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Sample records for health physics training

  1. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect

    1992-06-01

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  2. Athletic Training: From Physical Education to Allied Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Athletic training was spawned from physical education in the 1960s, and since that time has evolved into a recognized health care profession. The majority of accredited athletic training education programs (ATEPs) are housed within academic units of kinesiology. However, the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) has recommended that ATEPs…

  3. EEG Brain Activity in Dynamic Health Qigong Training: Same Effects for Mental Practice and Physical Training?

    PubMed Central

    Henz, Diana; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant uptake of meditation and related relaxation techniques, as a means of alleviating stress and fostering an attentive mind. Several electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have reported changes in spectral band frequencies during Qigong meditation indicating a relaxed state. Much less is reported on effects of brain activation patterns induced by Qigong techniques involving bodily movement. In this study, we tested whether (1) physical Qigong training alters EEG theta and alpha activation, and (2) mental practice induces the same effect as a physical Qigong training. Subjects performed the dynamic Health Qigong technique Wu Qin Xi (five animals) physically and by mental practice in a within-subjects design. Experimental conditions were randomized. Two 2-min (eyes-open, eyes-closed) EEG sequences under resting conditions were recorded before and immediately after each 15-min exercise. Analyses of variance were performed for spectral power density data. Increased alpha power was found in posterior regions in mental practice and physical training for eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Theta power was increased after mental practice in central areas in eyes-open conditions, decreased in fronto-central areas in eyes-closed conditions. Results suggest that mental, as well as physical Qigong training, increases alpha activity and therefore induces a relaxed state of mind. The observed differences in theta activity indicate different attentional processes in physical and mental Qigong training. No difference in theta activity was obtained in physical and mental Qigong training for eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state. In contrast, mental practice of Qigong entails a high degree of internalized attention that correlates with theta activity, and that is dependent on eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state. PMID:28223957

  4. EEG Brain Activity in Dynamic Health Qigong Training: Same Effects for Mental Practice and Physical Training?

    PubMed

    Henz, Diana; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant uptake of meditation and related relaxation techniques, as a means of alleviating stress and fostering an attentive mind. Several electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have reported changes in spectral band frequencies during Qigong meditation indicating a relaxed state. Much less is reported on effects of brain activation patterns induced by Qigong techniques involving bodily movement. In this study, we tested whether (1) physical Qigong training alters EEG theta and alpha activation, and (2) mental practice induces the same effect as a physical Qigong training. Subjects performed the dynamic Health Qigong technique Wu Qin Xi (five animals) physically and by mental practice in a within-subjects design. Experimental conditions were randomized. Two 2-min (eyes-open, eyes-closed) EEG sequences under resting conditions were recorded before and immediately after each 15-min exercise. Analyses of variance were performed for spectral power density data. Increased alpha power was found in posterior regions in mental practice and physical training for eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. Theta power was increased after mental practice in central areas in eyes-open conditions, decreased in fronto-central areas in eyes-closed conditions. Results suggest that mental, as well as physical Qigong training, increases alpha activity and therefore induces a relaxed state of mind. The observed differences in theta activity indicate different attentional processes in physical and mental Qigong training. No difference in theta activity was obtained in physical and mental Qigong training for eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state. In contrast, mental practice of Qigong entails a high degree of internalized attention that correlates with theta activity, and that is dependent on eyes-open and eyes-closed resting state.

  5. Policy approach to nutrition and physical activity education in health care professional training.

    PubMed

    Levy, Matthew D; Loy, Lisel; Zatz, Laura Y

    2014-05-01

    Nutrition and physical activity are key risk factors for a host of today's most prevalent and costly chronic conditions, such as obesity and diabetes; yet, health care providers are not adequately trained to educate patients on the components of a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this article is to underscore the need for improved nutrition and physical activity training among health care professionals and to explore opportunities for how policy can help support a shift in training. We first identify key barriers to sufficient training in nutrition and physical activity. Then, we provide an overview of how recent changes in the government and institutional policy environment are supporting a shift toward prevention in our health care system and creating an even greater need for improved training of health care professionals in nutrition and physical activity. Last, we outline recommendations for additional policy changes that could drive enhanced training for health care professionals and recommend future directions in research.

  6. Policy approach to nutrition and physical activity education in health care professional training1234

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Lisel; Zatz, Laura Y

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition and physical activity are key risk factors for a host of today's most prevalent and costly chronic conditions, such as obesity and diabetes; yet, health care providers are not adequately trained to educate patients on the components of a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this article is to underscore the need for improved nutrition and physical activity training among health care professionals and to explore opportunities for how policy can help support a shift in training. We first identify key barriers to sufficient training in nutrition and physical activity. Then, we provide an overview of how recent changes in the government and institutional policy environment are supporting a shift toward prevention in our health care system and creating an even greater need for improved training of health care professionals in nutrition and physical activity. Last, we outline recommendations for additional policy changes that could drive enhanced training for health care professionals and recommend future directions in research. PMID:24646822

  7. Mental and Physical (MAP) Training: a neurogenesis-inspired intervention that enhances health in humans.

    PubMed

    Shors, Tracey J; Olson, Ryan L; Bates, Marsha E; Selby, Edward A; Alderman, Brandon L

    2014-11-01

    New neurons are generated in the hippocampus each day and their survival is greatly enhanced through effortful learning (Shors, 2014). The numbers of cells produced can be increased by physical exercise (van Praag, Kempermann, & Gage, 1999). These findings inspired us to develop a clinical intervention for humans known as Mental and Physical Training, or MAP Training. Each session consists of 30min of mental training with focused attention meditation (20min sitting and 10min walking). Meditation is an effortful training practice that involves learning about the transient nature of thoughts and thought patterns, and acquiring skills to recognize them without necessarily attaching meaning and/or emotions to them. The mental training component is followed by physical training with 30min of aerobic exercise performed at moderate intensity. During this component, participants learn choreographed dance routines while engaging in aerobic exercise. In a pilot "proof-of-concept" study, we provided supervised MAP Training (2 sessions per week for 8weeks) to a group of young mothers in the local community who were recently homeless, most of them having previously suffered from physical and sexual abuse, addiction, and depression. Preliminary data suggest that MAP Training improves dependent measures of aerobic fitness (as assessed by maximal rate of oxygen consumed) while decreasing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Similar changes were not observed in a group of recently homeless women who did not participate in MAP Training. It is not currently possible to determine whether new neurons in the human brain increase in number as a result of MAP Training. Rather these preliminary results of MAP Training illustrate how neuroscientific research can be translated into novel clinical interventions that benefit human health and wellness.

  8. Health workers' views of a program to facilitate physical health care in mental health settings: implications for implementation and training.

    PubMed

    Baker, Wendy; Harris, Melanie; Battersby, Malcolm

    2014-12-01

    Physical comorbidities shorten the lifespan of people with severe mental illness therefore mental health clinicians need to support service users in risk factor-related behaviour change. We investigated mental health care workers' views of a physical health self-management support program in order to identify implementation requirements. Qualitative interviews were conducted with workers who had differing levels of experience with a self-management support program. Themes were identified using interpretive descriptive analysis and then matched against domains used in implementation models to draw implications for successful practice change. Three main themes emerged related to: (1) understandings of disease management within job roles; (2) requirements for putting self-management support into practice; and (3) challenges of coordination in disease management. Priority domains from implementation models were inner and outer health service settings. While staff training is required, practice change for care which takes account of both mental and physical health also requires changes in organisational frameworks. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  9. Affect-regulated exercise intensity: does training at an intensity that feels 'good' improve physical health?

    PubMed

    Parfitt, Gaynor; Alrumh, Amnah; Rowlands, Alex V

    2012-11-01

    Affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' can be used to control exercise intensity amongst both active and sedentary individuals and should support exercise adherence. It is not known, however, whether affect-regulated exercise training can lead to physical health gains. The aim of this study was to examine if affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' leads to improved fitness over the course of an 8-week training programme. A repeated measures design (pretest-posttest) with independent groups (training and control). 20 sedentary females completed a submaximal graded exercise test and were then allocated to either a training group or control group. The training group completed two supervised sessions and one unsupervised session per week for 8 weeks. Exercise intensity was affect-regulated to feel 'good'. Following the 8 weeks of training, both groups completed a second submaximal graded exercise test. Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated a significant increase in the time to reach ventilatory threshold in the training group (318 ± 23.7s) compared to control (248 ± 16.9s). Overall compliance to training was high (>92%). Participants in the training group exercised at intensities that would be classified as being in the lower range of the recommended guidelines (≈ 50% V˙O(2) max) for cardiovascular health. Affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' can be used in a training programme to regulate exercise intensity. This approach led to a 19% increase in time to reach ventilatory threshold, which is indicative of improved fitness. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Training practice nurses to improve the physical health of patients with severe mental illness: effects on beliefs and attitudes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Sheila

    2012-06-01

    Annual health checks are recommended for patients with severe mental illness (SMI) as they are at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Ideally, these health checks should be carried out in primary care. Practice nurses are already competent in carrying out physical health checks, but might have misconceptions about mental illness, which is a barrier to offering the service. We used a mirror imaging study to establish the effectiveness of a training package for practice nurses that aims to address common misconceptions about the physical health of people with SMI. This 2-hour training package (Northampton Physical Health and Wellbeing Project) was delivered to eight practice nurses. Their misconceptions and beliefs were assessed before and after training. Motivation to work with community mental health workers was assessed after training. The practice nurses involved in the study rejected commonly held misconceptions about the physical health of people with SMI after training. Their attitudes towards their role in providing health checks appeared to be modified in a positive direction. Their motivation to work with community mental health workers also seemed to be enhanced. The Northampton Physical Health and Wellbeing Project training was effective in modifying practice nurses' misconceptions about physical health in people with SMI.

  11. Health-related physical fitness in children and adolescents with Down syndrome and response to training.

    PubMed

    González-Agüero, A; Vicente-Rodríguez, G; Moreno, L A; Guerra-Balic, M; Ara, I; Casajús, J A

    2010-10-01

    Physical fitness is related to health at all ages. Information about physical fitness in the Down syndrome (DS) population, however, is scarce, especially when we consider children and adolescents. A review of the current data available on this topic would be both timely and important as it would serve as a starting point to stimulate new research perspectives. The data we reviewed from the literature showed a general trend toward lower values of physical fitness parameters and worse body composition variables in children and adolescents with DS compared with the population without intellectual disability (ID) or even with the population with ID without DS. Notably, children and adolescents with DS have been described as less active or overprotected; however, these factors may not be the cause of their poor physical fitness. Many of the training programs carried out in children and adolescents with DS did not yield the desired responses, and the reasons are still unknown. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current available literature on health-related physical fitness in children and adolescents with DS, and the effect of training on these variables. From the literature available, it is clear that more data on this population are necessary. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Effect of equitation training on health and physical fitness of college females.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Michael C

    2006-09-01

    Limited information exists concerning equitation as a viable form of physical activity. The study's purpose was to quantify effects of an equitation training program on health and physical fitness of college females. Following written informed consent, 15 college females enrolled in equitation and 10 controls (age = 23.6 +/- 2.5 years; ht = 165.3 +/- 5.3 cm; wt = 62.4 +/- 3.4 kg) underwent a comprehensive pre- and post-series of tests to assess cardiorespiratory response (Bruce; VO2(peak), HR(peak), VE(peak), RER(peak), MAP(peak), RPP(peak)), body composition (body mass, body fat, fat-free mass), muscular power [Wingate; peak and mean power (MP), total power output, fatigue index (FI)], muscular strength (curl-ups, reverse sit-ups, pushups, handgrip), blood chemistry, and coronary risk. The equitation group trained at various equine gaits for 14 weeks, 5 days/week. Multivariate analyses of variance (Wilks' Lambda) indicated a significant main effect of training across muscular power (F (4,25) = 3.965; P = 0.013), but not across cardiorespiratory response (F (11,18) = 1.472; P = 0.225), body composition (F (3,26) = 1.081; P = 0.375), or muscular strength (F (4,25) = 2.172; P = 0.102). Pre-post improvements in MP (+13.3%; P = 0.01), total work output (+11.8%; P = 0.015), and FI (-10.5%; P = 0.038) were observed. Nonsignificant improvements of 8.5-11.4% were observed in muscular strength and body composition. In conclusion, equitation does not provide an adequate stimulus to improve health and fitness in young adults. Individuals who participate in equitation need to supplement this activity with traditional aerobic and load-bearing training regimens.

  13. Mental health nursing and physical health care: a cross-sectional study of nurses' attitudes, practice, and perceived training needs for the physical health care of people with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Robson, Debbie; Haddad, Mark; Gray, Richard; Gournay, Kevin

    2013-10-01

    Mental health nurses have a key role in improving the physical health of people with a serious mental illness, however, there have been few studies of their attitudes or the extent of their involvement in this work. The aim of this study was to examine mental health nurses' attitudes to physical health care and explore associations with their practice and training. A postal questionnaire survey including the Physical Health Attitude Scale for mental health nurses (PHASe) was used within a UK mental health trust. The 52% (n = 585) of staff who responded reported varying levels of physical health practice; this most frequently involved providing dietary and exercise advice and less frequently included advice regarding cancer screening and smoking cessation. Having received post-registration physical health-care training and working in inpatient settings was associated with greater reported involvement. More positive attitudes were also evident for nurses who had attended post-registration physical health training or had an additional adult/general nursing qualification. Overall, the attitudes of mental health nurses towards physical health care appear positive and the willingness of nurses to take on these roles needs to be recognized. However, there are areas where nurses in our sample were more ambivalent such as cancer screening and smoking cessation.

  14. Side Effects of Physical Training: Association of Fitness Improvement to Espirt de Corps, Performance, Health, and Attrition in Marine Corps Basic Training. Report No. 83-37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, R. R., Jr.

    Physical training is a significant element of Marine Corps basic training which may affect nonfitness basic training outcomes in addition to improving fitness. If so, physical training side effects should be considered when designing and evaluating physical training programs. This study capitalized on naturally occurring platoon differences in…

  15. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  16. Army Physical Readiness Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    training. C hapter 1 Approac h Military leaders have always recognized that the effectiveness of Soldiers depends largely on their physical condition...allotted for PRT effectively . 1-7. Each PRT session has specific tasks, conditions and standards that support the physical requirements needed to...and physical qualifications of the PRT leader affect his effectiveness . He should exemplify the things he is seeking to teach. It is a great advantage

  17. Effect of intensive outpatient physical training on gait performance and cardiovascular health in people with hemiparesis after stroke.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Roed; Bech-Pedersen, Daniel Thue; Zeeman, Peter; Sørensen, Janne; Andersen, Lars L; Schönberger, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Stroke can result in severe motor deficits, and many people who have survived a stroke have poor cardiovascular fitness, with potentially disabling effects on daily life. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of intensive physical training on gait performance and cardiovascular health parameters in people with stroke in the chronic stage. This was a single-group, pretest-posttest experimental study. Fourteen people with hemiparesis after cerebrovascular injury (mean age=58.4 years, mean time since injury=25 months) participated in a 12-week training intervention, 5 times per week for 1.5 hours per session. The intervention consisted of high-intensity, body-weight-supported treadmill training; progressive resistance strength training; and aerobic exercise. The main outcome measures were gait performance (Six-Minute Walk Test, 10-Meter Walk Test, and aerobic capacity) and parameters of cardiovascular health (systolic and diastolic blood pressures, body mass index, and resting heart rate). Significant improvements in all main outcome parameters were observed in response to the intervention. Gait speed during the Six-Minute Walk Test increased 62%, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased 10% and 11%, respectively. Weekly testing of walking speed showed that most of the increase in the walking speed occurred in the first 8 weeks of training. Correlation analyses showed that improvements were unrelated to age, chronicity, or level of functioning. High-intensity physical training for people with stroke in the chronic stage increased walking speed regardless of chronicity, age, or level of functioning. Further studies should investigate the intervention duration needed to reach the full potential of gait recovery.

  18. Effect of physical activity, social support, and skills training on late-life emotional health: a systematic literature review and implications for public health research.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Mark B; Steinman, Lesley E; Carlson, Whitney L; Mochan, Kara N; Abraido-Lanza, Ana F; Bryant, Lucinda L; Duffy, Michael; Knight, Bob G; Jeste, Dilip V; Leith, Katherine H; Lenze, Eric J; Logsdon, Rebecca G; Satariano, William A; Zweiback, Damita J; Anderson, Lynda A

    2014-01-01

    Given that emotional health is a critical component of healthy aging, we undertook a systematic literature review to assess whether current interventions can positively affect older adults' emotional health. A national panel of health services and mental health researchers guided the review. Eligibility criteria included community-dwelling older adult (aged ≥ 50 years) samples, reproducible interventions, and emotional health outcomes, which included multiple domains and both positive (well-being) and illness-related (anxiety) dimensions. This review focused on three types of interventions - physical activity, social support, and skills training - given their public health significance and large number of studies identified. Panel members evaluated the strength of evidence (quality and effectiveness). In all, 292 articles met inclusion criteria. These included 83 exercise/physical activity, 25 social support, and 40 skills training interventions. For evidence rating, these 148 interventions were categorized into 64 pairings by intervention type and emotional health outcome, e.g., strength training targeting loneliness or social support to address mood. 83% of these pairings were rated at least fair quality. Expert panelists found sufficient evidence of effectiveness only for skills training interventions with health outcomes of decreasing anxiety and improving quality of life and self-efficacy. Due to limitations in reviewed studies, many intervention-outcome pairings yielded insufficient evidence. Skills training interventions improved several aspects of emotional health in community-dwelling older adults, while the effects for other outcomes and interventions lacked clear evidence. We discuss the implications and challenges in moving forward in this important area.

  19. Physical Activity, Cognitive Function, and Brain Health: What Is the Role of Exercise Training in the Prevention of Dementia?

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Sara M.; Parker, Beth; Thompson, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    The population of elderly adults in the US is growing, and the prevalence of age-related cognitive decline and dementia is expected to increase in turn. Effective and inexpensive interventions or preventive measures are necessary to attenuate the increased economic and social burden of dementia. This review will focus on the potential for physical activity and exercise training to promote brain health and improve cognitive function via neurophysiological changes. We will review pertinent animal and human research examining the effects of physical activity on cognitive function and neurophysiology. We will discuss cross-sectional and longitudinal studies addressing the relationship between neurocognitive health and cardiorespiratory fitness or habitual activity level. We will then present and discuss longitudinal investigations examining the effects of exercise training on cognitive function and neurophysiology. We will conclude by summarizing our current understanding of the relationship between physical activity and brain health, and present areas for future research given the current gaps in our understanding of this issue. PMID:24961266

  20. Mental Health Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Strength and Quality of Evidence 2-4 Table 2-3 Targeted Skills 2-6 Table 3-1 Fundamental Principles of Mental Health Training and Implementation 3...well-being, readiness and performance. 3.3.9 User Acceptability Mental health training must be perceived to be useful by those being trained in order...the training from helpful. However, while user acceptability is necessary, it is not sufficient for establishing good mental health training [5], [6

  1. A conceptual model for worksite intelligent physical exercise training - IPET - intervention for decreasing life style health risk indicators among employees: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health promotion at the work site in terms of physical activity has proven positive effects but optimization of relevant exercise training protocols and implementation for high adherence are still scanty. Methods/Design The aim of this paper is to present a study protocol with a conceptual model for planning the optimal individually tailored physical exercise training for each worker based on individual health check, existing guidelines and state of the art sports science training recommendations in the broad categories of cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength in specific body parts, and functional training including balance training. The hypotheses of this research are that individually tailored worksite-based intelligent physical exercise training, IPET, among workers with inactive job categories will: 1) Improve cardiorespiratory fitness and/or individual health risk indicators, 2) Improve muscle strength and decrease musculoskeletal disorders, 3) Succeed in regular adherence to worksite and leisure physical activity training, and 3) Reduce sickness absence and productivity losses (presenteeism) in office workers. The present RCT study enrolled almost 400 employees with sedentary jobs in the private as well as public sectors. The training interventions last 2 years with measures at baseline as well as one and two years follow-up. Discussion If proven effective, the intelligent physical exercise training scheduled as well as the information for its practical implementation can provide meaningful scientifically based information for public health policy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, number: NCT01366950. PMID:24964869

  2. The Effect of Acceptance Training on Psychological and Physical Health Outcomes in Elders with Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Patricia E.; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A.; Bekhet, Abir K.; DeHelian, Laura; Morris, Diana L.

    2012-01-01

    This pilot trial investigated the short and long-term effects of Acceptance Training (ACT) intervention on acceptance, perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression in elders with chronic conditions living in retirement communities (RCs). The ACT intervention combined Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy with music, relaxation, and guided imagery during six weekly 2-hour sessions. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 African-American and 46 White elders across four data collection points in six randomly selected RCs using well-established measures of perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression, and a measure of acceptance of chronic conditions adapted from a previous measure of acceptance of diabetes. While changes were found in perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression, the most significant changes occurred in the elders’ acceptance of chronic conditions immediately after the intervention (t = −2.62, p < .02), and these changes persisted for 6 and 12 weeks (t’s = −2.74, −3.32, p’s < .01), respectively. Although a 40% attrition rate reduced the sample size from 62 (N = 62) to 37 (N = 37), the significant increases in acceptance over time provide initial evidence for the fidelity of the ACT intervention. PMID:23061175

  3. The effect of acceptance training on psychological and physical health outcomes in elders with chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Patricia E; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Bekhet, Abir K; DeHelian, Laura; Morris, Diana L

    2011-12-01

    This pilot trial investigated the short and long-term effects of Acceptance Training (ACT) intervention on acceptance, perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression in elders with chronic conditions living in retirement communities (RCs). The ACT intervention combined Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy with music, relaxation, and guided imagery during six weekly 2-hour sessions. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 African-American and 46 White elders across four data collection points in six randomly selected RCs using well-established measures of perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression, and a measure of acceptance of chronic conditions adapted from a previous measure of acceptance of diabetes. While changes were found in perceived health, functional status, anxiety, and depression, the most significant changes occurred in the elders' acceptance of chronic conditions immediately after the intervention (t = -2.62, p < .02), and these changes persisted for 6 and 12 weeks (t's = -2.74, -3.32, p's < .01), respectively. Although a 40% attrition rate reduced the sample size from 62 (N = 62) to 37 (N = 37), the significant increases in acceptance over time provide initial evidence for the fidelity of the ACT intervention.

  4. Training Public Health Advisors.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Pamela A; Brusuelas, Kristin M; Baden, Daniel J; Duncan, Heather L

    2015-01-01

    Federal public health advisors provide guidance and assistance to health departments to improve public health program work. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) prepares them with specialized training in administering public health programs. This article describes the evolving training and is based on internal CDC documents and interviews. The first federal public health advisors worked in health departments to assist with controlling syphilis after World War II. Over time, more CDC prevention programs hired them. To meet emerging needs, 3 major changes occurred: the Public Health Prevention Service, a fellowship program, in 1999; the Public Health Associate Program in 2007; and integration of those programs. Key components of the updated training are competency-based training, field experience, supervision, recruitment and retention, and stakeholder support. The enduring strength of the training has been the experience in a public health agency developing practical skills for program implementation and management.

  5. Physics of Health Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baublitz, Millard; Goldberg, Bennett

    A one-semester algebra-based physics course is being offered to Boston University students whose major fields of study are in allied health sciences: physical therapy, athletic training, and speech, language, and hearing sciences. The classroom instruction incorporates high-engagement learning techniques including worksheets, student response devices, small group discussions, and physics demonstrations instead of traditional lectures. The use of pre-session exercises and quizzes has been implemented. The course also requires weekly laboratory experiments in mechanics or electricity. We are using standard pre- and post-course concept inventories to compare this one-semester introductory physics course to ten years of pre- and post-course data collected on students in the same majors but who completed a two-semester course.

  6. Effectiveness of high-intensity interval training on the mental and physical health of people with chronic schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng Hsiu; Lee, Chin Pang; Hsu, Shih Chieh; Chang, Chia Ming; Chen, Ching Yen

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-volume high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is emerging as a time-efficient exercise strategy for improving cardiorespiratory fitness and for controlling blood sugar levels and hypertension. In addition, patient acceptance of HIIT may improve adherence to exercise programs. This study evaluated the effectiveness of HIIT for improving the mental and physical health of people with chronic schizophrenia. Methods Twenty patients attending a psychiatric day care unit volunteered for an 8-week program of HIIT. Blood pressure, resting heart rate, body weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio were measured weekly. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score was recorded at baseline and at the end of the study. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scores were recorded every 2 weeks. Results Statistically significant changes occurred in the physical and mental parameters measured in the 18 patients who completed the study. Body weight, body mass index, resting heart rate, and pulse pressure decreased significantly. Mean arterial pressure and diastolic blood pressure increased significantly. Mental health scores improved, with the Negative Scale score decreasing from 31.17±5.95 to 27.78±3.57 (P<0.01) and the General Psychopathology Scale score from 14.28±2.16 to 13.00±1.72 (P<0.01). Positive Scale scores changed, but not significantly, from 12.28±2.27 to 12.33±2.00 (P=0.729). Scores on the BDI (from 19.56±15.28 to 15.89±14.33, P<0.001) and BAI (from 13.67±13.83 to 10.06±11.18, P=0.003) both improved significantly. Conclusion This study demonstrated that HIIT has positive effects on the physical and mental health of patients with chronic schizophrenia. PMID:26060400

  7. Effect of a 4-week Nordic walking training on the physical fitness and self-assessment of the quality of health of women of the perimenopausal age

    PubMed Central

    Saulicz, Mariola; Saulicz, Edward; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Wolny, Tomasz; Knapik, Andrzej; Rottermund, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To determine the effect of a 4-week Nordic walking training on the physical fitness of women of the perimenopausal age and self-assessment of the quality of their health. Material and methods Eighty-four women between 48 and 58 years of age were included in the study. Half of the group (42) was assigned to the control group and the other half was assigned to the experimental group. In both groups studied, physical fitness was evaluated using a modified Fullerton's test and a quality of life self-assessment SF-36 (Short Form of Health Status Questionnaire). Similar tests were repeated 4 weeks later. In the experimental group, a Nordic walking training was conducted between the two tests. During 4 weeks, 10 training sessions were performed, each session was 60 minutes long, and there was an interval of 2 days between the sessions. Results A 4-week Nordic walking training resulted in a significant improvement (p < 0.001) of physical fitness as demonstrated by an increased strength and flexibility of the upper and lower part of the body and the ability to walk a longer distance during a 6-minute walking test. Women participating in the training also showed a significant improvement in health in terms of both physical health (p < 0.001) and mental health (p < 0.001). Conclusions A 4-week Nordic walking training has a positive effect on the physical fitness of the women in the perimenopausal age. Participation in training contributes also to a clearly higher self-assessment of the quality of health. PMID:26327897

  8. Physical training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J; Moran, F

    2008-01-23

    Physical training may form an important part of the care package for people with cystic fibrosis. To determine whether a prescribed regimen of physical training produces improvement or prevents deterioration in physiological and clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis compared to no training. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Date of the most recent search: September 2007. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials in which a prescribed regimen of physical training is compared to no physical training in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Of the 26 studies identified, seven studies which included 231 participants, met the inclusion criteria. This review does provide some limited evidence from both short- and long-term studies that aerobic or anaerobic physical training has a positive effect on primary outcomes (exercise capacity, strength and lung function) but improvements are not consistent between studies. Conclusions about the efficacy of physical training in cystic fibrosis are limited by the small size, short duration and incomplete reporting of most of the studies included in this review. Physical training is already part of the care package offered to most people with cystic fibrosis and there is a lack of evidence to actively discourage this. The benefits obtained from including physical training in a package of care may be influenced by the type of training programme. Further research is needed to assess comprehensively the benefits of exercise programmes in people with cystic fibrosis and the relative benefits of the addition of aerobic versus anaerobic versus a combination of both types of physical training to the care

  9. A Simple Introduction to Physical Health Impairments: A Series for Caregivers of Infants and Toddlers. Model of Interdisciplinary Training for Children with Handicaps (MITCH).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe County School District, Key West, FL.

    Intended for use in Florida training programs for caregivers of infants and toddlers with disabilities, this booklet describes some of the more common physical and health impairments that can affect young children. For each disability, the description generally stresses typical characteristics and special requirements. Addresses and telephone…

  10. [Update on current care guidelines: physical activity and exercise training for adults in sickness and in health].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the aforementioned guideline is to promote physical activity in the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of diseases. Physical activity, either alone or combined with other lifestyle modifications, plays a key role in the management of several chronic diseases. In this guideline, the following diseases will be discussed: musculoskeletal, endocrinological, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, as well as cancer, depression and urinary incontinence. In addition, physical activity during pregnancy and in senior citizens is discussed. Physical activity and exercise training have also been mentioned in 27 other Current Care clinical guidelines.

  11. Medical physics practice and training in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Amuasi, John H; Kyere, Augustine K; Schandorf, Cyril; Fletcher, John J; Boadu, Mary; Addison, Eric K; Hasford, Francis; Sosu, Edem K; Sackey, Theophilus A; Tagoe, Samuel N A; Inkoom, Stephen; Serfor-Armah, Yaw

    2016-06-01

    Medical physics has been an indispensable and strategic stakeholder in the delivery of radiological services to the healthcare system of Ghana. The practice has immensely supported radiation oncology and medical imaging facilities over the years, while the locally established training programme continues to produce human resource to feed these facilities. The training programme has grown to receive students from other African countries in addition to local students. Ghana has been recognised by the International Atomic Energy Agency as Regional Designated Centre for Academic Training of Medical Physicists in Africa. The Ghana Society for Medical Physics collaborates with the School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences of the University of Ghana to ensure that training offered to medical physicists meet international standards, making them clinically qualified. The Society has also worked together with other bodies for the passage of the Health Profession's Regulatory Bodies Act, giving legal backing to the practice of medical physics and other allied health professions in Ghana. The country has participated in a number of International Atomic Energy Agency's projects on medical physics and has benefited from its training courses, fellowships and workshops, as well as those of other agencies such as International Organization for Medical Physics. This has placed Ghana's medical physicists in good position to practice competently and improve healthcare. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Subjective perceived impact of Tai Chi training on physical and mental health among community older adults at risk for ischemic stroke: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guohua; Xiong, Zhenyu; Zheng, Xin; Li, Junzhe; Duan, Tingjin; Qi, Dalu; Ling, Kun; Chen, Lidian

    2017-04-20

    Evidence from quantitative studies suggest that Tai Chi produces a variety of health-related benefits, but few qualitative studies have investigated how older adults perceive the benefit of Tai Chi. The objective of the current study was to qualitatively evaluate the perceived benefits of Tai Chi practice among community older population. This study was conducted with participants from a trial examining the effects of a 12-week Tai Chi training on ischemic stroke risk in community older adults (n = 170). A total of 20 participants were randomly selected from a convenience sample of participants who had completed 12-week Tai Chi training (n = 68) were interviewed regarding their perceived benefit on physical and mental health and whether Tai Chi exercise was suitable for the elderly. All participants agreed that Tai Chi training could relax their body and make them comfortable. Most of them thought Tai Chi training could promote physical health, including relieving pain, enhancing digestion, strengthening immunity, enhancing energy and improving sleep quality, enhancing their mental and emotional state (e.g. improving mood and reducing anxiety, improving concentration and promoting interpersonal relationship). Most of participants also agreed that Tai Chi exercise was appropriate for community older people. Three primary themes emerged from content analysis: Improving physical health; Enhancing mental and emotional state; Conforming with the request of the elderly. The findings indicate that regular Tai Chi exercise may have positive benefits in terms of improved physical health and mental state among community elderly population, and may be useful and feasible body-mind exercise to community elderly population for its positive effects and advantages. ChiCTR ChiCTR-TRC-13003601 . Registered 23 July 2014.

  13. Prescribed exercise: a prospective study of health-related quality of life and physical fitness among participants in an officially sponsored municipal physical training program.

    PubMed

    Lerdal, Anners; Celius, Elin Hannevig; Pedersen, Gunn

    2013-09-01

    Participants who completed a 3-month prescribed individualized exercise program in groups were followed-up prospectively. The aims were to describe the characteristics of the participants, their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and physical fitness at baseline, at completion and at 12-month follow-up, and to identify predictors of HRQoL and physical fitness at completion and at 12-month follow-up. A 1-group follow-up design was used. Data were collected from records of 163 attendees at a municipality-sponsored health center in Norway. HRQoL was measured by self-report using the COOP/WONCA questionnaire. Physical fitness was estimated from the results of a 2-km walk test. Of the 163 participants referred to the clinic, 130 (79.8%) were women and 33 were (20.2%) men. Participants who completed were older than those who dropped out. The participants showed clinical improvement in physical fitness and all health-related quality life domains (d > 0.53) at the completion of the program and in physical functioning, mental health, performance of daily activities, overall health, and perceived improved health after 12 months (d > 0.36). Participation in group-based prescribed exercise program for 3 months may improve physical fitness and HRQoL significantly in short and long terms.

  14. Mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on health-related fitness and physical activity: the ATLAS cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan J; Morgan, Philip J; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Stodden, David F; Lubans, David R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of resistance training skill competency on percentage of body fat, muscular fitness and physical activity among a sample of adolescent boys participating in a school-based obesity prevention intervention. Participants were 361 adolescent boys taking part in the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) cluster randomised controlled trial: a school-based program targeting the health behaviours of economically disadvantaged adolescent males considered "at-risk" of obesity. Body fat percentage (bioelectrical impedance), muscular fitness (hand grip dynamometry and push-ups), physical activity (accelerometry) and resistance training skill competency were assessed at baseline and post-intervention (i.e., 8 months). Three separate multi-level mediation models were analysed to investigate the potential mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on each of the study outcomes using a product-of-coefficients test. Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. The intervention had a significant impact on the resistance training skill competency of the boys, and improvements in skill competency significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on percentage of body fat and the combined muscular fitness score. No significant mediated effects were found for physical activity. Improving resistance training skill competency may be an effective strategy for achieving improvements in body composition and muscular fitness in adolescent boys.

  15. Effects of a combined physical training and nutrition intervention on physical performance and health-related quality of life in prefrail older women living in the community: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jinhee; Yoshida, Yuko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kim, Hunkyung; Suzuki, Takao; Lee, Yunhwan

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a 12-week combined physical exercise training and nutritional intervention improves physical performance and enhances health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among prefrail elderly women living in the community. This was a randomized controlled trial in which participants were recruited and randomly assigned to the exercise and nutrition group (EN, n = 30), exercise only group (E, n = 28), and control group (C, n = 31). Group training classes were held at a research center in Itabashi Ward, Tokyo, Japan. Eighty-nine prefrail women aged 70 years or older. The EN group participated in an exercise training and nutritional program (cooking class) once a week, and the E group participated in the exercise training program only. Outcome measures that included physical performance (handgrip strength, balance, walking speed) and HRQOL (Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey) were obtained at entry, the end of the 12-week intervention, and 6 months after completion of the intervention program. At the end of the 12-week intervention, significant improvements in the physical component summary score and 3 (role physical, bodily pain, role emotional) of the 8 domains of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey were observed in the EN group. The E group exhibited a significantly increased handgrip strength at postintervention. The positive effects, however, were not maintained at 6-month follow-up, but were reduced. The combined physical exercise training and nutritional intervention program has beneficial effects on several domains of HRQOL and handgrip strength in prefrail elderly women living in the community. However, further studies are needed to examine approaches that facilitate maintenance of the improved outcomes by combined exercise training and nutritional intervention. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  16. A higher effort-based paradigm in physical activity and exercise for public health: making the case for a greater emphasis on resistance training.

    PubMed

    Steele, James; Fisher, James; Skivington, Martin; Dunn, Chris; Arnold, Josh; Tew, Garry; Batterham, Alan M; Nunan, David; O'Driscoll, Jamie M; Mann, Steven; Beedie, Chris; Jobson, Simon; Smith, Dave; Vigotsky, Andrew; Phillips, Stuart; Estabrooks, Paul; Winett, Richard

    2017-04-05

    It is well known that physical activity and exercise is associated with a lower risk of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. Further, it appears that risk reductions are greater when physical activity and/or exercise is performed at a higher intensity of effort. Why this may be the case is perhaps explained by the accumulating evidence linking physical fitness and performance outcomes (e.g. cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, and muscle mass) also to morbidity and mortality risk. Current guidelines about the performance of moderate/vigorous physical activity using aerobic exercise modes focuses upon the accumulation of a minimum volume of physical activity and/or exercise, and have thus far produced disappointing outcomes. As such there has been increased interest in the use of higher effort physical activity and exercise as being potentially more efficacious. Though there is currently debate as to the effectiveness of public health prescription based around higher effort physical activity and exercise, most discussion around this has focused upon modes considered to be traditionally 'aerobic' (e.g. running, cycling, rowing, swimming etc.). A mode customarily performed to a relatively high intensity of effort that we believe has been overlooked is resistance training. Current guidelines do include recommendations to engage in 'muscle strengthening activities' though there has been very little emphasis upon these modes in either research or public health effort. As such the purpose of this debate article is to discuss the emerging higher effort paradigm in physical activity and exercise for public health and to make a case for why there should be a greater emphasis placed upon resistance training as a mode in this paradigm shift.

  17. Testing, Training and Tensions: The Expression of Health within Physical Education Curricula in Secondary Schools in England and Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Jo; Leggett, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    This paper utilises critical discourse analysis to explore and discuss the expression of health within physical education (PE) curricula in secondary schools in England and Wales. The study adopted a case study approach, involving three state secondary schools in England and two in Wales. Data were drawn from interviews with PE teachers and…

  18. Testing, Training and Tensions: The Expression of Health within Physical Education Curricula in Secondary Schools in England and Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Jo; Leggett, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    This paper utilises critical discourse analysis to explore and discuss the expression of health within physical education (PE) curricula in secondary schools in England and Wales. The study adopted a case study approach, involving three state secondary schools in England and two in Wales. Data were drawn from interviews with PE teachers and…

  19. Effectiveness of Start to Run, a 6-week training program for novice runners, on increasing health-enhancing physical activity: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of the organized sports sector as a setting for health-promotion is a relatively new strategy. In the past few years, different countries have been investing resources in the organized sports sector for promoting health-enhancing physical activity. In the Netherlands, National Sports Federations were funded to develop and implement “easily accessible” sporting programs, aimed at the least active population groups. Start to Run, a 6-week training program for novice runners, developed by the Dutch Athletics Organization, is one of these programs. In this study, the effects of Start to Run on health-enhancing physical activity were investigated. Methods Physical activity levels of Start to Run participants were assessed by means of the Short QUestionnaire to ASsess Health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH) at baseline, immediately after completing the program and six months after baseline. A control group, matched for age and sex, was assessed at baseline and after six months. Compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures were the total time spent in physical activity and the time spent in each physical activity intensity category and domain. Changes in physical activity within groups were tested with paired t-tests and McNemar tests. Changes between groups were examined with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses. Results In the Start to Run group, the percentage of people who met the Dutch Norm for Health-enhancing Physical Activity, Fit-norm and Combi-norm increased significantly, both in the short- and longer-term. In the control group, no significant changes in physical activity were observed. When comparing results between groups, significantly more Start to Run participants compared with control group participants were meeting the Fit-norm and Combi-norm after six months. The differences in physical activity between groups in favor of the Start to Run group

  20. Effectiveness of Start to Run, a 6-week training program for novice runners, on increasing health-enhancing physical activity: a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ooms, Linda; Veenhof, Cindy; de Bakker, Dinny H

    2013-07-31

    The use of the organized sports sector as a setting for health-promotion is a relatively new strategy. In the past few years, different countries have been investing resources in the organized sports sector for promoting health-enhancing physical activity. In the Netherlands, National Sports Federations were funded to develop and implement "easily accessible" sporting programs, aimed at the least active population groups. Start to Run, a 6-week training program for novice runners, developed by the Dutch Athletics Organization, is one of these programs. In this study, the effects of Start to Run on health-enhancing physical activity were investigated. Physical activity levels of Start to Run participants were assessed by means of the Short QUestionnaire to ASsess Health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH) at baseline, immediately after completing the program and six months after baseline. A control group, matched for age and sex, was assessed at baseline and after six months. Compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines was the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures were the total time spent in physical activity and the time spent in each physical activity intensity category and domain. Changes in physical activity within groups were tested with paired t-tests and McNemar tests. Changes between groups were examined with multiple linear and logistic regression analyses. In the Start to Run group, the percentage of people who met the Dutch Norm for Health-enhancing Physical Activity, Fit-norm and Combi-norm increased significantly, both in the short- and longer-term. In the control group, no significant changes in physical activity were observed. When comparing results between groups, significantly more Start to Run participants compared with control group participants were meeting the Fit-norm and Combi-norm after six months. The differences in physical activity between groups in favor of the Start to Run group could be explained by an

  1. Health physics ethics.

    PubMed

    Evdokimoff, Victor

    2004-02-01

    Ethics is defined in the New World Dictionary as ". . . moral principles governing appropriate conduct for an individual or group." The Health Physics Membership Directory contains 2 references for professional conduct for health physicists. The first is for members of the Health Physics Society. The second is for Certified Health Physicists. They are similar: A health physicist must always maintain the highest ethical standards whether beginning a career or having practiced for decades. A review of some key principles by example will hopefully demonstrate how to avoid ethical dilemmas for health physicists.

  2. Training Undergraduate Physics Peer Tutors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.

    2004-05-01

    The University of Wisconsin's Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program matches upper level undergraduate physics students in small study groups with students studying introductory algebra-based physics. We work with students who are potentially at-risk for having academic trouble with the course. They include students with a low exam score, learning disabilities, no high school physics, weak math backgrounds, and/or on academic probation. We also work with students from groups under represented in the sciences and who may be feeling isolated or marginal on campus such as minority, returning adult, and international students. The tutors provide a supportive learning environment, extra practice problems, and an overview of key concepts. In so doing, they help our students to build confidence and problem solving skills applicable to physics and other areas of their academic careers. The Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program is modeled after a similar program for chemistry created by the University of Wisconsin's Chemistry Learning Center. Both programs are now run in collaboration. The tutors are chosen for their academic strength and excellent communication skills. Our tutors are majoring in physics, math, and secondary-level science education. The tutors receive ongoing training and supervision throughout the year. They attend weekly discipline-specific meetings to discuss strategies for teaching the content currently being discussed in the physics course. They also participate in a weekly teaching seminar with science tutors from chemistry and biochemistry to discuss teaching methods, mentoring, and general information relating to the students with whom we work. We will describe an overview of the Physics Peer Mentor Tutor Program with a focus on the teacher training program for our undergraduate tutors.

  3. Physical exercise and health.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Alberto; Masiá, M Dolores; Galve, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    Regular physical exercise is an established recommendation for preventing and treating the main modifiable cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Performing physical activity of moderate intensity for a minimum of 30 min 5 days a week or of high intensity for a minimum of 20 min 3 days a week improves functional capacity and is associated with reductions in the incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Physical exercise induces physiological cardiovascular adaptations that improve physical performance, and only in extreme cases can these adaptations lead to an increased risk of physical exercise-associated complications. The incidence of sudden death or serious complications during physical exercise is very low and is concentrated in people with heart diseases or with pathological cardiac adaptation to exercise. Most of these cases can be detected by cardiology units or well-trained professionals. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The Brockport Physical Fitness Test Training Manual. [Project Target].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnick, Joseph P.; Short, Francis X., Ed.

    This training manual presents information on the Brockport Physical Fitness Test (BPFT), a criterion-referenced fitness test for children and adolescents with disabilities. The first chapter of the test training manual includes information dealing with health-related criterion-referenced testing, the interaction between physical activity and…

  5. Optimal Physical Training During Military Basic Training Period.

    PubMed

    Santtila, Matti; Pihlainen, Kai; Viskari, Jarmo; Kyröläinen, Heikki

    2015-11-01

    The goal for military basic training (BT) is to create a foundation for physical fitness and military skills of soldiers. Thereafter, more advanced military training can safely take place. Large differences in the initial physical performance of conscripts or recruits have led military units to develop more safe and effective training programs. The purpose of this review article was to describe the limiting factors of optimal physical training during the BT period. This review revealed that the high volume of low-intensity physical activity combined with endurance-type military training (like combat training, prolonged physical activity, and field shooting) during BT interferes with optimal development of maximal oxygen uptake and muscle strength of the soldiers. Therefore, more progressive, periodized, and individualized training programs are needed. In conclusion, optimal training programs lead to higher training responses and lower risks for injuries and overloading.

  6. Physical exercise training for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Thomas; Nolan, Sarah J; Hebestreit, Helge; Kriemler, Susi

    2015-06-28

    Physical exercise training may form an important part of regular care for people with cystic fibrosis. This is an update of previously published reviews. To determine the effects of physical exercise training compared to no training on aerobic exercise capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second, health-related quality of life and other patient-relevant (secondary) outcomes in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 10 March 2015. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials comparing exercise training of any type and duration with conventional care in people with cystic fibrosis. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Of the 48 studies identified, 13 studies which included 402 participants, met the inclusion criteria. The numbers in each study ranged from nine up to 72 participants; one study was in adults, six were in children and adolescents and six studies included all age ranges. Four studies of hospitalised participants lasted less than one month and nine studies were outpatient-based, lasting between two months and three years. The studies included participants with a wide range of disease severity and employed differing levels of supervision with a mixture of types of training. There was also wide variation in the quality of the included studies.This systematic review shows limited evidence from both short- and long-term studies that in people with cystic fibrosis aerobic or anaerobic physical exercise training or a combination of both has a positive effect on aerobic exercise capacity, pulmonary function and health-related quality of life. Although improvements are not consistent between studies and ranged

  7. Evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial resilience training for heart health, and the added value of promoting physical activity: a cluster randomized trial of the READY program

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Depression and poor social support are significant risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), and stress and anxiety can trigger coronary events. People experiencing such psychosocial difficulties are more likely to be physically inactive, which is also an independent risk factor for CHD. Resilience training can target these risk factors, but there is little research evaluating the effectiveness of such programs. This paper describes the design and measures of a study to evaluate a resilience training program (READY) to promote psychosocial well-being for heart health, and the added value of integrating physical activity promotion. Methods/Design In a cluster randomized trial, 95 participants will be allocated to either a waitlist or one of two intervention conditions. Both intervention conditions will receive a 10 × 2.5 hour group resilience training program (READY) over 13 weeks. The program targets five protective factors identified from empirical evidence and analyzed as mediating variables: positive emotions, cognitive flexibility, social support, life meaning, and active coping. Resilience enhancement strategies reflect the six core Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (values, mindfulness, defusion, acceptance, self-as-context, committed action) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy strategies such as relaxation training and social support building skills. Sessions include psychoeducation, discussions, experiential exercises, and home assignments. One intervention condition will include an additional session and ongoing content promoting physical activity. Measurement will occur at baseline, two weeks post intervention, and at eight weeks follow-up, and will include questionnaires, pedometer step logs, and physical and hematological measures. Primary outcome measures will include self-reported indicators of psychosocial well-being and depression. Secondary outcome measures will include self-reported indicators of stress, anxiety and physical

  8. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: Characteristics of Trained Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centeio, Erin E.; Erwin, Heather; Castelli, Darla M.

    2014-01-01

    As public health concerns about physical inactivity and childhood obesity continue to rise, researchers are calling for interventions that comprehensively lead to more opportunities to participate in physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics and attitudes of trained physical education teachers during the…

  9. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  10. Strength Training and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the potential health benefits of strength training for children, discussing the role of strength training in preventing sports-related injuries and highlighting design considerations for such programs. The focus is on musculoskeletal adaptations to strength training that are observable in healthy children. Guidelines for…

  11. Health Auxiliary Training, Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabeau, E.S.

    This guide for the training of home health aides is a compilation of lecture outlines supplemented by a suggested class schedule for the use of the program director in planning the overall program and preparing for the classes he is to teach. Developed by the Training Branch of the Division of Indian Health in cooperation with the Office of…

  12. [What the cardiologist should know about physical training].

    PubMed

    Verdier, J C

    2006-11-01

    Because of the cardiovascular stresses and the potential risks of physical training, cardiologists are often asked to give an opinion on aptitude for sport. It is therefore important to understand the fundamentals of physical training. This is based on specific rules; general physical preparation, progressive nature of the activity, individualisation of training programmes, specificity of sporting activity, recovery times and planning of exercise. The two main types of training (aerobics and weight training) are used preferentially according to the type of sport but good aerobic capacity is required in all specialities. The training implies a certain physical stress and the individual has his own limitations. The cardiologist may help identify an imbalance between the two without being an expert in all sporting disciplines. In this field, the physician is no substitute for the coach but can help in managing the sportsman's health.

  13. Effects of Training and Detraining on Physical Fitness, Physical Activity Patterns, Cardiovascular Variables, and HRQoL after 3 Health-Promotion Interventions in Institutionalized Elders.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Alexandrina; Carvalho, Joana; Santos, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of different strategies of health on the levels of physical activity (PA), physical fitness (PF), cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and quality of life (QoL) of the institutionalized elderly. Concurrently studies were made of the effect of detraining on these same variables. In this investigation we carried out a prospective longitudinal study with an experimental design, with 1 year plus 3 months of a detraining period. Methodology. (a) A questionnaire with socio-demographic characteristics and a QoL scale (MOS SF-36); (b) Functional Fitness Test to assess PF; (c) An MTI Actigraph to evaluate the PA; (d) Biochemical analysis of blood, blood pressure and bio-impedance. The Main Results Indicated That: (i) ST significantly improved strength and body flexibility and AT the aerobic endurance, agility/dynamic balance and lower strength and flexibility; (ii) Implications of detraining were more evident on the PA groups in the lower body flexibility, which is associated with agility/dynamic balance and lower strength in the AT group; (iii) Cardiovascular variables improved significantly especially blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose in the ST and HDL in the AT group; not having undergone significant changes with the detraining. The results of this thesis contribute positively to highlight the importance of PA in the promotion of health, prevention and reduction of CVD risk factors and the improvement of the PF and QoL.

  14. Effects of Training and Detraining on Physical Fitness, Physical Activity Patterns, Cardiovascular Variables, and HRQoL after 3 Health-Promotion Interventions in Institutionalized Elders

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Alexandrina; Carvalho, Joana; Santos, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of different strategies of health on the levels of physical activity (PA), physical fitness (PF), cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and quality of life (QoL) of the institutionalized elderly. Concurrently studies were made of the effect of detraining on these same variables. In this investigation we carried out a prospective longitudinal study with an experimental design, with 1 year plus 3 months of a detraining period. Methodology. (a) A questionnaire with socio-demographic characteristics and a QoL scale (MOS SF-36); (b) Functional Fitness Test to assess PF; (c) An MTI Actigraph to evaluate the PA; (d) Biochemical analysis of blood, blood pressure and bio-impedance. The Main Results Indicated That: (i) ST significantly improved strength and body flexibility and AT the aerobic endurance, agility/dynamic balance and lower strength and flexibility; (ii) Implications of detraining were more evident on the PA groups in the lower body flexibility, which is associated with agility/dynamic balance and lower strength in the AT group; (iii) Cardiovascular variables improved significantly especially blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose in the ST and HDL in the AT group; not having undergone significant changes with the detraining. The results of this thesis contribute positively to highlight the importance of PA in the promotion of health, prevention and reduction of CVD risk factors and the improvement of the PF and QoL. PMID:22332008

  15. [Physical rehabilitation, train the brain!

    PubMed

    Bonnechère, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    Since centuries, scientists, clinicians and philosophers have been debating about the interactions between the body and the mind. Researches and advances in neurophysiology over the last decades have challenged many principles and theories, mainly based on empirical observations, generally well accepted in clinical practice. These new findings, achieved through functional "magnetic resonance imaging", awake brain surgery and allow new techniques and opportunities in physical rehabilitation. More than ever the body and the brain must be considered and treated as a functional entity, the distinction between body and soul developed by Platon should no longer be applied. The development of new technologies, in particular the virtual reality, lends itself perfectly to this global approach. The aim of this article is to present how a purely cognitive training can have beneficial effects on the body and the motor performances in clinics. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  16. Emergency Response Health Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, RaJah; Pemberton, Wendy; Beal, William

    2012-05-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health; however, there are major differences between health physics for research or occupational safety and health physics during a large-scale radiological emergency. The deployment of a U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) monitoring and assessment team to Japan in the wake of the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant yielded a wealth of lessons on these difference. Critical teams (CMOC (Consequence Management Outside the Continental U.S.) and CMHT (Consequence Management Home Team) ) worked together to collect, compile, review, and analyze radiological data from Japan to support the response needs of and answer questions from the Government of Japan, the U.S. military in Japan, the U.S. Embassy and U.S. citizens in Japan, and U.S. citizens in America. This paper addresses the unique challenges presented to the health physicist or analyst of radiological data in a large-scale emergency. A key lesson learned was that public perception and the availability of technology with social media requires a diligent effort to keep the public informed of the science behind the decisions in a manner that is meaningful to them.

  17. Beta blockade and physical training in rats.

    PubMed

    Harri, M

    1982-01-01

    Beta adrenergic blocking agents are widely used in the treatment of hypertension. Recent findings indicate that long-term physical training also could reduce elevated blood pressure and many physicians therefore recommend their patients to include physical training in their everyday program. However, it is not known whether a combination of beta blockade and physical training influences the responses of an organism to physical training. This problem was investigated using laboratory rats as an experimental animal model. Both swimming and running training were used, and a group of animals was trained without any medication while the other group performed their daily training session under the influence of 10 mg/kg of propranolol. Some of the effects produced by swimming training, such as hypertrophy of brown adipose tissue and heart muscle, resting bradycardia, increased tachycardic and tail skin temperature responses to isoprenaline, increased calorigenic response to noradrenaline and delayed cooling rate in cold water were similar to those produced by cold acclimation or repeated noradrenaline injections. It is thus tempting to conclude that the training-induced release of noradrenaline was responsible for the changes mentioned. Propranolol, when associated with the training, effectively hampered these changes. Running training increased the activity of oxidative enzymes in the skeletal muscle much more than did swimming training or repeated noradrenaline injections. Furthermore, running training neither induced hypertrophy of the brown fat nor enhanced calorigenic response to noradrenaline; it even led to enhanced rate of body cooling in cold water. Therefore the adaptive changes caused by running training most probably are not due to cold acclimation effects in spite of that propranolol, when associated with the running sessions, antagonized the development of running-induced changes, too. Some of these changes, such as cardiomegaly, training bradycardia and

  18. EMERGENCY RESPONSE HEALTH PHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, RaJah; Pemberton, Wendy; Beal, William

    2012-01-01

    Health physics is an important discipline with regard to understanding the effects of radiation on human health. Topics of discussion included in this manuscript are related to responding to a radiation emergency, and the necessary balance between desired high accuracy laboratory results and rapid turnaround requirements. Considerations are addressed for methodology with which to provide the most competent solutions despite challenges presented from incomplete datasets and, at times, limited methodology. An emphasis is placed on error and uncertainty of sample analysis results, how error affects products, and what is communicated in the final product.

  19. [Update on Current Care Guideline: Physical activity and exercise training for adults in sickness and in health].

    PubMed

    Rauramaa, Rainer; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Arokoski, Jari; Hohtari, Hannele; Ketola, Eeva; Kettunen, Jyrki; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kujala, Urho; Laukkanen, Jari; Pylkkänen, Liisa; Savela, Salla; Savonen, Kai; Tikkanen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the guideline is to promote physical activity in the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of diseases. Physical activity plays a key role in the management of several chronic noncommunicable diseases. In this guideline, the following diseases are discussed: endocrinological, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and respiratory diseases, as well as depression and cancer. In addition, physical activity during pregnancy and in senior citizens is reviewed. Exercise counseling should be included as part of disease management and lifestyle guidance.

  20. Health and physical function predicting strength and balance training adoption: a community-based study among individuals aged 75 and older.

    PubMed

    Aartolahti, Eeva; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Lönnroos, Eija; Häkkinen, Arja

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the characteristics of health and physical function that are associated with not starting strength and balance training (SBT). The study population consisted of 339 community-dwelling individuals (75-98 years, 72% female). As part of a population-based intervention study they received comprehensive geriatric assessment, physical activity counseling, and had the opportunity to take part in SBT at the gym once a week. Compared with the SBT-adopters, the nonadopters (n = 157, 46%) were older and less physically active, had more comorbidities and lower cognitive abilities, more often had sedative load of drugs or were at the risk of malnutrition, had lower grip strength and more instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) difficulties, and displayed weaker performance in Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go assessments. In multivariate models, higher age, impaired cognition, and lower grip strength were independently associated with nonadoption. In the future, more individually-tailored interventions are needed to overcome the factors that prevent exercise initiation.

  1. Regenerate: assessing the feasibility of a strength-training program to enhance the physical and mental health of chronic post stroke patients with depression.

    PubMed

    Sims, J; Galea, M; Taylor, N; Dodd, K; Jespersen, S; Joubert, L; Joubert, J

    2009-01-01

    The Regenerate pilot study explored whether a 10-week, community-based progressive resistance training (PRT) program could reduce depressive symptoms in depressed chronic stroke survivors. Participants were screened for depressive status using the PHQ-9 and confirmed by psychiatric assessment. Eligible people (n = 45) were randomised to PRT or a waiting-list comparison group. The PRT program included two high intensity sessions/week for 10 weeks at a community-based gymnasium. Depressive status, physical and mental health and quality of life were measured at baseline, 10 weeks and 6 months. Muscle strength was assessed using 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) for upper and lower limbs. The participants' median age was 69 years: 27 were male. The intervention group had lower depression scores than the comparison group at all time points. At 6-month follow-up, there was a trend for PRT participants to be more likely to be no longer depressed than the comparison group, but the difference was not significant after adjusting for baseline scores. There were modest improvements in health and wellbeing over time, but many scores were lower than reported in non-depressed people. Intervention participants demonstrated significant improvements in strength. Program adherence was good: on average 75% of the 10-week program was completed. The intervention appeared to be feasible within a community-based setting. To optimize stroke recovery and improve the quality of life of stroke survivors, health professionals should continue to focus on helping survivors' mental health recovery as well their physical rehabilitation. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Safety and Health Training Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Safety Advisory Council, Washington, DC.

    Information obtained from a survey of safety and health training activities undertaken by Federal agencies is provided in the document which serves as a resource guide and directory of agency safety programs. The document, intended to help Federal managers meet their safety training needs with available government resources, is divided into four…

  3. Training College Physics and Physical Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, R. B.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes survey data about the need and appropriate character of graduate degree programs designed to prepare two-year and four-year college physics and physical science teachers. Indicates that future employment favors two-year college teachers with a master's degree in the region west of the Mississippi River. (CC)

  4. Training College Physics and Physical Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, R. B.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes survey data about the need and appropriate character of graduate degree programs designed to prepare two-year and four-year college physics and physical science teachers. Indicates that future employment favors two-year college teachers with a master's degree in the region west of the Mississippi River. (CC)

  5. Health literacy training for health professions students.

    PubMed

    Hadden, Kristie B

    2015-07-01

    This pilot project assessed the effectiveness of training health professionals in (1) readability assessment of written health materials, (2) plain language editing, and (3) formatting materials so they are easy to understand and use. Over six semesters, five students participated in the project. Students were trained to assess document readability, confirm and interpret readability results and "stamp" the documents with results. Students then edited documents under supervision, via revised documents were re-assessed for readability and approved. Training was assessed through readability score comparison and exit interviews with students. Most original readability scores were 10th grade to college level. After editing, the average reading level of 73% was 6th grade or better. Students and supervisor rated skill levels as "proficient" at the end of the semester. To address the gap between document reading level and patients' reading ability, health documents should be assessed and edited for plain language. Working with patient documents from various health fields, our program effectively trained health professions students in these skills. Training health professions students in readability assessment and plain language editing can reduce literacy demands on patients and address the need for professionals with these skills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical Training for Long-Duration Spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Loehr, James A; Guilliams, Mark E; Petersen, Nora; Hirsch, Natalie; Kawashima, Shino; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Physical training has been conducted on the International Space Station (ISS) for the past 10 yr as a countermeasure to physiological deconditioning during spaceflight. Each member space agency has developed its own approach to creating and implementing physical training protocols for their astronauts. We have divided physical training into three distinct phases (preflight, in-flight, and postflight) and provided a description of each phase with its constraints and limitations. We also discuss how each member agency (NASA, ESA, CSA, and JAXA) prescribed physical training for their crewmembers during the first 10 yr of ISS operations. It is important to understand the operational environment, the agency responsible for the physical training program, and the constraints and limitations associated with spaceflight to accurately design and implement exercise training or interpret the exercise data collected on ISS. As exploration missions move forward, resolving agency differences in physical training programs will become important to maximizing the effectiveness of exercise as a countermeasure and minimizing any mission impacts.

  7. Health-Related Physical Fitness Knowledge of Student Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael G.; Berry, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Compared the health-related fitness knowledge of students in allied health care professions, assessing 48 athletic training students, 33 nursing students, and 36 physical therapy students. On the posttest, athletic training and physical therapy groups scored higher than the nursing group. Discusses implications for health profession education.…

  8. Side Effects of Physical Training. Association of Fitness Improvement to Esprit de Corps, Performance, Health, and Attrition in Marine Corps Basic Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    started training. (b) After going through boot camp, I believe I can do anything I set my mind to. Social Skills : The extent to which the recruit feels...only in the second study. The hypothesis was sup- ported for Self-Esteem, but not Social Skills (see Table 3). informal replication of the Self-Esteem...2.76 .003 Social Skills 5.07 5.06 -0.11 (.455)b NOTE: The, se/f/mprovenent Ind/cators weft only Inchldd In Study 2. t The indicated significance Is

  9. [Physical education, health and physical activities: difficult relationships].

    PubMed

    Cogérino, Geneviève

    2016-06-08

    Physical education (PE) is an appropriate subject to investigate the links between physical activity (PA) and health. The current training of PE teachers tends to emphasize the link between PA and physical fitness, to the detriment of other health components. The occupational, environmental, cultural dimensions of PA are frequently overlooked. This article lists four topics related to PA-health links, which could be more extensively included in initial PE teacher training, on the basis of abundant scientific literature: 1. the diversity of exercise motives, according to the subject’s age, gender, ability, competence, living conditions, etc.; 2. the role of body image on the desire or reluctance of teenagers to perform PA or certain physical activities; 3. the evolution of motivations towards PA throughout life; 4. the impact of the PE teachers’ masculinist conceptions, consubstantial of PE, due to its link with sport. These topics could contribute to a better analysis of what individuals seek through PA and the PA-health links they value. They could help teachers to adjust their teaching to contribute to the pupils’ health and not solely their physical fitness..

  10. Resistance training is medicine: effects of strength training on health.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Wayne L

    2012-01-01

    Inactive adults experience a 3% to 8% loss of muscle mass per decade, accompanied by resting metabolic rate reduction and fat accumulation. Ten weeks of resistance training may increase lean weight by 1.4 kg, increase resting metabolic rate by 7%, and reduce fat weight by 1.8 kg. Benefits of resistance training include improved physical performance, movement control, walking speed, functional independence, cognitive abilities, and self-esteem. Resistance training may assist prevention and management of type 2 diabetes by decreasing visceral fat, reducing HbA1c, increasing the density of glucose transporter type 4, and improving insulin sensitivity. Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, by reducing resting blood pressure, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Resistance training may promote bone development, with studies showing 1% to 3% increase in bone mineral density. Resistance training may be effective for reducing low back pain and easing discomfort associated with arthritis and fibromyalgia and has been shown to reverse specific aging factors in skeletal muscle.

  11. SPARTEN (Scientific Program of Aerobic and Resistance Training Exercise in the Navy): A Total Body Fitness Program for Health and Physical Readiness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    RI D-R158 869 SPARTEN (SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM OF AEROBIC AND RESISTANCE 1/1 TRINING EXERCISE I..(U) NAYAL HEALTH RESEAlRCH CENTER I SAN DIEGO CA E J...Program Outline Participants in the SPARTEN (Scientific Program of Aerobic and Resistance Training Exercise in the Navy) total body fitness program will...shipboard Scientific Program of Aerobic and Resistance Training Exercise (SPARTEN). 2. Cancellation. USS GEORGEPHILIPINST 6100.1 3. Background. All personnel

  12. [Influence of physical activity on human health].

    PubMed

    Predel, H-G; Tokarski, W

    2005-08-01

    The lack of physical activity -- frequently associated with malnutrition -- has led to a dramatic increase of so-called diseases of civilization in industrial nations. Hereby -- apart from the cardiovascular diseases -- in particular disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as well as the musculoskeletal system are included. Physical inactivity can be considered a proven risk factor for these diseases. Children and adolescents are increasingly affected. In the development of effective preventive strategies, the enhancement of physical/sportive activities in everyday life as well as with in the framework of systematic health-orientated training plays a central role. This is confirmed by an abundance of scientific studies indicating that regular physical activity has anenormous potential with regard to the physical and psychological health maintenance in all life phases. The underlying biological mechanisms are complex and affect almost all human organic systems. Yet, the health benefit is critically dependent upon the form, duration and intensity. Endurance-orientated activities such as walking, running, cycling etc. performed at a moderate intensity, exercised at least 2 days a week for a duration of 30-60 min, are recommended. This should be supplemented by moderate strength training comprising all relevant muscle groups. An early commencement of regular, continuous, lifelong physical activities is particularly effective and can be, thus, recommended from a health-orientated perspective.

  13. [Physical activity and reproductive health].

    PubMed

    Sundgot-Borgen, J

    2000-11-20

    The purpose of this article is to review the present knowledge about physical activity and reproductive health. Medline and manual search for articles related to exercise and menstrual function, and exercise and pregnancy were performed. Repetitive intensive exercise with increased stress hormone utilisation seems to partly explain the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The prevalence of menstrual irregularities is higher among athletes who participate in sports in which leanness is considered important for performance. Most of the studies concerning exercise-induced amenorrhoea have focused on low body weight and low fat ratio of body weight. However, energy drain and nutrient deficiency have been found to be important variables explaining menstrual irregularity in athletes. Loss of bone mass is related to menstrual irregularities hence it is important that menstrual irregularity not is considered a "normal" aspect of being an athlete. There are a number of positive effects and a few hypothetical risks related to exercise during pregnancy. There are no clinically controlled studies allowing us to draw conclusions about the effect of intensive training during pregnancy. Physically active women should be aware of the importance of sufficient energy intake to keep their regular menstrual cycle. Moderate exercise during pregnancy is recommended.

  14. Health condition and physical function as predictors of adherence in long-term strength and balance training among community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Aartolahti, Eeva; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Lönnroos, Eija; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Häkkinen, Arja

    2015-01-01

    Strength and balance training (SBT) has remarkable health benefits, but little is known regarding exercise adherence in older adults. We examined the adherence to strength and balance training and determinants of adherence among ≥75 year old adults. 182 community-dwelling individuals (aged 75-98 years, 71% female) began group-based SBT as part of a population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for the Good Care of the Elderly study. Training was offered once a week for 2.3 years. Adherence was defined as the proportion of attended sessions relative to offered sessions. Participants were classified based on their adherence level into low (≤33.3%), moderate (33.4-66.5%) and high (≥66.6%) adherers. The mean length of training was 19 ± 9 months, and 68% continued participation for at least two years. The mean training adherence was 55 ± 29% for all participants and 18%, 53% and 82% for low, moderate and high adherers, respectively. High adherence was predicted by female sex; younger age; better cognition; independence in Instrumental Activities of Daily Living; higher knee extension strength; faster walking speed; and better performance on the Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go tests. Poorer self-perceived health and the use of a walking aid were related to low adherence. Long-term continuation of training is possible for older community-dwelling adults, although poorer health and functional limitations affect training adherence. Our findings have implications for tailoring interventions and support for older adults to optimize their exercise adherence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Family Interventions in Physical Health

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    As we begin to understand the relationships between family interaction and physical health, we can develop interventions that focus on education, support, and problem solving. The author reviews existing research on family interventions in physical health and proposes guidelines for developing, implementing, and studying family interventions. PMID:21229055

  16. Breastfeeding. COTALMA: training health professionals.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, M C

    1994-01-01

    The Comite Tecnico de Apoyo a la Lactancia Materna (COTALMA), the Technical Breastfeeding Support Committee, was founded in Bolivia in 1989. It is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It is administered in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MOH). MOH and UNICEF choose the hospitals, who send teams that include a pediatrician, a gynecologist, a nurse, and a nutritionist. The first phase of the course (5.5 days) covers the scientific background of breastfeeding. A baseline study is then planned and conducted at each hospital. 2 to 3 months later, the second phase takes place during which data is presented and breast feeding programs are developed for each hospital. Communication, training, counseling, and planning and evaluation are covered. Practicums are conducted at hospitals. Trainers are usually members of COTALMA. The person in charge of maternal and child health services at MOH lectures on national health policies concerning mothers and children. Training includes use of the national health card, breastfeeding and child survival, and breastfeeding as a family planning method. Culturally appropriate course materials, which are in Spanish, are adapted from those developed by Wellstart International. Articles by COTALMA members and others are added. Participants are encouraged to train all staff at their institutions.

  17. Meteor Trains - Terminology and Physical Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Jirí

    2006-10-01

    This article presents a summary of various luminous phenomena that may follow after passage of a meteor. The terminology recommended by the International Astronomical Union in 1961 is used, which calls these phenomena trains. Nowadays, several types of trains can be clearly distinguished. The understanding of the underlying physical and chemical processes is, however, still not satisfactory and the nomenclature of different train phenomena has not yet been settled. In this paper I call them wake, green train, persistent train, and reflection train. Meteor wakes are formed by rarified non-equilibrium gas behind the meteoroid. The green train, produced by the radiation of the forbidden oxygen line at 557.7 nm, is created by reactions among atmospheric species. The persistent train is the most complex phenomenon with three phases of evolution. The afterglow phase is formed by cooling rarified gas. After that, atomic recombination phase follows. The third and most persistent continuum phase is probably fed by chemiluminescence. Finally, the reflection train occurs when sunlight is scattered by a dust cloud created by meteoroid disruption.

  18. Physical training--beyond increasing exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Zdrenghea, D; Poantă, Laura; Pop, Dana; Zdrenghea, V; Zdrenghea, M

    2008-01-01

    Physical training has traditionally represented the main method used in cardiovascular rehabilitation of ischemic patients in the past years. Nowadays, cardiovascular rehabilitation has been extended to other cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure. Also, cardiovascular rehabilitation included psychological, social and professional measures along with secondary prevention methods such as lifestyle changes. It has also been found that physical training has other additional effects which increased exercise tolerance. Effects on the risk factors regard beneficial effect on body weight, on the serum lipids levels, on psychosocial stress, on high blood pressure and on insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus. Physical exercise has also beneficial effects on the balance between sympathetic--vagal tone, inducing a vagal predominance, has anti-atherogenic and anti-ischemic effects, influencing the endothelial function, the inflammation (anti-inflammatory effect), both arteriogenesis and angiogenesis and thrombosis. Physical training could improve the symptoms of coronary patients by preconditioning, which has a protective effect for the myocardium. We may state that physical exercise has beneficial effects in cardiovascular patients because it increases exercise tolerance with positive consequences on the quality of life and professional reintegration, but also because it has positive effects beyond this. Thus, physical exercise should be practiced through cardiac rehabilitation programs, by all cardiovascular patients.

  19. Physical fitness and physical training during Norwegian military service.

    PubMed

    Dyrstad, Sindre M; Soltvedt, Rune; Hallén, Jostein

    2006-08-01

    Evaluate the physical fitness and training of Norwegian infantry soldiers during 10 months of compulsory military service. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and maximal numbers of sit-ups, push-ups, and chin-ups and 3-km running time were tested in 107 male infantry soldiers at the beginning and end of basic training (BT), and again at demobilization. The amount of physical training was registered throughout the military service. During BT, major improvements in sit-ups and push-ups were found. VO2max increased in soldiers with the lowest initial VO2max, but decreased to pre-BT level at demobilization. The amount of obligatory physical training was 8.5 hours x week(-1) during BT and 35% lower after BT, and was usually performed in uniform at low to moderate intensity. The amount of high-intensity endurance and strength training during compulsory military service is to low to improve the soldiers' endurance and muscular strength.

  20. Basic Physical Science. Apprentice Related Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Eric

    One in a series of core instructional materials for apprentices to use during the first or second years of apprentice-related subjects training, this booklet deals with basic physical science. The first section consists of an outline of the content and scope of the core materials as well as a self-assessment pretest. Covered in the four…

  1. Effects of an integrated health education and elastic band resistance training program on physical function and muscle strength in community-dwelling elderly women: Healthy Aging and Happy Aging II study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung-Lyul; Kim, Hee-Jae; Woo, Shinae; Cho, Be-Long; Song, Misoon; Park, Yeon-Hwan; Lim, Jae-Young; Song, Wook

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, we determined the effect of an integrated health education and elastic band resistance training program on body composition, physical function, muscle strength and quality in community-dwelling elderly women. We recruited participants with eligibility inclusion criteria, and randomly assigned them to either the control group (n = 19) or the intervention group (n = 19). The integrated intervention program comprised of health education and individual counseling, and elastic band training for 18 weeks (8 weeks of supervised training and 10 weeks of self-directed training). We assessed body composition, muscle strength and quality, and physical function at pre-, after 8 weeks (mid-) and 18 weeks (post-training). After the intervention, there were no significant changes in skeletal muscle index, fat free mass, total lean mass and total fat mass for both the control group and intervention group. However, the interaction effect was significantly different in SPPB score (P < 0.05), isokinetic strength (60 deg/s, P < 0.001; 120 deg/s; P < 0.05) and muscle quality (P < 0.05) after 18 weeks of intervention relative to the baseline of the control and intervention groups. The supervised elastic band training of 8 weeks did not improve short physical performance battery score and isokinetic strength, whereas there was a significant increase of those outcomes (10.6% improvement, 9.8~23.5% improvement) after 10 weeks of following self-directed exercise compared with the baseline. These results show the effectiveness of following self-directed resistance training with health education after supervised training cessation in improvement of short physical performance battery and leg muscle strength. This intervention program might be an effective method to promote muscle strength and quality, and to prevent frailty in elderly women. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 825-833. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Diet, physical exercise and cognitive behavioral training as a combined workplace based intervention to reduce body weight and increase physical capacity in health care workers - a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Health care workers comprise a high-risk workgroup with respect to deterioration and early retirement. There is high prevalence of obesity and many of the workers are overweight. Together, these factors play a significant role in the health-related problems within this sector. The present study evaluates the effects of the first 3-months of a cluster randomized controlled lifestyle intervention among health care workers. The intervention addresses body weight, general health variables, physical capacity and musculoskeletal pain. Methods 98 female, overweight health care workers were cluster-randomized to an intervention group or a reference group. The intervention consisted of an individually dietary plan with an energy deficit of 1200 kcal/day (15 min/hour), strengthening exercises (15 min/hour) and cognitive behavioral training (30 min/hour) during working hours 1 hour/week. Leisure time aerobic fitness was planned for 2 hour/week. The reference group was offered monthly oral presentations. Body weight, BMI, body fat percentage (bioimpedance), waist circumference, blood pressure, musculoskeletal pain, maximal oxygen uptake (maximal bicycle test), and isometric maximal muscle strength of 3 body regions were measured before and after the intervention period. Results In an intention-to-treat analysis from pre to post tests, the intervention group significantly reduced body weight with 3.6 kg (p < 0.001), BMI from 30.5 to 29.2 (p < 0.001), body fat percentage from 40.9 to 39.3 (p < 0.001), waist circumference from 99.7 to 95.5 cm (p < 0.001) and blood pressure from 134/85 to 127/80 mmHg (p < 0.001), with significant difference between the intervention and control group (p < 0.001) on all measures. No effect of intervention was found in musculoskeletal pain, maximal oxygen uptake and muscle strength, but on aerobic fitness. Conclusion The significantly reduced body weight, body fat, waist circumference and blood pressure as well as increased aerobic fitness

  3. Diet, physical exercise and cognitive behavioral training as a combined workplace based intervention to reduce body weight and increase physical capacity in health care workers - a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jeanette R; Faber, Anne; Ekner, Dorte; Overgaard, Kristian; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2011-08-27

    Health care workers comprise a high-risk workgroup with respect to deterioration and early retirement. There is high prevalence of obesity and many of the workers are overweight. Together, these factors play a significant role in the health-related problems within this sector. The present study evaluates the effects of the first 3-months of a cluster randomized controlled lifestyle intervention among health care workers. The intervention addresses body weight, general health variables, physical capacity and musculoskeletal pain. 98 female, overweight health care workers were cluster-randomized to an intervention group or a reference group. The intervention consisted of an individually dietary plan with an energy deficit of 1200 kcal/day (15 min/hour), strengthening exercises (15 min/hour) and cognitive behavioral training (30 min/hour) during working hours 1 hour/week. Leisure time aerobic fitness was planned for 2 hour/week. The reference group was offered monthly oral presentations. Body weight, BMI, body fat percentage (bioimpedance), waist circumference, blood pressure, musculoskeletal pain, maximal oxygen uptake (maximal bicycle test), and isometric maximal muscle strength of 3 body regions were measured before and after the intervention period. In an intention-to-treat analysis from pre to post tests, the intervention group significantly reduced body weight with 3.6 kg (p < 0.001), BMI from 30.5 to 29.2 (p < 0.001), body fat percentage from 40.9 to 39.3 (p < 0.001), waist circumference from 99.7 to 95.5 cm (p < 0.001) and blood pressure from 134/85 to 127/80 mmHg (p < 0.001), with significant difference between the intervention and control group (p < 0.001) on all measures. No effect of intervention was found in musculoskeletal pain, maximal oxygen uptake and muscle strength, but on aerobic fitness. The significantly reduced body weight, body fat, waist circumference and blood pressure as well as increased aerobic fitness in the intervention group show the

  4. Physical training risk factors for musculoskeletal injury in female soldiers.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tanja C; Songer, Thomas; Ye, Feifei; LaPorte, Ronald; Grier, Tyson; Anderson, Morgan; Chervak, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries (MSIs) result in the most medical encounters, lost duty days, and permanent disability. Women are at greater risk of injury than men and physical training is the leading cause of injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographic, body composition, fitness, and physical training risk factors for injuries in female Soldiers serving in garrison Army units over the past 12 months. Self-report survey was collected from 625 women. The ankle was the most frequently injured body region, 13%. Running was the activity most often associated with injury, 34%. In univariate analysis lower rank, older age, history of deployment, no unit runs, weekly frequency of personal resistance training, and history of injury were all associated with injury. In multivariate analysis rank, history of injury, weekly frequency of unit runs, and weekly frequency of personal resistance training were the best combination of predictors of injury. Running once or twice a week with the unit protected against MSIs, whereas participating in personal resistance training sessions once or twice a week increased the risk of MSIs. With more emphasis on running and resistance training, the U.S. Army could reduce injuries and save billions of dollars in training and health care costs.

  5. Physical fitness and exercise training of individuals with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Fernhall, B

    1993-04-01

    Recent social policies have focused on reentering persons with mental retardation (MR) into the work force and the mainstream of society. However, as individuals with MR age, their rate of institutionalization greatly outweighs that of the general population as well as children with MR. Health care organizations have expressed serious concern about the impact of an aging population with disabilities, particularly the cost associated with institutionalization. Considering that cardiovascular disorders are more common in population with than without MR, and that physical fitness has been directly related to work productivity among individuals with MR, physical fitness and exercise training have important implications for this population. Yet, available data suggest that individuals with MR have low levels of physical fitness, a higher incidence of obesity, and may respond differently to exercise training than persons without MR. This paper reviews current knowledge of physical fitness status, impact of exercise testing and training, and identifies differences between populations with and without MR, with special emphasis on trends associated with aging. This review is limited to three physical fitness components: obesity, cardiovascular fitness, and muscular strength and endurance, as these components have been shown to impact health and well-being, and are related to work performance of persons with MR. Suggestions for future research are also provided.

  6. Explorations in Mental Health Training: Project Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Ralph, Ed.; And Others

    The report contains summaries of 176 pilot projects demonstrating new and innovative approaches for training mental health personnel. Projects were conducted under grants awarded by the Experimental and Special Training Branch of the Division of Manpower and Training Programs, National Institute of Mental Health. The projects have been developed…

  7. Health-related physical fitness for children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Maltais, Désirée B.; Wiart, Lesley; Fowler, Eileen; Verschuren, Olaf; Damiano, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    Low levels of physical activity are a global health concern for all children. Children with cerebral palsy have even lower physical activity levels than their typically developing peers. Low levels of physical activity, and thus an increased risk for related chronic diseases, are associated with deficits in health-related physical fitness. Recent research has provided therapists with the resources to effectively perform physical fitness testing and physical activity training in clinical settings with children who have cerebral palsy, although most testing and training data to date pertains to those who walk. Nevertheless, based on the present evidence, all children with cerebral palsy should engage, to the extent they are able, in aerobic, anaerobic and muscle strengthening activities. Future research is required to determine the best ways to evaluate health-related physical fitness in non-ambulatory children with cerebral palsy and foster long-term changes in physical activity behavior in all children with this condition. PMID:24820339

  8. Existentially Oriented Training for Mental Health Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Carl

    1976-01-01

    The author presents an overview of the role of existentialism in the training of counselors and mental health practitioners. Exercises and skill development techniques are also presented for existentially oriented training of psychotherapists, using a workshop format. (HLM)

  9. Existentially Oriented Training for Mental Health Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Carl

    1976-01-01

    The author presents an overview of the role of existentialism in the training of counselors and mental health practitioners. Exercises and skill development techniques are also presented for existentially oriented training of psychotherapists, using a workshop format. (HLM)

  10. Physical Education's Role in Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallis, James F.; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes contributions physical education makes to child and adult health. Topics discussed are current levels of U.S. children's physical activity; status of elementary physical education programs; health-related physical activity interventions; public health analysis of elementary physical education; and public health role and goal for physical…

  11. Technician Training in Environmental Health Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert G.; Sherman, Alan

    1976-01-01

    The Environmental Health Science Technology Program was initiated by Middlesex County College in 1971 to provide the trained personnel needed by industry and government. Major areas needing environmental health technicians, the environmental health technology curriculum, and the on-the-job-training internship program are discussed. (BT)

  12. Light water reactor health physics.

    PubMed

    Prince, Robert J; Bradley, Scott E

    2004-11-01

    In this article an overview of the historical development of light water reactor health physics programs is presented. Operational health physics programs have developed and matured as experience in operating and maintaining light water reactors has been gained. Initial programs grew quickly in both size and complexity with the number and size of nuclear units under construction and in operation. Operational health physics programs evolved to face various challenges confronted by the nuclear industry, increasing the effectiveness of radiological safety measures. Industry improvements in radiological safety performance have resulted in significant decreases in annual collective exposures from a high value of 790 person-rem in 1980 to 117 person-rem per reactor in 2002. Though significant gains have been made, the continued viability of the nuclear power industry is confronted with an aging workforce, as well as the challenges posed by deregulation and the need to maintain operational excellence.

  13. Light water reactor health physics.

    PubMed

    Prince, Robert J; Bradley, Scott E

    2005-06-01

    In this article an overview of the historical development of light water reactor health physics programs is presented. Operational health physics programs have developed and matured as experience in operating and maintaining light water reactors has been gained. Initial programs grew quickly in both size and complexity with the number and size of nuclear units under construction and in operation. Operational health physics programs evolved to face various challenges confronted by the nuclear industry, increasing the effectiveness of radiological safety measures. Industry improvements in radiological safety performance have resulted in significant decreases in annual collective exposures from a high value of 790 person-rem in 1980 to 117 person-rem per reactor in 2002. Though significant gains have been made, the continued viability of the nuclear power industry is confronted with an aging workforce, as well as the challenges posed by deregulation and the need to maintain operational excellence.

  14. Training Physicians for Public Health Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Lyla M., Ed.; Munthali, A. Wezi, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Public health efforts have resulted in tremendous improvements in the health of individuals and communities. The foundation for effective public health interventions rests, in large part, on a well-trained workforce. Unfortunately there is a major shortage of public health physicians who are prepared to face today's public health challenges.…

  15. Training Physicians for Public Health Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Lyla M., Ed.; Munthali, A. Wezi, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Public health efforts have resulted in tremendous improvements in the health of individuals and communities. The foundation for effective public health interventions rests, in large part, on a well-trained workforce. Unfortunately there is a major shortage of public health physicians who are prepared to face today's public health challenges.…

  16. Understanding health policy leaders’ training needs

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L. Lerissa; Volny Darko, Renée; McKool, Marissa; Yan, Fengxia; Heiman, Harry

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the training needs of health policy leaders and practitioners across career stages; identified areas of core content for health policy training programs; and, identified training modalities for health policy leaders. Methods We convened a focus group of health policy leaders at varying career stages to inform the development of the Health Policy Leaders’ Training Needs Assessment tool. We piloted and distributed the tool electronically. We used descriptive statistics and thematic coding for analysis. Results Seventy participants varying in age and stage of career completed the tool. “Cost implications of health policies” ranked highest for personal knowledge development and “intersection of policy and politics” ranked highest for health policy leaders in general. “Effective communication skills” ranked as the highest skill element and “integrity” as the highest attribute element. Format for training varied based on age and career stage. Conclusions This study highlighted the training needs of health policy leaders personally as well as their perceptions of the needs for training health policy leaders in general. The findings are applicable for current health policy leadership training programs as well as those in development. PMID:28333982

  17. Understanding health policy leaders' training needs.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Carey Roth; Smith, L Lerissa; Volny Darko, Renée; McKool, Marissa; Yan, Fengxia; Heiman, Harry

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the training needs of health policy leaders and practitioners across career stages; identified areas of core content for health policy training programs; and, identified training modalities for health policy leaders. We convened a focus group of health policy leaders at varying career stages to inform the development of the Health Policy Leaders' Training Needs Assessment tool. We piloted and distributed the tool electronically. We used descriptive statistics and thematic coding for analysis. Seventy participants varying in age and stage of career completed the tool. "Cost implications of health policies" ranked highest for personal knowledge development and "intersection of policy and politics" ranked highest for health policy leaders in general. "Effective communication skills" ranked as the highest skill element and "integrity" as the highest attribute element. Format for training varied based on age and career stage. This study highlighted the training needs of health policy leaders personally as well as their perceptions of the needs for training health policy leaders in general. The findings are applicable for current health policy leadership training programs as well as those in development.

  18. Physics With Health Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urone, Paul Peter

    1985-09-01

    An accessible, algebra-based text covering the introductory physics necessary for applied health and nursing. Presentation integrates health science applications throughout. Excellent illustrations support the exposition. Chapters contain over 100 worked examples, over 450 review questions, and more than 550 end-of-chapter problems graded according to difficulty. Offers discussion of the latest applications such as ionizing radiation and radiation doses, nuclear imaging techniques, CT scanners, ultrasound techniques, artificial hearts, and laser surgery.

  19. Physical training increases osteoprotegerin in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Ingrid; Parini, Paolo; Gustafsson, Sven A; Andersson, Göran; Brinck, Jonas

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether mechanical loading by exercise over a 1-year period in postmenopausal women had an effect on the receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand/osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG) system or the levels of the Wnt-signaling antagonist sclerostin. A total of 112 postmenopausal were randomized to either sedentary life (controls) or physical activity (training group). Ninety-two women fulfilled the study protocol. The training program consisted of three fast 30-min walks and one or two 1-h aerobic training sessions per week. The effect on the bone mineral density of the hip assessed with dual X-ray absorptiometry was positive as reported earlier. Blood samples were taken from participants at baseline and after 1 year and serum levels of OPG, RANKL and sclerostin were quantified together with the bone metabolism markers C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (CTX) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP). The results were analyzed using an analysis of covariance model using baseline values as the covariate. The training group displayed a clear mean increase of OPG +7.55 pg/ml compared to controls (p = 0.007). The mean changes for RANKL +0.19 pg/ml (square-root transformed data) and sclerostin +0.62 pmol/l were non-significant (p = 0.13 and p = 0.34). The changes in bone turnover markers CTX and BALP showed a tendency to decrease in the training group versus controls but the changes were small and non-significant. Although our study is limited in number of participating women, we have been able to show an OPG-associated, and RANKL- and sclerostin-independent, training-induced inhibition of postmenopausal bone loss.

  20. Does respiratory muscle training increase physical performance?

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Billy; Fricke, Hannes; de Marées, Markus; Linville, John W; Mester, Joachim

    2009-09-01

    Special force units and military personnel undergo demanding physical exercise and might benefit from high-intensity respiratory muscle training (RMT) by increasing their endurance performance. This study examined the effects of a 6-week high-intensity RMT on running performance and oxygen uptake (VO2max) in a group of German Special Force Squad members. 17 participants were randomly assigned to a training or control group. Baseline and post-testing included a ramp test, as well as an incremental test on a treadmill, performed to physical exhaustion. VO2, respiratory exchange ratio, and heart rate were measured breath by breath. Furthermore, maximum running speed (V(max)), 4 mmol x 1(-1) lactate threshold (V4) and perception of respiratory effort were determined. During pulmonary testing, sustained maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressure (PI(max) and PE(max)) were obtained. RMT was performed daily at approximately 90% PI(max) for 6 weeks with 2 x 30 breath cycles using an Ultrabreathe lung trainer. No statistical differences were detected between the groups for any parameter after RMT. High-intensity RMT did not show any benefits on VO2max and endurance performance and are unlikely to be of benefit to military or paramilitary training programs for an increase in endurance performance.

  1. Physical activity, hydration and health.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ascensión; Manonelles, Pedro; Palacios, Nieves; Wärnberg, Julia; Casajús, José A; Pérez, Margarita; Aznar, Susana; Benito, Pedro J; Martínez-Gomez, David; Ortega, Francisco B; Ortega, Eduardo; Urrialde, Rafael

    2014-06-01

    Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory disea ses and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  2. Health literacy training: A model for effective implementation and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kristin; Swarbrick, Peggy; Krzos, Izabela M; Ruppert, Stephen; O'Neill, Sheila

    2015-12-01

    Training the mental health workforce to provide health promotion and support to people using their services to manage comorbid conditions is essential if full integration of physical and mental health is to become a reality. We document how a training model was explicitly designed to extend curricula beyond the classroom in order to increase the frequency and quality of physical health interventions. We also show how implementation was supported by a strong project structure and a facilitative administration. This article was informed by the workforce development literature, process observations, and key informant interviews. Passive dissemination cannot change practice. Buy-in and commitment from agency leaders facilitates collaboration between consultant-trainers and trainees. Organizations with strong implementation structures help ensure training uptake. When contracting with trainers, ensure that they understand the need for and are willing to commit to sustainability. Additionally, organizations will benefit by using lessons from implementation science when approaching workforce. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. [Physical activity and cardiovascular health].

    PubMed

    Temporelli, Pier Luigi

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that regular moderate physical activity, in the context of a healthy lifestyle, significantly reduces the likelihood of cardiovascular events, both in primary and secondary prevention. In addition, it is scientifically proven that exercise can reduce the incidence of diabetes, osteoporosis, depression, breast cancer and colon cancer. Despite this strong evidence, sedentary lifestyle remains a widespread habit in the western world. Even in Italy the adult population has a poor attitude to regular physical activity. It is therefore necessary, as continuously recommended by the World Health Organization, to motivate people to "move" since the transition from inactivity to regular light to moderate physical activity has a huge impact on health, resulting in significant savings of resources. We do not need to be athletes to exercise - it should be part of all our daily routines.

  4. Outage managment and health physics issue, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2008-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles include: Outage optimization initiatives, by George B. Beam, AREVA NP, Inc.; New plant based on excellent track records, by Jim Scarola, Progress Energy; Meeting customer needs and providing environmental benefits, by Peter S. Hastings, Duke Energy; Plants with 3-D design, by Jack A. Bailey, Tennessee Valley Authority; and Highest quality with exceptional planning, by Jason A. Walls, Duke Energy. Industry innovation articles include: Integrated exposure reduction plan, by Ed Wolfe, Exelon; Performance-based radiation worker training, by Joe Giuffre and Timothy Vriezerma, American Electric Power.

  5. Recreation and Health Agencies: Working Together to Promote Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipp, JoAnn; Dusenbury, Linda J.

    1994-01-01

    The Colorado Department of Health formed the Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Prevention Coalition to address Colorado's problem with CVD. The article describes the work of the Coalition's Physical Activity Subcommittee, the Subcommittee's Exer-Deck tool to promote increased physical activity, and the training of professionals to work collaboratively…

  6. Standard Model of Particle Physics--a health physics perspective.

    PubMed

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2010-11-01

    The Standard Model of Particle Physics is reviewed with an emphasis on its relationship to the physics supporting the health physics profession. Concepts important to health physics are emphasized and specific applications are presented. The capability of the Standard Model to provide health physics relevant information is illustrated with application of conservation laws to neutron and muon decay and in the calculation of the neutron mean lifetime.

  7. Athletic Training and Public Health Summit.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mark; Bovbjerg, Viktor; Hannigan, Kim; Hootman, Jennifer M; Johnson, Sam T; Kucera, Kristen L; Norcross, Marc F

    2016-07-01

    To introduce athletic trainers to the benefits of using a population-based approach to injury and illness prevention and to explore opportunities for partnering with public health professionals on these initiatives. Athletic trainers play leading roles in individual injury and illness prevention but are less familiar with policy development, evaluation, and implementation from a population-level standpoint. The Athletic Training and Public Health Summit was convened to understand, explore, and develop the intersection of athletic training and public health. To further the integration of athletic training within the public health arena, athletic trainers must expand their professional focus beyond the individual to the population level.

  8. A Comparison between the Effects of Aerobic Dance Training on Mini-Trampoline and Hard Wooden Surface on Bone Resorption, Health-Related Physical Fitness, Balance, and Foot Plantar Pressure in Thai Working Women.

    PubMed

    Sukkeaw, Wittawat; Kritpet, Thanomwong; Bunyaratavej, Narong

    2015-09-01

    To compare the effects of aerobic dance training on mini-trampoline and hard wooden surface on bone resorption, health-related physical fitness, balance, and foot plantar pressure in Thai working women. Sixty-three volunteered females aged 35-45 years old participated in the study and were divided into 3 groups: A) aerobic dance on mini-trampoline (21 females), B) aerobic dance on hard wooden surface (21 females), and C) control group (21 females). All subjects in the aerobic dance groups wore heart rate monitors during exercise. Aerobic dance worked out 3 times a week, 40 minutes a day for 12 weeks. The intensity was set at 60-80% of the maximum heart rate. The control group engaged in routine physical activity. The collected data were bone formation (N-terminal propeptine of procollagen type I: P1NP) bone resorption (Telopeptide cross linked: β-CrossLaps) health-related physical fitness, balance, and foot plantar pressure. The obtained data from pre- and post trainings were compared and analyzed by paired samples t-test and one way analysis of covariance. The significant difference was at 0.05 level. After the 12-week training, the biochemical bone markers of both mini-trampoline and hard wooden surface aerobic dance training subjects decreased in bone resorption (β-CrossLaps) but increased in boneformation (P1NP). Health-related physical fitness, balance, and foot plantar pressure were not only better when comparing to the pre-test result but also significantly different when comparing to the control group (p < 0.05). The aerobic dance on mini-trampoline showed that leg muscular strength, balance and foot plantar pressure were significantly better than the aerobic dance on hard wooden surface (p < 0.05). The aerobic dance on mini-trampoline and hard wooden surface had positive effects on biochemical bone markers. However, the aerobic dance on mini-trampoline had more leg muscular strength and balance including less foot plantar pressure. It is considered to be

  9. Physical training effects in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Romano, G; Simonella, R; Falleti, E; Bortolotti, N; Deiuri, E; Antonutto, G; De Vita, S; Ferraccioli, G F; Montanaro, D

    2010-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated the benefits of rehabilitation in uraemic patients. This study evaluates physical and psychosocial effects of exercise on renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Eight RTRs were evaluated before and after an exercise training consisting of thirty 40-minute sessions, three times a week, performed with the interval training technique. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) significantly decreased (p<0.04 and <0.008, respectively). Quality of life mean scores (SF-36 test) significantly increased (p<0.000). No differences were recorded for muscle and fat mass, maximal explosive power of the lower limbs, alkaline and acid phosphatase, parathormone (PTH), myoglobin, lipoprotein-A, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), at rest heart rate, and cardiac troponin. IL-6 decreased from 2.8±0.6 to 1.7±0.5 pg/mL (p<0.01). Resting MAP fell from 112±4 to 99±3 mmHg (p<0.02). The metabolic threshold rose from 33±4 to 43±5% (p<0.033). The blood lactate level at peak exercise increased from 5.2±0.9 to 6.2±0.7 mmol/L (p<0.012). The maximum oxygen uptake increased from 1200±210 to 1359±202 mL/min (p<0.05), iso-load oxygen uptake decreased from 1110±190 to 1007±187 mL/min (p<0.034). The maximum working capacity increased from 90±14 to 115±15 watts (p<0.000). This study suggests that an appropriate dose of physical training is a useful, safe and non-pharmacologic contribution to RTR treatment. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Physical activity, physical fitness and the effect of exercise training interventions in lymphoma patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vermaete, Nele; Wolter, Pascal; Verhoef, Gregor; Gosselink, Rik

    2013-08-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common and most distressing problems in lymphoma patients. A vicious circle is presumed between fatigue, physical activity and physical fitness. It is plausible that an exercise training program would be effective in reducing fatigue, by breaking this vicious circle. The purposes of this review are to provide an overview of the literature on physical activity and physical fitness in lymphoma patients before, during and after anticancer treatment, and to summarise the literature on exercise training interventions in lymphoma patients. We conducted a search for studies reporting on physical activity, physical fitness or the effect of exercise training in lymphoma patients. A total of 13 articles were selected. Due to a small number of articles and methodological issues, it was not possible to make final conclusions. The results indicated that 21 % to 29 % of lymphoma survivors meet the American College of Sports Medicine public health guidelines for physical activity. Maximal exercise capacity was decreased before treatment, especially in patients with advanced disease, and was close to normal during and/or after treatment. Lower levels of physical activity as well as lower physical fitness seemed to be associated with more symptoms of fatigue. Aerobic exercise training interventions seemed to be feasible and safe and had positive effects on cardiorespiratory fitness, fatigue and self-reported physical functioning. Further research is needed to examine physical activity and physical fitness in a longitudinal, objective way in large samples and to examine the effect of exercise training in lymphoma patients.

  11. Training the Auxiliary Health Workers; An Analysis of Functions, Training Content, Training Costs, and Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    The booklet describes what each type of worker is allowed to do and presents an overview of the substantive content of the training, length of training, training costs, and kinds of facilities and staff needed. The types of workers include community health aide, homemaker-home health aide, social worker aide, food service supervisor, physical…

  12. Emotional states and physical health.

    PubMed

    Salovey, P; Rothman, A J; Detweiler, J B; Steward, W T

    2000-01-01

    Positive emotional states may promote healthy perceptions, beliefs, and physical well-being itself. To explore potential mechanisms linking pleasant feelings and good health, the authors consider several lines of research, including (a) direct effects of positive affect on physiology, especially the immune system, (b) the information value of emotional experiences, (c) the psychological resources engendered by positive feeling states, (d) the ways in which mood can motivate health-relevant behaviors, and (e) the elicitation of social support. As anticipated by the Greek physician Hippocrates, positive emotions and healthy outcomes may be linked through multiple pathways.

  13. High Intensity Interval Training for Maximizing Health Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger-Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    2017-04-03

    Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes. The primary objective of this review is to discuss how aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as compared to moderate continuous training may maximize outcomes, and to provide practical advices for successful clinical and home-based HIIT.

  14. Physical activity participation and constraints among athletic training students.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Justin; Rogers, Katherine; Anderson, Jordan

    2015-02-01

    Researchers have examined the physical activity (PA) habits of certified athletic trainers; however, none have looked specifically at athletic training students. To assess PA participation and constraints to participation among athletic training students. Cross-sectional study. Entry-level athletic training education programs (undergraduate and graduate) across the United States. Participants were 1125 entry-level athletic training students. Self-reported PA participation, including a calculated PA index based on a typical week. Leisure constraints and demographic data were also collected. Only 22.8% (252/1105) of athletic training students were meeting the American College of Sports Medicine recommendations for PA through moderate-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise. Although 52.3% (580/1105) were meeting the recommendations through vigorous-intensity cardiorespiratory exercise, 60.5% (681/1125) were meeting the recommendations based on the combined total of moderate or vigorous cardiorespiratory exercise. In addition, 57.2% (643/1125) of respondents met the recommendations for resistance exercise. Exercise habits of athletic training students appear to be better than the national average and similar to those of practicing athletic trainers. Students reported structural constraints such as lack of time due to work or studies as the most significant barrier to exercise participation. Athletic training students experienced similar constraints to PA participation as practicing athletic trainers, and these constraints appeared to influence their exercise participation during their entry-level education. Athletic training students may benefit from a greater emphasis on work-life balance during their entry-level education to promote better health and fitness habits.

  15. [Metabolic fitness: physical activity and health].

    PubMed

    Saltin, Bengt; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2002-04-15

    Physical inactivity is strongly associated with an increased risk of premature disease and death, and the falling level of physical activity in Denmark (as in many other countries) makes physical inactivity a major life-style risk factor in many western countries today. Both aerobic fitness (maximum oxygen uptake) and metabolic capacity of the muscles are important in this matter. The present paper focuses on the role of the metabolic capacity/fitness of muscle, because this appears to be especially critical for the development of metabolic-related diseases and thus for the health of the individual. A definition of metabolic fitness is proposed as the ratio between mitochondrial capacity for substrate utilisation and maximum oxygen uptake of the muscle. Indirect means of determining this parameter are discussed. Skeletal muscle is an extraordinarily plastic tissue and metabolic capacity/fitness changes quickly when the level of physical activity is altered. High metabolic fitness includes an elevated use of fat at rest and during exercise. The capacity for glucose metabolism is also enhanced in trained muscle. Some of these adaptations to physical activity are explained. Exercise-induced activation of genes coding for proteins involved in metabolism is described as an underlying mechanism for some of these adaptations. The increased gene expression is of relatively short duration, which implies that a certain regularity of physical activity is required to maintain high metabolic fitness. Thus, metabolic fitness is directly related to how much the muscle is used, but even low levels of physical activity have a beneficial effect on metabolic fitness and the overall health of the individual.

  16. Physical Training, Fitness, and Injuries: Lessons Learned From Military Studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bruce H; Hauschild, Veronique D

    2015-11-01

    Injuries are the leading cause of medical encounters across the U.S. military services resulting in more than 2.0 million clinic visits per year. Almost 50% of military service members experience an injury each year and half of those injuries are caused by physical training (PT), exercise, or sports. To prevent a problem as large and complex as injuries in the military requires a systematic approach. Several key questions must be answered to effectively address a problem such as injuries: (1) how big is the problem? (2) what are the causes and risk factors for the problem? (3) do modifiable risk factors for the problem exist? and (4) what works to prevent the problem? The article discusses leading causes of injuries for U.S. Army populations. It then explores key risk factors for exercise and training-related injuries: (1) the amounts of training, (2) types of training activities, (3) participants level of fitness, and (4) personal health risk behaviors. The article concludes with a review of prevention strategies illustrating interventions that have been shown to be effective, and others that are not effective. The data presented suggest that PT and exercise cause injuries and that modifications of training are most likely to prevent the problem.

  17. 10 CFR 1046.12 - Physical fitness training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Physical fitness training program. 1046.12 Section 1046.12... Force Personnel § 1046.12 Physical fitness training program. (a) Each incumbent security police officer, who has not met the applicable physical fitness qualification standard, shall participate in a DOE...

  18. 10 CFR 1046.12 - Physical fitness training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Physical fitness training program. 1046.12 Section 1046.12... Force Personnel § 1046.12 Physical fitness training program. (a) Each incumbent security police officer, who has not met the applicable physical fitness qualification standard, shall participate in a DOE...

  19. 10 CFR 1046.12 - Physical fitness training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Physical fitness training program. 1046.12 Section 1046.12... Force Personnel § 1046.12 Physical fitness training program. (a) Each incumbent security police officer, who has not met the applicable physical fitness qualification standard, shall participate in a DOE...

  20. 10 CFR 1046.12 - Physical fitness training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Physical fitness training program. 1046.12 Section 1046.12...-10-14) Protective Force Personnel § 1046.12 Physical fitness training program. (a) Each incumbent security police officer, who has not met the applicable physical fitness qualification standard, shall...

  1. 10 CFR 1046.12 - Physical fitness training program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Physical fitness training program. 1046.12 Section 1046.12... Force Personnel § 1046.12 Physical fitness training program. (a) Each incumbent security police officer, who has not met the applicable physical fitness qualification standard, shall participate in a DOE...

  2. Physical health nurse consultant role to improve physical health in mental health services: A carer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Wilson, Karen; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The physical health of people diagnosed with a mental illness is significantly poorer in comparison with the general population. Awareness of this health disparity is increasing; however, strategies to address the problem are limited. Carers play an important role in the physical health care of people with mental illness, particularly in facilitating navigation of and advocating in the health care system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant position has been suggested as a way to address the physical health care disparity and limited research available suggests that positive outcomes are possible. In the present study, a qualitative exploratory research project was undertaken, involving in-depth interviews with people identifying as mental health carers. Two focus groups and one individual interview were conducted involving a total of 13 carers. The resulting data were analyzed thematically. Views and opinions about the proposed physical health nurse consultant (PHNC) position were sought during these interviews and are reported in this paper. Two main sub-themes were evident relating to characteristics of this role: reliability and consistency; and communication and support. Essentially carers expressed a need for support for themselves and consumers in addressing physical health concerns. Successful implementation of this position would require a consistent and reliable approach. Carers are significant stakeholders in the physical health of consumers of mental health services and their active involvement in identifying and tailoring services, including development of the physical health nurse consultant must be seen as a priority. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Physical health monitoring in mental health settings: a study exploring mental health nurses' views of their role.

    PubMed

    Mwebe, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    To explore nurses' views of their role in the screening and monitoring of the physical care needs of people with serious mental illness in a mental health service provider. There is increasing awareness through research that people with serious mental illness disproportionately experience and die early from physical health conditions. Mental health nurses are best placed as front-line workers to offer screening, monitoring and interventions; however, their views on physical care interventions are not studied often. Qualitative exploratory study. The study was carried out in a mental health inpatient centre in England. Volunteer sampling was adopted for the study with a total target sample of (n = 20) nurses from three inpatient wards. Semistructured interviews were conducted with (n = 10) registered mental health nurses who had consented to take part in the study. Inductive data analysis and theme development were guided by a thematic analytic framework. Participants shared a clear commitment regarding their role regarding physical health screening and monitoring in mental health settings. Four themes emerged as follows: features of current practice and physical health monitoring; perceived barriers to physical health monitoring; education and training needs; and strategies to improve physical health monitoring. Nurses were unequivocal in their resolve to ensure good standard physical health monitoring and screening interventions in practice. However, identified obstacles have to be addressed to ensure that physical health screening and monitoring is integrated adequately in everyday clinical activities. Achieving this would require improvements in nurses' training, and an integrated multiservice and team-working approach. Attending to the physical health needs of people with serious mental illness has been associated with multiple improvements in both mental and physical health; nurses have a vital role to play in identifying and addressing causes of poor

  4. Physical Fitness and Depressive Symptoms during Army Basic Combat Training

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Shannon K.; Wilkinson, Larrell L.; Wigfall, Lisa T.; Reynolds, Alexandria M.; Muraca, Stephanie T.; Glover, Saundra H.; Wooten, Nikki R.; Sui, Xuemei; Beets, Michael W.; Durstine, J. Larry; Newman-Norlund, Roger D.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mental health-related problems are a significant cause of attrition during Basic Combat Training (BCT). Evidence in civilian populations suggests that physical fitness is associated with psychological benefits in civilians, but little is known about the association between physical fitness and psychological adjustment during BCT. Methods This study prospectively examined the association between physical fitness and depressive symptoms in 300 BCT soldiers from May to July, 2012 at Fort Jackson, Columbia, SC. Soldiers completed a baseline Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and survey within one week of arriving at BCT, and an end of cycle survey after eight weeks of BCT. Soldiers were assigned to the “high” fitness category if they had a passing score on the standard APFT of greater than or equal to 180 points out of 300 points. Soldiers scoring less than 180 points on the APFT were assigned to the “ low” fitness category. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Results In multivariate analyses, adjusting for baseline demographics, self-reported sleep prior to BCT, BCT confidence, Army identification, and depressive symptoms, the odds of reporting depressive symptoms were 60% lower for soldiers in the high fitness category (odds ratio, OR 0.40; 95% confidence interval, CI 0.19–0.84), compared to soldiers in the low fitness category. Conclusions Analogous to other positive outcomes of soldier fitness, improvement of soldier physical fitness prior to BCT might improve soldiers' psychological health outcomes. PMID:24870581

  5. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Maye; Gerein, Nancy; Tarin, Ehsanullah; Butcher, Christopher; Pearson, Stephen; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2009-01-01

    Background The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. Methods The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Results Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least useful areas were those that dealt

  6. Elevating physical activity as a public health priority: creation of the National Society of Physical Activity Practitioners in Public Health.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Christine; Abercrombie, Eydie; Epping, Jacqueline N; Mordecai, LeeAnn; Newkirk, Jimmy; Ray, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Physical activity has emerged as a distinct area of public health practice. As this field evolved, the need for a professional organization for physical activity practitioners in public health became evident. A collaboration of several existing public health professional organizations formed to address this new area of public health practice. The collaboration laid the foundation to establish a professional organization. National Association of Physical Activity Practitioners in Public Health (NSPAPPH) was launched in April 2006. NSPAPPH accomplishments to date include convening a national meeting of physical activity practitioners, conducting strategic planning, adopting bylaws and core competencies for professional practice, developing a website and electronic newsletter, and establishing training opportunities for practitioners. Future plans for NSPAPPH include development of a professional certification for physical activity practitioners in public health; enhancement of training and professional development opportunities; recruitment of members from national, tribal, state, and local organizations working in public and private sectors; publications of journal articles, reports, and issue briefs; and development of a policy agenda. Implementing these plans will serve to strengthen public health infrastructure for physical activity, thus improving the physical activity behaviors of Americans and the health of the nation.

  7. "Physical Education", "Health and Physical Education", "Physical Literacy" and "Health Literacy": Global Nomenclature Confusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Timothy; Soukup, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    The title "physical education" (PE) is the traditional taxonomy used to represent the education discipline. Health and physical education (HPE) is regarded to be an all-encompassing health-dimensional title that has been recently embraced by various education systems around the world. Hence, it can be argued that PE and HPE are often…

  8. Resistance Training in Youth: Laying the Foundation for Injury Prevention and Physical Literacy.

    PubMed

    Zwolski, Christin; Quatman-Yates, Catherine; Paterno, Mark V

    The rising incidence of physical activity- and sports-related injuries has prompted the present-day investigation of resistance training as a potential means of injury prevention and physical literacy development among youth. Relevant studies on the topics of athlete development, physical literacy, resistance training, and injury prevention in children and adolescents were reviewed (PubMed and Sports Discus, 1982-2016). Recommendations from consensus guidelines and position statements applicable to resistance training and injury prevention in youth, in addition to young athlete development, were reviewed. Additionally, hand searches, expert requests, article reference lists, and gray literature were utilized and reviewed for pertinent content. Clinical review. Level 4. Youth throughout the physical activity spectrum are at risk for physical activity- and sports-related injury. Of highest priority are early specializers, physically inactive youth, and young girls, owing to increased injury rates. Resistance training among these at-risk populations has been shown to reduce injury risk by up to 68% and improve sports performance and health measures, in addition to accelerating the development of physical literacy. Recent recommendations, position statements, and national initiatives advocate for the incorporation of resistance training with qualified instruction among these groups. Resistance training in addition to free play and other structured physical activity training can serve as a protective means against injury and a positive catalyst for the development of physical literacy to offset the impact of diminishing physical activity and early sport specialization in today's youth.

  9. HOME HEALTH AIDE TRAINING PROJECT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater New Haven Community Council, CT.

    THE HOME HEALTH AIDE PERFORMS SIMPLE PERSONAL CARE FUNCTIONS UNDER NURSING SUPERVISION IN THE HOME CARE OF AN ILL OR DISABLED PERSON. THE PROJECT OBJECTIVES WERE TO TRAIN AS AIDES 30 MEN AND WOMEN AGE 45 YEARS AND OLDER WITH LIMITED INCOMES TO MEET A COMMUNITY EMPLOYMENT NEED AND TO EXPERIMENT IN RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, TRAINING, AND EMPLOYMENT…

  10. Evaluation of the Army Physical Training and Weight Control Programs. Part 3. The Revised Survey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    2 295-310. Dishman, R. K., Sallis, J. F., & Orenstein, D. R. (1985). The determinatns of physical activity and exercise . Public Health Reports, 100... physical activity and exercise : a summary. Public Health Reports, 100, 1188-126. 4..’ 7...down according to levels of fitness or ability for physical training activities or exercise ? Always (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) Never 10. Mandatory

  11. Global recommendations on physical activity for health

    MedlinePlus

    ... English Français Русский Español Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health Menu Diet, Physical Activity & Health Global ... obesity Documents & publications Related links Global recommendations on physical activity for health WHO developed the "Global Recommendations on ...

  12. Physical Activity and Health: Does Physical Education Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell R.; O'Neill, Jennifer R.; McIver, Kerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Physical education has been an institution in American schools since the late 19th century, and today almost all American children are exposed to physical education classes. It has often been claimed that physical education provides important benefits to public health. The purpose of this paper is to determine if physical education increases…

  13. Physical Activity and Health: Does Physical Education Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell R.; O'Neill, Jennifer R.; McIver, Kerry L.

    2011-01-01

    Physical education has been an institution in American schools since the late 19th century, and today almost all American children are exposed to physical education classes. It has often been claimed that physical education provides important benefits to public health. The purpose of this paper is to determine if physical education increases…

  14. Military Applicability of Interval Training for Health and Performance.

    PubMed

    Gibala, Martin J; Gagnon, Patrick J; Nindl, Bradley C

    2015-11-01

    Militaries from around the globe have predominantly used endurance training as their primary mode of aerobic physical conditioning, with historical emphasis placed on the long distance run. In contrast to this traditional exercise approach to training, interval training is characterized by brief, intermittent bouts of intense exercise, separated by periods of lower intensity exercise or rest for recovery. Although hardly a novel concept, research over the past decade has shed new light on the potency of interval training to elicit physiological adaptations in a time-efficient manner. This work has largely focused on the benefits of low-volume interval training, which involves a relatively small total amount of exercise, as compared with the traditional high-volume approach to training historically favored by militaries. Studies that have directly compared interval and moderate-intensity continuous training have shown similar improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness and the capacity for aerobic energy metabolism, despite large differences in total exercise and training time commitment. Interval training can also be applied in a calisthenics manner to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and strength, and this approach could easily be incorporated into a military conditioning environment. Although interval training can elicit physiological changes in men and women, the potential for sex-specific adaptations in the adaptive response to interval training warrants further investigation. Additional work is needed to clarify adaptations occurring over the longer term; however, interval training deserves consideration from a military applicability standpoint as a time-efficient training strategy to enhance soldier health and performance. There is value for military leaders in identifying strategies that reduce the time required for exercise, but nonetheless provide an effective training stimulus.

  15. Diabetes Training for Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background A 2.5-month diabetes education training for community health workers (CHWs) was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Methods Training methods used included case studies, role-playing, and lectures. Exams were used throughout the training for its evaluation. Teaching was delivered by different ways: a one day American Diabetes Association (ADA) course; a five day Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP); Conversation Maps; and a series of seven National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) diabetes education booklets. Results Qualitative and quantitative evaluative methods were used during and after the training. The CHWs’ diabetes knowledge was evaluated by a pre- and post-test Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ). The post-test was conducted one week after completing the training. The findings showed that the diabetes knowledge of the CHWs increased. Conclusions Diabetes competencies and evaluative tools need to be developed specific for CHWs as a way to standardize all CHW diabetes trainings. PMID:27110434

  16. Effects of Low Impact Aerobic Dance and Fitball Training on Bone Resorption and Health-Related Physical Fitness in Thai Working Women.

    PubMed

    Na Ayudthaya, Wanitcha Chatkun; Kritpet, Thanomwong

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effects of low impact aerobic dance and fitball training on bone resorption in Thai working women. The samples of this study consisted of 47 females at the age from 35-45. The subjects were divided into two groups: A) 23 females in a low impact aerobic dance (20 min) and fitball (15 min) training group, and B) 24 females in a low impact aerobic dance training group (35 min). Both groups wore a heart rate monitor during the exercise training. The sessions in the training program over 12 weeks were performed a 3-day a week, 35-minute for work out per session at an intensity of 60-80% of maximum heart rate. Before and after the 12-week training program, bone resorption (Telopeptidecrosslinked: β-CrossLaps) and bone formation (N-terminal propeptine of procollagen type 1: P1NP) including physiological and fitness data were assessed. The data of pre and post trainings within and between the groups as well as the data of changes in dependent variables were compared and analyzed by using paired t-test and independent-test. The statistically significant difference was set at the 0.05 level. Both the low impact aerobic dance and fitball training group and the low impact aerobic dance training group revealed their lower level of bone resorption (β-CrossLaps) while the first group showed statistically significant change (p < 0.05). In addition, there were no significant changes of bone resorption (β-CrossLaps) and bone formation (P1NP) between these two groups. However; both groups had not only a significant decrease in resting heart rate, systolic and diastolic pressure, but also an increase in muscular strength and endurance and maximum oxygen uptake when the training was completed. Flexibility ofthe group withfitball was increased significantly (p < 0.05). Low impact aerobic dance and fitball training has the positive effect of slowing down bone resorption and is beneficial to healthy bones. They concurrently increase lower back flexibility.

  17. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  18. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  19. Athletic Training and Public Health Summit

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Mark; Bovbjerg, Viktor; Hannigan, Kim; Hootman, Jennifer M.; Johnson, Sam T.; Kucera, Kristen L.; Norcross, Marc F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective:  To introduce athletic trainers to the benefits of using a population-based approach to injury and illness prevention and to explore opportunities for partnering with public health professionals on these initiatives. Background:  Athletic trainers play leading roles in individual injury and illness prevention but are less familiar with policy development, evaluation, and implementation from a population-level standpoint. The Athletic Training and Public Health Summit was convened to understand, explore, and develop the intersection of athletic training and public health. Conclusions:  To further the integration of athletic training within the public health arena, athletic trainers must expand their professional focus beyond the individual to the population level. PMID:27295487

  20. Mental health training for law enforcement professionals.

    PubMed

    Vermette, Heidi S; Pinals, Debra A; Appelbaum, Paul S

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine topics of interest and preferred modalities of training for police officers in their work with persons with mental illness. Police officers across Massachusetts attending in-service mental health training were asked to rate the importance of potential mental health topics and the effectiveness of potential training modalities on a Likert-type scale. Additional data collected included the officer's experience, level of education, motivation for attendance, previous attendance of post-academy mental health training, and preferences for length, frequency, training site, and trainer qualifications. A t test was used to determine if there were significant differences (p < .05) between those who volunteered and those who were mandated to attend the training. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used to determine if there were significant differences (p < .05) between mental health topics and lecture formats and to determine the effect of education and experience on the results. Although all topics suggested were rated, primarily, as fairly important, the topics of Dangerousness, Suicide by Cop, Decreasing Suicide Risk, Mental Health Law, and Your Potential Liability for Bad Outcomes were given the highest ratings. Role-playing was rated significantly lower than other training modalities, while Videos and Small Group Discussion had the highest mean scores. Level of prior education had no significant effect on the ratings, but officers with more experience rated the importance of mental illness as a training topic significantly higher than officers with less experience. This survey suggests that police officers are interested in learning more about working with persons with mental illness and view it as an important aspect of the job.

  1. Outage management and health physics issue, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Agnihotri, Newal

    2006-05-15

    The focus of the May-June issue is on outage management and health physics. Major articles/reports in this issue include: A design with experience for the U.S., by Michael J. Wallace, Constellation Generation Group; Hope to be among the first, by Randy Hutchinson, Entergy Nuclear; Plans to file COLs in 2008, by Garry Miller, Progress Energy; Evolution of ICRP's recommendations, by Lars-Erik Holm, ICRP; European network on education and training in radiological protection, by Michele Coeck, SCK-CEN, Belgium; Outage managment: an important tool for improving nuclear power plant performance, by Thomas Mazour and Jiri Mandula, IAEA, Austria; and Plant profile: Exploring new paths to excellence, by Anne Thomas, Exelon Nuclear.

  2. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  3. Telehealth Innovations in Health Education and Training

    PubMed Central

    De, Suvranu; Hall, Richard W.; Johansen, Edward; Meglan, Dwight; Peng, Grace C.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Telehealth applications are increasingly important in many areas of health education and training. In addition, they will play a vital role in biomedical research and research training by facilitating remote collaborations and providing access to expensive/remote instrumentation. In order to fulfill their true potential to leverage education, training, and research activities, innovations in telehealth applications should be fostered across a range of technology fronts, including online, on-demand computational models for simulation; simplified interfaces for software and hardware; software frameworks for simulations; portable telepresence systems; artificial intelligence applications to be applied when simulated human patients are not options; and the development of more simulator applications. This article presents the results of discussion on potential areas of future development, barries to overcome, and suggestions to translate the promise of telehealth applications into a transformed environment of training, education, and research in the health sciences. PMID:20155874

  4. Telehealth innovations in health education and training.

    PubMed

    Conde, José G; De, Suvranu; Hall, Richard W; Johansen, Edward; Meglan, Dwight; Peng, Grace C Y

    2010-01-01

    Telehealth applications are increasingly important in many areas of health education and training. In addition, they will play a vital role in biomedical research and research training by facilitating remote collaborations and providing access to expensive/remote instrumentation. In order to fulfill their true potential to leverage education, training, and research activities, innovations in telehealth applications should be fostered across a range of technology fronts, including online, on-demand computational models for simulation; simplified interfaces for software and hardware; software frameworks for simulations; portable telepresence systems; artificial intelligence applications to be applied when simulated human patients are not options; and the development of more simulator applications. This article presents the results of discussion on potential areas of future development, barries to overcome, and suggestions to translate the promise of telehealth applications into a transformed environment of training, education, and research in the health sciences.

  5. [Physical training in chronic heart failure: pathophysiology and clinical evolution].

    PubMed

    Rivas Estany, Eduardo; Hernández García, Susana

    2016-09-05

    Chronic heart failure has become one of the main global health problems; 23 million people suffer from this disease worldwide and age of onset has varied considerably over the past five decades, coinciding with other co-morbidities as longevity in the population increases. Treatment of heart failure has also shown striking variations in recent years. Such is the case of the substitution of sympathomimetic drugs by beta-blocking agents, which primarily means a conceptual change in the pathophysiological interpretation of this syndrome. Incorporating to the treatment of heart failure drugs such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers has meant a great step forward in the treatment of patients with this condition that significantly has decreased mortality and morbidity. The latest introduction of the drug identified as angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (LCZ696), launched in August 2014 with an even greater reduction in mortality and morbidity of heart failure and fewer side effects, offers a valid hope in the treatment of this pathology. Training and physical activity is another area of treatment being completely reassessed. Pathophysiological aspects that link the practice of systematic physical exercise with heart failure and how they both relate to clinical outcomes, morbidity and mortality in the trained patient are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Global health training in pediatric residency programs.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brett D; Lee, Anne Cc; Newby, P K; Chamberlin, M Robert; Huang, Chi-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    Our goal was to describe current resident interest, participation, curricula, resources, and obstacles related to global health training within pediatric residency programs. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the 201 accredited pediatric residency programs in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean from October 2006 to January 2007. Survey topics included resident interest and participation in electives, training opportunities, program support, and educational curricular content related to global health. Of the 201 surveyed pediatric residency programs, 106 (53%) responded. Fifteen percent of responding programs reported that a majority of their residents were interested in global health. Fifty-two percent offered a global health elective within the previous year, and 47% had formally incorporated global health into their training curricula. Six percent of the programs reported a formalized track or certificate in global health. The median number of residents per program participating in global health electives within the previous year was 0 during postgraduate year 1, 1 during postgraduate year 2, and 2 during postgraduate year 3. The median number of all residents per program participating in a global health elective in the previous year was 3 (7.4% of program size). Among programs that offered a global health elective, support to participating residents included prerequisite clinical training (36%), cultural orientation (36%), language training (15%), faculty mentorship (82%), and post-elective debriefing (77%). Fourteen percent of the programs provided full funding for resident electives. Characteristics of pediatric residency programs that were significantly associated with higher resident participation in a global health elective were larger program size, university affiliation, greater reported resident interest, and faculty involvement in global health. More than half of the pediatric residency programs surveyed offered a global health

  7. Health-related physical fitness for children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Désirée B; Wiart, Lesley; Fowler, Eileen; Verschuren, Olaf; Damiano, Diane L

    2014-08-01

    Low levels of physical activity are a global health concern for all children. Children with cerebral palsy have even lower physical activity levels than their typically developing peers. Low levels of physical activity, and thus an increased risk for related chronic diseases, are associated with deficits in health-related physical fitness. Recent research has provided therapists with the resources to effectively perform physical fitness testing and physical activity training in clinical settings with children who have cerebral palsy, although most testing and training data to date pertains to those who walk. Nevertheless, on the basis of the present evidence, all children with cerebral palsy should engage, to the extent they are able, in aerobic, anaerobic, and muscle-strengthening activities. Future research is required to determine the best ways to evaluate health-related physical fitness in nonambulatory children with cerebral palsy and foster long-term changes in physical activity behavior in all children with this condition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Screening physical health? Yes! But...: nurses' views on physical health screening in mental health care.

    PubMed

    Happell, Brenda; Scott, David; Nankivell, Janette; Platania-Phung, Chris

    2013-08-01

    To explore nurses' views on the role of nurses in screening and monitoring for physical care of consumers with serious mental illness, at a regional mental health care service. People with serious mental illness experience heightened incidence of preventable and treatable physical illnesses such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Screening and monitoring are considered universal clinical safeguards. Nurses can potentially facilitate systematic screening, but their views on physical health care practices are rarely investigated. Qualitative exploratory study. Focus group interviews with 38 nurses of a regional mental health care service district of Australia. To facilitate discussion, participants were presented with a screening system, called the Health Improvement Profile (HIP), as an exemplar of screening of physical health risks by nurses. Inductive data analysis and theme development were guided by a thematic analysis framework. Nurses argued that treatable and preventable physical health problems were common. Four main themes were identified: screening - essential for good practice; the policy-practice gap; 'screening then what?' and, is HIP the answer? Screening and monitoring were considered crucial to proper diagnosis and treatment, however, were not performed systematically or consistently. Nurse readiness for an enhanced role in screening was shaped by: role and responsibility issues, legal liability concerns, funding and staff shortages. Participants were concerned that lack of follow up would limit effectiveness of these interventions. Screening was considered an important clinical step in effective diagnosis and treatment; however, identified barriers need to be addressed to ensure screening is part of a systemic approach to improve physical health of consumers with serious mental illness. Nurses have potential to influence improvement in physical health outcomes for consumers of mental health services. Such potential can only be realised if a

  9. Terrorism preparedness training for occupational health professionals.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Robyn R M; Gemson, Donald H; Qureshi, Kristine; McCollum, Michael C

    2004-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess occupational health professionals' terrorism preparedness and perceptions of worksite readiness. Questionnaire data were collected at the conclusion of an educational workshop on disaster response. Participants reported increased confidence in clinical skills and the ability to avoid exposure while providing care to victims of terrorist attacks as a result of the workshop. Fewer than one third (32%) of participants reported that their employer was prepared for a bioterrorism attack, and a large percentage (75%) reported feeling unprepared to provide mental health counseling after a terrorist attack. Relatively brief training in terrorism preparedness can increase the confidence of occupational health professionals in their ability to respond to terrorism. Adequate preparedness for the broad range of potential terrorist events may require much more intensive training than is currently being provided to occupational health professionals.

  10. Occupational safety and health training in DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Farabaugh, M.J. ); O'Dell, C. )

    1991-11-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his Ten Point Initiative'' charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent Tiger Teams'' are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

  11. Occupational safety and health training in DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Farabaugh, M.J.; O`Dell, C.

    1991-11-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his ``Ten Point Initiative`` charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent ``Tiger Teams`` are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

  12. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 10. PT/OT QPCB Task Sort for Physical and Occupational Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 10 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties in physical and occupational therapy. (BT)

  13. Epidemiology of Injuries Associated With Physical Training Among Young Men in the Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    the benefits of physical activity and exercise has led army. ked. Sci. Sports i.verc., Vol. 25, No. 2, pp. 197-203, 1993. It is widely acknowledged that...musculoskeletal injuries occur as a result public health officials in the United States to promote of vigorous physical activity and exercise , but... EXERCISE , PHYSICAL the foundation for Army training injury prevention ACTIVITY , INCIDENCE, MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS strategies. The primary purposes of

  14. FUNdamental Integrative Training (FIT) for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowsky, Michael; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for physical education teachers to integrate different types of fitness activities into their lessons in order to provide opportunities for all students to learn and practice a variety of movement skills that will enhance their physical fitness and support free-time physical activity. An increased focus on age-appropriate…

  15. FUNdamental Integrative Training (FIT) for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowsky, Michael; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing need for physical education teachers to integrate different types of fitness activities into their lessons in order to provide opportunities for all students to learn and practice a variety of movement skills that will enhance their physical fitness and support free-time physical activity. An increased focus on age-appropriate…

  16. Attitude Changes of Specialist Students of Physical Education towards Physical Activity during Teacher-Training Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrell, G. V.; Holt, D.

    1982-01-01

    A longitudinal investigation of the attitudes towards physical activity of specialist students of physical education was undertaken during a course of training teachers. Significant changes of attitude with time were noted, particularly in the Vertigo and Ascetic dimensions. (Author)

  17. Attitude Changes of Specialist Students of Physical Education towards Physical Activity during Teacher-Training Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrell, G. V.; Holt, D.

    1982-01-01

    A longitudinal investigation of the attitudes towards physical activity of specialist students of physical education was undertaken during a course of training teachers. Significant changes of attitude with time were noted, particularly in the Vertigo and Ascetic dimensions. (Author)

  18. High intensity interval and moderate continuous cycle training in a physical education programme improves health-related fitness in young females

    PubMed Central

    Zmijewski, P; Krawczyk, K; Czajkowska, A; Kęska, A; Kapuściński, P; Mazurek, T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of eight weeks of regular physical education classes supplemented with high intensity interval cycle exercise (HIIE) or continuous cycle exercises of moderate intensity (CME). Forty-eight collegiate females exercising in two regular physical education classes per week were randomly assigned to two programmes (HIIE; n = 24 or CME; n = 24) of additional (one session of 63 minutes per week) physical activity for 8 weeks. Participants performed HIIE comprising 2 series of 6x10 s sprinting with maximal pedalling cadence and active recovery pedalling with intensity 65%–75% HRmax or performed CME corresponding to 65%-75% HRmax. Before and after the 8-week programmes, anthropometric data and aero- and anaerobic capacity were measured. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant time main effect for VO2max (p < 0.001), similar improvements being found in both groups (+12% in HIIE and +11% in CME), despite body mass not changing significantly (p = 0.59; +0.4% in HIIE and -0.1% in CME). A significant main time effect was found for relative fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). A group x time interaction effect was found for relative FM and FFM (p = 0.018 and p = 0.018); a greater reduction in FM and greater increase in FFM were noted in the CME than the HIIE group. Improvements in anaerobic power were observed in both groups (p < 0.001), but it was greater in the HIIE group (interaction effect, p = 0.022). Weight loss is not mandatory for exercise-induced effects on improving aerobic and anaerobic capacity in collegiate females. Eight weeks of regular physical education classes supplemented with CME sessions are more effective in improving body composition than physical education classes supplemented with HIIE sessions. In contrast to earlier, smaller trials, similar improvements in aerobic capacity were observed following physical activity with additional HIIE or CME sessions. PMID

  19. High intensity interval and moderate continuous cycle training in a physical education programme improves health-related fitness in young females.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, K; Zmijewski, P; Krawczyk, K; Czajkowska, A; Kęska, A; Kapuściński, P; Mazurek, T

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of eight weeks of regular physical education classes supplemented with high intensity interval cycle exercise (HIIE) or continuous cycle exercises of moderate intensity (CME). Forty-eight collegiate females exercising in two regular physical education classes per week were randomly assigned to two programmes (HIIE; n = 24 or CME; n = 24) of additional (one session of 63 minutes per week) physical activity for 8 weeks. Participants performed HIIE comprising 2 series of 6x10 s sprinting with maximal pedalling cadence and active recovery pedalling with intensity 65%-75% HRmax or performed CME corresponding to 65%-75% HRmax. Before and after the 8-week programmes, anthropometric data and aero- and anaerobic capacity were measured. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant time main effect for VO2max (p < 0.001), similar improvements being found in both groups (+12% in HIIE and +11% in CME), despite body mass not changing significantly (p = 0.59; +0.4% in HIIE and -0.1% in CME). A significant main time effect was found for relative fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). A group x time interaction effect was found for relative FM and FFM (p = 0.018 and p = 0.018); a greater reduction in FM and greater increase in FFM were noted in the CME than the HIIE group. Improvements in anaerobic power were observed in both groups (p < 0.001), but it was greater in the HIIE group (interaction effect, p = 0.022). Weight loss is not mandatory for exercise-induced effects on improving aerobic and anaerobic capacity in collegiate females. Eight weeks of regular physical education classes supplemented with CME sessions are more effective in improving body composition than physical education classes supplemented with HIIE sessions. In contrast to earlier, smaller trials, similar improvements in aerobic capacity were observed following physical activity with additional HIIE or CME sessions.

  20. Culturally Sensitive Refugee Mental Health Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Refugees Assistance Program - Mental Health Technical Assistance Center.

    This report, based on a survey conducted during the summer and fall of 1986, identifies culturally sensitive training programs for professionals, paraprofessionals, and others who provide mental health services to refugees. An introductory section discusses the language, cultural, racial, experiential, and socioeconomic factors of refugee mental…

  1. Training managers for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kekki, P

    1994-01-01

    The University of Helsinki has devised a powerful in-service training course for managers of health centres. By working together at the University and their own centres on setting objectives, analysing data and solving problems, the participants greatly enhance their management and teamwork skills.

  2. Physical Activity and Public Health: Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the effects of physical activity on depression and anxiety, discussing the scientific strength of studies on physical activity, depression, and anxiety against the standards of science accepted in epidemiology with a focus on the independence, consistency, dose-response gradient, and biological plausibility of the evidence. (Author/SM)

  3. Global health training in ophthalmology residency programs.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Peter G; Feldman, Brad H; Lauer, Andreas K; Paul Chan, Robison V; Sun, Grace

    2015-01-01

    To assess current global health education and international electives in ophthalmology residency programs and barriers to global health implementation in ophthalmology resident education. A web-based survey regarding participation in global health and international electives was emailed to residency program directors at 116 accredited ophthalmology residency programs via an Association of University Professors in Ophthalmology (AUPO) residency program director listserv. Fifty-nine (51%) ophthalmology residency program directors responded. Thirty-seven program directors (63%) said global health was important to medical students when evaluating residency programs. Thirty-two program directors (55%) reported developing international electives. Reported barriers to resident participation in international electives were: 1) insufficient financial support, 2) inadequate resident coverage at home, and 3) lack of ACGME approval for international electives. Program directors requested more information about resident international electives, funding, and global ophthalmology educational resources. They requested ACGME recognition of international electives to facilitate resident participation. More than half (54%) of program directors supported international electives for residents. This survey demonstrates that program directors believe global health is an important consideration when medical students evaluate training programs. Despite perceived barriers to incorporating global health opportunities into residency training, program directors are interested in development of global health resources and plan to further develop global health opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Astronaut John Glenn running as part of physical training program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission, participates in a strict physical training program, as he exemplifies by frequent running. Here he pauses during an exercise period on the beach near Cape Canaveral, Florida.

  5. Effects of physical training on myocardial vascularity and perfusion.

    PubMed

    Scheuer, J

    1982-09-01

    Physical training is thought to be a stimulus for coronary vascular growth and coronary collateral development. This report is a summary of knowledge in the area. Studies in experimental animals with normal hearts indicate that physical training promotes increased myocardial capillary density and also causes enlargement of the surface coronary vessels. The physiologic effect of these changes on coronary vascular reserve and protection of segments of the heart against myocardial ischemia has not been established. Physically trained dogs and pigs do not appear to be protected against the effects of coronary occlusion, in that the ischemic area appears to be as large in trained animals as in untrained animals for any given coronary lesion. One study in physically trained rats appears to show protection against myocardial infarction, but whether this is related to coronary vascular changes has not been established. Experiments in dogs subjected to chronic narrowing or gradual occlusion demonstrate that physical training in these models does promote collateral blood flow as measured by retrograde flow in open-chest experiments. Studies using the microsphere technique in closed-chest animals confirms increased collateral flow to ischemic areas in some animals, but the magnitude of the increases appears to be small and varies greatly from animal to animal. Studies in athletes suggest that myocardial blood flow is lower at any submaximal level of training in athletes than in sedentary persons. Studies in patients with coronary artery disease have generally failed to show an increase in coronary blood flow or in perfusion of ischemic areas after physical training programs, but the techniques used might not have been sensitive enough to detect changes. The evidence in the experimental animals is sufficiently promising to indicate that the search should be continued to define physical training programs that will most stimulate myocardial vascularity and coronary collaterals

  6. [Quality in occupational health education and training].

    PubMed

    Manno, M

    2010-01-01

    According to the International Code of Ethics of the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) "occupational health practice must be performed according to the highest professional standards and ethical principles". So, the first ethical requirement for an occupational physician is a scientifically and professionally sound conduct, and vice-versa, the ethical principles must be an integral part of his/her education and training. The different tools and contexts for the education and training in occupational health (OH) in Italy, at both the undergraduate and postgraduate level, are presented. Moreover, the past and present contribution of the academic institutions and professional associations active in occupational health, to improve the professional standards of the occupational physicians is discussed. It is suggested that the objectives and the contents in OH education and training should not be limited to simply fulfil the legal requirements aimed to the protection of health and safety in the workplace (as it seems to be largely the case today), but they should rather anticipate and overcome them, by also including a thorough discussion of the fundamental ethical principles and duties to be accomplished in OH.

  7. Physical Training Injuries and Interventions for Military Recruits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    FITNESS AND TRAINING-RELATED INJURY RISK Researchers have identified multiple risk factors for training- related injury ( Table I). Physical fitness...composition or body fatness can be directly esti- mated by hydrostatic weighing, dual-energy X-ray absorp- tiometry, bioelectrical impedance, skinfold ... thickness , and circumferential measures. The Army uses specified anatomic circumferential measurements to estimate body fat percent- age. Body mass

  8. Multidisciplinary Field Training in Undergraduate Physical Geography: Russian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasimov, Nikolay S.; Chalov, Sergey R.; Panin, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Field training is seen as a central component of the discipline of Physical Geography and an essential part of the undergraduate curriculum. This paper explores the structure and relationships between fieldwork and theoretical courses and the abundant experiences of field training in the undergraduate curriculum of 37 Russian universities. It…

  9. Multidisciplinary Field Training in Undergraduate Physical Geography: Russian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasimov, Nikolay S.; Chalov, Sergey R.; Panin, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Field training is seen as a central component of the discipline of Physical Geography and an essential part of the undergraduate curriculum. This paper explores the structure and relationships between fieldwork and theoretical courses and the abundant experiences of field training in the undergraduate curriculum of 37 Russian universities. It…

  10. Physical Activity, Public Health, and Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Kahan, David

    2008-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a serious public health problem that is associated with numerous preventable diseases. Public health concerns, particularly those related to the increased prevalence of overweight, obesity, and diabetes, call for schools to become proactive in the promotion of healthy, physically active lifestyles. This article begins by…

  11. Physical Activity, Public Health, and Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Kahan, David

    2008-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a serious public health problem that is associated with numerous preventable diseases. Public health concerns, particularly those related to the increased prevalence of overweight, obesity, and diabetes, call for schools to become proactive in the promotion of healthy, physically active lifestyles. This article begins by…

  12. Effects of habitual physical activity on response to endurance training.

    PubMed

    Hautala, Arto; Martinmaki, Kaisu; Kiviniemi, Antti; Kinnunen, Hannu; Virtanen, Paula; Jaatinen, Jukka; Tulppo, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesised that habitual physical activity (PA) together with progressive endurance training contributes to the differences in training response (Δ[V(·)]O(2max)) in healthy and physically active male participants. Twenty volunteers (age 30±3 years and [V(·)]O(2max) 54±7 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) participated in an eight-week training program which included four to six heart rate-guided exercise sessions weekly. PA data over the whole period were collected by an accelerometer-equipped wristwatch. Individual relative intensities of endurance training and PA were separately determined by adjusting to [V(·)]O(2max) reserve and calculated as mean daily duration (min) of training and PA at light, moderate, high and very high intensity levels. [V(·)]O(2max) increased 6.4±4.1% (p < 0.0001) during the training period. Δ[V(·)]O(2max) correlated with the amount of habitual PA that was mainly of light intensity (r = 0.53, p = 0.016), but not with the duration of moderate, high or very high intensity PA (p = ns for all). Age, body mass index, and daily amount of training at any intensity level of exercise were not related to Δ[V(·)]O(2max) (p = ns for all). In conclusion, a high amount of habitual PA together with prescribed endurance training was associated with good training response in physically active males.

  13. Six Steps for Implementing Plyometric Training in Elementary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Shaughnessy, Candice; Bush, Gayle; Cherry, Starla

    2013-01-01

    Physical education should have a powerful and positive impact on students' ability and desire to be physically active for a lifetime. Increasing physical activity continues to be a national priority because of the positive physical and mental health benefits associated with an active lifestyle (Pangrazi & Beighle, 2010). To promote these…

  14. Six Steps for Implementing Plyometric Training in Elementary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard-Shaughnessy, Candice; Bush, Gayle; Cherry, Starla

    2013-01-01

    Physical education should have a powerful and positive impact on students' ability and desire to be physically active for a lifetime. Increasing physical activity continues to be a national priority because of the positive physical and mental health benefits associated with an active lifestyle (Pangrazi & Beighle, 2010). To promote these…

  15. Measuring Physical Neighborhood Quality Related to Health

    PubMed Central

    Rollings, Kimberly A.; Wells, Nancy M.; Evans, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Although sociodemographic factors are one aspect of understanding the effects of neighborhood environments on health, equating neighborhood quality with socioeconomic status ignores the important role of physical neighborhood attributes. Prior work on neighborhood environments and health has relied primarily on level of socioeconomic disadvantage as the indicator of neighborhood quality without attention to physical neighborhood quality. A small but increasing number of studies have assessed neighborhood physical characteristics. Findings generally indicate that there is an association between living in deprived neighborhoods and poor health outcomes, but rigorous evidence linking specific physical neighborhood attributes to particular health outcomes is lacking. This paper discusses the methodological challenges and limitations of measuring physical neighborhood environments relevant to health and concludes with proposed directions for future work. PMID:25938692

  16. Health Physics and Radiological Health, 4th Edition.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Douglas

    2013-11-01

    Health Physics and Radiological Health, 4th Edition. Johnson Thomas E., Birky Brian K., Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a Walter Kluwer business, Baltimore, Maryland, 2012, $205.99. ISBN: 9781609134198, 1288 pp. (hardcover). © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. [Perceptions about continuous training of Chilean health care teachers].

    PubMed

    Pérez V, Cristhian; Fasce H, Eduardo; Coloma N, Katherine; Vaccarezza G, Giulietta; Ortega B, Javiera

    2013-06-01

    Continuous training of teachers, in discipline and pedagogical topics, is a key step to improve the quality of educational processes. To report the perception of Chilean teachers of undergraduate health care programs, about continuous training activities. Twenty teachers working at different undergraduate health care programs in Chile were interviewed. Maximum variation and theoretical sampling methods were used to select the sample. Data was analyzed by open coding, according to the Grounded Theory guidelines. Nine categories emerged from data analysis: Access to continuous training, meaning of training in discipline, activities of continuous training in discipline, meaning of continuous training in pedagogy, kinds of continuous training in pedagogy, quality of continuous training in pedagogy, ideal of continuous training in pedagogy, outcomes of continuous training in pedagogy and needs for continuous training in pedagogy. Teachers of health care programs prefer to participate in contextualized training activities. Also, they emphasize their need of training in evaluation and teaching strategies.

  18. Physical demands of training and competition in collegiate netball players.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Phillip T; Pinder, Sarah J; Curran, Jourdan D; Gabbett, Tim J

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the physical demands of netball match play and different training activities. Eight collegiate netball players participated in the study. Heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and accelerometer player load (PL) data were collected in 4 matches and 15 training sessions. Training sessions were classified as skills, game-based, traditional conditioning, or repeated high-intensity effort training. Accelerometer data were collected in 3 planes and were normalized to match play/training time (PL per minute, forward per minute, sideward per minute, and vertical per minute). Centers had a higher PL per minute than all other positions (effect size; ES = 0.67-0.91), including higher accelerations in the forward (ES = 0.82-0.92), sideward (ES = 0.61-0.93), and vertical (ES = 0.74-0.93) planes. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between positions for RPE and peak HR. Skills training had a similar PL to match play. However, the mean HR of skills training was significantly lower than match play and all other modes of training (ES = 0.77-0.88). Peak HR for skills training (186 ± 10 b·min) and traditional conditioning (196 ± 8 b·min) was similar to match play (193 ± 9 b·min). There were no meaningful differences in RPE between match play and all modes of training. The center position produces greater physical demands during match play. The movement demands of netball match play are best replicated by skills training, whereas traditional conditioning best replicates the HR demands of match play. Other training modes may require modification to meet the physical demands of match play.

  19. Bicycle Trains, Cycling, and Physical Activity: A Pilot Cluster RCT.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Jason A; Haaland, Wren; Jacobs, Maya; Abbey-Lambertz, Mark; Miller, Josh; Salls, Deb; Todd, Winifred; Madding, Rachel; Ellis, Katherine; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2017-10-01

    Increasing children's cycling to school and physical activity are national health goals. The objective was to conduct an RCT of a bicycle train program to assess impact on students' school travel mode and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Pilot cluster RCT with randomization at the school level and N=54 participants. Fourth-fifth graders from four public schools serving low-income families in Seattle, WA in 2014 with analyses in 2015-2016. All participants were provided and fitted with bicycles, safety equipment (helmets, locks, and lights), and a 2- to 3-hour bicycle safety course. The intervention was a bicycle train offered daily (i.e., students volunteered to cycle with study staff to and from school). Time 1 assessments occurred prior to randomization. Time 2 assessments occurred after 3-5 weeks of the intervention (i.e., during Weeks 4-6 of the intervention period). The primary outcome was the percentage of daily commutes to school by cycling measured by validated survey. MVPA, measured by accelerometry and GPS units and processed by machine learning algorithms, was a secondary outcome. For two separate adjusted repeated measures linear mixed effects models in which students (N=54) were nested within schools (N=4), intervention participants had: (1) an absolute increase in mean percentage of daily commutes by cycling of 44.9%, (95% CI=26.8, 63.0) and (2) an increase in mean MVPA of 21.6 minutes/day, (95% CI=8.7, 34.6) from Time 1 to Time 2 compared with controls. A pilot bicycle train intervention increased cycling to school and daily MVPA in the short term among diverse, inner-city elementary school students. The bicycle train intervention appears promising and warrants further experimental trials among large, diverse samples with longer follow-up. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT02006186. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Physical Training on Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkins, Carlyle H.

    1976-01-01

    Presents further evidence for the relationship between improvements in physical fitness and psychological fitness in a group of infirm adult males. The men in the group under study were at high risk of CHD (coronary heart disease). (Author/RK)

  1. Effects of Physical Training on Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkins, Carlyle H.

    1976-01-01

    Presents further evidence for the relationship between improvements in physical fitness and psychological fitness in a group of infirm adult males. The men in the group under study were at high risk of CHD (coronary heart disease). (Author/RK)

  2. Distinct Brain and Behavioral Benefits from Cognitive vs. Physical Training: A Randomized Trial in Aging Adults.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Sandra B; Aslan, Sina; Spence, Jeffrey S; Keebler, Molly W; DeFina, Laura F; Didehbani, Nyaz; Perez, Alison M; Lu, Hanzhang; D'Esposito, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Insidious declines in normal aging are well-established. Emerging evidence suggests that non-pharmacological interventions, specifically cognitive and physical training, may counter diminishing age-related cognitive and brain functions. This randomized trial compared effects of two training protocols: cognitive training (CT) vs. physical training (PT) on cognition and brain function in adults 56-75 years. Sedentary participants (N = 36) were randomized to either CT or PT group for 3 h/week over 12 weeks. They were assessed at baseline-, mid-, and post-training using neurocognitive, MRI, and physiological measures. The CT group improved on executive function whereas PT group's memory was enhanced. Uniquely deploying cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) MRI, the CT cohort showed increased CBF within the prefrontal and middle/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) without change to CVR compared to PT group. Improvements in complex abstraction were positively associated with increased resting CBF in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). Exercisers with higher CBF in hippocampi bilaterally showed better immediate memory. The preliminary evidence indicates that increased cognitive and physical activity improves brain health in distinct ways. Reasoning training enhanced frontal networks shown to be integral to top-down cognitive control and brain resilience. Evidence of increased resting CBF without changes to CVR implicates increased neural health rather than improved vascular response. Exercise did not improve cerebrovascular response, although CBF increased in hippocampi of those with memory gains. Distinct benefits incentivize testing effectiveness of combined protocols to strengthen brain health.

  3. Distinct Brain and Behavioral Benefits from Cognitive vs. Physical Training: A Randomized Trial in Aging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Sandra B.; Aslan, Sina; Spence, Jeffrey S.; Keebler, Molly W.; DeFina, Laura F.; Didehbani, Nyaz; Perez, Alison M.; Lu, Hanzhang; D'Esposito, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Insidious declines in normal aging are well-established. Emerging evidence suggests that non-pharmacological interventions, specifically cognitive and physical training, may counter diminishing age-related cognitive and brain functions. This randomized trial compared effects of two training protocols: cognitive training (CT) vs. physical training (PT) on cognition and brain function in adults 56–75 years. Sedentary participants (N = 36) were randomized to either CT or PT group for 3 h/week over 12 weeks. They were assessed at baseline-, mid-, and post-training using neurocognitive, MRI, and physiological measures. The CT group improved on executive function whereas PT group's memory was enhanced. Uniquely deploying cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral vascular reactivity (CVR) MRI, the CT cohort showed increased CBF within the prefrontal and middle/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) without change to CVR compared to PT group. Improvements in complex abstraction were positively associated with increased resting CBF in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). Exercisers with higher CBF in hippocampi bilaterally showed better immediate memory. The preliminary evidence indicates that increased cognitive and physical activity improves brain health in distinct ways. Reasoning training enhanced frontal networks shown to be integral to top-down cognitive control and brain resilience. Evidence of increased resting CBF without changes to CVR implicates increased neural health rather than improved vascular response. Exercise did not improve cerebrovascular response, although CBF increased in hippocampi of those with memory gains. Distinct benefits incentivize testing effectiveness of combined protocols to strengthen brain health. PMID:27462210

  4. Physical and cognitive effects of virtual reality integrated training.

    PubMed

    Stone, Richard T; Watts, Kristopher P; Zhong, Peihan; Wei, Chen-Shuang

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cognitive and physical impact of virtual reality (VR) integrated training versus traditional training methods in the domain of weld training. Weld training is very important in various industries and represents a complex skill set appropriate for advanced training intervention. As such, there has been a long search for the most successful and most cost-effective method for training new welders. Participants in this study were randomly assigned to one of two separate training courses taught by sanctioned American Welding Society certified welding instructors; the duration of each course was 2 weeks. After completing the training for a specific weld type, participants were given the opportunity to test for the corresponding certification. Participants were evaluated in terms of their cognitive and physical parameters, total training time exposure, and welding certification awards earned. Each of the four weld types taught in this study represented distinct levels of difficulty and required the development of specialized knowledge and skills. This study demonstrated that participants in the VR integrated training group (VR50) performed as well as, and in some cases, significantly outperformed, the traditional welding (TW) training group.The VR50 group was found to have a 41.6% increase in overall certifications earned compared with the TW group. VR technology is a valuable tool for the production of skilled welders in a shorter time and often with more highly developed skills than their traditionally trained counterparts. These findings strongly support the use ofVR integrated training in the welding industry.

  5. MO-DE-BRA-04: The CREATE Medical Physics Research Training Network: Training of New Generation Innovators

    SciTech Connect

    Seuntjens, J; Collins, L; Devic, S; El Naqa, I; Nadeau, J; Reader, A; Beaulieu, L; Despres, P; Pike, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Over the past century, physicists have played a major role in transforming scientific discovery into everyday clinical applications. However, with the increasingly stringent requirements to regulate medical physics as a health profession, the role of physicists as scientists and innovators has become at serious risk of erosion. These challenges trigger the need for a new, revolutionized training program at the graduate level that respects scientific rigor, attention for medical physics-relevant developments in basic sciences, innovation and entrepreneurship. Methods: A grant proposal was funded by the Collaborative REsearch and Training Experience program (CREATE) of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada. This enabled the creation of the Medical Physics Research Training Network (MPRTN) around two CAMPEP-accredited medical physics programs. Members of the network consist of medical device companies, government (research and regulatory) and academia. The MPRTN/CREATE program proposes a curriculum with three main themes: (1) radiation physics, (2) imaging & image processing and (3) radiation response, outcomes and modeling. Results: The MPRTN was created mid 2013 (mprtn.com) and features (1) four new basic Ph.D. courses; (2) industry participation in research projects; (3) formal job-readiness training with involvement of guest faculty from academia, government and industry. MPRTN activities since 2013 include 22 conferences; 7 workshops and 4 exchange travels. Three patents were filed or issued, nine awards/best papers were won. Fifteen journal publications were accepted/published, 102 conference abstracts. There are now 13 industry partners. Conclusion: A medical physics research training network has been set up with the goal to harness graduate student’s job-readiness for industry, government and academia in addition to the conventional clinical role. Two years after inception, significant successes have been booked

  6. Seeing Fluid Physics via Visual Expertise Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean; Goodman, Katherine; Curran, Tim

    2016-11-01

    In a course on Flow Visualization, students often expressed that their perception of fluid flows had increased, implying the acquisition of a type of visual expertise, akin to that of radiologists or dog show judges. In the first steps towards measuring this expertise, we emulated an experimental design from psychology. The study had two groups of participants: "novices" with no formal fluids education, and "experts" who had passed as least one fluid mechanics course. All participants were trained to place static images of fluid flows into two categories (laminar and turbulent). Half the participants were trained on flow images with a specific format (Von Kármán vortex streets), and the other half on a broader group. Novices' results were in line with past perceptual expertise studies, showing that it is easier to transfer learning from a broad category to a new specific format than vice versa. In contrast, experts did not have a significant difference between training conditions, suggesting the experts did not undergo the same learning process as the novices. We theorize that expert subjects were able to access their conceptual knowledge about fluids to perform this new, visual task. This finding supports new ways of understanding conceptual learning.

  7. [Health promotion effectiveness: testing the German statutory health insurance agencies evaluation system in health promotion, and preliminary findings from 212 health training courses].

    PubMed

    Kliche, T; Schreiner-Kürten, K; Wanek, V; Koch, U

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a measurement system for the evaluation of health promotion training courses offered by German statutory health insurance companies. In a field test, N=1 671 participants from 212 youth and adult courses for the promotion of either physical activity, coping with stress or nutritional improvement were included. 80% were female. Participants were questioned in a pre-post-design with a three month follow-up. The questionnaires covered health behaviour and health status. Participants' compliance and psychometric quality of the measurement instruments were good. On average, the health insurance companies assigned participants to different interventions adequately according to the participant's individual health problems. The health promotion courses triggered improvements of high effect sizes for health behaviour patterns, of moderate effect sizes for physical complaints, subjective health ratings, and health-related quality of life. Effects decreased after the end of the intervention but remained significantly above the initial values. BMI values continued their improvement after the end of the training courses. Thus, health promotion training courses generated stable health improvements of practically relevant effect sizes. The interventions provided good support and health improvements for all subgroups of participants, regardless of age, gender and educational background. Thus, the health promotion curricula of the health insurance companies offer a ubiquitous and easily accessible but effective intervention for health promotion in Germany, although men are clearly underrepresented among the participants. The trainings may be recommended and used by other health-care suppliers. The evaluation toolkit provides practical and valid instruments for a routine evaluation of health promotion trainings. It should be applied within random sampling designs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevelacqua, Joseph John

    1999-01-01

    Radiation litigation, the cleanup and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, radon exposure, nuclear medicine, food irradiation, stricter regulatory climate--these are some of the reasons health physics and radiation protection professionals are increasingly called upon to upgrade their skills. Designed to prepare candidates for the American Board of Health Physics Comprehensive examination (Part I) and other certification examinations, Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions introduces professionals in the field to radiation protection principles and their practical application in routine and emergency situations. It features more than 650 worked examples illustrating concepts under discussion along with an in-depth coverage of sources of radiation, standards and regulations, biological effects of ionizing radiation, instrumentation, external and internal dosimetry, counting statistics, monitoring and interpretations, operational health physics, transportation and waste, nuclear emergencies, and more. Reflecting for the first time the true scope of health physics at an introductory level, Basic Health Physics: Problems and Solutions gives readers the tools to properly evaluate challenging situations in all areas of radiation protection, including the medical, university, power reactor, fuel cycle, research reactor, environmental, non-ionizing radiation, and accelerator health physics.

  9. [Effects of Tai Chi exercise on physical and mental health].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa-Ohira, Masako; Toda, Masahiro; Den, Rei; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    2010-09-01

    Recently, Tai Chi, which is one of the Chinese traditional martial arts, has been receiving attention. The main feature of Tai Chi is its flowing movements including loosening up, relaxing, and practicing meditation with slow abdominal respiration. Tai Chi is widely taken as part of health-promotion activities or rehabilitation training, and significant mental and physical effects have been reported so far. In this review report, Tai Chi was confirmed to be beneficial not only as a rehabilitation training for old people or patients with various diseases but also as an exercise for healthy people. These findings suggest the potential of Tai Chi as a complementary and alternative therapy.

  10. Physics for Allied Health Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldick, Howard

    2000-04-01

    In this paper I will describe two courses that I have been teaching for the past 6 years to physical therapy and occupational therapy students Emphasis will be paced on those points that distinguish these courses from others with which I am familiar. I will discuss the syllabus: homework, exams, labs and the final grade. I will also present a topic outline of the courses showing how examples are drawn from the human body to illustrate the physics concept under discussion and to stimulate the students's interest in the material. The following basic concepts of physics will be covered (each with human body examples): vectors, components, statics, conservation of energy, efficiency, change of state, heat transfer, electric charge, electric field, voltage and capacitance.

  11. Effect of physical fitness and training on physiological responses to hypogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiki, H.; Nakaya, M.; Sudoh, M.; Abe, M.; Taketomi, Y.; Oh'Ishi, K.; Saiki, Y.; Saiki, A.

    The studies on the orthostatic tolerance during the hypodynamics exposure seem to be significant in connection with the selection, training and health maintenance of astronauts. Using male human subjects of various physical fitness levels, fluctuations of their physical fitness through 2 weeks of vigorous athletic training were measured in many parameters. For some of the subjects, the effects of 6 hr thermal neutral water immersion exposure in head out supine position on the physical fitness parameters and orthostatic tolerability were compared before training with after training. The results obtained were as follows: (1) Before training, orthostatic tolerability before hypodynamics exposure increased, following the physical fitness levels; the value after the hypodynamics exposure decreased in all the cases, but no differences were observed between the physical fitness levels. (2) As a result of training an increase of the physical fitness capacity was observed. The increase of orthostatic tolerability before hypodynamics exposure was noticed except for athletes. (3) Before hypodynamics exposure the urinary excretion of noradrenaline on non-athlete subjects increased as the physicsl fitness level increased. The values were decreased by physical training, the more so the better the physical fitness. After hypodynamics exposure the same relation was observed. But for athletes the values remain more stable and the decrease by hypodynamics exposure was not so distinctive. Such decreased reaction to hypodynamic conditions seems to reveal the neuro hormonal mechanism for the detrimental adaptation of athletes to hypodynamics. These results suggest that stable athletes do not always have low orthostatic tolerability, but do not respond well to hypodynamic conditions, at least from the orthostatic point of view. The mechanism seems related to sympathetic nerve activity.

  12. Strength training and physical activity in boys: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Udo; Witassek, Fabienne; Petrò, Renato; Fritz, Chris; Eiholzer, Urs

    2013-12-01

    In developed societies levels of daily physical activity (PA) among school-age children are decreasing. This implies risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Specific strategies to improve levels of PA are needed. In prepubertal boys there is evidence that strength training increases spontaneous PA outside of training. A total of 102 schoolchildren (age 10-14 years) in Switzerland were randomly assigned to physical education classes or to participate twice weekly at a guided strength training program for 19 weeks. Spontaneous PA energy expenditure (PAEE; 3axial accelerometry for 7 days), leg and arm strength, and body composition (dual energy radiograph absorptiometry) were measured at baseline, after 19 weeks of training intervention, and after 3 months of washout. There were no significant differences between the groups at baseline. In the intervention group, PAEE increased by 10% from baseline to end of training in boys (P = .02), but not in girls. Leg and arm strength were increased owing to training intervention in both boys and girls. All other variables were unchanged. Baseline PAEE was significantly negatively correlated with changes of PAEE. Targeted strength training significantly increases daily spontaneous PA behavior in boys. The less active children showed the greatest increase in spontaneous PAEE. Girls showed a similar increase in strength, but not in spontaneous PAEE. This may be explained by their earlier pubertal development. Strength training may be a promising strategy in schools to counteract decreasing levels of PA.

  13. Adaptations to a New Physical Training Program in the Combat Controller Training Pipeline

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    trainees undertook an 8-week modified physical fitness training program designed to reduce overtraining and injury and improve performance. We...principally aimed at reducing overtraining and overuse injury , educating trainees and cadre on how to train smarter, and transitioning from...program, overuse injuries decreased by a staggering 67%. The new program dramatically eliminated overtraining in trainees. We believe several of

  14. An Evaluation of Physical Readiness Training in Armor One Station Unit Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    behavior modification principles, had each soldier repeat a gradually increasing number of sets of pushups, with each set being 50% of his maximum...discussing the relative importance of the pushup, situp, and 2-mile run subtests in the APRT. Keywords: Armor; Army training; Behavior ; Modification ; Muscles; Performand (human); Physical fitness; Predictions; Training.

  15. Health Instruction Packages: Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephen J.; Lupi, Frances A.

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are used in these two learning modules to instruct physical therapists and others involved in the care of the infirm in methods of comfortably positioning patients in beds and chairs. The first module, "Basic Positioning in Bed and Chair," describes how to position a patient in the upright sitting…

  16. Vocal Health for Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Josh; McColl, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Evidence suggests that teachers are often at risk for vocal disease and are more likely to change occupations because of their voice problems compared to non-teachers. Physical educators are especially at risk for voice problems due to the intense daily demands of voice projection. Chronic abuse can cause swelling and inflammation of the…

  17. Health Instruction Packages: Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Stephen J.; Lupi, Frances A.

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are used in these two learning modules to instruct physical therapists and others involved in the care of the infirm in methods of comfortably positioning patients in beds and chairs. The first module, "Basic Positioning in Bed and Chair," describes how to position a patient in the upright sitting…

  18. Mental Health Worker Training. A State-of-the-Art Reference on Statewide Mental Health Agency Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    A study examined the statewide mental health agency training programs for paraprofessional mental health workers that exist throughout the United States. During the study, researchers contacted all 50 state mental health manpower development offices and requested copies of statewide training programs, instructional materials, training needs…

  19. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  20. A Healthy Investment: Building the Facilities to Train the Next Generation of Nursing and Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Bob

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of community colleges are investing in new facilities and programs to train health care workers in a variety of professions, including nursing, radiology, health information technology, physical therapy, dentistry, and surgical technology. Community colleges have historically offered job training programs in health care, but with…

  1. Altitude Training and its Influence on Physical Endurance in Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Strzała, Marek; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Szyguła, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    It is possible to plan an altitude training (AT) period in such a way that the enhanced physical endurance obtained as a result of adaptation to hypoxia will appear and can be used to improve performance in competition. Yet finding rationales for usage of AT in highly trained swimmers is problematic. In practice AT, in its various forms, is still controversial, and an objective review of research concentrating on the advantages and disadvantages of AT has been presented in several scientific publications, including in no small part the observations of swimmers. The aim of this article is to review the various methods and present both the advantageous and unfavourable physiological changes that occur in athletes as a result of AT. Moreover, AT results in the sport of swimming have been collected. They include an approach towards primary models of altitude/hypoxic training: live high + train high, live high + train low, live low + train high, as well as subsequent methods: Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure (IHE) and Intermittent Hypoxic Training (IHT). Apnoea training, which is descended from freediving, is also mentioned, and which can be used with, or as a substitute for, the well-known IHE or IHT methods. In conclusion, swimmers who train using hypoxia may be among the best-trained athletes, and that even a slight improvement in physical endurance might result in the shortening of a swimming time in a given competition, and the achievement of a personal best, which is hard to obtain by normal training methods, when the personal results of the swimmer have reached a plateau. PMID:23486564

  2. Pet ownership and physical health.

    PubMed

    Matchock, Robert L

    2015-09-01

    Pet ownership and brief human-animal interactions can serve as a form of social support and convey a host of beneficial psychological and physiological health benefits. This article critically examines recent relevant literature on the pet-health connection. Cross-sectional studies indicate correlations between pet ownership and numerous aspects of positive health outcomes, including improvements on cardiovascular measures and decreases in loneliness. Quasi-experimental studies and better controlled experimental studies corroborate these associations and suggest that owning and/or interacting with a pet may be causally related to some positive health outcomes. The value of pet ownership and animal-assisted therapy (AAT), as a nonpharmacological treatment modality, augmentation to traditional treatment, and healthy preventive behavior (in the case of pet ownership), is starting to be realized. However, more investigations that employ randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and investigations that more closely examine the underlying mechanism of the pet-health effect, such as oxytocin, are needed.

  3. Strength Training Improves Body Image and Physical Activity Behaviors Among Midlife and Older Rural Women.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Rebecca A; Eldridge, Galen; Lynch, Wesley; Paul, Lynn C

    2013-08-01

    The effect of strength training on body image is understudied. The Strong Women Program, a 10-week, twice weekly strength-training program, was provided by Extension agents to 341 older rural women (62±12 years); changes in body image and other psychosocial variables were evaluated. Paired-sample t-test analyses were conducted to assess mean differences pre- to post-program. Strength training was associated with significant improvements in several dimensions of body image, health-related quality of life, and physical activity behaviors, satisfaction, and comfort among rural aging women-an often underserved population that stands to benefit considerably from similar programs.

  4. Health physics 1992 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, radiation protection services are provided by ESH-1, -4, and -12, and technical support is provided by ESH-6 to Laboratory groups that work with significant quantities of fissile material. The mission of all these groups is to protect Laboratory workers, the public, and the environment from radiation associated with Laboratory operations. In this report, 1992 radiation protection performance trends are presented. These data show that, in general, the collective external dose equivalent quantities from penetrating (gamma, x-ray, and neutron) radiation and from nonpenetrating (beta and low-energy photon) radiation showed a slight downward trend during 1992. The number of confirmed contaminations of skin and personal clothing decreased in 1992 when compared to the previous year. Finally, there was one reportable DOE 5000.3A internal contamination event in 1992. The 1992 radiation protection activities of the Laboratory, conducted at both the Nevada Test Site and at Los Alamos, are presented and discussed. These activities include external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, radiation-monitoring instrumentation, sample analysis, workplace radiological monitoring, nuclear criticality safety, hazardous materials response, radiological training, and radiological records. This report details routine activities, including any significant changes and improvements in 1992; additional activities, including special investigations, studies, and reviews; publications and presentations; and professional activities, including professional memberships, training received, and conferences attended.

  5. Child abuse and physical health in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Tracie O; MacMillan, Harriet L; Boyle, Michael; Cheung, Kristene; Taillieu, Tamara; Turner, Sarah; Sareen, Jitender

    2016-03-16

    A large literature exists on the association between child abuse and mental health, but less is known about associations with physical health. The study objective was to determine if several types of child abuse were related to an increased likelihood of negative physical health outcomes in a nationally representative sample of Canadian adults. Data are from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey-Mental Health (n = 23,395). The study sample was representative of the Canadian population aged 18 or older. Child physical abuse, sexual abuse, and exposure to intimate partner violence were assessed in relation to self-perceived general health and 13 self-reported, physician-diagnosed physical conditions. All child abuse types were associated with having a physical condition (odds ratios = 1.4 to 2.0) and increased odds of obesity (odds ratios = 1.2 to 1.4). Abuse in childhood was associated with arthritis, back problems, high blood pressure, migraine headaches, chronic bronchitis/emphysema/COPD, cancer, stroke, bowel disease, and chronic fatigue syndrome in adulthood, even when sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, and obesity were taken into account (odds ratios = 1.1 to 2.6). Child abuse remained significantly associated with back problems, migraine headaches, and bowel disease when further adjusting for mental conditions and other physical conditions (odds ratios = 1.2 to 1.5). Sex was a significant moderator between child abuse and back problems, chronic bronchitis/emphysema/COPD, cancer, and chronic fatigue syndrome, with slightly stronger effects for women than men. Abuse in childhood was associated with increased odds of having 9 of the 13 physical conditions assessed in this study and reduced self-perceived general health in adulthood. Awareness of associations between child abuse and physical conditions is important in the provision of health care.

  6. The institutionalization of public health training and the health sciences.

    PubMed

    Laaser, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    The health of the population is determined by a number of ecological determinants in addition to medical care. Therefore a close relationship exists with the social and political context in a society. With regard to the health care system, schools of public health as institutions for training, research, and services have to focus on four main deficits in the area of information, prevention, social gradients, and the regulation of health care delivery. A task profile derives which comprises (a) training for research and services, (b) monitoring population health and setting of priorities, (c) applied research on public health, (d) consulting the decision makers, and (e) intervention and public accountability. How to perform in these areas has to be related to basic ethical principles, notably, equity, participation, subsidiarity, sustainability, and efficiency. Furthermore, international trends in modern education have to be considered as for the European Union in the Bologna Declaration of 1999, with reference to academization and internationalization of advanced studies. The resulting institutional profile of modern schools of public health is characterized by their academic basis, interdisciplinarity, and multi-professionality. The paradigm of the New Public Health is an equal merger of medical and social sciences, a predominantly postgraduate study program, an international scope, close links to the government, local networks with service institutions, and a focus on contemporary health issues. In the former socialist economies of Central and Eastern Europe a regional collaboration beyond borders (the concept of regionality) is apt to support the achievement of international standards of excellence for newly developing schools of public health.

  7. Injury and Fitness Outcomes during Implementation of Physical Readiness Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    recommended quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness in healthy adults. Medicine and...J. J. Knapik’ K. G. Hauret’ S. Arnold’ M. Canham-Chervak’ A. J. Mansfield’ E. l. Hoedebecke’ D. McMillian2 Injury and Fitness Outcomes During... fitness outcomes in Ba- sic Combat Training (BCT) during implementation of Physical Readiness Training (PRT). PRT is the U.S. Army’s emerging physi- cal

  8. Exercise training and habitual physical activity: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damon L; Johannsen, Neil M; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Earnest, Conrad P; Johnson, William D; Blair, Steven N; Sénéchal, Martin; Church, Timothy S

    2012-12-01

    Exercise training reduces adiposity and risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the combined effects of habitual free-living physical activity and aerobic training on waist circumference, weight, fitness, and blood pressure in postmenopausal women are unknown. To evaluate the effects of habitual physical activity levels during aerobic training on weight, waist circumference, fitness, and blood pressure. Secondary analysis of an RCT. Original data collected April 2001 to June 2005 and analyzed in 2012. Postmenopausal women in a supervised exercise trial. Women (n=325) were randomized to 4, 8, or 12 kcal/kg per week of aerobic training or a control group for 6 months. All outcome measures were collected at baseline and follow-up. Changes in dependent variables within each training group were evaluated across tertiles of pedometer-determined habitual physical activity outside exercise training sessions. Changes in waist circumference and weight. Reductions in waist circumference were significantly greater with higher steps/day accumulated outside exercise training compared to lower levels in the 4 (high: -4.8 cm vs low: -1.4 cm, p=0.03); 8 (high: -4.2 cm vs low: -0.4 cm, p=0.03), and 12 kcal/kg per week groups (high: -4.1 cm vs low: -0.7 cm, p=0.05). For all groups, p-trend≤0.03. A trend was observed for greater weight reduction with higher steps/day in the 4 kcal/kg per week group (p-trend=0.04) but not for the other exercise doses. No effects were observed for blood pressure or fitness measures (all p>0.05). In postmenopausal women, higher habitual physical activity while participating in aerobic training was associated with greater reductions in central adiposity, and was supportive of weight loss compared to lower levels. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Reunification of Health and Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Seymour

    1982-01-01

    The movement toward a separation of physical education and health education is gradually receding with the realization that a holistic education is more suitable to the physical and psychological growth of the individual personality. The reunification of the two disciplines is important for the unification of mind and body. (JN)

  10. Effects of an 8-Month Exercise Training Program on Off-Exercise Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    RANGAN, VIKRAM V.; WILLIS, LESLIE H.; SLENTZ, CRIS A.; BATEMAN, LORI A.; SHIELDS, A. TAMLYN; HOUMARD, JOSEPH A.; KRAUS, WILLIAM E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose An active lifestyle is widely recognized as having a beneficial effect on cardiovascular health. However, no clear consensus exists as to whether exercise training increases overall physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) or whether individuals participating in regular exercise compensate by reducing their off-exercise physical activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in PAEE in response to aerobic training (AT), resistance training (RT), or combined aerobic and resistance training (AT/RT). Methods Data are from 82 participants in the Studies of Targeted Risk Reduction Interventions through Defined Exercise—Aerobic Training versus Resistance Training study, a randomized trial of overweight (body mass index = 25–35 kg·m−2) adults, in which participants were randomized to receive 8 months of AT, RT, or AT/RT. All subjects completed a 4-month control period before randomization. PAEE was measured using triaxial RT3 accelerometers, which subjects wore for a 5- to 7-d period before and after the exercise intervention. Data reduction was performed with a previously published computer-based algorithm. Results There was no significant change in off-exercise PAEE in any of the exercise training groups. We observed a significant increase in total PAEE that included the exercise training, in both AT and AT/RT but not in RT. Conclusions Eight months of exercise training was not associated with a compensatory reduction in off-exercise physical activity, regardless of exercise modality. The absence of compensation is particularly notable for AT/RT subjects, who performed a larger volume of exercise than did AT or RT subjects. We believe that the extended duration of our exercise training program was the key factor in allowing subjects to reach a new steady-state level of physical activity within their daily lives. PMID:21364488

  11. Presenteeism according to healthy behaviors, physical health, and work environment.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ray M; Aldana, Steven G; Pope, James E; Anderson, David R; Coberley, Carter R; Whitmer, R William

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the contribution that selected demographic characteristics, health behaviors, physical health outcomes, and workplace environmental factors have on presenteeism (on-the-job productivity loss attributed to poor health and other personal issues). Analyses are based on a cross-sectional survey administered to 3 geographically diverse US companies in 2010. Work-related factors had the greatest influence on presenteeism (eg, too much to do but not enough time to do it, insufficient technological support/resources). Personal problems and financial stress/concerns also contributed substantially to presenteeism. Factors with less contribution to presenteeism included physical limitations, depression or anxiety, inadequate job training, and problems with supervisors and coworkers. Presenteeism was greatest for those ages 30-49, women, separated/divorced/widowed employees, and those with a high school degree or some college. Clerical/office workers and service workers had higher presenteeism. Managers and professionals had the highest level of presenteeism related to having too much to do but too little time to do it, and transportation workers had the greatest presenteeism because of physical health limitations. Lowering presenteeism will require that employers have realistic expectations of workers, help workers prioritize, and provide sufficient technological support. Financial stress and concerns may warrant financial planning services. Health promotion interventions aimed at improving nutrition and physical and mental health also may contribute to reducing presenteeism.

  12. Physical health functioning among United Methodist clergy.

    PubMed

    Proeschold-Bell, Rae Jean; LeGrand, Sara

    2012-09-01

    United Methodist clergy have been found to have higher than average self-reported rates of obesity, diabetes, asthma, arthritis, and high blood pressure. However, health diagnoses differ from physical health functioning, which indicates how much health problems interfere with activities of daily living. Ninety-five percent (n = 1726) of all actively serving United Methodist clergy in North Carolina completed the SF-12, a measure of physical health functioning that has US norms based on self-administered survey data. Sixty-two percent (n = 1074) of our sample completed the SF-12 by self-administered formats. We used mean difference tests among self-administered clergy surveys to compare the clergy SF-12 Physical Composite Scores to US-normed scores. Clergy reported significantly better physical health composite scores than their gender- and age-matched peers, despite above average disease burden in the same sample. Although health interventions tailored to clergy that address chronic disease are urgently needed, it may be difficult to elicit participation given pastors' optimistic view of their physical health functioning.

  13. The Athletic Health Care and Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Stephen G.; Schlotfeldt, John D.; Foley, Wayne E.

    1985-01-01

    The Athletic Health Care and Training Program was developed to meet the educational, organizational and record-keeping needs of the interscholastic athletic program of the Seattle Public Schools. The program components were the education of coaches, school nurses and student trainers; development of a centralized training room; implementation of written procedures, and establishment of a record-keeping system. At the end of the three-year study period, schools involved in the program were better prepared to handle emergencies than were control schools. Schools involved in the program were found to have an injury-recognition rate comparable to that previously reported for high schools that had athletic trainers, a rate substantially higher than that in the control schools. The experimental schools were judged to have managed these injuries satisfactorily 95% of the time, compared with a satisfactory management rate of 14% for the control schools. PMID:3993012

  14. Effect of bedside physical diagnosis training on third-year medical students' physical exam skills.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lloyd; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Go, Roderick A; Daroowalla, Feroza

    2014-01-01

    Graduating medical students, when surveyed, noted a deficit in training in physical examination skills. In an attempt to remedy this deficit we implemented a pilot program for 3rd-year medical students consisting of twice-weekly bedside diagnosis rounds as part of their 8-week medicine clerkship. To assess the success of this program we reviewed students' objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) scores at the completion of the clerkship compared with prior years' students who did not have the bedside physical diagnosis training. Students who were trained (n = 109) had an overall higher OSCE physical exam score (p < .01) than students without the training (n = 85). Bedside physical diagnosis rounds appear to have elevated the overall OSCE score for 3rd-year medical students.

  15. Effects of 12 Weeks of Physical Training on Body Composition and Physical Fitness in Military Recruits

    PubMed Central

    CAMPOS, LEANDRA C. B.; CAMPOS, FABIO A. D.; BEZERRA, THIAGO A. R.; PELLEGRINOTTI, ÍDICO LUIZ

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the morphological and functional changes in military recruits after twelve weeks of physical training. The sample consisted of 130 volunteer recruits aged 18–19 years. Anthropometric variables were assessed (body weight, height, body mass index, arm, waist, and hip circumference, waist/hip ratio, skinfold thickness of the triceps, suprailiac, and abdomen, and body fat percentage) and the sit-up test (1 minute), push-up test, and 12-minute running test. The physical training protocol involved running workouts, strength, agility, and flexibility. Descriptive statistical procedures were performed with mean, standard deviation, variance, and percentage and the comparison between the two moments was performed using the Student t test for dependent samples. The significance level was set at p <0.05. The results demonstrated a decrease in the sum of the three skinfolds (42.7±25.2mm to 33.9±17.7mm), a decrease in fat percentage (14.1±7.3% to 11.8±6.1%), an increase in lean mass (57.6±6.0kg to 58.6±8.0kg), and decreased fat mass (10.1±6.4kg to 8.3±5.2kg). They also showed improvements in push-up test (21.3±9.0 to 33.5±8.9), sit-up test (35.2±8.3 to 49.8±7.4), the 12 minute test (2212±316m to 2760±214m), and V̇O2max (35.2±8.3ml.kg−1.min−1 to 49.8±7.4 ml.kg−1.min−1). No differences were observed in body mass, height, body mass index, or hip circumference. According to the above, it was found that the methodology adopted in the physical training was effective in reducing the percentage of fat and increasing cardiorespiratory fitness, improving the physical capacity and health of the military recruits. PMID:28674600

  16. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  17. Health Care Provider Physical Activity Prescription Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josyula, Lakshmi; Lyle, Roseann

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility and impact of a health care provider’s (HCP) physical activity (PA) prescription on the PA of patients on preventive care visits. Methods: Consenting adult patients completed health and PA questionnaires and were sequentially assigned to intervention groups. HCPs prescribed PA using a written prescription only…

  18. The effect of retirement on physical health.

    PubMed Central

    Ekerdt, D J; Baden, L; Bossé, R; Dibbs, E

    1983-01-01

    This prospective study compared pre- to post-retirement changes in physical health among male retirees with changes among age peers who continued to work. The 229 retirees and 409 workers aged 55-73 at follow-up were all participants in the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study. Physical health at baseline and follow-up (three to four years apart) was rated on a four-point scale according to the findings of medical examinations. Although physical health declined generally over time, regression analyses showed no significant difference between eventual retirees and continuing workers on health change, after controlling for age and excluding men who retired due to illness or disability. Among retirees alone, pre- to post-retirement health change was also not significantly associated with several circumstances which purportedly make the retirement transition more stressful, such as mandatory retirement or retirement to a reduced standard of living. The results of this study of physical health, which corroborate those of other studies based on self-reported health measures and mortality data, support the conclusion that the event of retirement does not influence the risk of health deterioration. PMID:6859363

  19. Physical and Mental Health Among Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Michelle J.; Weaver, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    The physical and mental health of cancer patients needs to be addressed not only during active treatment but also throughout the continuum of survivorship care. This commentary provides an overview of issues pertinent to cancer survivors, with an emphasis on mental health issues and recommendations for annual clinical screening and monitoring using recently published guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology. PMID:25046097

  20. Answers to Health Questions in Physical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Robert, Ed.

    Culled from the answers of physical education teachers and coaches, this booklet attempts to indicate the scope of health problems and suggests some directions which the solutions may take. It is divided into three parts. Part 1, Health and Safety in Activity Programs, answers questions on first aid, excused absences, and desirability of…

  1. Public health nurses' approaches to early childhood physical activity in Finland.

    PubMed

    Javanainen-Levonen, Tarja; Poskiparta, Marita; Rintala, Pauli; Satomaa, Pekka

    2009-03-01

    This study was conducted using five focus groups with 24 public health nurses from regional child health clinics in order to explore health professionals' perceptions concerning physical activity. Participants were professionally experienced (mean 13.9 years), female (mean 46.2 years) nurses with some training in health-enhancing physical activity. Frame analysis of verbatim transcripts resulted in four frames: the environmental frame, the family frame, the natural frame and the wellbeing and health frame. The importance of physical and social environment, especially the role of parents, was highlighted as determinants of physical activity. Furthermore, the natural characteristics of physical activity in early childhood and the benefits of physical activity for wellbeing and health were focused on within these frames. According to the findings, the sample of Finnish nurses approached physical activity multidimensionally. Further research is warranted to ascertain how these approaches come true in health care settings in Finland as well as elsewhere.

  2. Internet-Supported Physical Exercise Training for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis—A Randomised, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Tallner, Alexander; Streber, René; Hentschke, Christian; Morgott, Marc; Geidl, Wolfgang; Mäurer, Mathias; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is effective in improving functional outcomes in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). We evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of internet-based exercise training (e-training) for pwMS on health-related quality of life (HrQoL). Secondary outcomes were muscle strength, aerobic capacity, lung function, physical activity, and fatigue. This is a randomised, controlled trial with a wait-list control group. Data were collected at baseline, after three and six months, and analysed using a hybrid linear model. One-hundred twenty-six pwMS participated in the home-based aerobic (1×/week) and strength training (2×/week) intervention that was supervised and documented via an internet-platform. The intervention group received e-training for six months, and the control group received e-training after a three months waiting period. Significant differences between the groups were only observed for muscle strength (knee flexion (effect size ES = 0.3, p = 0.003), knee extension (ES = 0.24, p = 0.015)), peak expiratory flow (ES = 0.2, p = 0.039), and sports activity (ES = 0.33, p = 0.001) after three months. E-training had no effect on HrQoL but did on muscle strength, lung function, and physical activity. It is a promising and feasible approach to facilitate large-scale, yet individual, training support. PMID:27706046

  3. Internet-Supported Physical Exercise Training for Persons with Multiple Sclerosis-A Randomised, Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Tallner, Alexander; Streber, René; Hentschke, Christian; Morgott, Marc; Geidl, Wolfgang; Mäurer, Mathias; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2016-09-30

    Physical exercise is effective in improving functional outcomes in persons with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). We evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of internet-based exercise training (e-training) for pwMS on health-related quality of life (HrQoL). Secondary outcomes were muscle strength, aerobic capacity, lung function, physical activity, and fatigue. This is a randomised, controlled trial with a wait-list control group. Data were collected at baseline, after three and six months, and analysed using a hybrid linear model. One-hundred twenty-six pwMS participated in the home-based aerobic (1×/week) and strength training (2×/week) intervention that was supervised and documented via an internet-platform. The intervention group received e-training for six months, and the control group received e-training after a three months waiting period. Significant differences between the groups were only observed for muscle strength (knee flexion (effect size ES = 0.3, p = 0.003), knee extension (ES = 0.24, p = 0.015)), peak expiratory flow (ES = 0.2, p = 0.039), and sports activity (ES = 0.33, p = 0.001) after three months. E-training had no effect on HrQoL but did on muscle strength, lung function, and physical activity. It is a promising and feasible approach to facilitate large-scale, yet individual, training support.

  4. Health Physics Enrollents and Degrees Survey, 2006 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2007-03-31

    This annual survey collects 2006 data on the number of health physics degrees awarded as well as the number of students enrolled in health physics academic programs. Thirty universities offer health physics degrees; all responded to the survey.

  5. Effect of training on physical capacity and physical strain in persons with tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Dallmeijer, A J; Hopman, M T; Angenot, E L; van der Woude, L H

    1997-09-01

    The effects of quad rugby training on physical capacity and physical strain during standardized activities of daily living were investigated in 9 trained (A) and 5 untrained quad rugby players (B), and 7 inactive persons with tetraplegia (C) at 0, 3 and 6 months after the start of a quad rugby training program (1.5h.wk[-1]). Physical capacity was measured as maximal isometric strength, peak power output (POpeak) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) on a stationary wheelchair ergometer. Physical strain was expressed as a percentage of heart-rate reserve. No measurable training effects could be observed for POpeak, VO2peak and physical strain. A significant rise in maximal isometric strength was found in group B after 3 and 6 months of training, whereas no significant changes were found in groups A and C. The results suggest that a higher training frequency and/or intensity may be needed to gain significant training effects for POpeak and VO2peak.

  6. Cardiovascular effects of extreme physical training.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, W; Rost, R; De Meirleir, K; Liesen, H; Heck, H; Mader, A

    1986-01-01

    After a short historical remark the development of athlete's heart in childhood is described. Within 2 years significant differences were observed between endurance-trained (swimming) and untrained girls and boys determined by X-ray and echocardiographical examinations. The limits of the physiological size in relation to body weight were not exceeded within 10 years of longitudinal studies. A second point deals with athlete's heart from physiological and clinical viewpoints. The largest healthy heart ever found in our examinations of athletes had a size of 1,700 ml. Sixteen years after stopping the active career it was reduced to 950 ml without a pathological finding. Questionable and pathological cases are described. A third chapter covers the blood supply of internal organs during exercise combined with air or oxygen breathing. In this connection liver, kidneys, heart, lungs, and brain have been investigated. The reduced blood supply of the liver and kidneys during intense exercise on the cycle ergometer was not influenced significantly by inspiration of oxygen. A significant blood volume increase of the lungs was noticed during incremental rates of work. Exercise augmented also blood flow of the brain in relation to the work rate (at 100 W a 27% increase in grey matter flow of the right hemisphere). A fourth chapter deals with new hormonal and neurohormonal aspects related to the cardiovascular system. Beta-endorphines remained unchanged at work rates below the anaerobic threshold but increased significantly during maximal rate of work. The opiate antagonist naloxone abolished the rise in body temperature seen during ergometer exercise. The serotonin antagonist ketanserin lowered the blood pressure and the arterial lactic acid level during an incremental exercise test, similar to the results with the dopamine agonist pergolide. The hormone cardiodilatin is produced in the atrial appendages, and it is a potent substance in the regulation of the cardiovascular

  7. Bikram yoga training and physical fitness in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Brian L; Hart, Cady E F

    2013-03-01

    There has been relatively little longitudinal controlled investigation of the effects of yoga on general physical fitness, despite the widespread participation in this form of exercise. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the effect of short-term Bikram yoga training on general physical fitness. Young healthy adults were randomized to yoga training (N = 10, 29 ± 6 years, 24 sessions in 8 weeks) or a control group (N = 11, 26 ± 7 years). Each yoga training session consisted of 90-minute standardized supervised postures performed in a heated and humidified studio. Isometric deadlift strength, handgrip strength, lower back/hamstring and shoulder flexibility, resting heart rate and blood pressure, maximal oxygen consumption (treadmill), and lean and fat mass (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) were measured before and after training. Yoga subjects exhibited increased deadlift strength, substantially increased lower back/hamstring flexibility, increased shoulder flexibility, and modestly decreased body fat compared with control group. There were no changes in handgrip strength, cardiovascular measures, or maximal aerobic fitness. In summary, this short-term yoga training protocol produced beneficial changes in musculoskeletal fitness that were specific to the training stimulus.

  8. Physical Training Improves Insulin Resistance Syndrome Markers in Obese Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyun-Sik; Gutin, Bernard; Barbeau, Paule; Owens, Scott; Lemmon, Christian R.; Allison, Jerry; Litaker, Mark S.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that physical training (PT), especially high-intensity PT, would favorably affect components of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in obese adolescents. Data on teens randomized into lifestyle education (LSE) alone, LSE plus moderate -intensity PT, and LSE plus high-intensity PT indicated that PT, especially high-intensity…

  9. Astronaut John Glenn running as part of physical training program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-20

    S64-14883 (1962) --- Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., pilot of the Mercury-Atlas 6 mission, participates in a strict physical training program, as he exemplifies by frequent running. Here he pauses during an exercise period on the beach near Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Responsibilities and Training Needs of Paraeducators in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ronald W.; Kotecki, Jerome E.; Harvey, Michael W.; Oliver, Amy

    2007-01-01

    This study describes responsibilities and training needs of paraeducators in physical education. Paraeducators (n = 138) employed in 34 midwestern schools received a 27-item questionnaire. Of the 138 paraeducators contacted, 76 responded, resulting in a 55.1% response rate. Only 16% of the total respondents (n = 76) reported receiving specific…

  11. Responsibilities and Training Needs of Paraeducators in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ronald W.; Kotecki, Jerome E.; Harvey, Michael W.; Oliver, Amy

    2007-01-01

    This study describes responsibilities and training needs of paraeducators in physical education. Paraeducators (n = 138) employed in 34 midwestern schools received a 27-item questionnaire. Of the 138 paraeducators contacted, 76 responded, resulting in a 55.1% response rate. Only 16% of the total respondents (n = 76) reported receiving specific…

  12. Physical Training Improves Insulin Resistance Syndrome Markers in Obese Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Hyun-Sik; Gutin, Bernard; Barbeau, Paule; Owens, Scott; Lemmon, Christian R.; Allison, Jerry; Litaker, Mark S.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2002-01-01

    Tested the hypothesis that physical training (PT), especially high-intensity PT, would favorably affect components of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in obese adolescents. Data on teens randomized into lifestyle education (LSE) alone, LSE plus moderate -intensity PT, and LSE plus high-intensity PT indicated that PT, especially high-intensity…

  13. The Training and Work of Ph.D. Physical Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Schweitzer, A. E.

    2003-05-01

    Doctoral education has often been viewed as the pinnacle of the formal education system. How useful is doctoral training in one's later career? In an NSF-funded project, we set out to perform a study of the training, careers, and work activities of Ph.D. physical scientists. The study included both in-depth interviews and a survey sent out to a sample of Ph.D. holders 4-8 years after graduation. Come and find out the results of this study: What skills are most Ph.D. physical scientists using? What should graduate programs be teaching? Are Ph.D.'s who are working in their specific field of training happier than their counterparts working different jobs? What skills and preparation lead to future job satisfaction, perhaps the most important indicator of the "success" of graduate education? A preprint and further details can be found at the project web site at: spot.colorado.edu/ phdcarer.

  14. Mental Health Service Users' Experiences of Training Focused on Empowerment: Training Environment and the Benefits of Training.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Irja; Kylmä, Jari; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi; Kulmala, Anna; Kaunonen, Marja

    2016-06-01

    This qualitative study investigated the mental health service users' (MHSUs') experiences of empowerment training and it was based on individual interviews with 24 MHSUs. Findings showed that MHSUs described the training environment through three dimensions: social interaction, learners' internal resources and the pedagogical execution of training. The training reinforced their positive internal resources, stimulated their inner mind activity and gave meaning to their lives. The knowledge of the training environment helps to build environment, which will support MHSUs' training. Empowerment training could be used to strengthen MHSUs' positive internal resources giving them also a possibility to train their cognitive activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Gymnastics in the Army School of Physical Training

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, DE; Hargrove, R; Clasper, J

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION As a result of a single spinal injury seen at Frimley Park Hospital, we reviewed the injuries recorded at the Army School of Physical Training since December 1996. PATIENTS AND METHODS This was a retrospective review of all acute accidents and injuries recorded in the Accident Book since its inception. RESULTS Over 75% of the injuries that were serious enough to result in soldiers having their training terminated were as a direct result of gymnastic events such as vaulting, trampolining and somersaults. These events were also responsible for most of the small number of career-threatening injuries. CONCLUSIONS This raises questions about the inclusion of gymnastic events in course training programmes, especially when considering its relevance to army training in general. PMID:17002850

  16. Environmental Scan of Weight Bias Exposure in Primary Health Care Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; Nutter, Sarah; Alberga, Angela; Jelinski, Susan; Ball, Geoff D. C.; Edwards, Alun; Oddie, Scott; Sharma, Arya M.; Pickering, Barbara; Forhan, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Negative attitudes and beliefs about individuals with obesity (also known as weight bias) have negative consequences for physical and mental health for individuals with obesity and impact the quality of care provided by health professionals. A preliminary environmental scan of college and university training programs was conducted consisting of 67…

  17. The Training of Physics Teachers in Cuba: A Historical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesús Alamino Ortega, Diego

    The regular, systematic training of physics teachers in Cuba is quite recent when compared to the long history of physics itself. However, its development may serve to illustrate some interesting solutions to a long-standing question: How should a physics teacher be trained in agreement with a certain society at a given moment? In the Cuban context the answer to this question involves quite an original sequence of continuities and breaks, following perhaps the thoughts of Bolívar's teacher, Simón Rodríguez, who wrote in the nineteenth century: "Beware! The mania of slavishly imitating the enlightened nations may well make America in its infancy play the role of an old lady."

  18. Community Health Aides in Grenada: A Proposed Experimental Training Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaur, Manjit; Mayfield, James B.

    1994-01-01

    Key factors of a model for training community health aides are (1) extended time for updating and reinforcing skills; (2) relevance to local situations; (3) group process and interpersonal communication training; (4) practical materials; and (5) participation of physicians, local health workers, and community leaders in rural health policy…

  19. Technical Health Training Manual. Volume 1. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-35a.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mari; And Others

    This manual is designed as a resource for trainers who provide preservice training, either in-country or state-side, to health specialists and generalists assigned to health projects at the community and clinical levels. The training is intended to assist the volunteer in developing knowledge and skill in the areas of primary health care and the…

  20. Technical Health Training Manual. Volume 2. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-35a.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Mari; And Others

    This manual is designed as a resource for trainers who provide preservice training, either in-country or state-side, to health specialists and generalists assigned to health projects at the community and clinical levels. The training is intended to assist the volunteer in developing knowledge and skill in the areas of primary health care and the…

  1. Diet and physical activity: a healthful binomial.

    PubMed

    Entrala-Bueno, A; Iglesias, C; de Jesús, F

    2003-09-01

    Individual health status is the result of a combination of different factors such as genetics, dowry, age, nutritional status, physical activity, as well as environmental factors, hygiene, salubrity, stress and tobacco consumption. The existence of bad food habits and other risk factors leads to an increase in the development of chronic diseases, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and certain types of cancer. Such diseases occupy greater rates of morbidity and mortality in European countries. This situation seems to justify that in our country defective intervention on different risk factors or, perhaps, a worsening in the control of some of them is taking place where the diet and lifestyle seem clearly implied. It is clear that if we take as bases the angular determinants for cardiovascular health identified in the 'Victory Declaration on Cardiac Health', healthful food habits, free tobacco lifestyle, regular physical activity and positive psycho-social atmosphere, future perspectives in our country do not seem to be very favourable.

  2. Physical Training as Non-Pharmacological Treatment of Neurocardiogenic Syncope

    PubMed Central

    Takahagi, Vanessa Cristina Miranda; Costa, Daniela Caetano; Crescêncio, Júlio César; Gallo, Lourenço

    2014-01-01

    Background Characterized as a sudden and temporary loss of consciousness and postural tone, with quick and spontaneous recovery, syncope is caused by an acute reduction of systemic arterial pressure and, therefore, of cerebral blood flow. Unsatisfactory results with the use of drugs allowed the nonpharmacological treatment of neurocardiogenic syncope was contemplated as the first therapeutic option. Objectives To compare, in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope, the impact of a moderate intensity aerobic physical training (AFT) and a control intervention on the positivity of head-up tilting test (HUT) and orthostatic tolerance time. Methods Were studied 21 patients with a history of recurrent neurocardiogenic syncope and HUT. The patients were randomized into: trained group (TG), n = 11, and control group (CG), n = 10. The TG was submitted to 12 weeks of AFT supervised, in cycle ergometer, and the CG to a control procedure that consisted in 15 minutes of stretching and 15 minutes of light walk. Results The TG had a positive effect to physical training, with a significant increase in peak oxygen consumption. The CG did not show any statistically significant change before and after the intervention. After the intervention period, 72.7% of the TG sample had negative results to the HUT, not having syncope in the revaluation. Conclusion The program of supervised aerobic physical training for 12 weeks was able to reduce the number of positive HUT, as it was able to increase tolerance time in orthostatic position during the HUT after the intervention period. PMID:24714795

  3. [Effects of physical activity and physical training on the psychological status of older persons with and without cognitive impairment].

    PubMed

    Gogulla, S; Lemke, N; Hauer, K

    2012-06-01

    Fear of falling and depression in the elderly and among cognitively impaired people lead to restrictions in quality of life. Being more active is associated with improved mental health as documented in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies. This is especially true for depression. Such epidemiologic evidence is lacking in fear of falling. This review summarizes current evidence from epidemiological and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and gives an outlook for future research perspectives. The majority of studies included in this review document a significant reduction of depression and fear of falling in older persons by physical training with less evidence in persons with cognitive impairment. With respect to intensity, duration, and amount of exercise, evidence-based recommendations were limited by the small number of high-quality comparative RCTs. High-intensity strength or endurance training was the most effective for reducing depression, while participation in Tai-Chi or multifactorial training programs was most effective to reduce fear of falling.

  4. Physical activity and health in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bhavesh; Robinson, Rebecca; Till, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Adolescence represents a critical period of development during which personal lifestyle choices and behaviour patterns establish, including the choice to be physically active. Physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour and low cardiorespiratory fitness are strong risk factors for the development of chronic diseases with resulting morbidity and mortality, as well as economic burden to wider society from health and social care provision, and reduced occupational productivity. Worrying trends in adverse physical activity behaviours necessitate urgent and concerted action. Healthcare professionals caring for adolescents and young adults are ideally placed and suited to deliver powerful messages promoting physical activity and behaviour change. Every encounter represents an opportunity to ask about physical activity, provide advice, or signpost to appropriate pathways or opportunities. Key initial targets include getting everyone to reduce their sedentary behaviour and be more active, with even a little being more beneficial than none at all. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence-based practice training for health professionals in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Dizon, Janine Margarita; Dizon, Ryan Joseph; Regino, Jocel; Gabriel, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is integral in the health care system whether in developed or developing countries. Thus, all health professionals need to be trained in EBP. An EBP training program was conducted to health professionals in a developing country, the Philippines. The health professionals (medical doctors and allied health professionals [physical therapists and occupational therapists]) were working in hospitals in Manila, Philippines. The program aimed to build capacity in EBP in terms of knowledge and skills. The EBP training program was conducted as a 1-day face-to-face training. Pre- and post-test measures of EBP knowledge and skills were taken prior to and immediately after the 1-day training, using the Fresno test of evidence-based medicine for the medical doctors and the Adapted Fresno test for the allied health professionals. The EBP training program resulted in significant improvements in knowledge and skills for both the medical doctors (change in pre- and post-Fresno test measures, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.6-23.5; P≤0.05) and the allied health professionals (change in pre- and post-Adapted Fresno test measures, 95% CI: 32.7-38.5; P≤0.05). The EBP training conducted amongst the health professionals is an effective and tested undertaking in introducing EBP in developing countries such as the Philippines.

  6. Can physical therapists deliver a pain coping skills program? An examination of training processes and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Christina; Lewis, Prudence; Bennell, Kim L; Ahamed, Yasmin; Crough, Denae; Jull, Gwendolen A; Kenardy, Justin; Nicholas, Michael K; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Physical therapists are well established as providers of treatments for common, painful, and disabling conditions, such as knee osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, they are well placed to deliver treatments that integrate physical and psychosocial elements. Attention is usually given to outcomes of such programs, but few studies have examined the processes and outcomes of training physical therapists to deliver such treatments. The aim of this study was to describe the processes in training physical therapists: (1) to deliver a standardized pain coping skills treatment and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of that training. This study was an analysis of data relating to therapist performance in a randomized clinical trial. Eleven physical therapists were trained to deliver a 10-session pain coping skills training program for people with knee OA as part of a randomized controlled trial (N=222). The initial training was provided in a workshop format and included extensive, ongoing supervision by a psychologist and rigorous use of well-defined performance criteria to assess competence. Adherence to the program, ratings of performance, and use of advanced skills were all measured against these criteria in a sample (n=74, 10%) of the audio recordings of the intervention sessions. Overall, the physical therapists achieved a very high standard of treatment delivery, with 96.6% adherence to the program and mean performance ratings all in the satisfactory range. These results were maintained throughout the intervention and across all sessions. Only 10% of the delivered sessions were analyzed, and the physical therapists who took part in the study were a self-selected group. This study demonstrated that a systematic approach to training and accrediting physical therapists to deliver a standardized pain coping skills program can result in high and sustained levels of adherence to the program. Training fidelity was achieved in this group of motivated clinicians, but the supervision

  7. Is Special Training Needed to Teach "Physics For Elementary Teachers"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitzewitz, Paul W.; Devlin, J. F.; Savage, R. M.; Swift, C. M.

    2006-12-01

    A group of 16 physics teachers spent five days in San Diego in the summer of 2004 learning about the newly developed Physics for Elementary Teachers (PET) curriculum. A large fraction of the time was spent honing skills in teaching this inquiry-based curriculum. How necessary is specialized training such as this week-long session to successfully teaching the PET curriculum? At the University of Michigan-Dearborn the PET curriculum is taught to five sections of 24 students each. Two sections are taught in the fall and winter terms, one section in the summer term. Between January 2005 and December 2006 ten sections were taught, five by PWZ who received the training, the remainder by the other authors of this poster. JFD had previously taught inquiry-based physics courses based on Powerful Ideas in Physical Science, CMS had previously taught inquiry-based courses in space/earth science. RMS is a high school teacher. All instructors made use of the text, video, and web-based resources supplied by the PET development team. There was also communication between instructors teaching different sections in the same term about daily progress and problems. There was, however, no program of class visitations or other means of coordinating teaching techniques. Comparisons of scores on diagnostic exams and student evaluations show that student learning and satisfaction with the course was not significantly different among the various instructors. We conclude that specialized training is not needed for a successful implementation of the PET curriculum.

  8. Physical training as a substance abuse prevention intervention for youth.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, T R; Sunderlin, J; Reynolds, R; Kohl, H W

    2000-01-01

    Program evaluation data from school and community applications of a physical fitness drug prevention program is presented. A train-the-trainer methodology was applied to install the program in twenty-two settings within the state of Illinois. The physical training program consisted of exercise and educational modules delivered over a twelve-week time period that focused on learning values and life skills through exercise. Complete pre-post data were obtained on 329 participating youth at six school and community based sites. Significant increases were demonstrated in physical activity and physical fitness (cardiovascular endurance, strength, and flexibility). Youth self-report data indicated significant decreases in risk factors such as low self-concept, poor school attendance, anxiety, depression, and number of friends who use alcohol and drugs. There were significant reductions in the percentage of youth who used cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, and alcohol. It was concluded that a strong relationship was demonstrated for increased fitness leading to lowered risk factors and usage patterns. Likewise, the train-the-trainer model was shown to be an effective installation approach to expand fitness programming within prevention settings.

  9. Does team training work? Principles for health care.

    PubMed

    Salas, Eduardo; DiazGranados, Deborah; Weaver, Sallie J; King, Heidi

    2008-11-01

    Teamwork is integral to a working environment conducive to patient safety and care. Team training is one methodology designed to equip team members with the competencies necessary for optimizing teamwork. There is evidence of team training's effectiveness in highly complex and dynamic work environments, such as aviation and health care. However, most quantitative evaluations of training do not offer any insight into the actual reasons why, how, and when team training is effective. To address this gap in understanding, and to provide guidance for members of the health care community interested in implementing team training programs, this article presents both quantitative results and a specific qualitative review and content analysis of team training implemented in health care. Based on this review, we offer eight evidence-based principles for effective planning, implementation, and evaluation of team training programs specific to health care.

  10. Adaptation to physical training in rats orally supplemented with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Eric Francelino; Lobato, Raquel Vieira; de Araújo, Ticiana Vasques; Orlando, Débora Ribeiro; Vicente da Costa, Diego; de Oliveira Silva, Víviam; Rogatto, Gustavo Puggina; Zangeronimo, Márcio Gilberto; Rosa, Priscila Vieira; Pereira, Luciano José

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated training adaptation and physical performance parameters in rats orally supplemented with glycerol, glucose, or saline, and submitted to moderate aerobic exercise. Thirty male rats were trained for 6 weeks and administered the supplements during the last 4 weeks of the experiment. Animals were distributed in a completely randomized factorial 2 × 3 design (with or without exercise and 3 substrates). Data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and means were compared using the Student-Newmann-Keuls test at 5%. Among the trained animals, none of the substances caused differences in the percentages of protein, fat, or water content in the carcass. Compared with the sedentary animals, the trained animals supplemented with saline and glucose showed a higher protein percentage in the carcass. The relative mass of the heart and adrenal glands was higher in the trained animals. Glycerol improved the protein content in non-trained animals and increased the relative adrenal mass in both groups. Glycerol reduced the variation in levels of lactate and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) during the last exercise session. There was no difference between groups regarding the relative mass of the thymus and gastrocnemius or with the diameter of muscle fibers or the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio. Supplementation with glycerol was efficient at attenuating variation in AST and lactate levels during exercise.

  11. The physical health of people with schizophrenia in Asia: Baseline findings from a physical health check programme.

    PubMed

    Thongsai, S; Gray, R; Bressington, D

    2016-06-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Physical health problems, especially cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders are far more common in people with severe mental illness (SMI) than the general population. While there are a considerable number of studies that have examined the physical health and health behaviours of people with SMI in Western countries, there have been few studies that have done this in Asia. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Unhealthy body mass index (BMI) values were observed in 44% of Thai service users diagnosed with schizophrenia despite desirable levels of exercise and relatively good diets being reported by the majority of participants. Being prescribed two or more antipsychotics was significantly associated with greater body weight and a higher BMI than in people prescribed only one antipsychotic. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Mental health professionals in Asia should be particularly aware of the additional risks of obesity that seem to be associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy when they are promoting the physical health of people with schizophrenia. Introduction People with schizophrenia have worse physical health than the general population, and studies in developed countries demonstrate that their health behaviours are often undesirable. However, as no similar studies have been conducted in Asian countries with emerging healthcare systems, the physical health promotion challenges in these settings is unknown. Aim To identify and explore relationships between cardiometabolic health risks, lifestyle and treatment characteristics in people with schizophrenia in Thailand. Method This cross-sectional study reports the baseline findings from a physical health check programme using the Thai version of the Health Improvement Profile. Results Despite desirable levels of exercise and relatively good diets being reported by most of the 105 service users, unhealthy body mass index values were observed in 44% of

  12. Maximal strength training as physical rehabilitation for patients with substance use disorder; a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Unhjem, Runar; Flemmen, Grete; Hoff, Jan; Wang, Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Patients with substance use disorder (SUD) suffer from multiple health and psychosocial problems. Because poor physical capacities following an inactive lifestyle may indeed contribute to these problems, physical training is often suggested as an attractive supplement to conventional SUD treatment. Strength training is shown to increase muscle strength and effectively improve health and longevity. Therefore we investigated the feasibility and effect of a maximal strength training intervention for SUD patients in clinical treatment. 16 males and 8 females were randomized into a training group (TG) and a control group (CG). The TG performed lower extremities maximal strength training (85-90 % of 1 repetition maximum (1RM)) 3 times a week for 8 weeks, while the CG participated in conventional clinical activities. The TG increased hack squat 1RM (88 ± 54 %), plantar flexion 1RM (26 ± 20 %), hack squat rate of force development (82 ± 29 %) and peak force (11 ± 5 %). Additionally, the TG improved neural function, expressed as voluntary V-wave (88 ± 83 %). The CG displayed no change in any physical parameters. The TG also reduced anxiety and insomnia, while the CG reduced anxiety. Maximal strength training was feasible for SUD patients in treatment, and improved multiple risk factors for falls, fractures and lifestyle related diseases. As conventional treatment appears to have no effect on muscle strength, systematic strength training should be implemented as part of clinical practice. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02218970 (August 14, 2014).

  13. Definitions: Health, Fitness, and Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B.; Pangrazi, Robert P.; Franks, B. Don

    2000-01-01

    This paper defines a variety of fitness components, using a simple multidimensional hierarchical model that is consistent with recent definitions in the literature. It groups the definitions into two broad categories: product and process. Products refer to states of being such as physical fitness, health, and wellness. They are commonly referred…

  14. Research Methods in Health, Physical Education, Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, M. Gladys, Ed.

    Methods for designing and conducting research related to health education, physical education and reaction are described. The use of libraries, the selection and definition of research problems, principles of statistically sampling, and data collection devices are presented. Instructions for the construction and validation of tests as well as…

  15. Numeracy in Health and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Colleen; Geiger, Vince; Goos, Merrilyn; Dole, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a teacher's Maths lesson that focuses on numeracy in health and physical education learning area. In the lesson, the students were learning about Directed Numbers, something they often struggle with and a topic where the teacher finds it hard to explain using real life situations when using addition and subtraction. The…

  16. International Perspectives on Health Education and Training for Allied Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa-Alonso, Cristina; Zafra-Mezcua, Juan A.; Botella-Rodriguez, Manuel; Novalbos-Ruiz, Jose P.

    1998-01-01

    Improvement of health care will require international cooperation. This will necessitate reorientation in training, teamwork, and democratization of the health system, based on patients' real needs. (SK)

  17. Pleiotropic effects of simvastatin in physically trained ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, N.; Brito, J.O.; Fernandes, T.G.; Llesuy, S.F.; Irigoyen, M.C.; Belló-Klein, A.; De Angelis, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that simvastatin treatment can improve cardiovascular and autonomic functions and membrane lipoperoxidation, with an increased effect when applied to physically trained ovariectomized rats. Ovariectomized rats were divided into sedentary, sedentary+simvastatin and trained+simvastatin groups (n = 8 each). Exercise training was performed on a treadmill for 8 weeks and simvastatin (5 mg/kg) was administered in the last 2 weeks. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded in conscious animals. Baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated by the tachycardic and bradycardic responses to BP changes. Cardiac vagal and sympathetic effects were determined using methylatropine and propranolol. Oxidative stress was evaluated based on heart and liver lipoperoxidation using the chemiluminescence method. The simvastatin-treated groups presented reduced body weight and mean BP (trained+simvastatin = 99 ± 2 and sedentary+simvastatin = 107 ± 2 mmHg) compared to the sedentary group (122 ± 1 mmHg). Furthermore, the trained group showed lower BP and heart rate compared to the other groups. Tachycardic and bradycardic responses were enhanced in both simvastatin-treated groups. The vagal effect was increased in the trained+simvastatin group and the sympathetic effect was decreased in the sedentary+simvastatin group. Hepatic lipoperoxidation was reduced in sedentary+simvastatin (≈21%) and trained+simvastatin groups (≈57%) compared to the sedentary group. Correlation analysis involving all animals demonstrated that cardiac lipoperoxidation was negatively related to the vagal effect (r = -0.7) and positively correlated to the sympathetic effect (r = 0.7). In conclusion, improvement in cardiovascular and autonomic functions associated with a reduction of lipoperoxidation with simvastatin treatment was increased in trained ovariectomized rats. PMID:23739748

  18. Tobacco cessation counseling training in US entry-level physical therapist education curricula: prevalence, content, and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Pignataro, Rose M; Gurka, Matthew J; Jones, Dina L; Kershner, Ruth E; Ohtake, Patricia J; Stauber, William T; Swisher, Anne K

    2014-09-01

    The US Public Health Service (USPHS) recommends tobacco cessation counseling (TCC) training for all health care professionals. Within physical therapist practice, smoking can have adverse effects on treatment outcomes in all body systems. In addition, people with physical disabilities have a higher smoking prevalence than the general population, creating a strong need for tobacco cessation among physical therapy clientele. Therefore, TCC training is an important component of entry-level physical therapist education. The aims of this study were: (1) to determine need for TCC training within entry-level physical therapist education and (2) to identify potential barriers to implementation of USPHS guidelines in the academic environment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted. Directors or academic coordinators of clinical education from entry-level physical therapist programs (N=204) were surveyed using an online instrument designed specifically for this study. Data regarding program and faculty characteristics, tobacco-related training content, and faculty opinions toward TCC in both physical therapist practice and education were analyzed descriptively. The response rate was 71%. A majority (60%) of programs indicated inclusion of tobacco-related training, most commonly 1 to 2 hours in duration, and of these programs, 40% trained students in the implementation of USPHS clinical guidelines for TCC. Data analyses were constrained by limited or missing data in some areas. A single faculty member completed the survey for each program. There is a need for TCC training in entry-level physical therapist education. Inclusion may be facilitated by addressing perceived barriers toward TCC as a component of physical therapist practice and promoting the relevance of TCC as it relates to intended outcomes of physical therapy interventions. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  19. Randomized trial on the effects of a combined physical/cognitive training in aged MCI subjects: the Train the Brain study

    PubMed Central

    Maffei, L.; Picano, E.; Andreassi, M. G.; Angelucci, A.; Baldacci, F.; Baroncelli, L.; Begenisic, T.; Bellinvia, P. F.; Berardi, N.; Biagi, L.; Bonaccorsi, J.; Bonanni, E.; Bonuccelli, U.; Borghini, A.; Braschi, C.; Broccardi, M.; Bruno, R. M.; Caleo, M.; Carlesi, C.; Carnicelli, L.; Cartoni, G.; Cecchetti, L.; Cenni, M. C.; Ceravolo, R.; Chico, L.; Cintoli, S.; Cioni, G.; Coscia, M.; Costa, M.; D’Angelo, G.; D’Ascanio, P.; Nes, M. De; Turco, S. Del; Coscio, E. Di; Galante, M. Di; Lascio, N. di; Faita, F.; Falorni, I.; Faraguna, U.; Fenu, A.; Fortunato, L.; Franco, R.; Gargani, L.; Gargiulo, R.; Ghiadoni, L.; Giorgi, F. S.; Iannarella, R.; Iofrida, C.; Kusmic, C.; Limongi, F.; Maestri, M.; Maffei, M.; Maggi, S.; Mainardi, M.; Mammana, L.; Marabotti, A.; Mariotti, V.; Melissari, E.; Mercuri, A.; Micera, S.; Molinaro, S.; Narducci, R.; Navarra, T.; Noale, M.; Pagni, C.; Palumbo, S.; Pasquariello, R.; Pellegrini, S.; Pietrini, P.; Pizzorusso, T.; Poli, A.; Pratali, L.; Retico, A.; Ricciardi, E.; Rota, G.; Sale, A.; Sbrana, S.; Scabia, G.; Scali, M.; Scelfo, D.; Sicari, R.; Siciliano, G.; Stea, F.; Taddei, S.; Tognoni, G.; Tonacci, A.; Tosetti, M.; Turchi, S.; Volpi, L.

    2017-01-01

    Age-related cognitive impairment and dementia are an increasing societal burden. Epidemiological studies indicate that lifestyle factors, e.g. physical, cognitive and social activities, correlate with reduced dementia risk; moreover, positive effects on cognition of physical/cognitive training have been found in cognitively unimpaired elders. Less is known about effectiveness and action mechanisms of physical/cognitive training in elders already suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), a population at high risk for dementia. We assessed in 113 MCI subjects aged 65–89 years, the efficacy of combined physical-cognitive training on cognitive decline, Gray Matter (GM) volume loss and Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) in hippocampus and parahippocampal areas, and on brain-blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) activity elicited by a cognitive task, measured by ADAS-Cog scale, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) and fMRI, respectively, before and after 7 months of training vs. usual life. Cognitive status significantly decreased in MCI-no training and significantly increased in MCI-training subjects; training increased parahippocampal CBF, but no effect on GM volume loss was evident; BOLD activity increase, indicative of neural efficiency decline, was found only in MCI-no training subjects. These results show that a non pharmacological, multicomponent intervention improves cognitive status and indicators of brain health in MCI subjects. PMID:28045051

  20. The benefits of dispositional mindfulness in physical health: a longitudinal study of female college students.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Megan J; Mermelstein, Liza C; Edwards, Katie M; Gidycz, Christine A

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between dispositional mindfulness, health behaviors (eg, sleep, eating, and exercise), and physical health. Participants included 441 college women. Women completed self-report surveys at the beginning and end of a 10-week academic quarter. The study was conducted over 5 academic quarters from fall 2008 to fall 2010. Findings indicated that higher levels of dispositional mindfulness were related to healthier eating practices, better quality of sleep, and better physical health. Dispositional mindfulness contributed to better physical health even after controlling for traditional health habits. Finally, bidirectional mediational relationships were found between healthy eating and dispositional mindfulness as well as between sleep quality and dispositional mindfulness when physical health was the outcome variable. Findings suggest that incorporating mindfulness training into programming on college campuses may be beneficial, as results indicate that dispositional mindfulness is related to positive physical health among college students.

  1. Physical activity: health outcomes and importance for public health policy.

    PubMed

    Haskell, William L; Blair, Steven N; Hill, James O

    2009-10-01

    This manuscript presents a brief summary of the substantial data supporting an inverse relationship between the amount of habitual physical activity performed and a variety of negative health outcomes throughout the lifespan. It points out that despite these data a large segment of the US population remain insufficiently active resulting in a high population attributable risk for chronic disease due to inactivity. The accumulated data support the need for more comprehensive health promoting physical activity policies and programs, especially for the economically and socially disadvantaged and medically underserved.

  2. Health-enhancing physical activity among Saudi adults using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ).

    PubMed

    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2007-01-01

    To describe the physical activity profile of Saudi adults living in Riyadh, using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short-version telephone format. Physical activity was assessed using the official Arabic short form of IPAQ, intended for use in telephone interview. The instrument asks for times spent in walking, moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity of at least 10 min duration. The sample consisted of 1616 Saudis, between 15 and 78 years of age, living in Riyadh. Participants were drawn from a list of names in the telephone book using a simple random method. Telephone interviews were administered during the spring of 2003 by trained male interviewers. The final sample size was 1064 Saudi males and females (response rate of 66%), with males comprising about 66% of the respondents. Over 43% of Saudis did not participate in any type of moderate-intensity physical activity lasting for at least 10 min. More than 72% of the sample did not engage in any type of vigorous-intensity physical activity lasting for at least 10 min. The proportion of Saudis who walked for 150 min or more per week was 33.3%. Females were engaged more in moderate physical activity than males, whereas males participated more in vigorous activity compared with females. Activity levels did not show significant relationships with education level or job hours per week. Based on the three activity categories established by IPAQ, 40.6% of Saudis were inactive, 34.3% were minimally active and 25.1% were physically active. Physical inactivity increased with advancing age. The data suggest that the prevalence of physical inactivity among Saudis adults is relatively high. Efforts are needed to encourage Saudis to be more physically active, with the goal of increasing the proportion of Saudis engaging in health-enhancing physical activity.

  3. Training Mental Health Professionals in Child Sexual Abuse: Curricular Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Maureen C; Abreu, Roberto L

    2015-01-01

    Given the incidence of child sexual abuse in the United States, mental health professionals need training to detect, assess, and treat victims and should possess a clear understanding of the process of victimization. However, many mental health professionals who work with children and families have not been exposed to any training in child sexual abuse during their formal education. This article will examine the need for such training, suggest critical components of child sexual abuse training, and describe various methods of training (e.g., in person, Web-based, and community resources).

  4. Training opportunities for public health in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Shisana, O

    1994-03-01

    South Africa has 4 public health training institutions: the Transvaal School of Public Health, the Public Health Programme of the University of the Western Cape, the Natal Institute of Community Health Education, and the Eastern Cape School of Public Health. They are interinstitutional (universities, polytechnic schools, health service providers, statutory research councils, and nongovernmental organizations). A steering committee heads up each institution. One person leads the committee, managing all activities and making sure that all activities fulfill the requirements of the steering committee. The Epidemiological Society of Southern Africa also contributes to public health training through its annual forum for public health researchers and meetings of public health personnel, where they talk about public health training needs. Interest in public health training reemerged in the late 1980s, mainly due to the dismantling of apartheid, which called for a restructuring of the public health service. Primary health care is the focus of all South Africa's public health institutions. Courses convey community-oriented approaches in the design of health programs and research. They use a multidisciplinary approach to education. They examine socioeconomic conditions affecting health as well as the biomedical aspects of public health. The Transvaal School of Public Health targets post-basic and post-graduate health staff at the middle or senior level positions. On the other hand, the Eastern Cape School of Public Health targets field workers, primary health care workers, and public health professionals. Currently, the programs only provide a Master of Public Health. As South Africa makes its way to democracy and with adequate funding, public health training in South Africa will result in positive efforts helping all of Africa.

  5. An evaluation of physical activity training in Australian medical school curricula.

    PubMed

    Strong, Abigail; Stoutenberg, Mark; Hobson-Powell, Anita; Hargreaves, Mark; Beeler, Halle; Stamatakis, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the current level of physical activity (PA) training provided to Australian medical students. Individual interviews were completed via phone interview or online survey from June-October 2015. Program leaders from Australian medical schools, who were knowledgeable about their curriculum content, were invited to participate in the study. The number of programs, hours of PA training instruction, institutional attitude towards offering PA, barriers experienced, and content areas in which PA training was offered, were explored. Seventeen of the 19 (89%) Australian medical schools participated in the study. Among the responding schools, 15 (88.2%) reported providing specific PA training to medical students. Thirteen of these 15 schools (86.7%) taught the national aerobic guidelines while only seven (46.7%) taught the national strength training recommendations. Four, five, and six year programs reported providing an average of 6.6, 5.0, and 12.3h of PA training, respectively, across their entire curriculum. Only 42.9% of the schools that had PA training reported that it was sufficient for their medical students. Nearly half (41.2%) of the respondents reported no barriers to implementing PA training into their medical curricula. Most Australian medical schools reported including some PA training in their medical curriculum. Key topics, such as the national strength recommendations, however, were not taught by most schools. Given the importance of PA for the prevention and treatment of numerous mental and physical health outcomes, it is unlikely that the attention it currently receives adequately prepares medical students to treat patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Tobacco Cessation Counseling Training in US Entry-Level Physical Therapist Education Curricula: Prevalence, Content, and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gurka, Matthew J.; Jones, Dina L.; Kershner, Ruth E.; Ohtake, Patricia J.; Stauber, William T.; Swisher, Anne K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The US Public Health Service (USPHS) recommends tobacco cessation counseling (TCC) training for all health care professionals. Within physical therapist practice, smoking can have adverse effects on treatment outcomes in all body systems. In addition, people with physical disabilities have a higher smoking prevalence than the general population, creating a strong need for tobacco cessation among physical therapy clientele. Therefore, TCC training is an important component of entry-level physical therapist education. Objective The aims of this study were: (1) to determine need for TCC training within entry-level physical therapist education and (2) to identify potential barriers to implementation of USPHS guidelines in the academic environment. Design A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted. Methods Directors or academic coordinators of clinical education from entry-level physical therapist programs (N=204) were surveyed using an online instrument designed specifically for this study. Data regarding program and faculty characteristics, tobacco-related training content, and faculty opinions toward TCC in both physical therapist practice and education were analyzed descriptively. Results The response rate was 71%. A majority (60%) of programs indicated inclusion of tobacco-related training, most commonly 1 to 2 hours in duration, and of these programs, 40% trained students in the implementation of USPHS clinical guidelines for TCC. Limitations Data analyses were constrained by limited or missing data in some areas. A single faculty member completed the survey for each program. Conclusions There is a need for TCC training in entry-level physical therapist education. Inclusion may be facilitated by addressing perceived barriers toward TCC as a component of physical therapist practice and promoting the relevance of TCC as it relates to intended outcomes of physical therapy interventions. PMID:24830717

  7. Building global alliances for public health nutrition training.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Mark A; Galal, Osman; Margetts, Barrie M; Yngve, Agneta

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review of opportunities and challenges for future progress in building intercountry, regional, and global alliances for public health nutrition training. Drawing on experiences from developing, implementing, and evaluating public health nutrition training in Australasia, Europe, and the Middle East, suggestions are provided for building a network of global training activities. Opportunities are described in areas such as standardization of course competencies and registration schemes, resource sharing, student and trainer exchange programs, and professional development. Challenges are identified and options presented for building global alliances in public health nutrition training into the future.

  8. Role of physical and mental training in brain network configuration

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Philip P.

    2015-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the topology of brain networks is constructed by connecting nodes which may be continuously remodeled by appropriate training. Efficiency of physical and/or mental training on the brain relies on the flexibility of networks' architecture molded by local remodeling of proteins and synapses of excitatory neurons producing transformations in network topology. Continuous remodeling of proteins of excitatory neurons is fine-tuning the scaling and strength of excitatory synapses up or down via regulation of intra-cellular metabolic and regulatory networks of the genome-transcriptome-proteome interface. Alzheimer's disease is a model of “energy cost-driven small-world network disorder” with dysfunction of high-energy cost wiring as the network global efficiency is impaired by the deposition of an informed agent, the amyloid-β, selectively targeting high-degree nodes. In schizophrenia, the interconnectivity and density of rich-club networks are significantly reduced. Training-induced homeostatic synaptogenesis-enhancement, presumably via reconfiguration of brain networks into greater small-worldness, appears essential in learning, memory, and executive functions. A macroscopic cartography of creation-removal of synaptic connections in a macro-network, and at the intra-cellular scale, micro-networks regulate the physiological mechanisms for the preferential attachment of synapses. The strongest molecular relationship of exercise and functional connectivity was identified for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The allele variant, rs7294919, also shows a powerful relationship with the hippocampal volume. How the brain achieves this unique quest of reconfiguration remains a puzzle. What are the underlying mechanisms of synaptogenesis promoting communications brain ↔ muscle and brain ↔ brain in such trainings? What is the respective role of independent mental, physical, or combined-mental-physical trainings? Physical practice seems to be

  9. Role of physical and mental training in brain network configuration.

    PubMed

    Foster, Philip P

    2015-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the topology of brain networks is constructed by connecting nodes which may be continuously remodeled by appropriate training. Efficiency of physical and/or mental training on the brain relies on the flexibility of networks' architecture molded by local remodeling of proteins and synapses of excitatory neurons producing transformations in network topology. Continuous remodeling of proteins of excitatory neurons is fine-tuning the scaling and strength of excitatory synapses up or down via regulation of intra-cellular metabolic and regulatory networks of the genome-transcriptome-proteome interface. Alzheimer's disease is a model of "energy cost-driven small-world network disorder" with dysfunction of high-energy cost wiring as the network global efficiency is impaired by the deposition of an informed agent, the amyloid-β, selectively targeting high-degree nodes. In schizophrenia, the interconnectivity and density of rich-club networks are significantly reduced. Training-induced homeostatic synaptogenesis-enhancement, presumably via reconfiguration of brain networks into greater small-worldness, appears essential in learning, memory, and executive functions. A macroscopic cartography of creation-removal of synaptic connections in a macro-network, and at the intra-cellular scale, micro-networks regulate the physiological mechanisms for the preferential attachment of synapses. The strongest molecular relationship of exercise and functional connectivity was identified for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The allele variant, rs7294919, also shows a powerful relationship with the hippocampal volume. How the brain achieves this unique quest of reconfiguration remains a puzzle. What are the underlying mechanisms of synaptogenesis promoting communications brain ↔ muscle and brain ↔ brain in such trainings? What is the respective role of independent mental, physical, or combined-mental-physical trainings? Physical practice seems to be

  10. Evaluation of Consumer Health Training and Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellogg, Muriel; And Others

    PL89-749, passed in 1966, included a number of provisions for increasing participation of consumers in the improvement of the health care delivery system, including development of training programs to equip consumers for participation in the health planning process. The evaluation attempts to ascertain the direct effect of training programs on…

  11. Building the Future: The Maternal and Child Health Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athey, Jean; Kavanagh, Laura; Bagley, Karen; Hutchins, Vince

    This report describes the role of the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Training Program in planning and supporting training designed to produce state, community, university, and professional association leaders who can advocate for children and mothers and continue to effect change that saves lives and enhances health. The Maternal and Child Health…

  12. Personal Health Training Manual. Core Curriculum Resource Material. TR-21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This personal health training manual, intended for all Peace Corps volunteers, presents a series of training sessions dealing with basic health concepts and practices; it is designed to be used by Peace Corps Medical Officers and trainers to help trainees acquire the understanding, skills, and motivation necessary to keep themselves healthy in a…

  13. Health-Promoting Effects of Serial vs. Integrated Combined Strength and Aerobic Training.

    PubMed

    Karatrantou, K; Gerodimos, V; Häkkinen, K; Zafeiridis, A

    2017-01-01

    Combined strength and aerobic training programs are widely used for improving markers of physical fitness and health. We compared the efficiency of a serial and an integrated combined training program on health and overall fitness in middle-aged females. 54 females (46.7±4.5yrs) were assigned to a serial (SCG) or an integrated (ICG) combined training group or to a control group (CG). The SCG and ICG performed a 3-month training combining aerobic dance and calisthenics. The 2 training programs differ in the sequence of aerobic and strength exercises. SCG performed the strength exercises prior to aerobic; in ICG, the aerobic and strength exercises were altered in a predetermined order. Body composition/circumferences, blood pressure, respiratory function, flexibility, balance, muscle strength/endurance, power and aerobic capacity were measured before and after training. SCG and ICG significantly increased muscle strength and endurance, power, aerobic capacity, flexibility, balance, fat-free mass and respiratory function (p<0.001-0.05), while significant reductions were observed for blood pressure, heart rate and body fat/circumferences (p<0.001-0.05). However, there were no significant differences between SCG and ICG after training. Serial and integrated combined training programs confer analogous adaptations and can be used interchangeably for counteracting the detrimental effects of sedentary lifestyle on indices of physical fitness and health. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Toilet Training: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Plan (American Academy of Pediatrics) Also in Spanish Potty Training: How to Get the Job Done ( ... Child (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Related Issues Cognitive and Verbal Skills Needed for ...

  15. Exercise training improves physical function and fitness in long-term paediatric brain tumour survivors treated with cranial irradiation.

    PubMed

    Piscione, P J; Bouffet, E; Timmons, B; Courneya, K S; Tetzlaff, D; Schneiderman, J E; de Medeiros, C B; Bartels, U; Mabbott, D J

    2017-07-01

    We examined the efficacy of exercise training for improving physical functioning and cardiopulmonary fitness in survivors of paediatric brain tumours (BTs) treated with cranial irradiation. We conducted a controlled clinical trial with crossover of exercise training versus no training in the community in either a group or combined group/home setting. A volunteer sample of 28 children treated with cranial irradiation for brain tumours completed training (mean age = 11.53 years; mean time since diagnosis = 5.25 years). end-points were physical functioning assessed by four subtests from the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of motor performance (BOT-2) and pro-rated work rate from a cycle ergometer. Linear mixed modelling was used to evaluate time, training, training setting, and carryover effects. Adherence to training was 84%. Performance on the BOT-2 was below average for all assessments. However, training resulted in improvement in bilateral coordination (F (1, 30) = 6.59, p = 0.02), irrespective of training setting and improved performance was maintained even approximately 12°weeks after training had ended (F (1, 24) = 9.60, p = 0.005). Training resulted in increased pro-rated work rate for participants in the group training setting only (F (1, 25) = 4.57, p = 0.04) and these participants maintained their improved work rate approximately 12°weeks after training had ended (F (1, 20) = 8.38, p = 0.01). Exercise training improves physical functioning and fitness in paediatric BT survivors. Exercise interventions that ameliorate adverse physical effects and promote health in long-term survivors are highly recommended in this vulnerable population. (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01944761). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional strength training: Seated machine vs standing cable training to improve physical function in elderly.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Anoop; Martins, Maria M; De Faveri, Frederico G; Alan, Ozgur; Cetinkaya, Funda; Signorile, Joseph F

    2016-09-01

    The majority of the strength training studies in older adults have incorporated fixed-form exercises using seated resistance training machines. In light of the modest improvements in physical function shown in these studies, functional or task-specific exercises, involving movement patterns that mimic daily activities, have been studied. Free-form exercises, using free-weights or cable, is another form of functional strength training. Currently, no intervention studies exist comparing free-form exercises, using cable machines, and fixed-form exercises, using seated machines in older adults. A total of 29 independently-living older adults, 65years or older, were randomized into two groups, seated machine (SM, n=10) and standing cable (SC, n=12). After 12weeks of training twice per week, groups were compared. The primary outcome was the Physical Performance Battery (PPB), a measure of physical function. Secondary outcomes were lower and upper body strength and power, activities of daily living evaluated by multiple tests including: Physical Performance Test (PPT), pan carry and gallon jug transfers, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and self-reported function using Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Outcome assessors were blinded to participants' intervention assignments. The PPB (SC=0.23 points; SM=0.15 points) showed clinical and significant improvements, but there was no significant difference between the groups (g=0.2, 95% CI (-0.6, 1.0). For secondary outcomes, chair stand (g=0.7, 95% CI (0.2, 1.6), p=0.03) and pan carry (g=0.8, 95% CI (0.07, 1.07), p=0.04) favored SC, while chest press 1RM (g=0.2, 95% CI (0.06, 1.1), p=0.02) favored SM. There were no statistically significant group differences between PPB, gallon jug transfer, leg press 1RM, power, RPE or self-reported function. Standing cable training was not superior to seated machine training in improving physical performance in older adults. However, both training

  17. The University of Michigan Student Health Physics Society's Radiation and Health Physics World Wide Web Site.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Jonathan G; West, W Geoffrey; Wagner, Eric; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2005-05-01

    The University of Michigan Student Health Physics Society's (UMSHPS) Radiation and Health Physics World Wide Web Site is an informative database of radiation and health physics related topics. With over 1,000 visitors each day, the UMSHPS web site provides professionals and the general public with a valuable resource for information and research. Users of this site can either search for information by topic or submit questions directly to the qualified members the national Health Physics Society. During the past year, progress has been made in replacing the site's older, less versatile framework with new search engines and refined submittal forms, as well as a "Frequently Asked Questions" section. Within the database, references will include brief summaries of the site's available information and target audience. Although these changes have been beneficial for the site, the UMSHPS continuously seeks professional opinions and ideas to further the services that this online resource can provide to the profession and to the general public.

  18. Operational Physical Performance and Fitness in Military Women: Physiological, Musculoskeletal Injury, and Optimized Physical Training Considerations for Successfully Integrating Women Into Combat-Centric Military Occupations.

    PubMed

    Nindl, Bradley C; Jones, Bruce H; Van Arsdale, Stephanie J; Kelly, Karen; Kraemer, William J

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes presentations from a 2014 United States Department of Defense (DoD) Health Affairs Women in Combat symposium addressing physiological, musculoskeletal injury, and optimized physical training considerations from the operational physical performance section. The symposium was held to provide a state-of-the-science meeting on the U.S. DoD's rescinding of the ground combat exclusion policy opening up combat-centric occupations to women. Physiological, metabolic, body composition, bone density, cardiorespiratory fitness, and thermoregulation differences between men and women were briefly reviewed. Injury epidemiological data are presented within military training and operational environments demonstrating women to be at a higher risk for musculoskeletal injuries than men. Physical training considerations for improved muscle strength and power, occupational task performance, load carriage were also reviewed. Particular focus of this article was given to translating physiological and epidemiological findings from the literature on these topics toward actionable guidance and policy recommendations for military leaders responsible for military physical training doctrine: (1) inclusion of resistance training with special emphasis on strength and power development (i.e., activation of high-threshold motor units and recruitment of type II high-force muscle fibers), upper-body strength development, and heavy load carriage, (2) moving away from "field expediency" as the major criteria for determining military physical training policy and training implementation, (3) improvement of load carriage ability with emphasis placed on specific load carriage task performance, combined with both resistance and endurance training, and (4) providing greater equipment resources, coaching assets, and increased training time dedicated to physical readiness training. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  19. Building health care system capacity: training health care professionals in disaster preparedness health care coalitions.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lauren; Craddock, Hillary; Gulley, Kelly; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth W

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to learn from the experiences of well-established, disaster preparedness-focused health care coalition (HCC) leaders for the purpose of identifying opportunities for improved delivery of disaster-health principles to health professionals involved in HCCs. This report describes current HCC education and training needs, challenges, and promising practices. A semi-structured interview was conducted with a sample of leaders of nine preparedness-focused HCCs identified through a 3-stage purposive strategy. Transcripts were analyzed qualitatively. Training needs included: stakeholder engagement; economic sustainability; communication; coroner and mortuary services; chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE); mass-casualty incidents; and exercise design. Of these identified training needs, stakeholder engagement, economic sustainability, and exercise design were relevant to leaders within HCCs, as opposed to general HCC membership. Challenges to education and training included a lack of time, little-to-no staff devoted to training, and difficulty getting coalition members to prioritize training. Promising practices to these challenges are also presented. The success of mature coalitions in improving situational awareness, promoting planning, and enabling staff- and resource-sharing suggest the strengths and opportunities that are inherent within these organizations. However, offering effective education and training opportunities is a challenge in the absence of ubiquitous support, incentives, or requirements among health care professions. Notably, an online resource repository would help reduce the burden on individual coalitions by eliminating the need to continually develop learning opportunities.

  20. Physical exercise training and neurovascular unit in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Feng, R; Li, W B; Ren, S Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-06-20

    Physical exercise could exert a neuroprotective effect in both clinical studies and animal experiments. A series of related studies have indicated that physical exercise could reduce infarct volume, alleviate neurological deficits, decrease blood-brain barrier dysfunction, promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system and increase the survival rate after ischemic stroke. In this review, we summarized the protective effects of physical exercise on neurovascular unit (NVU), including neurons, astrocytes, pericytes and the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that exercise training could decrease the blood-brain barrier dysfunction and promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system. An awareness of the exercise intervention benefits pre- and post stroke may lead more stroke patients and people with high-risk factors to accept exercise therapy for the prevention and treatment of stroke.

  1. [Physical activity and exercise training for patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Karila, C; Ravilly, S; Gauthier, R; Tardif, C; Neveu, H; Maire, J; Ramel, S; Cracowski, C; Legallais, P; Foure, H; Halm, A-M; Saugier, J; Bordas, G; Loire, N; Kirszenbaum, M; Dassonville, J; Mely, L; Wuyam, B; Giovannetti, P; Ouksel, H; Ellaffi, M; Denjean, A

    2010-04-01

    In France patients with cystic fibrosis benefit from a multidisciplinary follow-up in Cystic Fibrosis Centres. In this follow-up, despite the numerous therapeutic benefits of exercise in this disease, little emphasis is placed on the promotion of physical activity. The aim of this article is to improve this aspect of management, giving advice from a working group of experts, based on the medical literature and clinical experience. These proposals include quantification of physical activity, evaluation of exercise, training and rehabilitation programs and finally, modification of behaviour to include physical activity in the overall cystic fibrosis treatment strategy. It is intended to set up multicentre studies to evaluate the impact of these proposals. Copyright 2010 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Teaching the Physics of Energy While Traveling by Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, Katrina

    2013-02-01

    Pacific Lutheran University (Tacoma, WA) is renowned for the number of its courses that offer international and study-away opportunities. Inspired by the theme of sustainability, and my growing concern about the environmental impact of conventional fuels, I offered a course, Physics of Energy, for the first time during PLU's January 2011 term (a one-month semester). The two-week travel portion of the course took students on the Amtrak Coast Starlight train route from Tacoma, WA, to Los Angeles to study various forms of energy production. Students studied physics topics in the classroom, through hands-on activities, by traveling to energy research and production facilities, and while working on their interdisciplinary term projects. The course, which utilized local talent and focused on sustainability, provided a positive physics learning experience for majors and non-majors alike.

  3. 30 CFR 72.510 - Miner health training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Miner health training. 72.510 Section 72.510 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Areas of Underground Coal...

  4. 30 CFR 72.510 - Miner health training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Miner health training. 72.510 Section 72.510 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Areas of Underground Coal...

  5. 30 CFR 72.510 - Miner health training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Miner health training. 72.510 Section 72.510 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Areas of Underground Coal...

  6. 30 CFR 72.510 - Miner health training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Miner health training. 72.510 Section 72.510 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Areas of Underground Coal...

  7. 30 CFR 72.510 - Miner health training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Miner health training. 72.510 Section 72.510 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Areas of Underground Coal...

  8. Benefits of physical exercise training on cognition and quality of life in frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Francis; Vu, Thien Tuong Minh; Chassé, Kathleen; Dupuis, Gilles; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Bherer, Louis

    2013-05-01

    Frailty is a state of vulnerability associated with increased risks of fall, hospitalization, cognitive deficits, and psychological distress. Studies with healthy senior suggest that physical exercise can help improve cognition and quality of life. Whether frail older adults can show such benefits remains to be documented. A total of 83 participants aged 61-89 years were assigned to an exercise-training group (3 times a week for 12 weeks) or a control group (waiting list). Frailty was determined by a complete geriatric examination using specific criteria. Pre- and post-test measures assessed physical capacity, cognitive performance, and quality of life. Compared with controls, the intervention group showed significant improvement in physical capacity (functional capacities and physical endurance), cognitive performance (executive functions, processing speed, and working memory), and quality of life (global quality of life, leisure activities, physical capacity, social/family relationships, and physical health). Benefits were overall equivalent between frail and nonfrail participants. Physical exercise training leads to improved cognitive functioning and psychological well-being in frail older adults.

  9. Culturally Competent Training Program: A Key to Training Lay Health Advisors for Promoting Breast Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Mei-yu; Song, Lixin; Seetoo, Amy; Cai, Cuijuan; Smith, Gary; Oakley, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    The lay health advisor (LHA) training program for breast cancer screening was conducted among Chinese-English bilingual trainees residing in Southeast Michigan. Guided by Bandura's Social Learning Theory, the development of the training curriculum followed the health communication process recommended by the National Cancer Institute. Data analysis…

  10. The Infant Parent Training Institute: A Developmental Model for Training Infant Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arons, Judith; Epstein, Ann; Sklan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Infant Parent Training Institute (IPTI) at Jewish Family and Children's Service of Greater Boston offers integrated clinical and theoretical infant mental health training. The curriculum reflects the belief that nurturing and reflective relationships promote optimal learning and growth. A specialty in infant mental health requires knowledge…

  11. Culturally Competent Training Program: A Key to Training Lay Health Advisors for Promoting Breast Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Mei-yu; Song, Lixin; Seetoo, Amy; Cai, Cuijuan; Smith, Gary; Oakley, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    The lay health advisor (LHA) training program for breast cancer screening was conducted among Chinese-English bilingual trainees residing in Southeast Michigan. Guided by Bandura's Social Learning Theory, the development of the training curriculum followed the health communication process recommended by the National Cancer Institute. Data analysis…

  12. The Infant Parent Training Institute: A Developmental Model for Training Infant Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arons, Judith; Epstein, Ann; Sklan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Infant Parent Training Institute (IPTI) at Jewish Family and Children's Service of Greater Boston offers integrated clinical and theoretical infant mental health training. The curriculum reflects the belief that nurturing and reflective relationships promote optimal learning and growth. A specialty in infant mental health requires knowledge…

  13. New health physics perspectives affecting instrumentation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.

    1983-06-01

    Measurements obtained from health physics instrumentation are basic to the radiation control process and are used by management to assure that radiation exposures are kept within limits specified by national-international authorities. Because of this inseparable relationship, health physics instrumentation must be keyed on a continuing basis to changes in radiation exposure standards. In the last five years, there have been dramatic changes to the basic radiation protection standards. These changes should be evaluated in the context of the need for corresponding changes in instrumentation technology. At the time these assessments are made, care must be exercised to assure that radiation protection standards are not dictated by inadequate state-of-the-art technology. It is imperative that the development pathway to be followed be properly structured. This is particularly true for ''critical'' instrumentation standards i.e., those standards directly related to the determination of the radiation status of the worker, public, and their environment.

  14. Training providers: beyond the basics of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Training is a critical part of health information technology implementations, but little emphasis is placed on post-implementation training to support day-to-day activities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-implementation training on key electronic health record activities. Methods Based on feedback from providers and requests for technical support, we developed two classes designed to improve providers’ effectiveness with the electronic health record. Training took place at Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic States. The classes focused on managing patient-level information using problem lists and medication lists, as well as efficient documentation and chart review. Both classes used the blended learning method, integrating concrete scenarios, hands-on exercises and take-home materials to reinforce class concepts. To evaluate training effectiveness, we used a case–control study with a 1:4 match on pre-training performance. We measured the usage rate of two key electronic health record functions (problem list and medication list management) for six months before and after training. Change scores were compared using the Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results 36 participants and 144 non-participants were included in the training evaluation. Training participants were more likely to manage both medication lists and problem lists after training. Class material is now being incorporated into an enterprise-wide multi-modal training program available to all providers at Kaiser Permanente in the Mid-Atlantic States. Conclusions Ongoing information technology training is well-received by healthcare providers, who expressed a clear preference for additional training. Training improved use of two important electronic health record features that are included as part of the Meaningful Use criteria. PMID:24295150

  15. Global health training in US graduate psychiatric education.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Alexander C; Fricchione, Gregory L; Walensky, Rochelle P; Ng, Courtney; Bangsberg, David R; Kerry, Vanessa B

    2014-08-01

    Global health training opportunities have figured prominently into medical students' residency program choices across a range of clinical specialties. To date, however, the national scope of global mental health education has not heretofore been systematically assessed. We therefore sought to characterize the distribution of global health training opportunities in US graduate psychiatric education. We examined the web pages of all US psychiatry residency training programs, along with search results from a systematic Google query designed to identify global health training opportunities. Of the 183 accredited US psychiatry residency programs, we identified 17 programs (9.3%) offering 28 global health training opportunities in 64 countries. Ten psychiatry residency programs offered their residents opportunities to participate in one or more elective-based rotations, eight offered research activities, and six offered extended field-based training. Most global health training opportunities occurred within the context of externally administered, institution-wide initiatives generally available to residents from a range of clinical specialties, rather than within internally administered departmental initiatives specifically tailored for psychiatry residents. There are relatively few global health training opportunities in US graduate psychiatric education. These activities have a clear role in enhancing mastery of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies, but important challenges related to program funding and evaluation remain.

  16. On your time: online training for the public health workforce.

    PubMed

    Kenefick, Hope Worden; Ravid, Sharon; MacVarish, Kathleen; Tsoi, Jennifer; Weill, Kenny; Faye, Elizabeth; Fidler, Anne

    2014-03-01

    The need for competency-based training for the public health workforce is well documented. However, human and financial resource limitations within public health agencies often make it difficult for public health practitioners to attend classroom-based training programs. The Internet is an increasingly popular way of extending training beyond the workforce. Although research describes attributes of effective online learning modules, much of the available training delivered via the Internet does not incorporate such attributes. The authors describe the On Your Time training series, an effective distance education program and training model for public health practitioners, which includes a standardized process for development, review, evaluation, and continuous quality improvement. On Your Time is a series of awareness-level (i.e., addressing what practitioners should know), competency-based training modules that address topics related to regulatory responsibilities of public health practitioners (e.g., assuring compliance with codes and regulations governing housing, retail food safety, private water supplies, hazardous and solid waste, on-site wastewater systems, etc.), public health surveillance, case investigation, disease prevention, health promotion, and emergency preparedness. The replicable model incorporates what is known about best practices for online training and maximizes available resources in the interests of sustainability.

  17. Assessing the Education and Training Needs of Nebraska's Public Health Workforce.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Brandon L; Johansson, Patrik; Nayar, Preethy; Apenteng, Bettye A; Opoku, Samuel; Nguyen, Anh

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the Great Plains Public Health Training Center (Grant #UB6HP22821) conducted an online survey of state and local health departments and the American Indian (tribal clinics, tribal health departments, and urban Indian clinic) public health workforce across three professional levels. The objectives of the needs assessment were to determine the competency levels of the state's public health workforce, assess gaps in public health competencies, identify public health training interests, needs, and preferences, and to determine the barriers and motivators to participate in public health training. The assessment was developed using the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice, Core Competencies for Public Health Professionals survey (1). The final assessment was created and piloted by numerous individuals representing practice and academia. Respondents identified cultural competency and communication skills as the two most important public health competency domains. Although the public health professionals perceived that they were least proficient in the area of policy development and program planning, participants identified the greatest needs for training in financial planning and management skills and analytical/assessment skills. In general, respondents preferred instructor-led interactive training sessions offered as onsite multi-day workshops or computer-based courses. Respondents identified obesity, health disparities, physical activity, chronic diseases, and diabetes as the top five public health topical areas. These priorities align with State and National public health plans. The findings of the needs assessment were used to tailor educational opportunities to build the capacity of Nebraska's public health system. Additionally, the results were used to develop workforce development plans for numerous local health departments throughout Nebraska.

  18. Health Policy Training: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Harry J; Smith, L Lerissa; McKool, Marissa; Mitchell, Denise N; Roth Bayer, Carey

    2015-12-23

    The context within which health care and public health systems operate is framed by health policies. There is growing consensus about the need for increased health policy leadership and a health professional workforce prepared to assume these leadership roles. At the same time, there is strong evidence supporting the need for a broader policy lens and the need to intentionally target health disparities. We reviewed the published literature between 1983 and 2013 regarding health policy training. From 5124 articles identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Articles varied across common themes including target audience, goal(s), health policy definition, and core curricular content. The majority of articles were directed to medical or nursing audiences. Most articles framed health policy as health care policy and only a small number adopted a broader health in all policies definition. Few articles specifically addressed vulnerable populations or health disparities. The need for more rigorous research and evaluation to inform health policy training is compelling. Providing health professionals with the knowledge and skills to engage and take leadership roles in health policy will require training programs to move beyond their limited health care-oriented health policy framework to adopt a broader health and health equity in all policies approach.

  19. Health Policy Training: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Heiman, Harry J.; Smith, L. Lerissa; McKool, Marissa; Mitchell, Denise N.; Roth Bayer, Carey

    2015-01-01

    The context within which health care and public health systems operate is framed by health policies. There is growing consensus about the need for increased health policy leadership and a health professional workforce prepared to assume these leadership roles. At the same time, there is strong evidence supporting the need for a broader policy lens and the need to intentionally target health disparities. We reviewed the published literature between 1983 and 2013 regarding health policy training. From 5124 articles identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Articles varied across common themes including target audience, goal(s), health policy definition, and core curricular content. The majority of articles were directed to medical or nursing audiences. Most articles framed health policy as health care policy and only a small number adopted a broader health in all policies definition. Few articles specifically addressed vulnerable populations or health disparities. The need for more rigorous research and evaluation to inform health policy training is compelling. Providing health professionals with the knowledge and skills to engage and take leadership roles in health policy will require training programs to move beyond their limited health care-oriented health policy framework to adopt a broader health and health equity in all policies approach. PMID:26703657

  20. Students' Motivation, Physical Activity Levels, & Health-Related Physical Fitness in Middle School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Newton, Maria; Carson, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the predictive utility of students' motivation (self-efficacy and task values) to their physical activity levels and health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength/endurance) in middle school fitness activity classes. Participants (N = 305) responded to questionnaires assessing their self-efficacy…

  1. Students' Motivation, Physical Activity Levels, & Health-Related Physical Fitness in Middle School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Newton, Maria; Carson, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the predictive utility of students' motivation (self-efficacy and task values) to their physical activity levels and health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength/endurance) in middle school fitness activity classes. Participants (N = 305) responded to questionnaires assessing their self-efficacy…

  2. HotSpot Health Physics Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Homann, S. G.

    2013-04-18

    The HotSpot Health Physics Codes were created to provide emergency response personnel and emergency planners with a fast, field-portable set of software tools for evaluating insidents involving redioactive material. The software is also used for safety-analysis of facilities handling nuclear material. HotSpot provides a fast and usually conservative means for estimation the radiation effects associated with the short-term (less than 24 hours) atmospheric release of radioactive materials.

  3. Physical Activity, Health Benefits, and Mortality Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinos, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A plethora of epidemiologic evidence from large studies supports unequivocally an inverse, independent, and graded association between volume of physical activity, health, and cardiovascular and overall mortality. This association is evident in apparently healthy individuals, patients with hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular disease, regardless of body weight. Moreover, the degree of risk associated with physical inactivity is similar to, and in some cases even stronger than, the more traditional cardiovascular risk factors. The exercise-induced health benefits are in part related to favorable modulations of cardiovascular risk factors observed by increased physical activity or structured exercise programs. Although the independent contribution of the exercise components, intensity, duration, and frequency to the reduction of mortality risk is not clear, it is well accepted that an exercise volume threshold defined at caloric expenditure of approximately 1,000 Kcal per week appears to be necessary for significant reduction in mortality risk. Further reductions in risk are observed with higher volumes of energy expenditure. Physical exertion is also associated with a relatively low and transient increase in risk for cardiac events. This risk is significantly higher for older and sedentary individuals. Therefore, such individuals should consult their physician prior to engaging in exercise. “Walking is man’s best medicine”Hippocrates PMID:23198160

  4. [The importance of physical activity and fitness for human health].

    PubMed

    Brandes, M

    2012-01-01

    The decline of physical activity is considered to play an important role in the deterioration of health predictors, such as overweight, and the associated increase of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Therefore, most interventional strategies aim for increasing physical activity. Instead of physical activity, some studies use physical fitness as a key variable. Though physical fitness is influenced by genetic factors, physical fitness has to be developed by physical activity. As recent reports demonstrate the prospective associations between physical fitness and health and mortality, these associations are not reported for physical activity. Due to the fact that physical fitness-in contrast to physical activity-is evaluated with standardized laboratory measurements, it appears advisable to assess physical fitness for prospective health perspectives. Although physical fitness is determined by genetics, physical activity is the primary modifiable determinant for increasing physical fitness and should be aimed for to improve physical fitness in interventional strategies.

  5. Physical Fitness Influences Stress Reactions to Extreme Military Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-09

    Research Center, 140 Sylvester Road, San Diego, CA 92106. tJohns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205...examining individual differences in buman perfor- 738 MILITARY MEDICINE, Vol. 173, August 2008 Physical Fitness and Military Stress manee and stress

  6. Nutritional intervention and physical training in malnourished frail community-dwelling elderly persons carried out by trained lay “buddies”: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In elderly persons frailty and malnutrition are very common and can lead to serious health hazards such as increased mortality, morbidity, dependency, institutionalization and a reduced quality of life. In Austria, the prevalence of frailty and malnutrition are increasing steadily and are becoming a challenge for our social system. Physical training and adequate nutrition may improve this situation. Methods/design In this randomized controlled trial, 80 malnourished frail community-dwelling patients (≥ 65 years) hospitalized at wards for internal medicine are recruited. Additionally, 80 lay volunteers (≥ 50 years), named buddies are recruited and subsequently trained regarding health enhancing physical activity and nutrition in four standardized training sessions. These buddies visit the malnourished frail persons at home twice a week for about one hour during an initial period of 10–12 weeks. While participants allocated to the intervention group (n = 40) receive intervention to improve their fluid intake, protein and energy intake, perform strength training and try to increase their baseline activities, the control group (n = 40) only gets home visits without any intervention. After 10–12 weeks, both, the intervention and the control group, receive the nutritional intervention and the physical training. Health, nutritional and frailty status, physical fitness, body composition and chronic inflammation of buddies and frail persons are recorded before the intervention, after 10–12 weeks, 6 and 12 months. Discussion To your knowledge this trial is the first of its kind to provide nutritional and physical activity interventions to malnourished frail community-dwelling persons by trained lay buddies, in which an improvement of the frail persons´ and the buddies’ health status is measured. This study assesses the efficacy of such an intervention and may offer new perspectives for the management of frailty and malnutrition. Trail

  7. Health information systems training for a countrywide implementation in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Margolis, A; Vero, A; Bessonart, L; Barbiel, A; Ferla, M

    2009-01-01

    Health Information systems training is one of the bottlenecks in clinical systems implementation. In this article, a strategy to massively create and train interdisciplinary coordinating teams is described for a project in Uruguay at FEMI, a non-academic setting which includes 23 health care institutions across the country and a tertiary referral center in Montevideo. A series of educational activities were designed for the local coordinating teams. They included both onsite and online formats, site visits, integrated with some of the project tasks. In total, 128 professionals from all the Institutions participated in one or more of the training sessions (onsite and online) and 87 of them accomplished one of the forms of training. Massive basic health informatics training was possible in Uruguay through collaboration with academic institutions at the country and regional level. Next steps include an active involvement of nurses in the educational events and planning of massive training of end users.

  8. Resources for development of training in public health and health managment in Eastern Europe: the Kaunas experience.

    PubMed

    Kalediene, Ramune

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the resources and steps required for development and evaluation of training in public health and management of public health as experienced in Kaunas University of Medicine, Lithuania. The transition from Departments of Social Medicine and Hygiene to a Faculty of Public Health of international standards requires a process of adaptation and development of human resources more than physical facilities. After restoration of independence in 1990, rapid development of training in public health was started in Lithuania. Great support was provided by the international projects Baltic Rim Partnership for Public Health (BRIMHEALTH) and European Union Trans-European Mobility Scheme for University Students (TEMPUS). Undergraduate and postgraduate training programs were successfully implemented in the Faculty of Public Health, Kaunas University of Medicine. Lithuanian experience could serve as an example of success and pitfalls in training a critical mass of professionals who should act as powerful advocates for health, promoting analysis, continuity and success of public health interventions, and health care reforms in countries in transition.

  9. Mental Health Consumer Experiences and Strategies When Seeking Physical Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Ewart, Stephanie B.; Bocking, Julia; Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert

    2016-01-01

    People with mental illness have higher rates of physical health problems and consequently live significantly shorter lives. This issue is not yet viewed as a national health priority and research about mental health consumer views on accessing physical health care is lacking. The aim of this study is to explore the experience of mental health consumers in utilizing health services for physical health needs. Qualitative exploratory design was utilized. Semistructured focus groups were held with 31 consumer participants. Thematic analysis revealed that three main themes emerged: scarcity of physical health care, with problems accessing diagnosis, advice or treatment for physical health problems; disempowerment due to scarcity of physical health care; and tenuous empowerment describing survival resistance strategies utilized. Mental health consumers were concerned about physical health and the nonresponsive health system. A specialist physical health nurse consultant within mental health services should potentially redress this gap in health care provision. PMID:28462330

  10. Influences of physical training on the heart of dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, H. L.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    To investigate the effects of physical training on cardiac dimensions and function, eight dogs were exercised for 12 weeks by treadmill running 1 hour/day, 5 days/week. Five dogs were confined in cages as controls for an 8-week period. Heart rates were monitored by telemetry during rest and exercise. Maximum QRS spatial magnitudes were calculated from records of McFee lead electrocardiograms. Left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions were determined radiographically by the bead and clip technique. Training produced statistically significant decreases in heart rate at rest and at a standard work load of 6.1 mph on a level treadmill and statistically significant increases in work load at a standard heart rate of 194 beats/min. Improvements were rapid during the first 4 weeks of training but gradual during the remaining 8 weeks. Training caused small but statistically significant increases in left ventricular end-diastolic wall thickness, estimated left ventricular mass, and maximum QRS spatial magnitude.

  11. Influences of physical training on the heart of dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, H. L.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    To investigate the effects of physical training on cardiac dimensions and function, eight dogs were exercised for 12 weeks by treadmill running 1 hour/day, 5 days/week. Five dogs were confined in cages as controls for an 8-week period. Heart rates were monitored by telemetry during rest and exercise. Maximum QRS spatial magnitudes were calculated from records of McFee lead electrocardiograms. Left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions were determined radiographically by the bead and clip technique. Training produced statistically significant decreases in heart rate at rest and at a standard work load of 6.1 mph on a level treadmill and statistically significant increases in work load at a standard heart rate of 194 beats/min. Improvements were rapid during the first 4 weeks of training but gradual during the remaining 8 weeks. Training caused small but statistically significant increases in left ventricular end-diastolic wall thickness, estimated left ventricular mass, and maximum QRS spatial magnitude.

  12. The fitness training unit in U.S. Army basic combat training: physical fitness, training outcomes, and injuries.

    PubMed

    Knapik, J J; Canham-Chervak, M; Hoedebecke, E; Hewitson, W C; Hauret, K; Held, C; Sharp, M A

    2001-04-01

    This study involved a retrospective examination of physical fitness, training outcomes, and injury rates among personnel in the Fitness Training Unit (FTU). Personnel were assigned to the FTU based on low performance on push-ups, sit-ups, and/or a 1-mile run (N = 44 men, 95 women) and received an augmented physical fitness program before basic combat training (BCT). They were compared with 712 men and 379 women who took the same test but were not assigned to the FTU and went directly to BCT. FTU and non-FTU personnel trained in the same battalions. Army Physical Fitness Test scores and BCT outcomes (discharged or completed BCT in 8 weeks) were obtained from unit training records. Injuries during BCT were documented from a review of the medical records. On entry to BCT, FTU women had similar 2-mile run times compared with non-FTU women (21.6 vs. 21.5 minutes, respectively; p = 0.86); FTU men were considerably slower on the 2-mile run than non-FTU men (20.3 vs. 17.3 minutes; p < 0.01). FTU women and non-FTU women had similar graduation success (60% vs. 68%, respectively; p = 0.14) and time-loss injury rates (1.3 vs. 1.4 people injured/100 person-days, respectively; p = 0.90). FTU men were less likely to graduate than non-FTU men (55% vs. 82%; p < 0.01) and more likely to suffer a time-loss injury (1.2 vs. 0.7 people injured/100 person-days; p < 0.01). Efforts should be directed toward providing a sufficient training stimulus to improve the aerobic fitness level of men (as well as women) in the FTU.

  13. Peer Training of Community Health Workers to Improve Heart Health Among African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Willock, Robina Josiah; Mayberry, Robert M.; Yan, Fengxia; Daniels, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Training community health workers (CHWs) builds a workforce that is essential to addressing the chronic disease crisis. This article describes a highly replicable CHW training program that targets heart disease risk among African American women. Background African American women suffer disproportionately from heart disease mortality and morbidity. Well-trained CHWs are uniquely positioned to close this disparity gap. Method We used a Learning Circle approach to train CHWs in heart health education. The curriculum blended web-based, self-directed learning and in-person peer coaching. CHWs learned through (a) peer-to-peer sharing, (b) problem solving and brainstorming, and (c) leadership and experiential activities. Training evaluation measures were CHWs' (a) self-confidence, (b) heart health knowledge, (c) satisfaction with training, (d) training retention, and (e) replication of training within 90 days after training. Results This training resulted in appreciable effects on four of five outcome measures. Heart health knowledge increased significantly among experienced CHWs (p = .011). CHWs were satisfied with training and retention was 100%. CHWs initiated and subsequently delivered 122 person hours of community heart health education and CHW training in their communities. Discussion/Conclusion CHW heart health training using Learning Circles is a practical and replicable method of training CHWs and holds significant potential for building capacity in resource-poor community organizations. PMID:24891525

  14. Effect of team sports and resistance training on physical function, quality of life, and motivation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, M T; Vorup, J; Nistrup, A; Wikman, J M; Alstrøm, J M; Melcher, P S; Pfister, G U; Bangsbo, J

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of team sports and resistance training on physical function, psychological health, quality of life, and motivation in older untrained adults. Twenty-five untrained men and forty-seven untrained women aged 80 (range: 67-93) years were recruited. Fifty-one were assigned to a training group (TRG) of which twenty-five performed team training (TG) and twenty-six resistance training (RG). The remaining twenty-one were allocated to a control group (CG). TRG trained for 1 hour twice a week for 12 weeks. Compared with CG, TRG improved the number of arm curls within 30 seconds (P<.05) and 30-seconds chair stand (P<.05) during the intervention. In TRG, participation in training led to higher (P<.05) scores in the subscales psychological well-being, general quality of life, and health-related quality of life, as well as decreased anxiety and depression levels. No differences between changes in TG and RG were found over the intervention period, neither in physical function tests nor psychological questionnaires. Both TG and RG were highly motivated for training, but TG expressed a higher degree of enjoyment and intrinsic motivation mainly due to social interaction during the activity, whereas RG was more motivated by extrinsic factors like health and fitness benefits. In conclusion, both team training and resistance training improved physical function, psychological well-being, and quality of life. However, team sport training motivated the participants more by intrinsic factors than resistance training.

  15. Health physics support for thermal shield repair at Connecticut Yankee

    SciTech Connect

    Nevelos, W.F.; Gates, W.J. )

    1988-10-01

    This article describes the radiation and safety controls used by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company to support underwater repair work on the Haddam Neck Plant's core barrel thermal shield. The work was conducted by divers in the reactor cavity using remote tools and protected by a specially-constructed physical barrier that restricted their movements to a carefully defined and thoroughly surveyed area. A unique dosimetry test rig was used to determine the dose rate profiles within the work areas, and all underwater survey equipment was qualified against personnel dosimetric devices. Underwater operations were monitored and controlled by remote means (video surveillance and dosimetry telemetry), and health physics technicians were rotated through job coverage to avoid complacency and maximize training opportunities. A single, hot particle event occurred during one dive, but this was identified almost immediately and controlled to prevent excessive exposure to the diver.

  16. Can We Improve Training for Health Professionals to Sustain Local Health Development?

    PubMed

    King, Stephen

    2016-11-01

    Can we improve training for health professionals? We explore specific variables that need to be accounted for to achieve sustainable local health development through training. A problem-based approach with appreciation of the need for making changes is suggested as the only authentic basis for training.

  17. Can We Improve Training for Health Professionals to Sustain Local Health Development?

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Can we improve training for health professionals? We explore specific variables that need to be accounted for to achieve sustainable local health development through training. A problem-based approach with appreciation of the need for making changes is suggested as the only authentic basis for training. PMID:28090174

  18. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 4. Recommendations on physical exercise training. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    PubMed

    Cléroux, J; Feldman, R D; Petrella, R J

    1999-05-04

    To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of regular physical activity on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults. People may engage in no, sporadic or regular physical activity that may be of low, moderate or vigorous intensity. For sedentary people with hypertension, the options are to undertake or maintain regular physical activity and to avoid or moderate medication use; to use another lifestyle modification technique; to commence or continue antihypertensive medication; or to take no action and remain at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The health outcomes considered were changes in blood pressure and in morbidity and mortality rates. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period 1966-1997 with the terms exercise, exertion, physical activity, hypertension and blood pressure. Both reports of trials and review articles were obtained. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of these articles, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to level of evidence. A high value was placed on avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by untreated hypertension. Physical activity of moderate intensity involving rhythmic movements with the lower limbs for 50-60 minutes, 3 or 4 times per week, reduces blood pressure and appears to be more effective than vigorous exercise. Harm is uncommon and is generally restricted to the musculoskeletal injuries that may occur with any repetitive activity. Injury occurs more often with jogging than with walking, cycling or swimming. The costs include the costs of appropriate shoes, garments and equipment, but these were not specifically measured. (1) People with mild hypertension should engage in 50-60 minutes

  19. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 4. Recommendations on physical exercise training. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Cleroux, J; Feldman, RD; Petrella, RJ

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of regular physical activity on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults. OPTIONS: People may engage in no, sporadic or regular physical activity that may be of low, moderate or vigorous intensity. For sedentary people with hypertension, the options are to undertake or maintain regular physical activity and to avoid or moderate medication use; to use another lifestyle modification technique; to commence or continue antihypertensive medication; or to take no action and remain at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. OUTCOMES: The health outcomes considered were changes in blood pressure and in morbidity and mortality rates. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period 1966-1997 with the terms exercise, exertion, physical activity, hypertension and blood pressure. Both reports of trials and review articles were obtained. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of these articles, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to level of evidence. VALUES: A high value was placed on avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by untreated hypertension. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Physical activity of moderate intensity involving rhythmic movements with the lower limbs for 50-60 minutes, 3 or 4 times per week, reduces blood pressure and appears to be more effective than vigorous exercise. Harm is uncommon and is generally restricted to the musculoskeletal injuries that may occur with any repetitive activity. Injury occurs more often with jogging than with walking, cycling or swimming. The costs include the costs of appropriate shoes, garments and equipment, but these were not specifically

  20. Adaptations to a new physical training program in the combat controller training pipeline.

    PubMed

    Walker, Thomas B; Lennemann, Lynette M; Anderson, Vint; Lyons, William; Zupan, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    The United States Air Force combat controller (CCT) training pipeline is extremely arduous and historically has a high attrition rate of 70 to 80%. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of incorporating a 711 Human Performance Wing (HPW) / Biobehavior, Bioassessment, and Biosurveillance Branch (RHPF)-developed physical fitness-training program into the combat controller (CCT) 5-level training physical fitness program. One-hundred-nine CCT trainees were tested and trained during their initial eight weeks at the 720th Special Tactics Training Squadron (STTS) at Hurlburt Field. Modifications to their physical training program were principally aimed at reducing overtraining and overuse injury, educating trainees and cadre on how to train smarter, and transitioning from traditional to "functional" PT. A battery of physiological measurements and a psychological test were administered prior to and immediately after trainees undertook an 8-week modified physical fitness training program designed to reduce overtraining and injury and improve performance. We performed multiple physical tests for cardiovascular endurance (VO₂max and running economy), "anaerobic" capacity (Wingate power and loaded running tests), body composition (skinfolds), power (Wingate and vertical jump), and reaction time (Makoto eye-hand test). We used the Mental Toughness Questionnaire 48 (MTQ-48) for the psychological test. We observed several significant improvements in physical and physiological performance over the eight weeks of training. Body composition improved by 16.2% (p < 0.05). VO₂max, time-to-exhaustion, and ventilatory threshold were all significantly higher after implementation of the new program than before it. We observed strong trends towards improvement in work accomplished during loaded running (p = 0.07) and in average power per body mass during lower body Wingate (p = 0.08). Other measures of lower body power did not change significantly over the

  1. Environmental health physics-50 years of progress.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Dade W

    2004-10-01

    Environmental health physics is an interdisciplinary field, involving study of the release, transport, and fate of radioactive material in the environment. Further, it addresses the interaction of humans with radioactive materials within the ambient (outdoor) environment and with the environments associated with modern technology and lifestyles. It also involves both naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides with the former generally being by far the highest source of exposure. In fact, doses from naturally occurring radionuclides are increasingly being used as a benchmark for the establishment of dose rate limits for people. Because of the pioneering work of early environmental health physicists, models exist today that can be used to assess the potential impacts of new nuclear facilities prior to their operation. In fact, these people represent the branch of the health physics profession who conducted environmental monitoring programs and performed the associated research studies that led to the identification of the principal radionuclides of interest, the major pathways and mechanisms through which they expose people, and the doses that may result from radioactive materials in the natural and technologically enhanced environments. One of their most important contributions was the identification and quantification of many of the key parameters that serve as input to such models. Monitoring of nuclear weapons development facilities used during and after World War II was the initial stimulus for the establishment of environmental health physics programs. Thereafter, these programs were expanded both nationally and globally, as a result of the atmospheric weapons testing programs of nations such as France, the People's Republic of China, the former Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Additional stimuli were provided by the development of the commercial nuclear power industry. Current environmental programs, particularly within

  2. Environmental health physics: 50 years of progress.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Dade W

    2005-06-01

    Environmental health physics is an interdisciplinary field, involving study of the release, transport, and fate of radioactive material in the environment. Further, it addresses the interaction of humans with radioactive materials within the ambient (outdoor) environment and with the environments associated with modern technology and lifestyles. It also involves both naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides with the former generally being by far the highest source of exposure. In fact, doses from naturally occurring radionuclides are increasingly being used as a benchmark for the establishment of dose rate limits for people. Because of the pioneering work of early environmental health physicists, models exist today that can be used to assess the potential impacts of new nuclear facilities prior to their operation. In fact, these people represent the branch of the health physics profession who conducted environmental monitoring programs and performed the associated research studies that led to the identification of the principal radionuclides of interest, the major pathways and mechanisms through which they expose people, and the doses that may result from radioactive materials in the natural and technologically enhanced environments. One of their most important contributions was the identification and quantification of many of the key parameters that serve as input to such models. Monitoring of nuclear weapons development facilities used during and after World War II was the initial stimulus for the establishment of environmental health physics programs. Thereafter, these programs were expanded both nationally and globally, as a result of the atmospheric weapons testing programs of nations such as France, the People's Republic of China, the former Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Additional stimuli were provided by the development of the commercial nuclear power industry. Current environmental programs, particularly within

  3. Integrated Health and Physical Education Program to Reduce Media Use and Increase Physical Activity in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clocksin, Brian D.; Wattson, Doris L.; Williams, Daniel P.; Randsell, Lynda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare an integrated health and physical education curriculum, focused on reducing media use and on increasing physical activity in middle school adolescents, to traditional and nonintegrated health and physical education curricula. Two middle schools' health and physical education classes were assigned to an…

  4. Physical Health: Individualized Health Incentive Program Modules for Physically Disabled Students for Grades Kindergarten Through Twelve. Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reggio, Kathryn D.; And Others

    Physical health is the focus of the third in a series of health education curriculum guides for physically handicapped students (grades K-12). An introductory section touches on physical health activities at the Human Resources School (Albertson, New York) and includes photographs of good health habits. The remainder of the document provides…

  5. Relevance, Flexibility and Recognition of Qualifications and Training in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferies, Derek Albert

    1992-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The thesis aims to identify the extent of relevance, flexibility and recognition of qualifications and training in physics in the UK and makes comparisons within an international context. Against a background of significant social and political change an assessment is made of the strengths, weaknesses and potential opportunities of the UK situation. As a basis for the research, consideration is given to the contribution of physics to current technological and social requirements as well as to the qualities which employers seek from physicists (Chapter 1). A review is made of educational routes for physicists in the EC and EFTA countries, the USA, Australasia and the (former) USSR (Chapter 2). Various forms of training for physicists at undergraduate and post-graduation levels are noted. It is seen that industrial organisations at the leading edge of technology place emphasis on the value of training and examples are given of co-operation between industry and academia in this respect (Chapter 3). An assessment is made of flexibility in arrangements for admission to and during degree course study. The contribution of credit accumulation and transfer schemes is taken into account. The relevance of degree courses to perceived needs is given consideration from various points of view (Chapter 4). Attempts to evaluate the comparability of educational standards are seen to be beset with problems. Detailed consideration is given to the EC First Directive on the mutual recognition of professional qualifications and a proposal is outlined for the introduction of a European professional title for physicists (Chapter 5). The investigations are then expanded and developed further and ways in which flexibility of study and recognition for physicists might be enhanced are proposed. An evaluation of UK performance and potential emphasises a need for strong collaboration in the international physics

  6. Physical fitness and health education program at NASA Headquarters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angotti, Cathy

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: policy procedures to enter the NASA Headquarters Physical Fitness and Health Program; eligibility; TDY eligibility; health promotions offered; and general facility management.

  7. The Intercultural Training of Mental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Paul

    This paper describes the Developing Interculturally Skilled Counselors (DISC) project, a three year training program designed to assess and articulate the need for cross-cultural counseling skills. A review of existing inservice or pre-service training programs is presented that suggests these programs are narrow in their approaches and…

  8. Homemaker Health Aide Service: Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration on Aging (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    TRaining women for homemaker service is an important function of every agency that provides such services. The Homemaker Service of the National Capital Area, Inc. designed a training manual to be used with either a single new employee or with a group as large as 15. Informal discussions, lectures, practice, and demonstration are methods of…

  9. Physics and Technological Training in Bulgarian Forge Craft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Petya N.; Velcheva, Keranka G.

    2010-01-01

    The contemporary world regenerates and preserves the traditions of decorative—applied art and the national crafts. This brings up young generation and helps them to uncover the sources of national culture. In the commonly educational system the technological training realizes succession of new methods for national and applied art. The aim is examination of the national crafts as technological processes for cultivation of different metal constructions. There are enforced physical laws here. Seven basic groups of forging methods consider in Bulgarian tradition craft as heat treatment, plastic deformation and applying of different tensions. This gives information about morphology of construction after applying of stress, enlarging or decreasing of the linear sizes, structure change and the change of physical and mechanical properties.

  10. [Nurses and public health: evolution of missions and trainings].

    PubMed

    Pommier, J; Deschamps, J P

    2004-06-01

    Reflection upon the role of nurses in public health is not something new; however, over the past few years, a questioning and similar reports have sprung up pointing to the difficulty perceived by nurses in reconciling their professional practice and public health. Currently, in light of the evolution of public health, where does the practice of nursing fit into public health practice? What are the potential movements and trends in terms of training? The goal of this paper is to present a number of possible avenues for thought on the subject, namely concerning the training and the allocation of competencies. It would be undoubtedly a pity to conceive of public health training today being intended only for nurses. It is rather preferable that post-graduate public health training is aimed at a variety of professional categories, regardless of their initial training or degree course. The development of schools of public health to which nurses could have access in the same way that other health professionals or from the social and educational fields do is critical. Above and beyond what is at stake for specialisation, and even independent of the implication of nurses in public health work, the current trend to re-balance the work and tasks of both nurses and doctors constitutes a significant challenge for public health.

  11. Effects of physical training and calcium intake on bone mineral density of students with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of physical training and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with mental retardation. Forty mentally retarded boys (age 7-10 years old) were randomly assigned to four groups (no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake and physical activity): training groups with or without calcium supplementation (Tr+Ca+ and Tr+Ca-) and nontraining groups with or without calcium supplementation (Tr-Ca+ and Tr-Ca-). The intervention involved 45 min of physical training performed 3 sessions a week and/or the addition of dietary calcium-rich food using enriched cow milk with vitamin D containing 230 mg calcium per serving, over 6 months. Paired-samples t-test and ANOVA analysis was used to determine the main and combined effects of training and calcium on BMD. All groups showed greater femoral neck BMD after 6 months. The increase in femoral neck BMD in the Tr+Ca+ group was 10% greater than increase in the Tr+Ca- group (not significant). Apparently, the effect of training was greater than calcium intake because the Tr+Ca- group achieved 4% greater BMD than Tr-Ca+ group (not significant). In this study, both training groups had greater BMD than the control group (Tr-Ca-) (P<0.05). In these participants with inadequate calcium intakes, additional exercise and calcium supplementation resulted in a 6-20% greater increase in BMD than controls at the loaded site (femoral neck). These results help to provide more evidence for public health organizations to deal with both exercise and nutrition issues in children for the achievement of peak BMD. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Education and Training for Health Professionals

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Classroom Series is a collection of webinars that highlights topics that provide the educational content, tools, and resources necessary for health professionals, especially those working in public health, to address cancer as a public health problem.

  13. IAI Training in Climate and Health in the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    The Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI) has addressed training in climate and health in the Americas in two major ways. First, IAI supports students to engage in research training. A multi-country health activity funded by IAI was the collaborative research network (CRN) on Diagnostics and Prediction of Human Health Impacts in the Tropical Americas, which focused principally on the effect of El Nino/Southern Oscillation and other aspects of climate variability on mosquito-borne diseases malaria and dengue. The CRN involved students in Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia and Jamaica. The CRN was also linked to other climate and health projects that used a similar approach. Second, IAI organizes training institutes to expand the network of global change research scientists and facilitate the transfer of global change research into practice. The IAI Training Institute on Climate and Health in the Americas was held on November 7 - 18, 2005 at the University of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica, engaging participants from the CRN and other programs in the Americas. The Training Institute's central objective was to help strengthen local and regional capacity to address the impacts of climate variability and climate change on human health in the populations of the Americas, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. The Training Institute had three core components: Science; Applications; and Proposal Development for Seed Grants. Recommendations for future Training Institutes included incorporating new technologies and communicating with policy-makers to develop more proactive societal strategies to manage risks.

  14. Worker health and safety training: assessing impact among responders.

    PubMed

    Weidner, B L; Gotsch, A R; Delnevo, C D; Newman, J B; McDonald, B

    1998-03-01

    A mail survey was conducted among emergency responders who received training at the New Jersey/New York Hazardous Materials Worker Training Center. Responses indicate that technical topics are extremely important (i.e., decontamination, personal protection); that the vast preponderance of trainees felt confident in their ability to recall specific critical concepts in a crisis; and that 42% of respondents (75) had experienced an incident that would have resulted in injury or death without training. Phone surveys for details of specific incidents reported by 43 of the 75 mail survey respondents revealed that anecdotal data provide powerful evidence of the value of training; that extensive and uniform training is needed across jurisdictions; that training should emphasize the technical aspects of health and safety, and should include demonstration and hands-on techniques; and that integrated organizational support for implementation of health and safety practices is critical.

  15. Teaching Ideas. Cardiovascular Health. Physical Activity: Fit to be Tried.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osness, Donna L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of a physical fitness unit within the health education curriculum is to help students understand the importance of physical fitness. Four physical activities for fourth to sixth grade students are described. (CJ)

  16. The intervention composed of aerobic training and non-exercise physical activity (I-CAN) study: Rationale, design and methods.

    PubMed

    Swift, Damon L; Dover, Sara E; Nevels, Tyara R; Solar, Chelsey A; Brophy, Patricia M; Hall, Tyler R; Houmard, Joseph A; Lutes, Lesley D

    2015-11-01

    Recent data has suggested that prolonged sedentary behavior is independent risk factor for cardiovascular and all-cause mortality independent of adequate amounts of moderate to vigorous physical activity. However, few studies have prospectively evaluated if exercise training and increasing non-exercise physical activity leads to greater reduction in cardiometabolic risk compared to aerobic training alone. The purpose of the Intervention Composed of Aerobic Training and Non-Exercise Physical Activity (I-CAN) study is to determine whether a physical activity program composed of both aerobic training (consistent with public health recommendations) and increasing non-exercise physical activity (3000 steps above baseline levels) leads to enhanced improvements in waist circumference, oral glucose tolerance, systemic inflammation, body composition, and fitness compared to aerobic training alone in obese adults (N=45). Commercially available accelerometers (Fitbits) will be used to monitor physical activity levels and behavioral coaching will be used to develop strategies of how to increase non-exercise physical activity levels. In this manuscript, we describe the design, rationale, and methodology associated with the I-CAN study.

  17. International training in health informatics: a Brazilian experience.

    PubMed

    Marin, Heimar F; Massad, Eduaro; Marques, Eduardo P; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2004-01-01

    Technology is transforming not only the practice of health-care but also professional training and educational models. Developing countries, such as Brazil, are increasingly suffering from a severe shortage of health informatics specialists. Training of professionals in this field is expensive, and there is a limited supply of high-quality teaching resources available. We envision that training in health informatics can be better achieved if cultural and technological barriers are anticipated and the training program is prepared accordingly. We describe our four-year experience of a Brazil/USA training program and discuss lessons learned during its implementation. Eleven onsite courses, one seminar, and two conferences were developed under this unique initiative, which made possible the collaboration among different countries and distinguished leaders in the field of medical informatics.

  18. The Influence of Specific Physical Health Conditions on Retirement Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Kenneth S.; Wang, Mo

    2007-01-01

    Physical health has consistently been shown to strongly influence the retirement decision-making process. Unfortunately, "physical health" is typically operationalized in global terms. As a result, we know little about the specific aspects of physical health that influence the decision to retire. Therefore, in the present study, data from three…

  19. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2004 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2005-03-01

    This annual report details the the number of health physics bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded at a sampling of academic programs from 1998-2004. It also looks at health physics degrees by curriculum and the number of students enrolled in health physics degree programs at 28 U.S. universities in 2004.

  20. The Influence of Specific Physical Health Conditions on Retirement Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Kenneth S.; Wang, Mo

    2007-01-01

    Physical health has consistently been shown to strongly influence the retirement decision-making process. Unfortunately, "physical health" is typically operationalized in global terms. As a result, we know little about the specific aspects of physical health that influence the decision to retire. Therefore, in the present study, data from three…

  1. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2005 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2006-03-01

    This annual report details the number of health physics bachelor's, master's, and postdoctoral degrees awarded at a sampling of academic programs from 1998-2005. It also looks at health physics degrees by curriculum and the number of students enrolled in health physics degree programs at 30 U.S. universities in 2005.

  2. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Resource-limited Health Systems-Considerations for Training and Delivery.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Jason; Patterson, Dean; Munjal, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In the past 50 years, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has gained widespread recognition as a life-saving skill that can be taught successfully to the general public. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be considered a cost-effective intervention that requires minimal classroom training and low-cost equipment and supplies; it is commonly taught throughout much of the developed world. But, the simplicity of CPR training and its access for the general public may be misleading, as outcomes for patients in cardiopulmonary arrest are poor and survival is dependent upon a comprehensive "chain-of-survival," which is something not achieved easily in resource-limited health care settings. In addition to the significant financial and physical resources needed to both train and develop basic CPR capabilities within a community, there is a range of ethical questions that should also be considered. This report describes some of the financial and ethical challenges that might result from CPR training in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). It is determined that for many health care systems, CPR training may have financial and ethically-deleterious, unintended consequences. Evidence shows Basic Life Support (BLS) skills training in a community is an effective intervention to improve public health. But, health care systems with limited resources should include CPR training only after considering the full implications of that intervention.

  3. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  4. Physical Restraint Initiation in Nursing Homes and Subsequent Resident Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas G.; McCaffrey, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: It is widely believed that physical restraint use causes mental and physical health decline in nursing home residents. Yet few studies exist showing an association between restraint initiation and health decline. In this research, we examined whether physical restraint initiation is associated with subsequent lower physical or mental…

  5. Does Current Army Physical Fitness Training Doctrine Adequately Prepare Soldiers for War?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    corrected this deficiency and adequately addressed the correlation between effective physical training and success on the battlefield? The most recent... effectiveness of its physical training program in preparing soldiers for combat. The cursory acknowledgment of the necessity to link physical training...the U.S. Army do not possess the requisite physical fitness levels to most effectively perform their duties in combat. This has been the case since

  6. The Health Physics Society Science Teacher Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Albert E.

    2001-03-01

    The South Texas Chapter of the Health Physics Society (STC) maintains a program of education for science teachers, grades 4-12. This program, originally funded by the U.S. Department of Energy but now supported by STC, is intended to teach fundamentals of radiation and radiation safety at a level suitable for comprehension by lay persons. Course topics include Fundamentals of Radiation, Cellular Biology and Radiation Health Effects, Exposure to Radiation in Modern Life, Radioactive Waste, and Radiation Safety. The 8-hour course is usually given on Saturdays at locations in Texas as requested by educational or other groups. Classes of up to 25 teacher-students are ideal. Lesson plans, reference materials, a video tape, software, and a radiation detector are provided to each participant. To schedule a workshop in your area, contact alevans@swbell.net or David Fogle, david.fogle@tdh.state.tx.us.

  7. Izabel dos Santos and the training of the health workers.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Carlos Henrique Assunção

    2015-06-01

    This article discusses the career of Izabel dos Santos (1927-2010) as a means of examining the connections between health schools and agendas in contemporary Brazil. The article highlights dos Santos's training and her work in the Serviço Especial de Saúde Pública (SESP- Special Public Health Service), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and in the formulation and implementation of national training programs for human resources within the area of health from the late 1970s onwards. The article highlights dos Santos's central role in the formulation and implementation of training policies for health workers, especially nursing technicians and assistants, and demonstrates how she occupies an important place in the history of Brazilian public health.

  8. Competency-based preparedness training for public health practitioners.

    PubMed

    Horney, Jennifer A; Sollecito, William; Alexander, Lorraine K

    2005-11-01

    The bioterrorism preparedness training needs of the public health workforce have been described in several studies, assessments, and surveys. To meet these needs, the North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness (NCCPHP) and the Public Health Leadership Program (PHLP) at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health developed a new distance learning course, Introduction to Public Health Preparedness for Disasters and Emergencies. After a review of assessment data to identify training needs, we conducted a literature review of methodology and concluded that a distance learning course would be the best approach. The course curriculum is based on the Bioterrorism and Emergency Readiness Competencies for All Public Health Workers. This paper describes the course development process and methods used to make this course an effective training tool.

  9. Mental health nurses' diabetes care skills - a training needs analysis.

    PubMed

    Nash, Michael

    2009-05-28

    This article explores mental health nurses' diabetes training needs. A survey of inpatient and community mental health nurses was undertaken using a 16-item self-reporting questionnaire. Two hundred and twenty questionnaires were sent out and 138 returned, providing a response rate of 63%. Analysis shows that mental health nurses are currently involved in a range of diabetes care activities, however, their knowledge and skills may not be up to date. Mental health nurses also report the growing impact of diabetes care on their workload. Areas of identified training needs include taking blood glucose readings, giving dietary advice, liaison with diabetes nurse specialists and weight management. Mental health services and education providers need to consider developing specific training courses for mental health nurses.

  10. The Training of Infant Mental Health Practitioners: The Norway Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slinning, Kari; Vannebo, Unni Tranaas

    2015-01-01

    Today the infant mental health field includes a multidisciplinary team of practitioners with very different training and education needs. Implementation research has shown that appropriate training is a key factor for successful outcomes of an intervention and that supervision and coaching are crucial. All professionals who work with young…

  11. Mental Health Training and the Hospice Community: A National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Charles A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Summarizes a national survey of the hospice community. Results indicated that the hospice community is attempting to meet the mental health training needs of its paid staff members and volunteers. However, more than half expressed a need for further training and a more systematic and comprehensive curriculum. (Author)

  12. Interdisciplinary Collaborative Training for School-Based Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papa, Patricia A.; Rector, Cherie; Stone, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Interdisciplinary training and education for school-based health professionals is important, but few such programs exist. This paper describes the California State University Interprofessional Collaboration Training Project and the Catholic University of America School Nurse Practitioner Program, offering suggestions for expanding…

  13. The Training of Infant Mental Health Practitioners: The Norway Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slinning, Kari; Vannebo, Unni Tranaas

    2015-01-01

    Today the infant mental health field includes a multidisciplinary team of practitioners with very different training and education needs. Implementation research has shown that appropriate training is a key factor for successful outcomes of an intervention and that supervision and coaching are crucial. All professionals who work with young…

  14. Gender and Physical Training Effects on Soldier Physical Competencies and Physiological Strain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    progressive overload occurred. The DSTO-TR-1875 37 last set consisted of the eccentric component of the exercise completed by the participant with the...to recently returning from Tandem Thrust and associated post- exercise leave. Subsequently, the improvement of the Control female was likely a result...of her own personal physical training regimen being reinitiated after the field exercise . CFA administration should be planned for the cooler

  15. Effects of Physical Training and Fitness on Running Injuries in Physically Active Young Men.

    PubMed

    Grier, Tyson L; Canham-Chervak, Michelle; Anderson, Morgan K; Bushman, Timothy T; Jones, Bruce H

    2017-01-01

    Grier, TL, Canham-Chervak, M, Anderson, MK, Bushman, TT, and Jones, BH. Effects of physical training and fitness on running injuries in physically active young men. J Strength Cond Res 31(1): 207-216, 2017-The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of physical training (PT) and fitness on risks for running-related injuries (RRIs) in physically active young men. Personal characteristics, PT, Army Physical Fitness Test scores, and injury data were obtained by survey. Army Physical Fitness Test variables (push-ups, sit-ups, and 2-mile run) were converted into quartiles (Q), where Q1 = lowest performance and Q4 = highest performance. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. Over 4,000 (n = 4,236) soldiers were surveyed. Running injury incidence was 14%. A greater risk of an RRI was associated with older age (OR31+/<22 years = 1.62, 95% CI, 1.21-2.18), higher BMI ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), and total distance ran per week during unit PT (OR16.1+/1-5 miles = 1.66, 95% CI, 1.15-2.41). A lower risk of an RRI was associated with total distance run per week during personal PT (OR5.1-10/1-5 miles = 0.70, 95% CI, 0.53-0.91, OR10.1-16 +/1-5 miles = 0.58, 95% CI, 0.35-0.97, OR16.1+/1-5 miles = 0.54, 95% CI, 0.30-0.98), higher aerobic endurance as measured by 2-mile run performance (ORQ4/Q1 = 0.50, 95% CI, 0.35-0.72), and unit resistance training ≥3 times a week (OR≥3 times per week/none = 0.46, 95% CI, 0.29-0.73). Greater personal PT running mileage decreased injuries in this population suggesting that the increased protective effect of higher aerobic fitness outweighed the injurious effect of running more miles during personal PT. Countermeasures to prevent RRIs could entail enhancing aerobic endurance, providing opportunities for personal aerobic training, monitoring for excessive unit PT running mileage and encouraging unit resistance training ≥3 times per week.

  16. Safety of sports facilities and training of graduates in physical education.

    PubMed

    Romano Spica, V; Giampaoli, S; Di Onofrio, V; Liguori, G

    2015-01-01

    Post-industrial societies have to face the problem of physical inactivity and inappropriate lifestyles. Programs to promote physical activity are strongly supported by supranational, national and local institutions and organizations. These programs can be developed in sport facilities but also in places that are not institutionally dedicated to sport. The use of urban and working sites has the advantage of better reach the various segments of the population, but at the same time requires coordination between various professionals in structuring an effective intervention. Bibliographical research in the historical archives of the library of the University of Rome Foro Italico, online databases, paleoigiene (wikigiene), documents archives (GSMS-SItI, WHO, ISS, OsEPi, INAIL, ISTAT, national laws). Several guidelines and regulations face the problem of safety in sport environments. The context is in rapid evolution and directions are provided by public health authorities. Graduates in Sport and Physical Activity, represent an additional resource in terms of: prevention and safety in the workplace, health education, application of preventive and adapted physical activities in the territory. These tasks can be integrated in all prevention stages: e.g. childhood and primary prevention programs in school, adapted physical activity for the elderly. The contribution of public health specialists is strategic in the surveillance and coordination of integrated projects. At the same time, graduates in Physical Education appear to be pivots for health promotion and qualified resources for institutions in the territory. Their training should always include contents related to prevention and safety, regulations on sport and working environments, along with bases of preventive medicine related to the context of physical activity.

  17. Training on intellectual disability in health sciences: the European perspective

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Martínez-Leal, Rafael; Heyler, Carla; Alvarez-Galvez, Javier; Veenstra, Marja Y.; García-Ibáñez, Jose; Carpenter, Sylvia; Bertelli, Marco; Munir, Kerim; Torr, Jennifer; Van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Intellectual disability (ID) has consequences at all stages of life, requires high service provision and leads to high health and societal costs. However, ID is largely disregarded as a health issue by national and international organisations, as are training in ID and in the health aspects of ID at every level of the education system. Specific aim This paper aims to (1) update the current information about availability of training and education in ID and related health issues in Europe with a particular focus in mental health; and (2) to identify opportunities arising from the initial process of educational harmonization in Europe to include ID contents in health sciences curricula and professional training. Method We carried out a systematic search of scientific databases and websites, as well as policy and research reports from the European Commission, European Council and WHO. Furthermore, we contacted key international organisations related to health education and/or ID in Europe, as well as other regional institutions. Results ID modules and contents are minimal in the revised health sciences curricula and publications on ID training in Europe are equally scarce. European countries report few undergraduate and graduate training modules in ID, even in key specialties such as paediatrics. Within the health sector, ID programmes focus mainly on psychiatry and psychology. Conclusion The poor availability of ID training in health sciences is a matter of concern. However, the current European policy on training provides an opportunity to promote ID in the curricula of programmes at all levels. This strategy should address all professionals working in ID and it should increase the focus on ID relative to other developmental disorders at all stages of life. PMID:25705375

  18. [Pedagogical training in stricto sensu graduate programs in public health].

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Guilherme Torres; Ribeiro, Victoria Maria Brant

    2013-06-01

    The scope of this research is to discuss the relevance and need for pedagogical training of university lecturers in the Public Health field. The contention is that college teaching is a practice that requires specific training, since it is characterized by complex elements that transcend the mastery of given content. Considering stricto sensu graduate studies as an important stage in the training of future university lecturers, an attempt was made to identify and analyze the subjects and practices of pedagogical training in academic masters and doctorate programs in Public Health. To achieve the research aim, this work was based on Pierre Bourdieu's field theory and on Tomaz Tadeu da Silva's curriculum theory. Results indicate that the programs do not consider the aspect of teacher training as a major issue. With regard to the Public Health field approximately 61% of masters and 38% of doctorate programs have pedagogical training subjects/practices. Furthermore, there is a tendency for technical-instrumental training, which is in line with the history of the Public Health field. The conclusion is that there is a need to develop a culture that values college and graduate Public Health teaching, considering the complexity of pedagogical practice in all its dimensions.

  19. Efficacy of Environmental Health E-Training for Journalists

    PubMed Central

    Parin, Megan L.; Yancey, Elissa; Beidler, Caroline; Haynes, Erin N.

    2015-01-01

    Communities report a low level of trust in environmental health media coverage. In order to support risk communication objectives, the goals of the research study were to identify whether or not there is a gap in environmental reporting training for journalists, to outline journalists’ methods for gathering environmental health news, to observe journalists’ attitudes toward environmental health training and communication, and to determine if electronic training (online/e-training) can effectively train journalists in environmental health topics. The results indicated that environmental journalists have very little to no formal environmental journalism training. In addition, a significant percentage of journalists do not have any formal journalism education. Respondents most preferred to receive continuing environmental journalism training online. Online instruction was also perceived as effective in increasing knowledge and providing necessary reporting tools, even among participants adverse to online instructional methods. Our findings highlight the changing media climate’s need for an increase in electronic journalism education opportunities to support environmental health journalism competencies among working professional journalists. PMID:26998499

  20. Physical Training and Well-Being in Older Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability: A Residential Care Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmeli, Eli; Orbach, Iris; Zinger-Vaknin, Tzvia; Morad, Mohammed; Merrick, Joav

    2008-01-01

    Background: Exercise is important for health and well-being. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of physical training on general well-being and self-image in older people with intellectual disability. Methods: This study evaluated older adults with intellectual disability in residential care in Israel. The concept of well-being…

  1. Objective Assessment of Physical Activity: Classifiers for Public Health.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Patterson, Ruth E; Ellis, Katherine; Godbole, Suneeta; Johnson, Eileen; Lanckriet, Gert; Staudenmayer, John

    2016-05-01

    Walking for health is recommended by health agencies, partly based on epidemiological studies of self-reported behaviors. Accelerometers are now replacing survey data, but it is not clear that intensity-based cut points reflect the behaviors previously reported. New computational techniques can help classify raw accelerometer data into behaviors meaningful for public health. Five hundred twenty days of triaxial 30-Hz accelerometer data from three studies (n = 78) were employed as training data. Study 1 included prescribed activities completed in natural settings. The other two studies included multiple days of free-living data with SenseCam-annotated ground truth. The two populations in the free-living data sets were demographically and physical different. Random forest classifiers were trained on each data set, and the classification accuracy on the training data set and that applied to the other available data sets were assessed. Accelerometer cut points were also compared with the ground truth from the three data sets. The random forest classified all behaviors with over 80% accuracy. Classifiers developed on the prescribed data performed with higher accuracy than the free-living data classifier, but these did not perform as well on the free-living data sets. Many of the observed behaviors occurred at different intensities compared with those identified by existing cut points. New machine learning classifiers developed from prescribed activities (study 1) were considerably less accurate when applied to free-living populations or to a functionally different population (studies 2 and 3). These classifiers, developed on free-living data, may have value when applied to large cohort studies with existing hip accelerometer data.

  2. Handbook for Home Health Aide Training. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    The home health aide is a member of a team which provides home health care services, usually a part of the overall health services furnished by the local county health department. She does those things which are required to maintain normal physical and emotional comfort and to help the patient toward independent living in his own home, working…

  3. From training to practice: the impact of ENGAGE, Ireland's national men's health training programme.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Aoife; Carroll, Paula; Richardson, Noel; Doheny, Martin; Brennan, Lorcan; Lambe, Barry

    2016-12-24

    Ireland's National Men's Health Policy recommended developing training programmes tailored to the needs of those working in health and allied health professionals and ENGAGE was developed to meet that recommendation. This study evaluated the impact of ENGAGE on frontline service providers' self-reported knowledge, skills, capacity and practice up to 5-months post training. Between 2012 and 2015, ENGAGE Trainers (n = 57) delivered 62 1-day training programmes to 810 participants. This study was conducted on a subset of those training days (n = 26) and participants. Quantitative methodologies were used to collect pre (n = 295), post (n = 295) and 5-month post (n = 128) training questionnaire data. Overall, participants were highly satisfied with the training immediately post training (8.60 ± 1.60 out of 10) and at 5-month follow up (8.06 ± 1.43 out of 10). Participants' self-reported level of knowledge, skill and capacity in identifying priorities, engaging men and influencing practice beyond their own organisation increased immediately following training (P < 0.001) and, with the exception of improving capacity to engage men and influencing practice beyond their organisation, these improvements were sustained at 5-month post training (P < 0.001). The vast majority of service providers (93.4%) reported that ENGAGE had impacted their work practice up to 5-month post training. The findings suggest that ENGAGE has succeeded in improving service providers' capacity to engage and work with men; improving gender competency in the delivery of health and health related services may increase the utilisation of such services by men and thereby improve health outcomes for men.

  4. The Relationship between Physical Activity and General Health among Menopausal Women in Ahvaz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Nasibeh; Jalili, Lida; Khazaeian, Somayeh; nia, Anvar-sadat Nayebi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Most women experience significant changes in their general health status during menopause, which negatively affects their quality of life. Physical activity has also been shown to enhance quality of life. However, little is known about the effect of physical activity on women’s health during the menopausal transition. This study aimed to determine the relationship between physical activity and general health among menopausal women in Ahvaz, Iran. Methods This cross sectional study was carried out on 600 menopausal women using cluster random sampling during 2013–2014. Data collection tools were three questionnaires; women’s demographic characteristics, the Goldenberg’s questionnaire, and International physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics through SPSS version 19. The statistical tests were performed at the 95% confidence interval. Results There was a significant relationship between the total score of physical activity and physical health, social functioning, anxiety and depression (p<0.05), but no significant relationship was found between subscales related to physical activity and general health (p>0.05). Conclusion Physical activity is effective in improving general health in menopausal women. Proper training and effective interventions for regular physical activity can be important steps to promote the general health of menopausal women. PMID:28243418

  5. The Relationship between Physical Activity and General Health among Menopausal Women in Ahvaz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Nasibeh; Jalili, Lida; Khazaeian, Somayeh; Nia, Anvar-Sadat Nayebi

    2017-01-01

    Most women experience significant changes in their general health status during menopause, which negatively affects their quality of life. Physical activity has also been shown to enhance quality of life. However, little is known about the effect of physical activity on women's health during the menopausal transition. This study aimed to determine the relationship between physical activity and general health among menopausal women in Ahvaz, Iran. This cross sectional study was carried out on 600 menopausal women using cluster random sampling during 2013-2014. Data collection tools were three questionnaires; women's demographic characteristics, the Goldenberg's questionnaire, and International physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ). Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics through SPSS version 19. The statistical tests were performed at the 95% confidence interval. There was a significant relationship between the total score of physical activity and physical health, social functioning, anxiety and depression (p<0.05), but no significant relationship was found between subscales related to physical activity and general health (p>0.05). Physical activity is effective in improving general health in menopausal women. Proper training and effective interventions for regular physical activity can be important steps to promote the general health of menopausal women.

  6. Training and service in public health, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training, 2008 - 2014.

    PubMed

    Nguku, Patrick; Oyemakinde, Akin; Sabitu, Kabir; Olayinka, Adebola; Ajayi, Ikeoluwapo; Fawole, Olufunmilayo; Babirye, Rebecca; Gitta, Sheba; Mukanga, David; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya; Gidado, Saheed; Biya, Oladayo; Gana, Chinyere; Ajumobi, Olufemi; Abubakar, Aisha; Sani-Gwarzo, Nasir; Ngobua, Samuel; Oleribe, Obinna; Poggensee, Gabriele; Nsubuga, Peter; Nyager, Joseph; Nasidi, Abdulsalami

    2014-01-01

    The health workforce is one of the key building blocks for strengthening health systems. There is an alarming shortage of curative and preventive health care workers in developing countries many of which are in Africa. Africa resultantly records appalling health indices as a consequence of endemic and emerging health issues that are exacerbated by a lack of a public health workforce. In low-income countries, efforts to build public health surveillance and response systems have stalled, due in part, to the lack of epidemiologists and well-trained laboratorians. To strengthen public health systems in Africa, especially for disease surveillance and response, a number of countries have adopted a competency-based approach of training - Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP). The Nigeria FELTP was established in October 2008 as an inservice training program in field epidemiology, veterinary epidemiology and public health laboratory epidemiology and management. The first cohort of NFELTP residents began their training on 20th October 2008 and completed their training in December 2010. The program was scaled up in 2011 and it admitted 39 residents in its third cohort. The program has admitted residents in six annual cohorts since its inception admitting a total of 207 residents as of 2014 covering all the States. In addition the program has trained 595 health care workers in short courses. Since its inception, the program has responded to 133 suspected outbreaks ranging from environmental related outbreaks, vaccine preventable diseases, water and food borne, zoonoses, (including suspected viral hemorrhagic fevers) as well as neglected tropical diseases. With its emphasis on one health approach of solving public health issues the program has recruited physicians, veterinarians and laboratorians to work jointly on human, animal and environmental health issues. Residents have worked to identify risk factors of disease at the human animal interface for

  7. Training and Service in Public Health, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training, 2008 – 2014

    PubMed Central

    Nguku, Patrick; Oyemakinde, Akin; Sabitu, Kabir; Olayinka, Adebola; Ajayi, Ikeoluwapo; Fawole, Olufunmilayo; Babirye, Rebecca; Gitta, Sheba; Mukanga, David; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya; Gidado, Saheed; Biya, Oladayo; Gana, Chinyere; Ajumobi, Olufemi; Abubakar, Aisha; Sani-Gwarzo, Nasir; Ngobua, Samuel; Oleribe, Obinna; Poggensee, Gabriele; Nsubuga, Peter; Nyager, Joseph; Nasidi, Abdulsalami

    2014-01-01

    The health workforce is one of the key building blocks for strengthening health systems. There is an alarming shortage of curative and preventive health care workers in developing countries many of which are in Africa. Africa resultantly records appalling health indices as a consequence of endemic and emerging health issues that are exacerbated by a lack of a public health workforce. In low-income countries, efforts to build public health surveillance and response systems have stalled, due in part, to the lack of epidemiologists and well-trained laboratorians. To strengthen public health systems in Africa, especially for disease surveillance and response, a number of countries have adopted a competency-based approach of training - Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP). The Nigeria FELTP was established in October 2008 as an inservice training program in field epidemiology, veterinary epidemiology and public health laboratory epidemiology and management. The first cohort of NFELTP residents began their training on 20th October 2008 and completed their training in December 2010. The program was scaled up in 2011 and it admitted 39 residents in its third cohort. The program has admitted residents in six annual cohorts since its inception admitting a total of 207 residents as of 2014 covering all the States. In addition the program has trained 595 health care workers in short courses. Since its inception, the program has responded to 133 suspected outbreaks ranging from environmental related outbreaks, vaccine preventable diseases, water and food borne, zoonoses, (including suspected viral hemorrhagic fevers) as well as neglected tropical diseases. With its emphasis on one health approach of solving public health issues the program has recruited physicians, veterinarians and laboratorians to work jointly on human, animal and environmental health issues. Residents have worked to identify risk factors of disease at the human animal interface for

  8. Mental Health Interpreter Training: Where to Find Training? What Type? What's the Cost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitsett, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers some basic information about mental health interpreter training. The information offered in this paper is organized into table form with the following column headings: (1) training program; (2) cost; (3) type; (4) time; (5) outcome; (6) primary topics covered; (7) skills attained; and (8) prerequisites to enroll.

  9. Evaluation of health promotion training for the Western Australian Aboriginal maternal and child health sector.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Alexa; Lobo, Roanna C; Griffin, Denese M; Woods, Heather A

    2015-04-01

    The evaluation of health promotion training for the Western Australian (WA) Aboriginal maternal and child health (MCH) sector. Fifty-one MCH professionals from five regions in WA who attended one of three health promotion short courses in 2012-2013 were invited to complete an online survey or a telephone interview, between 4 to 17 months post-course. Respondents were asked how they had utilised the information and resources from the training and to identify the enabling factors or barriers to integrating health promotion into their work practices subsequently. Overall response rate was 33% (n=17); 94% of respondents reported they had utilised the information and resources from the course and 76% had undertaken health promotion activities since attending the course. Building contacts with other MCH providers and access to planning tools were identified as valuable components of the course. Barriers to translating knowledge into practice included financial constraints and lack of organisational support for health promotion activity. Health promotion training provides participants with the skills and confidence to deliver health promotion strategies in their communities. The training presents an opportunity to build health professionals' capacity to address some determinants of poor health outcomes among pregnant Aboriginal women and their babies. SO WHAT?: Training would be enhanced if accompanied by ongoing support for participants to integrate health promotion into their work practice, organisational development including health promotion training for senior management, establishing stronger referral pathways among partner organisations to support continuity of care and embedding training into MCH workforce curricula.

  10. Training health personnel in birth-spacing.

    PubMed

    Ladjali, M

    1982-01-01

    The 1st part of this article covers on-the-job training of midwives in the area of family planning in Algeria. The 2nd part focuses on the immediate and long term evaluation of this training. Retraining sessions last for 1 month and bring together, for each session, 20-25 participants from the entire country. After the organizers have announced the proposed objectives and after the participants have helped to put them in their final form, the issue of the selection of candidates is addressed. In addition, the methods underlying both the theoretical and the practical training are explained. Program evaluation is carried out at the end of each training session in order to evaluate both theoretical and practical learning. This evaluation has consistently shown a considerable increase in knowledge by the trainees. Final evaluation involves the analysis of the quality of care delivered to the population. This long-term evaluation has been carried out over a period of 5 years (1974-1979). An evaluation of the 421 people trained in this way was undertaken at their work sites, partly through a national study of the tendency of workers who have participated in the retraining sessions to remain at their jobs. After 5 years of evaluation, the number of consultations has multiplied by 6, (from 47,998 to 331,989) since the beginning of the program, with 86% of all workers retrained having remained in their positions. The difficulties encountered in the retraining sessions are described.

  11. [The effect of physical training on physical, mental and social conditions in drug and/or alcohol addicts].

    PubMed

    Sell, E H; Christensen, N J

    1989-08-14

    The physical, mental and social conditions of eight drug and alcohol addicts were examined prior to and after a period of three months with systemical physical training. The condition improved significantly during training. The circulatory reaction to stress remained unchanged before and after training but the resting levels for pulse and blood pressure were lower after training. Prior to training, a significant correlation was observed between the excretion of adrenalin in the urine and the anxiety level and this was not observed after training. The anxiety level measured by a STAI test decreased during the period of training whereas the excretion of adrenalin in the urine was not altered significantly and remained within the normal range. The patients were followed-up for approximately 18 months after discharge from hospital. During this period, the result of the physical stress and a hiking holiday which was included in the treatment were discussed before discharge. None of the patients continued the physical training after discharge from hospital despite encouragement to do so. The group gradually disintegrated and two years after the conclusion of the training, five patients had resumed the addiction. This investigation suggests that physical training may be of significance in the treatment of addicts but continued contact with the therapist is of decisive significance.

  12. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS

    PubMed Central

    O’CONNOR, TOM; FLYNN, MICHAEL; WEINSTOCK, DEBORAH; ZANONI, JOSEPH

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the essential elements of effective occupational safety and health education and training programs targeting under-served communities. While not an exhaustive review of the literature on occupational safety and health training, the paper provides a guide for practitioners and researchers to the key factors they should consider in the design and implementation of training programs for underserved communities. It also addresses issues of evaluation of such programs, with specific emphasis on considerations for programs involving low-literacy and limited-English-speaking workers. PMID:25053607

  13. Occupational safety and health education and training for underserved populations.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Tom; Flynn, Michael; Weinstock, Deborah; Zanoni, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the essential elements of effective occupational safety and health education and training programs targeting underserved communities. While not an exhaustive review of the literature on occupational safety and health training, the paper provides a guide for practitioners and researchers to the key factors they should consider in the design and implementation of training programs for underserved communities. It also addresses issues of evaluation of such programs, with specific emphasis on considerations for programs involving low-literacy and limited-English-speaking workers.

  14. One Health research and training in Australia and New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Simon A.; McKenzie, Joanna; Woldeyohannes, Solomon M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the review This review was performed to create a repository of information on One Health research and training in Australia and New Zealand (ANZ). The review sought to determine 1) how many training activities there are in ANZ, 2) how much research on zoonotic diseases is undertaken by multidisciplinary teams, and 3) how collaborative and integrated they are. Recent findings There are few opportunities for training in One Health in ANZ. The majority require enrolment in a postgraduate degree programme, and there is only one postgraduate level course that is also available for continuing professional development (CPD). Of the broad range of One Health research performed in ANZ, the majority is performed by teams with limited disciplinary diversity, although diversity is improving. Summary Progress has been made in building collaboration between human, animal, and environmental health professions. However, the lack of clearly defined competencies and agreed purpose for One Health may be impeding collaboration. PMID:27906122

  15. Effects of combined physical and cognitive training on fitness and neuropsychological outcomes in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins-Crépeau, Laurence; Berryman, Nicolas; Fraser, Sarah A; Vu, Thien Tuong Minh; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Li, Karen ZH; Bosquet, Laurent; Bherer, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Physical exercise and cognitive training have been shown to enhance cognition among older adults. However, few studies have looked at the potential synergetic effects of combining physical and cognitive training in a single study. Prior trials on combined training have led to interesting yet equivocal results. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of combined physical and cognitive interventions on physical fitness and neuropsychological performance in healthy older adults. Methods Seventy-six participants were randomly assigned to one of four training combinations using a 2×2 factorial design. The physical intervention was a mixed aerobic and resistance training program, and the cognitive intervention was a dual-task (DT) training program. Stretching and toning exercises and computer lessons were used as active control conditions. Physical and cognitive measures were collected pre- and postintervention. Results All groups showed equivalent improvements in measures of functional mobility. The aerobic–strength condition led to larger effect size in lower body strength, independently of cognitive training. All groups showed improved speed of processing and inhibition abilities, but only participants who took part in the DT training, independently of physical training, showed increased task-switching abilities. The level of functional mobility after intervention was significantly associated with task-switching abilities. Conclusion Combined training did not yield synergetic effects. However, DT training did lead to transfer effects on executive performance in neuropsychological tests. Both aerobic-resistance training and stretching-toning exercises can improve functional mobility in older adults. PMID:27698558

  16. Physical Activity, Health, and Well-Being: An International Scientific Consensus Conference. Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Claude; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents eight papers: "Physical Activity and Health"; "Exercise and Physical Health"; "Exercise and Physical Health: Cancer and Immune Function"; "Exercise and Psychosocial Health"; "Physical Activity, Health, and Wellbeing at Different Life Stages"; "Descriptive Epidemiology of…

  17. Physical Activity, Health, and Well-Being: An International Scientific Consensus Conference. Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Claude; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents eight papers: "Physical Activity and Health"; "Exercise and Physical Health"; "Exercise and Physical Health: Cancer and Immune Function"; "Exercise and Psychosocial Health"; "Physical Activity, Health, and Wellbeing at Different Life Stages"; "Descriptive Epidemiology of…

  18. Building peace through participatory health training: a case from Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Ui, S; Leng, K; Aoyama, A

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the significance and effectiveness of participatory health training as a tool for peace building. It does so by analysing a case of training for 'health promoters' run by a Cambodian government health agency. The authors observed participants during the training and interviewed those involved in the courses. A developing capacity for coexistence and reconciliation between individuals who had been on opposite sides during the years of Khmer Rouge terror and continuous internal war was observed among both participants and trainers. Factors embodied in the training that facilitated favourable changes in self and in relations with others were identified as: (1) 'space for dialogue' was created by concrete common public health interests and urgent needs; (2) training took place 'live-in' style in a rural setting; (3) course contents and methods were consistent with peace education; (4) trainers had a conscious function as role models; and (5) there was continuity of effort and consequent accumulation of experience. To build peace, as well as conducting training directly on a technical topic, these essential factors need to be incorporated in the training programmes.

  19. One Health training, research, and outreach in North America

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Cheryl; Kaplan, Bruce; Logan, Jenae E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The One Health (OH) concept, formerly referred to as ‘One Medicine’ in the later part of the 20th century, has gained exceptional popularity in the early 21st century, and numerous academic and non-academic institutions have developed One Health programs. Objectives To summarize One Health training, research, and outreach activities originating in North America. Methods We used data from extensive electronic records maintained by the One Health Commission (OHC) (www.onehealthcommission.org/) and the One Health Initiative (www.onehealthinitiative.com/) and from web-based searches, combined with the corporate knowledge of the authors and their professional contacts. Finally, a call was released to members of the OHC's Global One Health Community listserv, asking that they populate a Google document with information on One Health training, research, and outreach activities in North American academic and non-academic institutions. Results A current snapshot of North American One Health training, research, and outreach activities as of August 2016 has evolved. Conclusions It is clear that the One Health concept has gained considerable recognition during the first decade of the 21st century, with numerous current training and research activities carried out among North American academic, non-academic, government, corporate, and non-profit entities. PMID:27906120

  20. 77 FR 20743 - Protective Force Personnel Medical, Physical Readiness, Training, and Access Authorization Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 1046 RIN 1992-AA40 Protective Force Personnel Medical, Physical Readiness... on the proposed rule to amend the standards for medical, physical performance, training, and access... proposed rule to revise the standards for medical, physical performance, training, and access...

  1. The value of physical examination in mental health nursing.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carolyn T

    2016-03-01

    This article explores the use of a physical examination assignment in a mental health general nursing clinical placement course that addresses the poor physical health of people with mental illness and the barriers traditionally impeding health care provision for this population. A descriptive qualitative approach utilizes inductive content analysis to investigate 145 student survey responses. The assignment assists student nurses in understanding that physical and mental well-being are intrinsically linked. Students report increased comfort performing a physical examination on patients with mental illness post assignment. Students' initial bias towards this population was minimized post the clinical assignment. Poor physical health is common among people with mental health problems. Many view the provision of care as a major public health issue. Nurses are the front line caregivers of mental health service consumers and are well positioned to assess their physical needs. Their assessment may be the first step in recognizing health care issues in this population.

  2. Innovative health information technology training: exploring blended learning.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Gina; Kitzmiller, Rebecca R; Breckenridge-Sproat, Sara

    2012-02-01

    Healthcare staff members are faced with an ever-increasing technology-enabled care environment as hospitals respond to financial and regulatory pressures to implement comprehensive electronic health record systems. Health information technology training may prove to facilitate user acceptance and overall adoption of advanced technologies. However, there is little evidence regarding best methods of providing health information technology training. This study retrospectively examined the difference in staff satisfaction between two training methods: traditional instructor-led and blended learning and found that participants were equally satisfied with either method. Furthermore, regardless of how much time was provided for practice, participants expressed a desire for more. These findings suggest that healthcare staff are open to new methods of training delivery and that, as adult learners, they desire increased opportunities to engage in hands-on activities.

  3. Partnership work between Public Health and Health Psychology: introduction to a novel training programme.

    PubMed

    Gilinsky, Alyssa S; Dombrowski, Stephan U; Dale, Hannah; Marks, Douglas; Robinson, Clare; Eades, Claire; Ouzounidou, Despina

    2010-11-11

    Public health services implement individual, community and population level interventions to change health behaviours, improve healthy life expectancy and reduce health inequalities. Understanding and changing health behaviour is complex. Integrating behaviour change theory and evidence into interventions has the potential to improve services. Health Psychologists apply evidence and theories aimed at understanding and changing health behaviour. A Scottish programme is piloting the training of Health Psychologists within NHS contexts to address prominent public health challenges. This article outlines the details of this novel programme. Two projects are examined to illustrate the potential of partnership working between public health and health psychology. In order to develop and improve behaviour change interventions and services, public health planners may want to consider developing and using the knowledge and skills of Health Psychologists. Supporting such training within public health contexts is a promising avenue to build critical NHS internal mass to tackle the major public health challenges ahead.

  4. Physical activity, diet and skeletal health.

    PubMed

    Branca, F

    1999-09-01

    Diet and physical exercise concur in the determination of skeletal mass at the end of adolescence and in the conservation of it during adult life. The functional demand imposed on bone is a major determinant of its structural characteristics. Stress applied to a skeletal segment affects the geometry of the bone, the microarchitecture and the composition of the matrix. The stimulatory effect occurs when the skeleton is subjected to strains exceeding habitual skeletal loads, and the intensity of load is more important than the duration of the stimulus. Physical activity leads to greater bone density in children and adolescents and, to a minor extent, in adults. Weight bearing activities, such as walking, have a greater effect than non weight bearing activities, such as cycling and swimming. Reduction of loads as in bed resting or in space flights leads to bone loss. Intense training may cause damage, promptly repaired, as in stress fractures observed in army recruits. Female athletes may experience oligo-amenorrhea, though they still have a positive bone balance. There is an important interaction between the mechanical demands and the availability of nutrients to manufacture bone tissue. The increase in bone density in post-menopausal women is positively related to calcium intake when calcium supplementation is accompanied by exercise. When mechanical demands are low, such as during immobilisation, the intestinal calcium absorption is reduced. Calcium intake should also be analysed in the light of other dietary factors affecting the balance between absorption and excretion, and in combination with a number of other minerals, trace elements and bioactive substances with an impact on bone metabolism.

  5. A role for mental health nursing in the physical health care of consumers with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Happell, B; Platania-Phung, C; Gray, R; Hardy, S; Lambert, T; McAllister, M; Davies, C

    2011-10-01

    There is extensive international evidence that people with severe mental illness have a lower standard of physical health than the general population. This leads to higher morbidity and mortality rates. Many of the causes for this poor physical health are modifiable. Yet the physical needs of this consumer group are neglected by healthcare systems in Australia, and elsewhere. While medical specialists are clearly integral to remedying this, nurses are well placed to play a key role in focused prevention and early intervention in the physical well-being of consumers with mental health problems. This paper outlines the specifics on how mental health nurses can be sensitized, prepared and empowered to help turn this serious health issue around. In particular, mental health nurses could be trained in and then utilize a new physical health check and response system in the UK (called the Health Improvement Profile) if adapted for use within Australia. This profile will be briefly introduced, and then its value to improving health care discussed.

  6. Self-reported health status of students in-processing into military medical advanced individual training.

    PubMed

    Rice, Valerie J Berg; Mays, Mary Z; Gable, Clayton

    2009-01-01

    It is important to be aware of the health and injury status of students in military training settings in order to adequately plan for their progression through required physical training and provision of health care to meet their needs. This paper describes the self-reported health status of students arriving in two medical training Battalions at Ft. Sam Houston. The results revealed that 43% of arriving soldiers had musculoskeletal symptoms and 35% had symptoms that interfered with their ability to accomplish the normal daily activities required as students. The most common sites of symptoms were knee (17 and 18%), foot/toe (16 and 13%), ankle (9 and 10%), and lower leg (9 and 12%) for the 232nd and 187th Medical Battalions respectively. Risk factors for those with musculoskeletal injury (MSI) symptoms that interfere with their abilities to do their jobs include gender, past history of injury, and self-reported stress and fitness levels. Other risk factors for medical specialties other than combat medic include being older (over 24 yrs of age), active duty status, being overweight, and use of smokeless tobacco. This information can help identify soldiers considered at risk of incurring a MSI during AIT. With this knowledge, physical training can be designed to help soldiers achieve fitness without additional injury and health care facilities can be designed to provide appropriate staffing of the health care professionals needed for evaluation and treatment.

  7. Training, Communication, and Competence: The Making of Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Luong, My-Linh

    2009-01-01

    The role of medical anthropology in tackling the problems and challenges at the intersections of public health, medicine, and technology was addressed during the 2009 Society for Medical Anthropology Conference at Yale University in an interdisciplinary panel session entitled Training, Communication, and Competence: The Making of Health Care Professionals. PMID:20027287

  8. Health Education Training Needs Assessment for CPHU Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Charles; Davis, Robert C.

    In the autumn of 1983, a study was conducted of the needs of county public health unit (CPHU) nurses in Florida for additional training in health education. Questionnaires were developed and mailed to 136 persons, with a return rate of 68 percent. Most of the respondents were white female registered nurses with a mean age of 44 years, who were…

  9. Health and Safety Legislation in Australia: Complexity for Training Remains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Susanne; Barratt-Pugh, Llandis

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study that examined the impact of the National Occupational Health and Safety Strategy 2002-2012 and the harmonisation of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 on Australian training design, delivery and outcomes. There has been a comparative reduction in work related injuries, fatalities and disease, and…

  10. Training Alliances in Health and Education: A Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightly, Beverly E., Ed.

    The final report describes the accomplishments of the 3-year project, "Training Alliances in Health and Education" (TAHE), a program designed to involve allied health professionals and Professional Development and Dissemination (PRODD) cemters in efforts to develop a coordinated delivery system to meet the education and education-related…

  11. Assessment of village health worker training program in Tuguegarao, Philippine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Min; Koh, Kwang Wook; Oak, Chul Ho; Jung, Woo Hyuk; Kim, Sung Hyun; Park, Dae Hee

    2009-11-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of 'village health worker training program' which aimed to build community participatory health promotion capacity of community leaders in villages of low developed country and to develop methods for further development of the program. The intervention group were 134 community leaders from 25 barangays (village). Control group were 149 form 4 barangays. Intervention group participated 3-day training program. Questionnaire was developed based on 'Health Promotion Capacity Checklist' which assessed capacity in 4 feathers; 'knowledge', 'skill', 'commitment', and 'resource'. Each feather was assessed in 4 point rating scale. Capacity scores between intervention group and control group were examined to identify changes between the pre- and post-intervention periods. A qualitative evaluation of the program was conducted to assess the appropriateness of the program. The program was conducted in Tuguegarao city, Philippine in January, 2009. The result showed significant increases in the total health promotion capacity and each feather of health promotion capacities between pre and post assessment of intervention group. But there was no significant change in that of control group. Participants marked high level of satisfaction for preparedness, selection of main subjects and education method. Qualitative evaluation revealed that training program facilitated community participatory health promotion capacity of participants. This study suggested that the Village health worker training program is effective for building health promotion capacity of community leaders and it can be a main method for helping low developed countries with further development.

  12. Training of Health Service Personnel in the Veterans' Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Veterans' Affairs.

    During fiscal year 1970, more than 49,000 persons received training through the Veterans' Administration (VA) in 125 different health services programs, including 21,550 physicians, 1,359 dentists, and 26,142 trainees in the allied and administrative health fields. Many VA hospitals and out-patient clinics indicated that more than 12,000…

  13. Health and Safety Legislation in Australia: Complexity for Training Remains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahn, Susanne; Barratt-Pugh, Llandis

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study that examined the impact of the National Occupational Health and Safety Strategy 2002-2012 and the harmonisation of the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 on Australian training design, delivery and outcomes. There has been a comparative reduction in work related injuries, fatalities and disease, and…

  14. Training in Mental Health: Evaluation of the Telephone Conference Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, C.; Smyer, M. A.

    The Telephone Conference Network, sponsored by The Pennsylvania State University's Coordinating Council for Health Care, is designed as a cost-effective format for providing inservice training in geriatric mental health for individuals who serve the elderly. Institutions which subscribe to the Telephone Conference Network are equipped with a…

  15. A Mental Health Training Model for Use with Indochinese Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohon, J. Donald, Jr.

    The Indochinese Mental Health Project of the International Institute of San Francisco has as its major goal that of helping Indochinese refugees to receive training and to find employment in community mental health services in order that they may work with incoming refugee populations. Prospective trainees are evaluated and selected on the basis…

  16. Gains in cognition through combined cognitive and physical training: the role of training dosage and severity of neurocognitive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bamidis, Panagiotis D.; Fissler, Patrick; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G.; Zilidou, Vasiliki; Konstantinidis, Evdokimos I.; Billis, Antonis S.; Romanopoulou, Evangelia; Karagianni, Maria; Beratis, Ion; Tsapanou, Angeliki; Tsilikopoulou, Georgia; Grigoriadou, Eirini; Ladas, Aristea; Kyrillidou, Athina; Tsolaki, Anthoula; Frantzidis, Christos; Sidiropoulos, Efstathios; Siountas, Anastasios; Matsi, Stavroula; Papatriantafyllou, John; Margioti, Eleni; Nika, Aspasia; Schlee, Winfried; Elbert, Thomas; Tsolaki, Magda; Vivas, Ana B.; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Physical as well as cognitive training interventions improve specific cognitive functions but effects barely generalize on global cognition. Combined physical and cognitive training may overcome this shortcoming as physical training may facilitate the neuroplastic potential which, in turn, may be guided by cognitive training. This study aimed at investigating the benefits of combined training on global cognition while assessing the effect of training dosage and exploring the role of several potential effect modifiers. In this multi-center study, 322 older adults with or without neurocognitive disorders (NCDs) were allocated to a computerized, game-based, combined physical and cognitive training group (n = 237) or a passive control group (n = 85). Training group participants were allocated to different training dosages ranging from 24 to 110 potential sessions. In a pre-post-test design, global cognition was assessed by averaging standardized performance in working memory, episodic memory and executive function tests. The intervention group increased in global cognition compared to the control group, p = 0.002, Cohen’s d = 0.31. Exploratory analysis revealed a trend for less benefits in participants with more severe NCD, p = 0.08 (cognitively healthy: d = 0.54; mild cognitive impairment: d = 0.19; dementia: d = 0.04). In participants without dementia, we found a dose-response effect of the potential number and of the completed number of training sessions on global cognition, p = 0.008 and p = 0.04, respectively. The results indicate that combined physical and cognitive training improves global cognition in a dose-responsive manner but these benefits may be less pronounced in older adults with more severe NCD. The long-lasting impact of combined training on the incidence and trajectory of NCDs in relation to its severity should be assessed in future long-term trials. PMID:26300772

  17. A nutrition/health training program for Peace Corps volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bahl, S M; Orban, D A; Montoya, I D

    1989-01-01

    Nutrition and health education is a crucial component of the overall mission of the Peace Corps program. Individuals selected to work as Peace Corps volunteers need to be well prepared to perform this complex and challenging job in recipient countries. This article presents a model for a training program for Peace Corps trainees that was conducted over a 5-week period. The program was planned in accordance with some specific training guidelines that were provided by the Peace Corps. The trainees included nine women ranging in age from 22 to 61 years with diverse backgrounds; however, all had a BA/BS in a health-related discipline. Training curriculum included fundamental nutrition and health-related areas: basic nutrition, foods, clinical nutrition, maternal and child health, communicable diseases and sanitation, health strategies, and community development. Fifty percent of the curriculum was devoted to "hands-on" practical and clinical activities. Maternal and child health was emphasized in the training curriculum as this is an area of concern in all developing countries. The trainees were evaluated by weekly quizzes as well as completion of a special project involving applications of all their newly acquired skills. Implications of the training program are discussed.

  18. Health Physics Positions Data Base: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Borges, T.; Stafford, R.S.; Lu, P.Y.; Carter, D.

    1994-02-01

    The Health Physics Positions (HPPOS) Data Base of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is a collection of NRC staff positions on a wide range of topics involving radiation protection (health physics). It consists of 328 documents in the form of letters, memoranda, and excerpts from technical reports. The HPPOS Data Base was developed by the NRC Headquarters and Regional Offices to help ensure uniformity in inspections, enforcement, and licensing actions. Staff members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have assisted the NRC staff in summarizing the documents during the preparation of this NUREG report. These summaries are also being made available as a {open_quotes}stand alone{close_quotes} software package for IBM and IBM-compatible personal computers. The software package for this report is called HPPOS Version 2.0. A variety of indexing schemes were used to increase the usefulness of the NUREG report and its associated software. The software package and the summaries in the report are written in the context of the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} 10 CFR Part 20 ({section}{section}20.1001--20.2401). The purpose of this NUREG report is to allow interested individuals to familiarize themselves with the contents of the HPPOS Data Base and with the basis of many NRC decisions and regulations. The HPPOS summaries and original documents are intended to serve as a source of information for radiation protection programs at nuclear research and power reactors, nuclear medicine, and other industries that either process or use nuclear materials.

  19. HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the PC

    SciTech Connect

    Homann, S.G.

    1994-03-01

    The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-PC (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).

  20. Weight training, aerobic physical activities, and long-term waist circumference change in men

    PubMed Central

    Mekary, Rania A.; Grøntved, Anders; Despres, Jean-Pierre; De Moura, Leandro Pereira; Asgarzadeh, Morteza; Willett, Walter C.; Rimm, Eric B.; Giovannucci, Edward; Hu, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Findings on weight training and waist circumference (WC) change are controversial. This study examined prospectively whether weight training, moderate-to-vigorous aerobic activity (MVAA), and replacement of one activity for another were associated with favorable changes in WC and body weight (BW). Methods Physical activity, WC, and BW were reported in 1996 and 2008 in a cohort of 10,500 healthy U.S. men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We used multiple linear regression models (partition/substitution) to assess these associations. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, we observed a significant inverse dose-response relationship between weight training and WC change (P-trend<0.001). Less age-associated WC increase was seen with a 20 min/day activity increase; this benefit was significantly stronger for weight training (-0.67cm, 95%CI -0.93, -0.41) than for MVAA (-0.33cm, 95%CI -0.40, -0.27), other activities (-0.16cm, 95%CI -0.28, -0.03), or TV watching (0.08cm, 95%CI 0.05, 0.12). Substituting 20 min/day of weight training for any other discretionary activity had the strongest inverse association with WC change. MVAA had the strongest inverse association with BW change (-0.23kg, 95%CI -0.29, -0.17). Conclusions Among various activities, weight training had the strongest association with less WC increase. Studies on frequency /volume of weight training and WC change are warranted. PMID:25530447

  1. Unique Educational Needs of Learners with Physical and Other Health Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Robbie M.

    This monograph addresses the educational needs of learners who have physical and health impairments that adversely interfere with their educational performance and who thus require special training, related services, adaptive equipment, modified materials, and/or barrier free facilities. The first section discusses the identification of learners…

  2. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-06-01

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

  3. A capacity mapping approach to public health training resources.

    PubMed

    Dato, Virginia M; Potter, Margaret A; Fertman, Carl I; Pistella, Christine L

    2002-01-01

    The capacity mapping approach can be used to identify existing community resources. As part of this approach, inventories are used to provide information for a capacity map. The authors describe the development of two inventories and a capacity map for public health workforce development. For the first inventory, the authors contacted 754 institutions to determine available public health training resources; 191 institutions reported resources, including 126 directly providing distance learning technologies and courses or modules addressing important competency domains. Distance learning technologies included video conferencing facilities (61%) and satellite download facilities (50%). For the second inventory, the authors obtained information on 129 distance-accessible public health training modules. The workforce development capacity map produced from these two inventories revealed substantial resources available for use by individuals or agencies wishing to improve training in public health competencies.

  4. Public Health Ethics Related Training for Public Health Workforce: An Emerging Need in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kanekar, A; Bitto, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethics is a discipline, which primarily deals with what is moral and immoral behavior. Public Health Ethics is translation of ethical theories and concepts into practice to address complex multidimensional public health problems. The primary purpose of this paper was to conduct a narrative literature review-addressing role of ethics in developing curriculum in programs and schools of public health, ethics-related instruction in schools and programs of public health and the role of ethics in developing a competent public health workforce. Methods: An open search of various health databases including Google scholar and Ebscohost yielded 15 articles related to use of ethics in public health practice or public health training and the salient features were reported. Results: Results indicated a variable amount of ethics’ related training in schools and programs of public health along with public health practitioner training across the nation. Bioethics, medical ethics and public health ethics were found to be subspecialties’ needing separate ethical frameworks to guide decision making. Conclusions: Ethics based curricular and non-curricular training for emerging public health professionals from schools and programs of public health in the United States is extremely essential. In the current age of public health challenges faced in the United States and globally, to have an ethically untrained public health force is arguably, immoral and unethical and jeopardizes population health. There is an urgent need to develop innovative ethic based curriculums in academia as well as finding effective means to translate these curricular competencies into public health practice. PMID:23113159

  5. Public health ethics related training for public health workforce: an emerging need in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, A; Bitto, A

    2012-01-01

    Ethics is a discipline, which primarily deals with what is moral and immoral behavior. Public Health Ethics is translation of ethical theories and concepts into practice to address complex multidimensional public health problems. The primary purpose of this paper was to conduct a narrative literature review-addressing role of ethics in developing curriculum in programs and schools of public health, ethics-related instruction in schools and programs of public health and the role of ethics in developing a competent public health workforce. An open search of various health databases including Google scholar and Ebscohost yielded 15 articles related to use of ethics in public health practice or public health training and the salient features were reported. Results indicated a variable amount of ethics' related training in schools and programs of public health along with public health practitioner training across the nation. Bioethics, medical ethics and public health ethics were found to be subspecialties' needing separate ethical frameworks to guide decision making. Ethics based curricular and non-curricular training for emerging public health professionals from schools and programs of public health in the United States is extremely essential. In the current age of public health challenges faced in the United States and globally, to have an ethically untrained public health force is arguably, immoral and unethical and jeopardizes population health. There is an urgent need to develop innovative ethic based curriculums in academia as well as finding effective means to translate these curricular competencies into public health practice.

  6. The Afrocentric Paradigm in Health-Related Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Beverly D.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the potential role of culture in health-related physical activity participation, discussing kinesiology and reporting results from a health-related physical activity study of women, some of whom had taken a culturally designed aerobics class. Participants demonstrated the positive impact of culture on physical activity participation.…

  7. A Model for Training Public Health Workers in Health Policy: the Nebraska Health Policy Academy

    PubMed Central

    Brandert, Kathleen; McCarthy, Claudine; Grimm, Brandon; Svoboda, Colleen; Palm, David

    2014-01-01

    There is growing recognition that health goals are more likely to be achieved and sustained if programs are complemented by appropriate changes in the policies, systems, and environments that shape their communities. However, the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to create and implement policy are among the major needs identified by practitioners at both the state and local levels. This article describes the structure and content of the Nebraska Health Policy Academy (the Academy), a 9-month program developed to meet the demand for this training. The Academy is a competency-based training program that aims to increase the capacity of Nebraska’s state and local public health staff and their community partners to use public health policy and law as a public health tool. Our initiative allows for participation across a large, sparsely populated state; is grounded in adult learning theory; introduces the key principles and practices of policy, systems, and environmental change; and is offered free of charge to the state’s public health workforce. Challenges and lessons learned when offering workforce development on public health policy efforts are discussed. PMID:24831286

  8. A model for training public health workers in health policy: the Nebraska Health Policy Academy.

    PubMed

    Brandert, Kathleen; McCarthy, Claudine; Grimm, Brandon; Svoboda, Colleen; Palm, David; Stimpson, Jim P

    2014-05-15

    There is growing recognition that health goals are more likely to be achieved and sustained if programs are complemented by appropriate changes in the policies, systems, and environments that shape their communities. However, the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to create and implement policy are among the major needs identified by practitioners at both the state and local levels. This article describes the structure and content of the Nebraska Health Policy Academy (the Academy), a 9-month program developed to meet the demand for this training. The Academy is a competency-based training program that aims to increase the capacity of Nebraska's state and local public health staff and their community partners to use public health policy and law as a public health tool. Our initiative allows for participation across a large, sparsely populated state; is grounded in adult learning theory; introduces the key principles and practices of policy, systems, and environmental change; and is offered free of charge to the state's public health workforce. Challenges and lessons learned when offering workforce development on public health policy efforts are discussed.

  9. NATO survey of mental health training in army recruits.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amy B; Delahaij, Roos; Bailey, Suzanne M; Van den Berge, Carlo; Parmak, Merle; van Tussenbroek, Barend; Puente, José M; Landratova, Sandra; Kral, Pavel; Kreim, Guenter; Rietdijk, Deirdre; McGurk, Dennis; Castro, Carl Andrew

    2013-07-01

    To-date, there has been no international review of mental health resilience training during Basic Training nor an assessment of what service members perceive as useful from their perspective. In response to this knowledge gap, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Human Factors & Medicine Research & Technology Task Group "Mental Health Training" initiated a survey and interview with seven to twenty recruits from nine nations to inform the development of such training (N = 121). All nations provided data from soldiers joining the military as volunteers, whereas two nations also provided data from conscripts. Results from the volunteer data showed relatively consistent ranking in terms of perceived demands, coping strategies, and preferences for resilience skill training across the nations. Analysis of data from conscripts identified a select number of differences compared to volunteers. Subjects also provided examples of coping with stress during Basic Training that can be used in future training; themes are presented here. Results are designed to show the kinds of demands facing new recruits and coping methods used to overcome these demands to develop relevant resilience training for NATO nations.

  10. Review-Research on the physical training model of human body based on HQ.

    PubMed

    Junjie, Liu

    2016-11-01

    Health quotient (HQ) is the newest health culture and concept in the 21st century, and the analysis of the human body sports model is not enough mature at present, what's more, the purpose of this paper is to study the integration of the two subjects the health quotient and the sport model. This paper draws the conclusion that physical training and education in colleges and universities can improve the health quotient, and it will make students possess a more healthy body and mind. Then through a new rigid body model of sports to simulate the human physical exercise. After that this paper has an in-depth study on the dynamic model of the human body movement on the basis of establishing the matrix and equation. The simulation results of the human body bicycle riding and pole throwing show that the human body joint movement simulation can be realized and it has a certain operability as well. By means of such simulated calculation, we can come to a conclusion that the movement of the ankle joint, knee joint and hip joint's motion law and real motion are basically the same. So it further verify the accuracy of the motion model, which lay the foundation of other research movement model, also, the study of the movement model is an important method in the study of human health in the future.

  11. Does training frequency and supervision affect compliance, performance and muscular health? A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dalager, Tina; Bredahl, Thomas G V; Pedersen, Mogens T; Boyle, Eleanor; Andersen, Lars L; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to determine the effect of one weekly hour of specific strength training within working hours, performed with the same total training volume but with different training frequencies and durations, or with different levels of supervision, on compliance, muscle health and performance, behavior and work performance. In total, 573 office workers were cluster-randomized to: 1 WS: one 60-min supervised session/week, 3 WS: three 20-min supervised sessions/week, 9 WS: nine 7-min supervised sessions/week, 3 MS: three 20-min sessions/week with minimal supervision, or REF: a reference group without training. Outcomes were diary-based compliance, total training volume, muscle performance and questionnaire-based health, behavior and work performance. Comparisons were made among the WS training groups and between 3 WS and 3 MS. If no difference, training groups were collapsed (TG) and compared with REF. Results demonstrated similar degrees of compliance, mean(range) of 39(33-44)%, and total training volume, 13.266(11.977-15.096)kg. Musculoskeletal pain in neck and shoulders were reduced with approx. 50% in TG, which was significant compared with REF. Only the training groups improved significantly their muscle strength 8(4-13)% and endurance 27(12-37)%, both being significant compared with REF. No change in workability, productivity or self-rated health was demonstrated. Secondary analysis showed exercise self-efficacy to be a significant predictor of compliance. Regardless of training schedule and supervision, similar degrees of compliance were shown together with reduced musculoskeletal pain and improved muscle performance. These findings provide evidence that a great degree of flexibility is legitimate for companies in planning future implementation of physical exercise programs at the workplace. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027390. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Models of Professional and Paraprofessional Training in Refugee Mental Health. Task VI--Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshino, George; Bamford, Pauline

    Pursuant to the mission of the University of Minnesota's Mental Health Technical Assistance Center for the state refugee assistance programs, this report presents models of culturally sensitive training for professional and paraprofessional personnel who provide mental health service to refugees. After an introduction which places this report in…

  13. Mental Health Technician Training Program, Desert Willow Training Center, March 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    Founded in 1971, the program was designed to allow Indian Health Service (IHS) trainees to take as little or as much training as they needed to fill their agency's requirements and their own career ambitions. A full complement of courses leading to an associate degree in Mental Health Technology was developed for the Center and accredited through…

  14. Navajo Area Health and Physical Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomah, Kent; And Others

    Based on health education needs of Navajo children as established by the Navajo Area health and physical education committees, this curriculum guideline for health and physical education is delineated into three phases reflecting emphasis of instructional techniques (introductory, exploration/extended learning, widened learning) and three levels…

  15. Health-Related Measures of Children's Physical Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell R.

    1991-01-01

    Summarizes health-related physical fitness measurement procedures for children, emphasizing field measures. Health-related physical fitness encompasses cardiorespiratory endurance, body composition, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility. The article presents several issues pertinent to research on health-related fitness testing. (SM)

  16. The Role of Bilingual Workers without Professional Mental Health Training in Mental Health Services for Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egli, Eric

    This paper discusses the use of bilingual workers who do not have formal mental health training as mediators and providers of mental health care for refugees. The introduction provides a background discussion of the need for refugee mental health services, the characteristics of bilingual mental health workers, and the work places and expectations…

  17. Development of Oral Health Training for Rural and Remote Aboriginal Health Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacza, Tom; Steele, Lesley; Tennant, Marc

    2001-01-01

    A culturally appropriate oral health training course tailored to the needs of rural Aboriginal health workers was developed in Western Australia. The course is taught in three modules ranging from introductory material to comprehensive practical and theoretical knowledge of basic dental health care. The program encourages Aboriginal health workers…

  18. Physical health of people in prison.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-01-11

    Essential facts Since 2013, NHS England has commissioned health services for prisoners in England. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) says health care in prison plays an important role in identifying health needs, including chronic conditions.

  19. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Brittany; Muhumuza, Ibra; Mumena, Chris; Isyagi, Moses; Barrow, Jane; Meeks, Valli

    2013-03-08

    Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined 'vertical' direct patient care training with 'horizontal' interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come.

  20. Including oral health training in a health system strengthening program in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Brittany; Muhumuza, Ibra; Mumena, Chris; Isyagi, Moses; Barrow, Jane; Meeks, Valli

    2013-01-01

    Rwanda's Ministry of Health, with the Clinton Health Access Initiative, implemented the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Program. The purpose of the program is to train and retain high-quality health care professionals to improve and sustain health in Rwanda. In May 2011, an oral health team from Rwanda and the United States proposed that oral health be included in the HRH Program, due to its important links to health, in a recommendation to the Rwandan Ministry of Health. The proposal outlined a diagonal approach to curriculum design that supports the principles of global health through interconnected training for both treatment and collaborative prevention, rather than discipline-based fragmented training focused on isolated risk factors. It combined 'vertical' direct patient care training with 'horizontal' interdisciplinary training to address common underlying risk factors and associations for disease through primary care, program retention, and sustainability. The proposal was accepted by the Ministry of Health and was approved for funding by the US Government and The Global Fund. Rwanda's first Bachelor of Dental Surgery program, which is in the planning phase, is being developed. Competencies, the training curriculum, insurance and payment schemes, licensure, and other challenges are currently being addressed. With the Ministry of Health supporting the dental HRH efforts and fully appreciating the importance of oral health, all are hopeful that these developments will ultimately lead to more robust oral health data collection, a well-trained and well-retained dental profession, and vastly improved oral health and overall health for the people of Rwanda in the decades to come.

  1. The Effects of Strength Training on Strength and Health-Related Quality of Life in Older Adult Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damush, Teresa M.; Damush, Joseph G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluates the short-term effects of an accessible exercise intervention on the strength and health-related quality of life among older women. Results of an 8-week resistance training intervention revealed significant increases in three major muscles. However, there were no significant changes on either mental or physical health functioning.…

  2. Preventive Medicine and Public Health Training Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Harkin, Tom [D-IA

    2009-03-25

    Senate - 03/25/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. Effects of two different 5 weeks training programs on the physical fitness of military recruits.

    PubMed

    Sporiš, Goran; Harasin, Dražen; Baić, Mario; Krističević, Tomislav; Krakan, Ivan; Milanović, Zoran; Cular, Dražen; Bagarić-Krakan, Lucija

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of programmed continuous endurance and relative strength training (CERS) with the basic military physical readiness training (BMPR) on the physical readiness. Croatian military recruits (21.3 ± 1.9 years) were divided in the CERS (N = 48) and BMPR (N = 76) groups. Training sessions were conducted three times a week for a total of 5 weeks. The t-test determined positive training effects for both training programs. Significant positive changes in BMPR group were measured in almost all measured variables. In CERS group, besides the 20 m dash run, statistically significant positive changes were not determined in standing horizontal jump, pull-ups and sit and reach test. The positive training effects in both training groups were achieved because of the low initial physical readiness level of the recruits and a short training period in which the statistically significant differences between programs could not be achieved.

  4. Integrating Healthy Communities concepts into health professions training.

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, G; Cashman, S B; Seifer, S D; Inouye, A; Hagopian, A

    2000-01-01

    To meet the demands of the evolving health care system, health professionals need skills that will allow them to anticipate and respond to the broader social determinants of health. To ensure that these skills are learned during their professional education and training, health professions institutions must look beyond the medical model of caring for communities. Models in Seattle and Roanoke demonstrate the curricular changes necessary to ensure that students in the health professions are adequately prepared to contribute to building Healthy Communities in the 21st century. In addition to these models, a number of resources are available to help promote the needed institutional changes. PMID:10968767

  5. Physical activity promotion in the health care system.

    PubMed

    Vuori, Ilkka M; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) and exercise training (ET) have great potential in the prevention, management, and rehabilitation of a variety of diseases, but this potential has not been fully realized in clinical practice. The health care system (HCS) could do much more to support patients in increasing their PA and ET. However, counseling on ET is not used widely by the HCS owing partly to attitudes but mainly to practical obstacles. Extensive searches of MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and ScienceDirect for literature published between January 1, 2000, and January 31, 2013, provided data to assess the critical characteristics of ET counseling. The evidence reveals that especially brief ET counseling is an efficient, effective, and cost-effective means to increase PA and ET and to bring considerable clinical benefits to various patient groups. Furthermore, it can be practiced as part of the routine work of the HCS. However, there is a need and feasible means to increase the use and improve the quality of ET counseling. To include PA and ET promotion as important means of comprehensive health care and disease management, a fundamental change is needed. Because exercise is medicine, it should be seen and dealt with in the same ways as pharmaceuticals and other medical interventions regarding the basic and continuing education and training of health care personnel and processes to assess its needs and to prescribe and deliver it, to reimburse the services related to it, and to fund research on its efficacy, effectiveness, feasibility, and interactions and comparability with other preventive, therapeutic, and rehabilitative modalities. This change requires credible, strong, and skillful advocacy inside the medical community and the HCS.

  6. [Evaluation of the effectiveness of home-based physical activity promotion by community health workers].

    PubMed

    Costa, Evelyn Fabiana; Andrade, Douglas Roque; Garcia, Leandro Martin Totaro; Ribeiro, Evelyn Helena Corgosinho; Santos, Taynã Ishi dos; Florindo, Alex Antonio

    2015-10-01

    This study analyzed the effectiveness of physical activity promotion by community health workers (CHW) during home visits. This was a non-randomized controlled trial that lasted six months, with one group of CHW that received training to promote physical activity during home visits among users of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) and a control group. Physical activity and stages of behavior change were evaluated in 176 adults (n = 90 in the intervention group and n = 86 in the control group) assisted by the CHW. Associations, prevalence ratios, and generalized estimate equations were conducted to verify differences between groups. No evidence of differences in physical activity and stages of behavior change were observed between the two groups. CHW from the intervention group conducted more home visits promoting physical activity among elders, those with low schooling, unemployed, and those with chronic diseases. It is important to reassess the work and priorities of CHW to expand physical activity promotion under the SUS.

  7. Context counts: training health workers in and for rural and remote areas.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Roger; Neusy, Andre-Jacques

    2010-10-01

    Access to well trained and motivated health workers is the major rural health issue. Without local access, it is unlikely that people in rural and remote communities will be able to achieve the Millennium Development Goals. Studies in many countries have shown that the three factors most strongly associated with entering rural practice are: (i) a rural background; (ii) positive clinical and educational experiences in rural settings as part of undergraduate medical education; and (iii) targeted training for rural practice at the postgraduate level. This paper presents evidence for policy initiatives involving the training of medical students from, in and for rural and remote areas. We give examples of medical schools in different regions of the world that are using an evidence-based and context-driven educational approach to producing skilled and motivated health workers. We demonstrate how context influences the design and implementation of different rural education programmes. Successful programmes have overcome major obstacles including negative assumptions and attitudes, and limitations of human, physical, educational and financial resources. Training rural health workers in the rural setting is likely to result in greatly improved recruitment and retention of skilled health-care providers in rural underserved areas with consequent improvement in access to health care for the local communities.

  8. The quest for One Health: human resource training aspects.

    PubMed

    Kiwara, Angwara; Semakafu, Ave-Maria; Frumence, Gasto

    2014-04-23

    Appropriately trained Human Resources for Health (HRH) are key inputs into One Health. '… more than 50% of all infectious diseases of humans originate from animals and that, of the emerging diseases about 75% could be traced back to animal origin' (Rweyemamu et al. 2006). A comprehensive understanding of the social determinants of health, through an appropriate training model for HRH, is a key input. This study aimed to explore if human and veterinary medical schools were using such a model or providing time for this model in their curricula. Specific objectives were to: determine the time that human and veterinary medical schools' curricula provide for subjects or courses related to the social determinants of health; analyse the curricula contents to establish how they relate to the social determinants of health; and explore how a bio-medical model may influence the graduates' understanding and practice of One Health. A review of human and veterinary graduate-level medical schools' curricula in East Africa was performed in April 2013 and May 2013. The findings were: in the curricula, SDH contents for knowledge enhancement about One Health are minimal and that teaching is Germ Theory model-driven and partisan. Out of the total training time for physicians and veterinarians, less than 10% was provided for the social determinants of health-related courses. In conclusion, the curricula and training times provided are inadequate for graduates to fully understand the social determinants of health and their role in One Health. Furthermore, the Germ Theory model that has been adopted addresses secondary causes and is inappropriate. There is a need for more in-depth model. This article suggests that a vicious cycle of ill-health model must be taught.

  9. Worksite intervention effects on physical health: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Chow, Chin-Moi; Kirby, Adrienne; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2006-09-01

    Overweight and physical inactivity are risk factors for increased disease burden and health care expenditure. Well-designed studies are still needed to determine the treatment efficacy of worksite interventions targeting such risk factors. This randomized controlled trial was conducted at one of Australia's casinos in 2002-2003, to investigate the effects of a comprehensive exercise and lifestyle intervention on physical fitness. Only 6.4% of the workforce expressed interest in being study participants. Seventy-three employees (aged 32 +/- 8 years, 51% overweight/obese, 73% shift workers and 52% women) were recruited and randomized to treatment or wait-list control groups for 24 weeks, 44 of whom completed the intervention. Components of the intervention include supervised moderate-to-high intensity exercise including combined aerobic (at least 20 min duration 3 days/week) and weight-training (for an estimated 30 min completed 2-3 days/week), and dietary/health education (delivered via group seminars, one-on-one counselling and literature through the provision of a worksite manual). ANCOVA, by intention-to-treat and of study completers, found significant between-group differences in the mean waist circumference and predicted maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), favouring the intervention, but effects were concentrated in one subject. For study completers, between-group differences in the mean waist circumference (82.3 +/- 9.2 versus 90.5 +/- 17.8 cm, p = 0.01) and predicted VO2max (47 versus 41 ml/kg/min, p < 0.001) remained significant without the outlier, favouring the intervention. Higher intervention compliance predicted greater improvements in physical fitness. No significant effects on body mass or body mass index were found. This worksite intervention significantly improved waist circumference and aerobic fitness in healthy but sedentary employees, most of whom were shift workers. Worksite interventions have the potential to counter the increasing burden of

  10. Optimism and Physical Health: A Meta-analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Heather N.; Greenhouse, Joel B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Prior research links optimism to physical health, but the strength of the association has not been systematically evaluated. Purpose The purpose of this study is to conduct a meta-analytic review to determine the strength of the association between optimism and physical health. Methods The findings from 83 studies, with 108 effect sizes (ESs), were included in the analyses, using random-effects models. Results Overall, the mean ES characterizing the relationship between optimism and physical health outcomes was 0.17, p<.001. ESs were larger for studies using subjective (versus objective) measures of physical health. Subsidiary analyses were also conducted grouping studies into those that focused solely on mortality, survival, cardiovascular outcomes, physiological markers (including immune function), immune function only, cancer outcomes, outcomes related to pregnancy, physical symptoms, or pain. In each case, optimism was a significant predictor of health outcomes or markers, all p<.001. Conclusions Optimism is a significant predictor of positive physical health outcomes. PMID:19711142

  11. Adolescent health care education and training: insights from Israel.

    PubMed

    Kerem, Nogah C; Hardoff, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing need for health care professionals to extend their knowledge in adolescent health care. Formal training curricula in adolescent medicine have been established in the United States, Canada, and Australia, yet many other countries have developed shorter training programs to enable interested physicians to further pursue knowledge and practical experience in delivering improved quality health care for adolescents. The Israeli experience in building an infrastructure that allows students and physicians to learn about adolescent medicine and to train in the field is described. It includes a series of lectures and seminars for medical students during medical school and at the clinical rotations in pediatric wards; the development of hospital-based and community-based multidisciplinary adolescent health services where residents can practice adolescent health care; a 3-year diploma course in adolescent medicine for specialists in pediatrics and family medicine; mini courses in adolescent medicine for pediatricians and family practitioners working in community settings; and a simulated patient-based program regarding communication with adolescents, aimed for all professional levels - medical students, residents, and specialists. This infrastructure has been developed to create a leading group of physicians, who are able to operate adolescent clinics and to teach adolescent medicine. Recently, a formal fellowship program in adolescent medicine has been approved by the Scientific Council of the Israel Medical Association. The Israeli experience described here could be applied in countries, where formal training programs in adolescent health care are not yet established.

  12. Virtual reality training for health-care professionals.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Fabrizia; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2003-08-01

    Emerging changes in health-care delivery are having a significant impact on the structure of health-care professionals' education. Today it is recognized that medical knowledge doubles every 6-8 years, with new medical procedures emerging everyday. While the half-life of medical information is so short, the average physician practices 30 years and the average nurse 40 years. Continuing education thus represents an important challenge to face. Recent advances in educational technology are offering an increasing number of innovative learning tools. Among these, Virtual Reality represents a promising area with high potential of enhancing the training of health-care professionals. Virtual Reality Training can provide a rich, interactive, engaging educational context, thus supporting experiential learning-by-doing; it can, in fact, contribute to raise interest and motivation in trainees and to effectively support skills acquisition and transfer, since the learning process can be settled within an experiential framework. Current virtual training applications for health-care differ a lot as to both their technological/multimedia sophistication and to the types of skills trained, varying for example from telesurgical applications to interactive simulations of human body and brain, to virtual worlds for emergency training. Other interesting applications include the development of immersive 3D environments for training psychiatrists and psychologists in the treatment of mental disorders. This paper has the main aim of discussing the rationale and main benefits for the use of virtual reality in health-care education and training. Significant research and projects carried out in this field will also be presented, followed by discussion on key issues concerning current limitations and future development directions.

  13. Elementary Physical Education Teachers' Content Knowledge of Physical Activity and Health-Related Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Jose A.; Disch, James G.; Morales, Julio

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine elementary physical education teachers' content knowledge of physical activity and health-related fitness. Sixty-four female and 24 male teachers completed the Appropriate Physical Activity and Health-Related Fitness test. Descriptive statistics results indicated that the mean percentage score for the test…

  14. Elementary Physical Education Teachers' Content Knowledge of Physical Activity and Health-Related Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Jose A.; Disch, James G.; Morales, Julio

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine elementary physical education teachers' content knowledge of physical activity and health-related fitness. Sixty-four female and 24 male teachers completed the Appropriate Physical Activity and Health-Related Fitness test. Descriptive statistics results indicated that the mean percentage score for the test…

  15. Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, and Health. C.H. McCloy Research Lecture: 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Steven N.

    1993-01-01

    Examines recent evidence on the relations between physical activity, physical fitness, and health, noting the possible causal nature of the associations. The article evaluates the public health burden of sedentary lifestyles in the United States and provides suggestions for increasing participation in physical activity. (SM)

  16. Training health professionals in conducting maternal death reviews.

    PubMed

    De Brouwere, Vincent; Zinnen, Véronique; Delvaux, Thérèse; Nana, Philip Njotang; Leke, Robert

    2014-10-01

    In countries where maternal death review (MDR) sessions are proposed as an intervention to improve quality of obstetric care, training focuses on the theory behind this method. However, experience shows that health staff lack confidence to apply the theory if they have not attended a practical training session. To address this problem, a training curriculum based on the new guidelines from the FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative for preparing and conducting MDR sessions was designed and tested in Cameroon. This curriculum is competency-based and consists primarily of practical individual or group exercises.

  17. Formal training in forensic mental health: psychiatry and psychology.

    PubMed

    Sadoff, Robert L; Dattilio, Frank M

    2012-01-01

    The field of forensic mental health has grown exponentially in the past decades to include forensic psychiatrists and psychologists serving as the primary experts to the court systems. However, many colleagues have chosen to pursue the avenue of serving as forensic experts without obtaining formal training and experience. This article discusses the importance of formal education, training and experience for psychiatrists and psychologists working in forensic settings and the ethical implications that befall those who fail to obtain such credentials. Specific aspects of training and supervised experience are discussed in detail.

  18. [Physical activity and exercise training in the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Claudia; Lackinger, Christian; Weitgasser, Raimund; Haber, Paul; Niebauer, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Lifestyle in general (nutrition, exercise, smoking habits), besides the genetic predisposition, is known to be a strong predictor for the development of diabetes. Exercise in particular is not only useful in improving glycaemia by lowering insulin resistance and positively affect insulin secretion, but to reduce cardiovascular risk.To gain substantial health benefits a minimum of 150 min of moderate or vigorous intense aerobic physical activity and muscle strengthening activities per week are needed. The positive effect of training correlates directly with the amount of fitness gained and lasts only as long as the fitness level is sustained. The effect of exercise is independent of age and gender. It is reversible and reproducible.Based on the large evidence of exercise referral and prescription the Austrian Diabetes Associations aims to implement the position of a "physical activity adviser" in multi-professional diabetes care.

  19. Environment as 'Brain Training': A review of geographical and physical environmental influences on cognitive ageing.

    PubMed

    Cassarino, Marica; Setti, Annalisa

    2015-09-01

    Global ageing demographics coupled with increased urbanisation pose major challenges to the provision of optimal living environments for older persons, particularly in relation to cognitive health. Although animal studies emphasize the benefits of enriched environments for cognition, and brain training interventions have shown that maintaining or improving cognitive vitality in older age is possible, our knowledge of the characteristics of our physical environment which are protective for cognitive ageing is lacking. The present review analyses different environmental characteristics (e.g. urban vs. rural settings, presence of green) in relation to cognitive performance in ageing. Studies of direct and indirect associations between physical environment and cognitive performance are reviewed in order to describe the evidence that our living contexts constitute a measurable factor in determining cognitive ageing.

  20. Leadership training for oral health professionals: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Taichman, Russell S; Parkinson, Joseph W; Nelson, Bonnie A; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C; Thompson, Joseph F

    2012-02-01

    With dramatic changes in the scope and mode of delivering oral health care on the horizon, a strategic approach to addressing the emerging opportunities and challenges is required. Such an approach will demand new and sustained initiatives to develop leaders with the skills, knowledge, and passion to guide oral health care into the future. The purpose of this position paper is to define the need for leadership training programs for dental and dental hygiene students to become future leaders. Whether these oral health professionals become leaders within a solo or group practice or at the local or national level of their profession, they must be given the mindset and tools to lead. This position paper will describe goals for leadership training and give examples of some programs that currently exist in dental education and other professional settings as the background for a call to action for dental education to provide leadership training opportunities for its students.

  1. The University–Public Health Partnership for Public Health Research Training in Quebec, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Hamelin, Anne-Marie; Malowany, Maureen; Levy, Joseph; Rossignol, Michel; Bergeron, Pierre; Kishchuk, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing effective preventive interventions to address contemporary public health problems requires improved capacity for applied public health research. A particular need has been recognized for capacity development in population health intervention research to address the complex multidisciplinary challenges of developing, implementing, and evaluating public health practices, intervention programs, and policies. Research training programs need to adapt to these new realities. We have presented an example of a 2003 to 2015 training program in transdisciplinary research on public health interventions that embedded doctoral and postdoctoral trainees in public health organizations in Quebec, Canada. This university–public health partnership for research training is an example of how to link science and practice to meet emerging needs in public health. PMID:27854518

  2. The University-Public Health Partnership for Public Health Research Training in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Gilles; Hamelin, Anne-Marie; Malowany, Maureen; Levy, Joseph; Rossignol, Michel; Bergeron, Pierre; Kishchuk, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing effective preventive interventions to address contemporary public health problems requires improved capacity for applied public health research. A particular need has been recognized for capacity development in population health intervention research to address the complex multidisciplinary challenges of developing, implementing, and evaluating public health practices, intervention programs, and policies. Research training programs need to adapt to these new realities. We have presented an example of a 2003 to 2015 training program in transdisciplinary research on public health interventions that embedded doctoral and postdoctoral trainees in public health organizations in Quebec, Canada. This university-public health partnership for research training is an example of how to link science and practice to meet emerging needs in public health.

  3. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 3--Recommended Amounts of Physical Activity for Optimal Health)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the third in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  4. Physical Activity: A Tool for Improving Health (Part 3--Recommended Amounts of Physical Activity for Optimal Health)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    By promoting physical activities and incorporating them into their community-based programs, Extension professionals are improving the health of individuals, particularly those with limited resources. This article is the third in a three-part series describing the benefits of physical activity for human health: (1) biological health benefits of…

  5. Training physician investigators in medicine and public health research.

    PubMed

    Gourevitch, Marc N; Jay, Melanie R; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Dreyer, Benard P; Foltin, George L; Lipkin, Mack; Schwartz, Mark D

    2012-07-01

    We have described and evaluated the impact of a unique fellowship program designed to train postdoctoral, physician fellows in research at the interface of medicine and public health. We developed a rigorous curriculum in public health content and research methods and fostered linkages with research mentors and local public health agencies. Didactic training provided the foundation for fellows' mentored research initiatives, which addressed real-world challenges in advancing the health status of vulnerable urban populations. Two multidisciplinary cohorts (6 per cohort) completed this 2-year degree-granting program and engaged in diverse public health research initiatives on topics such as improving pediatric care outcomes through health literacy interventions, reducing hospital readmission rates among urban poor with multiple comorbidities, increasing cancer screening uptake, and broadening the reach of addiction screening and intervention. The majority of fellows (10/12) published their fellowship work and currently have a career focused in public health-related research or practice (9/12). A fellowship training program can prepare physician investigators for research careers that bridge the divide between medicine and public health.

  6. Mental health following traumatic physical injury: an integrative literature review.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Taneal; Foster, Kim; Curtis, Kate

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the state of knowledge on the relationship between physical trauma and mental health in patients admitted to hospital with traumatic physical injury. Adults who sustain traumatic physical injury can experience a range of mental health problems related to the injury and subsequent changes in physical health and function. However early screening and identification of mental health problems after traumatic physical injury is inconsistent and not routine during the hospital admission process for the physically injured patient. Integrative review methods were used. Data were sourced for the period 1995-2010 from EMBASE, CINAHL, MEDLINE and PsycINFO and hand searching of key references. Abstracts were screened by 3 researchers against inclusion/exclusion criteria. Forty-one papers met the inclusion criteria. Data were retrieved, appraised for quality, analysed, and synthesised into 5 main categories. Forty-one primary research papers on the relationship between mental health and traumatic physical injury were reviewed. Studies showed that post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety were frequent sequelae associated with traumatic physical injury. However, these conditions were poorly identified and treated in the acute hospital phase despite their effect on physical health. There is limited understanding of the experience of traumatic physical injury, particularly in relation to mental health. Greater translation of research findings to practice is needed in order to promote routine screening, early identification and referral to treatment for mental health problems in this patient group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical exercise training interventions for children and young adults during and after treatment for childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Braam, Katja I; van der Torre, Patrick; Takken, Tim; Veening, Margreet A; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Kaspers, Gertjan J L

    2013-04-30

    A decreased physical fitness and impaired social functioning has been reported in patients and survivors of childhood cancer. This is influenced by the negative effects of disease and treatment of childhood cancer and by behavioural and social elements. Exercise training for adults during or after cancer therapy has frequently been reported to improve physical fitness and social functioning. More recently, literature on this subject became available for children and young adults with cancer, both during and after treatment. This review aimed to evaluate the effect of a physical exercise training intervention (at home, at a physical therapy centre, or hospital based) on the physical fitness of children with cancer, in comparison with the physical fitness in a care as usual control group. The intervention needed to be offered within the first five years from diagnosis.The second aim was to assess the effects of a physical exercise training intervention in this population on fatigue, anxiety, depression, self efficacy, and health-related quality of life and to assess the adverse effects of the intervention. For this review the electronic databases of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro, and ongoing trial registries were searched on 6 September 2011. In addition, a handsearch of reference lists and conference proceedings was performed in that same month. The review included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trials (CCTs) that compared the effects of physical exercise training with no training, in people who were within the first five years of their diagnosis of childhood cancer. By the use of standardised forms two review authors independently identified studies meeting the inclusion criteria, performed the data extraction, and assessed the risk of bias. Quality of the studies was rated by using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. Five articles were included in this review: four RCTs (14

  8. Hannover model for the implementation of physical and rehabilitation medicine teaching in undergraduate medical training.

    PubMed

    Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Schiller, Jörg; Schwarze, Monika; Fischer, Volkhard; Paulmann, Volker; Haller, Herrmann; Küther, Gerald

    2010-03-01

    As any patient may require rehabilitation and physical therapies, all physicians need to acquire at least a basic knowledge of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM). In 2005 PRM teaching was implemented in all phases of the curriculum for medical students in Germany. The curriculum includes, among others, the following topics: principles of rehabilitation; the model of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF); principles and effects of physiotherapy and occupational therapy; indications and contraindications for PRM interventions. Teaching of PRM topics is implemented from the first week in all phases of the curriculum, as: (i) lectures in the module "Introduction to Medicine (Propaedeuticum)"; (ii) a cross-sectional course entitled "Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine and Naturopathic Treatment (RPMN)"; (iii) single lectures on PRM in other fields; (iv) elective mandatory courses on the social model of rehabilitation, balneology, and others; and (v) the option to choose PRM as a subject for practical training. All modules are evaluated regularly by the students. Global ratings of the module "Propaedeuticum" were good, and of the cross-sectional course "RPMN" very good. The advanced part of the practical training was rated highly by the students. In conclusion, the implementation of teaching of PRM and other rehabilitation topics in undergraduate medical education is a successful concept that fulfils the criteria for education in medical school set out by the American Association of Academic Physiatrists.

  9. Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson's disease: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Alessandro; Barbirato, Dannyel; Araujo, Narahyana; Martins, Jose Vicente; Cavalcanti, Jose Luiz Sá; Santos, Tony Meireles; Coutinho, Evandro S; Laks, Jerson; Deslandes, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation is commonly used in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to improve their health and alleviate the symptoms. We compared the effects of three programs, strength training (ST), aerobic training (AT), and physiotherapy, on motor symptoms, functional capacity, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in PD patients. Twenty-two patients were recruited and randomized into three groups: AT (70% of maximum heart rate), ST (80% of one repetition maximum), and physiotherapy (in groups). Subjects participated in their respective interventions twice a week for 12 weeks. The assessments included measures of disease symptoms (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]), functional capacity (Senior Fitness Test), and EEG before and after 12 weeks of intervention. The PD motor symptoms (UPDRS-III) in the group of patients who performed ST and AT improved by 27.5% (effect size [ES]=1.25, confidence interval [CI]=-0.11, 2.25) and 35% (ES=1.34, CI=-0.16, 2.58), respectively, in contrast to the physiotherapy group, which showed a 2.9% improvement (ES=0.07, CI=-0.85, 0.99). Furthermore, the functional capacity of all three groups improved after the intervention. The mean frequency of the EEG analysis mainly showed the effect of the interventions on the groups (F=11.50, P=0.0001). ST and AT in patients with PD are associated with improved outcomes in disease symptoms and functional capacity.

  10. The Effects of a Non-Traditional Strength Training Program on the Health-Related Fitness Outcomes of Youth Strength Training Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Wendy; Foster, Byron

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which a non-traditional strength training program will impact the health-related fitness of youth. Researchers hypothesized that the strengthening program would positively affect the fitness outcomes. Participant physical education classes incorporated strengthening exercises three days…

  11. Strategies for combining physics videos and virtual laboratories in the training of physics teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Adriana; Vertchenko, Lev; Martins, Maria Inés

    2007-03-01

    Among the multimedia resources used in physics education, the most prominent are virtual laboratories and videos. On one hand, computer simulations and applets have very attractive graphic interfaces, showing an incredible amount of detail and movement. On the other hand, videos, offer the possibility of displaying high quality images, and are becoming more feasible with the increasing availability of digital resources. We believe it is important to discuss, throughout the teacher training program, both the functionality of information and communication technology (ICT) in physics education and, the varied applications of these resources. In our work we suggest the introduction of ICT resources in a sequence integrating these important tools in the teacher training program, as opposed to the traditional approach, in which virtual laboratories and videos are introduced separately. In this perspective, when we introduce and utilize virtual laboratory techniques we also provide for its use in videos, taking advantage of graphic interfaces. Thus the students in our program learn to use instructional software in the production of videos for classroom use.

  12. Benefits of Strength and Skill-based Training During Primary School Physical Education.

    PubMed

    Faigenbaum, Avery D; Bush, Jill A; McLoone, Ryan P; Kreckel, Michael C; Farrell, Anne; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Kang, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Physical education (PE) programs are evolving from a traditional skill-centered model to a health-centered model that focuses on time engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA). However, improvements in muscular fitness and fundamental movement skills are prerequisites for continuous participation in MVPA. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of integrative strength and skill-based training on measures of physical fitness in children during primary school PE. Children from two fourth grade PE classes were cluster randomized into either a fundamental integrative training (FIT) group (n = 20) or a control (CON) group (n = 21). The 8-week FIT program was performed twice per week during the first ∼ 1 5 minutes of each PE class and consisted of a circuit of strength and skill-based exercises. All participants were assessed for health- and skill-related fitness before and after the intervention. The outcome variables were analyzed via 2 × 2 repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc analysis. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) interaction of group by time was observed in FIT participants with improvements in aerobic capacity, push-ups, sit and reach flexibility, and single-leg hop. There were no groups by time effects for the sit-up and long jump tests. No injuries were reported. These findings highlight the potential benefits of integrating both health- and skill-related fitness components into primary school PE as evidenced by improvements in measures of aerobic capacity and muscular fitness in children.

  13. Strengthening health workforce capacity through work-based training.

    PubMed

    Matovu, Joseph K B; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Mawemuko, Susan; Okui, Olico; Bazeyo, William; Serwadda, David

    2013-01-24

    Although much attention has been given to increasing the number of health workers, less focus has been directed at developing models of training that address real-life workplace needs. Makerere University School of Public Health (MakSPH) with funding support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed an eight-month modular, in-service work-based training program aimed at strengthening the capacity for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) in health service delivery. This capacity building program, initiated in 2008, is offered to in-service health professionals working in Uganda. The purpose of the training is to strengthen the capacity to provide quality health services through hands-on training that allows for skills building with minimum work disruptions while encouraging greater involvement of other institutional staff to enhance continuity and sustainability. The hands-on training uses practical gaps and challenges at the workplace through a highly participatory process. Trainees work with other staff to design and implement 'projects' meant to address work-related priority problems, working closely with mentors. Trainees' knowledge and skills are enhanced through short courses offered at specific intervals throughout the course. Overall, 143 trainees were admitted between 2008 and 2011. Of these, 120 (84%) from 66 institutions completed the training successfully. Of the trainees, 37% were Social Scientists, 34% were Medical/Nursing/Clinical Officers, 5.8% were Statisticians, while 23% belonged to other professions. Majority of the trainees (80%) were employed by Non-Government Organizations while 20% worked with the public health sector. Trainees implemented 66 projects which addressed issues such as improving access to health care services; reducing waiting time for patients; strengthening M&E systems; and improving data collection and reporting. The projects implemented aimed to improve trainees

  14. Community Health Resource Training for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Elizabeth L.; Schrader, David C.

    This paper applies concepts from intercultural communication theory, adult learning theory, and traditional Native American medicine to a specific learning experience for Native Americans. The background is an educational opportunity offered by the Indian Health Services Bureau to tribe members to become employed on their reservations as Health…

  15. Training family physicians in community health centers: a health workforce solution.

    PubMed

    Morris, Carl G; Johnson, Brian; Kim, Sara; Chen, Frederick

    2008-04-01

    For more than 25 years, family medicine residencies (FMRs) have worked with community health centers (CHCs) to train family physicians. Despite the long history of this affiliation, little research has been done to understand the effects of training residents in this underserved community setting. This study compares CHC and non-CHC-trained family physicians regarding practice location, job and training satisfaction, and recruitment and retention to underserved areas. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a cohort of the 838 graduates from the WAMI (Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) Family Medicine Residency Network from 1986-2002. CHC-trained family physicians were almost twice as likely to work in underserved settings than their non-CHC-trained counterparts (64% versus 37%). When controlling for gender, percent full-time equivalent, and years from graduation, CHC-trained family physicians were 2.7 times more likely to work in underserved settings than non-CHC-trained family physicians. CHC and non-CHC-trained family physicians report similar job and training satisfaction and scope of practice. Training family physicians in CHCs meets the health workforce needs of the underserved, enhances the recruitment of family physicians to CHCs, and prepares family physicians similarly to their non-CHC trained counterparts.

  16. Training the combat and operational stress control dog: an innovative modality for behavioral health.

    PubMed

    Krol, William

    2012-01-01

    Combat and operational stress control (COSC) dogs represent a new category of military working dog. America's VetDogs, a nongovernmental, not-for-profit organization, trains and provides therapy dogs to work with the US Army's combat and operational stress control teams deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq. By taking the therapy/service dog concept to the next level, these dogs have become an important modality in the Army's initiative to safeguard Soldiers' behavioral health while deployed, allowing COSC unit members to break down stigmas that are still present when dealing with behavioral health issues. The training process begins by choosing a pool of dogs, exposing them to different sensory experiences over several months, and training the primary and secondary handlers who will be responsible for the dogs while deployed in theater. After their deployment ends, the dogs are retrained by America's VetDogs to further serve in military or Veterans Administration medical centers as physical, occupational, or behavioral therapy dogs.

  17. A perinatal health framework for women with physical disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Monika; Long-Bellil, Linda M; Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Iezzoni, Lisa I

    2015-10-01

    Studies suggest that women with disabilities experience health and health care disparities before, during, and after pregnancy. However, existing perinatal health and health care frameworks do not address the needs and barriers faced by women with physical disabilities around the time of pregnancy. A new framework that addresses perinatal disparities among women with physical disabilities is needed. To propose a framework for examining perinatal health and health care disparities among women with physical disabilities. We developed a perinatal health framework guided by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the integrated perinatal health framework by Misra et al. The proposed framework uses a life span perspective in a manner that directly addresses the multiple determinants specific to women with physical disabilities around the time of pregnancy. The framework is based on longitudinal and integrated perspectives that take into account women's functional status and environment over their life course. The perinatal health framework for women with physical disabilities was developed to inform the way researchers and health care professionals address disparities in perinatal health and health care among women with physical disabilities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reach the Person behind the Dementia - Physical Therapists' Reflections and Strategies when Composing Physical Training

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Ellinor; Skelton, Dawn A.; Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a disease characterized by cognitive impairment and physical decline that worsens over time. Exercise is one lifestyle factor that has been identified as a potential means of reducing or delaying progression of the symptoms of dementia, maximizing function and independence. The purpose of this study was to explore physical therapists’ (PTs) experiences and reflections on facilitating high-intensity functional exercise with older people living with dementia, in residential care home settings. The study used a qualitative design based on interviews, individually or in small groups, with seven PTs engaged as leaders in the training of older people with dementia. The interviews were analyzed with a modified Grounded Theory method with focus on constant comparisons. To increase trustworthiness the study used triangulation within investigators and member checking. The core category “Discover and act in the moment—learn over time” reflects how the PTs continuously developed their own learning in an iterative process. They built on previous knowledge to communicate with residents and staff and to tailor the high intensity training in relation to each individual at that time point. The category "Be on your toes" highlights how the PTs searched for sufficient information about each individual, before and during training, by eliciting the person's current status from staff and by interpreting the person's body language. The category "Build a bond with a palette of strategies" describes the importance of confirmation to build up trust and the use of group members and the room to create an interplay between exercise and social interaction. These findings highlight the continuous iterative process of building on existing knowledge, sharing and reflecting, being alert to any alterations needed for individuals that day, communication skills (both with residents and staff) and building a relationship and trust with residents in the effective delivery of high

  19. Twelve best practices for team training evaluation in health care.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Sallie J; Salas, Eduardo; King, Heidi B

    2011-08-01

    Evaluation and measurement are the building blocks of effective skill development, transfer of training, maintenance and sustainment of effective team performance, and continuous improvement. Evaluation efforts have varied in their methods, time frame, measures, and design. On the basis of the existing body of work, 12 best practice principles were extrapolated from the science of evaluation and measurement into the practice of team training evaluation. Team training evaluation refers to efforts dedicated to enumerating the impact of training (1) across multiple dimensions, (2) across multiple settings, and (3) over time. Evaluations of efforts to optimize teamwork are often afterthoughts in an industry that is grounded in evidence-based practice. The best practices regarding team training evaluation are provided as practical reminders and guidance for continuing to build a balanced and robust body of evidence regarding the impact of team training in health care. THE 12 BEST PRACTICES: The best practices are organized around three phases of training: planning, implementation, and follow-up. Rooted in the science of team training evaluation and performance measurement, they range from Best Practice 1: Before designing training, start backwards: think about traditional frameworks for evaluation in reverse to Best Practice 7: Consider organizational, team, or other factors that may help (or hinder) the effects of training and then to Best Practice 12: Report evaluation results in a meaningful way, both internally and externally. Although the 12 best practices may be perceived as intuitive, they are intended to serve as reminders that the notion of evidence-based practice applies to quality improvement initiatives such as team training and team development as equally as it does to clinical intervention and improvement efforts.

  20. Physical Activity and Health: The Benefits of Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart Rate & ... DFCN Promotion Implementation Maintaining Interest Needs Assessment Evaluating Success CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing ...

  1. An eight week school-based intervention with circuit training improves physical fitness and reduces body fat in male adolescents.

    PubMed

    Giannaki, Christoforos D; Aphamis, George; Tsouloupas, Costas N; Ioannou, Yiannakis; Hadjicharalambous, Marios

    2016-01-01

    School-based intervention programs have been found to effectively improve various fitness and health parameters. However, only few studies so far examined the effect of circuit training in school environment during physical education (PE) classes. The aim of the current study was to examine the effects of an eight-week circuit training on physical fitness and body fat in male adolescents. Thirty nine, 16-year old male high-school students participated in the current study. The students were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The intervention period lasted eight weeks and consisted of two circuit training sessions per week performed during regular PE classes. Total body fat was calculated by using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Physical fitness parameters such as cardiorespiratory fitness, flexibility, jumping ability and isometric arm strength were assessed through a battery of field tests. Finally, resting heart rate and blood pressure levels were assessed with an automatic monitor. By the end of the intervention period, total body fat and resting systolic blood pressure were significantly lower while cardiorespiratory fitness was significantly improved in the circuit training group only (P<0.05). In the control group Body Mass Index and total body fat percentage were significantly increased when compared pre- and post-intervention period (P<0.05). Eight weeks of circuit training during PE classes appeared to be effective in improving various physical fitness parameters and reducing fatness in male adolescents.

  2. Virtual training and coaching of health behavior: example from mindfulness meditation training.

    PubMed

    Hudlicka, Eva

    2013-08-01

    Computer-based virtual coaches are increasingly being explored for patient education, counseling, and health behavior training and coaching. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a Virtual Mindfulness Coach for training and coaching in mindfulness meditation. The coach was implemented as an embodied conversational character, providing mindfulness training and coaching via mixed initiative, text-based, natural language dialog with the student, and emphasizing affect-adaptive interaction. (The term 'mixed initiative dialog' refers to a human-machine dialog where either can initiate a conversation or a change in the conversation topic.) Findings from a pilot evaluation study indicate that the coach-based training is more effective in helping students establish a regular practice than self-administered training using written and audio materials. The coached group also appeared to be in more advanced stages of change in terms of the transtheoretical model, and have a higher sense of self-efficacy regarding establishment of a regular mindfulness practice. These results suggest that virtual coach-based training of mindfulness is both feasible, and potentially more effective, than a self-administered program. Of particular interest is the identification of the specific coach features that contribute to its effectiveness. Virtual coaches could provide easily accessible and cost-effective customized training for a range of health behaviors. The affect-adaptive aspect of these coaches is particularly relevant for helping patients establish long-term behavior changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Virtual Training and Coaching of Health Behavior: Example from Mindfulness Meditation Training

    PubMed Central

    Hudlicka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Objective Computer-based virtual coaches are increasingly being explored for patient education, counseling, and health behavior training and coaching. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a Virtual Mindfulness Coach for training and coaching in mindfulness meditation. Method The coach was implemented as an embodied conversational character, providing mindfulness training and coaching via mixed initiative, text-based, natural language dialogue with the student, and emphasizing affect-adaptive interaction. (The term ‘mixed initiative dialog’ refers to a human-machine dialogue where either can initiate a conversation or a change in the conversation topic.) Results Findings from a pilot evaluation study indicate that the coach-based training is more effective in helping students establish a regular practice than self-administered training using written and audio materials. The coached group also appeared to be in more advanced stages of change in terms of the transtheoretical model, and have a higher sense of self-efficacy regarding establishment of a regular mindfulness practice. Conclusion These results suggest that virtual coach-based training of mindfulness is both feasible, and potentially more effective, than a self-administered program. Of particular interest is the identification of the specific coach features that contribute to its effectiveness. Practice Implications Virtual coaches could provide easily-accessible and cost-effective customized training for a range of health behaviors. The affect-adaptive aspect of these coaches is particularly relevant for helping patients establish long-term behavior changes. PMID:23809167

  4. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  5. Effects of Medicine Ball Training on Fitness Performance of High-School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Mediate, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of medicine ball training on the fitness performance of high-school physical education students. Sixty-nine high-school students participated in a 6-week medicine training program during the first 10 to 15 minutes of each physical education class. A group of 49 students who participated in…

  6. Effects of Physical Training and Calcium Intake on Bone Mineral Density of Students with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of physical training and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with mental retardation. Forty mentally retarded boys (age 7-10 years old) were randomly assigned to four groups (no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake and physical activity): training groups with or…

  7. Effects of Physical Training and Calcium Intake on Bone Mineral Density of Students with Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemayattalab, Rasool

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of physical training and calcium intake on bone mineral density (BMD) of students with mental retardation. Forty mentally retarded boys (age 7-10 years old) were randomly assigned to four groups (no differences in age, BMD, calcium intake and physical activity): training groups with or…

  8. Effects of Medicine Ball Training on Fitness Performance of High-School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Mediate, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of medicine ball training on the fitness performance of high-school physical education students. Sixty-nine high-school students participated in a 6-week medicine training program during the first 10 to 15 minutes of each physical education class. A group of 49 students who participated in…

  9. Learning To Teach: An Examination of Non-Formally Trained Physical Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Daniel Z.

    The study reported in this paper examined how physical education teachers who have not received formal training learn to teach. The central research question addressed was: What teaching practices do nonformally trained physical education teachers exhibit, and from what sources do they gain the knowledge for such practices? In addressing this…

  10. A Conceptual Model of Training Transfer that Includes the Physical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillsman, Terron L.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2007-01-01

    The study presents the physical environment as an emerging factor impacting training transfer and proposes to position this variable in the Baldwin and Ford (1988) model of the training transfer process. The amended model positions workplace design, one element of the physical environment, as a part of organizational context in the work…

  11. Community Health Workers promoting physical activity: Targeting multiple levels of the Social Ecological Model

    PubMed Central

    Haughton, Jessica; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Burke, Kari Herzog; Elder, John P.; Montañez, Jacqueline; Arredondo, Elva M.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Community Health Workers (CHWs) as health educators and health promoters among Latino populations is widely recognized. The Affordable Care Act created important opportunities to increase the role of CHWs in preventive health. This article describes the implementation of CHW-led, culturally specific, faith-based program to increase physical activity (PA) among churchgoing Latinas. The current study augments previous research by describing the recruitment, selection, training, and evaluation of CHWs for a PA intervention targeting multiple levels of the Social Ecological Model. PMID:26280587

  12. Mental health training and development needs of community agency staff.

    PubMed

    Secker, Jenny; Hill, Kathryn

    2002-09-01

    Emphasis has long been placed in UK national policy on providing 'seamless' mental health services to meet both the health and social care needs of service users. While attention has been paid to the training required by specialist mental health and primary care staff in order to achieve this, the needs of other community agency staff have received less attention. The present article describes a study designed to identify the training needs of staff working within a broad range of agencies. Focus group discussions were used to explore participants' experiences of mental health problems amongst clients, their confidence in dealing with these, current sources of support and perceived training needs. The results indicate that participants in all agencies routinely encountered a range of problems. Colleagues were the main source of support, followed by line managers, but supervision structures and wider organisational support were lacking in some cases. Joint working with specialist mental health services was almost universally problematic and all groups identified a range of training needs. On the basis of the results, the present authors put forward suggestions as to how these needs might be met.

  13. Community health worker insights on their training and certification.

    PubMed

    Catalani, Caricia E; Findley, Sally E; Matos, Sergio; Rodriguez, Romelia

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the community health worker (CHW) field has grown significantly in the United States, with increasing numbers, roles, and visibility of CHWs. State health department regulators, health program administrators, and community health advocates have observed this growth with uncertainty about the definition of a CHW, how CHW roles differ from those of other health professionals, CHW training needs, and the potential impact of the growing certification and accreditation regulations. Despite the proliferation of regulatory policies, few studies have examined how regulation can most effectively support CHWs in the field. Our objective is to define CHW, identify training needs, and examine possibilities for credentialing from the perspective of CHWs in New York City. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) was used to engage CHW leadership and gather input from CHWs in the design and conduct of the study. The academic-community-state partnership designed focus group topic guides, and conducted fifteen focus groups with CHWs in New York City. The focus group responses were analyzed using HyperResearch and formed the basis for policy recommendations to the participating partners. We developed a consensus definition of CHW and its fundamental qualities. We identified unmet training needs in the area of core competencies. We outlined the characteristics of a credentialing process that would support and advance the work of CHWs. CBPR enabled CHWs to have a direct voice in defining their description, roles, training, and certification preferences. This informed policy recommendations to the state, university, and CHWs through a collaborative process.

  14. Self Reported Perceptions of Physical Demands on Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawaguchi, Jeffrey K.; Babcock, Garth; Little, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Context: According to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) Standards for the Accreditation of Entry-Level Athletic Training Education Programs, athletic training students (ATSs) must complete clinical experiences that provide opportunities to integrate cognitive function, psychomotor skills, and affective…

  15. Self Reported Perceptions of Physical Demands on Athletic Training Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawaguchi, Jeffrey K.; Babcock, Garth; Little, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Context: According to the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) Standards for the Accreditation of Entry-Level Athletic Training Education Programs, athletic training students (ATSs) must complete clinical experiences that provide opportunities to integrate cognitive function, psychomotor skills, and affective…

  16. Opportunities for Public Health to Increase Physical Activity Among Youths

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Joan M.; Fulton, Janet E.; Janz, Kathleen F.; Lee, Sarah M.; McKinnon, Robin A.; Pate, Russell R.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Young, Deborah Rohm; Troiano, Richard P.; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of youths engaging in 60 or more minutes of daily physical activity, physical inactivity remains a significant public health concern. The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) provides recommendations on the amount of physical activity needed for overall health; the PAG Midcourse Report (2013) describes effective strategies to help youths meet these recommendations. Public health professionals can be dynamic change agents where youths live, learn, and play by changing environments and policies to empower youths to develop regular physical activity habits to maintain throughout life. We have summarized key findings from the PAG Midcourse Report and outlined actions that public health professionals can take to ensure that all youths regularly engage in health-enhancing physical activity. PMID:25602864

  17. Training Physician Investigators in Medicine and Public Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Melanie R.; Goldfrank, Lewis R.; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Foltin, George L.; Lipkin, Mack; Schwartz, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We have described and evaluated the impact of a unique fellowship program designed to train postdoctoral, physician fellows in research at the interface of medicine and public health. Methods. We developed a rigorous curriculum in public health content and research methods and fostered linkages with research mentors and local public health agencies. Didactic training provided the foundation for fellows’ mentored research initiatives, which addressed real-world challenges in advancing the health status of vulnerable urban populations. Results. Two multidisciplinary cohorts (6 per cohort) completed this 2-year degree-granting program and engaged in diverse public health research initiatives on topics such as improving pediatric care outcomes through health literacy interventions, reducing hospital readmission rates among urban poor with multiple comorbidities, increasing cancer screening uptake, and broadening the reach of addiction screening and intervention. The majority of fellows (10/12) published their fellowship work and currently have a career focused in public health–related research or practice (9/12). Conclusions. A fellowship training program can prepare physician investigators for research careers that bridge the divide between medicine and public health. PMID:22594745

  18. Strand I, Physical Health: Health Status. Health Curriculum Materials for Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Curriculum Development Center.

    This health curriculum guide, intended for use with children in grades four through six, contends that the school is in a unique position to supplement efforts by home and community in raising the levels of physical, mental, and social-emotional health for each child. The contents of the guide are presented in outline form and cover observing…

  19. Mentoring in epidemiology and public health training.

    PubMed

    Davis, Faith G

    2013-08-01

    In the past, mentoring was the job of one senior researcher in which the mentor molded the mentee in his/her own image. With public health being a very multidisciplinary field, mentoring may need to evolve to facilitate the needs of emerging scientists-including epidemiologists. The mentoring relationship can begin at many education stages, including high school. Involving students at all education levels acts as a way to recruit and nurture interest in public health. On the basis of the experience in the medical sciences, mentoring programs also can be used to recruit and retain high-quality professionals in our discipline. Mentoring functions nurture a young mentee with the bonus of greater workplace satisfaction for the mentor. Nevertheless, more understanding of what constitutes successful mentoring and how to develop programs that create great mentors is needed.

  20. Information empowerment: predeparture resource training for students in global health.

    PubMed

    Rana, Gurpreet K

    2014-04-01

    The Taubman Health Sciences Library (THL) collaborates with health sciences schools to provide information skills instruction for students preparing for international experiences. THL enhances students' global health learning through predeparture instruction for students who are involved in global health research, clinical internships, and international collaborations. This includes teaching international literature searching skills, providing country-specific data sources, building awareness of relevant mobile resources, and encouraging investigation of international news. Information skills empower creation of stronger global partnerships. Use of information resources has enhanced international research and training experiences, built lifelong learning foundations, and contributed to the university's global engagement. THL continues to assess predeparture instruction.

  1. Values-based training for mental health nurses.

    PubMed

    Lamza, Claire; Smith, Paul

    A pilot programme successfully engaged large numbers of people in discussing and challenging the competing values that underpin mental health nursing practice. This was followed by a recommendation that using a values-based approach to mental health nursing improved interpersonal relationships between staff and patients and carers. This article reports the responses of mental health nurses at two health boards (NHS Fife and NHS Forth Valley) to a values-based training programme using the 10 Essential Shared Capabilities, developed by the Scottish Government and NHS Education for Scotland.

  2. Efficacy of life skills training on general health in students.

    PubMed

    Sahebalzamani, Mohammad; Farahani, Hojjatollah; Feizi, Fariba

    2012-11-01

    With regard to the importance of life skills, the present study deals with the effect of life skills training on general health of the students. This was a one-group, pre-test, post-test, quasi-experimental research. Forty students were selected through purposive sampling method. The data collection tool was Goldberg General Health Questionnaire. Paired t-test showed a 22 score significant decrease in general health after education compared to before education (P < 0.01). This study showed that life skills education increases general health level of the students.

  3. Health and safety organizing: OCAW'S worker-to-worker health and safety training program.

    PubMed

    Slatin, C

    2001-01-01

    In 1987, the Oil, Chemical, and Atomic Workers International Union (OCAW) was funded as one of the original eleven awardees of the Superfund Worker Training Program of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The OCAW, with the Labor Institute, developed a hazardous waste worker and hazardous materials emergency responder health and safety training program that was specific to its members in the represented industries. A social history is developed to explore a union-led, worker health education intervention. The program sought to develop worker-trainers who would conduct the training, using the Small-Group Activity Method, participate in curriculum development, and ultimately use health and safety training as a vehicle for identifying, developing, and mobilizing health and safety activists among the membership. Although the direction for this effort came from progressive leadership, it arose from the political economy of labor/management relations within specific industrial sectors.

  4. Quality and Health-Optimizing Physical Education: Using Assessment at the Health and Education Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Dean; Goodyear, Victoria; Baxter, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) recognizes quality physical education (QPE) must, along with physical, social and affective educative goals, seek to improve the health status of youth (UNESCO, 2015). Health-Optimizing Physical Education (HOPE) is a model of physical education (PE) that…

  5. Quality and Health-Optimizing Physical Education: Using Assessment at the Health and Education Nexus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Dean; Goodyear, Victoria; Baxter, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: The United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) recognizes quality physical education (QPE) must, along with physical, social and affective educative goals, seek to improve the health status of youth (UNESCO, 2015). Health-Optimizing Physical Education (HOPE) is a model of physical education (PE) that…

  6. The influence of nontraditional training modalities on physical performance: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Reginald B; Serres, Jennifer; Traver, Kyle L; Wright, Bruce; Vojta, Chris; Eveland, Ed

    2012-10-01

    The primary purpose of this effort was to review several forms of nontraditional (NT) training programs, including heavy lower extremity strength training, CrossFit training, kettlebell training, and agility training, and discuss the effects of these exercise regimens on physical performance. The secondary purpose was to evaluate NT fitness training programs for evidence that they may provide beneficial options to help airmen improve their fitness scores. A search of the literature for 1980-2010 was performed using the Franzello Aeromedical Library, Public Medicine, and Air Force Institute of Technology search engines. There were 50 articles located and the authors selected 29 articles that specifically addressed the primary and secondary purposes of this literature review. This review indicates that an NT training approach is warranted in the general Air Force population. Heavy leg strength training and agility training show promise in enhancing aerobic fitness and improving fitness scores, particularly among members who have difficulty passing a physical fitness test. Most of the nontraditional forms of physical training are not supported in the scientific literature, with the exception of heavy leg strength training and agility training. However, even these NT forms of training require further investigation.

  7. Brief report: Physical health of adolescent perpetrators of sibling aggression.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Corinna Jenkins; Van Gundy, Karen; Sharp, Erin Hiley; Rebellon, Cesar

    2015-12-01

    We describe adolescents' perpetration of sibling aggression and its link to physical health two years later. In-school surveys at Time 1 (N = 331) and Time 2 (two-years later, N = 283) were administered to adolescents (at Time 1, Mage = 15.71 years, SD = .63; 52% female) living in the United States querying about perpetration of aggression toward a sibling closest in age and perceived physical health. The majority of adolescents perpetrated aggression towards their sibling (74%). Adolescents who were part of brother-brother pairs reported the most aggression. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that perpetrating sibling aggression more often at Time 1 was predictive of lower physical health at Time 2 controlling for Time 1 physical health and demographic characteristics. Perpetration of aggression toward a sibling is common and has negative health consequences in late adolescence suggesting this issue should be targeted to improve adolescents' sibling dynamics and physical health.

  8. High-speed circuit training vs hypertrophy training to improve physical function in sarcopenic obese adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Anoop; Krawczyk, Steven N; Potiaumpai, Melanie; Signorile, Joseph F

    2014-12-01

    Progressive loss of muscle and strength with age is often coincident with increases in adiposity, leading to a condition called sarcopenic obesity. Studies have shown sarcopenic obese adults to be at higher risk for declines in physical function. Despite this rising public health concern, no intervention studies currently exist in this population. A total of 21 sarcopenic obese adults, 60 years or older, were randomized into two groups, strength/hypertrophy (SH, n=9) and high-speed circuit (HSC, n=8) and were trained for 15 weeks. The primary outcome was the SPPB modified as a measure of physical function, assessed by assessors blinded to randomization. Secondary outcomes were lower body and upper body power and strength, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), body fat % (BF%), skeletal muscle index (SMI), and grip strength (GRP). For the SPPB results favored HSC over SH (1.1, 95% CI (-.1 to 2.4), p=.08) and showed a moderate effect size (Hedge g=0.6, 95% CI (-0.4, 1.6)). For secondary outcomes, lower body power (mean difference=158 W, 95% CI (2, 315); p=.01) and RPE (mean difference=-1.5, 95% CI (-2.9, -0.12); p=.04) also favored HSC. IADL, SMI, BF%, upper and lower body strength and upper body power, showed no statistically significant differences between groups. Considering the moderate effect size, the large treatment effect shown by the upper limit of the 95% CI, the low perceived exertion, and no adverse effects, HSC training should be further investigated with a larger sample size in sarcopenic obese adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Physical training in man. Skeletal muscle metabolism in relation to muscle morphology and running ability.

    PubMed

    Bylund, A C; Bjurö, T; Cederblad, G; Holm, J; Lundholm, K; Sjöstroöm, M; Angquist, K A; Scherstén, T

    1977-03-15

    The metabolic and morphologic adaptation to physical training in skeletal muscle tissue of eleven middle-aged, physically untrained men was studied. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before, after 8 weeks and after 6 months of physical training for analysis of metabolic and morphologic variables. Glucose tolerance test indicated increased insulin sensitivity after 6 months of physical training. The activities of glycogen phosphorylase, hexokinase and glucose-6-P-dehydrogenase were increased but other enzymes involved in glycogen turnover and glycolysis were unchanged after 6 months of physical traning. The activities of citrate synthase and cytochrome-c-oxidase, representing the oxidative capacity were significantly increased already after 8 weeks of physical training. The incorporation rate of palmitate-carbon into CO2 and triglycerides increased, and the incorporation rate of leucine-carbon into CO2 decreased with 6 months of physical training. The fiber diameter of both Type 1- and Type 2-fibers increased, while the mitochondrial volume increased predominantly in Type 2-fibers. Significant correlations were found between metabolic, physiologic and morphologic variables before and after physical training. The results indicate an increased oxidative capacity, mainly located to Type 2-fibers, and an increased utilization of fatty acids in response to this type of physical training.

  10. A comparison of how behavioral health organizations utilize training to prepare for health care reform.

    PubMed

    Stanhope, Victoria; Choy-Brown, Mimi; Barrenger, Stacey; Manuel, Jennifer; Mercado, Micaela; McKay, Mary; Marcus, Steven C

    2017-02-14

    Under the Affordable Care Act, States have obtained Medicaid waivers to overhaul their behavioral health service systems to improve quality and reduce costs. Critical to implementation of broad service delivery reforms has been the preparation of organizations responsible for service delivery. This study focused on one large-scale initiative to overhaul its service system with the goal of improving service quality and reducing costs. The study examined the participation of behavioral health organizations in technical assistance efforts and the extent to which organizational factors related to their participation. This study matched two datasets to examine the organizational characteristics and training participation for 196 behavioral health organizations. Organizational characteristics were drawn from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS). Training variables were drawn from the Clinical Technical Assistance Center's master training database. Chi-square analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the proportion of organizations that participated in training, the organizational characteristics (size, population served, service quality, infrastructure) that predicted participation in training, and for those who participated, the type (clinical or business) and intensity of training (webinar, learning collaborative, in-person) they received. Overall 142 (72. 4%) of the sample participated in training. Organizations who pursued training were more likely to be large in size (p = .02), serve children in addition to adults (p < .01), provide child evidence-based practices (p = .01), and use computerized scheduling (p = .01). Of those trained, 95% participated in webinars, 64% participated in learning collaboratives and 35% participated in in-person trainings. More organizations participated in business trainings than clinical (63.8 vs. 59

  11. The relationship between mental health and health-related physical fitness of university students

    PubMed Central

    Jeoung, Bog Ja; Hong, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Yang Chool

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between mental health and health-related physical fitness of university students. For this study, 228 university students were participated in this experiment (male 91, female 137). We tested health-related physical fitness and mental health with questionnaire. Data were analyzed using independent t-test and liner regression. In the present results, there was significant difference according to gender in mental health and health-related physical fitness. The correlation between physical fitness and mental health was also observed. PMID:24409433

  12. Training of Community Health Agents in health hearing children: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Castro, Taís Teixeira de Oliveira; Zucki, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the training of Community Health Workers in the field of child hearing health. A systematic literature review on Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS) and Biblioteca Digital de Teses e Dissertações of USP databases was performed. The search strategy was oriented by the specific question: "How have the Community Health Workers been trained to work in the field of child hearing health?" The study selection criteria involved consistency with the proposed theme, belonging to the category of scientific papers, dissertation or thesis, and publication in Brazilian Portuguese. A total of 2,687 studies were found. After analyzing the title and abstract, eight studies were chosen for full reading, however, only four of them met the proposed criteria and were included in the review. The studies indicated live and virtual classes with the use of video conferencing or CD-ROM as training strategies for Community Health Workers. Trainings were effective. Only one questionnaire about hearing and language monitoring was described. Different possibilities for the activities of Community Health Workers were identified. Different learning methodologies have been used for training the Community Health Worker in the field of child hearing health, and all of have proven effective for knowledge acquisition. Community Health Workers play an important role in promoting and monitoring child hearing health.

  13. Living with Stigma: Depressed Elderly Persons' Experiences of Physical Health Problems

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Anne Lise; Lyberg, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to deepen the understanding of depressed elderly persons' lived experiences of physical health problems. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 depressed elderly persons who suffer from physical health problems. A hermeneutic analysis was performed, yielding one main theme, living with stigma, and three themes: longing to be taken seriously, being uncertain about whether the pain is physical or mental, and a sense of living in a war zone. The second theme comprised two subthemes, feeling like a stranger and feeling dizzy, while the third had one subtheme: afraid of being helpless and dependent on others. Stigma deprives individuals of their dignity and reinforces destructive patterns of isolation and hopelessness. Nurses should provide information in a sensitive way and try to avoid diagnostic overshadowing. Effective training programmes and procedures need to be developed with more focus on how to handle depressive ill health and physical problems in older people. PMID:25013728

  14. Capacity building in global mental health: professional training.

    PubMed

    Fricchione, Gregory L; Borba, Christina P C; Alem, Atalay; Shibre, Teshome; Carney, Julia R; Henderson, David C

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the optimal approach to building capacity in global mental health care will require partnerships between professional resources in high-income countries and promising health-related institutions in low- and middle-income countries. The result of these partnerships will be sustainable academic relationships that can educate a new generation of in-country primary care physicians and, eventually, specialized health professionals. Research capabilities will be an essential educational component to inform policy and practice, and to ensure careful outcome measurements of training and of intervention, prevention, and promotion strategies. The goal of these academic centers of excellence will be to develop quality, in-country clinical and research professionals, and to build a productive environment for these professionals to advance their careers locally. In sum, this article discusses human capacity building in global mental health, provides recommendations for training, and offers examples of recent initiatives.

  15. Capacity Building in Global Mental Health: Professional Training

    PubMed Central

    Fricchione, Gregory L; Borba, Christina P C; Alem, Atalay; Shibre, Teshome; Carney, Julia R; Henderson, David C

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the optimal approach to building capacity in global mental health care will require partnerships between professional resources in high-income countries and promising health-related institutions in low- and middle-income countries. The result of these partnerships will be sustainable academic relationships that can educate a new generation of in-country primary care physicians and, eventually, specialized health professionals. Research capabilities will be an essential educational component to inform policy and practice, and to ensure careful outcome measurements of training and of intervention, prevention, and promotion strategies. The goal of these academic centers of excellence will be to develop quality, in-country clinical and research professionals, and to build a productive environment for these professionals to advance their careers locally. In sum, this article discusses human capacity building in global mental health, provides recommendations for training, and offers examples of recent initiatives. (Harv Rev Psychiatry 2012;20:47–57.) PMID:22335182

  16. Associations between perceived health benefits and barriers to strength training, and stages of change for strength-training behavior among older Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Ai; Lee, Euna; Oka, Koichiro; Nakamura, Yoshio

    2014-05-01

    Although several studies have examined associations of perceived benefits and barriers with physical activity, no studies have focused on them corresponding to strength-training recommendations for older adults. This study examined the associations among the perceived health benefits of strength training, perceived barriers to strength straining, and stages of change for strength-training behavior in older Japanese adults. This cross-sectional survey included a random sample of 1144 adults (60-74 years) from the city of Tokorozawa. Stage of change was the independent variable, with perceived health benefits (eg, strength training can reduce body pain) and perceived barriers (eg, facilities are needed for strength training) as dependent variables. Data were analyzed by analysis of covariance and Bonferroni's multiple comparison. After adjusting for demographic variables, the perceived health-benefit score for precontemplation was significantly lower than for the other four stages. The perceived barrier scores in the precontemplation and contemplation stages were significantly higher than those in the preparation and maintenance stages. These results suggest that information about the health benefits for older adults and about the recommended type of strength training might be useful for the development of strategies to promote strength training among older adults.

  17. Managing medical emergencies in mental health settings using an interprofessional in-situ simulation training programme: A mixed methods evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Mary; Attoe, Chris; Tritschler, Christina; Cross, Sean

    2017-09-21

    In the UK, people with severe mental illness die up to 20years earlier than the general population, prompting increased focus on physical health in mental illness. However, training for mental health inpatient staff to meet patients' physical health needs has not received the same attention, with physical health training often being reactive and lacking evidence of effectiveness. To evaluate an interprofessional, in situ, simulation training intervention for managing medical deterioration in mental health settings. Investigating the impact of training on: 1. Participants' knowledge, confidence, and attitudes towards managing medical deterioration; and 2. Incident reporting, as an objective index of incident management. Participants' perceptions of the impact on their practice were qualitatively explored. This evaluation employed a mixed-methods pre-post intervention design. Fifty-three healthcare professionals participated including: mental health nurses, psychiatrists, healthcare assistants, and activity co-ordinators from two busy psychiatric triage wards in South London, UK. The intervention comprised eight half-day sessions delivered weekly across two wards. Structured surveys assessed participants' knowledge, confidence, and attitudes towards medical deterioration pre and post training. Participants' experience of training was qualitatively captured through post-course surveys and focus groups three months post training. Incident reporting rates for seven-month periods pre and post training were compared. Following training, participants showed significant improvement in knowledge (p<0.001), confidence (p<0.001), and attitudes towards (p<0.02) managing medical deterioration. Incident reporting increased by 33% following training. Participants' reported improved confidence in managing medical deterioration, better understanding of effective communication, improved self-reflection and team working, and an increased sense of responsibility for patients' physical

  18. Surgical Safety Training of World Health Organization Initiatives.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher R; Bates, Anthony S; Toll, Edward C; Cole, Matthew; Smith, Frank C T; Stark, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate training in surgical safety is essential to maximize patient safety. This national review quantified undergraduate surgical safety training. Training of 2 international safety initiatives was quantified: (1) World Health Organization (WHO) "Guidelines for Safe Surgery" and (2) Department of Health (DoH) "Principles of the Productive Operating Theatre." Also, 13 additional safety skills were quantified. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U tests. In all, 23 universities entered the study (71.9% response). Safety skills from WHO and DoH documents were formally taught in 4 UK medical schools (17.4%). Individual components of the documents were taught more frequently (47.6%). Half (50.9%) of the additional safety skills identified were taught. Surgical societies supplemented safety training, although the total amount of training provided was less than that in university curricula (P < .0001). Surgical safety training is inadequate in UK medical schools. To protect patients and maximize safety, a national undergraduate safety curriculum is recommended.

  19. Commentary: health care technology and medical education: putting physical diagnosis in its proper place.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Robert Lehr

    2010-06-01

    Bemoaning the lost art of the physical exam is an ancient practice, dating back hundreds, if not thousands, of years. Since the introduction of the stethoscope in the early 19th century, the clinical skills of physicians have waned as their dependence on technology has grown. This "lost skills literature" reflects the ambivalent relationship the medical profession has had with its technology, a relationship also dating back centuries. Despite the dominant role played by technology in the life of the 21st-century physician, medical students and trainees do not receive sufficient formal training in its use and assessment. This lacuna in training likely contributes to the well-documented inappropriate use of health care technology that threatens any attempt at improved patient care and reform of the health care system. The author recommends the introduction of a formal curriculum in the use and assessment of health care technology in medical education and training.

  20. Mental health symptoms in combat medic training: a longitudinal examination.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael E; Teyhen, Deydre S; Wu, Samuel S; Dugan, Jessica L; Wright, Alison C; Childs, John D; Yang, Guijun; George, Steven Z

    2009-06-01

    Mental health symptoms in military populations are rising and constitute a significant health concern. This study examined the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation in soldiers (N = 3,792) undergoing combat medic training. At the start of training, 10.4%, 15.5%, and 4.1% of soldiers had clinically significant depression, anxiety, or suicidal ideation, respectfully. These percentages increased to 12.2%, 20.3%, and 5.7% at completion of training, respectfully. Worsening of depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation occurred for 7.7%, 11.4%, and 4% of soldiers. Higher percentages of symptoms were associated with females, lower education, and lower income. Active duty personnel were more likely to worsen following training with respect to suicidal ideation (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2-2.9) compared to reservists. The identification of these significant predictors of mental health status may serve to identify individuals at risk. Additional work to examine the relative contribution of anticipatory (impending deployment) factors vs. training-related factors is warranted.