Science.gov

Sample records for health professions students

  1. How Health Professions Students Finance Their Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    This report was based on a survey to determine how students in the health professions of medicine osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine financed their educations during the 1970-71 school year. The purpose of this nationwide survey was to provide information on patterns of student expenses and on the sources…

  2. Health professions students' use of social media.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carolyn; Giordano, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The internet is increasingly a part of everyday life by facilitating networking opportunities and offering ways to associate with others who have similar interests, values, or goals. An online survey was administered to 644 first-year students and 413 graduating students via Surveymonkey to investigate their media preferences, to gauge if they are active on social media sites, and to evaluate how they responded to advertisements. Students were in the following health professions: biotechnology, couple and family therapy, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, public health, radiologic and imaging sciences, and pharmacy. Results indicate that students prefer online media as their primary source of information. The majority of students were using Facebook, and very few were using Twitter or LinkedIn or other social networking sites. Understanding social media usage has several implications for educating, connecting with, and researching health professions students from all stages of their academic career. PMID:21695367

  3. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds. 57.205... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.205 Health professions student loan funds. (a) Funds...

  4. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds. 57.205... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.205 Health professions student loan funds. (a) Funds...

  5. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds. 57.205... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.205 Health professions student loan funds. (a) Funds...

  6. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health professions student loan funds. 57.205... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.205 Health professions student loan funds. (a) Funds...

  7. Weight Bias in University Health Professions Students.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Cynthia; Brooks, Jennifer K; McKnight, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Negative attitudes toward people with high body weight have been documented in pre-professional health students, prompting concern that such feelings may manifest as poor patient care in professional practice. This study assessed weight bias in university students in the non-physician health professions. A convenience sample of 206 students completed an online survey composed of a validated 14-item scale (1-5 lowest to highest weight bias) and questions regarding personal experiences of weight bias. Respondents were grouped by discipline within graduate and undergraduate levels. Weight bias was present in a majority of respondents. Overall, the percentage of responses indicative of weight bias was 92.7%. The mean total score was 3.65. ± 0.52, and the rating exceeded 3 for all 14 scale descriptors of high-weight people. In graduate students, discipline had a significant main effect on total score (p=0.01), with lower scores in dietetics (3.17 ± 0.46) vs audiology/sign language/speech language pathology (3.84 ± 0.41) and physician assistant students (3.78 ± 0.51; p<0.05). These findings show that weight bias is prevalent in health professions students at a mountain west university. Well-controlled studies that track students into professional practice would help determine whether bias-reduction interventions in college improve provider behaviors and clinical outcomes. PMID:27585618

  8. 42 CFR 57.208 - Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health professions student loan promissory note and..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.208 Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements. (a) Promissory note form. Each health professions student...

  9. 42 CFR 57.207 - Maximum amount of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum amount of health professions student loans... LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.207 Maximum amount of health professions student loans. The total of the health professions student loans made from the fund to any student for a school year...

  10. 42 CFR 57.207 - Maximum amount of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum amount of health professions student loans... LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.207 Maximum amount of health professions student loans. The total of the health professions student loans made from the fund to any student for a school year...

  11. 42 CFR 57.208 - Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health professions student loan promissory note and..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.208 Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements. (a) Promissory note form. Each health professions student...

  12. 42 CFR 57.207 - Maximum amount of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum amount of health professions student loans... LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.207 Maximum amount of health professions student loans. The total of the health professions student loans made from the fund to any student for a school year...

  13. 42 CFR 57.207 - Maximum amount of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum amount of health professions student loans... LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.207 Maximum amount of health professions student loans. The total of the health professions student loans made from the fund to any student for a school year...

  14. 42 CFR 57.208 - Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health professions student loan promissory note and..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.208 Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements. (a) Promissory note form. Each health professions student...

  15. 42 CFR 57.208 - Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health professions student loan promissory note and..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.208 Health professions student loan promissory note and disclosure requirements. (a) Promissory note form. Each health professions student...

  16. 42 CFR 57.207 - Maximum amount of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum amount of health professions student loans... LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.207 Maximum amount of health professions student loans. The total of the health professions student loans made from the fund to any student for a school year...

  17. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. (a) Each health professions student loan, including accrued interests, will be repayable...

  18. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. (a) Each health professions student loan, including accrued interests, will be repayable...

  19. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. (a) Each health professions student loan, including accrued interests, will be repayable...

  20. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. (a) Each health professions student loan, including accrued interests, will be repayable...

  1. 42 CFR 57.210 - Repayment and collection of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... student loans. 57.210 Section 57.210 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.210 Repayment and collection of health professions student loans. (a) Each health professions student loan, including accrued interests, will be repayable...

  2. Health-Related Physical Fitness Knowledge of Student Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael G.; Berry, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Compared the health-related fitness knowledge of students in allied health care professions, assessing 48 athletic training students, 33 nursing students, and 36 physical therapy students. On the posttest, athletic training and physical therapy groups scored higher than the nursing group. Discusses implications for health profession education.…

  3. 42 CFR 57.209 - Payment of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment of health professions student loans. 57.209... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.209 Payment of health professions student loans. (a)...

  4. 42 CFR 57.209 - Payment of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment of health professions student loans. 57.209... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.209 Payment of health professions student loans. (a)...

  5. 42 CFR 57.211 - Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cancellation of health professions students loans..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.211 Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death. (a) Permanent and total disability. The Secretary will cancel...

  6. 42 CFR 57.209 - Payment of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment of health professions student loans. 57.209... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.209 Payment of health professions student loans. (a)...

  7. 42 CFR 57.209 - Payment of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment of health professions student loans. 57.209... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.209 Payment of health professions student loans. (a)...

  8. 42 CFR 57.211 - Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cancellation of health professions students loans..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.211 Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death. (a) Permanent and total disability. The Secretary will cancel...

  9. 42 CFR 57.209 - Payment of health professions student loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment of health professions student loans. 57.209... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.209 Payment of health professions student loans. (a)...

  10. 42 CFR 57.211 - Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cancellation of health professions students loans..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.211 Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death. (a) Permanent and total disability. The Secretary will cancel...

  11. 42 CFR 57.211 - Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cancellation of health professions students loans..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.211 Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death. (a) Permanent and total disability. The Secretary will cancel...

  12. 42 CFR 57.211 - Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cancellation of health professions students loans..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.211 Cancellation of health professions students loans for disability or death. (a) Permanent and total disability. The Secretary will cancel...

  13. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible...

  14. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible...

  15. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible...

  16. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible...

  17. 42 CFR 57.206 - Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... student loan applicants. 57.206 Section 57.206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..., SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Health Professions Student Loans § 57.206 Eligibility and selection of health professions student loan applicants. (a) Determination of eligibility. (1) Applicants are eligible...

  18. The Allied Health Professions: Opportunities for Minority Students. Career Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Maria

    The term "allied health" refers to a cluster of health professions encompassing as many as 200 occupational titles (exclusive of physicians and nurses) involved with the delivery of health or related services pertaining to the identification, evaluation, prevention, and treatment of diseases and disorders; dietary and nutritional services; and…

  19. A crash course in medical writing for health profession students.

    PubMed

    Crowson, Matthew Gordon

    2013-09-01

    The production of publications is a key component of one's career advancement in medicine. The goal of this piece is to discuss five tips to help health profession students get started in medical writing. First, students should take full advantage of the time-saving resources at the local academic biomedical library. Second, outlining a manuscript is one of the essential first steps for producing a successful, high-quality publication. Third, planning the manuscript and writing efficiently is critical since many young authors are either in medical school or residency and do not have ample time to devote to the writing process. Fourth, communicating complex concepts, thoughts, ideas, and observations in a simple way is important and helps limit redundancies, awkward passages, and improves reader comprehension. Lastly, a student can maximize their chances at publication if they are persistent in how they approach manuscript submission. The chances for successful publication of a project can be increased if young authors consider the tips supplied here.

  20. Evaluation of the pathways for students into health professions: the training of under-represented minority students to pursue maternal and child health professions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Alma D; Holmes, Faye J; Inkelas, Moira; Perez, Victor H; Verdugo, Bobby; Kuo, Alice A

    2015-02-01

    The Pathways for Students into Health Professions program is one of four nationally funded programs by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the US Department of Health and Human Services to support the training of undergraduate students, particularly from under-represented minority groups to pursue maternal and child health professions. To assess the program's impact on student ratings, knowledge, and interest in maternal and child health professions. A baseline survey on student ratings and knowledge in maternal and child health topics and careers, public health topics, and career development topics was provided to 32 students at the beginning of their first year in the program and approximately 1 year after participation. Half of the students (16 students) in the program from 2009-2011 were from traditionally underrepresented minority groups. After participation, students reported significantly higher ratings of interest in maternal and child health topics and careers and in receiving adequate academic and career guidance. Students also reported significantly higher knowledge of public health, childhood and maternal morbidity and mortality, health care disparities, and life course health development. The program's didactic, experiential, and mentorship activities are changing student ratings and knowledge in a favorable direction toward maternal and child health careers and topics. Undergraduate training programs may be an important mechanism to strengthen the pipeline of a diverse healthcare workforce.

  1. Does Behavioral Style Influence Learning Strategy in Health Professions Students?

    PubMed

    Williamson, J W; Krumwiede, K H; Reed, JoyLynn; Farmer, Suzanne; Behrendt, William

    2015-01-01

    Proficiency in areas of task completion, information processing, and time management are important attributes for successful academic performance and can be assessed using the Learning Assessment Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). The purpose of this study was to determine if there were differences in learning strategies across four behavioral profiles using the DISC style analysis (Dominance, Influence, Steadiness, Compliance). Graduate health professions students (n=247) were administered the DISC and LASSI to assess study strategy categories based on their natural DISC behavioral style. A one-way ANOVA was used to assess differences for 10 LASSI category scores across the four DISC profiles; scores were also compared with national percentile scores. The D and C profiles were above the 75th percentile for information processing, but below the 50th percentile for self-testing. The S profile had significantly lower scores (p<0.005) for information processing and was below the 50th percentile for anxiety (i.e., higher anxiety). The I profile was below the 50th percentile for time management and concentration to academic tasks. The data are in close agreement with recognized behaviors specific for each behavioral style and suggest that behavioral style should be considered an important factor in academic performance. PMID:26342613

  2. Student Participation in Health Professions Education Research: In Pursuit of the Aristotelian Mean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ruth P.

    2011-01-01

    In research ethics reviews, traditional approaches of research ethics boards (REBs) balance the risks with the potential for benefit of proposed studies, and this review process has been similar for health professions education research (HPER) as it has been for clinically based studies. Health professions students are the primary population from…

  3. Impatience of health professions students for health equity--can a new definition help?

    PubMed

    Miše, Joško

    2014-08-01

    The International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA) is concerned that students are not graduating feeling energized by their social purpose. IFMSA raises a question about the role of the definition of health in limiting the comprehensiveness of the current approach to health and health care in medical and health professions education. IFMSA surveyed medical students about medical curricula. We found that a minority of surveyed students have experienced interdisciplinary teaching, with the lowest exposure in low- and middle-income countries. Medical students are clearly stating their dissatisfaction with the lack of holistic and comprehensive approach to health and health care. Our impatience for contributing to health equity is a virtue in seeking change in curricula and broader collaboration for health. PMID:24943662

  4. Study of How Health Professions Students Finance Their Education, 1976-1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mocniak, Nina; And Others

    Expenses that health professions students incurred, sources of income to meet those expenditures, and indebtedness incurred by the students during the 1976-77 school year were studied. A questionnaire, which is appended, was mailed to a sample of students registered in schools of dentistry, optometry, osteopathic medicine, pharmacy, podiatry,…

  5. Evaluating career values of dietetic students. A model for other allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Vista V; Shanklin, Carol W

    2004-01-01

    Increased job opportunities in health professions make recruitment of students imperative. Effective recruitment requires a knowledge of what students value when making career decisions. This study of dietetic (n = 514) and other college students (n = 352) showed that achievement and economic security were the most important factors in their career selection regardless of major or race. Dietetic majors rated achievement, economic security, ability utilization, personal development, altruism, and working conditions significantly higher than did nondietetic students (p < or = 0.001). Economic security was rated significantly more important by dietetic and allied health majors than by other students. Many of the values important to students in this study are attainable through careers in dietetics and other allied health professions. The results of this study should be examined further with a larger sample of allied health majors to assist educators in recruiting and providing career counseling to students. PMID:15053221

  6. Psychometric testing of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy Health Profession Students' version with Australian paramedic students.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted; Boyle, Malcolm; Dousek, Simon

    2013-03-01

    Evidence now suggests that improved empathic behaviors can have a positive impact on healthcare outcomes. Therefore, having psychometrically-sound empathy scales is important for healthcare educators. In this study, the factor structure of the 20-item Jefferson Scale Empathy-Health Profession Students' version, when completed by a group of undergraduate paramedic students from a large Australian university, was investigated. Data from the Scale completed by 330 paramedic students were analyzed using principal components analysis followed by a maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis to test goodness of fit to the sample data. Two factors emerged from the principal components analysis, "compassionate care" and "perspective taking", accounting for 44.2% of the total variance. The 17-item two-factor model produced good model fit and good reliability estimates. Three of the original items did not fit the model. Results from the confirmatory factor analysis suggest that the 17-item Jefferson Scale Empathy-Health Profession Students' version is a valid and reliable measure for undergraduate paramedic students' empathy levels.

  7. Actions Underway to Reduce Delinquencies in the Health Professions and Nursing Student Loan Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The problem of loan payment delinquency in the Health Professions and Nursing Student Loan Programs was reviewed. Problems that schools have had in billing and collecting outstanding loans and the lack of effective program monitoring by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) were assessed, along with the DHHS' efforts to correct the…

  8. Assessment of alcohol and other drug use behaviors in health professions students.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N; Scott, David M; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Bartek, Jean K; Davis-Hall, R Ellen; Reardon, Thomas P; DeSimone, Edward M

    2006-09-01

    Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors of health professions students (HPS) were assessed by surveying both university-based HPS and other nursing programs in a Midwestern state in 1999. Response was 2,646 (56.4%) of surveyed students. Family history of alcohol-related and drug-related problems were reported by 39.8% and 13.9%, respectively, with 42.6% of respondents reporting one or both. Among nursing respondents, 48.1%, 19.2% and 51.1%, respectively, reported family problems with alcohol, drugs, or one or both. Past-year alcohol use was comparable to undergraduate college students (UCS) nationally (83%); heavy drinking, tobacco and recreational drug use by HPS were lower. Past year drug use was highest among medical students. Marijuana was the predominant illicit drug; medical students and males most often reported use. Health professions educational systems should proactively address student AOD prevention, education and assistance needs.

  9. Learning Style of Students and Practitioners in Five Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Noomi; Heimann, Nanci

    1991-01-01

    An Israeli sample of 378 students and 251 practitioners in occupational therapy (OT), social work, nursing, physical therapy, and clinical psychology completed Kolb's Learning Style Inventory. Findings suggest greater variance in learning style among students. OT students were least abstract. Both OT students and practitioners were predominantly…

  10. Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drug Use Behaviors in Health Professions Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; Scott, David M.; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Bartek, Jean K.; Davis-Hall, R. Ellen; Reardon, Thomas P.; DeSimone, Edward M., II

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors of health professions students (HPS) were assessed by surveying both university-based HPS and other nursing programs in a Midwestern state in 1999. Response was 2,646 (56.4%) of surveyed students. Family history of alcohol-related and drug-related problems were reported by 39.8% and 13.9%, respectively,…

  11. Learning Styles of Physiology Students Interested in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breckler, Jennifer; Joun, David; Ngo, Huy

    2009-01-01

    Student learning may be classified according to the sensory modalities by which one prefers to take in information. One such classification scheme uses the VARK instrument, which categorizes learning preferences as visual (V), auditory (A), reading-writing (R), or kinesthetic (K). Many students have a single, strong preferences ("unimodal"),…

  12. 42 CFR 57.205 - Health professions student loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS... will be accounted for separately from other funds, providing a clear audit trail for all transactions... noncompliance provisions of § 57.218 and the Department's Claims Collections regulations (45 CFR part 30),...

  13. Information and communication technology use among Victorian and South Australian oral health professions students.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Rodrigo; Habibi, Elmira; Morgan, Michael; Au-Yeung, Winnie

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine and analyze the use of information and communication technology (ICT) by oral health professions students in Victoria and South Australia. Data were collected during the 2009 and 2010 academic years via electronic survey. Out of 1,138 students studying in Adelaide and Victorian dental schools, 740 students participated, for an overall response rate of 65 percent. The majority were dental students (n=609) with 131 seeking a Bachelor of Oral Health (B.O.H.) degree. The majority were female (62.0 percent), had home Internet access (91.7 percent), and no barriers to accessing the Internet (87.2 percent). Among those who mentioned barriers, difficult access and cost were the most common. The Internet was accessed at least once a week by the majority for general purposes (93.5 percent) and for study purposes (84.2 percent). Nonetheless, thirty-nine students (5.3 percent) were non-frequent ICT users. The probability of an oral health professions student being in the non-ICT users group was explored utilizing a logistic regression analysis. The final model contained three predictors: location of school, ethnic background, and place of Internet use (χ(2) [3]=117.7; p<0.0001). After controlling for other variables in the model, those studying in South Australia were significantly more likely (OR=2.32; 95 percent CI 1.05 to 5.11) to be in the non-users groups. In the same manner, students from an Asian background were three times more likely to be non-users (OR=3.06; 95 percent CI 1.16 to 8.08). Those who had access to the Internet at home (OR=0.02; 95 percent CI 0.01 to 0.05) were less likely to be a non-user. These results represent a preliminary evaluation of ICT use among oral health professions students in Australia. It seems that a digital divide exists among these students. The information can be utilized in planning dental education programs and incorporating the use of ICT suitable for oral health professions students and

  14. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nelofar S.; Shahnaz, Syed I.; Gomathi, Kadayam G.

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula.

  15. An interprofessional socialization framework for developing an interprofessional identity among health professions students.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Hossein; Orchard, Carole; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Farah, Randa

    2013-11-01

    Although health professional educational programs have been successful in equipping graduates with skills, knowledge and professionalism, the emphasis on specialization and profession-specific education has enhanced the development of a uniprofessional identity, which has been found to be a major barrier to interprofessional collaborative person-centred practice (IPCPCP). Changes within healthcare professional education programs are necessary to enable a shift in direction toward interprofessional socialization (IPS) to promote IPCPCP. Currently, there is a paucity of conceptual frameworks to guide IPS. In this article, we present a framework designed to help illuminate an IPS process, which may inform efforts by educators and curriculum developers to facilitate the development of health professions students' dual identity, that is, an interprofessional identity in addition to their existing professional identity, as a first step toward IPCPCP. This framework integrates concepts derived from social identity theory and intergroup contact theory into a dual identity model of IPS.

  16. Measuring empathy in healthcare profession students using the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy: health provider--student version.

    PubMed

    Fields, Sylvia K; Mahan, Pamela; Tillman, Paula; Harris, Jeffrey; Maxwell, Kaye; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2011-07-01

    While empathy is commonly accepted as a mutually beneficial aspect of the health provider-patient relationship, evidence exists that many health profession students are unable to demonstrate this important skill. This study, the initial phase of a 2-year longitudinal series, examined measurement properties of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) adapted for administration to health profession students (JSE-HPS version), and investigated group differences of empathy scores in the baccalaureate nursing (BSN) program within the College of Health Professions at a public university in the southeastern part of the USA. The 20-item survey and a demographic questionnaire were completed by 265 BSN students. Correlational analyses, t-test, and analysis of variance were used to examine internal relationships and group differences. Results showed the median item-total score correlation was statistically significant (0.42). The internal consistency of the scale (Cronbach's coefficient α) was 0.78, falling within the generally agreed standard. Test-retest reliability coefficients were acceptable at 0.58 (within 3 months interval) and 0.69 (within 6 months interval) between testing. Women scored higher than men and older students outscored younger classmates. No significant relationship was found between empathy scores and ethnicity, previous non-nursing degree, or importance of religion to the participant. These findings support measurement properties of the JSE-HPS version, and can bolster the confidence of researchers in using the Scale for measuring empathy in diverse health profession students, as one component of program evaluation as well as evaluating interprofessional learning activities among diverse healthcare professional students and interprofessional collaboration.

  17. Analysis of eHealth Search Perspectives Among Female College Students in the Health Professions Using Q Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J. Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    Background The current “Millennial Generation” of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. Objective To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHealth search practices. Methods Q methodology was used to examine subjective perspectives regarding personal eHealth search practices among allied health students majoring in a health education degree program. Thirteen (n = 13) undergraduate students were interviewed about their attitudes and experiences conducting eHealth searches. From the interviews, 36 statements were used in a structured ranking task to identify clusters and determine which specific perceptions of eHealth search practices discriminated students into different groups. Scores on an objective measure of eHealth literacy were used to help categorize participant perspectives. Results Q-technique factor analysis of the rankings identified 3 clusters of respondents with differing views on eHealth searches that generally coincided with participants’ objective eHealth literacy scores. The proficient resourceful students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.56-0.80) described themselves as using multiple resources to obtain eHealth information, as opposed to simply relying on Internet search engines. The intermediate reluctant students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.75-0.90) reported engaging only Internet search engines to locate eHealth information, citing undeveloped evaluation skills when considering sources of information located on the Internet. Both groups of advanced students reported not knowing how to use Boolean operators to conduct Internet health searches. The basic hubristic students

  18. Interprofessional education for students of the health professions: the "Seamless Care" model.

    PubMed

    Mann, K V; Mcfetridge-Durdle, J; Martin-Misener, R; Clovis, J; Rowe, R; Beanlands, H; Sarria, M

    2009-05-01

    "Seamless Care" was one of 21 grants awarded by Health Canada to inform policymakers of the effectiveness of interprofessional education in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice among health professionals. The "Seamless Care" model of interprofessional education was designed with input from three Faculties at Dalhousie University (Medicine, Dentistry and Health Professions). The design was grounded in relevant learning theories--Social Cognitive Theory, Self-efficacy, Situated Learning theory and Constructivism. The intervention was informed by principles of active learning, problem-based learning, reflection and role modeling. The primary goal of Seamless Care was to develop students' interprofessional patient-centred collaborative skills through experiential learning. Fourteen student teams, each including one student from medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry and dental hygiene, learned with, from and about each other while they were mentored in the collaborative care of patients transitioning from acute care to the community. Student teams providing collaborative care assisted patients experiencing a chronic illness to become more active in managing their health through development of self-management and decision-making skills. This paper describes the Seamless Care model of interprofessional education and discusses the theoretical underpinnings of this experiential model of interprofessional education designed to extend classroom-based interprofessional education to the clinical setting.

  19. Psychometric properties of a Chinese version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Profession Students.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, C-Y; Tsai, Y-F; Kao, Y-C

    2013-12-01

    Empathy is central to a therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. Valid and reliable Chinese instruments to assess nursing students' empathy are lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of a Chinese version of the Jefferson Scale of Empathy-Health Profession Students (C-JSE-HPS) among Taiwanese undergraduate nursing students. A convenience sample of 613 Taiwanese nursing students participated in the study. Content validity, construct validity, internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability were examined. Content validity was confirmed by a content validity index of 0.89. Factor analysis yielded three components of perspective taking, compassionate care and standing in the patient's shoes, explaining 57.14% of total variance. Women scored higher on empathy than men. Also, students who were enrolled in the 4-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) indicated greater empathy degrees than those in the 2-year Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (RN-to-BSN). Cronbach's alpha coefficient and the test-retest reliability were 0.93 and 0.92 respectively. A C-JSE-HPS demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties to measure empathy of undergraduate nursing students. Educators may use this instrument to assess empathic qualities among students and design effective empathy-oriented nursing curricula to improve the quality of nursing care.

  20. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nelofar S.; Shahnaz, Syed I.; Gomathi, Kadayam G.

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula. PMID:27606105

  1. Using the Personal Background Preparation Survey to Identify Health Science Professions Students at Risk for Adverse Academic Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Craig W.; Johnson, Ronald; McKee, John C.; Kim, Mira

    2009-01-01

    In the first predictive validity study of a diagnostic and prescriptive instrument for averting adverse academic status events (AASE) among multiple populations of diverse health science professions students, entering matriculates' personal background and preparation survey (PBPS) scores consistently significantly predicted 1st- or 2nd-year AASE.…

  2. Interprofessional Workplace Learning in Primary Care: Students from Different Health Professions Work in Teams in Real-Life Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondevik, Gunnar Tschudi; Holst, Lone; Haugland, Mildrid; Baerheim, Anders; Raaheim, Arild

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional education may be defined as an occasion when two or more professions learn with, from, and about each other in order to improve collaboration and quality of care. We studied the self-reported experiences from Norwegian health care students participating in interprofessional workplace learning in primary care. We discuss the…

  3. Development of a scale to measure health professions students' self-efficacy beliefs in interprofessional learning.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karen; McFetridge-Durdle, Judith; Breau, Lynn; Clovis, Joanne; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Matheson, Tanya; Beanlands, Hope; Sarria, Maria

    2012-03-01

    A need exists for measures to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education (IPE) interventions. We undertook development and evaluation of a scale to measure self-efficacy perceptions of pre-licensure students in medicine, dentistry and health professions. The scale was developed in the context of a project entitled, "Seamless Care: An Experiential Model of Interprofessional Education for Collaborative Patient-Centered Practice". As self-efficacy perceptions are associated with the likelihood of taking on certain tasks, the difficulty of those tasks, and perseverance in the face of barriers, we reasoned that understanding changes in students' perceptions and their relation to other outcomes was important. A 16-item scale was developed from a conceptual analysis of relevant tasks and the existing literature. Content validity was assessed by six Canadian IPE experts. Pre-licensure students (n = 209) participated in a pilot test of the instrument. Content validity was rated highly by the six judges; internal consistency of the scale (Cronbach's α = 96) and subscales 1 (α = .94) and 2 (α = .93) were high. Principal components analysis resulted in identification of two factors, each accounting for 34% of the variance: interprofessional interaction, and interprofessional team evaluation and feedback. We conclude that this scale can be useful in evaluating IPE interventions. PMID:22166126

  4. Development of a scale to measure health professions students' self-efficacy beliefs in interprofessional learning.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karen; McFetridge-Durdle, Judith; Breau, Lynn; Clovis, Joanne; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Matheson, Tanya; Beanlands, Hope; Sarria, Maria

    2012-03-01

    A need exists for measures to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education (IPE) interventions. We undertook development and evaluation of a scale to measure self-efficacy perceptions of pre-licensure students in medicine, dentistry and health professions. The scale was developed in the context of a project entitled, "Seamless Care: An Experiential Model of Interprofessional Education for Collaborative Patient-Centered Practice". As self-efficacy perceptions are associated with the likelihood of taking on certain tasks, the difficulty of those tasks, and perseverance in the face of barriers, we reasoned that understanding changes in students' perceptions and their relation to other outcomes was important. A 16-item scale was developed from a conceptual analysis of relevant tasks and the existing literature. Content validity was assessed by six Canadian IPE experts. Pre-licensure students (n = 209) participated in a pilot test of the instrument. Content validity was rated highly by the six judges; internal consistency of the scale (Cronbach's α = 96) and subscales 1 (α = .94) and 2 (α = .93) were high. Principal components analysis resulted in identification of two factors, each accounting for 34% of the variance: interprofessional interaction, and interprofessional team evaluation and feedback. We conclude that this scale can be useful in evaluating IPE interventions.

  5. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    PubMed

    Glazer, Greer; Startsman, Laura F; Bankston, Karen; Michaels, Julia; Danek, Jennifer C; Fair, Malika

    2016-01-01

    Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30), motivation (22), readiness for the profession (17), service (12), and problem-solving (12). Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

  6. Medical Student Financing and the Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daubert, Victoria; And Others

    The impact of the Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-484) on the supply of physicians for the armed services was assessed. As background to the survey findings, information is presented on conditions of three federal programs and differences in their benefit structures and implications for program participation. These…

  7. 75 FR 1384 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers:...

  8. Student Financing in the Health Professions: Dependence on and Interactions between the Higher Education Act and the Public Health Service Act Financial Aid Programs: A Background Paper. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advisory Committee on Student Financial Assistance, Washington, DC.

    This paper identifies issues that underlie student financing of education in the health professions in terms of the interrelationships and interactions between financial aid programs under Title IV of the Higher Education Act and Titles VII and VIII of the Public Health Service Act. Section 1 provides background to the issues by describing…

  9. It's "Supposed" to Be Personal: Personal and Educational Factors Associated with Sexual Health Attitudes, Knowledge, Comfort and Skill in Health Profession Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Lindsey M.; Stepleman, Lara M.; Wilson, Christina K.; Campbell, Jeff; Villarosa, Margo; Bodie, Brittany; Decker, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The health professional and the patient are cultural beings with beliefs and attitudes that are shaped by family traditions, social development, and exposure to novel experiences. As such, it is especially important for health profession students to gain awareness about the personal and educational factors that likely inform their practice and…

  10. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nelofar S; Shahnaz, Syed I; Gomathi, Kadayam G

    2016-08-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula.

  11. Obesity, Diet, and Physical Activity Behaviors of Students in Health- Related Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Cynthia M.; Nobrega, Cheryl; Dulfan, Faina

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have examined incidence of obesity and healthy lifestyle behaviors in college students in health-related (HM) compared to other majors (NH). Since individuals are more likely to follow health promotion advice if the health care professional lives a healthy lifestyle, this information may be important in determining compliance of…

  12. Florida Health Professions Education Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This report presents the results of a review of health professions education in Florida and the social and economic forces affecting the supply and demand for health professionals in the state. Individual sections focus on medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, public health, nursing, physician assistantship, physical therapy,…

  13. "How to Do Things with Words" in Health Professions Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruitenberg, Claudia W.; Towle, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study of journal entries written by students in six health professions participating in the Interprofessional Health Mentors program at the University of British Columbia, Canada. The study examined (1) what health professions students learn about professional language and communication when given the…

  14. Health Professions and Nursing Student Loan and Scholarship Programs. Manual of Information, Policies, and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower Education.

    This manual covers basic policies and procedures governing four student loan and scholarship programs administered within the Bureau of Health Manpower, National Institutes of Health. An introductory chapter provides definitions, procedures, and reporting common to all programs, and this is followed by chapters describing: (1) The Health…

  15. ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENT GRANTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS PERSONNEL ACT OF 1966 AUTHORIZES THE SURGEON GENERAL TO MAKE GRANTS TO EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING PROGRAMS WHICH QUALIFY STUDENTS (1) FOR THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE OR ITS EQUIVALENT OR THE MASTER'S DEGREE TO THE EXTENT REQUIRED FOR BASIC PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION, REGISTRATION, OR LICENSURE…

  16. Native Americans in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane; Blue Spruce, George, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr., who became the first American Indian dentist in 1956, shares his views on health professions for Indian young people, as well as his own experiences. Resources for prospective dental students, information on the Society of American Indian Dentists, and inspiring stories of American Indian healers are provided. (CDS)

  17. The integrated model for interprofessional education: a design for preparing health professions' students to work in interprofessional teams.

    PubMed

    Grapczynski, Cynthia A; Schuurman, Shelley; Booth, Andrew D; Bambini, Deborah; Beel-Bates, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the process of helping students learn to work interprofessionally is figuring out how to design high-impact learning experiences that engage students in meaningful learning that is collaborative and experiential and can transform students understanding of their own and others' roles in the health care process. In this article, a model for interprofessional education, the Integrated Model for Interprofessional Education (IMIPE), is shared for introducing students in the health professions to the roles and responsibilities of some of the other healthcare professionals with whom they will work in practice. The IMIPE is a process model developed by an interprofessional faculty team used as the focal point of a pilot educational event for students from nursing, occupational therapy, physician assistant studies, and social work. The IMIPE is a derived model that combines concepts of holism, participation, and practical education, grounded in the adult educational philosophy of progressivism. Progressive adult education is focused on practical knowledge and problem-solving skills. The model uses collaborative, experiential, and transformative learning approaches to foster outcomes of communication, critical reflection, teamwork, ethics, and recognition of patient-client needs. These outcomes represent those identified by the World Health Organization and the Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel. PMID:26046119

  18. A National Study of Student Selection Practices in the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Marie C.; Crowley, Judeth A.

    1982-01-01

    Reports the outcomes of a 1978 national survey of candidate selection practices in 4 baccalaureate level and 7 associate degree level allied health disciplines. Found that few programs conducted evaluation of their admissions activities and that physical therapy and dental hygiene programs were the most structured in student selection. (JOW)

  19. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nelofar S; Shahnaz, Syed I; Gomathi, Kadayam G

    2016-08-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula. PMID:27606105

  20. Teaching and educational scholarship in Tanzania: faculty initiative to improve performance of health professions' students.

    PubMed

    Mkony, Charles A; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Owibingire, Sirra S; Fyfe, Molly V; Omer, Selma; Freeman, Phyllis; Makubi, Abel; Mloka, Doreen A; Portillo, Carmen J; Leyna, Germana H; Tarimo, Edith; Kaaya, Ephata E; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Well-educated and competent health professionals influence the health system in which they work to improve health outcomes, through clinical care and community interventions, and by raising standards of practice and supervision. To prepare these individuals, training institutions must ensure that their faculty members, who design and deliver education, are effective teachers. We describe the experience of the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) in encouraging improvements in the teaching capacity of its faculty and postgraduate students triggered by a major institutional transition to competency-based education. We employed a multi-stage process that started by identifying the teaching and learning needs and challenges of MUHAS students and faculty. Collaborating with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), MUHAS responded to these needs by introducing faculty to competency-based curricula and later to strategies for long term continuing improvement. We demonstrate that teaching faculty members are keen for local institutional support to enable them to enhance their skills as educators, and that they have been able to sustain a program of faculty development for their peers.

  1. Teaching and educational scholarship in Tanzania: faculty initiative to improve performance of health professions' students.

    PubMed

    Mkony, Charles A; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Owibingire, Sirra S; Fyfe, Molly V; Omer, Selma; Freeman, Phyllis; Makubi, Abel; Mloka, Doreen A; Portillo, Carmen J; Leyna, Germana H; Tarimo, Edith; Kaaya, Ephata E; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Well-educated and competent health professionals influence the health system in which they work to improve health outcomes, through clinical care and community interventions, and by raising standards of practice and supervision. To prepare these individuals, training institutions must ensure that their faculty members, who design and deliver education, are effective teachers. We describe the experience of the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) in encouraging improvements in the teaching capacity of its faculty and postgraduate students triggered by a major institutional transition to competency-based education. We employed a multi-stage process that started by identifying the teaching and learning needs and challenges of MUHAS students and faculty. Collaborating with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), MUHAS responded to these needs by introducing faculty to competency-based curricula and later to strategies for long term continuing improvement. We demonstrate that teaching faculty members are keen for local institutional support to enable them to enhance their skills as educators, and that they have been able to sustain a program of faculty development for their peers. PMID:23254841

  2. Enhancing capabilities in health professions education

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Susan J.; Siddiqui, Zarrin S.; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article documents the results of ongoing summative program evaluation of a suite of postgraduate courses at The University of Western Australia designed to enhance the educational capabilities, academic leadership and scholarly output of health professionals. Methods Commencing students were invited to participate in this descriptive, longitudinal study that surveyed students at commencement and subsequently over a seven year period. Data was collected at baseline and follow-up in relation to the respondents’ educational leadership responsibilities, promotions, involvement in new educational programs, and recognition for contributions towards student learning, educational scholarly outputs and involvement in training programs. Results The respondents came from a wide range of health professions and worked in various roles, with a quarter already holding leadership positions. During the follow-up period, half reported receiving a new promotion or moving to new positions requiring educational leadership. Those identifying as being involved with the development of new educational programs doubled and 34% received a new teaching award. Scholarly productivity doubled with 45% giving an oral presentation related to education, 21% publishing and 29% being successful in obtaining funding related to an education project.  Conclusions These postgraduate courses in health professions education appear to be positively influencing graduates’ capabilities, especially in the areas of educational leadership skills and scholarly productivity. For those looking to develop a community of leaders in health professions education, the authors offer some suggestions. PMID:26590857

  3. Evaluation of Health Profession Student Attitudes toward an Online Nutrition Education Problem-Based Learning Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Kathleen; Sadera, William

    2015-01-01

    The intent of problem-based learning (PBL) is to increase student motivation to learn, to promote critical thinking and to teach students to learn with complexity. PBL encourages students to understand that there are no straightforward answers and that problem solutions depend on context. This paper discusses the experience of undergraduate health…

  4. A Team-Based Practicum Bringing Together Students Across Educational Institutions and Health Professions.

    PubMed

    MacDonnell, Celia; George, Paul; Nimmagadda, Jayashree; Brown, Samantha; Gremel, Kathleen

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To assess student perceptions of teamwork during an interprofessional exercise and to evaluate if students could identify domestic violence through a standardized patient interview. Design. Medical, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, and social work students were assigned to teams to interview and examine a patient with a "cut on the hand" later revealed a result of domestic violence. They also practiced suturing technique and developed a patient care plan. A postexercise survey was administered. Assessment. From 70% to 94% of students surveyed agreed or strongly agreed, respectively, that their responsibilities were clear. All (100%) recognized the benefits of team-based care. Only 38% of the medical students reported team members providing insight into domestic violence, and 52% did not recognize team members as resources for these cases. Conclusion. Students gained perspective of knowledge and responsibilities of each team member. However, the results suggest further enhancements of curriculum related to domestic violence are needed. PMID:27170820

  5. A Team-Based Practicum Bringing Together Students Across Educational Institutions and Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    George, Paul; Nimmagadda, Jayashree; Brown, Samantha; Gremel, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess student perceptions of teamwork during an interprofessional exercise and to evaluate if students could identify domestic violence through a standardized patient interview. Design. Medical, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, and social work students were assigned to teams to interview and examine a patient with a “cut on the hand” later revealed a result of domestic violence. They also practiced suturing technique and developed a patient care plan. A postexercise survey was administered. Assessment. From 70% to 94% of students surveyed agreed or strongly agreed, respectively, that their responsibilities were clear. All (100%) recognized the benefits of team-based care. Only 38% of the medical students reported team members providing insight into domestic violence, and 52% did not recognize team members as resources for these cases. Conclusion. Students gained perspective of knowledge and responsibilities of each team member. However, the results suggest further enhancements of curriculum related to domestic violence are needed. PMID:27170820

  6. A Team-Based Practicum Bringing Together Students Across Educational Institutions and Health Professions.

    PubMed

    MacDonnell, Celia; George, Paul; Nimmagadda, Jayashree; Brown, Samantha; Gremel, Kathleen

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To assess student perceptions of teamwork during an interprofessional exercise and to evaluate if students could identify domestic violence through a standardized patient interview. Design. Medical, pharmacy, nursing, physical therapy, and social work students were assigned to teams to interview and examine a patient with a "cut on the hand" later revealed a result of domestic violence. They also practiced suturing technique and developed a patient care plan. A postexercise survey was administered. Assessment. From 70% to 94% of students surveyed agreed or strongly agreed, respectively, that their responsibilities were clear. All (100%) recognized the benefits of team-based care. Only 38% of the medical students reported team members providing insight into domestic violence, and 52% did not recognize team members as resources for these cases. Conclusion. Students gained perspective of knowledge and responsibilities of each team member. However, the results suggest further enhancements of curriculum related to domestic violence are needed.

  7. Student Perceptions of iPad Applications-Assisted Instruction in Health Professions Education.

    PubMed

    Little, Ross M; Colligan, Amanda; Broyles, India

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student's perceptions of the iPad applications-assisted instruction as part of their learning. In this study, multiple features and applications were evaluated as an instructional tool. Fifteen participants responded to the survey indicating their perceptions of the iPad and applications used as part of their course delivery. Overall, participants favored the use of this technology as an instructional tool in their learning and indicated several aspects that could be improved.

  8. Student Perceptions of iPad Applications-Assisted Instruction in Health Professions Education.

    PubMed

    Little, Ross M; Colligan, Amanda; Broyles, India

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student's perceptions of the iPad applications-assisted instruction as part of their learning. In this study, multiple features and applications were evaluated as an instructional tool. Fifteen participants responded to the survey indicating their perceptions of the iPad and applications used as part of their course delivery. Overall, participants favored the use of this technology as an instructional tool in their learning and indicated several aspects that could be improved. PMID:27585626

  9. Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Ann C., Ed.; Knebel, Elisa, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine study Crossing the Quality Chasm (2001) recommended that an interdisciplinary summit be held to further reform of health professions education in order to enhance quality and patient safety. Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality is the follow up to that summit, held in June 2002, where 150 participants across…

  10. Student Preparation for the International Environmental Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ian; Meehan, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many universities have strategies for exposing students to international experiences, but little is reported on their implementation. One example of an implemented activity is the multidisciplinary research project for undergraduate environment students, at RMIT University, that both prepares students to work in the environment profession and…

  11. "How to do things with words" in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Ruitenberg, Claudia W; Towle, Angela

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study of journal entries written by students in six health professions participating in the Interprofessional Health Mentors program at the University of British Columbia, Canada. The study examined (1) what health professions students learn about professional language and communication when given the opportunity, in an interprofessional group with a patient or client, to explore the uses, meanings, and effects of common health care terms, and (2) how health professional students write about their experience of discussing common health care terms, and what this reveals about how students see their development of professional discourse and participation in a professional discourse community. Using qualitative thematic analysis to address the first question, the study found that discussion of these health care terms provoked learning and reflection on how words commonly used in one health profession can be understood quite differently in other health professions, as well as on how health professionals' language choices may be perceived by patients and clients. Using discourse analysis to address the second question, the study further found that many of the students emphasized accuracy and certainty in language through clear definitions and intersubjective agreement. However, when prompted by the discussion they were willing to consider other functions and effects of language.

  12. Integrating Healthy Communities concepts into health professions training.

    PubMed Central

    Kinder, G; Cashman, S B; Seifer, S D; Inouye, A; Hagopian, A

    2000-01-01

    To meet the demands of the evolving health care system, health professionals need skills that will allow them to anticipate and respond to the broader social determinants of health. To ensure that these skills are learned during their professional education and training, health professions institutions must look beyond the medical model of caring for communities. Models in Seattle and Roanoke demonstrate the curricular changes necessary to ensure that students in the health professions are adequately prepared to contribute to building Healthy Communities in the 21st century. In addition to these models, a number of resources are available to help promote the needed institutional changes. PMID:10968767

  13. Students' Reasons for Entering the Educational Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Sandra

    This study examined why students decide to enter teaching as a profession through a survey of college students majoring in education at Northwestern Oklahoma State University. The study used triangulation with a data search, an anonymous survey, and an open-ended questionnaire. The 100 surveys were distributed randomly to junior and senior…

  14. Enhancement of Anatomical Learning and Developing Clinical Competence of First-Year Medical and Allied Health Profession Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim Janssen, Sarah A.; VanderMeulen, Stephane P.; Shostrom, Valerie K.; Lomneth, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on educational experiences can stimulate student interest, increase knowledge retention, and enhance development of clinical skills. The Lachman test, used to assess the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is commonly performed by health care professionals and is relatively easy to teach to first-year health profession…

  15. An Investigation of Students' Perceptions of Ethical Practice: Engaging a Reflective Dialogue about Ethics Education in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Phelan, Shanon K.; Lala, Anna Park; Mom, Vanna

    2015-01-01

    The ethical climate in which occupational therapists, and other health practitioners, currently practice is increasingly complex. There have been a number of calls for greater attention to ethics education within health science curricula. This study investigated occupational therapy students' perceptions of the meaning of ethical practice as a…

  16. Computer Assisted Instruction in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolurow, Lawrence M.; And Others

    Introductory remarks by staff members at Ohio State University College of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, U.S. Naval Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Michigan State University explore the educational requirements of the health professions and the ways in which the computer can aid in fulfilling these requirements. Programs…

  17. Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Ann C., Ed.; Knebel, Elisa, Ed.

    The 2001 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report "Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century" recommended that an interdisciplinary summit be held to develop next steps for reform of health professions education in order to enhance patient care quality and safety. In June 2002, the IOM convened this summit, which included 150…

  18. Creighton Collaborative Health Professions Partnership: Assessing Impact beyond the Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houtz, Lynne E.; Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade

    2006-01-01

    Creighton University, a private Jesuit institution in the Midwest, included a Health Professions Partnership Initiative (HPPI) to increase the pool of qualified underrepresented minority applicants by identifying students early and encouraging their progress through elementary and middle school, high school, college, and professional schools.…

  19. An investigation of students' perceptions of ethical practice: engaging a reflective dialogue about ethics education in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Phelan, Shanon K; Park Lala, Anna; Mom, Vanna

    2015-08-01

    The ethical climate in which occupational therapists, and other health practitioners, currently practice is increasingly complex. There have been a number of calls for greater attention to ethics education within health science curricula. This study investigated occupational therapy students' perceptions of the meaning of ethical practice as a means of engaging in a dialogue about the aims of ethics education in contemporary health science contexts. A phenomenological methodological approach was adopted for the study. Interviews were conducted over 2 years with 25 student participants. The data were analyzed using phenomenological methods of analysis. Seven themes depict students' views about the meaning of ethical practice and include: being faithful to the tenets of your practice, being communicative, being in tune with your values, understanding the client's needs, weighing the pros and cons, negotiating the grey zones, and taking time to reflect. The findings contribute to understanding students' conceptions of the meaning of ethical practice that include and move beyond traditional codes, principles, and professional standards to encompass a range of dimensions of ethical practice. These additional dimensions raise insights of relevance to those who design and facilitate ethics education with health professionals. PMID:25354661

  20. Information and Communication Technology to Facilitate Learning for Students in the Health Professions: Current Uses, Gaps, and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Ellen; Corcoran, Mary; Barnett, Jacqueline S.; Birkmeier, Marisa; Cohn, Rhea; Ekmekci, Ozgur; Falk, Nancy L.; Harrod, Thomas; Herrmann, Debra; Robinson, Sean; Walker, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the U.S. Healthcare System along with the need for institutions of higher education to prepare a work force ready to address the challenges of today and tomorrow have highlighted the need to incorporate technology in its broadest sense as part of the student learning experience. In health professional education, this becomes challenging…

  1. An investigation of students' perceptions of ethical practice: engaging a reflective dialogue about ethics education in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Phelan, Shanon K; Park Lala, Anna; Mom, Vanna

    2015-08-01

    The ethical climate in which occupational therapists, and other health practitioners, currently practice is increasingly complex. There have been a number of calls for greater attention to ethics education within health science curricula. This study investigated occupational therapy students' perceptions of the meaning of ethical practice as a means of engaging in a dialogue about the aims of ethics education in contemporary health science contexts. A phenomenological methodological approach was adopted for the study. Interviews were conducted over 2 years with 25 student participants. The data were analyzed using phenomenological methods of analysis. Seven themes depict students' views about the meaning of ethical practice and include: being faithful to the tenets of your practice, being communicative, being in tune with your values, understanding the client's needs, weighing the pros and cons, negotiating the grey zones, and taking time to reflect. The findings contribute to understanding students' conceptions of the meaning of ethical practice that include and move beyond traditional codes, principles, and professional standards to encompass a range of dimensions of ethical practice. These additional dimensions raise insights of relevance to those who design and facilitate ethics education with health professionals.

  2. MSW student perceptions of sexual health as relevant to the profession: Do social work educational experiences matter?

    PubMed

    Winter, Virginia Ramseyer; O'Neill, Elizabeth; Begun, Stephanie; Kattari, Shanna K; McKay, Kimberly

    2016-09-01

    Many social work clients are at an increased risk for negative outcomes related to sexual behavior, including unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, there is a dearth of literature on social work student experiences with these topics in social work classrooms and their perceptions about the topic's relevance to their practice. The purpose of this study is to explore relationships between experiences with STIs and contraception as topics in social work education and practica experiences on student perceptions toward sexual health as a relevant topic for social work. Among a national sample of MSW students (N = 443), experiences with STIs and contraception as topics in practica was significantly related to perceptions toward sexual health's relevance to social work. Findings and implications are discussed.

  3. 77 FR 21568 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... student account tuition and fees charges at the college or university they are attending, before the IHS... Scholarship Programs for Indians. The awards are for tuition and fees only and the average award to a full... Professions Scholarship Program. The awards are for 12 months in duration, and will cover both tuition...

  4. Association of trait and specific hopes: cross sectional study on students and workers of health professions in Split, Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Domagoj; Marušić, Matko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Hope (hoping) is most commonly assessed as a dispositional trait and associated with quality of life, self-care agency and non-attempts of suicide. However, little research has been conducted on hoping for specific events. Materials and Methods. We distributed a survey consisting of Integrative Hope Scale (IHS) and visual analogue scales on which respondents could declare their levels (intensity) of hope for specific events, to all first year health students enrolled at the University Department of Health Studies, Split, Croatia in 2011/2012, as well as to working health professionals attending a nursing conference in April 2012. Results. A total of 161 (89.4%) students and 88 (89.8%) working health professionals returned the completed questionnaires. We found high trait hope scores of students and working health professionals (Md = 111, 95% CI [109–113] vs. Md = 115, 95% CI [112–119]; U = 5,353, P = 0.065), and weak to moderate correlations of trait and specific hopes (r = 0.18–0.48, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient). Students and workers reported 31 different things they hoped for most in life, of which the most prevalent were being healthy and happy. There was very little agreement between participants’ reported influence of the four factors compromising the trait hope (self-confidence, ambition, optimism, and social support) on their specific hopes. Conclusions. Our findings, while strengthening the validity of hope as a trait, indicate that specific hopes of individuals are moderated by factors not captured by the IHS trait scale. Further research should explore specific hoping in detail, as well as the effectiveness of interventions aimed at increasing specific or generalized hoping. PMID:26819851

  5. Steps for Strengthening the Health Education Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perales, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Since its founding in 1950, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has evolved in response to the changing needs of both the public and the profession. This SOPHE Presidential Address provides a brief review of SOPHE's history and the legacy of its achievements over some 60 years. It also describes how new challenges being created by the…

  6. Ensuring Competency in Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Shirley Ann

    1986-01-01

    Reports that vocational health occupations programs are undergoing a self-analysis process including evaluation of competency and continuing competency. Presents perspectives of health professionals with comparisons to nursing and medical technology credentialing and continuing education. These perspectives are intended for other occupational…

  7. Feminism and women's health professions in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Adams, Tracey L; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Historically, prevailing gender ideologies were an important element in both the exclusionary strategies employed by male occupational groups and the countervailing responses by female groups. The way in which evolving gender ideologies, and feminism in particular, influence the continuing struggle for greater status and recognition by female professions, however, remains to be fully explored. In this paper, we examine the impact and the role of feminism and feminist ideologies within three female professional projects: nursing, dental hygiene and midwifery in Ontario. We argue that feminism provides an ideology of opposition that enables leaders in these professions to battle against professional inequalities by laying bare the gender inequalities that underlie them. Framing their struggles in feminist terms, female professions also seek recognition for the uniquely female contribution they make to the health care division of labour. At the same time, there exists a tension between ideals of feminism and ideals of professionalism, that has the potential to undermine female professional projects.

  8. Factors affecting a student's choice of dietetics as a profession.

    PubMed

    Markley, E J; Huyck, N I

    1992-08-01

    In order to design more effective recruitment strategies, 419 junior students in 38 coordinated dietetics programs completed self-administered questionnaires to identify factors that attracted them to the profession. The majority (43.9%) first became interested in a dietetics career while in college; 24.9% became interested before or during secondary school; and 17.7% were making a career change. Factors that most frequently led to a career in dietetics were a course in nutrition (32.9%), a friend or relative other than parent (31.0%), and a dietitian (30.3%). Students rated the opportunity to help others (95.2%) and the relationship of nutrition to health (94.0%) as characteristics of the profession that had a highly positive influence on their decision. Interests in health, disease, and health care (70.5%); teaching and health promotion (42.7%); sports and fitness (40.7%); counseling and behavior change (35.6%); and food and cooking (35.4%) were most frequently cited as influencing the choice of a dietetics career. Students were most interested in practicing dietetics as a consultant or in private practice (37.5%) or as a clinical dietitian (34.8%). New and innovative recruitment strategies should target high school and college students and pay special attention to second-career students. Interests such as health, disease, and health care and health promotion and characteristics of the profession such as the opportunity to help others attracted present dietetics students and should be emphasized in recruiting. The best marketing tools may be the practicing dietitian and a course in nutrition.

  9. The Case for Cultural Competence in Health Professions Education

    PubMed Central

    Shaya, Fadia T.; Gbarayor, Confidence M.

    2006-01-01

    Health profession schools in the United States have to be able to meet the health and pharmaceutical care demands of a rapidly growing racial and multiethnic population. One tactic is to develop and implement or expand existing resources and didactic courses to address cultural competence in the curricula of every college and school of pharmacy. The curriculum should require a focus on the reality of evidence-based health disparities among racial and ethnic minority populations; importance of providing culturally competent care and communication to meet the health needs of diverse patient populations; and exposure to cultural diversity. Students should be grounded in cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity. This article establishes a case for integrating cultural competence into the curricula of health professions schools. PMID:17332850

  10. Health Informatics and E-health Curriculum for Clinical Health Profession Degrees.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kathleen; Choo, Dawn; Butler-Henderson, Kerryn; Whetton, Sue; Maeder, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The project reported in this paper models a new approach to making health informatics and e-health education widely available to students in a range of Australian clinical health profession degrees. The development of a Masters level subject uses design-based research to apply educational quality assurance practices which are consistent with university qualification frameworks, and with clinical health profession education standards; at the same time it gives recognition to health informatics as a specialised profession in its own right. The paper presents details of (a) design with reference to the Australian Qualifications Framework and CHIA competencies, (b) peer review within a three-university teaching team, (c) external review by experts from the professions, (d) cross-institutional interprofessional online learning, (e) methods for evaluating student learning experiences and outcomes, and (f) mechanisms for making the curriculum openly available to interested parties. The project has sought and found demand among clinical health professionals for formal health informatics and e-health education that is designed for them. It has helped the educators and organisations involved to understand the need for nuanced and complementary health informatics educational offerings in Australian universities. These insights may aid in further efforts to address substantive and systemic challenges that clinical informatics faces in Australia.

  11. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Volume III: Women in Osteopathic Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    As part of a larger study of the success and problems of women as applicants to and students in the schools of eight health professions, the study of osteopathic medicine involved interviews with administrators, faculty, and medical students. Its central purpose was to identify any characteristics of the profession--in its history, organization,…

  12. Predictors of Success of Black Americans in a College-Level Pre-Health Professions Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, J. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Predictors of success for black freshmen entering Xavier University of Louisiana with an interest in the health professions were studied. Health professions were considered as the mainline fields of medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry, and pharmacy. Students majoring in biology, chemistry, or…

  13. Estimates and Projections of Black and Hispanic Personnel in Selected Health Professions, 1980-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spratley, Ernell

    Federal efforts to establish financial support for health professions education in the 1960s and 1970s have led to an increase in the enrollment of minorities and women in health professions schools. The increase in the number of minority students graduating from these schools during the past decade has resulted in more minority practitioners…

  14. Geriatric Education in the Health Professions: Are We Making Progress?

    PubMed Central

    Bardach, Shoshana H.; Rowles, Graham D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to the overall population, older adults consume a disproportionally large percentage of health care resources. Despite advocacy and efforts initiated more than 30 years ago, the number of providers with specialized training in geriatrics is still not commensurate with the growing population of older adults. This contribution provides a contemporary update on the status of geriatric education and explores how geriatric coverage is valued, how geriatric competence is defined, and how students are evaluated for geriatric competencies. Design and Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with curriculum representatives from 7 health profession disciplines in a case study of one academic medical center. Findings: Geriatric training varies across health professions’ disciplines. Although participants recognized the unique needs of older patients and valued geriatric coverage, they identified shortage of time in packed curricula, lack of geriatrics-trained educators, absence of financial incentive, and low student demand (resulting from limited exposure to older adults and gerontological stereotyping) as barriers to improving geriatric training. Implications: Progress in including geriatric training within curricula across the health professions continues to lag behind need as a result of the continuing presence of barriers identified several decades ago. There remains an urgent need for institutional commitment to enhance geriatric education as a component of health professions curricula. PMID:22394495

  15. Assessing Multicultural Competence of Helping-Profession Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hladik, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on assessing multicultural competence of helping-profession students. The "Multicultural Competence Scale of Helping-Profession Students" was used for data collection. The aim of the research was to find out the level of students' multicultural competence due to the current lack of this information in Central…

  16. Increasing minority representation in the health care professions.

    PubMed

    Gabard, Donald L

    2007-01-01

    Although race is a social construct with no scientific credibility, it is a powerful predictor of diminished health outcomes and health care delivery in the United States. Minorities who enter health professions provide a disproportionate quantity of health care services to minorities, the underserved, and poor. The goal of having a health care delivery system with similar demographics to the population it serves is seriously lacking in most health care professions. The author of this commentary proposes that health care educators should be more aggressive in admitting and recruiting students from minority communities through the use of affirmative action. The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Grutter v. Bollinger, not only supports this approach but also gives guidance for implementation. Under the general category of admission strategies, two strategies are proposed: (1) a defensible structure for admission using race/ethnicity as a factor and (2) expanded criteria for student selection. Under recruitment strategies, four strategies are offered: (1) outreach to kindergarten through 12th grade, (2) better informing school career counselors, (3) advertising possibilities, and (4) community involvement through local school boards. Because affirmative action in admissions is the most controversial and complex set of strategies, this report focuses particularly on this area. PMID:17941411

  17. Implementation and evaluation of an interdisciplinary health professions core curriculum.

    PubMed

    Buck, M M; Tilson, E R; Andersen, J C

    1999-01-01

    An interdisciplinary core curriculum has been implemented in the College of Health Professions at Armstrong Atlantic State University since spring 1996. The curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and values necessary for interprofessional practice. The courses are taught by interdisciplinary teams and are offered as electives or as part of major requirements in nursing, health science, physical therapy, dental hygiene, medical technology, radiologic sciences, and respiratory therapy. In addition to ongoing evaluation methods, a survey designed to assess the student and faculty perceptions of the experience has been conducted. Both groups agreed that the experience has had a positive impact on the students' professional performances, patient interactions, understanding of the health care delivery system, and health career preparation. Faculty agreed that teaching in an interdisciplinary team was a positive experience. The collaboration among the health professions' faculty has resulted in increased respect for one another and for others' disciplines. Although the experience places an additional burden on their workload, they agreed that the experience is beneficial, their efforts are worthwhile, and they would be willing to continue to teach interdisciplinary courses.

  18. Accreditation in the allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Stull, G A

    1989-01-01

    Specialized accreditation in the allied health professions can and will fulfill its basic purpose if its efforts are guided by the principle that evaluation must place its emphasis on the outcome of the educational process, no matter how difficult it may be to assess. This requires the commitment and cooperation of both the accrediting body and the institution and program under review. Accreditation is a vitally important and valuable system in higher education in general, and the allied health professions are no exception. If the system is to be effective, however, every temptation must be resisted by all involved parties to debase it by using it for self-serving purposes. A recognized accrediting agency not only has the right, but indeed the responsibility, to ensure that the graduates of a program under review possess the prerequisite knowledge and skills essential for entrance into a given allied health profession. In cases where that minimal standard is not attained, the program should be required to remove those deficiencies in a timely manner or, if sufficiently serious, have its accreditation withheld or withdrawn. There should be no exceptions to this course of action. Every standard or essential adopted should be defensible on sound educational grounds, and every program should be evaluated according to whether it is in compliance. Accrediting bodies must direct their efforts toward evaluating educational quality. They must respect institutional rights and responsibilities and not even attempt to prescribe what will be taught or by whom, or who will administer a given program. The entire accreditation process must account for institutional diversity and should not discourage experimentation, innovation, or modernization. However, the standards and essentials that are ultimately adopted must be applied uniformly and fairly and not in an arbitrary or capricious manner. Hence, it is imperative that the standards and essentials be stated in such a way that

  19. The Perceptions of Students in the Allied Health Professions towards Stroke Rehabilitation Teams and the SLP's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Insalaco, Deborah; Ozkurt, Elcin; Santiago, Dign

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions and knowledge of final-year speech-language pathology (SLP), physical and occupational therapy (PT, OT) students toward stroke rehabilitation teams and the SLPs' roles on them. The investigators adapted a survey developed by (Felsher & Ross, 1994) and administered it to 35 PT, 35 OT, and…

  20. College choice among prospective health professions majors: implications for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Chapman, D W; Holzemer, W L

    1985-12-01

    Factors associated with high school students' decisions to pursue health-related fields of study were investigated using the "Survey of Future Plans of High School Seniors." Data from 10,878 seniors were analyzed using regression and discriminant analysis. Results indicated that: The applicant pool for health professions overlapped most with the applicant pool for education, but education majors were characterized by lower academic aptitude; the specific characteristics of a college were less important to those entering health professions than to those entering other majors; and, health profession applicants with higher academic aptitude purport life goals more consistent with professional advancement than do lower aptitude applicants.

  1. The readiness of health profession students to comply with a hypothetical program of forced migration of a minority population.

    PubMed

    Charny, I W; Fromer, D

    1990-10-01

    The readiness of Jewish Israeli medical, psychology, and social work students to cooperate in a hypothetical government program involving expulsion of Arabs from Israel was explored via research scenarios that pointedly used terms reminiscent of Holocaust events. Strong moral sensitivity was expected on the part of the study subjects as both Jewish Israelis and vocationally committed to human welfare. The authors argue that the readiness of as many as one-third of the sample to "follow orders" is a disturbing sign, calling for greater vigilance in defense of human rights and values.

  2. The Clergy and the Mental Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Chalke, F. C. R.

    1965-01-01

    In this lecture, as a tribute to the late Samuel Prince, founder of the mental hygiene movement in the Maritime Provinces, the rapprochement between the clergy and mental health profession is discussed. A brief survey of the historical background of the churches' approaches to mental disorder leads to consideration of subjects of present mutual concern. Spiritual and emotional development, responsibility and guilt, law and freedom, psychic structure and sanctity, sexuality, and symbolic representation are among the areas which demand intellectual exploration in depth, jointly, by theologians and social scientists. The need is outlined for training parish clergy to carry out their role in ameliorating emotionally damaging social conditions and of educating and counselling parishioners. PMID:5320919

  3. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  4. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  5. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  6. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  7. 42 CFR 136.310 - Health professions recruitment grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Health professions recruitment grants. 136.310 Section 136.310 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH Indian Health Care Improvement Act...

  8. Problem-Based Learning: Outcomes Evidence from the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Mark A.; Dast, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, problem-based learning (PBL) has become a major force in health professions education and even in the broader educational world. This article focuses on the outcomes that have been found from using PBL in the health professions based on at least 20 reviews done since 1990. The outcomes identified in these reviews are…

  9. Florida Health Professions Education Profiles: 1991--Report 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This state-mandated report reviews the status of health professions education programs in Florida. Part 1 provides an overview of health professions education policy by describing special considerations for policymakers and program planning, reviewing outcomes of previous Florida Postsecondary Education Planning Commission recommendations, and…

  10. The Validation of the Active Learning in Health Professions Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kammer, Rebecca; Schreiner, Laurie; Kim, Young K.; Denial, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for an assessment tool for evaluating the effectiveness of active learning strategies such as problem-based learning in promoting deep learning and clinical reasoning skills within the dual environments of didactic and clinical settings in health professions education. The Active Learning in Health Professions Scale (ALPHS)…

  11. Decision to Enter the Profession of Student Affairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Deborah J.; McEwen, Marylu K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider factors that graduate students in master's degree programs in student affairs identify as influential to their decisions to enter the student affairs profession. A total of 300 master's students from 24 randomly selected graduate programs participated in the study. Relatively few differences were found…

  12. Preparing health professions' educators via online certificate program: structure and strategies for quality.

    PubMed

    Bonnel, Wanda; Tarnow, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Educating the faculty of today and tomorrow presents challenges in the health professions. In rapidly changing clinical and educational settings, faculty need to be prepared to maintain course quality and promote student learning outcomes. This article provides reflective analysis of an established online Health Professions Educator Certificate Program and shares quality teaching/learning structures and strategies that provide flexibility for diverse interprofessional learners. A systems model of structure, process, and outcomes organizes the analysis. PMID:25350048

  13. 78 FR 78976 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... requests, and will cover both tuition and fees and Other Related Costs (ORC). The average award to a full... Professions Scholarship Program. The awards are for 12 months in duration and will cover both tuition and fees... Professions Preparatory Scholarship support, tuition, fees and ORC is limited to two years for...

  14. Rehabilitation--an emerging allied health profession.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, R E; Pool, D A; Henke, R O; McCollum, P S

    1978-01-01

    Rehabilitation is perceived as the third phase of health care following preventive health care and curative medicine. The rehabilitation specialist assists the health care team in facilitating the patient to live and work with what he has left. The unique role of the rehabilitation specialist in the health care system is described, as well as his/her relation to traditional helth care personnel. The University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas in the School of Allied Health Sciences has offered professional education at both the undergraduate and graduate levels in the Department of Rehabilitation Science for the past five years. The curriculum description, student characteristics, and employment placements are distinguishing features of each program and describe how this rehabilitation specialist is educated. PMID:10307652

  15. Complexity and the health care professions.

    PubMed

    Doll, William E; Trueit, Donna

    2010-08-01

    The concept of complexity is a popular and contentious topic. Just what is complexity? What does it mean to 'think complexly'? This paper addresses both of these issues. Complexity thinking is impossible to define with any precision as it deals not only with change, dynamic change, evergoing, but with transformative change. Definitions require stability, the very element complexity neither has nor aspires to have. Instead complexity asks us to see, to deal with a world in continual flux; but a world that does have patterns to it, patterns that bind and structure through their interplay. In short, complexity seeing/thinking asks us to envision our world and events within that world in terms, not of 'things' but of process. In so doing, we are moving from a science that studies particles to the new sciences of chaos and complexity that study the interactive relations between and among particles, events, happenings. After distinguishing the similarities and contrasts between chaos and complexity, and showing the characteristics of each, along with looking at systems closed and open, frames modern and post-modern, this paper enumerates practical aspects of thinking complexly: accepting ambiguity, allowing humility to permeate one's being, and seeking out and utilizing difference and diversity. The health care profession by its very nature of dealing with that which is dynamically living deals with the complex daily. Its routines and rules, though, are too often caught in a modernist trap. This paper challenges all health care professionals to break free from that trap, and suggests ways to do so. PMID:20659213

  16. Attitude of Student Teachers towards Teaching Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhargava, Anupama; Pathy, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching being a dynamic activity requires a favourable attitude and certain specific competencies from its practitioners. Teachers' proficiency depends on the attitude she possesses for the profession. The positive attitude helps teacher to develop a conductive learner friendly environment in the classroom. This also casts a fruitful effect…

  17. Issues in Selecting Methods of Evaluating Clinical Competence in the Health Professions: Implications for Athletic Training Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlemas, David A.; Hensal, Carleton

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine methods used to evaluate the clinical competence and proficiency of students in medicine and allied health professions. To identify factors that would be valuable to educators in athletic training and other medical and allied health professions in the development and use of clinical assessment methods. Data Sources: We…

  18. Learning curves in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Martin V; Boutis, Kathy; Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A

    2015-08-01

    Learning curves, which graphically show the relationship between learning effort and achievement, are common in published education research but are not often used in day-to-day educational activities. The purpose of this article is to describe the generation and analysis of learning curves and their applicability to health professions education. The authors argue that the time is right for a closer look at using learning curves-given their desirable properties-to inform both self-directed instruction by individuals and education management by instructors.A typical learning curve is made up of a measure of learning (y-axis), a measure of effort (x-axis), and a mathematical linking function. At the individual level, learning curves make manifest a single person's progress towards competence including his/her rate of learning, the inflection point where learning becomes more effortful, and the remaining distance to mastery attainment. At the group level, overlaid learning curves show the full variation of a group of learners' paths through a given learning domain. Specifically, they make overt the difference between time-based and competency-based approaches to instruction. Additionally, instructors can use learning curve information to more accurately target educational resources to those who most require them.The learning curve approach requires a fine-grained collection of data that will not be possible in all educational settings; however, the increased use of an assessment paradigm that explicitly includes effort and its link to individual achievement could result in increased learner engagement and more effective instructional design. PMID:25806621

  19. Learning curves in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Martin V; Boutis, Kathy; Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A

    2015-08-01

    Learning curves, which graphically show the relationship between learning effort and achievement, are common in published education research but are not often used in day-to-day educational activities. The purpose of this article is to describe the generation and analysis of learning curves and their applicability to health professions education. The authors argue that the time is right for a closer look at using learning curves-given their desirable properties-to inform both self-directed instruction by individuals and education management by instructors.A typical learning curve is made up of a measure of learning (y-axis), a measure of effort (x-axis), and a mathematical linking function. At the individual level, learning curves make manifest a single person's progress towards competence including his/her rate of learning, the inflection point where learning becomes more effortful, and the remaining distance to mastery attainment. At the group level, overlaid learning curves show the full variation of a group of learners' paths through a given learning domain. Specifically, they make overt the difference between time-based and competency-based approaches to instruction. Additionally, instructors can use learning curve information to more accurately target educational resources to those who most require them.The learning curve approach requires a fine-grained collection of data that will not be possible in all educational settings; however, the increased use of an assessment paradigm that explicitly includes effort and its link to individual achievement could result in increased learner engagement and more effective instructional design.

  20. Plagiarism: using a collaborative approach in an online allied health professions course.

    PubMed

    Pence, Patricia L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase the awareness and understanding of plagiarism among undergraduate students enrolled in an online allied health professions course in a community college in the Midwestern United States. The results suggested that the interventions were effective in educating students about how to avoid plagiarism.

  1. A Pariah Profession? Some Student Perceptions of Accounting and Accountancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Roy; Murphy, Vivienne

    1995-01-01

    Existing literature and a survey of 106 undergraduate accounting students in the United Kingdom were analyzed for perceptions of the accounting profession and the academic discipline of accounting. Results suggest that among accounting and nonaccounting students alike, there exist coexisting perceptions of accounting as having high status and low…

  2. An Overview of the Health Professions Educational Assistance Act, 1963-1971. Report No. A1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBride, Owen

    Legislation regarding federal assistance to health professionals is reviewed with tables included on specific expenditures and enrollments. The 1963 Health Professions Educational Assistance Act provided financial assistance for schools in two areas: subsidies for construction of new capacity and loans to students. Amendments to the act in 1965…

  3. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    The study focused on eight health professions: medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry, pharmacy, and public health. Its central tasks were to identify and explore the barriers to success that women face as medical/professional school applicants and students and to describe the discrimination process that limits…

  4. The meanings of professional life: teaching across the health professions.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Maureen

    2002-08-01

    Most of professional ethics is grounded on the assumption that we can speak meaningfully about particular, insulated professions with aims and goals, that conceptually there exists a clear "inside and outside" to any given profession. Professional ethics has also inherited the two-part assumption from mainstream moral philosophy that we can speak meaningfully about agent-relative versus agent-neutral moral perspectives, and further, that it is only from the agent-neutral perspective that we can truly evaluate our professional moral aims, rules, and practices. Several important changes that have occurred, or are currently taking place, in the structure of the health care professions, challenge those assumptions and signal the need for teachers of professional ethics to rethink the content of what we teach as well as our teaching methods. The changes include: influences and critique from other professions and from those who are served by the health professions, and influences and critique from professionals themselves, including increased activism and dissent from within the professions. The discussion focuses on changes that have occurred in the health-related fields, but insofar as similar changes are occurring in other professions such as law and business, these arguments will have broader conceptual implications for the way we ought to think about professional ethics more generally.

  5. Death education in selected health professions.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, G E; Sumner, E D; Frederick, L M

    1992-01-01

    Health professionals have a high probability of working with populations experiencing death and other types of loss. Surveys of medical, nursing, pharmacy, dental, and social work schools in the United States to determine their offerings in thanatology revealed that the majority (with the exception of dentistry) offer some education on death and dying. Because most of the offerings are limited to one or two lectures, a high percentage of students are graduating with limited formal exposure in this area. However, offerings have come a long way since the early 1970s.

  6. The Health Professions Requirements Model: Structure and Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHHS/PHS), Hyattsville, MD. Div. of Health Professions Analysis.

    A major model to forecast requirements for health professionals, which is currently used by the Division of Health Professions Analysis of the U.S. Public Health Service, is described. Specifically, technical documentation is provided for the projections to 1990 that are presented in "A Report to the President and Congress on the Status of Health…

  7. Policy Recommendations for Health Professions Education. Item #7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This report presents recommendations for Illinois' Board of Higher Education's approval in the areas of: (1) general policies for health professions education, (2) the adoption of immediate program priorities to implement the general policy directions in health education programs, and (3) specific recommendations for adjustments in Health Services…

  8. An Approach for Calculating Student-Centered Value in Education – A Link between Quality, Efficiency, and the Learning Experience in the Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Caryn; Reeves, Scott; Walsh, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Health professional education is experiencing a cultural shift towards student-centered education. Although we are now challenging our traditional training methods, our methods for evaluating the impact of the training on the learner remains largely unchanged. What is not typically measured is student-centered value; whether it was ‘worth’ what the learner paid. The primary aim of this study was to apply a method of calculating student-centered value, applied to the context of a change in teaching methods within a health professional program. This study took place over the first semester of the third year of the Bachelor of Physiotherapy at Monash University, Victoria, Australia, in 2014. The entire third year cohort (n = 78) was invited to participate. Survey based design was used to collect the appropriate data. A blended learning model was implemented; subsequently students were only required to attend campus three days per week, with the remaining two days comprising online learning. This was compared to the previous year’s format, a campus-based face-to-face approach where students attended campus five days per week, with the primary outcome—Value to student. Value to student incorporates, user costs associated with transportation and equipment, the amount of time saved, the price paid and perceived gross benefit. Of the 78 students invited to participate, 76 completed the post-unit survey (non-participation rate 2.6%). Based on Value to student the blended learning approach provided a $1,314.93 net benefit to students. Another significant finding was that the perceived gross benefit for the blended learning approach was $4014.84 compared to the campus-based face-to-face approach of $3651.72, indicating that students would pay more for the blended learning approach. This paper successfully applied a novel method of calculating student-centered value. This is the first step in validating the value to student outcome. Measuring economic value to the

  9. An Approach for Calculating Student-Centered Value in Education - A Link between Quality, Efficiency, and the Learning Experience in the Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Nicklen, Peter; Rivers, George; Ooi, Caryn; Ilic, Dragan; Reeves, Scott; Walsh, Kieran; Maloney, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Health professional education is experiencing a cultural shift towards student-centered education. Although we are now challenging our traditional training methods, our methods for evaluating the impact of the training on the learner remains largely unchanged. What is not typically measured is student-centered value; whether it was 'worth' what the learner paid. The primary aim of this study was to apply a method of calculating student-centered value, applied to the context of a change in teaching methods within a health professional program. This study took place over the first semester of the third year of the Bachelor of Physiotherapy at Monash University, Victoria, Australia, in 2014. The entire third year cohort (n = 78) was invited to participate. Survey based design was used to collect the appropriate data. A blended learning model was implemented; subsequently students were only required to attend campus three days per week, with the remaining two days comprising online learning. This was compared to the previous year's format, a campus-based face-to-face approach where students attended campus five days per week, with the primary outcome-Value to student. Value to student incorporates, user costs associated with transportation and equipment, the amount of time saved, the price paid and perceived gross benefit. Of the 78 students invited to participate, 76 completed the post-unit survey (non-participation rate 2.6%). Based on Value to student the blended learning approach provided a $1,314.93 net benefit to students. Another significant finding was that the perceived gross benefit for the blended learning approach was $4014.84 compared to the campus-based face-to-face approach of $3651.72, indicating that students would pay more for the blended learning approach. This paper successfully applied a novel method of calculating student-centered value. This is the first step in validating the value to student outcome. Measuring economic value to the student may

  10. The Reasons Students Choose Teaching Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krecic, Marija Javornik; Grmek, Milena Ivanus

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present the reasons students at the Faculty of Education in Maribor, Slovenija, chose pedagogy for their study direction, and therefore becoming a teacher. A total 237 second-year students of the academic year 2003/04 were included in the research. Of the five groups of reasons for choosing this program (altruistic,…

  11. Using Technology to Promote Active and Social Learning Experiences in Health Professions Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruckert, Elizabeth; McDonald, Paige L.; Birkmeier, Marissa; Walker, Bryan; Cotton, Linda; Lyons, Laurie B.; Straker, Howard O.; Plack, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    Time and space constraints, large class sizes, competition for clinical internships, and geographic separation between classroom and clinical rotations for student interaction with peers and faculty pose challenges for health professions educational programs. This article presents a model for effectively incorporating technology to overcome these…

  12. Improving Diversity in the Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Peggy; Wynn, Jacqueline; McLean, Darius

    2016-01-01

    The health professional workforce of North Carolina does not reflect the rich diversity of the state's population, and the underrepresentation of various demographic groups in health care may affect the health outcomes of the state's citizens. There are opportunities for educational institutions to partner with others, share successful strategies, and implement measures to promote diversity among health professionals. PMID:26961841

  13. Redesigning Continuing Education in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academies Press, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Today in the United States, the professional health workforce is not consistently prepared to provide high quality health care and assure patient safety, even as the nation spends more per capita on health care than any other country. The absence of a comprehensive and well-integrated system of continuing education (CE) in the health professions…

  14. The Health Spa Industry and the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swengros, Glenn V.

    During the past three decades, the health spa industry has grown to become a viable component of our society. Many people, however, still have reservations about the sincerity of health spa proprietors. This is a result of nonprofessional management in the first years of business. Today the health spa industry finds itself with changed…

  15. 76 FR 8743 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-Graduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Programs for Indians. The awards are for tuition and fees only and the average award to a full-time student... Scholarship Program. The awards are for 12 months in duration, and will cover both tuition and fees and Other..., tuition and fees only, is limited to two years for full-time students and the part-time equivalent of...

  16. Health Professions Education Partnerships Act of 1998. Public Law 105-392.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document presents the full text of Public Law 105-392, the Health Professions Partnerships Act of 1998, a law which amends the Public Health Service Act to consolidate and reauthorize health professions and minority and disadvantaged health education programs. Title I concerns health professions education and financial assistance programs.…

  17. Double-Duty Caregiving: Women in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Brown, Judith Belle; Vandervoort, Anthony; McNair, Susan; Dashnay, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this feminist narrative study was to examine the experiences of women in four different health professions (nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, and social work) who provided care to elderly relatives. Although caring is a central and common feature of the personal and professional lives of many women (Baines, Evans, & Neysmith, 1991;…

  18. Curricular Development in Health Professions: Understanding Our Basic Assumptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Harper, Heidi M.; And Others

    A study analyzed documents developed through major studies, commissions, and research efforts in pharmacy education to determine the conceptual frameworks upon which health profession education programs are built. Researchers conducted a content analysis of each document by organizing the sentences, words, and phrases contained in separate units…

  19. Changing the future of health professions: embedding interprofessional education within an academic health center.

    PubMed

    Blue, Amy V; Mitcham, Maralynne; Smith, Thomas; Raymond, John; Greenberg, Raymond

    2010-08-01

    Institutions are increasingly considering interprofessional education (IPE) as a means to improve health care and reduce medical errors in the United States. Effective implementation of IPE within health professions education requires a strategic institutional approach to ensure longevity and sustainability. In 2007, the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) established Creating Collaborative Care (C), an IPE initiative that takes a multifaceted approach to weaving interprofessional collaborative experiences throughout MUSC's culture to prepare students to participate in interprofessional, collaborative health care and research settings.In this article, the authors describe C's guiding conceptual foundation and student learning goals. They present its implementation framework to illustrate how C is embedded within the institutional culture. It is housed in the provost's office, and an overarching implementation committee functions as a central coordinating group. Faculty members develop and implement C activities across professions by contributing to four collaborating domains-curricular, extracurricular, faculty development, and health care simulation-each of which captures an IPE component. The authors provide examples of IPE activities developed by each domain to illustrate the breadth of IPE at MUSC. The authors believe that MUSC's efforts, including the conceptual foundation and implementation framework, can be generalized to other institutions intent on developing IPE within their organizational cultures.

  20. [The White Paper of the health professions of Catalonia].

    PubMed

    Pomés, Xavier; Oriol, Albert; de Oleza, Rafael; Ania, Olinda; Avila, Alicia; Branda, Luis; Brugulat, Pilar; Gual, Arcadi; Creus, Mariona; Zurro, Amando Martin

    2003-01-01

    The White Paper of the Health Professions of Catalonia (WPHPC) is a strategic document for the development of the health professions. It deals with the main components of the manpower development (education, management and planning) in relation to the health services development required to attain the objectives defined in the Catalan Health Plan. The WPHPC fosters the coherence between social needs and professional competencies required to respond to them, as well as to the quantitative aspects of service needs under adequate standards of quality, effectiveness and efficiency. The WPHPC has followed a methodological process with maximum stakeholder participation and transparency. Citizens, professionals and health organizations have contributed significantly. The conclusions and recommendations of the WPHPC are organized around four axis: the citizenship, the professionals, the health care organizations and the health care model. Key elements are: the requirement of a new social contract between the different stakeholders, the values of professionalism, the need for a new credentialism of professional competencies, innovation in the education process, innovation of governance and management for organization of knowledge, the redistribution of work inside teams requires deregulation and reregulation of the professions, the need for actualized data on workforce and job positions and the permanent requirement of sociological research. PMID:14669637

  1. 42 CFR 136.304 - Publication of a list of allied health professions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Publication of a list of allied health professions... of a list of allied health professions. The Secretary, acting through the Service, shall publish from time to time in the Federal Register a list of the allied health professions for consideration for...

  2. 42 CFR 136.304 - Publication of a list of allied health professions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Publication of a list of allied health professions... of a list of allied health professions. The Secretary, acting through the Service, shall publish from time to time in the Federal Register a list of the allied health professions for consideration for...

  3. 78 FR 16685 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... applied to their student account tuition and fees charges at the college or university they are attending... an additional two months for approved summer school requests, and will cover both tuition and fees... awards are for 12 months in duration and will cover both tuition and fees and ORC. The average award to...

  4. [Women and health professions in Puerto Rico: 1990].

    PubMed

    León López, L E

    1998-03-01

    The main aim of the present study was to analyse the sex distribución for the health related professions in Puerto Rico. This was a descriptive investigation. The data was obtained from the Census of Population and Housing of Puerto Rico, 1990 and the fifth register of health professionals, 1989-92 from the Health Department of Puerto Rico. It was observed that women in the 90's are still participating, in the health professions, in occupations traditionally of their gender. Nevertheless, it has been observed an increased in the women's participation in those occupations usually performed by men such as: veterinary and podiatry. Women tend to be employed more frequently by the government. Men, on the other hand, are concentrated on those occupations with the highest prestige and status, in the health professions. In addition, a high proportion of men are employed on their own. In terms of income, women earn less income than men for almost all the health occupations taken into account.

  5. Contemporary models of change in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Schneller, E S; Ott, J B

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the special position that health professionals have occupied and the ways in which changes threaten the foundations of professional work. The application of modern management principles to health care runs the risk of overriding the "action orientation" that is a defining component of professional work. One goal of health workforce design should be the engineering of opportunities for the preservation of "professional voice" as a countervailing force to ensure high quality health care. Contemporary models of change applied to health care workforce include: (1) the system of professions models in which securing and maintaining jurisdiction are the mechanisms that professions employ to sustain their position, (2) a strategic adaptation model by which professions attempt to adjust to changing environments, (3) a model of redesigning patient care which applies Total Quality Management (TQM) and other "industrial techniques" to the health care workplace, and, (4) model of "consumer sovereignty" in which groups of citizens come together to determine the nature of care services and professional work, with the participation of the organizations and providers.

  6. 75 FR 26167 - Designation of Medically Underserved Populations and Health Professions Shortage Areas; Intent To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... Underserved Populations and Health Professions Shortage Areas; Intent To Form Negotiated Rulemaking Committee... of Medically Underserved Populations (MUPs) and Primary Care Health Professions Shortage Areas (HPSAs... indicators, representing the public's interest in assuring that the areas, populations and entities to...

  7. When students from different professions are co-located: the importance of interprofessional rapport for learning to work together.

    PubMed

    Croker, Anne; Fisher, Karin; Smith, Tony

    2015-01-01

    With increasing interest and research into interprofessional learning, there is scope to more deeply understand what happens when students from different professions live and study in the same location. This study aimed to explore the issue of co-location and its effects on how students learn to work with other professions. The setting for this study was a rural health education facility in Australia with close links to local health care and community services. Philosophical hermeneutics informed the research method. Interviews were undertaken with 29 participants, including students, academic educators and clinical supervisors in diagnostic radiography, medicine, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, pharmacy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech pathology. Photo-elicitation was used to facilitate participant engagement with the topic. The findings foreground the value of interprofessional rapport building opportunities for students learning to work together. Enabled by the proximity of different professions in shared educational, clinical and social spaces, interprofessional rapport building was contingent on contextual conditions (balance of professions, shared spaces and adequate time) and individual's interpersonal capabilities (being interested, being inclusive, developing interpersonal bonds, giving and receiving respect, bringing a sense of own profession and being patient-centred). In the absence of these conditions and capabilities, negative professional stereotypes may be inadvertently re-enforced. From these findings suggestions are made for nurturing interprofessional rapport building opportunities to enable students of different professions to learn to work together.

  8. Faculty Perspectives of the Educational Needs of At-Risk, Underrepresented Minorities in Health Profession Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Catherine

    Disproportionate numbers of underrepresented minorities (URMs) work in health professions as compared to minority representation in the general population. Meeting the health needs of a population is predicated on health provider racial concordance. A qualitative, phenomenological approach was used to explore10 faculty participant's lived experiences, perceptions of roles in the teaching-learning process, and perceptions of at-risk URM (ARURM) student academic support needs. Colaizzi's method was used for data interpretation, revealing four themes. The first theme relates to the perceived under-preparedness of students and related consequences. The second theme represents a perceived lack of awareness and knowledge of students and faculty. The third theme represents the evolving context of the teaching-learning process. The fourth theme reflects a desire to help ARURM students at faculty and institutional levels. Data generated themes guided development of the Academy of Future Health Professionals, a four credit summer-bridge program created to provide ARURM students with additional education and socialization into professional roles. Implications for positive social change include increasing the number of ARURM students admitted to health profession programs of study, which may result in increasing URMs in professional practice, increasing URM professional mentors, and decreasing health disparities of URMs.

  9. Scholarship, publication, and career advancement in health professions education: AMEE Guide No. 43.

    PubMed

    McGaghie, William C

    2009-07-01

    Scholarship and publication are key contributors to career advancement in health professions education worldwide. Scholarship is expressed in many ways including original research; integration and synthesis of ideas and data, often across disciplines; application of skill and knowledge to problems that have consequences for health professionals, students, and patients; and teaching in many forms. Professional publication also has diverse outlets ranging from empirical articles in peer reviewed journals, textbook chapters, videos, simulation technologies, and many other means of expression. Scholarship and publication are evaluated and judged using criteria that are consensual, public, and transparent. This three-part AMEE Guide presents advice about how to prepare and publish health professions education research reports and other forms of scholarship in professional journals and other outlets. Part One addresses scholarship-its varieties, assessment, and attributes of productive scholars and scholarly teams. Part Two maps the road to publication, beginning with what's important and reportable and moving to manuscript planning and writing, gauging manuscript quality, manuscript submission and review, and writing in English. Part Three offers 21 practical suggestions about how to advance a successful and satisfying career in the academic health professions. Concluding remarks encourage health professions educators to pursue scholarship with vision and reflection.

  10. 76 FR 68770 - Proposed Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for Under-Represented Minority Individuals... comments on proposed eligibility criteria for the Centers of Excellence (COE) program in health professions... INFORMATION: Purpose: The COE program supports programs of excellence in health professions education for...

  11. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Volume X: Bibliography and Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    The bibliography is part of an extensive study of the barriers to women's success in the schools and practice of eight health professions. It divides resources into 14 segments: one covers the health professions in general; one treats women and careers in general; one is devoted to each of eight health professions (medicine, osteopathic medicine,…

  12. A beleaguered profession yearning for Lincolns: the need for visionary leadership in the health care profession.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, A K

    1996-01-01

    In the current milieu of monumental change in medicine and the health sciences, effective leadership is needed from within the health care profession to address various challenges. A leader needs to be visionary, and must possess the ability to share this vision with others through effective communication. The leader should be fair, trustworthy, sincere, truthful, honest, courageous, and compassionate. He or she should be strong and resolute and be able to lead through persuasion rather than coercion. The leader should possess the attributes and skills to mold organizational change in the desired direction and to deal with reactions of individuals going through the change process. The democratic style of leadership appears to be the most effective, although the autocratic style may be needed occasionally to accomplish a specific task. The noncentered, laissez-faire style of leadership is generally not effective and results in significant frustration among subordinates. The most desirable type of power a leader can exercise over subordinates results from deep trust and effective communication, which make people follow the leader willingly. The health care profession needs to solicit the help of experienced members who have shown leadership to help guide various activities and to serve as mentors for the less experienced individuals. Special courses should be designed and implemented to develop specific leadership skills, which are applicable to various health care disciplines. Practical teaching models, including individuals from various disciplines working together in teams, with opportunities for leadership, should be implemented. Also, an appropriate culture that recognizes and rewards effective leadership in academe needs to be established within academic institutions.

  13. 3000 by 2000 and beyond: next steps for promoting diversity in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Charles; Beaudreau, James

    2003-09-01

    In 1991, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) launched a national campaign to enroll 3,000 underrepresented minority students in medical school by the year 2000. (The AAMC defined underrepresented minorities as blacks, Mexican Americans, mainland Puerto Ricans, and Native Americans, which includes American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.*) The initiative, named Project 3000 by 2000, focused on education-pipeline interventions. Although the project did not meet its numeric goal, in large part because of court decisions in several regions of the country that hampered affirmative action programs, Project 3000 by 2000 did have a number of important successes. At a time when there is a need to develop new and creative ways to promote diversity in health professions education, there are a number of lessons to be learned from this project. Large-scale national campaigns serve an extremely useful purpose in promoting diversity in the health professions. And for these campaigns to be successful, it is important that the health professions work together to coordinate their activities and share their resources to ensure that health professions close the diversity gap in the twenty-first century.

  14. 3000 by 2000 and beyond: next steps for promoting diversity in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Terrell, Charles; Beaudreau, James

    2003-09-01

    In 1991, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) launched a national campaign to enroll 3,000 underrepresented minority students in medical school by the year 2000. (The AAMC defined underrepresented minorities as blacks, Mexican Americans, mainland Puerto Ricans, and Native Americans, which includes American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians.*) The initiative, named Project 3000 by 2000, focused on education-pipeline interventions. Although the project did not meet its numeric goal, in large part because of court decisions in several regions of the country that hampered affirmative action programs, Project 3000 by 2000 did have a number of important successes. At a time when there is a need to develop new and creative ways to promote diversity in health professions education, there are a number of lessons to be learned from this project. Large-scale national campaigns serve an extremely useful purpose in promoting diversity in the health professions. And for these campaigns to be successful, it is important that the health professions work together to coordinate their activities and share their resources to ensure that health professions close the diversity gap in the twenty-first century. PMID:14518847

  15. Health Professions Education Research and the Institutional Review Board.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Mitchell T; DeMeo, Stephen; Nagler, Alisa; Hockenberry, Marilyn J

    2016-01-01

    The growth in health professions education (HPE) and a desire on the part of nurse and medical educators to disseminate their work have raised important questions about the ethical conduct of education research. At the center of the debate is the institutional review board (IRB) and its proper role in the oversight of HPE research. This article examines the IRB process and types of reviews for education research and presents an Education Project Summary Template to use for IRB reviews.

  16. Health Professions Education Research and the Institutional Review Board

    PubMed Central

    Heflin, Mitchell T.; DeMeo, Stephen; Nagler, Alisa; Hockenberry, Marilyn J.

    2016-01-01

    The growth in health professions education (HPE) and a desire on the part of nurse and medical educators to disseminate their work have raised important questions about the ethical conduct of education research. At the center of the debate is the institutional review board (IRB) and its proper role in the oversight of HPE research. This article examines the IRB process and types of reviews for education research and presents an Education Project Summary Template to use for IRB reviews. PMID:26501395

  17. Evidence based practice profiles: Differences among allied health professions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most previous studies of allied health professionals' evidence based practice (EBP) attitudes, knowledge and behaviours have been conducted with profession specific questionnaires of variable psychometric strength. This study compared the self-report EBP profiles of allied health professionals/trainees in an Australian university. Methods The Evidence-Based Practice Profile (EBP2) questionnaire assessed five domains (Relevance, Terminology, Practice, Confidence, Sympathy) in 918 subjects from five professional disciplines. One and 2-way factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and t-tests analysed differences based on prior exposure to EBP, stage of training, professional discipline, age and gender. Results There were significant differences between stages of training (p < 0.001) for all domains and between EBP exposure groups for all but one domain (Sympathy). Professional discipline groups differed for Relevance, Terminology, Practice (p < 0.001) and Confidence (p = 0.006). Males scored higher for Confidence (p = 0.002) and females for Sympathy (p = 0.04), older subjects (> 24 years) scored higher for all domains (p < 0.05). Age and exposure affected all domains (p < 0.02). Differences in stages of training largely explained age-related differences in Confidence and Practice (p ≤ 0.001) and exposure-related differences in Confidence, Practice and Sympathy (p ≤ 0.023). Conclusions Across five allied health professions, self-report EBP characteristics varied with EBP exposure, across stages of training, with profession and with age. PMID:20937140

  18. Errors as allies: error management training in health professions education.

    PubMed

    King, Aimee; Holder, Michael G; Ahmed, Rami A

    2013-06-01

    This paper adopts methods from the organisational team training literature to outline how health professions education can improve patient safety. We argue that health educators can improve training quality by intentionally encouraging errors during simulation-based team training. Preventable medical errors are inevitable, but encouraging errors in low-risk settings like simulation can allow teams to have better emotional control and foresight to manage the situation if it occurs again with live patients. Our paper outlines an innovative approach for delivering team training.

  19. An Exploratory Study of Women in the Health Professions Schools. Volume I: Data Analysis, Findings, Conclusions, Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban and Rural Systems Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    The study focused on women's education in eight health professions: medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, podiatry, pharmacy, and public health. Its central tasks were to identify and explore the barriers to success that women face as school applicants and students. Almost 600 interviews were conducted with…

  20. Properties, promotive and obstructive conditions of multi-professional teaching and learning of health professions and non-health professions: an explorative survey from the perspective of teachers

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Daniela; Höhmann, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Care for people with dementia is considered a multi-professional challenge that requires a collaborative approach between health professionals and non-health professionals. Didactic strategies to ensure the same qualifications across these occupational groups are lacking. This article presents the joint learning of selected properties and promotive and obstructive conditions, using the example of a multi-professional Master's programme. It subsequently draws conclusions for didactic concepts. Methodology: The perceptions of 12 teachers on this Master's programme, all representing different professions, were determined by using a qualitative exploratory survey on the three stated dimensions. With the aid of a summarising content analysis, their statements were condensed and abstracted so as to deduce appropriate requirements for methodical and didactic learning scenarios. Results: In view of the fact that the students have very varied previous knowledge, the main challenge is finding a balance between expertise and tediousness. Establishing essential and common expertise, as well as sensitivity for different perspectives, is made particularly difficult by the fact that health and non-health professions differ greatly in terms of methods and approaches. For a successful outcome, the content focal points and didactic and methodical concepts for a learning group need to take into account the composition of that specific group. Recourse to didactic standard concepts is only possible to a limited extent. Conclusions: The aim of joint teaching and learning of health and non-health professionals is to enhance the understanding of a profession: This is done by making individuals aware of their role in the chain of care, so they can recognise and organise the mutual conditionality of their own and external professional contributions. PMID:27280137

  1. The Impact of Personal Loss on the Experience of Health Professions: Graduate Students in End-of-Life and Bereavement Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supiano, Katherine P.; Vaughn-Cole, Beth

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the impact of prior personal experience with grief on self-reported personal and professional development of graduate students in nursing, social work, counseling, pastoral care, and genetic counseling involved as cofacilitators in bereavement support groups, and of medical students observing interdisciplinary inpatient…

  2. Cystic fibrosis research in allied health and nursing professions.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Judy M; Madge, Susan; Morton, Alison M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Elborn, J Stuart

    2012-09-01

    This report is the result of the "Allied Health and Nursing Professions Working Group" meeting which took place in Verona, Italy, November 2009, which was organised by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society, and involved 32 experts. The meeting was designed to provide a "roadmap" of high priority research questions that can be addressed by Allied Health Professionals (AHP) and nursing. The other goal was to identify research skills that would be beneficial to AHP and nursing researchers and would ultimately improve the research capacity and capability of these professions. The following tasks were accomplished: 1) a Delphi survey was used to identify high priority research areas and themes, 2) common research designs used in AHP and nursing research were evaluated in terms of their strengths and weaknesses, 3) methods for assessing the clinimetric and psychometric properties, as well as feasibility, of relevant outcome measures were reviewed, and 4) a common skill set for AHPs and nurses undertaking clinical research was agreed on and will guide the planning of future research opportunities. This report has identified important areas and themes for future research which include: adherence; physical activity/exercise; nutritional interventions; interventions for the newborn with CF and evaluation of outcome measures for use in AHP and nursing research. It has highlighted the significant challenges AHPs and nurses experience in conducting clinical research, and proposes strategies to overcome these challenges. It is hoped that this report will encourage research initiatives that assess the efficacy/effectiveness of AHP and nursing interventions in order to improve the evidence base. This should increase the quality of research conducted by these professions, justify services they currently provide, and expand their skills in new areas, with the ultimate goal of improving care for patients with CF.

  3. Interprofessional education and service learning: a model for the future of health professions education.

    PubMed

    De Los Santos, Maria; McFarlin, Christine Degnon; Martin, Lourdes

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of interprofessional education for healthcare professionals has been lackluster, at best, since it was recommended by the Institute of Medicine. There have been various attempts in institutions of higher learning to meet this goal with mixed results. Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University has developed the Green Family NeighborhoodHELP™ (GFNHelp) program to meet this challenge. GFNHelp is an interprofessional, longitudinal, service-learning program for healthcare students. Through participation in this program medical students team up with students from other professions, such as nursing, social work, and law, and collaborate to improve health outcomes for medically underserved families in the community. This educational program emphasizes the Core Competencies of the Interprofessional Education Collaborative through community-based service-learning, allowing student teams to engage firsthand and address the impact of social determinants on health.

  4. Promoting interprofessionalism: initial evaluation of a master of science in health professions education degree program

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Strang, Aimee; Edelman, David; Navedo, Deborah; Soto-Greene, Maria L; Guarino, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    This survey study assessed former students’ perceptions on the efficacy of how well a newly implemented master’s in health professions education degree program achieved its academic aims. These academic aims were operationalized by an author-developed scale to assess the following domains: a) developing interprofessional skills and identity; b) acquiring new academic skills; and c) providing a student-centered environment. The respondents represented a broad range of health care providers, including physicians, nurses, and occupational and physical therapists. Generalizability-theory was applied to partition the variance of the scores. Student’s overwhelmingly responded that the program successfully achieved its academic aims. PMID:26917985

  5. 76 FR 63624 - Bureau of Health Professions All-Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Professions All-Advisory...), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Bureau of Health Professions...

  6. Fact Sheet: Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 (PL 94-484).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    The Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 extends health manpower training authorities through FY 1980 with significant changes to meet national needs. It is designed to produce more primary care practitioners and improve health services in manpower shortage areas, providing support for the training of health professions (medicine,…

  7. Factors Influencing Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of the Athletic Training Profession and Career Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Sarah S.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Successful athletic training programs should help students develop a desire to work within the athletic training profession while providing adequate preparation for them to enter the workforce. Understanding athletic training students' perceptions of the profession as they leave programs and the factors that influence these…

  8. Inspiring Tanzanian medical students into the profession: appraisal of cadaveric dissection stress and coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Russa, Afadhali D; Mligiliche, L

    2014-01-01

    Learning experiences and environments greatly influence mastery of competencies during training and in future career. From its nature, cadaveric dissection early in the medical training has the potential to daunt the student's interest in the medical profession during training and in the future clinical practice. This study aimed at appraising the Tanzanian first year medical students at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences on emotional and physical stress during practice in cadaver dissection room, coping strategies and attitude on dissection. 169 students completed a self administered questionnaire that assessed emotional and physical symptoms encountered during cadaver dissection. The questionnaire also asked for the coping strategies. The frequency distributions were used to summarize demographic variables, reaction and coping strategies. The commonest symptoms were disgust, fear and nausea. Curiosity, prior mental preparedness, pressure and help from the staff were the major coping strategies. About four in five students were fearful and anxious at the beginning, but the figure dropped towards the end of the dissection course. Females reported significantly higher rates of symptoms than males. Prior exposure to a dead body significantly lowered the levels of stress. Close to 95% positively favored dissection over other methods. About 90% would go through the dissection course given another chance. Almost all students would recommend the medical profession to their younger relatives. Anatomy staff and mentors should devise appropriate coping strategies including gradual introduction to dissection room, proper cadaver preparations, proper counselling and complementing dissection with videos and radiographic pictures.

  9. Development of Professional Confidence in Health Education: Research Evidence of the Impact of Guided Practice into the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecimovich, Mark; Volet, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review critically the published research investigating how guided practice into the profession contributes to increased professional confidence in health care students, with a view to identifying its impact on the development of professional confidence. Design/methodology/approach: A literature search was…

  10. The Area Resource File (ARF). A Health Professions Planning and Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This report presents a description and sample products of the Area Resource File (ARF), a computer-based county-specific health resources information system which consolidates U.S. data on the health professions, hospital and nursing home facilities, hospital utilization levels, health professions training, hospital expenditures, Medicare…

  11. 75 FR 11189 - Bureau of Health Professions; All Advisory Committee Meeting; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Bureau of Health Professions; All Advisory... Professions All-Advisory Committee Meeting (AACM). Dates and Times: April 21, 2010, 8 a.m.-5 p.m....

  12. The supervisor's toolkit: A framework for doctoral supervision in health professions education: AMEE Guide No. 104.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, Susan Camille; Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah; Tekian, Ara; van der Vleuten, Cees; Cilliers, Francois

    2016-05-01

    Doctoral studies represent a complex undertaking for students and supervisors. Some research describes the experience of students while there are volumes of advice for students considering a doctorate. Yet the terrain for supervisors is less well-trodden and the concept of a pedagogy of supervision is only really starting to emerge. Texts on the doctoral journey from the supervisor's perspective are uncommon and less yet has been written in the context of health professions education. The aim of this Guide, therefore, is to provide guidance for the supervisor's journey, drawing on our collective experience and such literature as there is. We explore the doctoral journey of students and their supervisors, highlighting what the implications are for supervisory practice. Recognising the doctorate as much more than merely conducting a research project, and seeing it as a shared educational endeavour is fundamental to understanding the doctoral journey - a journey that is complex and mutable, constantly shifting as the candidate moves from novice to expert, from dependence to growing autonomy. Our intention is to present this Guide as a toolkit for both the novice and the experienced supervisor as it, on the one hand, seeks to make the practice of supervision more transparent while on the other, challenges the reader to critically reflect on the supervisory space in which they currently reside. Our hope is that the Guide opens up opportunities for generative conversations about the practice of doctoral supervision in health professions education.

  13. Shifting perceptions and challenging the profession's paradigms: reflections from an undergraduate week of population health.

    PubMed

    Dare, Anna J; Bullen, Chris

    2008-09-19

    The perception that population health is a poor cousin of the clinically orientated medical specialties has occurred despite a growing acknowledgement of the importance of a population health approach to the provision of medical care in the 21st Century. This perception appears entrenched within academic and clinical institutions, and is inherited by undergraduate students as they move through their training. Competing philosophies within modern medical curricula, medical socialisation, and historical professional belief structures have all contributed to both a covert and an overt scepticism towards population based approaches as being 'soft' and largely irrelevant. In May 2007, the University of Auckland introduced a new initiative for Year 5 medical students, called 'Population Health Intensive'. This was a week aimed at increasing medical undergraduate student's exposure to population health perspectives and initiatives. It challenged students and academic staff alike to reflect on their perceptions of the role of population health in medical practice and raised questions about the relevance of current medical education in light of the changing face of health and healthcare delivery. In this paper we consider the drivers of change and argue that population health has an important and legitimate place in both undergraduate medical training and clinical practice, thus widening the professions' understanding of health and disease.

  14. National Student Conference on Health Manpower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Student American Pharmaceutical Association, Washington, DC.

    This document summarizes the proceedings of the National Student Conference on Health Manpower, Chicago, March 1972. Following a staff report on the conference proceedings, student research papers on workshop topics are presented. These papers concern health profession recruitment and retention with consideration of general minority and sex-biased…

  15. Analysis of Sex and Gender Content in Allied Health Professions' Curricula.

    PubMed

    Stickley, Lois; Sechrist, Dawndra; Taylor, LesLee

    2016-01-01

    Sex and gender differences in rehabilitation are important because more than half of patients seen by allied health professionals are female. Sex- and gender-specific curricula should be audited to enhance interprofessional education in women's health. The research question was: What is the extent of information about sex and gender differences that is included in selected allied health professions curricula? Student scholars from allied health programs audited courses in real time for references to sex and gender differences. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The emphasis of instruction included primarily statements of facts for the physical and occupational therapy programs and brief discussions in the athletic training program. There was a significant difference among the categories of emphasis for the programs (X2 = 391.23, p<0.05). The individual disciplines identified the majority of content in the same rank order: body systems, health statistics, and health conditions. There were significant differences in the content areas related to sex and gender differences among the three disciplines (X2 = 70.67, p<0.05). This study provided the first content analysis of sex and gender differences in selected allied health professions. No textual inferences were made, but the study reported on the topics discussed and the extent of the sharing of information. PMID:27585612

  16. Analysis of Sex and Gender Content in Allied Health Professions' Curricula.

    PubMed

    Stickley, Lois; Sechrist, Dawndra; Taylor, LesLee

    2016-01-01

    Sex and gender differences in rehabilitation are important because more than half of patients seen by allied health professionals are female. Sex- and gender-specific curricula should be audited to enhance interprofessional education in women's health. The research question was: What is the extent of information about sex and gender differences that is included in selected allied health professions curricula? Student scholars from allied health programs audited courses in real time for references to sex and gender differences. The data were analyzed using content analysis. The emphasis of instruction included primarily statements of facts for the physical and occupational therapy programs and brief discussions in the athletic training program. There was a significant difference among the categories of emphasis for the programs (X2 = 391.23, p<0.05). The individual disciplines identified the majority of content in the same rank order: body systems, health statistics, and health conditions. There were significant differences in the content areas related to sex and gender differences among the three disciplines (X2 = 70.67, p<0.05). This study provided the first content analysis of sex and gender differences in selected allied health professions. No textual inferences were made, but the study reported on the topics discussed and the extent of the sharing of information.

  17. (Re)Introducing communication competence to the health professions.

    PubMed

    Spitzberg, Brian H

    2013-12-01

    Despite the central role that communication skills play in contemporary accounts of effective health care delivery in general, and the communication of medical error specifically, there is no common or consensual core in the health professions regarding the nature of such skills. This lack of consensus reflects, in part, the tendency for disciplines to reinvent concepts and measures without first situating such development in disciplines with more cognate specialization in such concepts. In this essay, an integrative model of communication competence is introduced, along with its theoretical background and rationale. Communication competence is defined as an impression of appropriateness and effectiveness, which is functionally related to individual motivation, knowledge, skills, and contextual facilitators and constraints. Within this conceptualization, error disclosure contexts are utilized to illustrate the heuristic value of the theory, and implications for assessment are suggested. Significance for public healthModels matter, as do the presuppositions that underlie their architecture. Research indicates that judgments of competence moderate outcomes such as satisfaction, trust, understanding, and power-sharing in relationships and in individual encounters. If the outcomes of health care encounters depend on the impression of competence that patients or their family members have of health care professionals, then knowing which specific communicative behaviors contribute to such impressions is not merely important - it is essential. To pursue such a research agenda requires that competence assessment and operationalization becomes better aligned with conceptual assumptions that separate behavioral performance from the judgments of the competence of that performance.

  18. (Re)Introducing Communication Competence to the Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Spitzberg, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the central role that communication skills play in contemporary accounts of effective health care delivery in general, and the communication of medical error specifically, there is no common or consensual core in the health professions regarding the nature of such skills. This lack of consensus reflects, in part, the tendency for disciplines to reinvent concepts and measures without first situating such development in disciplines with more cognate specialization in such concepts. In this essay, an integrative model of communication competence is introduced, along with its theoretical background and rationale. Communication competence is defined as an impression of appropriateness and effectiveness, which is functionally related to individual motivation, knowledge, skills, and contextual facilitators and constraints. Within this conceptualization, error disclosure contexts are utilized to illustrate the heuristic value of the theory, and implications for assessment are suggested. Significance for public health Models matter, as do the presuppositions that underlie their architecture. Research indicates that judgments of competence moderate outcomes such as satisfaction, trust, understanding, and power-sharing in relationships and in individual encounters. If the outcomes of health care encounters depend on the impression of competence that patients or their family members have of health care professionals, then knowing which specific communicative behaviors contribute to such impressions is not merely important – it is essential. To pursue such a research agenda requires that competence assessment and operationalization becomes better aligned with conceptual assumptions that separate behavioral performance from the judgments of the competence of that performance. PMID:25170494

  19. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background More than thirty-five sub-Saharan African countries have severe health workforce shortages. Many also struggle with a mismatch between the knowledge and competencies of health professionals and the needs of the populations they serve. Addressing these workforce challenges requires collaboration among health and education stakeholders and reform of health worker regulations. Health professional regulatory bodies, such as nursing and midwifery councils, have the mandate to reform regulations yet often do not have the resources or expertise to do so. In 2011, the United States of America Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began a four-year initiative to increase the collaboration among national stakeholders and help strengthen the capacity of health professional regulatory bodies to reform national regulatory frameworks. The initiative is called the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives. This article describes the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives and discusses its importance in implementing and sustaining national, regional, and global workforce initiatives. Discussion The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives convenes leaders responsible for regulation from 14 countries in East, Central and Southern Africa. It provides a high profile, south-to-south collaboration to assist countries in implementing joint approaches to problems affecting the health workforce. Implemented in partnership with Emory University, the Commonwealth Secretariat, and the East, Central and Southern African College of Nursing, this initiative also supports four to five countries per year in implementing locally-designed regulation improvement projects. Over time, the African Health Regulatory Collaborative for Nurses and Midwives will help to increase the regulatory capacity of health professional organizations and ultimately improve regulation and professional standards in this

  20. Health professions ethics rubric: validation of reliability in an interprofessional health ethics course.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Therese I; Hecht, Keith A; Lynch, J Christopher; Otsuka, Allen S; Shafer, Kathy J; Wilhelm, Miranda J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a health professions ethics rubric by an interprofessional team. The rubric was used by two pharmacy and two dental faculty members to score ethics cases submitted by 16 teams comprised of 80 pharmacy and 50 dental students. A debriefing session for each case was moderated by a non-rater faculty member to arrive at a consensus score for the cases. Interrater reliability was calculated for the four raters and the debriefing scores as well as the four raters without the debriefing scores. The overall interrater correlations were in the range of 0.790 to 0.906 for the four raters. Issues ranged from 0.320 to 0.758. Principles ranged from 0.610 to 0.838. Options ranged from 0.655 to 0.843. Analysis ranged from 0.667 to 0.918. Solution ranged from 0.739 to 0.886. With the inclusion of the consensus scores, the interrater correlations were even higher. The best correlations were for the overall score and solution components of the rubric. With further edits in the rubric and enhanced training by faculty raters and changes in the ethics learning session, the revised rubric could be evaluated again for grading. Further training for faculty using the rubric for grading student cases should enhance its reliability. Demonstrating to students the ethical decision making process using the rubric should enhance the validation process.

  1. The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative (ARC) at two years

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Carey F; Zuber, Alexandra; Kelley, Maureen A; Verani, Andre R; Riley, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    Background The African Health Profession Regulatory Collaborative (ARC) for nurses and midwives was created in response to the increasing reliance on shifting HIV tasks to nurses and midwives without the necessary regulation supporting this enhanced professional role. ARC Approach The ARC initiative comprises regional meetings, technical assistance, and regulatory improvement grants which enhance HIV service delivery by nurses and midwives, and systematic evaluation of project impact. Results Eight of 11 countries funded by ARC advanced a full stage in regulatory capacity during their 1-year project period. Countries in ARC also demonstrated increased capacity in project management and proposal writing. Discussion The progress of country teams thus far suggests ARC is a successful model for regulation strengthening and capacity building, as well as presenting a novel approach for sustainability and country ownership. The ARC platform has been a successful vehicle for regional harmonisation of updated regulations and promises to help facilitate the enhancement of HIV service delivery by nurses and midwives. PMID:27066113

  2. Native Americans in the Health Professions: Two Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with Dr. Joseph Bell, president of the American Association of Indian Physicians (AAIP), and Wabanang Kuczek, physician assistant, discuss health-care services needed by Native people, AAIP efforts to recruit Indian students into medicine, links to traditional healing, key health issues facing Indian people, and career opportunities as…

  3. PATHWAYS TO HEALTH CAREERS, EXPLORING HEALTH OCCUPATIONS AND PROFESSIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Careers Council of Illinois, Chicago.

    CAREERS IN THE AREAS OF DENTISTRY, DIETETICS, MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARY SCIENCE, MEDICAL LABORATORY WORK, MEDICINE, NURSING, OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, OPTOMETRY, PHARMACY, PHYSICAL THERAPY, PODIATRY, PUBLIC HEALTH, RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY, SOCIAL WORK, VETERINARY MEDICINE, HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION, AND OTHER HEALTH OCCUPATIONS ARE DESCRIBED IN TERMS OF THE…

  4. Integrating cognitive and affective dimensions of pain experience into health professions education

    PubMed Central

    Murinson, Beth B; Mezei, Lina; Nenortas, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Pain is prevalent in clinical settings, and yet it is relatively under-represented in the education of most students in the health professions. Because pain includes both sensory-discriminative and affective features, teaching students about pain presents unique challenges and opportunities. The present article describes the evolution of a new blueprint for clinical excellence that, among other competencies, incorporates a need for the emotional development of clinical trainees. The framework has been applied to the development and implementation of two new courses in pain. The first course is designed to provide a comprehensive foundation of medical knowledge regarding pain, while integratively introducing students to the affective dimensions of pain. The second course is designed to enhance students’ appreciation for the protean effects of pain through use of the humanities to represent medical experience. It is concluded that, to be most effective, fostering the emotional development of trainees in the health professions necessitates the incorporation of affect-focused learning objectives, educational tasks and assessment methods. PMID:22184551

  5. Evidence-Based Problem Solving: Liberal Education and Preparation for the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riegelman, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the health professions have moved from "eminence-based" solutions to "evidence-based" problem solving. This evolution provides new opportunities to implement integrative curricula for those preparing for the health professions. These new curricula can be built on the Essential Learning Outcomes identified through the Association…

  6. Electronic Continuing Education in the Health Professions: An Update on Evidence from RCTs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam-Antoniades, Margarita; Ratnapalan, Savithiri; Tait, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Demonstrating the effectiveness of the rapidly expanding field of electronic continuing education (e-CE) has important implications for CE in the health professions. This study provides an update on evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effectiveness of e-CE in the health professions. Methods: A literature…

  7. Assessment of the Educational Needs in Health Professions Programs, 1992. Item #3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This report presents an overview of the status of programs of health professions education in Illinois and reviews the policies related to these programs that were adopted by the Board of Higher Education in the early 1980s. Specific questions addressed are as follows: (1) Are the number, type, and distribution of health professions programs…

  8. State Support for Health Professions Education. Prepared for the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, by the Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    Information about state support for health professions education and for students attending health professions schools is presented, based on a request by the Senate Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research. The Subcommittee will be considering legislation, during the 96th Congress, to extend and modify Titles VII and VIII of the Public…

  9. Competency-based training of health professions teachers in seven developing countries.

    PubMed

    Vanderschmidt, L; Massey, J A; Arias, J; Duong, T; Haddad, J; Noche, L K; Kronfol, N; Lo, E K; Rizyal, S B; Shrestha, M P; Yepes, F

    1979-06-01

    A critical issue in the planning of better health care delivery for developing countries is the training and education of health personnel. The Center for Educational Development in Health (CEDH) has field tested its text, Systematic Course Design for the Health Fields, a manual on the application of competency-based curriculum development techniques. A competency-based approach to curriculum design derives instructional objectives, content, and evaluation from the on-the-job responsibilities for the health worker being trained. A field test was conducted in order to determine whether the systematic course design method was applicable in developing countries. For the purpose of the field test, 10 national field directors from Cameroon, Colombia, Honduras, Lebanon, Malaysia, Nepal, and Vietnam trained by CEDH in Boston taught teacher training workshops based on the Systematic Course Design model of a range of health professionals in their own countries. Evaluation of the teacher training workshops was conducted during and immediately following instruction and 1 year later. 167 men and women representing a range of 29 health professions, participated in the workshops. Participants designed 132 courses based on the SCD model and taught 54 courses to about 2000 students. In Colombia, Honduras, Malayasia, and Lebanon, the national field directors applied the method to a range of activities. These field directors developed and taught 11 additional teacher training workshops on SCD to 140 health professionals, and they provided consultation to 12 other health professional schools and governmental agencies. Subject to the limitations imposed by the data, it does seem that a systematic course design method can be applied in the developing world to train health professions teachers. A range of health professionals used the method to design and teach a variety of courses for their own instructional purposes. Further research on the long-range effect of the competency

  10. Pre-admission factors and utilization of tutoring services in health professions educational programs.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Urueta, Mayra; Williamson, Jon W

    2013-01-01

    Pre-admission factors tend to serve as indicators of student success in health professions educational programs, but less is known about the effects that academic assistance programs have on student success. This study sought to determine whether specific pre-admission factors could help to identify students who may require academic support during their health professions education. This retrospective analysis aimed to identify differences in pre-admission variables between those students requiring tutoring and a matched sample of students who did not require tutoring. One-way ANOVA was used to assess differences for dependent variables-age, cumulative GPA (cGPA), science GPA (sGPA), verbal graduate record examination (GRE) score, quantitative GRE score, analytical GRE score and combined GRE score, community college hours, average credit hours per semester, and highest semester credit hour load-across three groups of students who received no tutoring (NT 0 hrs), some tutoring (ST <8 hrs), and more tutoring (MT >8 hrs). Total GRE and average semester hours differentiated NT from ST from MT (p<0.05). A linear regression model with these pre-admission factors found only four of the independent variables to be significant (r2=0.41; p<0.05) in predicting hours of tutoring: quantitative GRE, sGPA, cGPA and average semester hours taken. The combination of lower GRE scores and lighter average semester course load were most predictive of the need for academic assistance as defined by hours of tutoring. While the value of the GRE in admissions processes is generally accepted, the average semester hour load in college can also provide important information regarding academic preparation and the need for tutoring services. PMID:23752233

  11. Health Professions Educational Assistance Amendments of 1985. Report Together with Additional Views to Accompany H.R. 2410. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    A bill amending the Public Health Service Act to revise and extend programs under Title VII (health professions programs) is addressed in this congressional report. The bill reauthorizes for 3 years the following programs: the Health Education Assistance Loan program of insurance for market-rate student loans (the ceiling is raised); the Health…

  12. "Love" and the mental health professions: toward understanding adult love.

    PubMed

    Levine, S B

    1996-01-01

    This essay explores three aspects of the normal processes of adult-adult love: falling in love, being in love, and staying in love. It describes the emotions, defenses, and challenges inherent in each phase. Love is an ordinary but immensely powerful adult aspiration. As a term it is impossible to define in any singular sense. The attainment of its lofty purposes requires profound intrapsychic adjustments involving creative acts of imagination, the integration of ideals with reality, evolving adaptations to the partner, the maintenance of a positive internal image of the partner, and ongoing struggles to overcome self-interest. These adjustments have not been well characterized by the mental health professions. This is ironic since a large portion of our work involves caring for love's casualties--that is, people whose miseries relate to their inability to successfully negotiate the phases of love or whose happiness is limited by their partners who cannot. Six arguments for ending professional avoidance of the topic are offered, the most compelling of which are love's relevance to both the pathogenesis of mental suffering and to the art of psychotherapeutic healing.

  13. "I Now Have a Visual Image in My Mind and It Is Something I Will Never Forget": An Analysis of an Arts-Informed Approach to Health Professions Ethics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Bidinosti, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of an arts informed approach to ethics education in a health professions education context. The purpose of this study was to investigate students' reported learning experiences as a result of engagement with an arts-informed project in a health professions' ethics course. A hermeneutic phenomenological methodological…

  14. Interdisciplinary: Cultural competency and culturally congruent education for millennials in health professions.

    PubMed

    Hawala-Druy, Souzan; Hill, Mary H

    2012-10-01

    The increasingly diverse multicultural and multigenerational student population in the United States requires that educators at all levels develop cultural knowledge, awareness, and sensitivity to help diverse learners fulfill their potential and to avoid cultural misunderstandings that can become obstacles or barriers to learning. The purpose of this study was to design and implement eclectic, creative, evidence-based interdisciplinary educational activities, along with culturally congruent teaching strategies, within a semester-long university course that promoted positive and culturally competent learning outcomes for culturally diverse, largely millennial students. The interdisciplinary course would prepare health professional students with the requisite knowledge and skills, through transformative learning that produces change agents, to provide culturally congruent and quality team-based care to diverse populations. This was a qualitative and quantitative study, which measured students' level of cultural awareness, competence, and proficiency pre and post the educational intervention. Instruments used for data collection included the Inventory for Assessing The Process of Cultural Competence-Student Version (IAPCC-SV) by Campinha-Bacote, course evaluations, students' feedback, and portfolio reflections. The study was conducted at a private academic institution located in the Mid-Atlantic region and the sample population included inter-professional students (N=106) from various health professions including nursing, pharmacy, and allied health sciences. Results from the pre- and post-test IAPCC-SV survey revealed that mean scores increased significantly from pre-test (60.8) to post-test (70.6). Thus, students' levels of cultural competency (awareness, knowledge, skills, desire, encounter) improved post-educational intervention, indicating that the teaching methods used in the course might be applied on a larger scale across the university system to cater to the

  15. Interdisciplinary: Cultural competency and culturally congruent education for millennials in health professions.

    PubMed

    Hawala-Druy, Souzan; Hill, Mary H

    2012-10-01

    The increasingly diverse multicultural and multigenerational student population in the United States requires that educators at all levels develop cultural knowledge, awareness, and sensitivity to help diverse learners fulfill their potential and to avoid cultural misunderstandings that can become obstacles or barriers to learning. The purpose of this study was to design and implement eclectic, creative, evidence-based interdisciplinary educational activities, along with culturally congruent teaching strategies, within a semester-long university course that promoted positive and culturally competent learning outcomes for culturally diverse, largely millennial students. The interdisciplinary course would prepare health professional students with the requisite knowledge and skills, through transformative learning that produces change agents, to provide culturally congruent and quality team-based care to diverse populations. This was a qualitative and quantitative study, which measured students' level of cultural awareness, competence, and proficiency pre and post the educational intervention. Instruments used for data collection included the Inventory for Assessing The Process of Cultural Competence-Student Version (IAPCC-SV) by Campinha-Bacote, course evaluations, students' feedback, and portfolio reflections. The study was conducted at a private academic institution located in the Mid-Atlantic region and the sample population included inter-professional students (N=106) from various health professions including nursing, pharmacy, and allied health sciences. Results from the pre- and post-test IAPCC-SV survey revealed that mean scores increased significantly from pre-test (60.8) to post-test (70.6). Thus, students' levels of cultural competency (awareness, knowledge, skills, desire, encounter) improved post-educational intervention, indicating that the teaching methods used in the course might be applied on a larger scale across the university system to cater to the

  16. Pathways to STEMM Professions for Students from Noncollege Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon D.; Pearson, Willie, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we use data from the Longitudinal Study of American Youth to examine the influence of parent education on pathways to science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) professions. Building on a general model of factors related to STEMM education and employment, we employ a two-group structural equation model to…

  17. Reducing health disparities in underserved communities via interprofessional collaboration across health care professions

    PubMed Central

    Vanderbilt, Allison A; Dail, Michael D; Jaberi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Health disparities can negatively impact subsets of the population who have systematically experienced greater socioeconomic obstacles to health. Health disparities are pervasive across the United States and no single health care profession can tackle this national crisis alone. It is essential that all health care providers work collaboratively toward the overarching goal of systematically closing the health disparities gap. Interprofessional collaboration is the foundation needed for health care providers to support patient needs and reduce health disparities in public health. Let us reach across the silos we work within and collaborate with our colleagues. Stand up and begin thinking about our communities, our patients, and the future overall health status of the population for the United States. PMID:25960659

  18. Innovations to enhance the quality of health professions education at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences--NECTAR program.

    PubMed

    Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo E; Nathoo, Kusum; Borok, Margaret; Chidzonga, Midion; Aagaard, Eva M; Connors, Susan C; Barry, Michele; Campbell, Thomas; Hakim, James

    2014-08-01

    The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS) is Zimbabwe's premier health professions training institution. However, several concerns were raised during the past decade over the quality of health education at UZCHS. The number of faculty and students declined markedly until 2010, when there was a medical student intake of 147 while the faculty comprised only 122 (39%) of a possible 314 positions. The economic and political crises that the country experienced from 1999 to 2009 compounded the difficulties faced by the institution by limiting the availability of resources. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative funding opportunity has given UZCHS the stimulus to embark on reforms to improve the quality of health education it offers. UZCHS, in partnership with the University of Colorado School of Medicine, the University of Colorado Denver Evaluation Center, and Stanford University, designed the Novel Education Clinical Trainees and Researchers (NECTAR) program to implement a series of health education innovations to meet this challenge. Between 2010 and 2013, innovations that have positively affected the quality of health professions education at UZCHS include the launch of comprehensive faculty development programs and mentored clinical and research programs for postgraduate students. A competency-based curriculum reform process has been initiated, a health professions department has been established, and the Research Support Center has been strengthened, providing critical resources to institutionalize health education and research implementation at the college. A core group of faculty trained in medical education has been assembled, helping to ensure the sustainability of these NECTAR activities.

  19. Developing Continuing Professional Education in the Health and Medical Professions through Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wojnar, Margaret; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how to negotiate power and interest among multiple stakeholders to develop continuing professional education programs as graduate study for those in the health and medical professions.

  20. The Careers in Health and Medical Professions Program (CHAMPS): An Impact Study of a University-Based STEM+H Outreach Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Eric W.; Perry, Justin C.; Ferguson, Robert L.; Jackson, Debbie K.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the impact of a Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Health (STEM+H) university-based pipeline program, the Careers in Health and Medical Professions Program, over the course of two summers among predominantly African-American high school students recruited from urban school districts (N = 155). Based on…

  1. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Service-Learning: Lessons from the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Kara; Seifer, Sarena; Sebastian, Juliann; Cora-Bramble, Denice; Hart, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Argues that, in the context of the present health care system, interdisciplinary service-learning holds promise for equipping future health professionals with collaborative problem-solving skills needed to effect change in community health care. Describes three models of interdisciplinary service-learning in health professions education, explores…

  2. The Elephant in the Room: Deconstructing the Place of Conservatives in the Student Affairs Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisler, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    The student affairs profession places considerable emphasis on the values of diversity, inclusiveness, and social justice as part of its mission to foster the holistic development of college students. Many vocal conservative critics point to these values as evidence of the liberal worldview that they claim dominates the higher education landscape.…

  3. Attrition from Student Affairs: Perspectives from Those Who Exited the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Sarah M.; Gardner, Megan Moore; Hughes, Carole; Lowery, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Attrition of student affairs professionals is an issue of concern for the profession. This mixed methods study highlights reasons why participants left their student affairs careers. Seven general themes emerged from the study, including burnout, salary issues, career alternatives, work/family conflict, limited advancement, supervisor issues and…

  4. Long-Run Success in the Accounting Profession: A Study of Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, Linda; Harwell, Jeff; Morris, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Accounting students are generally well aware of the skills, education, and accomplishments needed to get that first job and initially enter the accounting profession. However, it is equally important that accounting students approaching graduation have a good understanding of the skills, education and accomplishments required for an experienced…

  5. To What Extent Do Student Teachers Have the Values Required for the Profession?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales-Vives, Fabia; Camps, Misericordia; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine to what extent the values held by student teachers at the start of a university degree programme coincide with the values that practising teachers consider important for their profession. Our findings show that student teachers and practising teachers have different value profiles, and that there is…

  6. Attitude of Students towards Teaching Profession in Nigeria: Implications for Education Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egwu, Sarah Oben

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to ascertain attitude of students towards teaching profession in Faculty of Education, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki. A sample of 300 students completed a 15 item questionnaire designed for the study the instrument was validated and the reliability calculated which was 0.92 using Pearson product moment correlation…

  7. Maturity Effects on Students' Perceptions of How Accounting Scandals Impact the Accounting Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theuri, Peter; Weickgenannt, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the impact of recent ethical scandals on business students' perceptions of the accounting profession and related regulatory reforms, and whether such perceptions may be differentiated by maturity. Student maturity is distinguished by age, class standing, and number of accounting classes taken so far. The study results are based…

  8. Bridging the Gap between Accounting Students and the Profession: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightweis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the gap between accounting educators and the profession. Research indicates accounting graduates are underprepared for this challenging career. The issue stems from accounting educators who only lecture and accounting students who memorize the information provided in these lectures. Accounting students need opportunities to…

  9. Health-profession students’ teaching and learning expectations in Ugandan medical schools: pre- and postcommunity placement comparison

    PubMed Central

    Wakida, Edith K; Ruzaaza, Gad; Muggaga, Kintu; Akera, Peter; Oria, Hussein; Kiguli, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The benefits of community-based medical education for both students and teachers are becoming increasingly clear. However, there is paucity of information about the importance of incorporating students’ thoughts in the community-based education curriculum and the impact it has on their intentions to work in rural communities. The purpose of this study was to assess the teaching and learning expectations before and after placement of health-profession students going for community placement for the first time and make suggestions for improvement of the community-based programs. Methods The study was a cross-sectional survey with both structured and unstructured questions. Participants were recruited from four medical schools in Uganda targeting 100% participation of health-profession students going for community placement in 2014. In total, 454 and 305 participants responded to self-administered questionnaires before and after community placement, respectively; and they were from different programs and years of study. Results Students’ learning expectations before placement, in ranking were: community engagement, interpersonal skills, community diagnosis, clinical skills, lifestyle practices, and patient management. After placement, the order of ranking was: interpersonal skills, community engagement, community diagnosis, lifestyle practices, clinical skills, and patient management. Most of the students had prior rural exposure and expected to do community engagement. However, after community placement they indicated having developed interpersonal skills. The various health-profession students were able to harmoniously work together to achieve a common purpose, which they find difficult to do in a classroom environment. Conclusion Having student teams comprised of different health programs and years of study going for community placement together promoted peer-to-peer mentorship and enhanced team building during community placement. PMID:26677345

  10. Examining Students' Feelings and Perceptions of Accounting Profession in a Developing Country: The Role of Gender and Student Category

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbawuni, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the preconceived notions accounting students in Ghana have about the accounting profession and whether these perceptions are influenced by gender and student category (graduates and undergraduates). This study was a cross-sectional survey of 516 undergraduate and 78 graduate accounting students from a public university in…

  11. Is nursing's image a deterrent to recruiting men into the profession? Male high school students respond.

    PubMed

    Barkley, T W; Kohler, P A

    1992-01-01

    The extremely small number of men choosing the nursing profession as a career, coupled with the continuing shortage of nurses, prompted an investigation of male high school students' opinions about nursing. Kohler and Edwards' Career Questionnaire was administered to 126 male high school students representing grades 9-12 from three area public schools. Findings show that although the majority of subjects have a positive perception of nurses and nursing, the vast majority are not planning on entering the profession. Analysis of subjects' beliefs about nurses' financial status offers a possible explanation.

  12. Faculty Perspectives of the Educational Needs of At-Risk, Underrepresented Minorities in Health Profession Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Disproportionate numbers of underrepresented minorities (URMs) work in health professions as compared to minority representation in the general population. Meeting the health needs of a population is predicated on health provider racial concordance. A qualitative, phenomenological approach was used to explore 10 faculty participant's lived…

  13. A Survey of Practices in Hospital Pharmacies. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas D.; Henrich, Robert R.

    A survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine what procedures are used in health care facility pharmacies for the performance of tasks previously selected for inclusion in a proposed curriculum for pharmacy technicians. Questionnaires were distributed to a national sample of 48 health care facilities,…

  14. The Future of Health Professions Education: Challenges and Recommendations for a New Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberst, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    This article analyzes major challenges facing health care today as a basis to suggest a new framework for the professional preparation of health care professions. The long term goal is to produce practitioners who can successfully address these challenges and engage in a complete reconstitution of the current health care system to produce a more…

  15. Dispositionsspielraume im Bereich der Schulerbeurteilung. Auch ein Beitrag zur Professions--und Organisationsforschung (Teachers' Discretionary Powers Regarding Student Assessment--A Contribution to Research on Professions and Organizations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luders, Manfred

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes the practice of student assessment as that of a profession working in specific organizations. Examines how far discretionary powers regarding student assessment are open to teachers, to what degree grades play a role in communication among colleagues, and how teachers compensate the deficit in the rationalization of their assessment. (CMK)

  16. Promoting minority access to health careers through health profession-public school partnerships: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Davis G; Carline, Jan D

    2006-06-01

    Partnerships between health profession schools and public schools provide a framework for developing comprehensive, creative solutions to the problem of minority underrepresentation in health careers. This review examines the functioning of partner relationships, focusing on elements of the social context that determine success or failure, and stages of partnership development. Influential aspects of the social context include cultural differences between personnel in higher education and K-12 institutions, the resources available to the partnership, and constraints on partnership activity. Stages of the process that partner institutions must negotiate include initiation, ongoing management, and institutionalization. Strategies to improve minority student achievement are reviewed, including specific types of programmatic interventions and best practices. Strategies available to partnerships for improving minority achievement include academic enhancement, science or math instructional enrichment, career awareness and motivation, mentoring, research apprenticeship, reward incentives, and parental involvement. Of these, academic enhancement and instructional enrichment have the greatest potential for improving minority student outcomes. Partnerships need to take a sustained multipronged approach, providing intensive interventions that target students, teachers, and curricula at appropriate educational stages. Documenting program impact is critical for attracting more resources to increase minority access to health careers: sponsoring organizations should dedicate funds for assessment of the partnership's functioning and for rigorous evaluation of interventions.

  17. Promoting minority access to health careers through health profession-public school partnerships: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Davis G; Carline, Jan D

    2006-06-01

    Partnerships between health profession schools and public schools provide a framework for developing comprehensive, creative solutions to the problem of minority underrepresentation in health careers. This review examines the functioning of partner relationships, focusing on elements of the social context that determine success or failure, and stages of partnership development. Influential aspects of the social context include cultural differences between personnel in higher education and K-12 institutions, the resources available to the partnership, and constraints on partnership activity. Stages of the process that partner institutions must negotiate include initiation, ongoing management, and institutionalization. Strategies to improve minority student achievement are reviewed, including specific types of programmatic interventions and best practices. Strategies available to partnerships for improving minority achievement include academic enhancement, science or math instructional enrichment, career awareness and motivation, mentoring, research apprenticeship, reward incentives, and parental involvement. Of these, academic enhancement and instructional enrichment have the greatest potential for improving minority student outcomes. Partnerships need to take a sustained multipronged approach, providing intensive interventions that target students, teachers, and curricula at appropriate educational stages. Documenting program impact is critical for attracting more resources to increase minority access to health careers: sponsoring organizations should dedicate funds for assessment of the partnership's functioning and for rigorous evaluation of interventions. PMID:16723838

  18. Lived Experiences of Female Undergraduate Students, at a Nursing College in Abu Dhabi, about Nursing as a Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantash, Dania Abu; Van Belkum, Corrien

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explore the lived experiences of female undergraduate nursing students about nursing as a profession and the circumstances that have influenced their experience. Introduction: Nursing as a profession is a relatively new practice, and thus in the developmental stage, in the UAE. The number of national students (Emirati) who enrol in the…

  19. Overview to Health Professions Education: Health Education Commission Recommendations for Use in Developing the Illinois Master Plan--Phase IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, J. T.

    Recommendations for the preparation of health professionals in Illinois are made in order to: (1) ensure that an adequate number of health professionals are educated to meet the needs of Illinois citizens; (2) improve the distribution of available health manpower within the State; (3) enhance the access to health professions education programs for…

  20. Student Decision-Making in Selecting Rehabilitation Counseling Programs and Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arokiasamy, Charles; Rajani, Gita; Tracz, Susan; Orteiza, Roslyn

    2007-01-01

    The current and ever-growing shortage of qualified rehabilitation counselors in the country has made recruitment a high priority among rehabilitation counseling programs. This study identified factors that influenced students' decisions to choose or not choose the rehabilitation counseling profession or a particular rehabilitation counseling…

  1. Comparing Perceptions of the Nursing Profession among Associate and Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovan, Sherry R.

    2009-01-01

    The inconsistencies between the perception of the profession of nursing and the reality of practice can lead to problems in student attrition or result in disillusionment with a career in nursing after a new graduate enters practice. With the nursing shortage reaching critical levels, it is important to examine possible discrepancies that exist…

  2. The LGBT Campus Resource Center Director: The New Profession in Student Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanlo, Ronni L.

    2000-01-01

    Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Campus Resource Centers (LGBT CRCs) are new service units in the field of student affairs. Study surveys LGBT CRC directors to learn about their education, salary, operating budgets, and other pertinent issues with which to identify and document a growing new profession. (Contains 14 references and two tables.)…

  3. A Proposed Curriculum on Death and Dying for the Allied Health Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Marie C.

    1980-01-01

    This article summarizes the existing curricular models on death education for health professions students. A proposed course design for allied health professions students modified from Bloch's medical education objectives for a thanatology course is presented. The development of listening skills is given special emphasis. (Author/CT)

  4. Why Do They Leave? Departure from the Student Affairs Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Tara E.

    2013-01-01

    Departure among student affairs administrators in higher education has been an issue for decades (Evans, 1988; Lorden, 1998; Tull, 2006). Rates of departure from student affairs within the first five years of experience are estimated at 50% to 60% (Holmes, Verrier, & Chisholm, 1983; Lorden, 1998; Tull, 2006). However, there is very little…

  5. Writing in the Professions: An Internship for Interdisciplinary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourelle, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    This article considers how professional writing courses can prepare students in various disciplines for the workforce. Specifically, I argue for Writing in the Disciplines (WID) internships where students learn to write documents relevant for their careers while participating in practical work experiences. In the WID internships I describe,…

  6. Historically Black College and University Graduates' Admission to and Graduation from Health Profession Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen (Anita F.) Associates.

    Admission to and graduation from health profession schools by graduates of historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) were studied, with a focus on the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) and Howard University's Medical (HUMS) and Dental Schools (HUDS). Site visits and interviews were also conducted with the pre-health program…

  7. The Professional Health Educator and the FIRO-B: Our Person-Profession Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sechrist, William C.

    An analogy is drawn between the dynamics of interpersonal relationships and the relations of health educators to the health education profession. Recommended is the use of a 54-item questionnaire, the Fundamental Interpersonal Relationship Orientation - Behavior (FIRO-B), to determine what behavior a respondent expresses toward others and what…

  8. Health Professions Education Facilities in the Non-Profit Sector. 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    In this study of the physical facilities of the nation's health professions schools, all schools of dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, podiatry, public health, and veterinary medicine, and all parent institutions of the schools, were surveyed in May of 1973. The major goals of this pioneering survey were to assess the nature and…

  9. Profession differences in family focused practice in the adult mental health system.

    PubMed

    Maybery, Darryl; Goodyear, Melinda; O'Hanlon, Brendan; Cuff, Rose; Reupert, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    There is a large gulf between what psychiatric services should (or could) provide and what they do in practice. This article sought to determine practice differences between the differing professions working in adult mental health services in terms of their family focused work. Three hundred and seven adult mental health professionals completed a cross-sectional survey of family focused practices in adult mental health services. Findings highlight that social workers engaged in more family focused practice compared to psychiatric nurses, who performed consistently the lowest on direct family care, compared to both social workers and psychologists. Clear skill, knowledge, and confidence differences are indicated between the professions. The article concludes by offering direction for future profession education and training in family focused practices.

  10. Cooperative Learning in Inderdisciplinary Education for the Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Bonnie L.

    The concept of cooperative goal structuring was examined, along with the effect of one cooperative learning technique (group consensus examinations) on the perceptions and achievement of college students. Cooperative goal structure exists when students perceive that they can obtain their goal only if the other students with whom they work also…

  11. This Program Gives Students a Firsthand Look at Health Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Rebecca Brown

    1986-01-01

    The Salt Lake City schools' Health Careers Program gives junior and senior high school students who are considering medical profession careers an opportunity to have a two-semester internship experience in the medical field. Students earn credits while investigating various health careers. (MD)

  12. Should Counseling Be Considered a Health Care Profession? Critical Thoughts on the Transition to a Health Care Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    2007-01-01

    The counseling profession has increasingly identified with health care ideology. The logical justifications for this transition are critically examined. Ideological and practical consequences of the health care transition are also considered. The author concludes that the usual ways of justifying the transition to health care are insufficient and…

  13. Assessing change in health professions volunteers' perceptions after participating in Special Olympics healthy athlete events.

    PubMed

    Freudenthal, Jacqueline J; Boyd, Linda D; Tivis, Rick

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed perceptions of health professions student and faculty volunteers who participated with athletes at the 2009 Special Olympics World Winter Games in Healthy Athlete venues. The volunteers' perceptions and expectations of the abilities of intellectually disabled athletes were measured by administering pre-event and post-event questionnaires consisting of demographic questions and the Prognostic Belief Scale (PBS). Invitations to participate in the study were sent to 165 students and faculty members; of those, eighty (48.5 percent response rate) responded to the pre-event questionnaire, and sixty-seven (40.6 percent response rate) responded to the post-event questionnaire. Of the eighty respondents to the pre-event questionnaire, fifty-five (68.7 percent) also completed the post-event questionnaire. The ANOVA comparing pre- and post-event PBS scores between groups found a trend towards higher scores among the volunteers, but analysis did not demonstrate a significant effect in either group (p=.68) or the interaction of group by time (p=.46). Despite the findings from the PBS, participants' statements suggest the experience had an impact on their perceptions and expectations. Although not statistically significant, this study found a positive trend pre- to post-event in the volunteers' perceptions of the abilities of athletes with intellectual disabilities. In addition to didactic and clinical education, volunteer experiences may enhance care providers' knowledge, skill, and confidence levels for treating clients with intellectual disabilities. PMID:20837738

  14. Between professional autonomy and economic orientation — The medical profession in a changing health care system

    PubMed Central

    Kälble, Karl

    2005-01-01

    The current discussions surrounding the German health care system are being determined and defined by the concepts of "profitability", "efficiency" and "saving". These concepts also determine the demands made on this system and have had an effect on the medical profession. The economy's growing influence on physicians' decision-making and the increasing necessity to look at and regulate services under economic aspects arising from the need to save costs are seen by the medical profession as a threat to its autonomous conduct and freedom to make decisions, in other words it sees it as a danger to its medical orientation. Conflicts between medical autonomy and economic orientation in physicians' conduct are therefore already foreseeable, as are conflicts between medicine and economy in regards to who has the power to define the terms of the public health system. Objective: This article will outline the area of conflict based on the available literature. It will discuss how the political and economic regulatory attempts affect the medical profession's autonomous conduct. It will also discuss which conflicts of conduct emerge for physicians, what types of solutions the medical profession tends to develop as a reaction, and whether or not this tension between medical and economic orientation can be resolved in an acceptable way. Methodology: This article should first outline the changed economic and political basic conditions and the attempts to reform the German health care system, using this as a starting point. Following this, it will explore the significance professional autonomy acquires within the concept of profession from the point of view of the sociology of professions. With this in mind, the third part of this article will describe and analyze the effects of advanced economization on the medical profession's autonomous conduct, which has long been regarded as uncontested. This part of the article will also describe and analyze the medical profession

  15. The promise of competency-based education in the health professions for improving global health.

    PubMed

    Gruppen, Larry D; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S; Kolars, Joseph C

    2012-11-16

    Competency-based education (CBE) provides a useful alternative to time-based models for preparing health professionals and constructing educational programs. We describe the concept of 'competence' and 'competencies' as well as the critical curricular implications that derive from a focus on 'competence' rather than 'time'. These implications include: defining educational outcomes, developing individualized learning pathways, setting standards, and the centrality of valid assessment so as to reflect stakeholder priorities. We also highlight four challenges to implementing CBE: identifying the health needs of the community, defining competencies, developing self-regulated and flexible learning options, and assessing learners for competence. While CBE has been a prominent focus of educational reform in resource-rich countries, we believe it has even more potential to align educational programs with health system priorities in more resource-limited settings. Because CBE begins with a careful consideration of the competencies desired in the health professional workforce to address health care priorities, it provides a vehicle for integrating the health needs of the country with the values of the profession.

  16. Basis of Accreditation for Educational Programs in Designated Health Science Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Medical Association, Ottawa (Ontario).

    Designed as a guide to accreditation for educational programs in designated health science professions in Canada, this report provides educators with guidelines, general requirements, and requirements for specific programs. Following information on the organization, structure, goals, mission, values, philosophy, and terminology of accreditation of…

  17. Implementing a Diversity-Orientated Online Graduate-Level Health Professions Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savard, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    This case describes the strategies implemented in the development of an online Master's degree program in Health Professions Education (HPE) and an online short, Master's level diploma program. The strategies presented pertain to three of the main challenges identified: program cohesiveness, a multidisciplinary approach, and information technology…

  18. A Study of the Clinical Laboratory Occupations. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The objectives of this study which was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project were: (1) to determine the percent of medical laboratory workers who perform a comprehensive list of tasks and procedures; (2) to evaluate this performance in terms of certification and specialty area; and (3) on the basis of these data, to make…

  19. A Report on an Emerging Occupation: The Physician's Assistant. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuritsky, Joel; Reeder, Glenn

    To determine the variety of physician's assistant programs already established and ascertain what specific tasks physicians are willing to delegate to assistants, the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project staff corresponded with schools having physicans's assistant programs, interviewed local physicians, and surveyed selected physicians regarding…

  20. Report to the Congress on Nursing and Other Nonphysician Health Professions Educational Programs Reimbursed under Medicare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Health Professions.

    This report provides information on approved educational activities for nursing and other nonphysician health professions for which reimbursement is made to hospitals under the Medicare program. Information was summarized from an examination of existing data and a special study of the variations that exist in hospital educational activities. The…

  1. Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

    In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

  2. A New School of Health Professions. Volume 2. Appendices to the Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA. School of Medical Sciences.

    The document contains 22 appendixes which were cross-referenced in the final report of a study on the University of the Pacific's interdisciplinary program called School of Health Professions (SHP). Items include the following: (1-A) obesity study guide; (1-B) diabetes mellitus study guide; (1-C) hypertension study guide; (2) identification and…

  3. Changes in the Composition of the Health Professions Applicant Pool: 1977-1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources and Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Health Professions.

    The report synthesizes and summarizes trends in the numbers and characteristics of persons who have applied to selected health professions schools (i.e., allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine) from 1977 to 1987. It is based primarily on data made available by the professional associations of the schools and…

  4. 77 FR 22790 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles III, VII and VIII of the Public Health Service... nursing training for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. These various programs are included in... professions and nursing grant and cooperative agreement programs that use the low-income levels to...

  5. 76 FR 14417 - ``Low Income Levels'' Used for Various Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Health Professions and Nursing Programs Included in Titles III, VII and VIII of the Public Health Service... nursing training for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. These various programs are included in... professions and nursing grant and cooperative agreement programs that use the low-income levels to...

  6. Parsons, professions and the sociology of health care.

    PubMed

    Alaszewski, A; Manthorpe, J

    The fourth paper in the sociology series examines the work of the American Talcott Parsons. His work has particular relevance to the sociology of health and illness. The concept of the sick role as a means of understanding the effects of ill health, which he proposed, is critically examined here. PMID:7667129

  7. Georgia's Health Professions: A Decade of Change, 1985-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Libby V.; Little, Catherine J.

    This report examines the supply of and demand for health care professionals in the state of Georgia, including information on education, demographics, and workforce changes. Supply data analyzed included licensure and certification records; a survey of Georgia's major health care institutions provided demand data. Additionally, institutions of…

  8. Improving Hospital Ethics Committees (HEC): Educating across the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicker, Stuart F.; Kushner, Thomasine

    A team at the University of Connecticut Health Center developed a model ethics and law curriculum for Hospital Ethics Committee (HEC) members. A multi-disciplinary project team composed of philosophers, lawyers, physicians, and social scientists developed a 7-day intensive bioethics/health law/medicine curriculum. The team designed the curriculum…

  9. A Laboratory for Humanities and the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Warren T.

    1982-01-01

    The Georgetown University Health and Humanities Program is based on the concept of the university as a community concerned with the universe of knowledge. The interprofessional, interdisciplinary program serves the purposes of health professional education and enhances the quality of clinical treatment. (Author/SK)

  10. The Helping Professions Group: Interpersonal Dimensions in Health Sciences Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burra, Prakash; Bryans, Alexander McKelvey

    1979-01-01

    At Queen's University an extramural interprofessional discussion group, involving students and faculty members from medicine, nursing, theology, education, and law, has been meeting since February 1977. The discussions center on actual persons and problems with implications for a number of professional groups. (Author/LBH)

  11. Health and fracking: should the medical profession be concerned?

    PubMed

    Mash, Rachel; Minnaar, Jolynn; Mash, Bob

    2014-02-26

    The use of natural gas that is obtained from high-volume hydraulic fracturing (fracking) may reduce carbon emissions relative to the use of coal and have substantial economic benefits for South Africa. However, concerns have been raised regarding the health and environmental impacts. The drilling and fracking processes use hundreds of chemicals as well as silica sand. Additional elements are either released from or formed in the shale during drilling. These substances can enter the environment in various ways: through failures in the well casing; via alternative underground pathways; as wastewater, spills and leaks on the wellpad; through transportation accidents; and as air pollution. Although many of these chemicals and elements have known adverse health effects, there is little evidence available on the health impacts of fracking. These health concerns have not yet been fully addressed in policy making, and the authors recommend that the voice of health professionals should be part of the public debate on fracking and that a full health impact assessment be required before companies are given the go-ahead to drill. 

  12. Health and fracking: should the medical profession be concerned?

    PubMed

    Mash, Rachel; Minnaar, Jolynn; Mash, Bob

    2014-05-01

    The use of natural gas that is obtained from high-volume hydraulic fracturing (fracking) may reduce carbon emissions relative to the use of coal and have substantial economic benefits for South Africa. However, concerns have been raised regarding the health and environmental impacts. The drilling and fracking processes use hundreds of chemicals as well as silica sand. Additional elements are either released from or formed in the shale during drilling. These substances can enter the environment in various ways: through failures in the well casing; via alternative underground pathways; as wastewater, spills and leaks on the wellpad; through transportation accidents; and as air pollution. Although many of these chemicals and elements have known adverse health effects, there is little evidence available on the health impacts of fracking. These health concerns have not yet been fully addressed in policy making, and the authors recommend that the voice of health professionals should be part of the public debate on fracking and that a full health impact assessment be required before companies are given the go-ahead to drill.  PMID:25212197

  13. Increasing Diversity in Science and Health Professions: A 21-Year Longitudinal Study Documenting College and Career Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Ned, Judith; Ahn, David; Koehler, Alana; Kennedy, Jeanne D.

    2009-12-01

    Despite decades of precollege science education programs, African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans remain critically underrepresented in science and health professions. This report describes college and career outcomes among graduates of the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program (SMYSP), a 5-week summer residential program for low-income high school students among whom 97% have been followed for up to 21 years. Approximately 24 students are selected annually, with participation limited to low-income students who have faced substantial personal hardships. Undergraduate and medical students provide key program leadership and training. The curriculum is based on science inquiry education and includes hospital internships, anatomy practicums, research projects, faculty lectures, college admissions/standardized test preparation, and long-term college and career guidance. A total of 476 high school students participated between 1988 and 2008, with 61% from underrepresented ethnic minority groups. Overall, 78% of African American, 81% of Latino, and 82% of Native American participants have earned a 4-year college degree (among those admitted to college, and excluding those currently attending college). In contrast, among 25-34-year old California adults, 16% of African Americans, 8% of Latinos, and 10% of Native Americans earn a 4-year college degree. Among SMYSP's 4-year college graduates, 47% are attending or have completed medical or graduate school, and 43% are working as or training to become health professionals. SMYSP offers a model that expands inquiry-based science education beyond the classroom, and recognizes the role of universities as "high school interventionists" to help diversify health professions.

  14. Three Things to Do With Stories: Using Literature in Medical, Health Professions, and Interprofessional Education.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Michael; Wear, Delese

    2015-10-01

    It would be unusual to find a current medical school administrator or faculty member who has not heard the phrase "literature and medicine" or who does not know that literature is taught in various forms-short stories, novels, poems, essays-at many points in the curriculum at U.S. medical schools. Yet the phrase is used in slippery if not elusive ways, with no clear referent common to all who use it. This article focuses on three theoretical and pedagogical uses for literature in medical, health professions, and interprofessional education: close reading, ethical or moral inquiry, and drawing illustrations. Summaries of these approaches are provided, followed by demonstrations of how they might work in the classroom by using the story "Blankets," by Native American writer Sherman Alexie.Close reading requires reading slowly and carefully to enrich an initial encounter with a text. Ethical or moral inquiry turns to literary representations to challenge readers' assumptions and prejudices. Literature offers rich, provoking, and unusual depictions of common phenomena, so it can be used to draw illustrations. Although each approach can be used on its own, the authors argue that reading closely makes the other two approaches possible and meaningful because it shares with the diagnostic process many practices critical to skilled interprofessional caregiving: paying attention to details, gathering and reevaluating evidence, weighing competing interpretations. By modeling a close reading of a text, faculty can demonstrate how this skill, which courts rather than resists ambiguity, can assist students in making ethical and compassionate judgments.

  15. Utilizing Codes of Ethics in Health Professions Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahnke, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Codes of ethics abound in health care, the aims and purposes of which are multiple and varied, from operating as a decision making tool to acting as a standard of practice that can be operational in a legal context to providing a sense of elevated seriousness and professionalism within a field of practice. There is some doubt and controversy,…

  16. Engineering Maintenance. Occupational Analysis. UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas D.; And Others

    The report has described the results of a questionnaire survey covering task performance in the occupational area of hospital engineering and maintenance and the implications for curriculum development in personnel training. Survey respondents were selected from among personnel of 48 health care facilities in six cities, representing various sized…

  17. Resisting Outdated Models of Pedagogical Domination and Subordination in Health Professions Education.

    PubMed

    Chen, Angel; Brodie, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    This case highlights a dilemma for interprofessional trainees facing a traditional health professions hierarchy rather than an interprofessional collaborative practice culture within the clinical setting. In the case, the trainee must determine the best way to confront the attending physician, if at all, as well as the best way to mediate the situation with fellow health professions trainees and team members. The commentary provides guidelines for interprofessional collaborative practice as outlined by the Interprofessional Education Collaborative competencies, including determining team members' roles and responsibilities, providing clear communication, adopting clinical huddles, and embracing a sense of inquiry during times of conflict. Role modeling of interprofessional collaborative practice by faculty is crucial in training a future generation of health care professionals who can continue to improve patient outcomes and quality of care. PMID:27669135

  18. MedEdPORTAL: a report on oral health resources for health professions educators.

    PubMed

    Chickmagalur, Nithya S; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Sandmeyer, Sue; Valachovic, Richard W; Candler, Christopher S; Saleh, Michael; Cahill, Emily; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2013-09-01

    MedEdPORTAL is a unique web-based peer-reviewed publication venue for clinical health educators sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The open exchange of educational resources promotes professional collaboration across health professions. In 2008, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) collaborated with AAMC to allow dental educators to use the platform to publish dental curriculum resources. Oral health is integral to general health; hence, collaboration among health care professionals brings enormous value to patient-centered care. The aim of this study was to conduct a current survey of metrics and submission statistics of MedEdPORTAL resources. The data were collected using the MedEdPORTAL search engine and ADEA and AAMC staff. The data collected were categorized and reported in tables and charts. Results showed that at the time of this study there were over 2,000 medical and dental resources available to anyone worldwide. Oral health resources constituted approximately 30 percent of the total resources, which included cross-indexing with information relevant to both medical and dental audiences. There were several types of dental resources available; the most common were the ones focusing on critical thinking. The usage of MedEdPORTAL has been growing, with participation from over 190 countries and 10,000 educational institutions around the world. The findings of this report suggest that MedEdPORTAL is succeeding in its aim to foster global collaborative education, professional education, and educational scholarship. As such, MedEdPORTAL is providing a new forum for collaboration and opens venues for promising future work in professional education.

  19. Health care's human crisis - RX for an evolving profession.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bobbie

    2004-05-31

    In 2001, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation commissioned a study on the nursing shortage in the United States to gain a better understanding of the drivers and inform the Foundation's response. This article discusses the impetus for, and a brief summary of, the resulting report, "Health Care's Human Crisis: The American Nursing Shortage," published by the Foundation in 2002. It examines the historical, social, cultural, and economic factors that drive the nursing shortage. A new framework, namely a continuum of responses, is offered for understanding the myriad activities being undertaken in response to the problem, pointing the way to long-term, sustainable solutions. Recommendations and implications for nursing leaders are discussed.

  20. A protocol for a systematic review of knowledge translation strategies in the allied health professions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) aims to close the gap between knowledge and practice in order to realize the benefits of research through (a) improved health outcomes, (b) more effective health services and products, and (c) strengthened healthcare systems. While there is some understanding of strategies to put research findings into practice within nursing and medicine, we have limited knowledge of KT strategies in allied health professions. Given the interprofessional nature of healthcare, a lack of guidance for supporting KT strategies in the allied health professions is concerning. Our objective in this study is to systematically review published research on KT strategies in five allied health disciplines. Methods A medical research librarian will develop and implement search strategies designed to identify evidence that is relevant to each question of the review. Two reviewers will perform study selection and quality assessment using standard forms. For study selection, data will be extracted by two reviewers. For quality assessment, data will be extracted by one reviewer and verified by a second. Disagreements will be resolved through discussion or third party adjudication. Within each profession, data will be grouped and analyzed by research design and KT strategies using the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Review Group classification scheme. An overall synthesis across professions will be conducted. Significance A uniprofessional approach to KT does not represent the interprofessional context it targets. Our findings will provide the first systematic overview of KT strategies used in allied health professionals' clinical practice, as well as a foundation to inform future KT interventions in allied healthcare settings. PMID:21635763

  1. Spirituality, religion and health outcomes research: findings from the Center on Religion and the Professions.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Brick

    2009-01-01

    The Spirituality and Health Research Project of the MU Center on Religion and the Professions is investigating the relationships that exist among religion, spirituality, and health for persons with heterogeneous medical conditions. Pilot studies indicate that spirituality and congregational support are related to health outcomes, but religious practices are not. Additional research indicates that spiritual experiences are related to diminished right parietal functioning (through meditation/ prayer or brain injury), which is associated with decreased sense of the self. Implications for health professionals are discussed.

  2. Development of a Unified Code of Ethics for the Health Education Profession: A Report of the National Task Force on Ethics in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capwell, Ellen M.; Smith, Becky J.; Shirreffs, Janet; Olsen, Larry K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the development, over many years, of a unified code of ethics designed to represent the professional needs of various health education professionals working in the field. The code of ethics for the health education profession is included. It focuses on responsibility to: the public; the profession; employers; health education delivery:…

  3. The Role of Government and Lobbying in the Creation of a Health Profession: The Legal Foundations of Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The state and federal governments, along with private industry, play an important role in the development of a health profession. State governments establish training standards through licensure laws, and state programs dictate employment and payment opportunities. The federal government unifies a profession through recognition in national health…

  4. Early-phase dental students' motivations and expectations concerning the study and profession of dentistry.

    PubMed

    Lalloo, R; Ayo-Yusuf, O A; Yengopal, V

    2008-05-01

    This study investigated the career choice and aspirations of early phase dental students in the four dental schools in South Africa, namely the University of the Western Cape (UWC), University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), University of Limpopo (Medunsa) and University of Pretoria (UP). Willing participants completed a self-administered questionnaire (n=184). Motivations for entering a dentistry programme were similar across race and university, with wanting a secure job most often stated as an important factor. For a third of respondents, dentistry was not a first choice. Amongst the White students, it was a first choice for 82% compared with 59% amongst Black Africans. Expected income five-years after graduation also differed significantly across race and university, with White and UP students expecting to earn considerably higher than the others. About 36% of students were concerned about the levels of personal debt related to studying, with the White and Asian students less concerned. Those who expected lower levels of income from the profession were more concerned about personal debts. Most students planned to enter general dental practice (GDP) after community service, almost all White and Wits students expressed this intention, compared with only 35% of Black Africans and 39% of Medunsa students. Orthodontics and Maxillofacial & Oral Surgery were the most popular specialities of choice. The professional attribute "Has a friendly manner and good relationship with patients" was ranked high most often. In conclusion, career advice may not need to be tailored differently for the different racial groups. There is however a need for further investigations on how to address the concerns of financial security which may be realised by the practice of dentistry, and in particular the racial disparities observed in expectations of the profession. This study further highlights the need for government financial assistance for students from under-represented groups.

  5. A Report to the President & Congress on the Status of Health Professions Personnel in the United States. [Advance Issue, August 1978].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    This report, the first of a series of annual reports mandated by the Public Health Service Act as amended by the Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-484), describes and analyzes the status of health professions personnel in the United States. The professions covered are medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, optometry,…

  6. Health and the Built Environment: Exploring Foundations for a New Interdisciplinary Profession

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Jennifer; Thompson, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The supportive role of the built environment for human health is a growing area of interdisciplinary research, evidence-based policy development, and related practice. Nevertheless, despite closely linked origins, the contemporary professions of public health and urban planning largely operate within the neoliberal framework of academic, political, and policy silos. A reinvigorated relationship between the two is fundamental to building and sustaining an effective “healthy built environment profession.” A recent comprehensive review of the burgeoning literature on healthy built environments identified an emergent theme which we have termed “Professional Development.” This literature relates to the development of relationships between health and built environment professionals. It covers case studies illustrating good practice models for policy change, as well as ways professionals can work to translate research into policy. Intertwined with this empirical research is a dialogue on theoretical tensions emerging as health and built environment practitioners and researchers seek to establish mutual understanding and respect. The nature of evidence required to justify policy change, for example, has surfaced as an area of asynchrony between accepted disciplinary protocols. Our paper discusses this important body of research with a view to initiating and supporting the ongoing development of an interdisciplinary profession of healthy planning. PMID:23028393

  7. Health and the built environment: exploring foundations for a new interdisciplinary profession.

    PubMed

    Kent, Jennifer; Thompson, Susan

    2012-01-01

    The supportive role of the built environment for human health is a growing area of interdisciplinary research, evidence-based policy development, and related practice. Nevertheless, despite closely linked origins, the contemporary professions of public health and urban planning largely operate within the neoliberal framework of academic, political, and policy silos. A reinvigorated relationship between the two is fundamental to building and sustaining an effective "healthy built environment profession." A recent comprehensive review of the burgeoning literature on healthy built environments identified an emergent theme which we have termed "Professional Development." This literature relates to the development of relationships between health and built environment professionals. It covers case studies illustrating good practice models for policy change, as well as ways professionals can work to translate research into policy. Intertwined with this empirical research is a dialogue on theoretical tensions emerging as health and built environment practitioners and researchers seek to establish mutual understanding and respect. The nature of evidence required to justify policy change, for example, has surfaced as an area of asynchrony between accepted disciplinary protocols. Our paper discusses this important body of research with a view to initiating and supporting the ongoing development of an interdisciplinary profession of healthy planning.

  8. Altruism and compassion in the health professions: a search for clarity and precision.

    PubMed

    McGaghie, William C; Mytko, Johanna J; Brown, W Noel; Cameron, Jacqueline R

    2002-07-01

    This article presents a conceptual model of altruism grounded in compassion in the health professions. The intent is to bring order out of the current conceptual chaos about the meaning and practical operation of these constructs. The theory-based model proposes that altruism is expressed as overt behavior in specific situations that vary in levels of intensity. It assumes that altruism is not a broad-based, cross-situational personal trait; that altruism can be measured objectively; and that altruism can be increased via education, practice and reinforcement. The article concludes by demonstrating the progression from formation of a theory-based conceptual model, development of objective measures, performing systematic research and accumulating an orderly and consensual body of knowledge about altruism grounded in compassion in the health professions. PMID:12193319

  9. Altruism and compassion in the health professions: a search for clarity and precision.

    PubMed

    McGaghie, William C; Mytko, Johanna J; Brown, W Noel; Cameron, Jacqueline R

    2002-07-01

    This article presents a conceptual model of altruism grounded in compassion in the health professions. The intent is to bring order out of the current conceptual chaos about the meaning and practical operation of these constructs. The theory-based model proposes that altruism is expressed as overt behavior in specific situations that vary in levels of intensity. It assumes that altruism is not a broad-based, cross-situational personal trait; that altruism can be measured objectively; and that altruism can be increased via education, practice and reinforcement. The article concludes by demonstrating the progression from formation of a theory-based conceptual model, development of objective measures, performing systematic research and accumulating an orderly and consensual body of knowledge about altruism grounded in compassion in the health professions.

  10. Mapping the war: gender, health, and the medical profession in France and Germany, 1914-1918.

    PubMed

    Michl, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the gender and health politics of the German and the French medical professions, which incorporated military command structures into their civilian self-conception. Mobilized doctors committed themselves to the new circumstances and opportunities offered by the war. They applied the established military spatial 'map' which distinguished between the male-dominated front and the female-dominated home front and turned it into an epidemiological map, identifying danger zones which arose from points of contact between men and women. The analysis singles out two case studies: the rapid spread of venereal disease and psychiatric disorders. These case studies allow for a comparative analysis of the following questions: How did doctors assess the impacts of the war on the individual and the society as a whole? How did they view the war's impact on conventional gender orders, individual and national health? And how did they see their own role as a part of an independent civilian profession? PMID:25310677

  11. Promoting the place of the allied health professions in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Rothan-Tondeur, Monique; Courcier, Soizic; Béhier, Jehan-Michel; Leblanc, Judith; Peoch, Nadia; Lefort, Marie-Claude; Barthélémy, Philippe; Bassompierre, François; Bilbault, Pascal; Déal, Cécile; Diebolt, Vincent; Fraleux, Michèle; François, Bruno; Gambotti, Laetitia; Lévy-Marchal, Claire; Misse, Christophe; Roussel, Christophe; Sibenaler, Claire; Simon, Tabassome; Tavernier, Blanche; Thoby, Frédérique

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research is of major importance to today's society, as scientific evidence is increasingly demanded as a basis for progress, whether this involves developing new healthcare products, improving clinical practice and care protocols or progress in prevention. Clinical research therefore requires professionals who are both experienced and increasingly well trained. Against this background, allied health professionals are becoming involved more and more, both as team members supporting clinical research projects and as managers or coordinators of projects in their own field. Clinical research activities provide an ideal opportunity for continuing professional development. All of this means that the professional skills of the allied health professions and clinical research support professions must be enhanced, their role promoted in the context of lecturer status and in the longer term, their status recognised by the supervisory authorities. PMID:25099668

  12. Commentary: Forces That Drive the Vape Shop Industry and Implications for the Health Professions

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Steve; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Garcia, Robert; Barker, Dianne C.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Leventhal, Adam; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2016-01-01

    At least three factors may be driving the evolution of the vape shop industry, a rapidly growing market sector that specializes in the sales of electronic cigarettes: (1) the tobacco industry, (2) the public health sector and its diverse stakeholders, and (3) consumer demand. These influences and the responses of the vape shop sector have resulted in a rapidly changing landscape. This commentary briefly discusses these three factors and the implications for the health professions, as they address the vape shop industry and its consequences for public health. PMID:25967071

  13. A health professions faculty workload plan for a liberal arts setting.

    PubMed

    Bamberg, R; Free, L

    1986-08-01

    This case study describes an approach to planning the workload and expenditure of allied health faculty effort. The plan is based upon a review of the literature, a survey of other schools in similar settings, and faculty negotiation. It meets the need for faculty accountability, congruence between faculty workloads and institutional goals, faculty staffing determinations, and a means to compare nursing and allied health faculty workloads with those of more traditional liberal arts faculty. The plan may serve as a model for other health professions academic units.

  14. Student Health Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelliffe, James H.; Schipp, Michael K.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses important issues concerning the design of student health clinics, including convenient access, privacy and security, showers and sinks, durability and safety, and special considerations. (EV)

  15. Three Things to Do With Stories: Using Literature in Medical, Health Professions, and Interprofessional Education.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Michael; Wear, Delese

    2015-10-01

    It would be unusual to find a current medical school administrator or faculty member who has not heard the phrase "literature and medicine" or who does not know that literature is taught in various forms-short stories, novels, poems, essays-at many points in the curriculum at U.S. medical schools. Yet the phrase is used in slippery if not elusive ways, with no clear referent common to all who use it. This article focuses on three theoretical and pedagogical uses for literature in medical, health professions, and interprofessional education: close reading, ethical or moral inquiry, and drawing illustrations. Summaries of these approaches are provided, followed by demonstrations of how they might work in the classroom by using the story "Blankets," by Native American writer Sherman Alexie.Close reading requires reading slowly and carefully to enrich an initial encounter with a text. Ethical or moral inquiry turns to literary representations to challenge readers' assumptions and prejudices. Literature offers rich, provoking, and unusual depictions of common phenomena, so it can be used to draw illustrations. Although each approach can be used on its own, the authors argue that reading closely makes the other two approaches possible and meaningful because it shares with the diagnostic process many practices critical to skilled interprofessional caregiving: paying attention to details, gathering and reevaluating evidence, weighing competing interpretations. By modeling a close reading of a text, faculty can demonstrate how this skill, which courts rather than resists ambiguity, can assist students in making ethical and compassionate judgments. PMID:27002884

  16. Gender differences in managerial characteristics in a female-dominated health profession.

    PubMed

    Rozier, C K; Hersh-Cochran, M S

    1996-06-01

    This study examines gender differences in characteristics of managers in terms of leadership roles, use of power, type of supervisory style preferred, career commitment, and work/family conflict for the female profession of physical therapy. A questionnaire sent to all members of the Private Practice and Administration Sections of the American Physical Therapy Association yielded 545 managers, 58 percent of whom were female. Females preferred to use a transformational supervisory style more than the men did but males used more masculine leadership traits. Females were as committed to their careers as males and reported the same work/family conflict as the men. These results raise questions as to why proportionately more males are managers in a female-dominated profession. Have health care executives promoted men over women even when the occupation is mainly female?

  17. Gender differences in managerial characteristics in a female-dominated health profession.

    PubMed

    Rozier, C K; Hersh-Cochran, M S

    1996-06-01

    This study examines gender differences in characteristics of managers in terms of leadership roles, use of power, type of supervisory style preferred, career commitment, and work/family conflict for the female profession of physical therapy. A questionnaire sent to all members of the Private Practice and Administration Sections of the American Physical Therapy Association yielded 545 managers, 58 percent of whom were female. Females preferred to use a transformational supervisory style more than the men did but males used more masculine leadership traits. Females were as committed to their careers as males and reported the same work/family conflict as the men. These results raise questions as to why proportionately more males are managers in a female-dominated profession. Have health care executives promoted men over women even when the occupation is mainly female? PMID:10157009

  18. Protecting Student Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2004-01-01

    Public schools have certain responsibilities for the health of their students. Approximately half of the states require schools to implement health standards, including physical exams, as a prerequisite to attendance. All 50 states require public school students to be vaccinated against diseases such as diphtheria, measles, and rubella. And,…

  19. Reconstructing a health system and a profession: priorities of Iraqi nurses in the Kurdish region.

    PubMed

    Squires, Allison; Sindi, Ali; Fennie, Kristopher

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate nurses' priorities for health system reconstruction and professional development in Iraq, a survey of 744 Iraqi nurses was conducted, with the research process managed via the Internet. Seven definite priorities emerged along with significant differences in priorities related to years of experience, age, speciality area of nursing practice, gender, level of education, and geographic location of practice. Results indicate that nurses should be included in health system reconstruction processes and that support for the development of the nursing profession should be included in the plan for overall reconstruction.

  20. Challenges and opportunities for nutrition education and training in the health care professions: intraprofessional and interprofessional call to action1234

    PubMed Central

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Mirtallo, Jay M; Tobin, Brian W; Hark, Lisa; Van Horn, Linda; Palmer, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and applying nutrition knowledge and skills to all aspects of health care are extremely important, and all health care professions need basic training to effectively assess dietary intake and provide appropriate guidance, counseling, and treatment to their patients. With obesity rates at an all-time high and the increasing prevalence of diabetes projected to cost the Federal government billions of dollars, the need for interprofessional nutrition education is paramount. Physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, dentists, dental hygienists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and others can positively affect patient care by synchronizing and reinforcing the importance of nutrition across all specialty areas. Although nutrition is a critical component of acute and chronic disease management, as well as health and wellness across the health care professions, each profession must reevaluate its individual nutrition-related professional competencies before the establishment of meaningful interprofessional collaborative nutrition competencies. This article discusses gaps in nutrition education and training within individual health professions (ie, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and dietetics) and offers suggestions for educators, clinicians, researchers, and key stakeholders on how to build further capacity within the individual professions for basic and applied nutrition education. This “gaps methodology” can be applied to all health professions, including physician assistants, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and occupational therapists. PMID:24646823

  1. What Motivates Students to Choose the Teachers' Profession: A Scientific Educology of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskiniene, Manefa; Rodzeviciute, Emilija

    2005-01-01

    Youth, its objectives, readiness for life, education are the future of Lithuania. One of the major solutions of a young person is related to the choice of a future profession, and this solution is influenced by many factors: certain demands, calls and interests, capabilities and intellect, character and temperament, goals and values. The results…

  2. iDiversity and LIS Education: Student-Based Groups Promoting Cultural Competence as a Vision for the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    New homegrown groups such as iDiversity call attention to the important and essential role that student-based groups play in promoting cultural competency within their own institutions and the profession at large. The iDiversity story outlines (1) how student engagement can be transformed into leadership and action by diversity focus within the…

  3. Buying into the Profession: Looking at the Impact on Students of Expert Videotape Demonstrations in Counsellor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Patrice A.

    2008-01-01

    From analysing qualitative questionnaires, a group interview, and instructor interviews, this study explores the impact of viewing expert demonstration videotapes on students' learning processes, their identification as counsellors, and understanding of the counselling profession. Commonly, students selectively choose what they see and how they…

  4. Dialogue as skill: training a health professions workforce that can talk about race and racism.

    PubMed

    Murray-García, Jann L; Harrell, Steven; García, Jorge A; Gizzi, Elio; Simms-Mackey, Pamela

    2014-09-01

    Efforts in the field of multicultural education for the health professions have focused on increasing trainees' knowledge base and awareness of other cultures, and on teaching technical communication skills in cross-cultural encounters. Yet to be adequately addressed in training are profound issues of racial bias and the often awkward challenge of cross-racial dialogue, both of which likely play some part in well-documented racial disparities in health care encounters. We seek to establish the need for the skill of dialoguing explicitly with patients, colleagues, and others about race and racism and its implications for patient well-being, for clinical practice, and for the ongoing personal and professional development of health care professionals. We present evidence establishing the need to go beyond training in interview skills that efficiently "extract" relevant cultural and clinical information from patients. This evidence includes concepts from social psychology that include implicit bias, explicit bias, and aversive racism. Aiming to connect the dots of diverse literatures, we believe health professions educators and institutional leaders can play a pivotal role in reducing racial disparities in health care encounters by actively promoting, nurturing, and participating in this dialogue, modeling its value as an indispensable skill and institutional priority.

  5. Dialogue as skill: training a health professions workforce that can talk about race and racism.

    PubMed

    Murray-García, Jann L; Harrell, Steven; García, Jorge A; Gizzi, Elio; Simms-Mackey, Pamela

    2014-09-01

    Efforts in the field of multicultural education for the health professions have focused on increasing trainees' knowledge base and awareness of other cultures, and on teaching technical communication skills in cross-cultural encounters. Yet to be adequately addressed in training are profound issues of racial bias and the often awkward challenge of cross-racial dialogue, both of which likely play some part in well-documented racial disparities in health care encounters. We seek to establish the need for the skill of dialoguing explicitly with patients, colleagues, and others about race and racism and its implications for patient well-being, for clinical practice, and for the ongoing personal and professional development of health care professionals. We present evidence establishing the need to go beyond training in interview skills that efficiently "extract" relevant cultural and clinical information from patients. This evidence includes concepts from social psychology that include implicit bias, explicit bias, and aversive racism. Aiming to connect the dots of diverse literatures, we believe health professions educators and institutional leaders can play a pivotal role in reducing racial disparities in health care encounters by actively promoting, nurturing, and participating in this dialogue, modeling its value as an indispensable skill and institutional priority. PMID:25265221

  6. Health professions' education and practice: A commentary on transformation through the internet.

    PubMed

    King, Frederick B; Smith, Betsey C; Mathews, Mary Beth

    2006-01-01

    The Internet, in all of its forms and functions, is well on the way to becoming the most ubiquitous technology of the 21st century. It is changing the way the world does business, the way formal education is conducted, and the way humans interact with each other. The Internet already has become an invaluable tool for formal health education and for the delivery by health professionals of information, training, and education to their employees and patients. With new paradigms for health on the horizon, modem Internet technologies will transform health care practice and systems delivery. In this report, the authors focus attention on the use of distance learning/distance education technologies and their relationship to, and use in, the health professions.

  7. [Potentials for research and innovations in allied health professions in Germany].

    PubMed

    Voigt-Radloff, Sebastian; Lang, Britta; Antes, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the increasing complexity and continuously changing needs and demands in the German healthcare system, there is a need to strengthen knowledge translation, evidence-based practice and the conduct of clinical trials in the field of allied health professions. An interdisciplinary working group representing the fields of nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy developed a guide and a concept for seminars to provide potential analyses for research and innovations in the allied health professions in Germany. These potential analyses compare the current state of health care delivery for specific health problems and the corpus of evidence for the effectiveness of related interventions. Thus innovations can be identified which might improve client-centred healthcare in Germany. The introductory paper briefly reports the activities and results of the working group, describes the international context of transferring research into practice and outlines possibilities for the future development of coordinated research strategies in Germany. The following papers consist of five potential analyses: (1) Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) in long-term care; (2) giving birth in an upright position; (3) treadmill training for patients with Parkinson's disease; (4) training of everyday activities after stroke; and (5) communication training for patients with aphasia.

  8. Effective leadership--the way to excellence in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Osmani, Syed Suhail Naser

    2013-11-01

    The current times are witnessing an explosion of new knowledge in medicine. The demographic profile, geographic distribution of many diseases is changing, there have been dramatic shifts in the health care delivery, healthcare professionals are more socially and professionally accountable, patients have become more consumerist in their attitude. These factors coupled with the increasing demand for trained health care professionals has led to, firstly, a rapid increase in the health professionals education institutions and secondly curricular changes and adoption of newer teaching learning methodologies, to equip the graduates with the desirable outcomes. The scene in health professions education is one characterized by rapid activity and change. A time which demands effective leadership at these institutions for achieving excellence. Drawing from a decade long experience, at different medical schools in the gulf region, the author opines that it is effective leadership, as observed at the institutions where he worked, which is responsible for realization of institutional vision, rapid development and achievement of excellence.

  9. A legislative history of federal assistance for health professions training in primary care medicine and dentistry in the United States, 1963-2008.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P Preston

    2008-11-01

    This article reviews the legislative history of Title VII of the United States Public Health Service Act. It describes three periods of federal support for health professions training in medicine and dentistry. During the first era, 1963 to 1975, federal support led to an increase in the overall production of physicians and dentists, primarily through grants for construction, renovation, and expansion of schools. The second period, 1976 to 1991, witnessed a shift in federal support to train physicians, dentists, and physician assistants in the fields of primary care defined as family medicine, general internal medicine, and general pediatrics. During this era, divisions of general internal medicine and general pediatrics, and departments of family medicine, were established in nearly every medical and osteopathic medical school. All three disciplines conducted primary care residencies, medical student clerkships, and faculty development programs. The third period, 1992 to present, emphasized the policy goals of caring for vulnerable populations, greater diversity in the health professions, and curricula innovations to prepare trainees for the future practice of medicine and dentistry. Again, Title VII grantees met these policy goals by designing curricula and creating clinical experiences to teach care of the homeless, persons with HIV, the elderly, and other vulnerable populations. Many grantees recruited underrepresented minorities into their programs as trainees and as faculty, and all of them designed and implemented new curricula to address emerging health priorities.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  10. Influencers of career choice among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Brown-West, A P

    1991-01-01

    This study focused on the factors that influence students' choice of an allied health profession. A survey of 153 students in three allied health programs at the University of Connecticut revealed that "the need to help others," "prestige," "professional autonomy," "opportunities for advancement," "income potential," and "the effect of the specialty on family and personal life," were the major influencers of career choice among allied health students. Only a few students regarded malpractice suits and AIDS as negative influencers. While medical laboratory science majors regarded these as important factors, dietetics and physical therapy majors did not. The article suggests further use of these findings by program directors and career counselors. PMID:1761410

  11. Communication in Health Professions: A European consensus on inter- and multi-professional learning objectives in German

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Cadja; Kiessling, Claudia; Härtl, Anja; Haak, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim: Communication is object of increasing attention in the health professions. Teaching communication competencies should already begin in undergraduate education or pre-registration training. The aim of this project was to translate the Health Professions Core Communication Curriculum (HPCCC), an English catalogue of learning objectives, into German to make its content widely accessible in the German-speaking countries. This catalogue lists 61 educational objectives and was agreed on by 121 international communication experts. A European reference framework for inter- and multi-professional curriculum development for communication in the health professions in German-speaking countries should be provided. Method: The German version of the HPCCC was drafted by six academics and went through multiple revisions until consensus was reached. The learning objectives were paired with appropriate teaching and assessment tools drawn from the database of the teaching Committee of the European Association for Communication Health Care (tEACH). Results: The HPCCC learning objectives are now available in German and can be applied for curriculum planning and development in the different German-speaking health professions, the educational objectives can also be used for inter-professional purposes. Examples for teaching methods and assessment tools are given for using and implementing the objectives. Conclusion: The German version of the HPCCC with learning objectives for communication in health professions can contribute significantly to inter- and multi-professional curriculum development in the health care professions in the German-speaking countries. Examples for teaching methods and assessment tools from the materials compiled by tEACH supplement the curricular content and provide suggestions for practical implementation of the learning objectives in teaching and assessment. The relevance of the German HPCCC to the processes of curriculum development for the

  12. Students' Reactions to Three Typical Examinations in Health Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarid, Orly; Anson, Ofra; Bentov, Yaakov

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A search for universal and particular changes in emotional, behavioral and cognitive assessments in relation to three types of examinations: an oral presentation, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and a pencil and paper examination. Methods: One hundred and two students of health professions completed the Profile of…

  13. Academic Integrity and Plagiarism: A Review of the Influences and Risk Situations for Health Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Hai; Emmerton, Lynne; McKauge, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    Health professions are increasingly focusing on the development of integrity and professionalism in students of Health disciplines. While it is expected that Health students will develop, and commit to, the highest standards of conduct as undergraduates, and henceforth through their careers, the pressures of assessment and external commitments may…

  14. The History of SHSAAMc: Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Hembree, Wylie; Bonner, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an historical review of the organization known as Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers (SHSAAMc). The authors discuss characteristics of health service directors as well as the history of meetings, discussion, and leadership. The focus of the group is the healthcare needs of health professions students at…

  15. Introduction to the medical professions through an innovative medical student-run pipeline program.

    PubMed

    Nair, Navya; Marciscano, Ariel E; Vivar, Karina L; Schaeffer, Sarah; LaMont, Elizabeth; Francois, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    Underrepresented minorities (URMs) make up a disproportionately small percentage of medical school applicants, matriculants, and physicians relative to the general US population. Preprofessional pipeline programs may help introduce URMs to careers in the medical field. MiniMeds was developed as a paracurricular enrichment program that targeted URM students. The curriculum was designed and administered by medical students, and 2 trials of this program were conducted. Data were collected pre and post program through a survey that assessed knowledge of medical concepts and knowledge of and interest in careers in medicine. Attendance at program sessions correlated with baseline knowledge about medical professions. Knowledge about medical concepts increased significantly from baseline to follow-up for boys, a group significantly represented by URMs in our cohort. Median scores for knowledge of medical careers increased significantly from baseline to followup for URMs as well as for boys and girls. Preprofessional pipeline programs such as MiniMeds are able to engage and develop medical knowledge in URM students at a critical developmental age. Further evaluation and implementation of programs that incorporate medical students to actively develop and lead pipeline programs are warranted.

  16. The Careers in Health and Medical Professions Program (CHAMPS): An Impact Study of a University-Based STEM+H Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Eric W.; Perry, Justin C.; Ferguson, Robert L.; Jackson, Debbie K.

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the impact of a Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Health (STEM+H) university-based pipeline program, the Careers in Health and Medical Professions Program, over the course of two summers among predominantly African-American high school students recruited from urban school districts ( N = 155). Based on a mixed methods approach, results indicated that youth made significant gains in both academic and career knowledge. Furthermore, youth generally rated the program's sessions favorably, but also rated sessions with varying levels of satisfaction. The limitations and implications for program delivery and evaluation methods among pipeline programs are discussed.

  17. The health professions and the performance of future health systems in low-income countries: support or obstacle?

    PubMed

    Dussault, Gilles

    2008-05-01

    This paper discusses the present and future role of the health professions in health services delivery systems in low-income countries. Unlike richer countries, most low-income countries do not have a tradition of labour market regulation and the capacity of the professions themselves to regulate the provision of health services by their members tends to be weak. The paper looks at the impact of professional monopolies on the performance of health services delivery systems, e.g. equity of access, effectiveness of services, efficiency in the use of scarce resources, responsiveness to users' needs, including protection against the financial impact of utilising health services. It identifies issues which policy-makers face in relation to opening the health labour market while guaranteeing the safety and security of services provided by professionals. The suggestion is made that a "social contract", granting privileges of practice in exchange of a commitment to actively maintain and enhance the quality of their services, may be a viable course of action. This would require that the actors in the policy process collaborate in strengthening the capacity of regulatory agencies to perform their role. PMID:18336977

  18. Toward a virtue-based normative ethics for the health professions.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, E D

    1995-09-01

    Virtue is the most perdurable concept in the history of ethics, which is understandable given the ineradicability of the moral agent in the events of the moral life. Historically, virtue enjoyed normative force as long as the philosophical anthropology and the metaphysics of the good that grounded virtue were viable. That grounding has eroded in both general and medical ethics. If virtue is to be restored to a normative status, its philosophical underpinnings must be reconstructed. Such reconstruction seems unlikely in general ethics, where the possibility of agreement on the good for humans is remote. However, it is a realistic possibility in the professional ethics fo the health professions where agreement on the telos of the healing relationship is more likely to arise. Nevertheless, virtue-based ethics must be related conceptually and normatively to other ethical theories in a comprehensive moral philosophy of the health professions. If he really does think there is no distinction between virtue and vice, why, sir, when he leaves our house, let us count our spoons. Samuel Johnson

  19. Education and role conflict in the health visitor profession, 1918-39.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jane; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2010-06-01

    Health visiting was the public health profession in the UK, which arose during the Victorian period to support and supervise the mothers of the nation. The health visitor was expected to teach the new mothers hygiene, infant feeding and diet, help them in the home when necessary and then report back to the Medical Officer for Health. Her role therefore was multifaceted and required education and training from a number of differing bodies. She needed nursing skills to help with the practicalities of observation and home care, sanitary knowledge to ensure that the buildings were safe and training in law and epidemiology. In order to fulfil these professional requirements, by the middle of the twentieth century the health visitor was expected to be a nurse by background, be educated for health visiting in a university and understand community medicine. These differing and sometimes opposing requirements meant that the health visitor was often caught in-between conflicting ideologies. It is this idea of 'in-betweenness' from the work of the anthropologist Marilyn Strathern and its relation to the work and education of the health visitor that this article will focus.

  20. A proposed curriculum on death and dying for the allied health student.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, M C

    1980-02-01

    Encounters with a dying patient create a triple dilemma for the allied health professional. These include the anxiety aroused in the dying patient, the avoidance of the patient by other members of the health team and the allied health professional's own anxieties about death. This article summarizes the existing curricular models on death education for health professions students. A proposed course design for allied health professions students modified from Bloch's medical education objectives for a thanatology course is presented. Special emphasis is given to development of active listening skills which allied health personnel need in their role as supportive significant others for dying patients.

  1. Perceptions of Indian dental hygiene students toward their profession and its relationship with their explicit self-esteem scores

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shipra; Jain, Ashish; Garg, Sakshi; Sood, Shaveta; Kumari, Bindiya

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions toward the profession, the level of explicit self-esteem (ESE) of Indian students pursuing the course of dental hygienists, to evaluate the relationship between the two and to develop educational strategies to positively influence students’ perceptions. We also wished to evaluate the level of satisfaction of the students to the current status of professional employment in the country. Materials and Methods: Students in the second year of the dental hygienist 2-year course were asked to participate in a cross-sectional survey study. An instrument was used to obtain students’ perceptions about the profession by estimating the dimensions of “Motivation,” “Expectation” and “Environment”. Their self-esteem was evaluated using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale. Relationship of self esteem scores with perceptions towards profession was then evaluated. Results: Scores for dimensions including “Motivation,” “Expectation” and “Environment” were significantly high, as were the self-esteem scores. The level of ESE was positively correlated with their perceptions of the profession. Conclusions: The perception of the Indian dental hygienist students was significantly high and positively correlated to the ESE scores. We also conclude that environmental factors may be more influential than innate cultural factors for the development of self-esteem. PMID:25565754

  2. Can Transformational Leadership Influence on Teachers' Commitment towards Organization, Teaching Profession, and Students Learning? A Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Mohammed Sani; Ghavifekr, Simin; Ling, Sii; Siraj, Saedah; Azeez, Mohd Ibrahim K.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of transformational leadership as idealized influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation, and individualized consideration on teachers' commitment towards organization, teaching profession, and students' learning. A quantitative survey method was applied, and four broadly hypothesized…

  3. High School Students' Perceptions of Teaching and Their Intention to Choose Teaching as a Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to (a) explore high achieving high school students' perceptions of the teaching profession, (b) examine the influence of these perceptions on intentions to teach, and (c) test a recruitment suite of tools to determine the effectiveness of recruitment messaging and strategies. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB)…

  4. Student perspectives on sexual health: implications for interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Wilson, Christina K; Macapagal, Kathryn R; Valvano, Abbey K; Waller, Jennifer L; West, Lindsey M; Stepleman, Lara M

    2014-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration requires that health professionals think holistically about presenting concerns, particularly for multimodal problems like sexual dysfunction. However, health professions students appear to receive relatively little sexual health education, and generally none is offered on an interprofessional basis. To assess current degree of interprofessional thinking in sexual health care, 472 health professions students in Georgia, United States, were presented with a sexual dysfunction vignette and asked to rate the relevance of, and their familiarity with, interventions offered by several professionals. They also were asked to identify the most likely cause of the sexual dysfunction. Students rated relevance and familiarity with interventions as highest for physicians and lowest for dentists, with higher ratings of nurses by nursing students. More advanced students reported greater familiarity with mental health, physician, and physical therapy interventions. Finally, nursing students were less likely to attribute the dysfunction to a physical cause. These findings indicate that students may prioritize biomedical approaches in their initial assessment and may need additional supports to consider the spectrum of biopsychosocial factors contributing to sexual functioning. To encourage interprofessional critical thinking and prepare students for interprofessional care, sexual health curricula may be improved with the inclusion of interprofessional training. Specific recommendations for curriculum development are offered.

  5. Student perspectives on sexual health: implications for interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Wilson, Christina K; Macapagal, Kathryn R; Valvano, Abbey K; Waller, Jennifer L; West, Lindsey M; Stepleman, Lara M

    2014-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration requires that health professionals think holistically about presenting concerns, particularly for multimodal problems like sexual dysfunction. However, health professions students appear to receive relatively little sexual health education, and generally none is offered on an interprofessional basis. To assess current degree of interprofessional thinking in sexual health care, 472 health professions students in Georgia, United States, were presented with a sexual dysfunction vignette and asked to rate the relevance of, and their familiarity with, interventions offered by several professionals. They also were asked to identify the most likely cause of the sexual dysfunction. Students rated relevance and familiarity with interventions as highest for physicians and lowest for dentists, with higher ratings of nurses by nursing students. More advanced students reported greater familiarity with mental health, physician, and physical therapy interventions. Finally, nursing students were less likely to attribute the dysfunction to a physical cause. These findings indicate that students may prioritize biomedical approaches in their initial assessment and may need additional supports to consider the spectrum of biopsychosocial factors contributing to sexual functioning. To encourage interprofessional critical thinking and prepare students for interprofessional care, sexual health curricula may be improved with the inclusion of interprofessional training. Specific recommendations for curriculum development are offered. PMID:24547937

  6. Becoming an Academic: The Reconstruction of Identity by Recently Appointed Lecturers in Nursing, Midwifery and the Allied Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Caroline; Boyd, Pete

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the workplace learning experiences of recently appointed lecturers in UK higher education in nursing, midwifery and the allied health professions. Health care practitioners, appointed to academic posts in Universities, are experts in their respective clinical fields and hold strong practitioner identities developed through…

  7. When Duty Calls: The Implications of Social Justice Work for Policy, Education, and Practice in the Mental Health Professions. Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselica, Mark S.

    2004-01-01

    In reaction to the pioneering model of social justice education in counseling psychology described by Goodman, Liang, Helms, Latta, Sparks, and Weintraub, several implications of social justice work for policy, education, and practice in the mental health professions are suggested. Specifically, it is recommended that mental health scientists and…

  8. Comprehensive Health Professions Plan Review for Florida. Report 6. Report and Recommendations of the Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    The status of Florida health professions education is reviewed in this commission report, which provides information on enrollment and graduate levels, market place demand for graduates and new policy issues. After an introduction that summarizes the commission charge, commission activities, purpose and scope, background, health professions…

  9. Racial Diversity in the Medical Profession: The Impact of Affirmative Action Bans on Underrepresented Student of Color Matriculation in Medical Schools

    PubMed Central

    Mickey-Pabello, David

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of affirmative action bans in six states (California, Washington, Florida, Texas, Michigan, and Nebraska) on the matriculation rates of historically underrepresented students of color in public medical schools in these states. Findings show that affirmative action bans have led to about a 17% decline (from 18.5% to 15.3%) in the first-time matriculation of medical school students who are underrepresented students of color. This decline is similar to drops in the enrollment of students of color that have taken place across other educational sectors, including the nation’s most selective public undergraduate institutions, law schools, and various graduate fields of study, after bans on affirmative action were enacted in some of these states. The findings suggest that statewide laws banning the consideration of race in postsecondary admissions pose serious obstacles for the medical profession to address the health-care crisis facing the nation. PMID:26052161

  10. 'I now have a visual image in my mind and it is something I will never forget': an analysis of an arts-informed approach to health professions ethics education.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Bidinosti, Susan

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on a study of an arts informed approach to ethics education in a health professions education context. The purpose of this study was to investigate students' reported learning experiences as a result of engagement with an arts-informed project in a health professions' ethics course. A hermeneutic phenomenological methodological approach was adopted for the study. The data were collected over 5 years, and involved analysis of 234 occupational therapy students' written reflections on learning. Phenomenological methods were used. Five key themes were identified with respect to students' reported learning including: becoming aware of values, (re) discovering creativity, coming to value reflection in professional life, deepening self-awareness, and developing capacities to imagine future practices. There appear to be a number of unique ways in which arts-informed approaches can contribute to health professions education including: activating imaginative engagement, fostering interpretive capacity, inspiring transformative understandings, offering new ways of knowing, deepening reflection, and heightening consciousness, while also enriching the inner life of practitioners. Innovative approaches are being used to introduce arts-informed practices in health professions curricula programs. The findings point to the promise of arts-informed approaches for advancing health sciences education.

  11. Power and practices: questions concerning the legislation of health professions in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Velloso, Isabela S C; Ceci, Christine

    2015-07-01

    Developments in professional practice can be related to ongoing changes in relations of power among professionals, which often lead to changes in the boundaries of practices. The differing contexts of practices also influence these changing relations among health professionals. Legislation governing professional practice also differs from country to country. In Brazil, over the past 12 years, in a climate of deep disagreement, a new law to regulate medical practice has been discussed. It was sanctioned, or made into law, but with some notable changes, in July 2013. Of interest to us in this paper are the ways the proposed legislation, by setting out the boundaries and scope of medical practice, 'interfered' in the practices of other health professions, undermining many 'independent' practices that have developed over time. However, even taking into account the multiple routes through which practices are established and developed, the role of legislation that seems able to contradict and deny the historical realities of multiple, intersecting practices should be critically interrogated. In this paper, we use the theoretical resources of poststructuralist thinking to explore gaps, ambiguities, and power relations implicit in the discourses that constituted this law. We argue that although the new law can be understood as a social and political device that will interfere in the organization of other health professions' practices, such legislation is only part of what constitutes change in a consolidated professional practice. And while it is important to understand the effects of such legislation, healthcare practices are also realized or 'made real' through ongoing relations of knowledge and power, including, as we will see in this case, activities of resistance. The problem, then, is to understand the practical arrangements, including legislation, traditions and routines, values and knowledge that come to shape the practices of nursing in a particular context.

  12. Using staffing ratios for workforce planning: evidence on nine allied health professions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern healthcare managers are faced with pressure to deliver effective, efficient services within the context of fixed budget constraints. Managers are required to make decisions regarding the skill mix of the workforce particularly when staffing new services. One measure used to identify numbers and mix of staff in healthcare settings is workforce ratio. The aim of this study was to identify workforce ratios in nine allied health professions and to identify whether these measures are useful for planning allied health workforce requirements. Methods A systematic literature search using relevant MeSH headings of business, medical and allied health databases and relevant grey literature for the period 2000-2008 was undertaken. Results Twelve articles were identified which described the use of workforce ratios in allied health services. Only one of these was a staffing ratio linked to clinical outcomes. The most comprehensive measures were identified in rehabilitation medicine. Conclusion The evidence for use of staffing ratios for allied health practitioners is scarce and lags behind the fields of nursing and medicine. PMID:22293082

  13. The Research Apprenticeship Program: Promoting Careers in Biomedical Sciences and the Health Professions for Minority Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Denise D.

    This study examined the career decisions of 54 high school students who participated in the Research Apprenticeship Program (RAP) at Ohio State University during 1990-92. RAP is a precollege program which aims to provide meaningful experiences in various aspects of health-related research for minority high school students and teachers. RAP…

  14. An Antibiotic Resource Program for Students of the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tritz, Gerald J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a description of a computer program developed to supplement instruction in testing of antibiotics on clinical isolates of microorganisms. The program is a simulation and database for interpretation of experimental data designed to enhance laboratory learning and prepare future physicians to use computerized diagnostic instrumentation and…

  15. Exploring professional development needs of educators in the health sciences professions.

    PubMed

    Schönwetter, Dieter J; Hamilton, Joanne; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2015-02-01

    An increasing number of institutions of higher education are clustering their health sciences schools into a common unit. Therefore, it is imperative that the individual faculty development units assume new mandates to meet faculty development needs for stakeholders across these disciplines. Critical to providing current and relevant professional development activities is an awareness of the needs of academicians, including common as well as discipline-specific needs. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore the extent to which factors such as discipline, rank, gender, education, and years as an academician impact on perceived needs for faculty development. In February 2012, a cross-sectional survey of the perceived faculty development needs of academicians in the health sciences unit of a Canadian university was conducted using an online assessment tool. A total of 133 out of 1,409 potential participants completed the survey, for a response rate of 9.4%. The findings revealed more similarities than differences in terms of perceived faculty development needs. In addition, differences were found across all health professions schools and in factors such as discipline, academic rank, education, gender, and years as an academician. These findings suggest that faculty development and educational specialists should understand the shared as well as the unique needs of the individual health sciences schools in planning their professional development services.

  16. U.S. Health Care Professions Separate and Unequal: Sullivan Commission-- Lack of Diversity May Be Greatest Cause of Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    A lack of diversity among health care professionals is placing the health of at least one-third of the nation at risk. This fact was among findings announced recently by the Sullivan Commission on Diversity in the Healthcare Workforce in its report, "Missing Persons: Minorities in the Health Professions." The 16-member commission calls for a new…

  17. Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 (PL 94-484). Amended by Health Services Extension Act of 1977 (PL 95-83, Title III). Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    The Health Professions Educational Assistance Act of 1976, signed into law on Oct. 12, 1976, extends health mampower training authorities through fiscal year 1980 with significant changes to meet national needs. The law (PL 94-484), which amends Title VII of the Public Health Service Act and other laws, is designed primarily to produce more…

  18. Driving the Profession of Health Informatics: The Australasian College of Health Informatics.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher; Veil, Klaus; Williams, Peter; Cording, Andrew; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Grain, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Across the world, bodies representing health informatics or promoting health informatics are either societies of common interest or universities with health informatics courses/departments. Professional colleges in Health Informatics (similar to the idea of professional colleges in other health fields) are few and far between. The Australasian College of Health Informatics has been in existence since 2001, and has an increasing membership of nearly 100 fellows and members, acting as a national focal point for the promotion of Health Informatics in Australasia. Describing the activities of the college, this article demonstrates a need for increasing professionalization of Health informatics beyond the current structures.

  19. Education on occupational health and health related habits among dental students in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Matoš, Krešimir; Jurec, Zrinka; Galić, Ivan; Vodanović, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Occupational diseases are diseases caused by occupational exposures at the workplace, while diseases related to work are diseases caused by many factors, wherein the harmful work conditions are one of the possible causes. Dental medicine is a profession with a high risk of developing occupational diseases. The aim of this paper was to present the results of a survey about occupational health risks and health related habits among dental students at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb and to show how this survey led to an improvement in education by introducing a new course into the dental curriculum. Participants and methods Students of all years at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb (total of 663) were offered to participate in a survey about occupational health risks and health related habits. Results A questionnaire was completed by 351 students. 28.0% of male students and 22.5% of female students were smokers. During the first two years of study, up to 84.6% of students consumed alcoholic beverages at least once a week. Prior to enrollment in the university, 85.3% male and 77.6% female students were engaged in sports. The significant drop in the number of students who participated in sports was noticed in the first study year in both sexes. Student awareness of the health risks related to dental profession increases with the year of study. Most students believe that occupational diseases can be prevented. Conclusion The results have shown that students enter the School of Dental Medicine with a relatively low level of awareness of the health hazards of dental profession. Although the level of awareness increases with years of study, harmful habits such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and the lack of physical activity also remain present in the later years of study. PMID:27688426

  20. Education on occupational health and health related habits among dental students in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Matoš, Krešimir; Jurec, Zrinka; Galić, Ivan; Vodanović, Marin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Occupational diseases are diseases caused by occupational exposures at the workplace, while diseases related to work are diseases caused by many factors, wherein the harmful work conditions are one of the possible causes. Dental medicine is a profession with a high risk of developing occupational diseases. The aim of this paper was to present the results of a survey about occupational health risks and health related habits among dental students at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb and to show how this survey led to an improvement in education by introducing a new course into the dental curriculum. Participants and methods Students of all years at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb (total of 663) were offered to participate in a survey about occupational health risks and health related habits. Results A questionnaire was completed by 351 students. 28.0% of male students and 22.5% of female students were smokers. During the first two years of study, up to 84.6% of students consumed alcoholic beverages at least once a week. Prior to enrollment in the university, 85.3% male and 77.6% female students were engaged in sports. The significant drop in the number of students who participated in sports was noticed in the first study year in both sexes. Student awareness of the health risks related to dental profession increases with the year of study. Most students believe that occupational diseases can be prevented. Conclusion The results have shown that students enter the School of Dental Medicine with a relatively low level of awareness of the health hazards of dental profession. Although the level of awareness increases with years of study, harmful habits such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and the lack of physical activity also remain present in the later years of study.

  1. Increasing Diversity in Science and Health Professions: A 21-Year Longitudinal Study Documenting College and Career Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Ned, Judith; Ahn, David; Koehler, Alana; Kennedy, Jeanne D.

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of precollege science education programs, African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans remain critically underrepresented in science and health professions. This report describes college and career outcomes among graduates of the Stanford Medical Youth Science Program (SMYSP), a 5-week summer residential program for low-income…

  2. Systematic review of knowledge translation strategies in the allied health professions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) aims to close the research-practice gap in order to realize and maximize the benefits of research within the practice setting. Previous studies have investigated KT strategies in nursing and medicine; however, the present study is the first systematic review of the effectiveness of a variety of KT interventions in five allied health disciplines: dietetics, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physiotherapy, and speech-language pathology. Methods A health research librarian developed and implemented search strategies in eight electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, PASCAL, EMBASE, IPA, Scopus, CENTRAL) using language (English) and date restrictions (1985 to March 2010). Other relevant sources were manually searched. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts, reviewed full-text articles, performed data extraction, and performed quality assessment. Within each profession, evidence tables were created, grouping and analyzing data by research design, KT strategy, targeted behaviour, and primary outcome. The published descriptions of the KT interventions were compared to the Workgroup for Intervention Development and Evaluation Research (WIDER) Recommendations to Improve the Reporting of the Content of Behaviour Change Interventions. Results A total of 2,638 articles were located and the titles and abstracts were screened. Of those, 1,172 full-text articles were reviewed and subsequently 32 studies were included in the systematic review. A variety of single (n = 15) and multiple (n = 17) KT interventions were identified, with educational meetings being the predominant KT strategy (n = 11). The majority of primary outcomes were identified as professional/process outcomes (n = 25); however, patient outcomes (n = 4), economic outcomes (n = 2), and multiple primary outcomes (n = 1) were also represented. Generally, the studies were of low methodological quality. Outcome reporting bias was

  3. The Effectiveness of Blended Learning in Health Professions: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weijun; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Rong; Li, Yingxue

    2016-01-01

    Background Blended learning, defined as the combination of traditional face-to-face learning and asynchronous or synchronous e-learning, has grown rapidly and is now widely used in education. Concerns about the effectiveness of blended learning have led to an increasing number of studies on this topic. However, there has yet to be a quantitative synthesis evaluating the effectiveness of blended learning on knowledge acquisition in health professions. Objective We aimed to assess the effectiveness of blended learning for health professional learners compared with no intervention and with nonblended learning. We also aimed to explore factors that could explain differences in learning effects across study designs, participants, country socioeconomic status, intervention durations, randomization, and quality score for each of these questions. Methods We conducted a search of citations in Medline, CINAHL, Science Direct, Ovid Embase, Web of Science, CENTRAL, and ERIC through September 2014. Studies in any language that compared blended learning with no intervention or nonblended learning among health professional learners and assessed knowledge acquisition were included. Two reviewers independently evaluated study quality and abstracted information including characteristics of learners and intervention (study design, exercises, interactivity, peer discussion, and outcome assessment). Results We identified 56 eligible articles. Heterogeneity across studies was large (I2 ≥93.3) in all analyses. For studies comparing knowledge gained from blended learning versus no intervention, the pooled effect size was 1.40 (95% CI 1.04-1.77; P<.001; n=20 interventions) with no significant publication bias, and exclusion of any single study did not change the overall result. For studies comparing blended learning with nonblended learning (pure e-learning or pure traditional face-to-face learning), the pooled effect size was 0.81 (95% CI 0.57-1.05; P<.001; n=56 interventions), and

  4. Education of the Health Professions in the Context of the Health Care System: The Ontario Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charron, K. C.

    The document examines the education of health professionals in Ontario within the context of changing patterns for health care. The first of four chapters contains background information on geographic and population characteristics, Federal health legislation requiring a provincial response, and Ontario health legislation. The second chapter deals…

  5. Mental Health: Healing Deep Wounds from the Inside Out. Native Americans in the Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with Native American mental health and social workers discuss how Native mental health problems are related to historical trauma and chronically inadequate mental health services. Elements of culturally relevant mental health services include locally delivered workshops, kinship foster care, tribal elders, spirituality, and Native care…

  6. The State of Regulation in England: From the General Social Care Council to the Health and Care Professions Council

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Kenneth; Leigh, Jadwiga; Worsley, Aidan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the way in which social work, as a profession, has coped with and responded to the various forms of regulation to which it has been subject in England. First, we briefly detail the rise of external regulation of the professions, discussing both the rationale for, and criticisms of, such developments. Second, we take a closer look at developments within social work and the operation of the General Social Care Council (GSCC)'s conduct proceedings from its inception in 2001 until its dissolution in 2012. Third, we focus on the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and consider how it has begun its regulation of social workers since it took on this responsibility from August 2012. We conclude by outlining some of the concerns we have as well as discussing reasons as to why we feel this area of work needs to be explored further. PMID:27559200

  7. "Behind Every Profession Is a Person": Students' Written Memories of Their Own Teacher-Student Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uitto, Minna

    2012-01-01

    This article employs a narrative approach in examining the intertwining of the personal and professional in teacher-student relationships. A total of 141 Finnish people of various ages wrote about their teachers; specifically, the article focuses on memories related to their teachers' personal lives. Such memories illustrate the inevitable…

  8. Where Extrinsic Meets Intrinsic Motivation: An Investigation of Black Student Persistence in Pre-Health Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Constance R.; Winsor, Denise L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to increase the number of health care providers in underserved communities, numerous efforts are being made to increase the number of Black students in the health professions. Research supports the idea that individuals from minority populations seek doctors of the same race or culture. In an effort to provide increased health care to…

  9. Toward an Unambiguous Profession: A Review of Nursing. Health Administration Perspectives No. A6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Odin W.

    National data on nurses and nursing are organized into the following sections: (1) The Nursing Profession and Society, (2) The Structure and Nature of the Nursing Profession, with subsections on nursing in the general hospital and related facilities, nursing in the mental hospital and related facilities, community nursing, occupational health…

  10. Assessment challenges in competency-based education: A case study in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James T; Burkhardt, John C; Kasten, Steven J; Mullan, Patricia B; Santen, Sally A; Sheets, Kent J; Tsai, Antonius; Vasquez, John A; Gruppen, Larry D

    2016-05-01

    There is a growing demand for health sciences faculty with formal training in education. Addressing this need, the University of Michigan Medical School created a Master in Health Professions Education (UM-MHPE). The UM-MHPE is a competency-based education (CBE) program targeting professionals. The program is individualized and adaptive to the learner's situation using personal mentoring. Critical to CBE is an assessment process that accurately and reliably determines a learner's competence in educational domains. The program's assessment method has two principal components: an independent assessment committee and a learner repository. Learners submit evidence of competence that is evaluated by three independent assessors. The assessments are presented to an Assessment Committee who determines whether the submission provides evidence of competence. The learner receives feedback on the submission and, if needed, the actions needed to reach competency. During the program's first year, six learners presented 10 submissions for review. Assessing learners in a competency-based program has created challenges; setting standards that are not readily quantifiable is difficult. However, we argue it is a more genuine form of assessment and that this process could be adapted for use within most competency-based formats. While our approach is demanding, we document practical learning outcomes that assess competence.

  11. Environmental Education and the Health Professions: Framing Climate Change as a Health Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adlong, William; Dietsch, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The likelihood of adverse health impacts from climate change is high. Actions to reduce emissions, however, not only mitigate climate change but often have more immediate health co-benefits. One substantial co-benefit is gained through reductions of the high health costs of pollution from fossil fuel power stations, particularly coal. Evidence…

  12. Group Projects as a Method of Promoting Student Scientific Communication and Collaboration in a Public Health Microbiology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kristen L. W.; Baker, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    Communication of scientific and medical information and collaborative work are important skills for students pursuing careers in health professions and other biomedical sciences. In addition, group work and active learning can increase student engagement and analytical skills. Students in our public health microbiology class were required to work…

  13. Preparing the profession to care for youngsters with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Wong, Allen; Perlman, Steven P

    2010-01-01

    The complex issues involved in providing dental services to the increasing numbers of youngsters with special health care needs require the preparation of students and practitioners to meet these developments. A review of the changes in dental school requirements, the extent of needed services, the increased costs, and a challenge for current practitioners is presented. PMID:20806633

  14. Confirmatory factor analysis and job burnout correlates of the Health Professions Stress Inventory.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Syed; Lee, Jenny S Y

    2002-02-01

    Previous research in 1994 by Gupchup and Wolfgang identified four factors from Wolfgang's Health Professions Stress Inventory (1988) that were common among a sample of practicing pharmacists. The factors were labeled Professional Recognition. Patient Care Responsibilities, Job Conflicts, and Professional Uncertainty, respectively. We used confirmatory factor analysis to assess whether this factor structure was generalizable to nurses. To examine concurrent validity, we correlated the factors with Maslach and Jackson's three dimensions of job burnout, i.e., Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Personal Accomplishment. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey of a random sample of 9,380 nurses from across 43 public hospitals in Hong Kong, from which 2,267 (24.2%) responded. Analysis indicated statistically acceptable goodness of fit indices for the four-factor solution. Except for the factor Patient Care Responsibilities. all other factors had moderate correlations between .44 and .53 with Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization. Correlations between the factors of Stress Inventory and Personal Accomplishment were small but significant, ranging from -.25 to .13. Areas for further improving the psychometric properties of the inventory are discussed.

  15. Impact of Intervention on Disadvantaged First Year Students Who Plan To Major in Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haught, Patricia A.

    This report describes a program designed to encourage minority and financially, socially, or educationally disadvantaged incoming, freshman students to pursue health profession career goals. Sixteen at-risk students were selected to participate in a summer intervention program in West Virginia; a control group of 16 pre-medicine or pre-dentistry…

  16. The flipped classroom: a course redesign to foster learning and engagement in a health professions school.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Roth, Mary T; Glatt, Dylan M; Gharkholonarehe, Nastaran; Davidson, Christopher A; Griffin, LaToya M; Esserman, Denise A; Mumper, Russell J

    2014-02-01

    Recent calls for educational reform highlight ongoing concerns about the ability of current curricula to equip aspiring health care professionals with the skills for success. Whereas a wide range of proposed solutions attempt to address apparent deficiencies in current educational models, a growing body of literature consistently points to the need to rethink the traditional in-class, lecture-based course model. One such proposal is the flipped classroom, in which content is offloaded for students to learn on their own, and class time is dedicated to engaging students in student-centered learning activities, like problem-based learning and inquiry-oriented strategies. In 2012, the authors flipped a required first-year pharmaceutics course at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy. They offloaded all lectures to self-paced online videos and used class time to engage students in active learning exercises. In this article, the authors describe the philosophy and methodology used to redesign the Basic Pharmaceutics II course and outline the research they conducted to investigate the resulting outcomes. This article is intended to serve as a guide to instructors and educational programs seeking to develop, implement, and evaluate innovative and practical strategies to transform students' learning experience. As class attendance, students' learning, and the perceived value of this model all increased following participation in the flipped classroom, the authors conclude that this approach warrants careful consideration as educators aim to enhance learning, improve outcomes, and fully equip students to address 21st-century health care needs.

  17. Antecedents of Student Teachers' Affective Commitment to the Teaching Profession and Turnover Intention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Elstad, Eyvind; Solhaug, Trond; Turmo, Are

    2016-01-01

    Several European countries have experienced both a dearth of and reduction in the quality of applicants to teacher education study programmes. There is also significant leakage from these programmes. The rationale for this study therefore lies in the need to reduce teacher attrition. Research indicates that affective commitment to a profession is…

  18. The Roles of School Psychology Associations in Promoting the Profession, Professionals, and Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimerson, Shane R.

    2014-01-01

    Professions are strong only to the extent they are represented by active and effective professional associations. Professional associations are strong only to the extent that they are composed of active and effective professionals. This article highlights the belief that the contributions of capable, creative, and committed colleagues who provide…

  19. What veterinary practice managers can learn from other health care professions.

    PubMed

    Wood, F

    1996-02-01

    Joel Barker, a noted futurist, points out that the best ideas usually come from outside an industry or profession. As a management consultant, I often get new ideas from industries completely unrelated to my clients' industry. For example, companies interested in offering outstanding customer service might study Nordstrom's, L.L. Bean, or Lexus. Those interested in world class distribution might research Federal Express or United Parcel Service. Airlines, trying to minimize downtime of jets at the terminal, learn secrets from Indianapolis 500 pit crews. Similarly, in observing optometrists and dentists, there are valuable lessons for veterinarians. Dentists identified a business model or organizational structure that generates healthy profits. Independent optometrists experienced the onslaught of intense competition from huge corporate players and weathered the storm. The veterinary profession is not so unique. By studying other professions, we need not recreate the wheel. PMID:8778948

  20. Health care voluntourism: addressing ethical concerns of undergraduate student participation in global health volunteer work.

    PubMed

    McCall, Daniel; Iltis, Ana S

    2014-12-01

    The popularity and availability of global health experiences has increased, with organizations helping groups plan service trips and companies specializing in "voluntourism," health care professionals volunteering their services through different organizations, and medical students participating in global health electives. Much has been written about global health experiences in resource poor settings, but the literature focuses primarily on the work of health care professionals and medical students. This paper focuses on undergraduate student involvement in short term medical volunteer work in resource poor countries, a practice that has become popular among pre-health professions students. We argue that the participation of undergraduate students in global health experiences raises many of the ethical concerns associated with voluntourism and global health experiences for medical students. Some of these may be exacerbated by or emerge in unique ways when undergraduates volunteer. Guidelines and curricula for medical student engagement in global health experiences have been developed. Guidelines specific to undergraduate involvement in such trips and pre-departure curricula to prepare students should be developed and such training should be required of volunteers. We propose a framework for such guidelines and curricula, argue that universities should be the primary point of delivery even when universities are not organizing the trips, and recommend that curricula should be developed in light of additional data.

  1. International Students and Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Sawyer, Anne-Maree

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, reports of increased rates of mental ill health among young people worldwide have received much attention. Several studies indicate a greater incidence of mental health problems among tertiary students, compared with the general population, and higher levels of anxiety, in particular, among international students compared…

  2. Seeking Greater Relevance for Athletic Training Education within American Higher Education and the Health Care Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, David H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses several of the challenges facing today's system of higher education, and discusses the implications of these challenges for the athletic training profession. Among the major challenges are cost, accountability, access, and value of a higher education. The paper next focuses on several issues about which athletic training…

  3. The move towards research in the health professions: A comparison of Chiropractic and Physiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wall, James C; Turnbull, George I; Vernon, Howard

    1988-01-01

    This paper compares the efforts of physiotherapy and chiropractic to move towards the development of a scientific body of knowledge through research. The history of both professions is discussed with particular reference to the education of the clinical practitioners and the educational faculty. Four cited factors contributing to the paucity of research in chiropractic, namely anti-scientific elements in philosophy, lack of suitable role-models, lack of funds and a lack of understanding of research methodology are also seen as barriers to physiotherapy research. These obstacles are discussed in the light of the strategies being employed by both professions to deal with this issue and their success or otherwise. It is stressed that research by members of both professions is fundamental to ensure professional survival. Solutions are principally concerned with increasing the research output from those institutions which educate future professionals. This new generation will likely ensure that the professions are soundly based on scientific principles. The paper considers, therefore, the pre-professional curriculum primarily, although not exclusively, from a Canadian perspective.

  4. Moving the worksite health promotion profession forward: is the time right for requiring standards? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Cecilia; English, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Standards in any profession are adopted to assure that the individuals hired are adequately trained and the programs that they oversee are of the highest quality. Worksite health promotion should be no different from any other field. A review of the research conducted by experts in worksite health promotion is examined, along with an assessment of skills needed to ensure that wellness programs are effective and employees, their families, and even their communities are educated on the ways to best prevent chronic diseases and occupational incidences through healthy and safe behaviors. This article is consistent with Health Promotion Practice's mission and focuses on the exploration of the processes used to plan effective worksite health promotion programs, and it suggests initial discussions on whether these processes should become standards for professionals in the worksite health promotion field.

  5. Interprofessional teaching and learning in the health care professions: A qualitative evaluation of the Robert Bosch Foundation's grant program "Operation Team"

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Interprofessional teaching and learning is gaining significance in the health professions. At the same time, the development and implementation of such educational courses is demanding. Focusing on factors critical to success, the aim of this paper is to evaluate the experience gathered by eight grant projects in which interprofessional courses were designed. Emphasis is placed on the level of cooperation between the participating educational institutions, course content, the operative implementation of the course units and their permanent integration into curricula. Method: Data was collected in semi-structured, guideline-based interviews with project leaders and team members (n=43). University and vocational students who had attended the evaluated courses were also included in the survey (n=7) as a means to triangulate data. Analysis was carried out based on qualitative content analysis. Results: A participatory, dialogue-centered model of cooperation appears to be most suited for developing and implementing courses. Belonging to the factors critical to success are the time when courses are offered, the conditions for attendance, the different teaching and learning cultures of the professions involved, preparation and deployment of instructors, and the role played by project coordination. Permanently integrating interprofessional units into medical curricula revealed itself to be difficult. Conclusion: While the development and realization of interprofessional courses can be achieved easily enough in projects, curricular integration of the new course units is challenging. In respect to the latter, not only a large amount of staffing resources and time are required, but also the creation of the necessary system-level structures, not just within the educational institutions (organizational development) but also in the frameworks governing the professions. PMID:27280127

  6. Nursing students' perceptions toward the nursing profession from clinical practicum in a baccalaureate nursing program-a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Chen; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Weng, Wei-Che

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore senior nursing students' perceptions toward the nursing profession and their experiences in clinical practicum in Taiwan. This study used semistructured interview guides and unstructured face-to-face dialogue with the participants based on a qualitative method. A purposive sample with a snowball method from a baccalaureate nursing program in Southern Taiwan was used to recruit participants. A total of 30 senior nursing students participated in this study. Data were collected from February to May 2011. The interviews were transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed based on the phenomenological approach of qualitative methodology. Data were categorized into three major themes: in-depth recognition of nursing, recognition of the meaning and value of life, and decision conflicts for being a nurse. The findings of the study not only help nursing educators further understand the educational effects of clinical practicum, but also provide information for managers of medical organizations to recruit and train newly graduated nurses.

  7. Beyond Flexner: a new model for continuous learning in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bonnie M; Moore, Donald E; Stead, William W; Balser, Jeffrey R

    2010-02-01

    One hundred years after Flexner wrote his report for the Carnegie Foundation, calls are heard for another "Flexnerian revolution," a reform movement that would overhaul an approach to medical education that is criticized for its expense and inefficiency, its failure to respond to the health needs of our communities, and the high cost and inefficiency of the health care system it supports. To address these concerns, a group of Vanderbilt educators, national experts, administrators, residents, and students attended a retreat in November 2008. The goal of this meeting was to craft a new vision of physician learning based on the continuous development and assessment of competencies needed for effective and compassionate care under challenging circumstances. The vision that emerged from this gathering was that of a health care workforce comprised of physicians and other professionals, all capable of assessing practice outcomes, identifying learning needs, and engaging in continuous learning to achieve the best care for their patients. Several principles form the foundation for this vision. Learning should be competency based and embedded in the workplace. It should be linked to patient needs and undertaken by individual providers, by teams, and by institutions. Health professionals should be trained in this new model from the start of the educational experience, leading to true interprofessional education, with shared facilities and the same basic coursework. Multiple entry and exit points would provide flexibility and would allow health professionals to redirect their careers as their goals evolved. This article provides a detailed account of the model developed at the retreat and the obstacles that might be encountered in attempting to implement it.

  8. Technology-enabled assessment of health professions education: consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zubair; Boulet, John R; Cook, David A; Ellaway, Rachel; Fahal, Ahmad; Kneebone, Roger; Maley, Moira; Ostergaard, Doris; Ponnamperuma, Gominda; Wearn, Andy; Ziv, Amitai

    2011-01-01

    The uptake of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in health professions education can have far-reaching consequences on assessment. The medical education community still needs to develop a deeper understanding of how technology can underpin and extend assessment practices. This article was developed by the 2010 Ottawa Conference Consensus Group on technology-enabled assessment to guide practitioners and researchers working in this area. This article highlights the changing nature of ICTs in assessment, the importance of aligning technology-enabled assessment with local context and needs, the need for better evidence to support use of technologies in health profession education assessment, and a number of challenges, particularly validity threats, that need to be addressed while incorporating technology in assessment. Our recommendations are intended for all practitioners across health professional education. Recommendations include adhering to principles of good assessment, the need for developing coherent institutional policy, using technologies to broaden the competencies to be assessed, linking patient-outcome data to assessment of practitioner performance, and capitalizing on technologies for the management of the entire life-cycle of assessment.

  9. Area Health Education Center of the Navajo Health Authority to Establish the Navajo Center for Health Professions Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navajo Health Authority, Window Rock, AZ.

    The Area Health Education Center (AHEC) is designed to provide educational opportunities in health and allied fields and to improve health care for the Navajo people and other Indians in the region that includes and immediately surrounds the Navajo Indian Reservation. As prime contractor, the University of New Meixco School of Medicine will…

  10. The Use of PBL in an Interprofessional Education Course for Health Care Professional Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine; Pole, David; Leander, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    A problem-based learning (PBL) framework was utilized in a series of six interprofessional team seminars (IPTS) for postbaccalaureate students from seven health professions. The goal of IPTS was to develop a collaborative practice-ready workforce prepared to respond to patient care needs through use of concrete examples, skills development,…

  11. Student versus Faculty Attitudes toward the Veterinary Medical Profession and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoppe, Astrid; Trowald-Wigh, Gunilla

    2000-01-01

    Surveyed and interviewed first-year students and faculty in veterinary medicine at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences on attitudes toward education and practice. Students placed emphasis on specific knowledge and practical skills, while faculty spoke in favor of basic theory; students also wanted integrated exams. Both agreed that…

  12. Hightower Engineering Academy Prepares High School Students for the Engineering Professions - A Program by the Fort Bend Independent School District - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Lee; Verret, Doug; Griffin, Richard

    1998-10-01

    Hightower Engineering Academy, a project of the Fort Bend Independent School District, near Houston Texas, introduces high school students to the engineering professions. It has a college preparatory curriculum in which students are first grounded in the fundamentals of science and mathematics. Then more specific courses help them develop an appreciation for, and many of the skills of, the engineering profession. The Academy will implement a consistent teaching philosophy using a diverse array of innovative technology. The Academy is unique in the degree of partnership with local industry and state universities. It is committed to using the best known science pedagogy in combination with proven teaching art, experienced science educators and state-of-the art facilities all aimed at providing future engineers with complete mastery of the foundation knowledge of the profession. Hightower is committed to a "constructivist" teaching philosophy, the synergy of teamwork, and an appreciation of personal and professional ethics To the greatest extent possible, Hightower will have working engineers present the profession to students. There will be guest lecturers, field trips, and mentorships. Students will participate in engineering-specific organizations and competitions. Students will build a portfolio of their accomplishments at Hightower. They will experience project-based learning, culminating in a senior project that will encompass college-level research, experimentation, data analysis, and technical writing.

  13. Web Based Profession Orientation in Elementary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulbul, Halil Ibrahim; Sahin, Yasar Guneri; Yildiz, Turker Turan; Ercan, Tuncay

    2007-01-01

    In Turkey, the profession orientation programs for elementary education students have a critical importance. In the aspect of profession orientation application, the least dealt population is unfortunately the elementary school students. In this study, the problems caused by insufficient orientation and guidance of profession for those students…

  14. The Effects of Corporatization on Academic Medical Centers. How Will the Corporatization of Health Care Influence Health Professions Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Marvin R.

    Areas of agreement/conflict between academic medical centers and investor owned corporations are considered. Academic medical centers are part of the university system, which is responsible for education, research, and the related public good (e.g., nurturing of professions). Major areas for a potential confluence of interest between the academic…

  15. Addressing the Irreducible Needs of Interprofessional Education: Creating and Sustaining an Institutional Commons for Health Professions Training.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Mark A; Pfeifle, Andrea L

    2016-06-01

    Leaders in health professions education schools and programs are under pressure to respond to new accreditation requirements for interprofessional education (IPE). The work of creating and sustaining an IPE program at an academic health center is in many ways analogous to the challenge of creating and sustaining a "commons"-a set of resources shared by many, but owned by none. In this Commentary, the authors borrow from the work of Nobel Laureate Elinor Ostrum to describe the "design principles" necessary to build and maintain the set of common resources needed to successfully implement and sustain an IPE program. They interpret these principles in the context of their own experiences implementing IPE programs and recommend three institutional structural elements necessary to build and sustain an IPE program: (1) a representative governance body, (2) an accountable director or leader, and (3) a structure supporting vertical and horizontal communication and authority.

  16. Trends in task shifting in HIV treatment in Africa: Effectiveness, challenges and acceptability to the health professions

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Background Task shifting has been suggested to meet the demand for initiating and managing more patients on antiretroviral therapy. Although the idea of task shifting is not new, it acquires new relevance in the context of current healthcare delivery. Aim To appraise current trends in task shifting related to HIV treatment programmes in order to evaluate evidence related to the effectiveness of this strategy in addressing human resource constraints and improving patient outcomes, challenges identified in practice and the acceptability of this strategy to the health professions. Method Electronic databases were searched for studies published in English between January 2009 and December 2014. Keywords such as ‘task shifting’, ‘HIV treatment’, ‘human resources’ and ‘health professions’ were used. Results Evidence suggests that task shifting is an effective strategy for addressing human resource constraints in healthcare systems in many countries and provides a cost-effective approach without compromising patient outcomes. Challenges include inadequate supervision support and mentoring, absent regulatory frameworks, a lack of general health system strengthening and the need for monitoring and evaluation. The strategy generally seems to be accepted by the health professions although several arguments against task shifting as a long-term approach have been raised. Conclusion Task shifting occurs in many settings other than HIV treatment programmes and is viewed as a key strategy for governing human resources for healthcare. It may be an opportune time to review current task shifting recommendations to include a wider range of programmes and incorporate initiatives to address current challenges. PMID:26245622

  17. Interprofessional socialization as a way to introduce collaborative competencies to first-year health science students.

    PubMed

    DiVall, Margarita V; Kolbig, Leslie; Carney, Mary; Kirwin, Jennifer; Letzeiser, Christine; Mohammed, Shan

    2014-11-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is the cornerstone of preparing future health care providers but remains to be a challenge for many health science programs. We aimed to develop and evaluate an interprofessional conference for first-year health science students with goals to provide students with interprofessional socialization opportunity and introduce IPE principles. A half-day conference was based upon core competencies for health professionals and involved 277 first-year health sciences, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, and speech language pathology and audiology students. Alcohol and substance misuse was chosen as a topic for its relevance to college students and health professionals. Results from program evaluation revealed that the conference was successful in exposing students to core interprofessional competencies and provided useful information about alcohol and substance misuse. This study advocates for early inclusion of IPE in the health professions curricula in the form of interprofessional socialization.

  18. Health Professions Training and Nurse Education Improvement and Reauthorization Act of 1991. Report To Accompany S. 1933. 102d Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This document, submitted by Senator Kennedy, is the official Senate report on the authorization of the Health Professions Training and Nurse Education Improvement Act of 1991 (the reauthorization of the original Public Health Service Act)--legislation that provides for programs that support the training and education of professional health…

  19. Women's Leadership and Authority in the Health Professions. Proceedings of a Conference at UC Santa Cruz, June 19-21, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., San Francisco.

    The proceedings of a conference on women's leadership and authority in the health professions is presented. Following the opening remarks by Patricia Borne, speeches by Lucy Geiselman on the history of women in the health sciences and Sheryl Ruzek on the purpose of the conference are presented. The keynote address by Norma Juliet Wikler on the…

  20. A novel enrichment program using cascading mentorship to increase diversity in the health care professions.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Behnoosh; Santos, Rosanne; Angulo, Marco; Muratori, Walter

    2013-09-01

    The authors describe an innovative summer enrichment program based on a cascading mentorship model to transfer knowledge and skills from faculty to medical students to undergraduate students and finally to high school students. The program was designed to give high school students a glimpse of life in medical school and enhance the teaching and leadership skills of underrepresented undergraduate and medical students. Started in 2010 with 30 high school students and 9 college and medical student coaches, the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine Summer Premed Program expanded rapidly over the next two summers and enrolled a total of 253 high school students, 48 college students, and 12 medical students. The college and medical student coaches, the majority of whom were underrepresented in medicine (URIM), reported that the program enhanced their teaching and leadership skills and self-confidence, motivated them toward careers in academic medicine, and raised their awareness about the importance of cultural diversity. The authors present the details of this interactive, structured program and describe how URIM student empowerment, near-peer teaching, science socialization, and support from the institution's leadership and faculty members provided a climate that fostered belonging, a sense of personal transformation, and professional development among students from different levels of education and diverse backgrounds. Long-term follow-up of the participants' career choices is needed.

  1. Strategy and Action: Assessing Student-Led Culture Workshops within the Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King de Ramírez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    In order to prepare students to successfully engage with native speakers and members of heritage language communities both at home and abroad, educators must develop course curricula that emphasize cultural practices, products, perspectives, and comparisons as well as provide students with opportunities to directly apply the skills that they have…

  2. The Irrelevance of Student Teaching for Successful Induction into the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Louise M.

    Pertinent questions are raised which challenge the appropriateness of the student teaching experience. Research studies have shown that many beginning teachers found great difference between the more protected experience of student teaching and the real world of the beginning teacher who takes on the full responsibilities of the classroom. Future…

  3. Overcoming Biases to Effectively Serve African American College Students: A Call to the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Lonnie E.

    2005-01-01

    This article reexamines the help-seeking behavior of African American college students with a focus on possible counselor biases as well as biases in the settings in which counselors work. These issues are discussed as possible contributing factors to the underutilization of counseling by African American college students. Strategies to overcoming…

  4. Health workforce development in the European Union: A matrix for comparing trajectories of change in the professions.

    PubMed

    Pavolini, Emmanuele; Kuhlmann, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    This article assesses professional development trajectories in top-, middle- and basic-level health workforce groups (doctors, nurses, care assistants) in different European Union countries using available international databases. Three theoretical strands (labour market, welfare state, and professions studies) were connected to explore ideal types and to develop a matrix for comparison. With a focus on larger EU-15 countries and four different types of healthcare systems, Germany, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom serve as empirical test cases. The analysis draws on selected indicators from public statistics/OECD data and micro-data from the EU Labour Force Survey. Five ideal typical trajectories of professional development were identified from the literature, which served as a matrix to compare developments in the three health workforce groups. The results reveal country-specific trajectories with uneven professional development and bring opportunities for policy interventions into view. First, there is a need for integrated health labour market monitoring systems to improve data on the skills mix of the health workforce. Second, a relevant number of health workers with fixed contracts and involuntary part-time reveals an important source for better recruitment and retention strategies. Third, a general trend towards increasing numbers while worsening working conditions was identified across our country cases. This trend hits care assistants, partly also nurses, the most. The research illustrates how public data sources may serve to create new knowledge and promote more sustainable health workforce policy.

  5. Health workforce development in the European Union: A matrix for comparing trajectories of change in the professions.

    PubMed

    Pavolini, Emmanuele; Kuhlmann, Ellen

    2016-06-01

    This article assesses professional development trajectories in top-, middle- and basic-level health workforce groups (doctors, nurses, care assistants) in different European Union countries using available international databases. Three theoretical strands (labour market, welfare state, and professions studies) were connected to explore ideal types and to develop a matrix for comparison. With a focus on larger EU-15 countries and four different types of healthcare systems, Germany, Italy, Sweden and the United Kingdom serve as empirical test cases. The analysis draws on selected indicators from public statistics/OECD data and micro-data from the EU Labour Force Survey. Five ideal typical trajectories of professional development were identified from the literature, which served as a matrix to compare developments in the three health workforce groups. The results reveal country-specific trajectories with uneven professional development and bring opportunities for policy interventions into view. First, there is a need for integrated health labour market monitoring systems to improve data on the skills mix of the health workforce. Second, a relevant number of health workers with fixed contracts and involuntary part-time reveals an important source for better recruitment and retention strategies. Third, a general trend towards increasing numbers while worsening working conditions was identified across our country cases. This trend hits care assistants, partly also nurses, the most. The research illustrates how public data sources may serve to create new knowledge and promote more sustainable health workforce policy. PMID:27021776

  6. Third-Year Pharmacy Students' Work Experience and Attitudes and Perceptions of the Pharmacy Profession

    PubMed Central

    Schondelmeyer, Stephen W.; Hadsall, Ronald S.; Schommer, Jon C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To describe PharmD students' work experiences and activities; examine their attitudes towards their work; examine perceptions of preceptor pharmacists they worked with; and determine important issues associated with career preference. Methods A written survey was administered to third-year doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students at 8 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the Midwest. Results Five hundred thirty-three students (response rate = 70.4%) completed the survey instrument. Nearly 100% of PharmD students reported working in a pharmacy by the time their advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) began. Seventy-eight percent reported working in a community pharmacy, and 67% had worked in a chain community pharmacy. For all practice settings, students reported spending 69% of their time on activities such as compounding, dispensing, and distribution of drug products. Conclusions Most students are working in community pharmacy (mainly chain) positions where their primary function is traditional drug product dispensing and distribution. Having a controllable work schedule was the variable most strongly associated with career choice for all students. PMID:18698391

  7. Determinants and outcomes of motivation in health professions education: a systematic review based on self-determination theory

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed at conducting a systematic review in health professions education of determinants, mediators and outcomes of students’ motivation to engage in academic activities based on the self-determination theory’s perspective. Methods: A search was conducted across databases (MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases), hand-search of relevant journals, grey literature, and published research profile of key authors. Quantitative and qualitative studies were included if they reported research in health professions education focused on determinants, mediators, and/or outcomes of motivation from the self-determination and if meeting the quality criteria. Results: A total of 17 studies met the inclusion and quality criteria. Articles retrieved came from diverse locations and mainly from medical education and to a lesser extent from psychology and dental education. Intrapersonal (gender and personality traits) and interpersonal determinants (academic conditions and lifestyle, qualitative method of selection, feedback, and an autonomy supportive learning climate) have been reported to have a positive influence on students’ motivation to engage in academic activities. No studies were found that tested mediation effects between determinants and students’ motivation. In turn, students’ self-determined motivation has been found to be positively associated with different cognitive, affective, and behavioural outcomes. Conclusion: This study has found that generally, motivation could be enhanced by changes in the educational environment and by an early detection of students’ characteristics. Doing so may support future health practitioners’ self-determined motivation and positively influence how they process information and their emotions and how they approach their learning activities. PMID:27134006

  8. The Role of School Counselors in Meeting Students' Mental Health Needs: Examining Issues of Professional Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKruyf, Lorraine; Auger, Richard W.; Trice-Black, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    The professional identity of school counselors has evolved over time. This article traces the historical context driving this evolution, and suggests it is time for the profession to conjoin the roles of educational leader and mental health professional. This proposal is prompted by heightened awareness of unmet student mental health needs,…

  9. The Ethics of Care: Implications of Gilligan for the Student Services Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delworth, Ursula; Seeman, David

    1984-01-01

    Discusses Carol Gilligan's perspectives on the differences in male and female development, as stated in her 1982 book "In a Different Voice," in terms of implications for student services professionals. Presents several examples and related questions. (JAC)

  10. Does cheating by students undermine the integrity of the nursing profession?

    PubMed

    Glasper, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses the worrying media reports that suggest that large numbers of student nurses are cheating their way onto the professional register. PMID:27615531

  11. Does cheating by students undermine the integrity of the nursing profession?

    PubMed

    Glasper, Alan

    2016-09-01

    Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses the worrying media reports that suggest that large numbers of student nurses are cheating their way onto the professional register.

  12. An Educational Program for Underserved Middle School Students to Encourage Pursuit of Pharmacy and Other Health Science Careers

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thao T.; Tran, Linh

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop and implement an active, hands-on program for underrepresented minority (URM) seventh grade students and to determine if participation in the program increased interest in health care careers and understanding of pharmacy and physician assistant (PA) professions. Design. A hands-on educational program was developed in conjunction with local middle school administrators and staff for URM 7th grade students. The program was designed to be hands-on and focus on pharmacy and PA laboratory skills. A discussion component was included, allowing participants to interact personally with pharmacy and PA students and faculty members. Assessment. Students’ responses to survey questions about interest in health care careers and knowledge about health professions were compared before and after 2 separate offerings of the program. After the program, significant increases were seen in participants’ understanding of the pharmacy and PA professions. An increased percentage of participants reported interest in health care careers after the program than before the program. Conclusion. Introducing middle school-aged URM students to the pharmacy and PA professions through a hands-on educational program increased interest in, and knowledge of, these professions. PMID:26056405

  13. The impact of healthcare issues on the future of the nursing profession: the resulting increased influence of community-based and public health nursing.

    PubMed

    Swiadek, John W

    2009-01-01

    Several key issues, such as the necessity for cost containment, role conflicts between healthcare professions, nursing shortages, and organizational difficulties of healthcare organizations, significantly influence current healthcare delivery. These circumstances, which constitute a compelling need for responsive and effective change, are examined in terms of their impact upon the nursing profession. A review of the referenced journals and textbooks reveals that national nursing efforts will shift from acute care hospital-oriented provisions to community-based public health orientations. This evolution will result in improved health outcomes, less need for tertiary treatment, and savings for hospitals and insurance companies. PMID:19187050

  14. The professions.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2004-01-01

    The professions have been described in terms of their prestige and income, specialized skills and knowledge, protected markets, control over entry and discipline of members, common identity and values, long careers, managed relationships with nonprofessionals, licensure, ethics, and service to clients and the public. As useful as these characteristics are, they fail to capture the essence of the professions, especially the classic ones such as medicine and dentistry. A five-part definition is proposed, consisting of a community (including patient, professional, and peers), treating individuals in a customized private and personal fashion based on diagnosis, in a trusting relationship where the professional acts as an agent rather than engaging in economic exchanges. The evolution of the medical profession is discussed as an illustration of the way professions evolve and to reveal some of the historically "taken-for-granted" aspects of professionalism. The fact professional knowledge is both public and scientific and personal and unsusceptible to objective reduction is a paradox. The continued viability of professions such as dentistry depends on protecting against threats to the five essential characteristics that define professionalism. PMID:15948497

  15. INCREASING THE REPRESENTATION OF THE BLACK POPULATION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS IN CANADA.

    PubMed

    Vukic, Adele; Steenbeek, Audrey; Muxlow, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Increased representation of the Black population in the health care system is central to decrease health disparities, enhance access to services, and improve health outcomes and quality of care. Current strategies for recruitment and retention of the Black population in higher education in the health fields are explored. The added value of mentorship programs are presented as a promising approach for addressing the high rates of attrition of the Black population in health professional education institutions. PMID:27439230

  16. Teaching as a Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robards, Shirley N.

    2008-01-01

    The image of the schools and the teaching profession according to the media is usually negative. The negative picture is one reflecting the social problems of society and the failure of schools to educate, that is, drop-outs, teenage pregnancies, substance abuse, guns, knives, and attacks on students and teachers. Occasionally, the positive…

  17. Changing the Paradigm: Preparing Students for the Computing Profession in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Kay A.

    2003-01-01

    The dramatic technological developments of the past decade have led to a tremendous growth in the demand for computer science professionals well-versed in advanced technology and techniques. NASA, traditionally a haven for cutting-edge innovators, is now competing with every industrial and government sector for computer science talent. The computer science program at University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) faces challenges beyond those intrinsically presented by rapid technological change, because a significant number of UTSA students come from low-income families with no Internet or computer access at home. An examination of enrollment statistics for the computer science program at UTSA showed that very few students who entered as freshmen successfully graduated. The upper division courses appeared to be populated by graduate students removing deficiencies and by transfer students. The faculty was also concerned that the students who did graduate from the program did not have the strong technical and programming skills that the CS program had been noted for in the community during the 1980's.

  18. The Role of Health Services Research in the Renaissance of the Dental Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grembowski, David

    1997-01-01

    Recent Institute of Medicine directives for better use of oral health services can not be accomplished without health services research. One central research need concerns outcomes and effects of dental treatment. This will require better measures of a patient's oral health status, data on cost-effectiveness of common dental procedures, practice…

  19. Metropolis revisited: the evolving role of librarians in informatics education for the health professions

    PubMed Central

    King, Samuel B.; Lapidus, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The authors' goal was to assess changes in the role of librarians in informatics education from 2004 to 2013. This is a follow-up to “Metropolis Redux: The Unique Importance of Library Skills in Informatics,” a 2004 survey of informatics programs. Methods: An electronic survey was conducted in January 2013 and sent to librarians via the MEDLIB-L email discussion list, the library section of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the Medical Informatics Section of the Medical Library Association, the Information Technology Interest Group of the Association of College and Research Libraries/New England Region, and various library directors across the country. Results: Librarians from fifty-five institutions responded to the survey. Of these respondents, thirty-four included librarians in nonlibrary aspects of informatics training. Fifteen institutions have librarians participating in leadership positions in their informatics programs. Compared to the earlier survey, the role of librarians has evolved. Conclusions: Librarians possess skills that enable them to participate in informatics programs beyond a narrow library focus. Librarians currently perform significant leadership roles in informatics education. There are opportunities for librarian interdisciplinary collaboration in informatics programs. Implications: Informatics is much more than the study of technology. The information skills that librarians bring to the table enrich and broaden the study of informatics in addition to adding value to the library profession itself. PMID:25552939

  20. [Motives of the career choice and expectations of the profession in nursing students].

    PubMed

    Viet, A C

    1996-03-01

    Motivation in the choice of a career. What expectations do students-to-be have of nursing? Various groups of nursing students (n = 267) were questioned about reasons for their choice of career, and comparisons were made. In contrast to earlier research findings, there was a multitude of motives. One can no longer assume that nursing students are a homogeneous group. The intrinsic motivation, that of wanting to be useful, is still high, as in previous investigations. Extrinsic reasons (s.a. pay, conditions of work, etc.) which were previously hardly mentioned at all, have increasing importance. A further new reason given for the choice of the career is the opportunity it offers for personal development. It is no longer enough to assume that for future students the motivation of wanting to be useful can be taken for granted, and that all that is necessary for maintaining it, are satisfactory working conditions. In order to ensure job satisfaction and to prevent frustration it will be essential to create conditions which ensure that the motivation to be useful remains intact but which also promote personal growth and development. PMID:8715574

  1. The Student Affairs Profession: A Selective Bibliography. Revised Edition. ACPA Media Publication No. 46.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belson, Beverly; Stamatakos, Louis C.

    This bibliography contains a resource guide for persons working with students in postsecondary institutions. Selections related to historical perspectives and philosophical foundations are from materials written over more than 40 years. Entries primarily concerned with programmatic planning, organization, and administration have come predominantly…

  2. Journal Coverage of Issues Related to English Language Learners across Student-Service Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Craig A.; Hoffman, Alicia J.; Lundahl, Allison A.

    2009-01-01

    The number of students who are classified as English language learners (ELLs) is increasing within schools across the United States. Thus, it is important that school professionals have access to information regarding research-based assessment, prevention, and intervention practices that reflect the appropriate provision of services to this…

  3. Gender Barriers in the Legal Profession: Implications for Career Development of Female Law Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakauer, Lianne; Chen, Charles P.

    2003-01-01

    Examines some of the key issues pertinent to the life career development of female students in law schools. Explore gender-related psychosocial aspects, such as the differences between the career patterns of men and women. Several specific career counseling implications and strategies, aimed at addressing the unique needs of women studying in a…

  4. Serving Our Teaching Assistants and Our Profession: Teaching Graduate Students to Teach Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gracie, William J., Jr.

    There is a serious lack of interest in and concern for the training of graduate students (TAs) who teach most of the sections of college composition. Setting up a teacher training program in English departments still dominated by literature specialists is not an easy task, but there are some ways to change the negative climate. First, the…

  5. Differences between African-American and Caucasian Students on Enrollment Influences and Barriers in Kinesiology-Based Allied Health Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barfield, J. P.; Cobler, D. C.; Lam, Eddie T. C.; Zhang, James; Chitiyo, George

    2012-01-01

    Kinesiology departments have recently started to offer allied health education programs to attract additional students to teacher education units (9). Although allied health professions offer increased work opportunities, insufficient enrollment and training of minority students in these academic fields contribute to underrepresentation in the…

  6. The Role of Game Elements in Online Learning within Health Professions Education.

    PubMed

    Rojas, David; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Given the highly competitive and motivating nature of today's students, gamification, when properly implemented, can be an effective learning tool. Here we studied which gamification (gaming) elements that medical students would be interested in having when using an online learning system to acquire clinical skills. Focus groups sessions were held with medical students, game developers, and game designers to develop an understanding about their perception and preferences regarding gamification. Overall it was determined that gamification will lead to increased engagement and motivation and should include both competitive and social elements. PMID:27046600

  7. The Role of Game Elements in Online Learning within Health Professions Education.

    PubMed

    Rojas, David; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Given the highly competitive and motivating nature of today's students, gamification, when properly implemented, can be an effective learning tool. Here we studied which gamification (gaming) elements that medical students would be interested in having when using an online learning system to acquire clinical skills. Focus groups sessions were held with medical students, game developers, and game designers to develop an understanding about their perception and preferences regarding gamification. Overall it was determined that gamification will lead to increased engagement and motivation and should include both competitive and social elements.

  8. Health Literacy in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ickes, Melinda J.; Cottrell, Randall

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the health literacy levels, and the potential importance of healthy literacy, of college students. Participants: Courses were randomly selected from all upper level undergraduate courses at a large Research I university to obtain a sample size of N = 399. Methods: During the 2007-2008 school year,…

  9. Rethinking the future of tenure in the health professions: new wine in old bottles.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, J G

    1997-03-01

    The purpose and meaning of tenure and the tenets surrounding it are not likely to change. The uses of tenure and accountability on the part of the giver and holder of tenure are both under scrutiny. Tenure or the process for attaining it is not appropriate for health professionals who intend to be providers of health care. Not everyone needs to be tenure to perform a quality service. The constraints of tenure for today's practicing health professionals are discussed.

  10. Proceedings of the Western Regional Working Conference on "Ethnic Minorities and the Health Professions" (1st, Salt Lake City, Utah, March 23-25, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Boulder, CO.

    Sixty selected representatives from 13 western states, as well as other states throughout the U.S., gathered to share their concerns, exchange ideas, and demonstrate their unity for the continued expansion of the ethnic minority role within the health professions. Discussion centered on the degree of effectiveness of educational and governmental…

  11. The Promotion of Bottle Feeding by Multinational Corporations: How Advertising and the Health Professions Have Contributed. Cornell International Nutritioon Monograph Series, Number 2 (1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Ted; Latham, Michael C., Ed.

    This report investigates the ways bottle feeding of infants is promoted by multinational corporations. Data were obtained from the following: (1) a survey of available infant food advertising in newspapers and magazines from developing countries; (2) a study of some interrelationships between the health professions and infant food companies,…

  12. Development and Validation of Career Development Guidelines by Task/Activity Analysis of Occupational Safety and Health Professions: Industrial Hygiene and Safety Professional. Final Report. Technical Report XII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Ralph J.; And Others

    This report summarizes research findings which resulted in development of curricula for occupational safety and health professions based on task/activity analyses and related performance objectives. The first seven chapters focus on the seven objectives. Chapter 1, Literature Review and Selection of Employers, concerns tasks required for…

  13. Research to Practice in "The Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions": A Thematic Analysis of Volumes 1 through 24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntosh-Murray, Anu; Perrier, Laure; Davis, David

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Authors have stressed the importance of the broader contextual influences on practice improvement and learning and have expressed concern about gaps between research and practice. This implies a potential expansion of the knowledge base for continuing education in the health professions (CEHP) and an increased emphasis on research…

  14. Agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the School of Health Related Professions Faculty, July 1, 1986-June 30, 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and the School of Health Related Professions Faculty, an affiliate of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), covering the period July 1, 1986 through June 30, 1989, is presented. Topics covered include the following: preamble;…

  15. Enhancing Discipline-Specific Training across Allied Health Professions through Reflective Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Elaine; Wightman, Barbara; Rosenthal, Harold

    2010-01-01

    The professional preparation of allied health professionals typically focuses on the acquisition of knowledge in a particular area of expertise with less consideration of training on social-emotional development and on how to engage parents in the clinical process, parent-child relationships, or principles of mental health. The authors explore how…

  16. 76 FR 8748 - Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... health nursing, dentistry, psychiatry, osteopathy, optometry, pharmacy, psychology, public health, social...: Allopathic and Osteopathic. (b) Nurse: Associate, B.S., and M.S. Degree. (c) Clinical Psychology: Ph.D. and Psy.D. (d) Social Work: Masters level only. (e) Chemical Dependency Counseling: Baccalaureate...

  17. Teaching French as a Second Language for the Health Professions: Description of the Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mery-Gorrie, Rose

    The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, whose stated objective is to provide bilingual French-English services, has established a training program in French as a second language for health care professionals. The program was designed to provide health care providers with a minimum level of communicative competence in specific job-related…

  18. Allocation of health care resources: a challenge for the medical profession.

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, D; Linton, A L

    1986-01-01

    If current limitations on health care funding continue, medical practitioners will face increasing pressure to conserve scarce resources and to participate in the allocation of funds. This article discusses the ethical and economic aspects of the physician's role and briefly reviews some efficiency measures that might mitigate the effects of rationing of health care services. PMID:3080215

  19. 77 FR 6805 - Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of... Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: The Centers of Excellence (COE... comments that the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) received on the updates to...

  20. Mental Health Practitioners' Reflections on Psychological Work in Uganda: Exploring Perspectives from Different Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jennifer; d'Ardenne, Patricia; Nsereko, James; Kasujja, Rosco; Baillie, Dave; Mpango, Richard; Birabwa, Harriet; Hunter, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    The Butabika-East London Link collaborated with Ugandan mental health services to train mental health professionals (psychiatric clinical officers, "PCOs", and clinical psychologists and psychiatrists, "Core Group") in psychological therapies. The aims of this research were to investigate how professionals were applying and…

  1. Health care seeking behavior and perceptions of the medical profession among pre- and post-retirement age Dutch dancers.

    PubMed

    Air, Mamie

    2009-01-01

    A cross-sectional, descriptive survey and a medical chart review of 154 pre- and post-retirement age injured Dutch dancers were performed. The purpose was to examine dancers' health care seeking behavior and perceptions of the medical profession in context of the current health care system in The Netherlands, which includes both universal access and expertise in performing arts medicine. No logistical or perceptual restrictions to health care were reported by the dancers in this study. Only three younger dancers (< 35 years) lacked a primary care physician. No dancer reported monetary or insurance hindrances to acquiring an appointment or fear of going to the doctor. A small percentage of the younger group (18%), but none of the older dancers, reported that they felt the doctor would not understand them (chi(2) = 2.2, df = 1, p = 0.14). Dancers in both age groups most often sought first treatment from either a physiotherapist (36% to 40%) or a medical doctor (38.8% to 40.8%). When a physician was not consulted first, the primary reason was that dancers had already seen a physiotherapist and thought this treatment was sufficient. Approximately one-third of dancers expected their medical problem to go away on its own. Dutch dancers were additionally found to have a positive relationship with the medical profession, including high satisfaction and confidence. The majority of dancers were satisfied or very satisfied with their medical treatment prior to presenting to the dance medicine specialist (67% older dancers, 52% younger, chi(2) = 1.19, df = 1, p = 0.2). Nearly every dancer was satisfied or very satisfied after treatment by the specialist (100% older dancers, 93% younger dancers, chi(2) = 1.46, df = 1, p = 0.2), and moderately or completely confident of full recovery (80%, each group). Differences in older and younger dancers' perceptions and behaviors were nevertheless found. Older dancers were significantly more likely to continue to dance when injured than

  2. Nursing in Canada: a profession.

    PubMed

    Kopinak, J K

    1990-01-01

    The headlines scream out: "Hospitals alarmed as disgruntled nurses flee profession". "Living with death; the strains of daily tragedy feed chronic shortage of nurses". "Ministry should encourage alternative health care". "BC nurses set to withdraw services". As the provincial health care system falters and nurses, the very core of health care, flee the profession, politicians scramble to find answers. And so is Janice Kopinak, who takes a deep look at the current nurses' revolution and sees a glimmer of hope for change.

  3. Reflection and Reflective Practice in Health Professions Education: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Karen; Gordon, Jill; MacLeod, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The importance of reflection and reflective practice are frequently noted in the literature; indeed, reflective capacity is regarded by many as an essential characteristic for professional competence. Educators assert that the emergence of reflective practice is part of a change that acknowledges the need for students to act and to think…

  4. Work Values of Freshmen in Allied Health and Helping Professions: A Comparative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avi-Itzhak, Tamara E.; Ben-Shem, Idit

    1993-01-01

    A survey of Israeli first-year college students enrolled in occupational therapy (55), special education (33), nursing (88), and physical therapy (44) found significant differences in the work values of those in therapy-oriented versus service-oriented fields. For occupational therapists, job-related aesthetics were most important, management…

  5. Costs of Education in the Health Professions: Report of a Study Parts I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Resources Development.

    This report contains aggregate data on costs for all schools of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, veterinary medicine, and nursing, and the average education costs per student in these fields for a sample of schools during the 1972-73 academic year. Context for the study is provided by an appraisal of the educational…

  6. Implementing change in health professions education: stakeholder analysis and coalition building.

    PubMed

    Baum, Karyn D; Resnik, Cheryl D; Wu, Jennifer J; Roey, Steven C

    2007-01-01

    The challenges facing the health sciences education fields are more evident than ever. Professional health sciences educators have more demands on their time, more knowledge to manage, and ever-dwindling sources of financial support. Change is often necessary to either keep programs viable or meet the changing needs of health education. This article outlines a simple but powerful three-step tool to help educators become successful agents of change. Through the application of principles well known and widely used in business management, readers will understand the concepts behind stakeholder analysis and coalition building. These concepts are part of a powerful tool kit that educators need in order to become effective agents of change in the health sciences environment. Using the example of curriculum change at a school of veterinary medicine, we will outline the three steps involved, from stakeholder identification and analysis to building and managing coalitions for change.

  7. Implementing change in health professions education: stakeholder analysis and coalition building.

    PubMed

    Baum, Karyn D; Resnik, Cheryl D; Wu, Jennifer J; Roey, Steven C

    2007-01-01

    The challenges facing the health sciences education fields are more evident than ever. Professional health sciences educators have more demands on their time, more knowledge to manage, and ever-dwindling sources of financial support. Change is often necessary to either keep programs viable or meet the changing needs of health education. This article outlines a simple but powerful three-step tool to help educators become successful agents of change. Through the application of principles well known and widely used in business management, readers will understand the concepts behind stakeholder analysis and coalition building. These concepts are part of a powerful tool kit that educators need in order to become effective agents of change in the health sciences environment. Using the example of curriculum change at a school of veterinary medicine, we will outline the three steps involved, from stakeholder identification and analysis to building and managing coalitions for change. PMID:17446631

  8. Deadly professions: violent attacks against aid-workers and the health implications for local populations

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Jason-Louis; Karamouzian, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    War has devastating implications for families, communities, cultures, economies, and state infrastructure. Similarly, the last decade has seen an increase in the number of attacks against health workers in conflict zones and unstable environments. Unfortunately, these attacks have grave consequences for local populations which often rely on foreign aid programs for their health and well-being. As such, this paper will examine why aid-workers have increasingly been targeted for abductions, ambushes, assassinations, and various forms of intimidation. Furthermore, examples of terminated health programs, as well as populations served by current medical and humanitarian interventions, will be provided to impart a sense of magnitude and importance of health programs to the reader. Lastly, suggestions will be presented which could serve to minimize aid-workers’ risk and exposure to acts of violence in the field. PMID:24639979

  9. Intention to Work with Individuals with Dual Diagnosis: Testing the Theory of Planned Behavior among Students from Various Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Shirli

    2012-01-01

    Providing holistic care to individuals with the dual diagnosis (DD) of intellectual disability and mental illness is a challenging task that requires the work of various health care specialists. The aim of the current study was to examine the intentions of students from various fields to work with individuals with DD. A questionnaire was completed…

  10. Managerial leadership for research use in nursing and allied health care professions: a narrative synthesis protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses and allied health care professionals (physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech and language pathologists, dietitians) form more than half of the clinical health care workforce and play a central role in health service delivery. There is a potential to improve the quality of health care if these professionals routinely use research evidence to guide their clinical practice. However, the use of research evidence remains unpredictable and inconsistent. Leadership is consistently described in implementation research as critical to enhancing research use by health care professionals. However, this important literature has not yet been synthesized and there is a lack of clarity on what constitutes effective leadership for research use, or what kinds of intervention effectively develop leadership for the purpose of enabling and enhancing research use in clinical practice. We propose to synthesize the evidence on leadership behaviours amongst front line and senior managers that are associated with research evidence by nurses and allied health care professionals, and then determine the effectiveness of interventions that promote these behaviours. Methods/Design Using an integrated knowledge translation approach that supports a partnership between researchers and knowledge users throughout the research process, we will follow principles of knowledge synthesis using a systematic method to synthesize different types of evidence involving: searching the literature, study selection, data extraction and quality assessment, and analysis. A narrative synthesis will be conducted to explore relationships within and across studies and meta-analysis will be performed if sufficient homogeneity exists across studies employing experimental randomized control trial designs. Discussion With the engagement of knowledge users in leadership and practice, we will synthesize the research from a broad range of disciplines to understand the key elements of leadership

  11. The effects of hospital characteristics and radical organizational change on the relative standing of health care professions.

    PubMed

    Leicht, K T; Fennell, M L; Witkowski, K M

    1995-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of hospital characteristics and radical organizational change on the relative representation of health care professions in hospitals over the period of the 1980s. Health care organizations, and hospitals in particular, represent organizations where multiple professional groups make competing claims of expertise that often conflict. The question our research seeks to answer is whether different constellations of organizational characteristics and organizational changes affect the outcome of these professional conflicts. Using the annual census of hospitals compiled by the American Hospital Association, we examine the effects of several characteristics of community hospitals on the relative representation of specific professional groups. We find that hospital mergers favor physicians at the expense of administrators, and multihospital system affiliation favors technical core occupations at the expense of administrators. Measures of organizational growth and decline increase the relative representation of physicians and administrators compared to nurses, and increase the probability that hospitals will employ physicians' assistants and nurse practitioners. Our results are evaluated in light of recent developments in the sociology of medicine and research on the relative standing of occupations in other industries.

  12. Health Professions and Nurse Education. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, on H.R. 2405.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    The Subcommittee on Health and the Environment met to receive testimony on federal health professions programs authorized by Titles VII and VIII of the Public Health Service Act. These programs are slated for repeal by the Bush Administration in 1992. In particular the subcommittee heard testimony on the subject of critical shortages in training…

  13. Evaluation of high-school health science careers program impact on student retention and careers.

    PubMed

    Zavattieri, Lillian; D'Anna, Suzanne; Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to longitudinally measure the impact of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-School of Health Related Professions high-school Health Science Careers program on student retention in health careers. Students (n = 1,218) who earned college credit in the program from 1996 to 2002 were surveyed. The response rate was 17% of the total and 21% of the deliverable surveys. Students were equally distributed between vocational, comprehensive, and academy-type schools. Ninety-seven percent of the students continued their education after high school, with 70% attending 4-year colleges. Forty-nine percent of those entering 2-year colleges and 57% of those entering 4-year colleges pursued health-related careers. Ninety-five percent perceived the Health Science Careers program as valuable. The findings suggest that the Health Science Careers program was helpful in guiding students toward health-related professions. The evaluation helped to understand the impact and to realize the positive and negative aspects of the program by the respondents.

  14. Observations on the 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Turco, Mary G; Baron, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions took place in San Diego, California, March 17-19, 2016. Hosts were the Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME), Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professionals (ACEhp), and Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME). The target audience was the international community working to improve medical (CME), nursing (CNE), pharmacy (CPE), and interprofessional (CIPE) continuing education (CE) and continuing professional development (CPD). Goals included: addressing patients' concerns and needs; advancing global medical and interprofessional health sciences education; utilizing learning to address health disparities; and promoting international cooperation. The five keynote speakers were: patient advocate Alicia Cole ("Why What We Do Matters: The Patients Voice"); linguist Lorelei Lingard ("Myths about Healthcare Teamwork and Their Implications for How We Understand Competence"); futurist and philosopher Alex Jadad ("What Do We Need to Protect at All Costs in the 21st Century?"); ethicist and change agent Zeke Emanuel ("Learn to Change: Teaching Toward a Shifting Healthcare Horizon"); and technology innovator Stephen Downes ("From Individual to Community: The Learning Is in the Doing"). Organizers announced the new Dave Davis Distinguished Award for Excellence in Mentorship in Continuing Professional Development to honor the career of David Davis, MD, in CME/CPD scholarship in Canada, the United States, and beyond. Participants valued the emphasis on interprofessional education and practice, the importance of integrating the patient voice, the effectiveness of flipped classroom methods, and the power of collective competency theories. Attendee-respondents encouraged Congress planners to continue to strive for a broad global audience and themes of international interest. PMID:27584068

  15. Observations on the 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions.

    PubMed

    Turco, Mary G; Baron, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 World Congress on Continuing Professional Development: Advancing Learning and Care in the Health Professions took place in San Diego, California, March 17-19, 2016. Hosts were the Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME), Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professionals (ACEhp), and Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education (SACME). The target audience was the international community working to improve medical (CME), nursing (CNE), pharmacy (CPE), and interprofessional (CIPE) continuing education (CE) and continuing professional development (CPD). Goals included: addressing patients' concerns and needs; advancing global medical and interprofessional health sciences education; utilizing learning to address health disparities; and promoting international cooperation. The five keynote speakers were: patient advocate Alicia Cole ("Why What We Do Matters: The Patients Voice"); linguist Lorelei Lingard ("Myths about Healthcare Teamwork and Their Implications for How We Understand Competence"); futurist and philosopher Alex Jadad ("What Do We Need to Protect at All Costs in the 21st Century?"); ethicist and change agent Zeke Emanuel ("Learn to Change: Teaching Toward a Shifting Healthcare Horizon"); and technology innovator Stephen Downes ("From Individual to Community: The Learning Is in the Doing"). Organizers announced the new Dave Davis Distinguished Award for Excellence in Mentorship in Continuing Professional Development to honor the career of David Davis, MD, in CME/CPD scholarship in Canada, the United States, and beyond. Participants valued the emphasis on interprofessional education and practice, the importance of integrating the patient voice, the effectiveness of flipped classroom methods, and the power of collective competency theories. Attendee-respondents encouraged Congress planners to continue to strive for a broad global audience and themes of international interest.

  16. Associations Between Type of Health Profession and Judgments About Prevention of Sickling Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headings, Verle E.

    1976-01-01

    There are substantial clues that patient behavior with regard to disease treatment and prevention is a partial derivative of the quality of the patient-doctor relationship. Evidence is presented that suggests physicians and nurses are more directive regarding genetic counseling than are health professionals in the counseling field. (LBH)

  17. In Situ Simulation in Continuing Education for the Health Care Professions: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Michael A.; Hunt, Elizabeth A.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Federowicz, Molly A.; Weaver, Sallie J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Education in the health sciences increasingly relies on simulation-based training strategies to provide safe, structured, engaging, and effective practice opportunities. While this frequently occurs within a simulation center, in situ simulations occur within an actual clinical environment. This blending of learning and work…

  18. 78 FR 7787 - Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ..., social work, marriage and family therapy, chiropractic medicine, environmental health and engineering, an... Dietitian. (t) Engineering (Environmental): B.S. (Engineers must provide environmental engineering services... Corps of the PHS; or (C) Meet the professional standards for civil service employment in the IHS; or...

  19. Strengthening faculty recruitment for health professions training in basic sciences in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Simuyemba, Moses; Talib, Zohray; Michelo, Charles; Mutale, Wilbroad; Zulu, Joseph; Andrews, Ben; Nzala, Selestine; Katubulushi, Max; Njelesani, Evariste; Bowa, Kasonde; Maimbolwa, Margaret; Mudenda, John; Mulla, Yakub

    2014-08-01

    Zambia is facing a crisis in its human resources for health, with deficits in the number and skill mix of health workers. The University of Zambia School of Medicine (UNZA SOM) was the only medical school in the country for decades, but recently it was joined by three new medical schools--two private and one public. In addition to expanding medical education, the government has also approved several allied health programs, including pharmacy, physiotherapy, biomedical sciences, and environmental health. This expansion has been constrained by insufficient numbers of faculty. Through a grant from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), UNZA SOM has been investing in ways to address faculty recruitment, training, and retention. The MEPI-funded strategy involves directly sponsoring a cohort of faculty at UNZA SOM during the five-year grant, as well as establishing more than a dozen new master's programs, with the goal that all sponsored faculty are locally trained and retained. Because the issue of limited basic science faculty plagues medical schools throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, this strategy of using seed funding to build sustainable local capacity to recruit, train, and retain faculty could be a model for the region. PMID:25072591

  20. Strengthening Faculty Recruitment for Health Professions Training in Basic Sciences in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Simuyemba, Moses; Talib, Zohray; Michelo, Charles; Mutale, Wilbroad; Zulu, Joseph; Andrews, Ben; Katubulushi, Max; Njelesani, Evariste; Bowa, Kasonde; Maimbolwa, Margaret; Mudenda, John; Mulla, Yakub

    2014-01-01

    Zambia is facing a crisis in its human resources for health (HRH), with deficits in the number and skill mix of health workers. The University of Zambia School of Medicine (UNZA SOM) was the only medical school in the country for decades, but recently it was joined by three new medical schools—two private and one public. In addition to expanding medical education, the government has also approved several allied health programs, including pharmacy, physiotherapy, biomedical sciences, and environmental health. This expansion has been constrained by insufficient numbers of faculty. Through a grant from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), UNZA SOM has been investing in ways to address faculty recruitment, training, and retention. The MEPI-funded strategy involves directly sponsoring a cohort of faculty at UNZA SOM during the five-year grant, as well as establishing more than a dozen new master’s programs, with the goal that all sponsored faculty are locally trained and retained. Because the issue of limited basic science faculty plagues medical schools throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, this strategy of using seed funding to build sustainable local capacity to recruit, train, and retain faculty could be a model for the region. PMID:25072591

  1. Strengthening faculty recruitment for health professions training in basic sciences in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Simuyemba, Moses; Talib, Zohray; Michelo, Charles; Mutale, Wilbroad; Zulu, Joseph; Andrews, Ben; Nzala, Selestine; Katubulushi, Max; Njelesani, Evariste; Bowa, Kasonde; Maimbolwa, Margaret; Mudenda, John; Mulla, Yakub

    2014-08-01

    Zambia is facing a crisis in its human resources for health, with deficits in the number and skill mix of health workers. The University of Zambia School of Medicine (UNZA SOM) was the only medical school in the country for decades, but recently it was joined by three new medical schools--two private and one public. In addition to expanding medical education, the government has also approved several allied health programs, including pharmacy, physiotherapy, biomedical sciences, and environmental health. This expansion has been constrained by insufficient numbers of faculty. Through a grant from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), UNZA SOM has been investing in ways to address faculty recruitment, training, and retention. The MEPI-funded strategy involves directly sponsoring a cohort of faculty at UNZA SOM during the five-year grant, as well as establishing more than a dozen new master's programs, with the goal that all sponsored faculty are locally trained and retained. Because the issue of limited basic science faculty plagues medical schools throughout Sub-Saharan Africa, this strategy of using seed funding to build sustainable local capacity to recruit, train, and retain faculty could be a model for the region.

  2. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... Education Nursing Traineeship Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS... Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) program. Effective fiscal year (FY) 2014, AENT support for part-time... practitioners and nurse midwives. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joan Wasserman, DrPH, RN, Advanced...

  3. Multicultural Education in the Mental Health Professions: A Meta-Analytic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy B.; Constantine, Madonna G.; Dunn, Todd W.; Dinehart, Jared M.; Montoya, Jared A.

    2006-01-01

    The American Psychological Association and many other professional mental health organizations require graduate programs to provide education in multicultural issues. However, the effectiveness of multicultural education has been debated in the literature over the past several years. The overall purpose of this study was to examine the…

  4. Health Professions for the Next Decade--A Function of Health Policy. The Third Mary E. Switzer Memorial Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, C. Arden

    1975-01-01

    The decade ahead will probably see dramatic role changes in health services: (1) higher degree of public accountability, (2) a better definition of human rights to health services, (3) new career opportunities institutionalized into broad community health programs, and (4) increased importance of health program administrators. (MW)

  5. A comparative analysis of moral principles and behavioral norms in eight ethical codes relevant to health sciences librarianship, medical informatics, and the health professions

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Gary D.; Winkelstein, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Based on the authors' shared interest in the interprofessional challenges surrounding health information management, this study explores the degree to which librarians, informatics professionals, and core health professionals in medicine, nursing, and public health share common ethical behavior norms grounded in moral principles. Methods: Using the “Principlism” framework from a widely cited textbook of biomedical ethics, the authors analyze the statements in the ethical codes for associations of librarians (Medical Library Association [MLA], American Library Association, and Special Libraries Association), informatics professionals (American Medical Informatics Association [AMIA] and American Health Information Management Association), and core health professionals (American Medical Association, American Nurses Association, and American Public Health Association). This analysis focuses on whether and how the statements in these eight codes specify core moral norms (Autonomy, Beneficence, Non-Maleficence, and Justice), core behavioral norms (Veracity, Privacy, Confidentiality, and Fidelity), and other norms that are empirically derived from the code statements. Results: These eight ethical codes share a large number of common behavioral norms based most frequently on the principle of Beneficence, then on Autonomy and Justice, but rarely on Non-Maleficence. The MLA and AMIA codes share the largest number of common behavioral norms, and these two associations also share many norms with the other six associations. Implications: The shared core of behavioral norms among these professions, all grounded in core moral principles, point to many opportunities for building effective interprofessional communication and collaboration regarding the development, management, and use of health information resources and technologies. PMID:25349543

  6. The Dalhousie Health Mentors Program: introducing students to collaborative patient/client-centered practice.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Shelley; Andrews, Cynthia; Godden-Webster, Anne L; Lauckner, Heidi; Nasser, Susan

    2012-07-01

    The Dalhousie Health Mentors Program builds on a long history of interprofessional health education initiatives by introducing students in health and social care professions to chronic conditions and disabilities, patient/client-centredness, interprofessional learning, and team functioning. This large interprofessional education program (16 participating programs, 650 students) connects interprofessional student teams with Health Mentors, who are adult volunteers with chronic conditions, for a learning experience that extends over one academic year. Students explore their mentor's life story and chronic condition journey, the impact the condition has had on her/his life, and her/his experience with health care in general and interprofessional collaboration in particular. All aspects of the program planning, management, implementation, and evaluation have been interprofessional in nature. Lessons have been learned regarding. PMID:22524980

  7. Characteristics of early adopters of end-user online searching in the health professions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J G

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines end-user, online searching using data from a questionnaire mailed to 150 Canadian health professionals in practice settings. The response rate was 83% (n = 124). The data provide a demographic profile of early adopters of end-user searching in the health care community. Positive correlations with the user's level of implementation of end-user searching were found for the following variables: amount of time spent in research activities, amount of system training received, and use of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). There was a negative association between the amount of time spent in patient care and implementation level. General practitioners and family physicians had lower implementation levels than physicians in other specialties. Successful implementers were more likely to be computer literate and to place a high value on formal information sources such as books, journals, and libraries. Health professionals using so-called "user-friendly" or menu-based software had lower levels of personal commitment to using online databases, as measured by a combination of continuance of use, willingness to pay personally, type of recommendations made to colleagues, and hardware ownership.

  8. To what extent does the Health Professions Admission Test-Ireland predict performance in early undergraduate tests of communication and clinical skills? – An observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Internationally, tests of general mental ability are used in the selection of medical students. Examples include the Medical College Admission Test, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test and the UK Clinical Aptitude Test. The most widely used measure of their efficacy is predictive validity. A new tool, the Health Professions Admission Test- Ireland (HPAT-Ireland), was introduced in 2009. Traditionally, selection to Irish undergraduate medical schools relied on academic achievement. Since 2009, Irish and EU applicants are selected on a combination of their secondary school academic record (measured predominately by the Leaving Certificate Examination) and HPAT-Ireland score. This is the first study to report on the predictive validity of the HPAT-Ireland for early undergraduate assessments of communication and clinical skills. Method Students enrolled at two Irish medical schools in 2009 were followed up for two years. Data collected were gender, HPAT-Ireland total and subsection scores; Leaving Certificate Examination plus HPAT-Ireland combined score, Year 1 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores (Total score, communication and clinical subtest scores), Year 1 Multiple Choice Questions and Year 2 OSCE and subset scores. We report descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients and Multiple linear regression models. Results Data were available for 312 students. In Year 1 none of the selection criteria were significantly related to student OSCE performance. The Leaving Certificate Examination and Leaving Certificate plus HPAT-Ireland combined scores correlated with MCQ marks. In Year 2 a series of significant correlations emerged between the HPAT-Ireland and subsections thereof with OSCE Communication Z-scores; OSCE Clinical Z-scores; and Total OSCE Z-scores. However on multiple regression only the relationship between Total OSCE Score and the Total HPAT-Ireland score remained significant; albeit the

  9. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radis, Molly E.; Updegrove, Stephen C.; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A.

    2016-01-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result,…

  10. Discrepancies between Students' Health Education Knowledge and Health Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afaga, Lorna; And Others

    Although most health education programs have focused on knowledge as the major outcome, there is conflicting information about the impact of knowledge-based programs on health behaviors. This study compared student health knowledge and health practices by administering tests and questionnaires to 1,371 students in grades three and six, and junior…

  11. Health Educator Believability and College Student Self-Rated Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zullig, Keith J.; Reger-Nash, Bill; Valois, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the self-rated health (SRH) status among college students who reported receiving the majority of their health-related information from health educators. Participants: Students (n = 49,921) who completed the 2006 National College Health Association survey. Methods: Bivariate associations between SRH and the believability of…

  12. Distance learning in the health professions: on the verge of collapse or poised to soar?

    PubMed

    Campbell, C A

    2001-01-01

    Distance education provides universal access to education. While the issue of access to education is seemingly resolved, the question "what is the best way to teach?" remains. Thomas Jefferson espoused the creation of the academic village to foster broad, intensive scholarship. John Dewey, Ralph W. Tyler, Malcolm S. Knowles, and Alexander W. Astin echo Jefferson's ideals. To ensure excellence in distance learning, a disciplined rethinking of teaching and a reordering of academic priorities is essential. If consumer confidence in the academy is to be restored, there must be a return to collegial leadership in: defining institutional purpose and resource commitment, improving teacher competence, honing curricular content, perfecting interactive learning, selecting students, and designing outcome measures for both teaching and learning. Then, and only then, will distance learning be ready for "prime time."

  13. eHealth Literacy Among College Students: A Systematic Review With Implications for eHealth Education

    PubMed Central

    Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don; Tennant, Bethany; Chavarria, Enmanuel Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Background eHealth literacy refers to the ability of individuals to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic resources and apply such knowledge to addressing or solving a health problem. While the current generation of college students has access to a multitude of health information on the Internet, access alone does not ensure that students are skilled at conducting Internet searches for health information. Ensuring that college students have the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct advanced eHealth searches is an important responsibility particularly for the medical education community. It is unclear if college students, especially those in the medical and health professions, need customized eHealth literacy training for finding, interpreting, and evaluating health- and medical-related information available on the Internet. Objective The objective of our review was to summarize and critically evaluate the evidence from existing research on eHealth literacy levels among college students between the ages of 17 and 26 years attending various 4-year colleges and universities located around the world. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review on numerous scholarly databases using various combinations of relevant search terms and Boolean operators. The records were screened and assessed for inclusion in the review based on preestablished criteria. Findings from each study that met inclusion criteria were synthesized and summarized into emergent themes. Results In the final review we analyzed 6 peer-reviewed articles and 1 doctoral dissertation that satisfied the inclusion criteria. The number of participants in each reviewed study varied widely (from 34 to 5030). The representativeness of the results from smaller studies is questionable. All studies measured knowledge and/or behaviors related to college student ability to locate, use, and evaluate eHealth information. These studies indicated that many college students lack

  14. A national survey of admissions criteria and processes in selected allied health professions.

    PubMed

    Scott, A H; Chase, L M; Lefkowitz, R; Morton-Rias, D; Chambers, C; Joe, J; Holmes, G; Bloomberg, S

    1995-01-01

    A national survey of admissions criteria and procedures was conducted for allied health programs in diagnostic medical imaging, health information management, nurse-midwifery, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and physician assistant education. From a sample of 462, 63.2% responded. The survey canvassed general program information, prerequisites, admissions procedures, and demographic trends. Respondents were primarily from public institutions with faculty actively involved in admissions. The most common prerequisites were anatomy/physiology, physics, biology, chemistry, and psychology; and the most frequently required admissions criteria were GPA, references, interviews, science GPA, and writing sample. Standardized tests were rarely utilized. The following were the major prerequisite characteristics and skills considered: academic skills, communication skills, problem-solving abilities, maturity/confidence, motivation, and work/study habits. Changing demographics were reported, including an increase in second-career, older, and ethnically diverse applicants. Also discussed were nontraditional and minority applicant admissions issues. Future research suggestions include use of noncognitive variables, and academic and clinical outcome studies. The utility of this information for validation/revision of admissions criteria are presented. PMID:7642442

  15. Communication in Health Professions: A European consensus on inter- and multi-professional learning objectives in German.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Cadja; Kiessling, Claudia; Härtl, Anja; Haak, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Hintergrund und Zielsetzung: Kommunikation rückt in den Gesundheitsberufen zunehmend in den Blickpunkt. Die Vermittlung kommunikativer Kompetenzen sollte bereits im Studium bzw. in der Ausbildung beginnen.Ziel des Projekts war, einen englischsprachigen Ausbildungszielkatalog für die Kommunikation in den Gesundheitsberufen, das „Health Professions Core Communication Curriculum (HPCCC)“, ins Deutsche zu übersetzen und einer breiten deutschsprachigen Öffentlichkeit zugänglich zu machen. Der Katalog umfasst 61 Ausbildungsziele und wurde von 121 internationalen Kommunikationsexperten konsentiert. Ein europäischer Bezugsrahmen für die inter- und multiprofessionelle Curriculumentwicklung „Kommunikation in den Gesundheitsberufen“ im deutschsprachigen Raum sollte hergestellt werden.Methode: Die deutschsprachige Version des HPCCC wurde von sechs Personen entwickelt und in mehreren Revisionsschleifen konsentiert. Beispielhaft wurden Ausbildungsziele mit geeigneten didaktischen Methoden und Prüfungsinstrumenten aus der Materialiensammlung des teaching committee of the European Association for Communication Health Care (tEACH) versehen. Ergebnisse: Die Ausbildungsziele des HPCCC liegen nun in deutscher Version vor und können für die Curriculumsplanung und -entwicklung in den einzelnen deutschsprachigen Gesundheitsberufen aber auch berufsübergreifend genutzt werden. Anwendungsbeispiele für didaktische Methoden und Prüfungsinstrumente werden aufgelistet und zeigen konkrete Umsetzungsmöglichkeiten auf.Fazit: Die deutschsprachige Version des HPCCC, die Ausbildungsziele für die Kommunikation in den Gesundheitsberufen aufzeigt, kann einen wichtigen Beitrag zur inter- und multiprofessionellen Curriculumentwicklung in den Gesundheitsberufen im deutschen Sprachraum leisten. Beispiele für didaktische Methoden und Prüfungen aus der Materialiensammlung der tEACH ergänzen das curriculare Konzept und sollen Anregungen für die praktische Umsetzung der

  16. Intention to work with individuals with dual diagnosis: testing the theory of planned behavior among students from various professions.

    PubMed

    Werner, Shirli

    2012-05-01

    Providing holistic care to individuals with the dual diagnosis (DD) of intellectual disability and mental illness is a challenging task that requires the work of various health care specialists. The aim of the current study was to examine the intentions of students from various fields to work with individuals with DD. A questionnaire was completed by 512 social work, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, special education, and nursing students in Israel to measure students' attitudes toward working with individuals with DD, as well as their perceptions of subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy. Structural equation modeling showed that the students' intentions to work with individuals with DD were predicted by their attitudes and perceptions of subjective norms. Controllability was found to negatively affect their behavioral intentions. Furthermore, social work and nursing students were found to have the lowest behavioral intentions. Given the lack of education in the field of DD and the prevailing stigmatic attitudes toward this population, university programs should focus on increasing knowledge, promoting positive contact, and reducing the fear attached to working with people with DD. PMID:23029975

  17. Intention to work with individuals with dual diagnosis: testing the theory of planned behavior among students from various professions.

    PubMed

    Werner, Shirli

    2012-05-01

    Providing holistic care to individuals with the dual diagnosis (DD) of intellectual disability and mental illness is a challenging task that requires the work of various health care specialists. The aim of the current study was to examine the intentions of students from various fields to work with individuals with DD. A questionnaire was completed by 512 social work, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy, special education, and nursing students in Israel to measure students' attitudes toward working with individuals with DD, as well as their perceptions of subjective norms, controllability, and self-efficacy. Structural equation modeling showed that the students' intentions to work with individuals with DD were predicted by their attitudes and perceptions of subjective norms. Controllability was found to negatively affect their behavioral intentions. Furthermore, social work and nursing students were found to have the lowest behavioral intentions. Given the lack of education in the field of DD and the prevailing stigmatic attitudes toward this population, university programs should focus on increasing knowledge, promoting positive contact, and reducing the fear attached to working with people with DD.

  18. eHealth in Belgium, a new "secure" federal network: role of patients, health professions and social security services.

    PubMed

    France, Francis Roger

    2011-02-01

    eHealth platform is the official federal network in Belgium (created by law on 21 August 2008) devoted to a secure exchange of health data in many types of applications, such as health care purposes, simplification of administrative procedures and contribution to health policy. It implies a controlled access to decentralized databases and uses encrypted personal data. The national identification number has been chosen in order to authenticate the requester, the patient, and the receiver of information exchange. Authorizations have to be respected in order to obtain personal health data. Several questions are raised about its security: the lack of mandatory request for systematic journaling on accesses to the electronic patient record as well as the absence of explicit procedures for sanctions in case of unauthorized access, the new role of social security administration in managing security where a eHealth manager can be both judge and party (in the function of trusted third party for health data encryption and of a required lawyer for texts proposed by physicians to the Commission for the protection of private life). Another critic concerns the number of physicians in minority and the absence of patients' delegates in the eHealth Board. At a time when the patient is becoming a partner in the care team, should not he be the gate-keeper for the access to his own health record? How could networks help him to get the appropriate knowledge to contribute to care and to write his testament of life? Recent laws (on private life, patient rights and euthanasia) have contributed to a behavioural change in citizens and physician attitudes. Recommendations are made in order to improve the acceptability of eHealth platform.

  19. International Students, University Health Centers, and Memorable Messages about Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmack, Heather J.; Bedi, Shireen; Heiss, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    International students entering US universities often experience a variety of important socialization messages. One important message is learning about and using the US health system. International students often first encounter the US health system through their experiences with university health centers. The authors explore the memorable…

  20. Everyday Health Communication Experiences of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Leslie; Egbert, Nichole; Ho, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined college students' day-to-day health communication experiences. Participants: A convenience sample of 109 midwestern university students participated in the study. Methods: The participants completed health communication diaries for 2 weeks, generating 2,185 records. Frequent health topics included nutrition and…

  1. The Teaching Profession: High School Senior Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Jane; And Others

    Information from this study is intended to provide schools of education with high school students' perceptions of the teaching profession. Questionnaires submitted to students were designed to: (1) identify high school seniors' perceptions of the profession; (2) determine whether differences exist between groups categorized on the basis of sex and…

  2. Gaps and gains from engaging districts stakeholders for community-based health professions education in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Okello, Elialilia S; Nankumbi, Joyce; Ruzaaza, Gad Ndaruhutse; Bakengesa, Evelyn; Gumikiriza, Joy; Arubaku, Wilfred; Acio, Christine; Samantha, Mary; Matte, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Community-based education research and service (COBERS) is a brand of community-based education that has been adopted by the Medical Education and Service for All Ugandans consortium. The COBERS programme is aimed at equipping students in health professional education with the knowledge, attitudes and skills required to provide appropriate health care services. For sustainability purposes, the health professional training institutions have made efforts to involve various stakeholders in the implementation of the programme. However, the actual engagement process and outcome of such efforts have not been documented. This paper documents gaps and gains made in engaging district stakeholders for community-based education. Key informant interviews, focus group discussions and document review were used to collect data. Atlas.ti, computer software for qualitative data was used to aid analysis. The analysis revealed that the adopted engagement model has registered some gains including increased awareness among district leaders about potential opportunities offered by COBERS such as boosting of human resources at health facilities, opportunities for professional development for health care workers at health facilities, and establishment of linkages between prospective employees and employers. However, the engagement model left some gaps in terms of knowledge, awareness and ownership of the programme among some sections of stakeholders. The apparent information gap about the programme among district stakeholders, especially the political leadership, may hinder concerted partnership. The findings highlight the need for health professional education institutions to broaden the scope of actively engaged stakeholders with the district level. PMID:26556225

  3. Gaps and gains from engaging districts stakeholders for community-based health professions education in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Okello, Elialilia S; Nankumbi, Joyce; Ruzaaza, Gad Ndaruhutse; Bakengesa, Evelyn; Gumikiriza, Joy; Arubaku, Wilfred; Acio, Christine; Samantha, Mary; Matte, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Community-based education research and service (COBERS) is a brand of community-based education that has been adopted by the Medical Education and Service for All Ugandans consortium. The COBERS programme is aimed at equipping students in health professional education with the knowledge, attitudes and skills required to provide appropriate health care services. For sustainability purposes, the health professional training institutions have made efforts to involve various stakeholders in the implementation of the programme. However, the actual engagement process and outcome of such efforts have not been documented. This paper documents gaps and gains made in engaging district stakeholders for community-based education. Key informant interviews, focus group discussions and document review were used to collect data. Atlas.ti, computer software for qualitative data was used to aid analysis. The analysis revealed that the adopted engagement model has registered some gains including increased awareness among district leaders about potential opportunities offered by COBERS such as boosting of human resources at health facilities, opportunities for professional development for health care workers at health facilities, and establishment of linkages between prospective employees and employers. However, the engagement model left some gaps in terms of knowledge, awareness and ownership of the programme among some sections of stakeholders. The apparent information gap about the programme among district stakeholders, especially the political leadership, may hinder concerted partnership. The findings highlight the need for health professional education institutions to broaden the scope of actively engaged stakeholders with the district level.

  4. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health.

    PubMed

    Radis, Molly E; Updegrove, Stephen C; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A

    2016-04-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result, nurses' time is poorly utilized and students may suffer adverse outcomes including delayed school entry. In response to this pressing public health issue, a school medical advisor and director of school nurses in a local health department successfully negotiated access for school nurses to three health record systems: a state immunization tracking system, an electronic lead surveillance program, and an electronic health record system. This negotiation process is presented within a framework of the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation and provides a strategy for other school nurses seeking access to student health information. PMID:26547091

  5. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health.

    PubMed

    Radis, Molly E; Updegrove, Stephen C; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A

    2016-04-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result, nurses' time is poorly utilized and students may suffer adverse outcomes including delayed school entry. In response to this pressing public health issue, a school medical advisor and director of school nurses in a local health department successfully negotiated access for school nurses to three health record systems: a state immunization tracking system, an electronic lead surveillance program, and an electronic health record system. This negotiation process is presented within a framework of the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation and provides a strategy for other school nurses seeking access to student health information.

  6. Using Competency-Based Digital Open Learning Activities to Facilitate and Promote Health Professions Education (OLAmeD): A Proposal

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background Traditional learning in medical education has been transformed with the advent of information technology. We have recently seen global initiatives to produce online activities in an effort to scale up learning opportunities through learning management systems and massive open online courses for both undergraduate and continued professional education. Despite the positive impact of such efforts, factors such as cost, time, resources, and the specificity of educational contexts restrict the design and exchange of online medical educational activities. Objective The goal is to address the stated issues within the health professions education context while promoting learning by proposing the Online Learning Activities for Medical Education (OLAmeD) concept which builds on unified competency frameworks and generic technical standards for education. Methods We outline how frameworks used to describe a set of competencies for a specific topic in medical education across medical schools in the United States and Europe can be compared to identify commonalities that could result in a unified set of competencies representing both contexts adequately. Further, we examine how technical standards could be used to allow standardization, seamless sharing, and reusability of educational content. Results The entire process of developing and sharing OLAmeD is structured and presented in a set of steps using as example Urology as a part of clinical surgery specialization. Conclusions Beyond supporting the development, sharing, and repurposing of educational content, we expect OLAmeD to work as a tool that promotes learning and sets a base for a community of medical educational content developers across different educational contexts. PMID:27390226

  7. Empathy levels among health professional students: a cross-sectional study at two universities in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted; McKenna, Lisa; Boyle, Malcolm J; Palermo, Claire; Nestel, Debra; Brightwell, Richard; McCall, Louise; Russo, Verity

    2014-01-01

    Background Empathy is paramount in the health care setting, optimizing communication and rapport with patients. Recent empirical evidence suggests that empathy is associated with improved clinical outcomes. Therefore, given the importance of empathy in the health care setting, gaining a better understanding of students’ attitudes and self-reported empathy is important. The objective of this study was to examine self-reported empathy levels of students enrolled in different health disciplines from two large Australian universities. Materials and methods A total of 1,111 students from two different universities enrolled in eight different health professions were administered the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy – Health Profession Students version, a 20-item 7-point Likert scale questionnaire to evaluate self-reported empathy levels. Results A total of 1,111 students participated in this study. The majority of participants were from Monash University (n=771), with 340 students from Edith Cowan University. No statistically significant differences were found between universities: Monash University (mean 110.1, standard deviation [SD] 11.8); Edith Cowan University (mean 109.2, SD 13.3, P=0.306). The mean female empathy score (mean 110.8, SD 11.7) was significantly higher than the mean male score (mean 105.3, SD 13.5; P<0.0001; d=0.44). Paramedic students had significantly lower empathy scores (mean 106.3, SD 12.73) than all other participants except nursing students (P<0.0001). Conclusion Results relating to sex are reflective of previous studies. There is some discrepancy in results relating to empathy and its incline/decline as students progress through a program. Further study is warranted to explore why there are variations in empathy levels in students of different health disciplines. PMID:24833947

  8. Building interdisciplinary teamwork among allied health students through live clinical case simulations.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Janet R; Rathsack, Christi; Downs, David; Jorgensen, Kathy; Karges, Joy R; Nelson, Debralee

    2008-01-01

    A limited, yet growing, body of research suggests that health care students educated in interdisciplinary teamwork may become more collaborative professionals in the workplace, which, in turn, may foster more productive and satisfied health care professionals. Researchers also have identified lower mortality and morbidity rates, fewer hospitalizations, decreased costs, and improved function by patients among significant health benefits of interdisciplinary teamwork, especially when it is applied to underserved and geriatric populations. Such positive outcomes have prompted medical schools and accreditation boards of many allied health professions to add interdisciplinary education into their training requirements. Meeting these requirements has challenged universities, where there are multiple allied health programs and limited time, faculty, and financial resources to coordinate interdisciplinary education. The challenges have been magnified by insufficient research on the most effective methods to educate university students about interdisciplinary teamwork. This article presents the background, evolution, and key building blocks of one such method: a simulation-based workshop designed at our university over 7 years to educate its allied health students about various health professions through shared learning, interaction, and collaboration.

  9. A Perception Study of Computer Science and Information Systems Students on Bullying Prevalence in the Information Systems Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, James; Molluzzo, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Bullying is considered to be omnipresent in business firms and prevalent in entrepreneurial firms in information systems and in departments of information systems in industry. Entrepreneurialism and narcissism of personalities in the information systems profession may be perceived as especially predisposed to bullying. The authors of this paper…

  10. Sexual identity and anticipated occupation of male and female allied health and medical students.

    PubMed

    Clerc, J M

    1985-02-01

    The general purpose of this study was to help delineate the relationship among sex-stereotypic attributes, gender, and occupational choice in the health professions. Specifically, the study attempted to determine if there were differences in perceptions of sex-stereotypic attributes among four groups of individuals: male medical students, female medical students, male allied health students, and female allied health students. It was found that there were significant differences among the four previously described groups on their sex-role perceptions as measured by the Bem Inventory. This variance can be attributed to the main effect of gender. Occupation was found not to be a significant variable in explaining variance among the four groups on their masculinity, femininity, and androgyny scores. Likewise, androgyny scores did not distinguish individuals in traditional careers from those in non-traditional careers. PMID:3980293

  11. Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advertise a Job Explore a Career in Health Sciences Information Whether you're a high school student ... this rewarding, challenging profession. What is a health sciences or medical librarian? What do they do? Health ...

  12. Distance Learning and the Health Professions: A Synthesis Report of the Literature Investigating Continuing Professional Health Education at a Distance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Noseworthy, Tanya

    This synthesis report provides an extensive overview of literature evaluating use and effectiveness of distance learning technologies in delivering continuing education (CE) for health professionals. Chapter 2 discusses advantages and disadvantages of correspondence materials, explores suggestions for improving print-based learning materials, and…

  13. Federal Health Care Planning: Impact on the Student Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogen, Gerald K.

    1978-01-01

    Major proposals for national health insurance are surveyed with regard to the alternative impacts on the student health center enterprise, and suggestions are made for preparing for and directing the impact. (Author/DS)

  14. Survey of mental health of foreign students.

    PubMed

    Sam, D L; Eide, R

    1991-01-01

    The multifaceted nature of problems foreign students face have led some researchers to conclude that these students tend to suffer from poor health during their overseas sojourn. This assertion is examined among foreign students at the University of Bergen by means of a questionnaire survey. Loneliness, tiredness, sadness and worrying were reported as a frequent source of problem by nearly one in four of over 300 respondents. Students reported a decline in their general state of health as well as a rise in the occurrence of syndrome-like tendencies resembling paranoia, anxiety, depression and somatic complaints. These tendencies were attributed to certain psychosocial factors such as information received regarding study opportunities, social contacts with other tenants in the hall of residence and future job opportunities. Scandinavian students on the whole tended to have better mental health than students from the other countries. The implications of impaired health among foreign students is discussed. PMID:2047794

  15. The Significant Contribution of Student Health Services to Student Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Susan

    This document, put together by the Director of Santa Barbara City College Student Health Service, discusses how in the 108 community colleges in California the student health centers are in danger as administrators ponder budget cuts. To clarify the gravity of the situation, the report focuses on the Santa Barbara City College (SBCC) Student…

  16. Student Debt and Its Relation to Student Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Richard; Barkham, Michael; Audin, Kerry; Bradley, Margaret; Davy, John

    2004-01-01

    The present paper provides an analysis of the relationship between attitudes toward debt and mental health among university undergraduates. Data were collected from the same cohort of students across their three years of university, with responses from 2146, 1360 and 1391 first, second and third year students, respectively. Mental health was…

  17. The development and evaluation of online stories to enhance clinical learning experiences across health professions in rural Australia.

    PubMed

    Paliadelis, Penny Susan; Stupans, Leva; Parker, Vicki; Piper, Donella; Gillan, Pauline; Lea, Jackie; Jarrott, Helen Mary; Wilson, Rhonda; Hudson, Judith N; Fagan, Anthea

    2015-01-01

    Clinical placement learning experiences are integral to all health and medical curricula as a means of integrating theory into practice and preparing graduates to deliver safe, high-quality care to health consumers. A growing challenge for education providers is to access sufficient clinical placements with experienced supervisors who are skilled at maximising learning opportunities for students. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of an innovative online learning program aimed at enhancing student and clinical supervisors' preparedness for effective workplace-based learning. The evidence-based learning program used 'story-telling' as the learning framework. The stories, which were supported by a range of resources, aimed to engage the learners in understanding student and supervisor responsibilities, as well as the expectations and competencies needed to support effective learning in the clinical environment. Evaluation of this program by the learners and stakeholders clearly indicated that they felt authentically 'connected' with the characters in the stories and developed insights that suggested effective learning had occurred.

  18. The development and evaluation of online stories to enhance clinical learning experiences across health professions in rural Australia.

    PubMed

    Paliadelis, Penny Susan; Stupans, Leva; Parker, Vicki; Piper, Donella; Gillan, Pauline; Lea, Jackie; Jarrott, Helen Mary; Wilson, Rhonda; Hudson, Judith N; Fagan, Anthea

    2015-01-01

    Clinical placement learning experiences are integral to all health and medical curricula as a means of integrating theory into practice and preparing graduates to deliver safe, high-quality care to health consumers. A growing challenge for education providers is to access sufficient clinical placements with experienced supervisors who are skilled at maximising learning opportunities for students. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of an innovative online learning program aimed at enhancing student and clinical supervisors' preparedness for effective workplace-based learning. The evidence-based learning program used 'story-telling' as the learning framework. The stories, which were supported by a range of resources, aimed to engage the learners in understanding student and supervisor responsibilities, as well as the expectations and competencies needed to support effective learning in the clinical environment. Evaluation of this program by the learners and stakeholders clearly indicated that they felt authentically 'connected' with the characters in the stories and developed insights that suggested effective learning had occurred. PMID:26775526

  19. Guidelines for Health Services for Migrant Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazicich, Mirko, Ed.

    This publication provides a standard by which California migrant education health staff can plan, implement, and evaluate a health program for students in grades K-12. Following sections which describe current state legislation, the need for health services, and California's objectives and activities regarding health services for migrant students…

  20. Counseling the Chronically Health Impaired Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Brian, Comp.; And Others

    The role of counselors in working with chronically health impaired students is examined, and illustrations of the Chronic Health Impaired/Sickle Cell Anemia Program in Baltimore (MD) are presented. The importance of setting goals with the student is underlined, as is the necessity for counselors to have proper flexibility and time to devote to…

  1. Health-Promoting Behaviours in Conservatoire Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreutz, Gunter; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on health-promoting behaviours in students from two conservatoires, the Royal Northern College of Music (RNCM, Manchester, UK; n =199) and the Royal College of Music (RCM, London, UK; n = 74). The research questions concern (a) the levels and types of health-promoting behaviours among performance students and (b) the association…

  2. Evaluation of a Student Health Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Patricia C.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Analyzes the reaction of 53 medical students to their work experience in 3 poverty areas of California during the summer of 1967. They and 50 students from other professional schools were placed by The Student Health Organization in dental, community, and Planned Parenthood clinics, county hospitals, school districts, and Head Start programs. (WM)

  3. College Student Adjustment and Health Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Lisa Anne

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between student adjustment theory and college student health behaviors. Specifically, this research examined first-year freshmen college student physical activity and nutrition behaviors and impact on adjustment to college (N = 37,564). The design for this study was a non-experimental "ex post facto"…

  4. The student health collaboration: an innovative approach to enhancing communication and improving student health.

    PubMed

    Guilday, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    Students, families, school staff and school nurses all benefit from successful community partnerships. School nurses requested improved communication with local clinicians and access to the health information of their students. School nurses were not routinely recognized as part of the care team and therefore were not able to access protected health information found in the medical record, which would improve health outcomes for their students. With a goal of improving student health outcomes, a local pediatric health care delivery system partnered with school nurses to share student health information. School nurses were included as part of the health care team, with access to electronic health records. This is an innovative coordinated care team approach with parents, nurses, and community clinicians able to communicate, plan, intervene, and evaluate student health.

  5. Curricular transformation of health professions education in Tanzania: the process at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (2008-2011).

    PubMed

    Ngassapa, Olipa D; Kaaya, Ephata E; Fyfe, Molly V; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Kakoko, Deodatus C; Kayombo, Edmund J; Kisenge, Rodrick R; Loeser, Helen; Mwakigonja, Amos R; Outwater, Anne H; Martin-Holland, Judy; Mwambete, Kennedy D; Kida, Irene; Macfarlane, Sarah B

    2012-01-01

    Tanzania requires more health professionals equipped to tackle its serious health challenges. When it became an independent university in 2007, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) decided to transform its educational offerings to ensure its students practice competently and contribute to improving population health. In 2008, in collaboration with the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), all MUHAS's schools (dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health and social sciences) and institutes (traditional medicine and allied health sciences) began a university-wide process to revise curricula. Adopting university-wide committee structures, procedures, and a common schedule, MUHAS faculty set out to: (i) identify specific competencies for students to achieve by graduation (in eight domains, six that are inter-professional, hence consistent across schools); (ii) engage stakeholders to understand adequacies and inadequacies of current curricula; and (iii) restructure and revise curricula introducing competencies. The Tanzania Commission for Universities accredited the curricula in September 2011, and faculty started implementation with first-year students in October 2011. We learned that curricular revision of this magnitude requires: a compelling directive for change, designated leadership, resource mobilization inclusion of all stakeholders, clear guiding principles, an iterative plan linking flexible timetables to phases for curriculum development, engagement in skills training for the cultivation of future leaders, and extensive communication.

  6. Interprofessional Education (IPE) Activity amongst Health Sciences Students at Sultan Qaboos University: The time is now!

    PubMed

    Inuwa, Ibrahim M

    2012-11-01

    Historically, health professionals have been educated in profession-specific institutions which provide limited opportunities for learning interprofessional (IP) skills. Many qualified practitioners are therefore poorly prepared for the challenges of IP practice (IPP). Patients today have complex needs and typically require more than one professional to address their medical issues and effective IP care relies upon health care professionals' abilities to communicate with one another. Competent communication improves the quality of care, thus enhancing patient outcomes. The objective of IP education (IPE) is to prepare students to deliver IP care in the future. Sultan Qaboos University's medical and nursing colleges train the future health workforce for Oman. However, students have no opportunities for collaborative learning. It is imperative that opportunities be created where students learn with, about, and from each other with the aim of improving the quality of care they are likely to deliver in the future. PMID:23275839

  7. Interprofessional Education (IPE) Activity amongst Health Sciences Students at Sultan Qaboos University

    PubMed Central

    Inuwa, Ibrahim M.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, health professionals have been educated in profession-specific institutions which provide limited opportunities for learning interprofessional (IP) skills. Many qualified practitioners are therefore poorly prepared for the challenges of IP practice (IPP). Patients today have complex needs and typically require more than one professional to address their medical issues and effective IP care relies upon health care professionals’ abilities to communicate with one another. Competent communication improves the quality of care, thus enhancing patient outcomes. The objective of IP education (IPE) is to prepare students to deliver IP care in the future. Sultan Qaboos University’s medical and nursing colleges train the future health workforce for Oman. However, students have no opportunities for collaborative learning. It is imperative that opportunities be created where students learn with, about, and from each other with the aim of improving the quality of care they are likely to deliver in the future. PMID:23275839

  8. Allied Health Core Curriculum: Its Time Has Come

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, M. LaCheeta

    2004-01-01

    There is lack of a clear definition regarding an allied health core curriculum. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Bureau of Health Professions use the following to define a core curriculum: "A set of interdisciplinary courses, clinical training, and other educational exposures designed to provide allied health students at each level…

  9. Health Care for College Students

    MedlinePlus

    ... t exercise or play through pain. Mononucleosis ("Mono") College students often worry about a disease called " mono "—also ... Additional Information: Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students Healthy Tips for College Freshman Encouraging Teens to ...

  10. College Health Professionals and Academic Librarians: Collaboration for Student Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallyburton, Ann; Kolenbrander, Nancy; Robertson, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    College health professionals must find new ways of educating students on finding and evaluating consumer health information, specifically in the online environment. Librarians are trained as information professionals; however, librarians at general academic libraries are not taking a lead role in providing consumer health information. Objective:…

  11. The Paradox of Our Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ann M.; Panter, Suzanna L.

    2015-01-01

    The school library profession has gone through an evolution since its inception in the early 1900s. School librarians hold strong to unwavering core principles that remain true throughout time. Students today are tech-savvy consumers of information. With smartphones and tablets galore at their fingertips, they have access to all the knowledge of…

  12. College Admission: Profession or Industry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how the condition and fate of both the college admissions profession and liberal arts education are linked, and how they are both threatened by elements of commercialism. Argues for reasserting professionalism by looking beyond the competitive advantage of the college's interest to serve a broader function as trustees of students'…

  13. Professing faith, professing medicine: Physicians and the call to evangelize.

    PubMed

    Bochanski, Philip G

    2014-02-01

    THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH TRADITIONALLY ESTABLISHES MEDICINE AS A PROFESSION: A career, or vocation based on the professing of an oath regarding personal and public behavior. For Catholic physicians, the commitments of the Oath of Hippocrates take on new meaning when seen in light of the promises made at Baptism and renewed every Easter. This paper, originally an address to medical students, considers the role of Catholic physicians as evangelizers, those who spread the message and values of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. PMID:24899735

  14. Professing faith, professing medicine: Physicians and the call to evangelize

    PubMed Central

    Bochanski, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hippocratic Oath traditionally establishes medicine as a profession: A career, or vocation based on the professing of an oath regarding personal and public behavior. For Catholic physicians, the commitments of the Oath of Hippocrates take on new meaning when seen in light of the promises made at Baptism and renewed every Easter. This paper, originally an address to medical students, considers the role of Catholic physicians as evangelizers, those who spread the message and values of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. PMID:24899735

  15. Student learning outcomes associated with video vs. paper cases in a public health dentistry course.

    PubMed

    Chi, Donald L; Pickrell, Jacqueline E; Riedy, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Educational technologies such as video cases can improve health professions student learning outcomes, but few studies in dentistry have evaluated video-based technologies. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes associated with video and paper cases used in an introductory public health dentistry course. This was a retrospective cohort study with a historical control group. Based on dual coding theory, the authors tested the hypotheses that dental students who received a video case (n=37) would report better affective, cognitive, and overall learning outcomes than students who received a paper case (n=75). One-way ANOVA was used to test the hypotheses across ten cognitive, two affective, and one general assessment measures (α=0.05). Students in the video group reported a significantly higher overall mean effectiveness score than students in the paper group (4.2 and 3.3, respectively; p<0.001). Video cases were also associated with significantly higher mean scores across the remaining twelve measures and were effective in helping students achieve cognitive (e.g., facilitating good discussions, identifying public health problems, realizing how health disparities might impact their future role as dentists) and affective (e.g., empathizing with vulnerable individuals, appreciating how health disparities impact real people) goals. Compared to paper cases, video cases significantly improved cognitive, affective, and overall learning outcomes for dental students.

  16. Engaging students in community health: a public health advocacy curriculum.

    PubMed

    Curran, Nell; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn

    2014-03-01

    Individual risk assessment and behavior change dominate the content of high school health education instruction whereas broader social, political, and economic factors that influence health-known as upstream causes-are less commonly considered. With input from instructors and students, we developed a 10-lesson experiential Public Health Advocacy Curriculum that uses classroom-based activities to teach high school students about the upstream causes of health and engages them in community-based health advocacy. The Curriculum, most suitable for health- or advocacy-related elective classes or after-school programs, may be taught in its entirety or as single lessons integrated into existing coursework. Although students at many schools are using the Curriculum, it has been formally evaluated with 110 predominantly Latino students at one urban and one semirural public high school in Northern California (six classes). In pre-post surveys, students showed highly significant and positive changes in the nine questions that covered the three main Curriculum domains (Upstream Causes, Community Exploration, and Public Health Advocacy), p values .02 to <.001. The Curriculum is being widely disseminated without charge to local, national, and international audiences, with the objective of grooming a generation of youth who are committed to the public health perspective to health. PMID:23975798

  17. Health, sustainability and student travel.

    PubMed

    Green, Gill; Morris, Jenny; Wade, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    A survey of 246 pre-registration nursing students in a University in the South West of England was carried out to explore the impact of course related travel on the student experience. Results from the survey indicated that students' main mode of transport to practice placements was by car which reflects the rural nature of the South West and the relative paucity of public transport. Long distances that many students travel to their study centre and to placements, and the concurrent financial strain that this creates, impacted negatively on the student experience. Students recognised the need to travel to a place of study and clinical placements and suggestions of minimising the negative impact of travel were offered. These included the increased use of electronic delivery of lectures, attendance at local university premises, the provision of shared transport to placements and placements closer to the student's home. Few students, however, considered the environmental impact of travel. Higher Education Institutions need to address issues of sustainability through promoting student wellbeing and taking steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is therefore important that student awareness of sustainability related issues is increased as well as focusing on reducing the environmental impact through organisational change.

  18. Mental health of students: position statement.

    PubMed

    Blackborow, May; Tuck, Christine; Lambert, Patrice; Disney, Jody; Porter, Jessica; Jordan, Alicia

    2014-11-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that mental health is as critical to academic success as physical well-being. Registered professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) serve a vital role in the school community by promoting positive mental health outcomes in students through school/community evidence-based programs and curricula. As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses collaborate with school personnel, community health care professionals, students, and families, in the assessment, identification, intervention, referral, and follow-up of children in need of mental health services. School nurses are uniquely qualified to identify students with potential mental health problems. In addition, school nurses serve as advocates, facilitators, and counselors of mental health services both within the school environment and in the community. PMID:25417334

  19. Mental health of students: position statement.

    PubMed

    Blackborow, May; Tuck, Christine; Lambert, Patrice; Disney, Jody; Porter, Jessica; Jordan, Alicia

    2014-11-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that mental health is as critical to academic success as physical well-being. Registered professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) serve a vital role in the school community by promoting positive mental health outcomes in students through school/community evidence-based programs and curricula. As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses collaborate with school personnel, community health care professionals, students, and families, in the assessment, identification, intervention, referral, and follow-up of children in need of mental health services. School nurses are uniquely qualified to identify students with potential mental health problems. In addition, school nurses serve as advocates, facilitators, and counselors of mental health services both within the school environment and in the community.

  20. National Library of Medicine Web Resources for Student Health Professionals

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, R.

    2010-04-02

    Familiarize students affiliated with the Student National Medical Association with the National Library of Medicine's online resources that address medical conditions, health disparities, and public health preparedness needs.