grigg-Saito, Dorcas C.

    2015-01-01

    Refugees in the United States have high rates of chronic disease. Both long-term effects of the refugee experience and adjustment to the U.S. health environment may contribute. While there is significant research on health outcomes of newly resettled refugees and long-term mental health experiences of established refugees, there is currently…

  18. Race-Ethnicity and Health Trajectories: Tests of Three Hypotheses across Multiple Groups and Health Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tyson H.; O'Rand, Angela M.; Adkins, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    Racial-ethnic disparities in static levels of health are well documented. Less is known about racial-ethnic differences in age trajectories of health. The few studies on this topic have examined only single health outcomes and focused on black-white disparities. This study extends prior research by using a life course perspective, panel data from…

  19. Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Health Outcomes: Conference Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    “Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes,” an international specialty conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research, was held to address key uncertainties in our understanding of adverse health effects related to air po...

  20. Long-Term Refugee Health: Health Behaviors and Outcomes of Cambodian Refugee and Immigrant Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson-Peterman, Jerusha L.; Toof, Robin; Liang, Sidney L.; Grigg-Saito, Dorcas C.

    2015-01-01

    Refugees in the United States have high rates of chronic disease. Both long-term effects of the refugee experience and adjustment to the U.S. health environment may contribute. While there is significant research on health outcomes of newly resettled refugees and long-term mental health experiences of established refugees, there is currently…

  1. Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Health Outcomes: Conference Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    “Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes,” an international specialty conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research, was held to address key uncertainties in our understanding of adverse health effects related to air po...

  2. Student Outcomes Survey, 2000: National Report. Australian Vocational Education & Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    A survey was conducted of a randomly-selected sample of TAFE (Training and Further Education) graduates in Australia who completed vocational education and training (VET) qualifications during 1999 and of TAFE students who successfully completed some training ("module completers") and left the TAFE system. Analysis of the responses of…

  3. Outcomes of Primary Teacher Education in Finland: An Exit Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saloviita, Timo; Tolvanen, Asko

    2017-01-01

    Seven final year cohorts of Finnish pre-service primary teachers (N = 384) were given an exit survey, which measured their estimated attainment of knowledge and experience in the 10 domains of professional activity considered critical for new teachers in the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards. The results…

  4. Development of a National Survey to Assess Student Learning Outcomes of Community-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenstein, Gary; Thorme, Trisha; Cutforth, Nick; Tombari, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    With the goal of codifying student learning outcomes of community-based research (CBR), the authors created a conceptually valid and statistically reliable CBR Student Learning Outcomes Survey. The project began with individual interviews and focus groups with 70 undergraduates and faculty at six colleges and universities nationwide discussing…

  5. Development and Psychometric Validation of the Family Outcomes Survey-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; Raspa, Melissa; Olmsted, Murrey G.; Novak, Scott P.; Sam, Ann M.; Humphreys, Betsy P.; Nelson, Robin; Robinson, Nyle; Guillen, Chelsea

    2011-01-01

    Few psychometrically valid scales exist to assess family outcomes and the helpfulness of early intervention. This article describes the development and psychometric properties of the Family Outcomes Survey-Revised. The revision was prompted by the need to (a) create a new format that would be easier for parents to understand, (b) revise and expand…

  6. Measuring the Quality of VET Using the Student Outcomes Survey. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Wang-Sheng; Polidano, Cain

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this report is to examine the potential use of information from the Student Outcomes Survey, including the use of student course satisfaction information and post-study outcomes, as a means of determining markers of training quality. In an analysis of the student course satisfaction measures, the authors found there are very small…

  7. Development and Psychometric Validation of the Family Outcomes Survey-Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; Raspa, Melissa; Olmsted, Murrey G.; Novak, Scott P.; Sam, Ann M.; Humphreys, Betsy P.; Nelson, Robin; Robinson, Nyle; Guillen, Chelsea

    2011-01-01

    Few psychometrically valid scales exist to assess family outcomes and the helpfulness of early intervention. This article describes the development and psychometric properties of the Family Outcomes Survey-Revised. The revision was prompted by the need to (a) create a new format that would be easier for parents to understand, (b) revise and expand…

  8. The Illinois 9th Grade Adolescent Health Survey. Full Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    A survey was conducted in Illinois to identify the risk of certain health problems among adolescents; to determine the health status of Illinois youth in relation to the Surgeon General's "Healthy People 2000 Objectives" and monitor progress toward national and state goals; and to help those working at national, state, and local levels…

  9. Student Opinions About Health Services at Miami. Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Michael J.

    A random sample of Miami University undergraduate and graduate students were surveyed to determine their opinions about health care at the university. Most of the questions dealt with the university's student health service and satisfaction with the quality of medical treatment at the facility, perception of the staff's performance and interest in…

  10. Health Research Facilities: A survey of Doctorate-Granting Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atelsek, Frank J.; Gomberg, Irene L.

    The survey data cover three broad categories: (1) the status of existing health research facilities at doctorate-granting institutions (including their current value, adequacy, and condition); (2) the volume of new construction in progress; and (3) the additions to health research facilities anticipated during the next 5 years…

  11. Taking the Pulse of Undergraduate Health Psychology: A Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brack, Amy Badura; Kesitilwe, Kutlo; Ware, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a random national survey of 100 doctoral, 100 comprehensive, and 100 baccalaureate institutions to determine the current state of the undergraduate health psychology course. We found clear evidence of a maturing course with much greater commonality in name (health psychology), theoretical foundation (the biopsychosocial model), and…

  12. Licensed Practical Nurses in Occupational Health. An Initial Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jane A.; And Others

    The study, conducted in 1971, assessed characteristics of licensed practical nurses (LPN's) who worked in occupational health nursing. The survey instrument, a questionnaire, was returned by 591 LPN's in occupational health and provided data related to: personal characteristics, work and setting, administrative and professional functioning,…

  13. Taking the Pulse of Undergraduate Health Psychology: A Nationwide Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brack, Amy Badura; Kesitilwe, Kutlo; Ware, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a random national survey of 100 doctoral, 100 comprehensive, and 100 baccalaureate institutions to determine the current state of the undergraduate health psychology course. We found clear evidence of a maturing course with much greater commonality in name (health psychology), theoretical foundation (the biopsychosocial model), and…

  14. The Teaching of Undergraduate Health Psychology: A National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panjwani, Aliza A.; Gurung, Regan A. R.; Revenson, Tracey A.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted an online national survey to examine how undergraduate health psychology is taught, offer information about course design and content, and provide a needs analysis. Health psychology instructors (N = 126) answered questions about course format, teaching tools, importance of covering specific topics, and needed resources. A principal…

  15. Urban Forest Health Needs Assessment Survey: Results and Recommendations

    Treesearch

    Jill D. Pokorny

    1998-01-01

    The survey was designed to query urban forestry professionals in the 20 northeastern and Midwest States and the District of Columbia, which are served by the Northeastern Area, to learn about their attitudes toward the general issue of urban forest health, identify specific training and information needs in the area of urban tree health management, and discover...

  16. Biomass smoke exposures: health outcomes measures and study design.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Curtis W; Balmes, John R

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiological studies of biomass smoke health effects have been conducted in a variety of settings and with a variety of study designs. The Health Effects Workgroup discussed several approaches for the investigation of health effects in communities exposed to wood smoke from nearby wildland fires, intentional agricultural burning, or residential biomass burning devices such as woodstoves or cookstoves. This presentation briefly reviews observational and intervention studies that have been conducted within these exposure settings. The review is followed by a summary of discussion points among the workgroup members with particular emphasis on study design and the use of biomarkers for assessing outcomes in biomass smoke-exposed populations.

  17. Oral Health in Women During Preconception and Pregnancy: Implications for Birth Outcomes and Infant Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Burton L.

    2006-01-01

    The mouth is an obvious portal of entry to the body, and oral health reflects and influences general health and well being. Maternal oral health has significant implications for birth outcomes and infant oral health. Maternal periodontal disease, that is, a chronic infection of the gingiva and supporting tooth structures, has been associated with preterm birth, development of preeclampsia, and delivery of a small-for-gestational age infant. Maternal oral flora is transmitted to the newborn infant, and increased cariogenic flora in the mother predisposes the infant to the development of caries. It is intriguing to consider preconception, pregnancy, or intrapartum treatment of oral health conditions as a mechanism to improve women's oral and general health, pregnancy outcomes, and their children's dental health. However, given the relationship between oral health and general health, oral health care should be a goal in its own right for all individuals. Regardless of the potential for improved oral health to improve pregnancy outcomes, public policies that support comprehensive dental services for vulnerable women of childbearing age should be expanded so that their own oral and general health is safeguarded and their children's risk of caries is reduced. Oral health promotion should include education of women and their health care providers ways to prevent oral disease from occurring, and referral for dental services when disease is present. PMID:16816998

  18. A comprehensive Laboratory Services Survey of State Public Health Laboratories.

    PubMed

    Inhorn, Stanley L; Wilcke, Burton W; Downes, Frances Pouch; Adjanor, Oluwatosin Omolade; Cada, Ronald; Ford, James R

    2006-01-01

    In November 2004, the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) conducted a Comprehensive Laboratory Services Survey of State Public Health Laboratories (SPHLs) in order to establish the baseline data necessary for Healthy People 2010 Objective 23-13. This objective aims to measure the increase in the proportion of health agencies that provide or assure access to comprehensive laboratory services to support essential public health services. This assessment addressed only SPHLs and served as a baseline to periodically evaluate the level of improvement in the provision of laboratory services over the decade ending 2010. The 2004 survey used selected questions that were identified as key indicators of provision of comprehensive laboratory services. The survey was developed in consultation with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics, based on newly developed data sources. Forty-seven states and one territory responded to the survey. The survey was based on the 11 core functions of SPHLs as previously defined by APHL. The range of performance among individual laboratories for the 11 core functions (subobjectives) reflects the challenging issues that have confronted SPHLs in the first half of this decade. APHL is now working on a coordinated effort with other stakeholders to create seamless state and national systems for the provision of laboratory services in support of public health programs. These services are necessary to help face the threats raised by the specter of terrorism, emerging infections, and natural disasters.

  19. The Influence of Health Behaviors During Childhood on Adolescent Health Behaviors, Health Indicators, and Academic Outcomes Among Participants from Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Claudio R; Amato, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Health behaviors during childhood may influence adolescent health behaviors and be related to other important outcomes, but no longitudinal research has examined this in a multicultural population in Hawaii to date. This study investigated if childhood moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), fruit and vegetable consumption, and sedentary behavior influence adolescent (1) MVPA, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sedentary behavior; (2) body mass index (BMI) percentile, general health, and stress; and (3) school marks and school absenteeism. Three cohorts of public elementary school children (fourth to sixth graders) who participated in a state-mandated after-school program in 2004, 2005, and 2006 completed baseline (demographics, MVPA, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sedentary behavior) and 5-year follow-up surveys (demographics, MVPA, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sedentary behavior; BMI, general health, stress, school marks, and absenteeism; combined follow-up n = 334; 14.76 ± 0.87 years old; 55.1% female; 53% Asian, 19.8% Native Hawaiian/other Pacific Islander, 15.3% White, and 11.9% other). Regressions found that childhood MVPA (mean [m] = 45.42, standard deviation [SD] = 31.2 min/day) and fruit and vegetable consumption (m = 6.96, SD = 4.54 servings/day) predicted these behaviors in adolescence (m = 47.22, SD = 27.04 min/day and m = 4.63, SD = 3.03 servings/day, respectively, p < 0.05). Childhood sedentary behavior (m = 3.85, SD = 2.85 h/day)) predicted adolescent BMI percentile (m = 60.93, SD = 28.75, p < 0.05). Childhood fruit and vegetable consumption and sedentary behavior negatively predicted adolescent marks (B average, p < 0.05). Childhood health behaviors do influence adolescent health behaviors, some health outcomes, and some academic indicators in this population, especially childhood sedentary behavior, which underlines the importance of sedentary behavior

  20. National health and optometry--a survey of public attitudes.

    PubMed

    Allen, D C; Levi, D M

    1975-04-01

    A stratified probability sample of the Houston, Texas population was interviewed to assess public opinion of national health care and public awareness of vision care and its role in a national health care system. Over 80% of the population surveyed are in favor of a national health care bill, with a large percentage of the population favoring inclusion of vision care. Demographic trends are reported as they relate to various questions in the survey, and comparisons are made to a similar questionnaire one year earlier.

  1. Development and Implementation of Culturally Tailored Offline Mobile Health Surveys

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In low and middle income countries (LMICs), and other areas with low resources and unreliable access to the Internet, understanding the emerging best practices for the implementation of new mobile health (mHealth) technologies is needed for efficient and secure data management and for informing public health researchers. Innovations in mHealth technology can improve on previous methods, and dissemination of project development details and lessons learned during implementation are needed to provide lessons learned to stakeholders in both the United States and LMIC settings. Objective The aims of this paper are to share implementation strategies and lessons learned from the development and implementation stages of two survey research projects using offline mobile technology, and to inform and prepare public health researchers and practitioners to implement new mobile technologies in survey research projects in LMICs. Methods In 2015, two survey research projects were developed and piloted in Puerto Rico and pre-tested in Costa Rica to collect face-to-face data, get formative evaluation feedback, and to test the feasibility of an offline mobile data collection process. Fieldwork in each setting involved survey development, back translation with cultural tailoring, ethical review and approvals, data collector training, and piloting survey implementation on mobile tablets. Results Critical processes and workflows for survey research projects in low resource settings were identified and implemented. This included developing a secure mobile data platform tailored to each survey, establishing user accessibility, and training and eliciting feedback from data collectors and on-site LMIC project partners. Conclusions Formative and process evaluation strategies are necessary and useful for the development and implementation of survey research projects using emerging mHealth technologies in LMICs and other low resource settings. Lessons learned include: (1) plan

  2. Environmental Volunteering and Health Outcomes over a 20-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Pillemer, Karl; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E.; Reid, M. C.; Wells, Nancy M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested the hypothesis that volunteering in environmental organizations in midlife is associated with greater physical activity and improved mental and physical health over a 20-year period.  Design and Methods: The study used data from two waves (1974 and 1994) of the Alameda County Study, a longitudinal study of health and mortality that has followed a cohort of 6,928 adults since 1965. Using logistic and multiple regression models, we examined the prospective association between environmental and other volunteerism and three outcomes (physical activity, self-reported health, and depression), with 1974 volunteerism predicting 1994 outcomes, controlling for a number of relevant covariates.  Results: Midlife environmental volunteering was significantly associated with physical activity, self-reported health, and depressive symptoms.  Implications: This population-based study offers the first epidemiological evidence for a significant positive relationship between environmental volunteering and health and well-being outcomes. Further research, including intervention studies, is needed to confirm and shed additional light on these initial findings. PMID:20172902

  3. Defining ethnic enclave and its associations with self-reported health outcomes among Asian American adults in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sungwoo; Yi, Stella S.; De La Cruz, Nneka Lundy; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on ethnic enclave-health associations for Asian Americans is limited due to an inconsistent definition of ethnic enclave. The authors aimed to establish a robust criterion for defining Asian enclaves in New York City (NYC) and assessed the association between enclave residence and health outcomes among Asian American adults. Data came from 2009-12 NYC Community Health Surveys and 2008-12 American Community Survey. Asian enclave was defined as an area with high dissimilarity and isolation scores as well as high concentration of Asians. Five of 55 NYC community districts were identified as Asian enclaves. After controlling for confounding, enclave residence was associated with positive perception of general health with borderline significance (prevalence ratio = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.98, 1.15), but not with current smoking, hypertension, and diabetes. Ethnic enclave residence in urban areas may not produce a substantial impact on chronic health outcomes for Asian Americans beyond individual-level factors. PMID:26699378

  4. Body Dissatisfaction and Mental Health Outcomes Among Korean College Students.

    PubMed

    You, Sukkyung; Shin, Kyulee

    2016-06-01

    For many years, body dissatisfaction and mental health were thought of as Western phenomena and were studied mostly in Caucasian women. Recent studies, however, suggest that these issues are also present in men and in other ethnic groups. This study examined the association between body dissatisfaction and mental health outcomes, with personality traits and neuroticism playing possible predictive roles, using a Korean sample. A total of 545 college students, from five private universities in South Korea, completed assessment measures for depression, self-esteem, neuroticism, and body esteem scales. After controlling for covariates including body mass index and exercise time, body dissatisfaction was seen to play a mediating role between neuroticism and mental health outcomes. Differences between the sexes were also found in this relationship. For men, body dissatisfaction acted as a mediator between neuroticism and depression. For women, body dissatisfaction acted as a mediator between neuroticism and both depression and self-esteem. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Nutritionists' Health Study cohort: a web-based approach of life events, habits and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Folchetti, Luciana Gavilan Dias; Silva, Isis Tande da; Almeida-Pititto, Bianca de; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta G

    2016-08-31

    Non-communicable chronic diseases (NCCDs) represent a burden for public health. Alongside the established cardiometabolic risk factors such as high blood pressure and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism, living habits and nutritional status at different stages of life are seen as contributors to this scenario. Gut microbiota composition and subclinical inflammation have been pointed out as underlying mechanisms of NCCDs. Studies involving health professionals have brought relevant contributions to the knowledge about risk factors. Technological advances facilitate data collection and analysis for big samples. A web-based survey addressed to collect data from a cohort study, which is able to identify NCCDs risk factors, is highly desirable. The objective of the Brazilian Nutritionists' Health Study (NutriHS) is to gather online information on early life events, daily habits, emergent cardiometabolic risk factors and health outcomes of a specific subset of the Brazilian population. NutriHS, developed at the School of Public Health-University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, is a research initiative that enrols undergraduates of nutrition courses from Brazilian universities and graduated volunteers. A web-based self-administered system was designed to collect health-related data. After fulfilling online questionnaires (socioeconomic, early life events and lifestyle data), participants are invited to a clinical visit for physical examination and laboratory procedures (blood sampling, faeces collection and body composition). At a 3-year interval, they will be invited to repeat similar procedures. The NutriHS research protocol was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee and is providing promising data which contribute to the understanding of pathophysiological links between early life events, body composition, gut microbiota, and inflammatory and metabolic risk profile. The combination of a friendly tool with the innovative purposes of NutriHS offers a remarkable

  6. Associations between daily musicking and health: Results from a nationwide survey in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Ekholm, Ola; Juel, Knud; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2016-08-16

    To examine the associations between singing/playing musical instruments daily and various outcomes such as health-related quality of life and health behaviour. Data originates from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2013. The survey was based on a random sample of 25,000 adult Danes (response rate: 57%). Besides standard health-related questions the survey included eight specific music questions, based on a review of the sparse literature on music and health. On the same basis, 'daily musicking' was defined as normally singing/playing musical instruments at least 1 h/day. Both musically active men and women were more likely to report good self-rated health than individuals that were not active musically. However, the results also indicated that musically active women were less likely to report poor physical and mental health than women who were not active musically, while this pattern was not found among men. CONCLUSIONS GENDER SEEMS TO PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN MUSICKING AND HEALTH, BUT MORE RESEARCH IS NEEDED TO UNDERSTAND THESE DIFFERENCES AND THE UNDERLYING MECHANISMS IN ADDITION, LONGITUDINAL STUDIES ARE WARRANTED TO EXAMINE THE CAUSAL EFFECTS OF MUSICKING. © Author(s) 2016.

  7. [Outcomes evaluation of the school staff health promotion project].

    PubMed

    Woynarowska-Sołdan, Magdalena

    This article presents selected outcomes of a 3-year project "Health promotion of school staff in health-promoting schools," as well as the achievements and difficulties in its implementation. The research was conducted on 644 teachers and 226 members of non-teaching staff in 21 schools. The method involved opinion poll and authored questionnaires. A 2-part model of outcome evaluation was developed. Most participants appreciated the changes that took place within the 3 years of the project implementation. These included the improved level of their knowledge about health, health-conducive behaviors (62-93%) and the physical and social environment of the school (50-92%). Changes were more frequently acknowledged by teachers. About 80% of the participants had a positive attitude to the project, but only 20% assessed their involvement as considerable. About 90% believed that health promotion activities should be continued. According to the project leaders, insufficient support and financial resources, and difficulties in motivating school employees, particularly the nonteaching staff, to undertake health-promotion activities were the major handicaps in the project implementation. The project outcomes can be assessed as satisfying. They revealed that it is posssible to initiate health promotion among school staff. This can be effective on condition that participants are motivated, actively engaged in the project and supported by the head teacher and the local community. Necessarily, school leaders should be prepared to promote health among adults and to gain support from school policy decision makers, school administration, trade unions and universities involved in teacher training. Med Pr 2016;67(2):187-200. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  8. Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Debra L.; Tonthat, Luong

    This report presents statistics from the 1999 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) on selected health measures for children under 18 years of age, classified by sex, age, race/ethnicity, family structure, parent education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage, place of residence, region, and current health status. The NHIS…

  9. Associations of family-centered care with health care outcomes for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Dennis Z; Bird, T Mac; Tilford, J Mick

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association of family-centered care (FCC) with specific health care service outcomes for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). The study is a secondary analysis of the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Receipt of FCC was determined by five questions regarding how well health care providers addressed family concerns in the prior 12 months. We measured family burden by reports of delayed health care, unmet need, financial costs, and time devoted to care; health status, by stability of health care needs; and emergency department and outpatient service use. All statistical analyses used propensity score-based matching models to address selection bias. FCC was reported by 65.6% of respondents (N = 38,915). FCC was associated with less delayed health care (AOR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.66), fewer unmet service needs (AOR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.60), reduced odds of ≥1 h/week coordinating care (AOR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.74, 0.93) and reductions in out of pocket costs (AOR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.80, 0.96). FCC was associated with more stable health care needs (AOR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.21), reduced odds of emergency room visits (AOR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.82, 0.99) and increased odds of doctor visits (AOR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.14, 1.37). Our study demonstrates associations of positive health and family outcomes with FCC. Realizing the health care delivery benefits of FCC may require additional encounters to build key elements of trust and partnership.

  10. Dual pricing of health sciences periodicals: a survey.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D R; Jensen, J E

    1980-01-01

    A survey of dual pricing practices among publishers of health-related journals identified 281 periodicals with an average price differential of over 100% between individual and institutional subscription rates. Both the practice itself and the amount of the differential are increasing, indicating that journal subscriptions of health sciences libraries increasingly provide the financial support necessary for the publication of health sciences journals. Dual pricing is also correlated with copyright royalties. The problems that dual pricing creates for health sciences libraries' budgets are due in part to uncritical purchasing by libraries. Increased consumerism on the part of health science librarians is recommended. PMID:7437588

  11. Results from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report presents results pertaining to mental health from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older. This report presents national estimates of the prevalence of past year mental disorders and past year mental health…

  12. Achieving better health care outcomes for children in foster care.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Robin; Noonan, Kathleen; Rubin, David

    2009-04-01

    This article reviews the challenges health care systems face as they attempt to improve health care outcomes for children in foster care. It discusses several of the promising health care strategies occurring outside the perimeter of child welfare and identifies some of the key impasses in working alongside efforts in child welfare reform. The authors posit that the greatest impasse in establishing a reasonable quality of health care for these children is placement instability, in which children move frequently among multiple homes and in and out of the child welfare system. The authors propose potential strategies in which efforts to improve placement stability can serve as a vehicle for multidisciplinary reform across the health care system.

  13. Sampling in health geography: reconciling geographical objectives and probabilistic methods. An example of a health survey in Vientiane (Lao PDR).

    PubMed

    Vallée, Julie; Souris, Marc; Fournet, Florence; Bochaton, Audrey; Mobillion, Virginie; Peyronnie, Karine; Salem, Gérard

    2007-06-01

    Geographical objectives and probabilistic methods are difficult to reconcile in a unique health survey. Probabilistic methods focus on individuals to provide estimates of a variable's prevalence with a certain precision, while geographical approaches emphasise the selection of specific areas to study interactions between spatial characteristics and health outcomes. A sample selected from a small number of specific areas creates statistical challenges: the observations are not independent at the local level, and this results in poor statistical validity at the global level. Therefore, it is difficult to construct a sample that is appropriate for both geographical and probability methods. We used a two-stage selection procedure with a first non-random stage of selection of clusters. Instead of randomly selecting clusters, we deliberately chose a group of clusters, which as a whole would contain all the variation in health measures in the population. As there was no health information available before the survey, we selected a priori determinants that can influence the spatial homogeneity of the health characteristics. This method yields a distribution of variables in the sample that closely resembles that in the overall population, something that cannot be guaranteed with randomly-selected clusters, especially if the number of selected clusters is small. In this way, we were able to survey specific areas while minimising design effects and maximising statistical precision. We applied this strategy in a health survey carried out in Vientiane, Lao People's Democratic Republic. We selected well-known health determinants with unequal spatial distribution within the city: nationality and literacy. We deliberately selected a combination of clusters whose distribution of nationality and literacy is similar to the distribution in the general population. This paper describes the conceptual reasoning behind the construction of the survey sample and shows that it can be

  14. Sampling in health geography: reconciling geographical objectives and probabilistic methods. An example of a health survey in Vientiane (Lao PDR)

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Julie; Souris, Marc; Fournet, Florence; Bochaton, Audrey; Mobillion, Virginie; Peyronnie, Karine; Salem, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    Background Geographical objectives and probabilistic methods are difficult to reconcile in a unique health survey. Probabilistic methods focus on individuals to provide estimates of a variable's prevalence with a certain precision, while geographical approaches emphasise the selection of specific areas to study interactions between spatial characteristics and health outcomes. A sample selected from a small number of specific areas creates statistical challenges: the observations are not independent at the local level, and this results in poor statistical validity at the global level. Therefore, it is difficult to construct a sample that is appropriate for both geographical and probability methods. Methods We used a two-stage selection procedure with a first non-random stage of selection of clusters. Instead of randomly selecting clusters, we deliberately chose a group of clusters, which as a whole would contain all the variation in health measures in the population. As there was no health information available before the survey, we selected a priori determinants that can influence the spatial homogeneity of the health characteristics. This method yields a distribution of variables in the sample that closely resembles that in the overall population, something that cannot be guaranteed with randomly-selected clusters, especially if the number of selected clusters is small. In this way, we were able to survey specific areas while minimising design effects and maximising statistical precision. Application We applied this strategy in a health survey carried out in Vientiane, Lao People's Democratic Republic. We selected well-known health determinants with unequal spatial distribution within the city: nationality and literacy. We deliberately selected a combination of clusters whose distribution of nationality and literacy is similar to the distribution in the general population. Conclusion This paper describes the conceptual reasoning behind the construction of the

  15. Survey of Health Sciences CAI Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamp, Martin

    A project to develop an automated index of information about existing computerized instruction in the health sciences is reported and described. Methods of obtaining and indexing materials for the catalog are detailed. Entry and recovery techniques and selection of descriptors are described. Results to date show that the data base contains…

  16. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. I: Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentz, Willard K.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73 in Vance and Franklin Counties) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this booklet is the first in a series of nine and deals with methods of gathering preliminary information. Basically, this booklet presents information…

  17. Experiences in Rural Mental Health. I: Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentz, Willard K.; And Others

    Based on a North Carolina feasibility study (1967-73 in Vance and Franklin Counties) which focused on development of a pattern for providing comprehensive mental health services to rural people, this booklet is the first in a series of nine and deals with methods of gathering preliminary information. Basically, this booklet presents information…

  18. Public health financial management needs: report of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Costich, Julia F; Honoré, Peggy A; Scutchfield, F Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The work reported here builds on the identification of public health financial management practice competencies by a national expert panel. The next logical step was to provide a validity check for the competencies and identify priority areas for educational programming. We developed a survey for local public health finance officers based on the public health finance competencies and field tested it with a convenience sample of officials. We asked respondents to indicate the importance of each competency area and the need for training to improve performance; we also requested information regarding respondent education, jurisdiction size, and additional comments. Our local agency survey sample drew on the respondent list from the National Association of County and City Health Officials 2005 local health department survey, stratified by agency size and limited to jurisdiction populations of 25,000 to 1,000,000. Identifying appropriate respondents was a major challenge. The survey was fielded electronically, yielding 112 responses from 30 states. The areas identified as most important and needing most additional training were knowledge of budget activities, financial data interpretation and communication, and ability to assess and correct the organization's financial status. The majority of respondents had some postbaccalaureate education. Many provided additional comments and recommendations. Health department finance officers demonstrated a high level of general agreement regarding the importance of finance competencies in public health and the need for training. The findings point to a critical need for additional training opportunities that are accessible, cost-effective, and targeted to individual needs.

  19. Association of rule of law and health outcomes: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon-Rondon, Angela Maria; Attaran, Amir; Botero, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Sternberg, Angela Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore whether the rule of law is a foundational determinant of health that underlies other socioeconomic, political and cultural factors that have been associated with health outcomes. Setting Global project. Participants Data set of 96 countries, comprising 91% of the global population. Primary and secondary outcome measures The following health indicators, infant mortality rate, maternal mortality rate, life expectancy, and cardiovascular disease and diabetes mortality rate, were included to explore their association with the rule of law. We used a novel Rule of Law Index, gathered from survey sources, in a cross-sectional and ecological design. The Index is based on eight subindices: (1) Constraints on Government Powers; (2) Absence of Corruption; (3) Order and Security; (4) Fundamental Rights; (5) Open Government; (6) Regulatory Enforcement, (7) Civil Justice; and (8) Criminal Justice. Results The rule of law showed an independent association with infant mortality rate, maternal mortality rate, life expectancy, and cardiovascular disease and diabetes mortality rate, after adjusting for the countries’ level of per capita income, their expenditures in health, their level of political and civil freedom, their Gini measure of inequality and women's status (p<0.05). Rule of law remained significant in all the multivariate models, and the following adjustment for potential confounders remained robust for at least one or more of the health outcomes across all eight subindices of the rule of law. Findings show that the higher the country's level of adherence to the rule of law, the better the health of the population. Conclusions It is necessary to start considering the country's adherence to the rule of law as a foundational determinant of health. Health advocates should consider the improvement of rule of law as a tool to improve population health. Conversely, lack of progress in rule of law may constitute a structural barrier to health improvement

  20. Race-ethnicity and health trajectories: tests of three hypotheses across multiple groups and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tyson H; O'Rand, Angela M; Adkins, Daniel E

    2012-09-01

    Racial-ethnic disparities in static levels of health are well documented. Less is known about racial-ethnic differences in age trajectories of health. The few studies on this topic have examined only single health outcomes and focused on black-white disparities. This study extends prior research by using a life course perspective, panel data from the Health and Retirement Study, and multilevel growth curve models to investigate racial-ethnic differences in the trajectories of serious conditions and functional limitations among blacks, Mexican Americans, and whites. We test three hypotheses on the nature of racial-ethnic disparities in health across the life course (aging-as-leveler, persistent inequality, and cumulative disadvantage). Results controlling for mortality selection reveal that support for the hypotheses varies by health outcome, racial-ethnic group, and life stage. Controlling for childhood socioeconomic status, adult social and economic resources, and health behaviors reduces but does not eliminate racial-ethnic disparities in health trajectories.

  1. The Impact of Parent's Health Literacy on Pediatric Asthma Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Kathleen F; Zhang, Bin; Magruder, Teresa; Bailey, William C; Gerald, Lynn B

    2015-03-01

    Background: Health literacy has been associated with health disparities in many disease outcomes, including children's asthma. Parents are responsible for most of children's healthcare. Therefore, parents' health literacy may impact children's health outcomes, including asthma control. This study sought to determine the association between parent health literacy and children's asthma control among a cohort of predominately minority urban children aged between 6 and 12 years. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed children with asthma and their parents at a single outpatient visit. English-speaking parents and their children, aged between 6 and 12 years with physician-diagnosed asthma, were eligible for this study. Healthcare providers assessed asthma control and severity, and parents completed demographic, health literacy, asthma control, and asthma knowledge measures. Children completed a pulmonary function test as part of the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) scoring. Results: A total of 281 parent-child dyads provided data, with the majority of parents being mothers and African American, with a high school level education or less. Lower parent health literacy was associated with worse asthma control as rated both by the provider (p=0.007) and the ACQ (p=0.013), despite only moderate concordance between ratings (ρ=0.408, p<0.0001). Lower parent health literacy also was associated with less asthma knowledge, which was associated with worse asthma control. Conclusions: Higher parent health literacy was associated with more parent asthma knowledge and better child asthma control. Pediatric providers should consider tailoring education or treatment plans or utilizing universal precautions for low health literacy.

  2. School-based survey participation: oral health and BMI survey of Ohio third graders.

    PubMed

    Detty, Amber M R

    2013-09-01

    During the 2009-2010 school year, the Ohio Department of Health conducted a statewide oral health and body mass index (BMI) screening survey among 3rd grade children. This marked the fifth school-based survey regarding the oral health of Ohio children since 1987. At 50 %, the participation rate of the 2009-2010 oral health and BMI survey was at the lowest level ever experienced. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with participation rates in a school-based survey. A stratified, random sample of 377 schools was drawn from the list of 1,742 Ohio public elementary schools with third grade students. All third grade children in the sampled schools with parent or guardian consent received an oral health screening and height/weight measurement by trained health professionals. Participation rates at the school level were then combined with data on school characteristics and survey implementation. Predictors of school form return, participation, and refusal rates were assessed by generalized linear modeling (GLM). High student mobility and larger school size were associated with lower form return (p = 0.000 and p = 0.001, respectively) and lower participation rates (p = 0.000 and p = 0.005, respectively). Surveying in the fall or spring (as opposed to winter) significantly decreased form return (p = 0.001 and p = 0.016, respectively) and participation rates (p = 0.008 and p = 0.002, respectively), while being surveyed by internal staff (versus external screeners) significantly increased form return (p = 0.003) and participation rates (p = 0.001). Efforts to increase participation should focus more on schools with higher student mobility and larger size. Additionally, participation could be improved by using internal staff and surveying during winter.

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGY and Health Care Reform The National Health Survey of 1935-1936

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The National Health Survey undertaken in 1935 and 1936 was the largest morbidity survey until that time. It was also the first national survey to focus on chronic disease and disability. The decision to conduct a survey of this magnitude was part of the larger strategy to reform health care in the United States. The focus on morbidity allowed reformers to argue that the health status of Americans was poor, despite falling mortality rates that suggested the opposite. The focus on chronic disease morbidity proved to be an especially effective way of demonstrating the poor health of the population and the strong links between poverty and illness. The survey, undertaken by a small group of reform-minded epidemiologists led by Edgar Sydenstricker, was made possible by the close interaction during the Depression of agencies and actors in the public health and social welfare sectors, a collaboration which produced new ways of thinking about disease burdens. PMID:21233434

  4. Effectiveness of a Multilevel Workplace Health Promotion Program on Vitality, Health, and Work-Related Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Ingrid J.M.; Snoijer, Mirjam; de Kok, Brenda P.H.; van Vilsteren, Jeroen; Hofstetter, Hedwig

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a workplace health promotion program on employees’ vitality, health, and work-related outcomes, and exploring the influence of organizational support and the supervisors’ role on these outcomes. Methods: The 5-month intervention included activities at management, team, and individual level targeting self-management to perform healthy behaviors: a kick-off session, vitality training sessions, workshops, individual coaching, and intervision. Outcome measures were collected using questionnaires, health checks, and sickness absence data at baseline, after the intervention and at 10 months follow-up. For analysis linear and generalized mixed models were used. Results: Vitality, work performance, sickness absence, and self-management significantly improved. Good organizational support and involved supervisors were significantly associated with lower sickness absence. Conclusions: Including all organizational levels and focusing on increasing self-management provided promising results for improving vitality, health, and work-related outcomes. PMID:27136605

  5. European Health Examination Survey--towards a sustainable monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Hanna; Koponen, Päivikki; Mindell, Jennifer; Männistö, Satu; Kuulasmaa, Kari

    2014-04-01

    Health examination surveys (HESs), including both questionnaire and physical measurements, and in most cases also collection of biological samples, can provide objective health indicators. This information complements data from health interview surveys and administrative registers, and is important for evidence-based planning of health policies and prevention activities. HESs are valuable data sources for research. The first national HESs in Europe were conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s. They have recently been carried out in an increasing number of countries, but there has been no joint standardization between the countries. The European Health Examination Survey Pilot Project was conducted in 2009-2012. The European Health Examination Survey Pilot Reference Centre was established and pilot surveys were conducted in 12 countries.  European standardized protocols for key measurements on main chronic disease risk factors (height, weight, waist circumference, blood pressure, blood lipids and fasting glucose or HbA1c) were prepared. European-level training and external quality assessment were organized. Although the level of earlier experience, infrastructures, economic status and cultural settings varied between the pilot countries, it was possible to standardize measurements of HESs across the populations. Obtaining high participation rates was challenging.  HESs provide high-quality and representative population data to support policy decisions and research. For future national HESs, centralized coordination, training and external quality assessment are needed to ensure comparability of the results. Further studies on effects of different survey methods on comparability of the results and on recruitment and motivation of survey participants are needed.

  6. Maternal undernutrition and excessive body weight and risk of birth and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Nuruzzaman; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Shariff, Asma Ahmad; Rahman, Md Mostafizur; Rahman, Md Shafiur; Rahman, Md Aminur

    2017-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing in low- and middle-income countries, while underweight remains a significant health problems. However, the association between double burden of nutrition and risk of adverse birth and health outcomes is still unclear in Bangladesh. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of maternal undernutrition and excessive body weight on a range of maternal and child health outcomes. In this study, we used Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS) 2011 and 2014 data sets to cover the maternal, child and non-communicable diseases related health outcomes. The study considered a range of outcome variables including pregnancy complication, cesarean delivery, diabetes, hypertension, stunting, and wasting, low birth weight, genital discharge, genital sore/ulcer, stillbirth, early neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality, preterm birth and prolonged labor. The key exposure variable was maternal body mass index. Multilevel regression analysis was performed to examine the association between outcomes and exposure variables. Maternal overweight and obesity has increased from 10% in 2004 to 24% in 2014, a 240% increase in 10 years. Between 2004 and 2014, maternal undernutrition declined from 33% to 18%, a reduction rate of only 54% in 10 years. Compared to normal-weight women, overweight and obese women were more likely to have experienced pregnancy complication, cesarean delivery, diabetes, and hypertension. Underweight women were 1.3 times more likely to have children with stunting and 1.6 times more likely to experience wasting compared to normal weight women. Maternal BMI was not significantly associated with increased risk of genital sore or ulcer, genital discharge, menstrual irregularities, or low birth weight though in certain cases risk was higher. High maternal overweight and obesity were observed to have significant adverse effects on health outcomes, while underweight was a risk factor for newborn health. The findings

  7. An oral health survey of the Lumbee tribe in southeastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Wells, Pamela L; Caplan, Daniel J; Strauss, Ronald P; Bell, Danny; George, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The Lumbee tribe, North Carolina's largest American Indian tribe, is located in Robeson County, where there is an access to dental care crisis. There is a high incidence of systemic diseases, including coronary heart disease (CHD) and diabetes. The tribe also has a higher rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to Caucasian populations. There is little information available regarding the oral health of this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental care issues, oral health knowledge and oral health-related quality of life of the Lumbee tribe. A self-administered survey was developed to assess factors influencing access to dental care, oral health knowledge and oral health-related quality of life. The survey was administered to a convenience sample of 118 Lumbee Indians at the Lumbee Homecoming Festival in Pembroke, NC. Barriers to accessing dental care included being unable to leave work to find a dentist and cost of dental services. Many believed that it is natural to lose teeth as one ages. There was low oral health knowledge regarding oral and systemic health. Oral Health-related quality of life was affected. There was an association between poor access to dental care and poor oral health-related quality of life. Lumbee Indians reported barriers to accessing dental care. There was a significant relationship between difficulty accessing dental care and poor oral health-related quality of life.

  8. Comparing maternal child health problems and outcomes across public health nursing agencies.

    PubMed

    Monsen, Karen A; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Lytton, Amy B; Taft, Lila L; Schwichtenberg, Linda D; Martin, Karen S

    2010-05-01

    To use aggregated data from health informatics systems to identify needs of maternal and child health (MCH) clients served by county public health agencies and to demonstrate outcomes of services provided. Participating agencies developed and implemented a formal standardized classification data comparison process using structured Omaha System data. An exploratory descriptive analysis of the data was performed. Summary reports of aggregated and analyzed data from records of clients served and discharged in 2005 were compared. Client problems and outcomes were found to be similar across agencies, with behavioral, psychosocial, environmental and physiological problems identified and addressed. Differential improvement was noted by problem, outcome measure, and agency; and areas for enhancing intervention strategies were prioritized. Problems with greatest improvement across agencies were Antepartum/postpartum and Family planning, and least improvement across agencies were Neglect and Substance use. Findings demonstrated that public health nurses address many serious health-related problems with low-income high-risk MCH clients. MCH client needs were found to be similar across agencies. Public health nurse home visiting services addressed important health issues with MCH clients, and statistically significant improvement in client health problems occurred consistently across agencies. The data comparison processes developed in this project were useful for MCH programs, and may be applicable to other program areas using structured client data for evaluation purposes. Using informatics tools and data facilitated needs assessment, program evaluation, and outcomes management processes for the agencies, and will continue to play an integral role in directing practice and improving client outcomes.

  9. Specialist practice for UK community mental health nurses: the 1998--99 survey of course leaders.

    PubMed

    Hannigan, B; Burnard, P; Edwards, D; Turnbull, J

    2001-08-01

    Surveys of the leaders of the UK's post-qualifying education courses for community mental health nurses have taken place, on an annual basis, for over 10 years. In this paper, findings from the survey undertaken in the 1998--99 academic year are reported. These findings include: that most course leaders do not personally engage in clinical practice; that interprofessional education takes place at a minority of course centres, and that course philosophies and aims are characterised by an emphasis on both outcomes (in terms of, for example, skills acquisition, knowledge development and the ability to engage in reflective practice), and process (adult learning).

  10. Transition care: future directions in education, health policy, and outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Niraj; O'Hare, Kitty; Antonelli, Richard C; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    All youth must transition from pediatric to adult-centered medical care. This process is especially difficult for youth with special health care needs. Many youth do not receive the age-appropriate medical care they need and are at risk during this vulnerable time. Previous research has identified barriers that may prevent effective transition, and protocols have been developed to improve the process. Health outcomes related to successful transition have yet to be fully defined. Health care transition can also be influenced by education of providers, but there are gaps in medical education at the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Current changes in federal health policy allow improved health care coverage, provide some new financial incentives, and test new structures for transitional care, including the evolution of accountable care organizations (ACO). Future work must test how these systems changes will affect quality of care. Finally, transition protocols exist in various medical subspecialties; however, national survey results show no improvement in transition readiness, and there are no consistent measures of what constitutes transition success. In order to advance the field of transition, research must be done to integrate transition curricula at the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels; to provide advance financial incentives and pilot the ACO model in centers providing care to youth during transition; to define outcome measures of importance to transition; and to study the effectiveness of current transition tools on improving these outcomes.

  11. Transition Care: Future Directions in Education, Health Policy, and Outcomes Research

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Niraj; O’Hare, Kitty; Antonelli, Richard C.; Sawicki, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    All youth must transition from pediatric to adult-centered medical care. This process is especially difficult for youth with special health care needs. Many youth do not receive the age-appropriate medical care they need and are at risk during this vulnerable time. Previous research has identified barriers that may prevent effective transition, and protocols have been developed to improve the process. Health outcomes related to successful transition have yet to be fully defined. Health care transition can also be influenced by education of providers, but there are gaps in medical education at the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Current changes in federal health policy allow improved health care coverage, provide some new financial incentives, and test new structures for transitional care, including the evolution of accountable care organizations (ACO). Future work must test how these systems changes will affect quality of care. Finally, transition protocols exist in various medical subspecialties; however, national survey results show no improvement in transition readiness, and there are no consistent measures of what constitutes transition success. In order to advance the field of transition, research must be done to integrate transition curricula at the undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels; to provide advance financial incentives and pilot the ACO model in centers providing care to youth during transition; to define outcome measures of importance to transition; and to study the effectiveness of current transition tools on improving these outcomes. PMID:24602574

  12. Media exposure and oral health outcomes among adults.

    PubMed

    Zini, Avraham; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D; Vered, Yuval

    2013-02-01

    To assess the impact of media exposure on oral health outcomes among Jewish adults in Jerusalem, Israel, by means of a conceptual hierarchical model. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a stratified sample of 254 adults 35 to 44 years (mean age, 38.63 years) in Jerusalem, Israel. Media exposure was operationally categorized by type and frequency. Behavioral data included toothbrushing, dental attendance, oral hygiene aids use, plaque level, sugar consumption, and smoking. Clinical outcomes were assessed according to the decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT) index and the community periodontal index (CPI). Results were analyzed by chi-square test, independent test, one-way ANOVA, and linear and multiple logistic regression models. A total of 254 examinees consisted of 127 men and 127 mean (married couples). High type and high frequency of media exposure, as compared with other modes, revealed statistically significant higher caries experience (DMFT, 13.10), higher level of untreated decay (D, 1.67), and lower periodontal health (CPI [0], 0.39). A conceptual hierarchical regression model identified that the relationship described was mediated by sociodemographic determinants (education) and behavioral determinants (dental attendance and plaque level). Media exposure should be observed by community health program planners and general practitioners to examine the type and frequency of the messages. They also need to react on time to balanced bad advertising and add a good message at the community. This pragmatic approach could lead to better use of the media and improve oral health behavior and outcomes.

  13. A preference-based measure of health: the VR-6D derived from the veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Selim, Alfredo J; Rogers, William; Qian, Shirley X; Brazier, John; Kazis, Lewis E

    2011-10-01

    The Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey (VR-12) is currently the major endpoint used in the Medicare managed care outcomes measure in the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS(®)), referred to as the Health Outcomes Survey (HOS). The purpose of this study is to adapt the Brazier SF-6D utility measure to the VR-12 to generate a single utility index. We used the HOS cohorts 2 and 3 for SF-36 data and 9 for VR-12 data. We calculated SF-6D scores from the SF-36 using the algorithms developed by Brazier and colleagues. The values of the Brazier SF-6D were used to estimate utility scores from the VR-12 using a mapping approach based on a 2-stage mapping procedure, named as VR-6D. The VR-6D derived from the VR-12 has similar distributional properties as the SF-6D. The change in VR-6D showed significant variations across disease groups with different levels of morbidity and mortality. This study produced a utility measure for the VR-12 that is comparable to the SF-6D and responsive to change. The VR-6D can be used in evaluations of health care plans and cost-effectiveness analysis to compare the health gains that health care interventions can achieve.

  14. Outcomes in Child Health: Exploring the Use of Social Media to Engage Parents in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michele P; Shave, Kassi; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Scott, Shannon D; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-03-16

    With the rapid growth of technology and its improved accessibility globally, social media is gaining an increasingly important role in health care. Patients are frequently engaging with social media to access information, share content, and interact with others in online health communities. However, the use of social media as a stakeholder engagement strategy has been minimally explored, and effective methods for involving participants in research on the identification of patient-centered outcomes remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the process of using social media to engage parents in identifying patient-centered outcomes, using acute respiratory infections in children as an example to gauge feasibility. We conducted a process evaluation of a two-phase Web-based strategy to engage parents in research on patient-centered outcomes. In the first phase, we developed a website and study-specific Facebook and Twitter accounts to recruit parents to complete a Web-based survey identifying patient-centered outcomes. In the second phase, we used Facebook to host discussion with parents based on the survey results. The reach of social media as an engagement strategy and the characteristics of the population recruited were assessed. During the first phase, there were 5027 visits to the survey site, 110 participants completed the survey, 553 unique users visited the study website (675 visits), the Facebook page received 104 likes, and the Twitter account gained 52 followers over the 14-week study period. Most survey respondents identified Facebook (51.8%, 57/110) or a friend (45.5%, 50/110) as their source of referral. It was found that 70.0% (77/110) of respondents resided in Canada, in urban centers (92.7%, 102/110), and 88.2% (97/110) had a college or university degree or higher. The median year of birth was 1978 and 90.0% (99/110) were female. Most survey responses (88.2%, 97/110) were completed during the first month of the study. In the second phase, 4

  15. Outcomes in Child Health: Exploring the Use of Social Media to Engage Parents in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research

    PubMed Central

    Shave, Kassi; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Scott, Shannon D; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Background With the rapid growth of technology and its improved accessibility globally, social media is gaining an increasingly important role in health care. Patients are frequently engaging with social media to access information, share content, and interact with others in online health communities. However, the use of social media as a stakeholder engagement strategy has been minimally explored, and effective methods for involving participants in research on the identification of patient-centered outcomes remain unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the process of using social media to engage parents in identifying patient-centered outcomes, using acute respiratory infections in children as an example to gauge feasibility. Methods We conducted a process evaluation of a two-phase Web-based strategy to engage parents in research on patient-centered outcomes. In the first phase, we developed a website and study-specific Facebook and Twitter accounts to recruit parents to complete a Web-based survey identifying patient-centered outcomes. In the second phase, we used Facebook to host discussion with parents based on the survey results. The reach of social media as an engagement strategy and the characteristics of the population recruited were assessed. Results During the first phase, there were 5027 visits to the survey site, 110 participants completed the survey, 553 unique users visited the study website (675 visits), the Facebook page received 104 likes, and the Twitter account gained 52 followers over the 14-week study period. Most survey respondents identified Facebook (51.8%, 57/110) or a friend (45.5%, 50/110) as their source of referral. It was found that 70.0% (77/110) of respondents resided in Canada, in urban centers (92.7%, 102/110), and 88.2% (97/110) had a college or university degree or higher. The median year of birth was 1978 and 90.0% (99/110) were female. Most survey responses (88.2%, 97/110) were completed during the first month

  16. Brief Screening and Intervention for Alcohol and Drug Use in a College Student Health Clinic: Feasibility, Implementation, and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Hortensia; Reed, Elizabeth; Rowe, Erin; Picci, Jennifer; Mantella, Philomena; Prado, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the Brief Alcohol Screen and Intervention in College Students (BASICS) in a university primary care setting. Participants/Methods: Undergraduates (N = 449) participated in BASICS and electronic surveys assessing frequency/quantity of alcohol and drug use, psychosocial and mental health outcomes, and demographic…

  17. Environmental health outcomes and exposure risks among at-risk communities living in the Upper Olifants River Catchment, South Africa.

    PubMed

    John, Juanette; Wright, Caradee Yael; Oosthuizen, Maria Aletta; Steyn, Maronel; Genthe, Bettina; le Roux, Wouter; Albers, Patricia; Oberholster, Paul; Pauw, Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    Potential exposure to water and air pollution and associated health impacts of three low-income communities in the Upper Olifants River Catchment, South Africa, was investigated through a cross-sectional epidemiological study comprising a household survey. Water samples were collected and analysed for microbial indicators and pathogens. Ambient air-monitoring included some of the criteria pollutants, as well as mercury and manganese. Associations between environmental exposure and health outcomes were analysed by means of logistic regression. Despite poor water and air quality episodes, the communities' self-perceived health was good with relatively low prevalence of reported health outcomes. Hygiene practices with respect to water collection and storage were often poor, and most likely contributed to the regularly contaminated water storage containers. Community proximity to the polluted stream was associated with increased prevalence in adverse health outcomes. This paper reports on preliminary results and additional multivariate analyses are necessary to further understand study results.

  18. Rural mental health workforce needs assessment - a national survey.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Daniel; Macdowell, Martin; Glasser, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A variety of studies have indicated that rural communities have fewer mental health services and professionals than their urban counterparts. This study will examine the shortages of mental health prof