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Sample records for health record phr

  1. What Is a Personal Health Record (PHR)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a PHR? Information for Caregivers Avoiding Medical Identity Theft Why Should You Keep a PHR? How ... Will Choose a PHR PHR Video Library Medical Identity Theft Response Checklist Preparing for a Doctor’s Visit ...

  2. The use of biometrics in the Personal Health Record (PHR).

    PubMed

    Bonney, Wilfred

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of the Personal Health Record (PHR) has made individual health information more readily accessible to a wide range of users including patients, consumers, practitioners, and healthcare providers. However, increased accessibility of PHR threatens the confidentiality, privacy, and security of personalized health information. Therefore, a need for robust and reliable forms of authentication is of prime concern. The concept of biometric authentication is now highly visible to healthcare providers as a technology to prevent unauthorized access to individual health information. Implementing biometric authentication mechanisms to protect PHR facilitates access control and secure exchange of health information. In this paper, a literature review is used to explore the key benefits, technical barriers, challenges, and ethical implications for using biometric authentication in PHR. PMID:21335696

  3. The use of biometrics in the Personal Health Record (PHR).

    PubMed

    Bonney, Wilfred

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of the Personal Health Record (PHR) has made individual health information more readily accessible to a wide range of users including patients, consumers, practitioners, and healthcare providers. However, increased accessibility of PHR threatens the confidentiality, privacy, and security of personalized health information. Therefore, a need for robust and reliable forms of authentication is of prime concern. The concept of biometric authentication is now highly visible to healthcare providers as a technology to prevent unauthorized access to individual health information. Implementing biometric authentication mechanisms to protect PHR facilitates access control and secure exchange of health information. In this paper, a literature review is used to explore the key benefits, technical barriers, challenges, and ethical implications for using biometric authentication in PHR.

  4. The value of personal health record (PHR) systems.

    PubMed

    Kaelber, David; Pan, Eric C

    2008-11-06

    Personal health records (PHRs) are a rapidly growing area of health information technology despite a lack of significant value-based assessment.Here we present an assessment of the potential value of PHR systems, looking at both costs and benefits.We examine provider-tethered, payer-tethered, and third-party PHRs, as well as idealized interoperable PHRs. An analytical model was developed that considered eight PHR application and infrastructure functions. Our analysis projects the initial and annual costs and annual benefits of PHRs to the entire US over the next 10 years.This PHR analysis shows that all forms of PHRs have initial net negative value. However, at the end of 10 years, steady state annual net value ranging from$13 billion to -$29 billion. Interoperable PHRs provide the most value, followed by third-party PHRs and payer-tethered PHRs also showing positive net value. Provider-tethered PHRs constantly demonstrating negative net value.

  5. Secure Dynamic access control scheme of PHR in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Liu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chen, Chin-Sheng; Bau, Jian-Guo; Lin, Tzu-Ching

    2012-12-01

    With the development of information technology and medical technology, medical information has been developed from traditional paper records into electronic medical records, which have now been widely applied. The new-style medical information exchange system "personal health records (PHR)" is gradually developed. PHR is a kind of health records maintained and recorded by individuals. An ideal personal health record could integrate personal medical information from different sources and provide complete and correct personal health and medical summary through the Internet or portable media under the requirements of security and privacy. A lot of personal health records are being utilized. The patient-centered PHR information exchange system allows the public autonomously maintain and manage personal health records. Such management is convenient for storing, accessing, and sharing personal medical records. With the emergence of Cloud computing, PHR service has been transferred to storing data into Cloud servers that the resources could be flexibly utilized and the operation cost can be reduced. Nevertheless, patients would face privacy problem when storing PHR data into Cloud. Besides, it requires a secure protection scheme to encrypt the medical records of each patient for storing PHR into Cloud server. In the encryption process, it would be a challenge to achieve accurately accessing to medical records and corresponding to flexibility and efficiency. A new PHR access control scheme under Cloud computing environments is proposed in this study. With Lagrange interpolation polynomial to establish a secure and effective PHR information access scheme, it allows to accurately access to PHR with security and is suitable for enormous multi-users. Moreover, this scheme also dynamically supports multi-users in Cloud computing environments with personal privacy and offers legal authorities to access to PHR. From security and effectiveness analyses, the proposed PHR access

  6. Governance for personal health records.

    PubMed

    Reti, Shane R; Feldman, Henry J; Safran, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Personal health records (PHR) are a modern health technology with the ability to engage patients more fully in their healthcare. Despite widespread interest, there has been little discussion around PHR governance at an organizational level. We develop a governance model and compare it to the practices of some of the early PHR adopters, including hospitals and ambulatory care settings, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Decision-making structures varied between organizations. Business operations were present in all groups, but patients were not represented in any of the governance structures surveyed. To improve patient-centered care, policy making for PHRs needs to include patient representation at a governance level.

  7. Are Personal Health Records Safe? A Review of Free Web-Accessible Personal Health Record Privacy Policies

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several obstacles prevent the adoption and use of personal health record (PHR) systems, including users’ concerns regarding the privacy and security of their personal health information. Objective To analyze the privacy and security characteristics of PHR privacy policies. It is hoped that identification of the strengths and weaknesses of the PHR systems will be useful for PHR users, health care professionals, decision makers, and designers. Methods We conducted a systematic review using the principal databases related to health and computer science to discover the Web-based and free PHR systems mentioned in published articles. The privacy policy of each PHR system selected was reviewed to extract its main privacy and security characteristics. Results The search of databases and the myPHR website provided a total of 52 PHR systems, of which 24 met our inclusion criteria. Of these, 17 (71%) allowed users to manage their data and to control access to their health care information. Only 9 (38%) PHR systems permitted users to check who had accessed their data. The majority of PHR systems used information related to the users’ accesses to monitor and analyze system use, 12 (50%) of them aggregated user information to publish trends, and 20 (83%) used diverse types of security measures. Finally, 15 (63%) PHR systems were based on regulations or principles such as the US Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Health on the Net Foundation Code of Conduct (HONcode). Conclusions Most privacy policies of PHR systems do not provide an in-depth description of the security measures that they use. Moreover, compliance with standards and regulations in PHR systems is still low. PMID:22917868

  8. Development of a metabolic syndrome personal health record system.

    PubMed

    López, Diego M; Álvarez-Rosero, Rosa E; Sierra-Torres, Carlos H

    2015-01-01

    According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), a quarter of the world population is affected with metabolic syndrome (MS). The paper describes the development process of a Personal Health Record System (PHR) for the management of MS. Following the recommendations of ISO 9241-210:2010, a PHR for the promotion of physical activity and healthy nutrition was implemented. PMID:25980887

  9. Personal health records: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Fevrier-Thomas, U; Lokker, C; McKibbon, K A; Straus, S E

    2011-01-01

    Electronic personal health record systems (PHRs) support patient centered healthcare by making medical records and other relevant information accessible to patients, thus assisting patients in health self-management. We reviewed the literature on PHRs including design, functionality, implementation, applications, outcomes, and benefits. We found that, because primary care physicians play a key role in patient health, PHRs are likely to be linked to physician electronic medical record systems, so PHR adoption is dependent on growth in electronic medical record adoption. Many PHR systems are physician-oriented, and do not include patient-oriented functionalities. These must be provided to support self-management and disease prevention if improvements in health outcomes are to be expected. Differences in patient motivation to use PHRs exist, but an overall low adoption rate is to be expected, except for the disabled, chronically ill, or caregivers for the elderly. Finally, trials of PHR effectiveness and sustainability for patient self-management are needed. PMID:21672914

  10. Examining Acceptance of an Integrated Personal Health Record (PHR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Alicia A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this project was to examine the practice question, "What are the factors influencing acceptance of integrated PHRs for self-care management among the Howard University Hospital (HUH) Diabetes Treatment Clinic (DTC) patients?" These factors include a) demographic characteristics, b) computer access/use/experience,…

  11. A conceptual security framework for personal health records (PHRs).

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, Mikaela; Papakonstantinou, Despina; Malamateniou, Flora; Prentza, Andriana; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    Electronic personal health record (PHR) is a citizen-centric information tool that allows citizens to control their personal information. However, an ideal PHR should also allow citizens to connect with their formal and informal caregivers (e.g. a family member, a caregiver) and together manage citizen health and social information. This introduces specific challenges in terms of security since multiple parties make entries and require access to PHR data. Since citizens are typically non-security and non-domain experts is considered impossible to control all this information. To this end, this paper presents a conceptual security framework for the employment of an attribute-based PHR access control policy that is continually updated according to providers' local security policies and individual professionals and citizen sharing preferences.

  12. The Information Ecology of Personal Health Record Systems: Secure Messaging as Catalyst and Its Evolving Impact on Use and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazi, Kim M.

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) and PHR systems have been designed as consumer-oriented tools to empower patients and improve health care. Despite significant consumer interest and anticipated benefits, adoption remains low. Understanding the consumer perspective is necessary, but insufficient by itself. Consumer PHR use also has broad implications…

  13. An Organizational Framework of Personal Health Records for Social Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Syed Omair

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes an organizational framework for creating a community to share personal health record (PHR) information in the form of a Health Records Social Network (HRSN). The work builds upon existing social network community concepts as well as the existing Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED) model used by the medical community and…

  14. The military health system's personal health record pilot with Microsoft HealthVault and Google Health

    PubMed Central

    Barnhill, Rick; Heermann-Do, Kimberly A; Salzman, Keith L; Gimbel, Ronald W

    2011-01-01

    Objective To design, build, implement, and evaluate a personal health record (PHR), tethered to the Military Health System, that leverages Microsoft® HealthVault and Google® Health infrastructure based on user preference. Materials and methods A pilot project was conducted in 2008–2009 at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington. Our PHR was architected to a flexible platform that incorporated standards-based models of Continuity of Document and Continuity of Care Record to map Department of Defense-sourced health data, via a secure Veterans Administration data broker, to Microsoft® HealthVault and Google® Health based on user preference. The project design and implementation were guided by provider and patient advisory panels with formal user evaluation. Results The pilot project included 250 beneficiary users. Approximately 73.2% of users were <65 years of age, and 38.4% were female. Of the users, 169 (67.6%) selected Microsoft® HealthVault, and 81 (32.4%) selected Google® Health as their PHR of preference. Sample evaluation of users reflected 100% (n=60) satisfied with convenience of record access and 91.7% (n=55) satisfied with overall functionality of PHR. Discussion Key lessons learned related to data-transfer decisions (push vs pull), purposeful delays in reporting sensitive information, understanding and mapping PHR use and clinical workflow, and decisions on information patients may choose to share with their provider. Conclusion Currently PHRs are being viewed as empowering tools for patient activation. Design and implementation issues (eg, technical, organizational, information security) are substantial and must be thoughtfully approached. Adopting standards into design can enhance the national goal of portability and interoperability. PMID:21292705

  15. Security challenges in integration of a PHR-S into a standards based national EHR.

    PubMed

    Mense, Alexander; Hoheiser Pförtner, Franz; Sauermann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Health related data provided by patients themselves is expected to play a major role in future healthcare. Data from personal health devices, vaccination records, health diaries or observations of daily living, for instance, is stored in personal health records (PHR) which are maintained by personal health record systems (PHR-S). Combining this information with medical records provided by healthcare providers in electronic health records (EHR) is one of the next steps towards "personal care". Austria currently sets up a nationwide EHR system that incorporates all healthcare providers and is technically based on international standards (IHE, HL7, OASIS, ...). Looking at the expected potential of merging PHR and EHR data it is worth to analyse integration approaches. Although knowing that an integration requires the coordination of processes, information models and technical architectures, this paper specifically focuses on security issues by evaluating general security requirements for a PHR-S (based on HL7 PHR-S FM), comparing them with the information security specifications for the Austrian's national EHR (based on ISO/IES 27000 series) and identifying the main challenges as well as possible approaches.

  16. Patients’ Acceptance towards a Web-Based Personal Health Record System: An Empirical Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chung-Feng; Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Jang, Fong-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The health care sector has become increasingly interested in developing personal health record (PHR) systems as an Internet-based telehealthcare implementation to improve the quality and decrease the cost of care. However, the factors that influence patients’ intention to use PHR systems remain unclear. Based on physicians’ therapeutic expertise, we implemented a web-based infertile PHR system and proposed an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that integrates the physician-patient relationship (PPR) construct into TAM’s original perceived ease of use (PEOU) and perceived usefulness (PU) constructs to explore which factors will influence the behavioral intentions (BI) of infertile patients to use the PHR. From ninety participants from a medical center, 50 valid responses to a self-rating questionnaire were collected, yielding a response rate of 55.56%. The partial least squares (PLS) technique was used to assess the causal relationships that were hypothesized in the extended model. The results indicate that infertile patients expressed a moderately high intention to use the PHR system. The PPR and PU of patients had significant effects on their BI to use PHR, whereas the PEOU indirectly affected the patients’ BI through the PU. This investigation confirms that PPR can have a critical role in shaping patients’ perceptions of the use of healthcare information technologies. Hence, we suggest that hospitals should promote the potential usefulness of PHR and improve the quality of the physician-patient relationship to increase patients’ intention of using PHR. PMID:24142185

  17. Personal health records: mobile biosensors and smartphones for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sternly K; Seldon, H Lee

    2012-01-01

    A target of telehealth is to maintain or improve the health of people outside the normal healthcare infrastructure. A modern paradigm in healthcare, and one which fits perfectly with telehealth, is "person self-monitoring", and this fits with the concept of "personal health record" (PHR). One factor in maintaining health is to monitor physiological parameters; this is of course especially important in people with chronic maladies such as diabetes or heart disease. Parameters to be monitored include blood pressure, pulse rate, temperature, weight, blood glucose, oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram (ECG), etc. So one task within telehealth would be to help monitor an individual's physiological parameters outside of healthcare institutions and store the results in a PHR in a way which is available, comprehensible and beneficial to the individual concerned and to healthcare providers. To date many approaches to this problem have been fragmented - emphasizing only part of the problem - or proprietary and not freely verifiable. We describe a framework to approach this task; it emphasizes the implementation of standards for data acquisition, storage and transmission in order to maximize the compatibility among disparate components, e.g. various PHR systems. Data from mobile biosensors is collected on a smartphone using the IEEE 11073 standard where possible; the data can be stored in a PHR on the phone (using standard formats) or can be converted in real-time into more useful information in the PHR, which is based on the International Classification for Primary Care (ICPC2e). The phone PHR data or information can be uploaded to a central online PHR using either the Wi-Fi or GSM transmission protocol together with the Continuity of Care Record message format (CCR, ASTM E2369).

  18. The personal health record: consumers banking on their health.

    PubMed

    Ball, Marion J; Costin, Melinda Y; Lehmann, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    With personal health records (PHRs) acting much like ATM cards, increasingly wired consumers can "bank on health", accessing their own personal health information and a wide array of services. Consumer-owned, the PHR is dependent upon the existence of the legal electronic medical record (EMR) and interoperability. Working PHRs are in place in Veterans Health Administration, private health care institutions, and in the commercial sector. By allowing consumers to become involved in their own care, the PHR creates new roles and relationships. New tools change the clinician's workflow and thought flow, and pose new challenges for consumers. Key components of the PHR include the EMR and regional health information organizations (RHIOs); key strategies focus on human factors in successful project management. Online resources provided by the National Library of Medicine and Health On the Net help address consumer needs for information that is reliable and understandable. The growth of self-management tools adds to the challenge and the promise of PHRs for clinicians and consumers alike.

  19. Assessing the HIPAA standard in practice: PHR privacy policies.

    PubMed

    Carrión, Inmaculada; Alemán, José Luis Fernández; Toval, Ambrosio

    2011-01-01

    Health service providers are starting to become interested in providing PHRs (Personal Health Records). With PHRs, access to data is controlled by the patient, and not by the health care provider. Companies such as Google and Microsoft are establishing a leadership position in this emerging market. A number of benefits can be achieved with PHRs, but important challenges related to security and privacy must be addressed. This paper presents a review of the privacy policies of 20 free web-based PHRs. Security and privacy characteristics were extracted and assessed according to the HIPAA standard. The results show a number of important differences in the characteristics analyzed. Some improvements can be made to current PHR privacy policies to enhance the audit and management of access to users' PHRs. A questionnaire has been defined to assist PHR designers in this task.

  20. Applicability of IHE/Continua components for PHR systems: learning from experiences.

    PubMed

    Urbauer, Philipp; Sauermann, Stefan; Frohner, Matthias; Forjan, Mathias; Pohn, Birgit; Mense, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Capturing personal health data using smartphones, PCs or other devices, and the reuse of the data in personal health records (PHR) is becoming more and more attractive for modern health-conscious populations. This paper analyses interoperability specifications targeting standards-based communication of computer systems and personal health devices (e.g. blood pressure monitor) in healthcare from initiatives like Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) and Continua Health Alliance driven by industry and healthcare professionals. Furthermore it identifies certain contradictions and gaps in the specifications and suggests possible solutions. Despite these shortcomings, the specifications allow fully functional implementations of PHR systems. Henceforth, both big business and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can actively contribute to the widespread use of large-scale interoperable PHR systems.

  1. Applicability of IHE/Continua components for PHR systems: learning from experiences.

    PubMed

    Urbauer, Philipp; Sauermann, Stefan; Frohner, Matthias; Forjan, Mathias; Pohn, Birgit; Mense, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Capturing personal health data using smartphones, PCs or other devices, and the reuse of the data in personal health records (PHR) is becoming more and more attractive for modern health-conscious populations. This paper analyses interoperability specifications targeting standards-based communication of computer systems and personal health devices (e.g. blood pressure monitor) in healthcare from initiatives like Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) and Continua Health Alliance driven by industry and healthcare professionals. Furthermore it identifies certain contradictions and gaps in the specifications and suggests possible solutions. Despite these shortcomings, the specifications allow fully functional implementations of PHR systems. Henceforth, both big business and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can actively contribute to the widespread use of large-scale interoperable PHR systems. PMID:24374230

  2. Personal Health Record Use in the United States: Forecasting Future Adoption Levels

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) offer a tremendous opportunity to generate consumer support in pursing the triple aim of reducing costs, increasing access, and improving care quality. Moreover, surveys in the United States indicate that consumers want Web-based access to their medical records. However, concerns that consumers’ low health information literacy levels and physicians’ resistance to sharing notes will limit PHRs’ utility to a relatively small portion of the population have reduced both the product innovation and policy imperatives. Objective The purpose of our study was 3-fold: first, to report on US consumers’ current level of PHR activity; second, to describe the roles of imitation and innovation influence factors in determining PHR adoption rates; and third, to forecast future PHR diffusion uptake among US consumers under 3 scenarios. Methods We used secondary data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) of US citizens for the survey years 2008, 2011, and 2013. Applying technology diffusion theory and Bass modeling, we evaluated 3 future PHR adoption scenarios by varying the introduction dates. Results All models displayed the characteristic diffusion S-curve indicating that the PHR technology is likely to achieve significant market penetration ahead of meaningful use goals. The best-performing model indicates that PHR adoption will exceed 75% by 2020. Therefore, the meaningful use program targets for PHR adoption are below the rates likely to occur without an intervention. Conclusions The promise of improved care quality and cost savings through better consumer engagement prompted the US Institute of Medicine to call for universal PHR adoption in 1999. The PHR products available as of 2014 are likely to meet and exceed meaningful use stage 3 targets before 2020 without any incentive. Therefore, more ambitious uptake and functionality availability should be incorporated into future goals. PMID:27030105

  3. Testing the Electronic Personal Health Record Acceptance Model by Nurses for Managing Their Own Health

    PubMed Central

    Trinkoff, A.M.; Storr, C.L.; Wilson, M.L.; Gurses, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To our knowledge, no evidence is available on health care professionals’ use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) for their health management. We therefore focused on nurses’ personal use of ePHRs using a modified technology acceptance model. Objectives To examine (1) the psychometric properties of the ePHR acceptance model, (2) the associations of perceived usefulness, ease of use, data privacy and security protection, and perception of self as health-promoting role models to nurses’ own ePHR use, and (3) the moderating influences of age, chronic illness and medication use, and providers’ use of electronic health record (EHRs) on the associations between the ePHR acceptance constructs and ePHR use. Methods A convenience sample of registered nurses, those working in one of 12 hospitals in the Maryland and Washington, DC areas and members of the nursing informatics community (AMIA and HIMSS), were invited to respond to an anonymous online survey; 847 responded. Multiple logistic regression identified associations between the model constructs and ePHR use, and the moderating effect. Results Overall, ePHRs were used by 47%. Sufficient reliability for all scales was found. Three constructs were significantly related to nurses’ own ePHR use after adjusting for covariates: usefulness, data privacy and security protection, and health-promoting role model. Nurses with providers that used EHRs who perceived a higher level of data privacy and security protection had greater odds of ePHR use than those whose providers did not use EHRs. Older nurses with a higher self-perception as health-promoting role models had greater odds of ePHR use than younger nurses. Conclusions Nurses who use ePHRs for their personal health might promote adoption by the general public by serving as health-promoting role models. They can contribute to improvements in patient education and ePHR design, and serve as crucial resources when working with their

  4. Personal health record use and its association with antiretroviral adherence: survey and medical record data from 1871 US veterans infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    Keith McInnes, D; Shimada, Stephanie L; Rao, Sowmya R; Quill, Ann; Duggal, Mona; Gifford, Allen L; Brandt, Cynthia A; Houston, Thomas K; Ohl, Michael E; Gordon, Kirsha S; Mattocks, Kristin M; Kazis, Lewis E; Justice, Amy C

    2013-11-01

    Patient electronic personal health record (PHR) use has been associated with improved patient outcomes in diabetes and depression care. Little is known about the effect of PHR use on HIV care processes and outcomes. We evaluated whether there was an association between patient PHR use and antiretroviral adherence. Data came from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study and included cross-sectional survey and medical record data from 1871 HIV+ veterans. Our adherence measure was an antiretroviral medication possession ratio, dichotomized at 0.90, and based on pharmacy refill data. In our sample 44 % did not use the internet, 14 % used internet but not for health, 27 % used internet for health but not the PHR, and 14 % used the PHR. In multivariable analysis PHR use was associated with ≥90 % adherence after controlling for socio-demographic variables. Findings provide support for longitudinal studies and studies that identify which PHR functions (e.g. online medication refills, viewing lab results, secure messaging with providers) are most closely associated with medication adherence.

  5. Incorporating Personal Health Records into the Disease Management of Rural Heart Failure Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Karen Parsley

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) allow patients to access and in some cases manage their own health records. Their potential benefits include access to health information, enhanced asynchronous communication between patients and clinicians, and convenience of online appointment scheduling and prescription refills. Potential barriers to PHR use…

  6. A Personal Health Record System for Diabetes Care Conforming to the ISO 16527 Interoperability Requirements.

    PubMed

    Cerón, Jesús D; Gómez, Guillermo A; López, Diego M; González, Carolina; Blobel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    A Personal Health Record (PHR) is a health information repository controlled and managed directly by a patient or his/her custodian, or a person interested in his/her own health. PHR System's adoption and compliance with international standards is foremost important because it can help to meet international, national, regional or institutional interoperability and portability policies. In this paper, an interoperable PHR System for supporting the control of type 2 diabetes mellitus is proposed, which meets the mandatory interoperability requirements proposed in the Personal Health Record System Functional Model standard (ISO 16527). After performing a detailed analysis of different applications and platforms for the implementation of electronic Personal Health Records, the adaptation of the Indivo Health open source platform was completed. Interoperability functions were added to this platform by integrating the Mirth Connect platform. The assessment of the platform's interoperability capabilities was carried out by a group of experts, who verified the interoperability requirements proposed in the ISO 16527 standard.

  7. EHR/PHR Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... your consent or authorization because of the security technology used by the companies that offer them, according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Some of the organizations that provide Electronic Health Records include health plans and providers. Health ...

  8. Improving personal health records for patient-centered care

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Henry J; Ross, Stephen E; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the patient-centeredness of personal health records (PHR) and offer recommendations for best practice guidelines. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted in seven large early PHR adopter organizations in 2007. Organizations were purposively selected to represent a variety of US settings, including medium and large hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Measurements Patient-centeredness was assessed against a framework of care that includes: (1) respect for patient values, preferences, and expressed needs; (2) information and education; (3) access to care; (4) emotional support to relieve fear and anxiety; (5) involvement of family and friends; (6) continuity and secure transition between healthcare providers; (7) physical comfort; (8) coordination of care. Within this framework we used evidence for patient preferences (where it exists) to compare existing PHR policies, and propose a best practice model. Results Most organizations enable many patient-centered functions such as data access for proxies and minors. No organization allows patient views of clinical progress notes, and turnaround times for PHR reporting of normal laboratory results can be up to 7 days. Conclusion Findings suggest patient-centeredness for personal health records can be improved, and recommendations are made for best practice guidelines. PMID:20190063

  9. Digital divide: Use of electronic personal health record by different population groups.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung-Hun; Kim, Yongmin

    2010-01-01

    Personal Health Record (PHR) has been increasingly recognized and actively promoted by the federal government, experts and industry as an important tool for improving healthcare in the U.S. However, the PHR use by patients and its utility have not been studied well. We have evaluated a web-based PHR in multiple locations covering diverse population groups. The study sites included a surgical specialty clinic, a medical specialty clinic, and a mental health clinic at the University of Washington, and a low-income elderly housing facility near Seattle in the state of Washington. The PHR use by the low-income elderly was limited due to poor technical skills and low physical/cognitive abilities. On the other hand, the younger and affluent populations used the web-based PHR much easily and efficiently compared to the older and low-income group. They regarded managing personal health information easy while the older group struggled. As more computer literate individuals age, the next-generation elderly are certain to be more technically skilled than the current generation. Although the reduced physical/cognitive abilities due to aging would still be a challenge, more elderly people will be able to not only use a PHR system but also use it to the full extent to get the maximum benefit.

  10. Lessons learned from usability testing of the VA's personal health record

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Jason J; Russ, Alissa L; Jones, Josette; Russell, Scott A; Chumbler, Neale R

    2011-01-01

    In order to create user-centered design information to guide the development of personal health records (PHRs), 24 patients participated in usability assessments of VA's MyHealtheVet program. Observational videos and efficiency measures were collected among users performing four PHR scenarios: registration and log-in, prescription refill, tracking health, and searching for health information. Twenty-five percent of users successfully completed registration. Individuals preferred prescription numbers over names, sometimes due to privacy concerns. Only efficiency in prescription refills was significantly better than target values. Users wanted to print their information to share with their doctors, and questioned the value of MyHealtheVet search functions over existing online health information. In summary, PHR registration must balance simplicity and security, usability tests guide how PHRs can tailor functions to individual preferences, PHRs add value to users' data by making information more accessible and understandable, and healthcare organizations should build trust for PHR health content. PMID:21984604

  11. Developing a personal health record for community-dwelling older adults and clinicians: technology and content.

    PubMed

    Monsen, Karen A; Westra, Bonnie L; Paitich, Nadine; Ekstrom, Dawn; Mehle, Susan C; Kaeding, Maggie; Abdo, Sajeda; Natarajan, Gowtham; Ruddarraju, Uday Kumar Raju

    2012-07-01

    To empower older consumers and improve health outcomes, a consumer-friendly personal health record (PHR) is needed. The purpose of this article was to evaluate PHR technology and content for older community-dwelling consumers. Specific aims were to: (a) develop a secure, web-based application for a PHR to enable interoperable exchanges of data between consumers and clinicians; (b) develop structured, evidence-based shared care plan content for the PHR using an interface terminology standard; and (c) validate the shared care plans with consumers. An interoperable web-based form was developed. The standardized PHR content was developed by expert panel consensus using the Omaha System problem list and care plans, and validated by consumer interviews. Evidence-based shared care plans for 21 problems common among community-dwelling older adults were developed and encoded with Omaha System terms for data capture in the PHR. An additional problem, Neighborhood-workplace safety, was identified by consumers and will be added to the care plans.

  12. Patterns of Response to Patient-Centered Decision Support Through a Personal Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gary S.; Sullivan, Sarah M.; Dong, XinXin; Weimer, Melissa; Zeith, Caroline; Clark, Sunday; Roberts, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Over 140 million people in the United States have at least one chronic medical condition, but they receive fewer than 60% of guideline-recommended services for these conditions. Increasing patients' involvement in their own care may improve the receipt of guideline-recommended services. We evaluated patients' patterns of responses to notifications regarding guideline-recommended services delivered through a personalized health record (PHR). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 584 participants with high cardiovascular disease risk from 73 primary care practices into an active PHR in which they received patient-centered decision support—notifications delivered via a PHR regarding prevention gaps (i.e., unmet preventive healthcare or chronic disease monitoring). Participants with prevention gaps received up to three weekly messages regarding all services due within a 2-month time frame. These three-message cycles could repeat up to every 2 months for a new, or continuing, prevention gap. Results: Of the 584 participants, 501 (86%) received at least one reminder. Approximately 61% of these participants accessed the PHR or received the care that triggered the message after the first message and 73% after the first two messages. In subsequent three-message cycles, we observed no change in the number of messages required prior to participants accessing the PHR or receiving recommended care (chi-squared=12.4, p=0.3). Of the 2,656 prevention gaps these participants had over 1 year, 1,539 (58%) were closed. Conclusions: In this low-intensity intervention, participants accessed the PHR and received recommended care. Providing notification through the PHR allows patients to choose when they receive, and take action on, the message. Notifications can be provided to patients through a PHR without alert fatigue and may be an additional tool to help patients achieve better health. PMID:25243350

  13. Personal Health Records for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, R.; Park, A.; Dunn, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Personal health records (PHRs) connected to a physician’s electronic health record system hold substantial promise for supporting and engaging patients with chronic disease. Objectives: To explore how U.S. health care organizations are currently utilizing PHRs for chronic disease populations. Methods A mixed methods study including semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire was conducted. A purposive sample was developed of health care organizations which were recognized as exemplars for PHRs and were high performers in national patient satisfaction surveys (H-CAHPS or CAHPS). Within each organization, participants were health IT leaders or those managing high-risk or chronic disease populations. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants and completed questionnaires were received from 16 organizations (84% response rate). Most PHRs allowed patients to access health records and educational material, message their provider, renew prescriptions and request appointments. Patient generated data was increasingly being sought and combined with messaging, resulted in greater understanding of patient health and functioning outside of the clinic visit. However for chronic disease populations, there was little targeted involvement in PHR design and few tools to help interpret and manage their conditions beyond those offered for all. The PHR was largely uncoupled from high risk population management interventions and no clear framework for future PHR development emerged. Conclusion This technology is currently underutilized and represents a major opportunity given the potential benefits of patient engagement and shared decision making. A coherent patient-centric PHR design and evaluation strategy is required to realize its potential and maximize this natural hub for multidisciplinary care co-ordination. PMID:25024758

  14. 77 FR 53967 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program-Stage 2

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-04

    ... Private Fee-For-Service PHO Physician Hospital Organization PHR Personal Health Record PHS Public Health... Preferred Provider Organization PQRS Physician Quality Reporting System PSO Provider Sponsored Organization... Stage 1 final rule (75 FR 44316 through 44317). 2. Summary of Major Provisions a. Stage 2 Meaningful...

  15. A Framework for Privacy-preserving Classification of Next-generation PHR data.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Prentza, Andriana; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs), integrated with data from various sources, such as social care data, Electronic Health Record data and genetic information, are envisaged as having a pivotal role in transforming healthcare. These data, lumped under the term 'big data', are usually complex, noisy, heterogeneous, longitudinal and voluminous thus prohibiting their meaningful use by clinicians. Deriving value from these data requires the utilization of innovative data analysis techniques, which, however, may be hindered due to potential security and privacy breaches that may arise from improper release of personal health information. This paper presents a HIPAA-compliant machine learning framework that enables privacy-preserving classification of next-generation PHR data. The predictive models acquired can act as supporting tools to clinical practice by enabling more effective prevention, diagnosis and treatment of new incidents. The proposed framework has a huge potential for complementing medical staff expertise as it outperforms the manual inspection of PHR data while protecting patient privacy. PMID:25000030

  16. A Framework for Privacy-preserving Classification of Next-generation PHR data.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Prentza, Andriana; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs), integrated with data from various sources, such as social care data, Electronic Health Record data and genetic information, are envisaged as having a pivotal role in transforming healthcare. These data, lumped under the term 'big data', are usually complex, noisy, heterogeneous, longitudinal and voluminous thus prohibiting their meaningful use by clinicians. Deriving value from these data requires the utilization of innovative data analysis techniques, which, however, may be hindered due to potential security and privacy breaches that may arise from improper release of personal health information. This paper presents a HIPAA-compliant machine learning framework that enables privacy-preserving classification of next-generation PHR data. The predictive models acquired can act as supporting tools to clinical practice by enabling more effective prevention, diagnosis and treatment of new incidents. The proposed framework has a huge potential for complementing medical staff expertise as it outperforms the manual inspection of PHR data while protecting patient privacy.

  17. Patient Perceptions of a Personal Health Record: A Test of the Diffusion of Innovation Model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) have emerged as an important tool with which patients can electronically communicate with their doctors and doctor’s offices. However, there is a lack of theoretical and empirical research on how patients perceive the PHR and the differences in perceptions between users and non-users of the PHR. Objective To apply a theoretical model, the diffusion of innovation model, to the study of PHRs and conduct an exploratory empirical study on the applicability of the model to the study of perceptions of PHRs. A secondary objective was to assess whether perceptions of PHRs predict the perceived value of the PHR for communicating with the doctor’s office. Methods We first developed a survey capturing perceptions of PHR use and other factors such as sociodemographic characteristics, access and use of technology, perceived innovativeness in the domain of information technology, and perceptions of privacy and security. We then conducted a cross-sectional survey (N = 1500). Patients were grouped into five groups of 300: PHR users (innovators, other users, and laggards), rejecters, and non-adopters. We applied univariate statistical analysis (Pearson chi-square and one-way ANOVA) to assess differences among groups and used multivariate statistical techniques (factor analysis and multiple regression analysis) to assess the presence of factors identified by the diffusion of innovation model and the predictors of our dependent variable (value of PHR for communicating with the doctor’s office). Results Of the 1500 surveys, 760 surveys were returned for an overall response rate of 51%. Computer use among non-adopters (75%) was lower than that among PHR users (99%) and rejecters (92%) (P < .001). Non-adopters also reported a lower score on personal innovativeness in information technology (mean = 2.8) compared to 3.6 and 3.1, respectively, for users and rejecters (P < .001). Four factors identified by the diffusion of innovation model

  18. The Usability of Electronic Personal Health Record Systems for an Underserved Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Sara J.; Zarcadoolas, Christina; Vaughon, Wendy L.; Lee, Chin Chin; Rockoff, Maxine L.; Levy, Joslyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goals of this study were to identify the demands associated with using electronic personal health records (PHRs) and to evaluate the ability of adults of lower socioeconomic status and low health literacy to use PHRs to perform health management activities. Background PHRs are proliferating in clinical practices and health care organizations. These systems offer the potential of increasing the active involvement of patients in health self-management. However, little is known about the actual usability of these tools for health consumers. Method We used task analysis and health literacy load analysis to identify the cognitive and literacy demands inherent in the use of PHRs and evaluated the usability of three currently available PHR systems with a sample of 54 adults. Participants used the systems to perform tasks related to medication management, interpretation of lab/test results, and health maintenance. Data were also gathered on the participants’ perception of the potential value of using a PHR. Results The results indicated that a majority of the participants had difficulty completing the tasks and needed assistance. There was some variability according to task and PHR system. However, most participants perceived the use of PHRs as valuable. Conclusions Although considered a valuable tool by consumers, the use of PHR systems may be challenging for many people. Strategies are needed to enhance the usability of these systems, especially for people with low literacy, low health literacy, or limited technology skills. Application The data from this study have implications for the design of PHRs. PMID:25875437

  19. Building Structured Personal Health Records from Photographs of Printed Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Hu, Gang; Teng, Xiaofei; Xie, Guotong

    2015-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) provide patient-centric healthcare by making health records accessible to patients. In China, it is very difficult for individuals to access electronic health records. Instead, individuals can easily obtain the printed copies of their own medical records, such as prescriptions and lab test reports, from hospitals. In this paper, we propose a practical approach to extract structured data from printed medical records photographed by mobile phones. An optical character recognition (OCR) pipeline is performed to recognize text in a document photo, which addresses the problems of low image quality and content complexity by image pre-processing and multiple OCR engine synthesis. A series of annotation algorithms that support flexible layouts are then used to identify the document type, entities of interest, and entity correlations, from which a structured PHR document is built. The proposed approach was applied to real world medical records to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability. PMID:26958219

  20. History and Trends of "Personal Health Record" Research in PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongeun; Bates, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to review history and trends of personal health record research in PubMed and to provide accurate understanding and categorical analysis of expert opinions. Methods For the search strategy, PubMed was queried for 'personal health record, personal record, and PHR' in the title and abstract fields. Those containing different definitions of the word were removed by one-by-one analysis from the results, 695 articles. In the end, total of 229 articles were analyzed in this research. Results The results show that the changes in terms over the years and the shift to patient centeredness and mixed usage. And we identified history and trend of PHR research in some category that the number of publications by year, topic, methodologies and target diseases. Also from analysis of MeSH terms, we can show the focal interest in regards the PHR boundaries and related subjects. Conclusions For PHRs to be efficiently used by general public, initial understanding of the history and trends of PHR research may be helpful. Simultaneously, accurate understanding and categorical analysis of expert opinions that can lead to the development and growth of PHRs will be valuable to their adoption and expansion. PMID:21818452

  1. Meeting the health information needs of prostate cancer patients using personal health records

    PubMed Central

    Pai, H.H.; Lau, F.; Barnett, J.; Jones, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is interest in the use of health information technology in the form of personal health record (phr) systems to support patient needs for health information, care, and decision-making, particularly for patients with distressing, chronic diseases such as prostate cancer (pca). We sought feedback from pca patients who used a phr. Methods For 6 months, 22 pca patients in various phases of care at the BC Cancer Agency (bcca) were given access to a secure Web-based phr called provider, which they could use to view their medical records and use a set of support tools. Feedback was obtained using an end-of-study survey on usability, satisfaction, and concerns with provider. Site activity was recorded to assess usage patterns. Results Of the 17 patients who completed the study, 29% encountered some minor difficulties using provider. No security breaches were known to have occurred. The two most commonly accessed medical records were laboratory test results and transcribed doctor’s notes. Of survey respondents, 94% were satisfied with the access to their medical records, 65% said that provider helped to answer their questions, 77% felt that their privacy and confidentiality were preserved, 65% felt that using provider helped them to communicate better with their physicians, 83% found new and useful information that they would not have received by talking to their health care providers, and 88% said that they would continue to use provider. Conclusions Our results support the notion that phrs can provide cancer patients with timely access to their medical records and health information, and can assist in communication with health care providers, in knowledge generation, and in patient empowerment. PMID:24311957

  2. Genetic Counselors’ Current Use of Personal Health Records-Based Family Histories in Genetic Clinics and Considerations for Their Future Adoption

    PubMed Central

    DeShazo, Jonathan P.; Bodurtha, Joann; Quillin, John; Creswick, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Given the widespread adoption of electronic medical records and recent emergence of electronic family history tools, we examined genetic counselors’ perspectives on the emerging technology of the personal health record (PHR)-based family history tool that links to an electronic medical record (EMR). Two-hundred thirty-three genetic counselors responded to an on-line survey eliciting current use of electronic family history (EFH) tools and familiarity with PHR-based family history tools. Additionally, after being shown a series of screen shots of a newly developed PHR-based family history tool based on the U.S. Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait (United States Department of Health and Human Services 2009), participants were surveyed about the perceived usefulness, ease of use, and impact on current workflow that this kind of tool would have in their practices. Eighty-three percent reported that their institution has an EMR, yet only 35 % have a dedicated space for family history. Eighty-two percent reported that less than 5 % of their patients have a PHR, and only 16 % have worked with patients who have a PHR. Seventy-two percent or more agreed that a PHR-based family history tool would facilitate communication, increase accuracy of information, ensure consistency in recording information, increase focus on actual counseling, reduce repetitive questions, improve efficiency, and increase the legibility and clarity. Our findings suggest that participants were familiar with existing EFH tools, but that the majority did not use them in practice. Genetic counselors’ adoption of such tools is limited due to non-existence of this kind of technology or inability to integrate it into their clinics. They are also strongly in favor of adopting a PHR-based family history tool in genetics clinics, but have practical concerns that must be addressed before the tool can be implemented. PMID:23242928

  3. Personal health records: a randomized trial of effects on elder medication safety

    PubMed Central

    Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Hourcade, Juan Pablo; Doucette, William; Eichmann, David; Gryzlak, Brian; Lorentzen, Ryan; Wright, Kara; Letuchy, Elena; Mueller, Michael; Farris, Karen; Levy, Barcey

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the impact of a personal health record (PHR) on medication-use safety among older adults. Background Online PHRs have potential as tools to manage health information. We know little about how to make PHRs accessible for older adults and what effects this will have. Methods A PHR was designed and pretested with older adults and tested in a 6-month randomized controlled trial. After completing mailed baseline questionnaires, eligible computer users aged 65 and over were randomized 3:1 to be given access to a PHR (n=802) or serve as a standard care control group (n=273). Follow-up questionnaires measured change from baseline medication use, medication reconciliation behaviors, and medication management problems. Results Older adults were interested in keeping track of their health and medication information. A majority (55.2%) logged into the PHR and used it, but only 16.1% used it frequently. At follow-up, those randomized to the PHR group were significantly less likely to use multiple non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs—the most common warning generated by the system (viewed by 23% of participants). Compared with low/non-users, high users reported significantly more changes in medication use and improved medication reconciliation behaviors, and recognized significantly more side effects, but there was no difference in use of inappropriate medications or adherence measures. Conclusions PHRs can engage older adults for better medication self-management; however, features that motivate continued use will be needed. Longer-term studies of continued users will be required to evaluate the impact of these changes in behavior on patient health outcomes. PMID:24326536

  4. Family physicians’ perspectives on personal health records

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Gary L.; Williams, Andrew S.; Brown, Judith Belle

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore FPs’ perspectives on the value of personal health records (PHRs) in primary care and the implementation and adoption of PHRs in Canada. Design A qualitative design using semistructured interviews. Setting Southwestern Ontario. Participants Ten FPs. Methods The 10 FPs participated in semistructured interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. An iterative approach using immersion and crystallization was employed for analysis. Main findings Participants were generally positive about PHRs, and were attracted to their portability and potential to engage patients in health care. Their concerns focused on 3 main themes: data management, practice management, and the patient-physician relationship. Subthemes included security, privacy, reliability of data, workload, remuneration, physician obligations, patient misinterpretation of medical information, and electronic communication displacing face-to-face visits. Participants identified 3 key facilitators for adoption of PHR systems: integration with existing electronic health record systems, ease of use without being a burden on either time or money, and offering a demonstrated added value to family practice. Conclusion This study replicates previously published literature about FP concerns and opinions, and it further identifies remuneration as a potential barrier in Canadian fee-for-service payment models. Participants identified 3 key facilitators, which were suggested for implementation and adoption of PHRs, providing a basis for future research and development of these systems for use in Canadian family practice. PMID:21642732

  5. Performance evaluation of continuity of care records (CCRs): parsing models in a mobile health management system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Ming; Liou, Yong-Zan

    2014-10-01

    In a mobile health management system, mobile devices act as the application hosting devices for personal health records (PHRs) and the healthcare servers construct to exchange and analyze PHRs. One of the most popular PHR standards is continuity of care record (CCR). The CCR is expressed in XML formats. However, parsing is an expensive operation that can degrade XML processing performance. Hence, the objective of this study was to identify different operational and performance characteristics for those CCR parsing models including the XML DOM parser, the SAX parser, the PULL parser, and the JSON parser with regard to JSON data converted from XML-based CCR. Thus, developers can make sensible choices for their target PHR applications to parse CCRs when using mobile devices or servers with different system resources. Furthermore, the simulation experiments of four case studies are conducted to compare the parsing performance on Android mobile devices and the server with large quantities of CCR data. PMID:25086611

  6. Adoption of Electronic Personal Health Records in Canada: Perceptions of Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Breton, Erik; Fortin, Jean-Paul; Khoury, Lara; Dolovich, Lisa; Price, David; Wiljer, David; Bartlett, Gillian; Archer, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthcare stakeholders have a great interest in the adoption and use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) because of the potential benefits associated with them. Little is known, however, about the level of adoption of ePHRs in Canada and there is limited evidence concerning their benefits and implications for the healthcare system. This study aimed to describe the current situation of ePHRs in Canada and explore stakeholder perceptions regarding barriers and facilitators to their adoption. Methods: Using a qualitative descriptive study design, we conducted semi-structured phone interviews between October 2013 and February 2014 with 35 individuals from seven Canadian provinces. The participants represented six stakeholder groups (patients, ePHR administrators, healthcare professionals, organizations interested in health technology development, government agencies, and researchers). A detailed summary of each interview was created and thematic analysis was conducted. Results: We observed that there was no consensual definition of ePHR in Canada. Factors that could influence ePHR adoption were related to knowledge (confusion with other electronic medical records [EMRs] and lack of awareness), system design (usability and relevance), user capacities and attitudes (patient health literacy, education and interest, support for professionals), environmental factors (government commitment, targeted populations) and legal and ethical issues (information control and custody, confidentiality, privacy and security). Conclusion: ePHRs are slowly entering the Canadian healthcare landscape but provinces do not seem well-prepared for the implementation of this type of record. Guidance is needed on critical issues regarding ePHRs, such as ePHR definition, data ownership, access to information and interoperability with other electronic health records (EHRs). Better guidance on these issues would provide a greater awareness of ePHRs and inform stakeholders

  7. Adoption of Electronic Personal Health Records in Canada: Perceptions of Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Payne-Gagnon, Julie; Breton, Erik; Fortin, Jean-Paul; Khoury, Lara; Dolovich, Lisa; Price, David; Wiljer, David; Bartlett, Gillian; Archer, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthcare stakeholders have a great interest in the adoption and use of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) because of the potential benefits associated with them. Little is known, however, about the level of adoption of ePHRs in Canada and there is limited evidence concerning their benefits and implications for the healthcare system. This study aimed to describe the current situation of ePHRs in Canada and explore stakeholder perceptions regarding barriers and facilitators to their adoption. Methods: Using a qualitative descriptive study design, we conducted semi-structured phone interviews between October 2013 and February 2014 with 35 individuals from seven Canadian provinces. The participants represented six stakeholder groups (patients, ePHR administrators, healthcare professionals, organizations interested in health technology development, government agencies, and researchers). A detailed summary of each interview was created and thematic analysis was conducted. Results: We observed that there was no consensual definition of ePHR in Canada. Factors that could influence ePHR adoption were related to knowledge (confusion with other electronic medical records [EMRs] and lack of awareness), system design (usability and relevance), user capacities and attitudes (patient health literacy, education and interest, support for professionals), environmental factors (government commitment, targeted populations) and legal and ethical issues (information control and custody, confidentiality, privacy and security). Conclusion: ePHRs are slowly entering the Canadian healthcare landscape but provinces do not seem well-prepared for the implementation of this type of record. Guidance is needed on critical issues regarding ePHRs, such as ePHR definition, data ownership, access to information and interoperability with other electronic health records (EHRs). Better guidance on these issues would provide a greater awareness of ePHRs and inform stakeholders

  8. Implementation of health information technology in Veterans Health Administration to support transformational change: telehealth and personal health records.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Neale R; Haggstrom, David; Saleem, Jason J

    2011-12-01

    The Institute of Medicine report, Crossing the Quality Chasm, called for significant improvements in 6 elements of healthcare performance: safety, effectiveness, patient centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equity. To meet the changing care needs of older veterans, many of whom are trying to manage the complexities of their chronic diseases in their own homes, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has promoted many of the Institute of Medicine elements by implementing health information technology (health IT), such as telehealth and a personal health record (PHR). To that end, approximately 5 years ago, VHA created the Office of Care Coordination and in particular a patient-centered Care Coordination/Home Telehealth (CCHT) program, which uses telehealth technologies (eg, messaging devices) to coordinate care directly from a patient's home to help self-manage their chronic diseases. VHA has also developed a PHR, My HealtheVet, which is a secure web-based portal that provides veterans the capability to access and manage health information. This article discusses the mechanisms by which these forms of health IT have been implemented to improve access to care and improve health. For telehealth, we present the outcomes from some of the published literature. For PHRs, we outline what is known to date and future research directions. The article also examines some structural, policy-related, and organizational barriers to health IT implementation and offers suggestions for future research.

  9. Using Tablet Computers to Increase Patient Engagement With Electronic Personal Health Records: Protocol For a Prospective, Randomized Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    Magan Mendoza, Yimdriuska; Rosenthal, Jaime; Jacolbia, Ronald; Rajkomar, Alvin; Lee, Herman; Auerbach, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Inadequate patient engagement in care is a major barrier to successful transitions from the inpatient setting and can lead to preventable adverse events after discharge, particularly for older adults. While older adults may be less familiar with mobile devices and applications, they may benefit from focused bedside training to engage them in using their Personal Health Record (PHR). Mobile technologies such as tablet computers can be used in the hospital to help bridge this gap in experience by teaching older, hospitalized patients to actively manage their medication list through their PHR during hospitalization and continue to use their PHR for other post-discharge tasks such as scheduling follow-up appointments, viewing test results, and communicating with providers. Bridging this gap is especially important for older, hospitalized adults as they are at higher risk than younger populations for low engagement in transitions of care and poor outcomes such as readmission. Greater understanding of the advantages and limitations of mobile devices for older adults may be important for improving transitions of care. Objective To better understand the effective use of mobile technologies to improve transitions in care for hospitalized, older adults and leverage these technologies to improve inpatient and postdischarge care for older adults. Methods We will compare an intervention group with tablet-based training to engage effectively with their PHR to a control group also receiving tablets and basic access to their PHR but no additional training on how to engage with their PHR. Results Patient enrollment is ongoing. Conclusions Through this grant, we will further develop our preliminary dataset and practical experience with these mobile technologies to catalyze patient engagement during hospitalization. ClinicalTrial ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02109601; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02109601 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6jpXjkwM8

  10. How to Keep Your Health Information Private and Secure

    MedlinePlus

    ... communities, such as message boards. · Store in a personal health record (PHR) that is not offered through ... information. Here are some tips to ensure your personal health information is private and secure when accessing ...

  11. Confidentiality Protection of Digital Health Records in Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shyh-Wei; Chiang, Dai Lun; Liu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Lai, Feipei; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Electronic medical records containing confidential information were uploaded to the cloud. The cloud allows medical crews to access and manage the data and integration of medical records easily. This data system provides relevant information to medical personnel and facilitates and improve electronic medical record management and data transmission. A structure of cloud-based and patient-centered personal health record (PHR) is proposed in this study. This technique helps patients to manage their health information, such as appointment date with doctor, health reports, and a completed understanding of their own health conditions. It will create patients a positive attitudes to maintain the health. The patients make decision on their own for those whom has access to their records over a specific span of time specified by the patients. Storing data in the cloud environment can reduce costs and enhance the share of information, but the potential threat of information security should be taken into consideration. This study is proposing the cloud-based secure transmission mechanism is suitable for multiple users (like nurse aides, patients, and family members). PMID:27059737

  12. Confidentiality Protection of Digital Health Records in Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shyh-Wei; Chiang, Dai Lun; Liu, Chia-Hui; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Lai, Feipei; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Electronic medical records containing confidential information were uploaded to the cloud. The cloud allows medical crews to access and manage the data and integration of medical records easily. This data system provides relevant information to medical personnel and facilitates and improve electronic medical record management and data transmission. A structure of cloud-based and patient-centered personal health record (PHR) is proposed in this study. This technique helps patients to manage their health information, such as appointment date with doctor, health reports, and a completed understanding of their own health conditions. It will create patients a positive attitudes to maintain the health. The patients make decision on their own for those whom has access to their records over a specific span of time specified by the patients. Storing data in the cloud environment can reduce costs and enhance the share of information, but the potential threat of information security should be taken into consideration. This study is proposing the cloud-based secure transmission mechanism is suitable for multiple users (like nurse aides, patients, and family members).

  13. Machine Learning for Knowledge Extraction from PHR Big Data.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, Michaela; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing, Internet of things (IOT) and NoSQL database technologies can support a new generation of cloud-based PHR services that contain heterogeneous (unstructured, semi-structured and structured) patient data (health, social and lifestyle) from various sources, including automatically transmitted data from Internet connected devices of patient living space (e.g. medical devices connected to patients at home care). The patient data stored in such PHR systems constitute big data whose analysis with the use of appropriate machine learning algorithms is expected to improve diagnosis and treatment accuracy, to cut healthcare costs and, hence, to improve the overall quality and efficiency of healthcare provided. This paper describes a health data analytics engine which uses machine learning algorithms for analyzing cloud based PHR big health data towards knowledge extraction to support better healthcare delivery as regards disease diagnosis and prognosis. This engine comprises of the data preparation, the model generation and the data analysis modules and runs on the cloud taking advantage from the map/reduce paradigm provided by Apache Hadoop. PMID:25000009

  14. Machine Learning for Knowledge Extraction from PHR Big Data.

    PubMed

    Poulymenopoulou, Michaela; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing, Internet of things (IOT) and NoSQL database technologies can support a new generation of cloud-based PHR services that contain heterogeneous (unstructured, semi-structured and structured) patient data (health, social and lifestyle) from various sources, including automatically transmitted data from Internet connected devices of patient living space (e.g. medical devices connected to patients at home care). The patient data stored in such PHR systems constitute big data whose analysis with the use of appropriate machine learning algorithms is expected to improve diagnosis and treatment accuracy, to cut healthcare costs and, hence, to improve the overall quality and efficiency of healthcare provided. This paper describes a health data analytics engine which uses machine learning algorithms for analyzing cloud based PHR big health data towards knowledge extraction to support better healthcare delivery as regards disease diagnosis and prognosis. This engine comprises of the data preparation, the model generation and the data analysis modules and runs on the cloud taking advantage from the map/reduce paradigm provided by Apache Hadoop.

  15. An open platform for personal health record apps with platform-level privacy protection.

    PubMed

    Van Gorp, P; Comuzzi, M; Jahnen, A; Kaymak, U; Middleton, B

    2014-08-01

    One of the main barriers to the adoption of Personal Health Records (PHR) systems is their closed nature. It has been argued in the literature that this barrier can be overcome by introducing an open market of substitutable PHR apps. The requirements introduced by such an open market on the underlying platform have also been derived. In this paper, we argue that MyPHRMachines, a cloud-based PHR platform recently developed by the authors, satisfies these requirements better than its alternatives. The MyPHRMachines platform leverages Virtual Machines as flexible and secure execution sandboxes for health apps. MyPHRMachines does not prevent pushing hospital- or patient-generated data to one of its instances, nor does it prevent patients from sharing data with their trusted caregivers. External software developers have minimal barriers to contribute innovative apps to the platform, since apps are only required to avoid pushing patient data outside a MyPHRMachines cloud. We demonstrate the potential of MyPHRMachines by presenting two externally contributed apps. Both apps provide functionality going beyond the state-of-the-art in their application domain, while they did not require any specific MyPHRMachines platform extension.

  16. An open platform for personal health record apps with platform-level privacy protection.

    PubMed

    Van Gorp, P; Comuzzi, M; Jahnen, A; Kaymak, U; Middleton, B

    2014-08-01

    One of the main barriers to the adoption of Personal Health Records (PHR) systems is their closed nature. It has been argued in the literature that this barrier can be overcome by introducing an open market of substitutable PHR apps. The requirements introduced by such an open market on the underlying platform have also been derived. In this paper, we argue that MyPHRMachines, a cloud-based PHR platform recently developed by the authors, satisfies these requirements better than its alternatives. The MyPHRMachines platform leverages Virtual Machines as flexible and secure execution sandboxes for health apps. MyPHRMachines does not prevent pushing hospital- or patient-generated data to one of its instances, nor does it prevent patients from sharing data with their trusted caregivers. External software developers have minimal barriers to contribute innovative apps to the platform, since apps are only required to avoid pushing patient data outside a MyPHRMachines cloud. We demonstrate the potential of MyPHRMachines by presenting two externally contributed apps. Both apps provide functionality going beyond the state-of-the-art in their application domain, while they did not require any specific MyPHRMachines platform extension. PMID:24859286

  17. Rapid progress or lengthy process? Electronic personal health records in mental health.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Liam; Rose, Diana; Callard, Felicity; Denis, Mike; Wykes, Til

    2011-01-01

    A major objective of many healthcare providers is to increase patients' participation in their own care. The introduction of electronic personal health records (ePHRs) may help to achieve this. An ePHR is an electronic database of an individual's health information, accessible to and maintained by the patient. ePHRs are very much in vogue, with an increasing number of studies reporting their potential utility as well as cost. However, the vast majority of these studies focus on general healthcare. Little attempt has been made to document the specific problems which might occur throughout the implementation of ePHRs in mental health. This review identifies such concerns through an electronic search of the literature. Several potential difficulties are highlighted and addressed, including access to information technology, identifying relevant populations and the handling of sensitive information. Special attention is paid to the concept of 'empowerment' and what this means in relation to ePHRs.

  18. Using frames to influence consumer willingness to pay for the patient health record: a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Vishwanath, Arun

    2009-07-01

    The American College of Medical Informatics rated the lack of willingness to pay for the patient health record (PHR) as the biggest obstacles to its rapid diffusion. Extending research propositions from the decision sciences and political communication, this study tests the influence of different types of emphasis frames on increasing consumer willingness to pay for the PHR. Using a randomized experiment embedded within a probability survey, the effects of 3 different types of emphasis frames (individual-focused, collective-focused, and joint), along with a no-frames control, are tested on a sample of early and later technology adopters. The results indicate a significant relationship between the type of frame and the type of adopter. Early adopters were more susceptible to individual-focused frames that made causal attributions at the individual level, whereas later adopters were significantly influenced by collective-focused frames that made causal attributions at the societal level. Interestingly, the framing effect continued and significantly influenced both early and later adopters' willingness to pay for the PHR. The findings demonstrate the need to carefully communicate the value of a technology to adopters and suggest the possibility of using frames to spur the diffusion of PHRs.

  19. Electronic health record and electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    This article considers the government plans for the development of electronic health and patient records as set out in the NHS Plan and the progress and problems which have been encountered in their realization. PMID:16116372

  20. Ethical, legal and social issues for personal health records and applications.

    PubMed

    Cushman, Reid; Froomkin, A Michael; Cava, Anita; Abril, Patricia; Goodman, Kenneth W

    2010-10-01

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Project HealthDesign included funding of an ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) team, to serve in an advisory capacity to the nine design projects. In that capacity, the authors had the opportunity to analyze the personal health record (PHR) and personal health application (PHA) implementations for recurring themes. PHRs and PHAs invert the long-standing paradigm of health care institutions as the authoritative data-holders and data-processors in the system. With PHRs and PHAs, the individual is the center of his or her own health data universe, a position that brings new benefits but also entails new responsibilities for patients and other parties in the health information infrastructure. Implications for law, policy and practice follow from this shift. This article summarizes the issues raised by the first phase of Project HealthDesign projects, categorizing them into four topics: privacy and confidentiality, data security, decision support, and HIPAA and related legal-regulatory requirements. Discussion and resolution of these issues will be critical to successful PHR/PHA implementations in the years to come.

  1. Organizational strategies for promoting patient and provider uptake of personal health records

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Susan; Rozenblum, Ronen; Park, Andrea; Dunn, Marie; Bates, David W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate organizational strategies to promote personal health records (PHRs) adoption with a focus on patients with chronic disease. Methods Using semi-structured interviews and a web-based survey, we sampled US health delivery organizations which had implemented PHRs for at least 12 months, were recognized as PHR innovators, and had scored highly in national patient satisfaction surveys. Respondents had lead positions for clinical information systems or high-risk population management. Using grounded theory approach, thematic categories were derived from interviews and coupled with data from the survey. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants from 16 identified organizations. Organizational strategies were directed towards raising patient awareness via multimedia communications, and provider acceptance and uptake. Strategies for providers were grouped into six main themes: organizational vision, governance and policies, work process redesign, staff training, information technology (IT) support, and monitoring and incentives. Successful organizations actively communicated their vision, engaged leaders at all levels, had clear governance, planning, and protocols, set targets, and celebrated achievement. The most effective strategy for patient uptake was through health professional encouragement. No specific outreach efforts targeted patients with chronic disease. Registration and PHR activity was routinely measured but without reference to a denominator population or high risk subpopulations. Discussion and conclusion Successful PHR implementation represents a social change and operational project catalyzed by a technical solution. The key to clinician acceptance is making their work easier. However, organizations will likely not achieve the value they want from PHRs unless they target specific populations and monitor their uptake. PMID:25326601

  2. Electronic Health Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does your doc scribble notes onto sheets of paper and then slide them into an ever-expanding ... for errors. Security. There's always the chance that paper records can get lost or misfiled or somehow ...

  3. Multimedia Health Records: user-centered design approach for a multimedia uploading service.

    PubMed

    Plazzotta, Fernando; Mayan, John C; Storani, Fernando D; Ortiz, Juan M; Lopez, Gastón E; Gimenez, Gastón M; Luna, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Multimedia elements add value to text documents by transmitting information difficult to express in words. In healthcare, many professional and services keep this elements in their own repositories. This brings the problem of information fragmentation in different silos which hinder its access to other healthcare professionals. On the other hand patients have clinical data of their own in different formats generated in different healthcare organizations which is not accessible to professionals within our healthcare network. This paper describes the design, development and implementation processes of a service which allows media elements to be loaded in a patient clinical data repository (CDR) either through an electronic health record by professionals (EHR) or through a personal health record (PHR) by patients, in order to avoid fragmentation of the information.

  4. Patient-Centered e-Health Record over the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilacopoulos, George; Prentza, Andrianna; Kyriazis, Dimosthenis; Malamateniou, Flora; Maglaveras, Nicos; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Mourouzis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Patient-Centered e-Health (PCEH) conceptual aspects alongside a multidisciplinary project that combines state-of-the-art technologies like cloud computing. The project, by combining several aspects of PCEH, such as: (a) electronic Personal Healthcare Record (e-PHR), (b) homecare telemedicine technologies, (c) e-prescribing, e-referral, e-learning, with advanced technologies like cloud computing and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), will lead to an innovative integrated e-health platform of many benefits to the society, the economy, the industry, and the research community. To achieve this, a consortium of experts, both from industry (two companies, one hospital and one healthcare organization) and academia (three universities), was set to investigate, analyse, design, build and test the new platform. This paper provides insights to the PCEH concept and to the current stage of the project. In doing so, we aim at increasing the awareness of this important endeavor and sharing the lessons learned so far throughout our work.

  5. Personal health records: key adoption issues and implications for management.

    PubMed

    Raisinghani, Mahesh S; Young, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Electronic Personal Health Records (PHRs) has been perceived as the tool to empower consumers to become active decision-makers of their healthcare instead of leaving the decision to providers. However, there has been the lack of enthusiasm and adoption of PHRs. This paper examines the current healthcare climate and attempts to understand the major challenges associated with PHRs adoption. The paper-based and fragmented healthcare system is no longer appropriate for the digital economy of the 21st century. The integrated health information technology system is the solution to transform clinical practice to consumer centric and information driven. Tools such as PHRs are means to an end that provide better, safer and more affordable healthcare for consumers. However, there has been little research conducted to demonstrate PHR's tangible value, despite the widespread perceived value of these technologies. Although survey data reveals that there is a lack of awareness among the public, consumers are receptive to this concept, especially when a physician recommends it. Key issues in adopting PHRs and strategies for successful implementation of PHRs are discussed.

  6. Designing patient-centered personal health records (PHRs): health care professionals' perspective on patient-generated data.

    PubMed

    Huba, Nicholas; Zhang, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Currently, patients not only want access to various medical records their health care providers keep about them, but they also are willing to become active participants in managing their own health information and the health information of the ones they care for. Personal health records were developed to help fulfill this need. Health care professionals are instrumental in the successful adoption of PHRs. Nevertheless, a full understanding of different health care practitioners' views of PHRs, including how PHRs could fit into the existing health care system, is lacking. The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate PHRs from the perspective of health care professionals. Twenty-one practitioners with 10 different specialties were interviewed. The results suggest that although PHRs were still a novel concept to the study participants, a majority of them did value information provided by patients and would recommend that patients keep such records. Participants with different specialties tended to look for different types of information to be included in PHRs, and wished the information to be presented in ways that supported their work, as well as supported knowledge discovery. The participants also expressed a need to share patient information, but had various concerns about sharing. The implications of the results of the study in regard to the design of future PHR systems are discussed.

  7. Initial Usability and Feasibility Evaluation of a Personal Health Record-Based Self-Management System for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Barbara; Lucero, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic personal health record-based (ePHR-based) self-management systems can improve patient engagement and have an impact on health outcomes. In order to realize the benefits of these systems, there is a need to develop and evaluate heath information technology from the same theoretical underpinnings. Methods: Using an innovative usability approach based in human-centered distributed information design (HCDID), we tested an ePHR-based falls-prevention self-management system—Self-Assessment via a Personal Health Record (i.e., SAPHeR)—designed using HCDID principles in a laboratory. And we later evaluated SAPHeR’s use by community-dwelling older adults at home. Results: The innovative approach used in this study supported the analysis of four components: tasks, users, representations, and functions. Tasks were easily learned and features such as text-associated images facilitated task completion. Task performance times were slow, however user satisfaction was high. Nearly seven out of every ten features desired by design participants were evaluated in our usability testing of the SAPHeR system. The in vivo evaluation suggests that older adults could improve their confidence in performing indoor and outdoor activities after using the SAPHeR system. Discussion/Conclusion: We have applied an innovative consumer-usability evaluation. Our approach addresses the limitations of other usability testing methods that do not utilize consistent theoretically based methods for designing and testing technology. We have successfully demonstrated the utility of testing consumer technology use across multiple components (i.e., task, user, representational, functional) to evaluate the usefulness, usability, and satisfaction of an ePHR-based self-management system. PMID:26290889

  8. Which Users Should Be the Focus of Mobile Personal Health Records? Analysis of User Characteristics Influencing Usage of a Tethered Mobile Personal Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guna; Park, Joong Yeol; Shin, Soo-Yong; Hwang, Jong Su; Ryu, Hyeon Jeong; Bates, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study was conducted to analyze the usage pattern of a hospital-tethered mobile personal health records (m-PHRs) application named My Chart in My Hand (MCMH) and to identify user characteristics that influence m-PHR usage. Materials and Methods: Access logs to MCMH and its menus were collected for a total of 18 months, from August 2011 to January 2013. Usage patterns between users without a patient identification number (ID) and users with a patient ID were compared. Users with a patient ID were divided into light and heavy user groups by the median number of monthly access. Multiple linear regression models were used to assess MCMH usage pattern by characteristics of MCMH user with a patient ID. Results: The total number of MCMH logins was 105,603, and the median number of accesses was 15 times. Users (n = 7,096) mostly accessed the “My Chart” menu, but “OPD [outpatient department] Service Support” and “Health Management” menus were also frequently used. Patients with chronic diseases, experience of hospital visits including emergency room and OPD, and age group of 0–19 years were more frequently found among users with a patient ID (n = 2,186) (p < 0.001). A similar trend was found in the heavy user group (n = 1,123). Submenus of laboratory result, online appointment, and medication lists that were accessed mostly by users with a patient ID were associated with OPD visit and chronic diseases. Conclusions: This study showed that focuses on patients with chronic disease and more hospital visits and empowerment functions in a tethered m-PHR would be helpful to pursue the extensive use. PMID:26447775

  9. Behavioral health electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Ted; Barrows, Erik

    2008-03-01

    The electronic medical record (EMR) will be an important part of the future of medical practice. Behavioral health treatment demands certain additions to the capabilities of a standard general medical EMR. The current focus on the quality management and financial aspects of the EMR are only initial examples of what this tool can do. It is important for behavioral health practitioners to understand that they must embrace this innovation and mold it into a product that serves their needs and the needs of their patients. An efficient and effective EMR will greatly assist the overall clinical enterprise in a number of important areas. PMID:18295041

  10. Consumer Opinions of Health Information Exchange, e-Prescribing, and Personal Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Gary L.; Lander, Lina; Morien, Marsha; Lomelin, Daniel E.; Brittin, Jeri; Reker, Celeste; Klepser, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Consumer satisfaction is a crucial component of health information technology (HIT) utilization, as high satisfaction is expected to increase HIT utilization among providers and to allow consumers to become full participants in their own healthcare management. Objective The primary objective of this pilot study was to identify consumer perspectives on health information technologies including health information exchange (HIE), e-prescribing (e-Rx), and personal health records (PHRs). Methods Eight focus groups were conducted in seven towns and cities across Nebraska in 2013. Each group consisted of 10–12 participants. Discussions were organized topically in the following categories: HIE, e-Rx, and PHR. The qualitative analysis consisted of immersion and crystallization to develop a coding scheme that included both preconceived and emergent themes. Common themes across focus groups were identified and compiled for each discussion category. Results The study had 67 participants, of which 18 (27 percent) were male. Focus group findings revealed both perceived barriers and benefits to the adoption of HIT. Common HIT concerns expressed across focus groups included privacy and security of medical information, decreases in quality of care, inconsistent provider participation, and the potential cost of implementation. Positive expectations regarding HIT included better accuracy and completeness of information, and improved communication and coordination between healthcare providers. Improvements in patient care were expected as a result of easy physician access to consolidated information across providers as well as the speed of sharing and availability of information in an emergency. In addition, participants were optimistic about patient empowerment and convenient access to and control of personal health data. Conclusion Consumer concerns focused on privacy and security of the health information, as well as the cost of implementing the technologies and the

  11. Structural basis of Rap phosphatase inhibition by Phr peptides.

    PubMed

    Gallego del Sol, Francisca; Marina, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Two-component systems, composed of a sensor histidine kinase and an effector response regulator (RR), are the main signal transduction devices in bacteria. In Bacillus, the Rap protein family modulates complex signaling processes mediated by two-component systems, such as competence, sporulation, or biofilm formation, by inhibiting the RR components involved in these pathways. Despite the high degree of sequence homology, Rap proteins exert their activity by two completely different mechanisms of action: inducing RR dephosphorylation or blocking RR binding to its target promoter. However the regulatory mechanism involving Rap proteins is even more complex since Rap activity is antagonized by specific signaling peptides (Phr) through a mechanism that remains unknown at the molecular level. Using X-ray analyses, we determined the structure of RapF, the anti-activator of competence RR ComA, alone and in complex with its regulatory peptide PhrF. The structural and functional data presented herein reveal that peptide PhrF blocks the RapF-ComA interaction through an allosteric mechanism. PhrF accommodates in the C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat domain of RapF by inducing its constriction, a conformational change propagated by a pronounced rotation to the N-terminal ComA-binding domain. This movement partially disrupts the ComA binding site by triggering the ComA disassociation, whose interaction with RapF is also sterically impaired in the PhrF-induced conformation of RapF. Sequence analyses of the Rap proteins, guided by the RapF-PhrF structure, unveil the molecular basis of Phr recognition and discrimination, allowing us to relax the Phr specificity of RapF by a single residue change.

  12. Biometrics for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Flores Zuniga, Alejandro Enrique; Win, Khin Than; Susilo, Willy

    2010-10-01

    Securing electronic health records, in scenarios in which the provision of care services is share among multiple actors, could become a complex and costly activity. Correct identification of patients and physician, protection of privacy and confidentiality, assignment of access permissions for healthcare providers and resolutions of conflicts rise as main points of concern in the development of interconnected health information networks. Biometric technologies have been proposed as a possible technological solution for these issues due to its ability to provide a mechanism for unique verification of an individual identity. This paper presents an analysis of the benefit as well as disadvantages offered by biometric technology. A comparison between this technology and more traditional identification methods is used to determine the key benefits and flaws of the use biometric in health information systems. The comparison as been made considering the viability of the technologies for medical environments, global security needs, the contemplation of a share care environment and the costs involved in the implementation and maintenance of such technologies. This paper also discusses alternative uses for biometrics technologies in health care environments. The outcome of this analysis lays in the fact that even when biometric technologies offer several advantages over traditional method of identification, they are still in the early stages of providing a suitable solution for a health care environment. PMID:20703610

  13. Biometrics for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Flores Zuniga, Alejandro Enrique; Win, Khin Than; Susilo, Willy

    2010-10-01

    Securing electronic health records, in scenarios in which the provision of care services is share among multiple actors, could become a complex and costly activity. Correct identification of patients and physician, protection of privacy and confidentiality, assignment of access permissions for healthcare providers and resolutions of conflicts rise as main points of concern in the development of interconnected health information networks. Biometric technologies have been proposed as a possible technological solution for these issues due to its ability to provide a mechanism for unique verification of an individual identity. This paper presents an analysis of the benefit as well as disadvantages offered by biometric technology. A comparison between this technology and more traditional identification methods is used to determine the key benefits and flaws of the use biometric in health information systems. The comparison as been made considering the viability of the technologies for medical environments, global security needs, the contemplation of a share care environment and the costs involved in the implementation and maintenance of such technologies. This paper also discusses alternative uses for biometrics technologies in health care environments. The outcome of this analysis lays in the fact that even when biometric technologies offer several advantages over traditional method of identification, they are still in the early stages of providing a suitable solution for a health care environment.

  14. Perceptions of chronically ill and healthy consumers about electronic personal health records: a comparative empirical investigation

    PubMed Central

    Cocosila, Mihail; Archer, Norm

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a model of consumer perceptions of electronic personal health records (PHRs) and validate it in a comparative study between consumers who report having a chronic illness and those who report being well. Materials and methods A model of PHR use motivators and barriers was built and tested through a national survey across Canada. Data were collected from 800 individuals, 18 years or older. Half reported having a chronic illness or disability and half reported being well. Analyses were performed with structural equation modelling techniques. Results A total of 389 answers from chronically ill and 383 from well participants were collected. Perceived usefulness was the key explanation of the intention to use PHRs for both ill and well people (total effect of 0.601 and 0.565, respectively) followed by security, privacy and trust in PHRs (total effect of 0.377 and 0.479, respectively). Conversely, computer anxiety was perceived as a significant barrier (total effect of −0.327 for ill individuals and −0.212 for well individuals). Discussion The model proposed was appropriate in explaining key consumer positive and negative perceptions on electronic PHR use. We found little difference in perceptions of electronic PHRs between chronically ill and well individuals, although self-reporting their health status might have influenced the results. Conclusions To increase the adoption rate of electronic PHRs among both chronically ill and well consumers it is necessary to reinforce consumer perceptions of the usefulness of and trust in these eHealth technologies while mitigating their anxieties about computer use in general. PMID:25056975

  15. Integrated Personal Health Records: Transformative Tools for Consumer-Centric Care

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Raymond, Brian; Tang, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background Integrated personal health records (PHRs) offer significant potential to stimulate transformational changes in health care delivery and self-care by patients. In 2006, an invitational roundtable sponsored by Kaiser Permanente Institute, the American Medical Informatics Association, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality was held to identify the transformative potential of PHRs, as well as barriers to realizing this potential and a framework for action to move them closer to the health care mainstream. This paper highlights and builds on the insights shared during the roundtable. Discussion While there is a spectrum of dominant PHR models, (standalone, tethered, integrated), the authors state that only the integrated model has true transformative potential to strengthen consumers' ability to manage their own health care. Integrated PHRs improve the quality, completeness, depth, and accessibility of health information provided by patients; enable facile communication between patients and providers; provide access to health knowledge for patients; ensure portability of medical records and other personal health information; and incorporate auto-population of content. Numerous factors impede widespread adoption of integrated PHRs: obstacles in the health care system/culture; issues of consumer confidence and trust; lack of technical standards for interoperability; lack of HIT infrastructure; the digital divide; uncertain value realization/ROI; and uncertain market demand. Recent efforts have led to progress on standards for integrated PHRs, and government agencies and private companies are offering different models to consumers, but substantial obstacles remain to be addressed. Immediate steps to advance integrated PHRs should include sharing existing knowledge and expanding knowledge about them, building on existing efforts, and continuing dialogue among public and private sector stakeholders. Summary Integrated PHRs promote active, ongoing

  16. Personal Health Records: Beneficial or Burdensome for Patients and Healthcare Providers?

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Melissa; Boateng, Samuel; Studeny, Jana; Coustasse, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) have been mandated to be made available to patients to provide increased access to medical care information, encourage participation in healthcare decision making, and enable correction of errors within medical records. The purpose of this study was to analyze the usefulness of PHRs from the perspectives of patients and providers. The methodology of this qualitative study was a literature review using 34 articles. PHRs are powerful tools for patients and healthcare providers. Better healthcare results and correction of medical records have been shown to be positive outcomes of the use of PHRs. PHRs have also been shown to be difficult for patients to use and understand, and providers had concerns about correct information transferring to the portals and patients eliminating information from the record. Concerns regarding patient understanding of medical records, legal liability, and the response time required of providers were also identified. For the PHR to succeed in the US healthcare system, assurance that the information will be protected, useful, and easily accessed is necessary. PMID:27134613

  17. PACS and electronic health records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Simona; Gilboa, Flora; Shani, Uri

    2002-05-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a major component of the health informatics domain. An important part of the EHR is the medical images obtained over a patient's lifetime and stored in diverse PACS. The vision presented in this paper is that future medical information systems will convert data from various medical sources -- including diverse modalities, PACS, HIS, CIS, RIS, and proprietary systems -- to HL7 standard XML documents. Then, the various documents are indexed and compiled to EHRs, upon which complex queries can be posed. We describe the conversion of data retrieved from PACS systems through DICOM to HL7 standard XML documents. This enables the EHR system to answer queries such as 'Get all chest images of patients at the age of 20-30, that have blood type 'A' and are allergic to pine trees', which a single PACS cannot answer. The integration of data from multiple sources makes our approach capable of delivering such answers. It enables the correlation of medical, demographic, clinical, and even genetic information. In addition, by fully indexing all the tagged data in DICOM objects, it becomes possible to offer access to huge amounts of valuable data, which can be better exploited in the specific radiology domain.

  18. Structures of PHR domains from Mus musculus Phr1 (Mycbp2) explain the loss-of-function mutation (Gly1092-->Glu) of the C. elegans ortholog RPM-1.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A; Miller, Stacy A; Bain, Kevin T; Rutter, Marc E; Gheyi, Tarun; Abrams, Benjamin; Wang, Yingchun; Atwell, Shane; Luz, John G; Thompson, Devon A; Wasserman, Stephen R; Emtage, J Spencer; Park, Eun Chan; Rongo, Christopher; Jin, Yishi; Klemke, Richard L; Sauder, J Michael; Burley, Stephen K

    2010-04-01

    PHR [PAM (protein associated with Myc)-HIW (Highwire)-RPM-1 (regulator of presynaptic morphology 1)] proteins are conserved, large multi-domain E3 ubiquitin ligases with modular architecture. PHR proteins presynaptically control synaptic growth and axon guidance and postsynaptically regulate endocytosis of glutamate receptors. Dysfunction of neuronal ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. PHR proteins are characterized by the presence of two PHR domains near the N-terminus, which are essential for proper localization and function. Structures of both the first and second PHR domains of Mus musculus (mouse) Phr1 (MYC binding protein 2, Mycbp2) have been determined, revealing a novel beta sandwich fold composed of 11 antiparallel beta-strands. Conserved loops decorate the apical side of the first PHR domain (MmPHR1), yielding a distinct conserved surface feature. The surface of the second PHR domain (MmPHR2), in contrast, lacks significant conservation. Importantly, the structure of MmPHR1 provides insights into a loss-of-function mutation, Gly1092-->Glu, observed in the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog RPM-1. PMID:20156452

  19. [Requirements regarding health records: transfer or copy].

    PubMed

    Brands, W G; van der Ven, J M; Eijkman, M A J

    2013-06-01

    Dutch law requires every healthcare provider, which obviously includes dentists, to maintain health records. Most of the rules governing the health record requirement are in the Law of Agreement to Medical Treatment (WGBO). And, as is often the case with the law, interpretation is left to the (disciplinary)judge. There is, in fact, a considerable amount of legal precedent concerning what information belongs in the health record. It is not uncommon for a dentist to be on the losing side in a legal proceeding because his defence is not supported by the health record. And if it becomes clear that (a portion of) the health record has been destroyed, despite the legal requirement to maintain records, in this too the dentist can count on little sympathy from the judge. In a recent judgment, the Central Disciplinary Committee was more severe than ever- with far-reaching consequences for the relevant dentist. PMID:23858633

  20. Veterans' voices: use of the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Survey to identify My HealtheVet personal health record users' characteristics, needs, and preferences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Consumer research reveals considerable interest in the use of Personal Health Records (PHRs), yet adoption remains relatively low. Both adopters and nonadopters represent important perspectives from which to understand this paradox. Objective This study focuses on direct feedback from adopters obtained using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) survey on the My HealtheVet PHR portal (http://www.myhealth.va.gov) of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The results represent a source of direct feedback with which to better understand veterans' needs and preferences. Methods The ACSI Survey was implemented in October 2007 to measure satisfaction and elicit information about characteristics and preferences of My HealtheVet PHR adopters. The data represent a continuous random sample of site visitors who have navigated at least four pages on the site. A total of 100 617 surveys were completed (17.2%). Results Satisfaction with My HealtheVet is high (8.3/10.0), and users are highly likely to return to the site (8.6/10.0) and recommend the site to other veterans (9.1/10.0). The majority of system adopters are male (91%), between the ages of 51 and 70 (68%), and served in the Vietnam War (60%). Most veterans currently visit the site to utilize pharmacy-related features. Conclusion VHA has used the ACSI to monitor satisfaction, and to better understand the characteristics, needs, and preferences of early adopters. The data provide an important source of direct feedback to inform program development. Future research will include monitoring the impact of enhancements and new features on satisfaction, and conducting additional research with nonadopters to identify barriers to adoption and use. PMID:20190065

  1. Development of a Multi-Agent m-Health Application Based on Various Protocols for Chronic Disease Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Sang; Cho, Hune; Kim, Hwa Sun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a mobile health application (Self-Management mobile Personal Health Record: "SmPHR") to ensure the interoperability of various personal health devices (PHDs) and electronic medical record systems (EMRs) for continuous self-management of chronic disease patients. The SmPHR was developed for Android 4.0.3, and implemented according to the optimized standard protocol for each interface of healthcare services adopted by the Continua Health Alliance (CHA). That is, the Personal Area Network (PAN) interface between the application and PHD implements ISO/IEEE 11073-20,601, 10,404, 10,407, 10,415, 10,417, and Bluetooth Health Device Profile (HDP), and EMRs with a wide area network (WAN) interface implement HL7 V2.6; the Health Record Network (HRN) interface implements Continuity of Care Document (CCD) and Continuity of Care Record (CCR). Also, for SmPHR, we evaluated the transmission error rate between the interface using four PHDs and personal health record systems (PHRs) from previous research, with 611 users and elderly people after receiving institutional review board (IRB) approval. In the evaluation, the PAN interface showed 15 (2.4 %) errors, and the WAN and HRN interface showed 13 (2.1 %) errors in a total of 611 transmission attempts. Also, we received opinions regarding SmPHR from 15 healthcare professionals who took part in the clinical trial. Thus, SmPHR can be provided as an interconnected PHR mobile health service to patients, allowing 'plug and play' of PHDs and EMRs through various standard protocols. PMID:26573657

  2. Development of a Multi-Agent m-Health Application Based on Various Protocols for Chronic Disease Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Sang; Cho, Hune; Kim, Hwa Sun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a mobile health application (Self-Management mobile Personal Health Record: "SmPHR") to ensure the interoperability of various personal health devices (PHDs) and electronic medical record systems (EMRs) for continuous self-management of chronic disease patients. The SmPHR was developed for Android 4.0.3, and implemented according to the optimized standard protocol for each interface of healthcare services adopted by the Continua Health Alliance (CHA). That is, the Personal Area Network (PAN) interface between the application and PHD implements ISO/IEEE 11073-20,601, 10,404, 10,407, 10,415, 10,417, and Bluetooth Health Device Profile (HDP), and EMRs with a wide area network (WAN) interface implement HL7 V2.6; the Health Record Network (HRN) interface implements Continuity of Care Document (CCD) and Continuity of Care Record (CCR). Also, for SmPHR, we evaluated the transmission error rate between the interface using four PHDs and personal health record systems (PHRs) from previous research, with 611 users and elderly people after receiving institutional review board (IRB) approval. In the evaluation, the PAN interface showed 15 (2.4 %) errors, and the WAN and HRN interface showed 13 (2.1 %) errors in a total of 611 transmission attempts. Also, we received opinions regarding SmPHR from 15 healthcare professionals who took part in the clinical trial. Thus, SmPHR can be provided as an interconnected PHR mobile health service to patients, allowing 'plug and play' of PHDs and EMRs through various standard protocols.

  3. Use of electronic personal health record systems to encourage HIV screening: an exploratory study of patient and provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When detected, HIV can be effectively treated with antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless in the U.S. approximately 25% of those who are HIV-infected do not know it. Much remains unknown about how to increase HIV testing rates. New Internet outreach methods have the potential to increase disease awareness and screening among patients, especially as electronic personal health records (PHRs) become more widely available. In the US Department of Veterans' Affairs medical care system, 900,000 veterans have indicated an interest in receiving electronic health-related communications through the PHR. Therefore we sought to evaluate the optimal circumstances and conditions for outreach about HIV screening. In an exploratory, qualitative research study we examined patient and provider perceptions of Internet-based outreach to increase HIV screening among veterans who use the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) health care system. Findings We conducted two rounds of focus groups with veterans and healthcare providers at VHA medical centers. The study's first phase elicited general perceptions of an electronic outreach program to increase screening for HIV, diabetes, and high cholesterol. Using phase 1 results, outreach message texts were drafted and then presented to participants in the second phase. Analysis followed modified grounded theory. Patients and providers indicated that electronic outreach through a PHR would provide useful information and would motivate patients to be screened for HIV. Patients believed that electronic information would be more convenient and understandable than information provided verbally. Patients saw little difference between messages about HIV versus about diabetes and cholesterol. Providers, however, felt patients would disapprove of HIV-related messages due to stigma. Providers expected increased workload from the electronic outreach, and thus suggested adding primary care resources and devising methods to smooth the flow of

  4. Nurses' Perceptions of the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Rocquel Devonne

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of electronic health records (EHR) by health care organizations has been limited. Despite the broad consensus on the potential benefits of EHRs, health care organizations have been slow to adopt the technology. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore licensed practical and registered nurses'…

  5. Lifelong personal health data and application software via virtual machines in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Van Gorp, Pieter; Comuzzi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) should remain the lifelong property of patients, who should be able to show them conveniently and securely to selected caregivers and institutions. In this paper, we present MyPHRMachines, a cloud-based PHR system taking a radically new architectural solution to health record portability. In MyPHRMachines, health-related data and the application software to view and/or analyze it are separately deployed in the PHR system. After uploading their medical data to MyPHRMachines, patients can access them again from remote virtual machines that contain the right software to visualize and analyze them without any need for conversion. Patients can share their remote virtual machine session with selected caregivers, who will need only a Web browser to access the pre-loaded fragments of their lifelong PHR. We discuss a prototype of MyPHRMachines applied to two use cases, i.e., radiology image sharing and personalized medicine. PMID:24403402

  6. Quality and Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and use of health information technology, the electronic health record (EHR) in particular, has the potential to help improve the quality of care, increase patient safety, and reduce health care costs. Unfortunately, adoption and use of health information technology has been slow, especially when compared to the adoption and use of…

  7. Fear of e-Health records implementation?

    PubMed

    Laur, Audrey

    2015-03-01

    As our world is dominated by Information Communication and Technologies (ICT), governments of many leading countries have decided to implement ICT in their health systems. The first step is the digitalisation of medical records (e-Health Records or EHRs). In order to reduce concerns that health systems encountered, EHRs are supposed to prevent duplicated prescriptions and hospitalisations, ineffective transferability of medical records, lack of communication in clinical assessments, etc. They are also expected to improve the relationship between health providers and patients. At first sight, EHR seems to offer considerable potential for assisting health policies, enabling the development of new tools to facilitate coordination and cooperation among health professionals and promoting a new approach to sharing medical information. However, as discussed in this article, recent debates have shown that EHR presents pros and cons (technical, financial, social) that governments need to clarify urgently. PMID:25027492

  8. Fear of e-Health records implementation?

    PubMed

    Laur, Audrey

    2015-03-01

    As our world is dominated by Information Communication and Technologies (ICT), governments of many leading countries have decided to implement ICT in their health systems. The first step is the digitalisation of medical records (e-Health Records or EHRs). In order to reduce concerns that health systems encountered, EHRs are supposed to prevent duplicated prescriptions and hospitalisations, ineffective transferability of medical records, lack of communication in clinical assessments, etc. They are also expected to improve the relationship between health providers and patients. At first sight, EHR seems to offer considerable potential for assisting health policies, enabling the development of new tools to facilitate coordination and cooperation among health professionals and promoting a new approach to sharing medical information. However, as discussed in this article, recent debates have shown that EHR presents pros and cons (technical, financial, social) that governments need to clarify urgently.

  9. Syndromic Surveillance Using Ambulatory Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Hripcsak, George; Soulakis, Nicholas D.; Li, Li; Morrison, Frances P.; Lai, Albert M.; Friedman, Carol; Calman, Neil S.; Mostashari, Farzad

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the performance of electronic health record data for syndromic surveillance and to assess the feasibility of broadly distributed surveillance. Design Two systems were developed to identify influenza-like illness and gastrointestinal infectious disease in ambulatory electronic health record data from a network of community health centers. The first system used queries on structured data and was designed for this specific electronic health record. The second used natural language processing of narrative data, but its queries were developed independently from this health record. Both were compared to influenza isolates and to a verified emergency department chief complaint surveillance system. Measurements Lagged cross-correlation and graphs of the three time series. Results For influenza-like illness, both the structured and narrative data correlated well with the influenza isolates and with the emergency department data, achieving cross-correlations of 0.89 (structured) and 0.84 (narrative) for isolates and 0.93 and 0.89 for emergency department data, and having similar peaks during influenza season. For gastrointestinal infectious disease, the structured data correlated fairly well with the emergency department data (0.81) with a similar peak, but the narrative data correlated less well (0.47). Conclusions It is feasible to use electronic health records for syndromic surveillance. The structured data performed best but required knowledge engineering to match the health record data to the queries. The narrative data illustrated the potential performance of a broadly disseminated system and achieved mixed results. PMID:19261941

  10. Longitudinal health record: a pediatrician's viewpoint of the longitudinal health record.

    PubMed

    Oberst, B B

    1989-01-01

    This paper will discuss the Health Record in terms of content, value of a Longitudinal Record, need for a dynamic and interactive record versus the current archived chronological repository of information, areas of application in research, clinical benefits and population related research concerning present and future influences upon a person's health. It will contain the categories of information utilized in a model Health Record, what facts should be contained within a brief Synopsis or Record Abstract and the contents of a master Pediatric Database. Areas of uses, abuses, potential problems, security needs, privacy and confidentiality issues, legal aspects, transfer of information, technical considerations, computerization of the Record and other matters will be discussed.

  11. Frequently Asked Questions about Personal Health Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... directed. Most facilities do charge for copies. The fee can only include the cost of copying (including ... healthcare provider is allowed to charge a reasonable fee for copies of your health record. The fee ...

  12. Teaching Electronic Health Record Communication Skills.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Mary Val; Sandoval, Marie; Hart, Vicki; Drill, Clarissa

    2016-06-01

    This pilot study investigated nurse practitioner students' communication skills when utilizing the electronic health record during history taking. The nurse practitioner students (n = 16) were videotaped utilizing the electronic health record while taking health histories with standardized patients. The students were videotaped during two separate sessions during one semester. Two observers recorded the time spent (1) typing and talking, (2) typing only, and (3) looking at the computer without talking. Total history taking time, computer placement, and communication skills were also recorded. During the formative session, mean history taking time was 11.4 minutes, with 3.5 minutes engaged with the computer (30.6% of visit). During the evaluative session, mean history taking time was 12.4 minutes, with 2.95 minutes engaged with the computer (24% of visit). The percentage of time individuals spent changed over the two visits: typing and talking, -3.1% (P = .3); typing only, +12.8% (P = .038); and looking at the computer, -9.6% (P = .039). This study demonstrated that time spent engaged with the computer during a patient encounter does decrease with student practice and education. Therefore, students benefit from instruction on electronic health record-specific communication skills, and use of a simple mnemonic to reinforce this is suggested.

  13. National electronic health record interoperability chronology.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, Stephen P

    2009-05-01

    The federal initiative for electronic health record (EHR) interoperability began in 2000 and set the stage for the establishment of the 2004 Executive Order for EHR interoperability by 2014. This article discusses the chronology from the 2001 e-Government Consolidated Health Informatics (CHI) initiative through the current congressional mandates for an aligned, interoperable, and agile DoD AHLTA and VA VistA.

  14. Electronic Health Records and Community Health Surveillance of Childhood Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Flood, Tracy L.; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Tomayko, Emily J.; Tandias, Aman; Carrel, Aaron L.; Hanrahan, Lawrence P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity remains a public health concern, and tracking local progress may require local surveillance systems. Electronic health record data may provide a cost-effective solution. Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of estimating childhood obesity rates using de-identified electronic health records for the purpose of public health surveillance and health promotion. Methods Data were extracted from the Public Health Information Exchange (PHINEX) database. PHINEX contains de-identified electronic health records from patients primarily in south central Wisconsin. Data on children and adolescents (aged 2–19 years, 2011–2012, n=93,130) were transformed in a two-step procedure that adjusted for missing data and weighted for a national population distribution. Weighted and adjusted obesity rates were compared to the 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Data were analyzed in 2014. Results The weighted and adjusted obesity rate was 16.1% (95% CI=15.8, 16.4). Non-Hispanic white children and adolescents (11.8%, 95% CI=11.5, 12.1) had lower obesity rates compared to non-Hispanic black (22.0%, 95% CI=20.7, 23.2) and Hispanic (23.8%, 95% CI=22.4, 25.1) patients. Overall, electronic health record–derived point estimates were comparable to NHANES, revealing disparities from preschool onward. Conclusions Electronic health records that are weighted and adjusted to account for intrinsic bias may create an opportunity for comparing regional disparities with precision. In PHINEX patients, childhood obesity disparities were measurable from a young age, highlighting the need for early intervention for at-risk children. The electronic health record is a cost-effective, promising tool for local obesity prevention efforts. PMID:25599907

  15. Electronic health records for cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Ouhbi, Sofia; Idri, Ali; Fernández-Alemán, Jose Luis; Toval, Ambrosio; Benjelloun, Halima

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, many cardiology health care centers and hospitals adopt new technologies to improve interaction with their patients. The Electronic Health Records (EHR) offer health care centers and institutions the possibility to improve the management of their patients' health data. Currently, many physicians are using EHRs to improve health care quality and efficiency. A large number of companies have emerged to provide hospitals with the opportunity to adopt EHRs within a health care platform proposing different functionalities and services which achieve certain certification criteria. This paper identifies the current list of certified EHRs for cardiovascular medicine and assesses the specifications of the EHRs selected. The result of this paper may assist EHR seekers for cardiovascular medicine in their tasks. PMID:25570218

  16. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  17. Barriers to implement Electronic Health Records (EHRs)

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Arab-Chadegani, Razieh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: During the past 20 years, with huge advances in information technology and particularly in the areas of health, various forms of electronic records have been studied, analyzed, designed or implemented. An Electronic Health Records (EHRs) is defined as digitally stored healthcare information throughout an individual’s lifetime with the purpose of supporting continuity of care, education, and research. The EHRs may include such things as observations, laboratory tests, medical images, treatments, therapies; drugs administered, patient identifying information, legal permissions, and so on. Despite of the potential benefits of electronic health records, implement of this project facing with barriers and restriction ,that the most of these limitations are cost constraints, technical limitations, standardization limits, attitudinal constraints–behavior of individuals and organizational constraints. Aim: The aim of this study was to express the main barriers to implement EHRs. Methods: This study was unsystematic-review study. The literature was searched on main barriers to implement EHRs with the help of library, books, conference proceedings, data bank, and also searches engines available at Google, Google scholar. For our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations: Electronic health record, implement, obstacle, and information technology in the searching areas of title, keywords, abstract, and full text. Results and discussion: In this study, more than 43 articles and reports were collected and 32 of them were selected based on their relevancy. Many studies indicate that the most important factor than other limitations to implement the EHR are resistance to change. PMID:24167440

  18. Electronic health records: current and future use.

    PubMed

    Peters, Steve G; Khan, Munawwar A

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current state of the electronic medical record, including benefits and shortcomings, and presents key factors likely to drive development in the next decade and beyond. The current electronic medical record to a large extent represents a digital version of the traditional paper legal record, owned and maintained by the practitioner. The future electronic health record is expected to be a shared tool, engaging patients in decision making, wellness and disease management and providing data for individual decision support, population management and analytics. Many drivers will determine this path, including payment model reform, proliferation of mobile platforms, telemedicine, genomics and individualized medicine and advances in 'big data' technologies.

  19. Confidentiality, electronic health records, and the clinician.

    PubMed

    Graves, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The advent of electronic health records (EHRs) to improve access and enable research in the everyday clinical world has simultaneously made medical information much more vulnerable to illicit, non-beneficent uses. This wealth of identified, aggregated data has and will attract attacks by domestic governments for surveillance and protection, foreign governments for espionage and sabotage, organized crime for illegal profits, and large corporations for "legal" profits. Against these powers with almost unlimited resources no security scheme is likely to prevail, so the design of such systems should include appropriate security measures. Unlike paper records, where the person maintaining and controlling the existence of the records also controls access to them, these two functions can be separated for EHRs. By giving physical control over access to individual records to their individual owners, the aggregate is dismantled, thereby protecting the nation's identified health information from large-scale data mining or tampering. Control over the existence and integrity of all the records--yet without the ability to examine their contents--would be left with larger institutions. This article discusses the implications of all of the above for the role of the clinician in assuring confidentiality (a cornerstone of clinical practice), for research and everyday practice, and for current security designs.

  20. Electronic Health Record Meets Digital Library

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, Betsy L.

    2000-01-01

    Linking the electronic health record to the digital library is a Web-era reformulation of the long-standing informatics goal of seamless integration of automated clinical data and relevant knowledge-based information to support informed decisions. The spread of the Internet, the development of the World Wide Web, and converging format standards for electronic health data and digital publications make effective linking increasingly feasible. Some existing systems link electronic health data and knowledge-based information in limited settings or limited ways. Yet many challenging informatics research problems remain to be solved before flexible and seamless linking becomes a reality and before systems become capable of delivering the specific piece of information needed at the time and place a decision must be made. Connecting the electronic health record to the digital library also requires positive resolution of important policy issues, including health data privacy, government envouragement of high-speed communications, electronic intellectual property rights, and standards for health data and for digital libraries. Both the research problems and the policy issues should be important priorities for the field of medical informatics. PMID:10984463

  1. Legal Considerations for Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Sherry; Hoffman, Andrew L

    2015-05-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) solutions provide many potential benefits for dental practices, whether those programs run internally on a dental practice's computers or are cloud-based solutions. However, these programs also create new risks for a dental practice, which may be mitigated through due diligence and adequate contractual provisions to ensure protection for dentists. This article addresses the legal considerations associated with a dentist entering into a service contract with an EHR vendor.

  2. Legal Considerations for Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Sherry; Hoffman, Andrew L

    2015-05-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) solutions provide many potential benefits for dental practices, whether those programs run internally on a dental practice's computers or are cloud-based solutions. However, these programs also create new risks for a dental practice, which may be mitigated through due diligence and adequate contractual provisions to ensure protection for dentists. This article addresses the legal considerations associated with a dentist entering into a service contract with an EHR vendor. PMID:26798899

  3. Disassociation for electronic health record privacy.

    PubMed

    Loukides, Grigorios; Liagouris, John; Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris; Terrovitis, Manolis

    2014-08-01

    The dissemination of Electronic Health Record (EHR) data, beyond the originating healthcare institutions, can enable large-scale, low-cost medical studies that have the potential to improve public health. Thus, funding bodies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the U.S., encourage or require the dissemination of EHR data, and a growing number of innovative medical investigations are being performed using such data. However, simply disseminating EHR data, after removing identifying information, may risk privacy, as patients can still be linked with their record, based on diagnosis codes. This paper proposes the first approach that prevents this type of data linkage using disassociation, an operation that transforms records by splitting them into carefully selected subsets. Our approach preserves privacy with significantly lower data utility loss than existing methods and does not require data owners to specify diagnosis codes that may lead to identity disclosure, as these methods do. Consequently, it can be employed when data need to be shared broadly and be used in studies, beyond the intended ones. Through extensive experiments using EHR data, we demonstrate that our method can construct data that are highly useful for supporting various types of clinical case count studies and general medical analysis tasks.

  4. Patient health record on a smart card.

    PubMed

    Naszlady, A; Naszlady, J

    1998-02-01

    A validated health questionnaire has been used for the documentation of a patient's history (826 items) and of the findings from physical examination (591 items) in our clinical ward for 25 years. This computerized patient record has been completed in EUCLIDES code (CEN TC/251) for laboratory tests and an ATC and EAN code listing for the names of the drugs permanently required by the patient. In addition, emergency data were also included on an EEPROM chipcard with a 24 kb capacity. The program is written in FOX-PRO language. A group of 5000 chronically ill in-patients received these cards which contain their health data. For security reasons the contents of the smart card is only accessible by a doctor's PIN coded key card. The personalization of each card was carried out in our health center and the depersonalized alphanumeric data were collected for further statistical evaluation. This information served as a basis for a real need assessment of health care and for the calculation of its cost. Code-combined with an optical card, a completely paperless electronic patient record system has been developed containing all three information carriers in medicine: Texts, Curves and Pictures.

  5. Electronic Health Record Application Support Service Enablers.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, M S; Neokleous, K; Aristodemou, A; Constantinou, I; Antoniou, Z; Schiza, E C; Pattichis, C S; Schizas, C N

    2015-08-01

    There is a huge need for open source software solutions in the healthcare domain, given the flexibility, interoperability and resource savings characteristics they offer. In this context, this paper presents the development of three open source libraries - Specific Enablers (SEs) for eHealth applications that were developed under the European project titled "Future Internet Social and Technological Alignment Research" (FI-STAR) funded under the "Future Internet Public Private Partnership" (FI-PPP) program. The three SEs developed under the Electronic Health Record Application Support Service Enablers (EHR-EN) correspond to: a) an Electronic Health Record enabler (EHR SE), b) a patient summary enabler based on the EU project "European patient Summary Open Source services" (epSOS SE) supporting patient mobility and the offering of interoperable services, and c) a Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) enabler (PACS SE) based on the dcm4che open source system for the support of medical imaging functionality. The EHR SE follows the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) V2.0 and supports the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profiles (recently awarded in Connectathon 2015). These three FI-STAR platform enablers are designed to facilitate the deployment of innovative applications and value added services in the health care sector. They can be downloaded from the FI-STAR cataloque website. Work in progress focuses in the validation and evaluation scenarios for the proving and demonstration of the usability, applicability and adaptability of the proposed enablers. PMID:26736531

  6. Macro influencers of electronic health records adoption.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay V; Chinta, Ravi; Zhirkin, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    While adoption rates for electronic health records (EHRs) have improved, the reasons for significant geographical differences in EHR adoption within the USA have remained unclear. To understand the reasons for these variations across states, we have compiled from secondary sources a profile of different states within the USA, based on macroeconomic and macro health-environment factors. Regression analyses were performed using these indicator factors on EHR adoption. The results showed that internet usage and literacy are significantly associated with certain measures of EHR adoption. Income level was not significantly associated with EHR adoption. Per capita patient days (a proxy for healthcare need intensity within a state) is negatively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Health insurance coverage is positively correlated with EHR adoption rate. Older physicians (>60 years) tend to adopt EHR systems less than their younger counterparts. These findings have policy implications on formulating regionally focused incentive programs.

  7. Missed Policy Opportunities to Advance Health Equity by Recording Demographic Data in Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Daniel E.; Holden, Kisha B.; Mack, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    The science of eliminating health disparities is complex and dependent on demographic data. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) encourages the adoption of electronic health records and requires basic demographic data collection; however, current data generated are insufficient to address known health disparities in vulnerable populations, including individuals from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds, with disabilities, and with diverse sexual identities. We conducted an administrative history of HITECH and identified gaps between the policy objective and required measure. We identified 20 opportunities for change and 5 changes, 2 of which required the collection of less data. Until health care demographic data collection requirements are consistent with public health requirements, the national goal of eliminating health disparities cannot be realized. PMID:25905840

  8. Quality and Certification of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Hoerbst, A.; Ammenwerth, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous projects, initiatives, and programs are dedicated to the development of Electronic Health Records (EHR) worldwide. Increasingly more of these plans have recently been brought from a scientific environment to real life applications. In this context, quality is a crucial factor with regard to the acceptance and utility of Electronic Health Records. However, the dissemination of the existing quality approaches is often rather limited. Objectives The present paper aims at the description and comparison of the current major quality certification approaches to EHRs. Methods A literature analysis was carried out in order to identify the relevant publications with regard to EHR quality certification. PubMed, ACM Digital Library, IEEExplore, CiteSeer, and Google (Scholar) were used to collect relevant sources. The documents that were obtained were analyzed using techniques of qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis discusses and compares the quality approaches of CCHIT, EuroRec, IHE, openEHR, and EN13606. These approaches differ with regard to their focus, support of service-oriented EHRs, process of (re-)certification and testing, number of systems certified and tested, supporting organizations, and regional relevance. Discussion The analyzed approaches show differences with regard to their structure and processes. System vendors can exploit these approaches in order to improve and certify their information systems. Health care organizations can use these approaches to support selection processes or to assess the quality of their own information systems. PMID:23616834

  9. [Shared electronic health record in Catalonia, Spain].

    PubMed

    Marimon-Suñol, Santiago; Rovira-Barberà, María; Acedo-Anta, Mateo; Nozal-Baldajos, Montserrat A; Guanyabens-Calvet, Joan

    2010-02-01

    Under the law adopted by its Parliament, the Government of Catalonia has developed an electronic medical record system for its National Health System (NHS). The model is governed by the following principles: 1) The citizen as owner of the data: direct access to his data and right to exercise his opposition's privileges; 2) Generate confidence in the system: security and confidentiality strength; 3) Shared model of information management: publishing system and access to organized and structured information, keeping in mind that the NHS of Catalonia is formally an "Integrated system of healthcare public use" (catalan acronym: SISCAT) with a wide variety of legal structures within its healthcare institutions; 4) Use of communication standards and catalogs as a need for technological and functional integration. In summary: single system of medical records shared between different actors, using interoperability tools and whose development is according to the legislation applicable in Catalonia and within its healthcare system. The result has been the establishment of a set of components and relation rules among which we highlight the following: 1) Display of information that collects sociodemographic data of the citizen, documents or reports (radiology, laboratory, therapeutic procedures, hospital release, emergency room), diagnostic health, prescription and immunization plus a summary screen with the most recent and relevant references; 2) Set of tools helping the user and direct messaging between professionals to facilitate their cooperation; 3) Model designed for supranational connections which will allow adding later, with ad hoc rules, clinical data provided by the private health sector or the proper citizen.

  10. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  11. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  12. 42 CFR 425.506 - Electronic health records technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electronic health records technology. 425.506 Section 425.506 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Standards and Reporting § 425.506 Electronic health records technology. (a) ACOs, ACO participants, and...

  13. Mining Electronic Health Records using Linked Data.

    PubMed

    Odgers, David J; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful Use guidelines have pushed the United States Healthcare System to adopt electronic health record systems (EHRs) at an unprecedented rate. Hospitals and medical centers are providing access to clinical data via clinical data warehouses such as i2b2, or Stanford's STRIDE database. In order to realize the potential of using these data for translational research, clinical data warehouses must be interoperable with standardized health terminologies, biomedical ontologies, and growing networks of Linked Open Data such as Bio2RDF. Applying the principles of Linked Data, we transformed a de-identified version of the STRIDE into a semantic clinical data warehouse containing visits, labs, diagnoses, prescriptions, and annotated clinical notes. We demonstrate the utility of this system though basic cohort selection, phenotypic profiling, and identification of disease genes. This work is significant in that it demonstrates the feasibility of using semantic web technologies to directly exploit existing biomedical ontologies and Linked Open Data.

  14. Mining Electronic Health Records using Linked Data

    PubMed Central

    Odgers, David J.; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful Use guidelines have pushed the United States Healthcare System to adopt electronic health record systems (EHRs) at an unprecedented rate. Hospitals and medical centers are providing access to clinical data via clinical data warehouses such as i2b2, or Stanford’s STRIDE database. In order to realize the potential of using these data for translational research, clinical data warehouses must be interoperable with standardized health terminologies, biomedical ontologies, and growing networks of Linked Open Data such as Bio2RDF. Applying the principles of Linked Data, we transformed a de-identified version of the STRIDE into a semantic clinical data warehouse containing visits, labs, diagnoses, prescriptions, and annotated clinical notes. We demonstrate the utility of this system though basic cohort selection, phenotypic profiling, and identification of disease genes. This work is significant in that it demonstrates the feasibility of using semantic web technologies to directly exploit existing biomedical ontologies and Linked Open Data. PMID:26306276

  15. Transforming Education for Electronic Health Record Implementation.

    PubMed

    Nicklaus, Jennifer; Kusser, Janet; Zessin, Julie; Amaya, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Outcomes are an integral part of health care. Over the years, the educational team at the authors' hospital has sought effective, realistic options for electronic health record (EHR) training that ensures standardized documentation of patient data by nursing personnel. Thus, providers will have easily available access and clinicians will experience confidence in the proficiency of their skills to use the EHR. This article describes the transformation from an instructor-led classroom training plan into a focused clinician workflow training pathway using Benner's novice-to-expert model and Lowe's five Key Principles for Successful EHR Training. Multiple teaching strategies have been incorporated into the education plan, including a computer skills assessment test, an EHR proficiency tool, web-based training modules, clinical (or specialty) scenarios, followed by practice in learning laboratories. The educational plan has produced individualized EHR learning, confident nursing performance, and overall unit management satisfaction. PMID:26247658

  16. Mining Electronic Health Records using Linked Data.

    PubMed

    Odgers, David J; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful Use guidelines have pushed the United States Healthcare System to adopt electronic health record systems (EHRs) at an unprecedented rate. Hospitals and medical centers are providing access to clinical data via clinical data warehouses such as i2b2, or Stanford's STRIDE database. In order to realize the potential of using these data for translational research, clinical data warehouses must be interoperable with standardized health terminologies, biomedical ontologies, and growing networks of Linked Open Data such as Bio2RDF. Applying the principles of Linked Data, we transformed a de-identified version of the STRIDE into a semantic clinical data warehouse containing visits, labs, diagnoses, prescriptions, and annotated clinical notes. We demonstrate the utility of this system though basic cohort selection, phenotypic profiling, and identification of disease genes. This work is significant in that it demonstrates the feasibility of using semantic web technologies to directly exploit existing biomedical ontologies and Linked Open Data. PMID:26306276

  17. Health record problem-oriented information system.

    PubMed

    Romeu, J; Sotos, F; Ros, L; Ortiz, A

    1995-01-01

    Health Record refers to the recording of the medical and relevant social history of the patient, obtained directly or indirectly. It is an instrument of frequent use that must guarantee the quality of assistance provided, reflecting all information pertinent to forming the patient's medical history. It must be designed so that data is easily and effectively retrieved for everyday use, without compromising the patient's privacy. The Health Record Problem Oriented model achieves all of these objectives. This model comprises: 1. Initial data: the relevant medical histories and biography is recorded. 2. Problems list: the patient provides reasons why she is seeking medical attention. 3. Performance plans: these include diagnostic, therapeutic, pharmacological, dietetic, physiotherapist, and surgical plans, as well as the education of the patient. 4. Evolution notes: the progress of the condition. This model guarantees multi-professional registration, an integral focus on the health, and a continued focus on the patient. These characteristics make it the model par excellence of Primary Care. Prior to the implementation of this model, existing information must be analyzed so that it can eventually be converted to a relational database. The Entity-Relationship Model (E/R Model) has been used to represent the database. Here, the basic concepts involved are entities, relationships, and attributes. Entities represent classes or objects from the real world that have common characteristics. The relationships represent the aggregation of two or more entities. The attributes are elemental properties of both entities and relationships. The E/R Diagram graphically represents the conceptual model of a database; the one built for the Health Record Problem Oriented reflects all the entities that compound the attending processes and the relationships existing between them. The Patient is the central axis of the attending process. The record contains the identifying data of the subject

  18. Integrating Electronic Health Record Competencies into Undergraduate Health Informatics Education.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Griffith, Janessa; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on our findings arising from a qualitative, interview study of students' experiences in an undergraduate health informatics program. Our findings suggest that electronic health record competencies need to be integrated into an undergraduate curriculum. Participants suggested that there is a need to educate students about the use of the EHR, followed by best practices around interface design, workflow, and implementation with this work culminating in students spearheading the design of the technology as part of their educational program of study. PMID:27577461

  19. Structures of PHR Domains from Mus musculus Phr1 (Mycbp2) Explain the Loss-of-Function Mutation (Gly1092 → Glu) of the C. elegans Ortholog RPM-1

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Miller, Stacy A.; Bain, Kevin T.; Rutter, Marc E.; Gheyi, Tarun; Abrams, Benjamin; Wang, Yingchun; Atwell, Shane; Luz, John G.; Thompson, Devon A.; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Park, Eun Chan; Rongo, Christopher; Jin, Yishi; Klemke, Richard L.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2010-11-15

    PHR [PAM (protein associated with Myc)-HIW (Highwire)-RPM-1 (regulator of presynaptic morphology 1)] proteins are conserved, large multi-domain E3 ubiquitin ligases with modular architecture. PHR proteins presynaptically control synaptic growth and axon guidance and postsynaptically regulate endocytosis of glutamate receptors. Dysfunction of neuronal ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. PHR proteins are characterized by the presence of two PHR domains near the N-terminus, which are essential for proper localization and function. Structures of both the first and second PHR domains of Mus musculus (mouse) Phr1 (MYC binding protein 2, Mycbp2) have been determined, revealing a novel {beta} sandwich fold composed of 11 antiparallel {beta}-strands. Conserved loops decorate the apical side of the first PHR domain (MmPHR1), yielding a distinct conserved surface feature. The surface of the second PHR domain (MmPHR2), in contrast, lacks significant conservation. Importantly, the structure of MmPHR1 provides insights into a loss-of-function mutation, Gly1092 {yields} Glu, observed in the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog RPM-1.

  20. A method to implement fine-grained access control for personal health records through standard relational database queries.

    PubMed

    Sujansky, Walter V; Faus, Sam A; Stone, Ethan; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    2010-10-01

    Online personal health records (PHRs) enable patients to access, manage, and share certain of their own health information electronically. This capability creates the need for precise access-controls mechanisms that restrict the sharing of data to that intended by the patient. The authors describe the design and implementation of an access-control mechanism for PHR repositories that is modeled on the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML) standard, but intended to reduce the cognitive and computational complexity of XACML. The authors implemented the mechanism entirely in a relational database system using ANSI-standard SQL statements. Based on a set of access-control rules encoded as relational table rows, the mechanism determines via a single SQL query whether a user who accesses patient data from a specific application is authorized to perform a requested operation on a specified data object. Testing of this query on a moderately large database has demonstrated execution times consistently below 100ms. The authors include the details of the implementation, including algorithms, examples, and a test database as Supplementary materials.

  1. Technological trends in health care: electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sam

    2010-01-01

    The most relevant technological trend affecting health care organizations and physician services is the electronic health record (EHR). Billions of dollars from the federal government stimulus bill are available for investment toward EHR. Based on the government directives, it is evident EHR has to be a high-priority technological intervention in health care organizations. Addressed in the following pages are the effects of the EHR trend on financial and human resources; analysis of advantages and disadvantages of EHR; action steps involved in implementing EHR, and a timeline for implementation. Medical facilities that do not meet the timetable for using EHR will likely experience reduction of Medicare payments. This article also identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats of the EHR and steps to be taken by hospitals and physician medical groups to receive stimulus payment.

  2. Predictability Bounds of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Dahlem, Dominik; Maniloff, Diego; Ratti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The ability to intervene in disease progression given a person’s disease history has the potential to solve one of society’s most pressing issues: advancing health care delivery and reducing its cost. Controlling disease progression is inherently associated with the ability to predict possible future diseases given a patient’s medical history. We invoke an information-theoretic methodology to quantify the level of predictability inherent in disease histories of a large electronic health records dataset with over half a million patients. In our analysis, we progress from zeroth order through temporal informed statistics, both from an individual patient’s standpoint and also considering the collective effects. Our findings confirm our intuition that knowledge of common disease progressions results in higher predictability bounds than treating disease histories independently. We complement this result by showing the point at which the temporal dependence structure vanishes with increasing orders of the time-correlated statistic. Surprisingly, we also show that shuffling individual disease histories only marginally degrades the predictability bounds. This apparent contradiction with respect to the importance of time-ordered information is indicative of the complexities involved in capturing the health-care process and the difficulties associated with utilising this information in universal prediction algorithms. PMID:26148751

  3. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    MedlinePlus

    ... billing purposes, does this facility use electronic health records? This is a computerized version of the resident's health and personal information used in the management of the resident's health care." All providers were ...

  4. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  5. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  6. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  7. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  8. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  9. Change management with the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Schmucker, DeeAnn

    2009-01-01

    Many medical organizations have already changed to, are implementing, or are contemplating implementing an electronic health record (EHR) system. As in all change, some people accept the switch from paper to EHRs much easier and with more enthuiasm than others. It is common for organizations to overlook the importance of including change management properties as they create the overall plan for the change from paper to paperless. Often the result of this is anger, frustration, and lack of cooperation or even sabotage from physicians and office staff who are the recipients of the training on the EHR system. This article examines the steps for, opportunities for, and positive results from incorporating change management principles from the very beginning, and the benefits accrued by understanding and utilizing the concepts of good choices, relationships, planning, and feedback.

  10. Selective binding and detection of magnetic labels using PHR sensor via photoresist micro-wells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sunjong; Baek, Nam Seob; Jung, Sang-Don; Chung, Myung-Ae; Hung, Tran Quang; Anandakumar, S; Rani, V Sudha; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Kim, CheolGi

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a novel platform for selective binding of magnetic labels on planar Hall resistance sensor (PHR) for biosensing applications. The photoresist (PR) micro wells were prepared on the PHR sensor junctions to trap the magnetic bead at specified locations on the sensor surface and thin layer of Au was sputtered in the PR wells immobilize bimolecular. The Au surface is functionalized with single-stranded oligonucleotide and further biotin was used to immobilize streptavidin coated magnetic labels (Dynabeads Myone 1.0 microm, Invitrogen Co.). After removal of the PR wells on the sensor surface the non specific binding magnetic labels were successfully removed and only the chemically bounded magnetic labels were remained on the Au surface for detection of biomolecules using PHR sensor. We controlled the number of magnetic labels on the PHR sensor surface by using different sizes of the PR well on the junctions. The specifically bounded magnetic labels were successfully detected by characterizing the individual PHR sensor junctions. This technique enables the complete control over the magnetic labels for selective binding of biomolecules on the sensor surface for increasing the sensitivity of the PHR sensor as well as removal of the non specific bindings on the sensor surface.

  11. Comparing concepts for electronic health record architectures.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Keeping all relevant information directly or indirectly related to patient's care, electronic health records (EHR) systems are supposed to be kernel application for any kind of health information systems. For facilitating shared care, managed care, or disease management, such EHR systems have to be scalable, portable, distributed, and interoperable which has to be enabled by a proper architecture supporting informational and functional needs as well. Advanced EHR architectures are based on object-oriented or component-oriented paradigms and use modern tooling to design, specify, implement and maintain EHR solutions. They reflect not only medical information but also underlying concepts and integrate an extended vocabulary. The most advanced EHR architecture approaches CEN ENV 13606, G-CPR, HL7 RIM and derived models, and finally the Australian GEHR project are shortly characterised. For comparing the solutions, the ISO RM - ODP, the Generic Component Model and the CORBA 3 methodology have been used. The HARP methodology for enhancing the current harmonisation of openEHR is shortly discussed.

  12. Personal health records for people living with HIV: a review.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kea; Klaman, Stacey L; Shea, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    Personal health records have the potential to improve patient outcomes, but the state of the literature on personal health record usage by people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is unclear. The purpose of this review is to examine the impact of personal health records on HIV-related health beliefs and behaviors. We used the Health Belief Model to guide a review of studies examining the impact of electronic personal health records on the health beliefs and behaviors among people living with HIV. The search yielded 434 results. Following abstract review, 19 papers were selected for full-text review, and 12 were included in the review. A limited number of studies in this review found a positive impact of personal health records on HIV-related beliefs and behaviors. Additional research is needed to identify which personal health record features are most influential in changing health behaviors and why adoption rates remain low, particularly for groups at greatest risk for poor HIV outcomes. Theory-informed interventions are needed to identify which patients are likely to benefit from using personal health records and how to reduce barriers to personal health record adoption for people living with HIV. PMID:26917113

  13. Mandatory Use of Electronic Health Records: Overcoming Physician Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Viseeta K.

    2012-01-01

    Literature supports the idea that electronic health records hold tremendous value for the healthcare system in that it increases patient safety, improves the quality of care and provides greater efficiency. The move toward mandatory implementation of electronic health records is a growing concern in the United States health care industry. The…

  14. Electronic Health Records Place 1st at Indy 500

    MedlinePlus

    ... Electronic Health Records were instantly, securely available to medical personnel at the world-famous Indy 500 motor race. ... data-sharing system that allows physicians and emergency medical personnel access to individual patient records. It is made ...

  15. Lessons premier hospitals learned about implementing electronic health records.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Susan D; Figlioli, Keith

    2010-04-01

    Implementing health information technology (IT) is a major strategic objective for providers. To pinpoint considerations that tie to success, the Premier health care alliance surveyed hospitals to develop an electronic health record best-practices library. Compiled from diverse health care organizations, the library outlines considerations to support "meaningful use" in the areas of computerized physician order entry, medication management, clinical documentation, reporting of measures, privacy, information exchange, management of populations' health, and personal health records. Best practices also uncovered strategies for securing executive leadership, culture change, communication, and support for clinicians. This paper summarizes lessons from the library, providing recommendations to speed up health IT implementation. PMID:20368596

  16. Lessons premier hospitals learned about implementing electronic health records.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Susan D; Figlioli, Keith

    2010-04-01

    Implementing health information technology (IT) is a major strategic objective for providers. To pinpoint considerations that tie to success, the Premier health care alliance surveyed hospitals to develop an electronic health record best-practices library. Compiled from diverse health care organizations, the library outlines considerations to support "meaningful use" in the areas of computerized physician order entry, medication management, clinical documentation, reporting of measures, privacy, information exchange, management of populations' health, and personal health records. Best practices also uncovered strategies for securing executive leadership, culture change, communication, and support for clinicians. This paper summarizes lessons from the library, providing recommendations to speed up health IT implementation.

  17. eHealth Terminology Management in Austria.

    PubMed

    Seerainer, Carina; Sabutsch, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    When it comes to establishing and operating a nationwide personal health record (PHR), effective and efficient terminology management including the development, administration, maintenance and publishing of terminologies is a precondition for semantic interoperability. In the Austrian national patient health record "ELGA" all relevant terminologies are provided and distributed by means of a CTS2-conformant terminology server. In the following article, issues and lessons learned from terminology management in a large-scale eHealth project are presented. Experience has proved the necessity of a national authority for medical terminology management in Austria. PMID:27577418

  18. Electronic Health Records and Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Yanamadala, Swati; Morrison, Doug; Curtin, Catherine; McDonald, Kathryn; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electronic health records (EHRs) were implemented to improve quality of care and patient outcomes. This study assessed the relationship between EHR-adoption and patient outcomes. We performed an observational study using State Inpatient Databases linked to American Hospital Association survey, 2011. Surgical and medical patients from 6 large, diverse states were included. We performed univariate analyses and developed hierarchical regression models relating level of EHR utilization and mortality, readmission rates, and complications. We evaluated the effect of EHR adoption on outcomes in a difference-in-differences analysis, 2008 to 2011. Medical and surgical patients sought care at hospitals reporting no EHR (3.5%), partial EHR (55.2%), and full EHR systems (41.3%). In univariate analyses, patients at hospitals with full EHR had the lowest rates of inpatient mortality, readmissions, and Patient Safety Indicators followed by patients at hospitals with partial EHR and then patients at hospitals with no EHR (P < 0.05). However, these associations were not robust when accounting for other patient and hospital factors, and adoption of an EHR system was not associated with improved patient outcomes (P > 0.05). These results indicate that patients receiving medical and surgical care at hospitals with no EHR system have similar outcomes compared to patients seeking care at hospitals with a full EHR system, after controlling for important confounders. To date, we have not yet seen the promised benefits of EHR systems on patient outcomes in the inpatient setting. EHRs may play a smaller role than expected in patient outcomes and overall quality of care. PMID:27175631

  19. Access to health records: the rights of the patient.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2010-07-01

    From time to time patients will ask to see or request a copy of the records made about them and the treatment they received from district nurses and other health professionals. While district nurses can informally allow a patient to see the content of the records they use, a request to view or have a copy of the wider health record requires a formal request for access under the Data Protection Act 1998. This article considers the requirements for requesting and granting access to a patient to view and obtain a copy of their health record.

  20. The evolution of the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Doyle-Lindrud, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Medical record documentation of patient data has evolved during the past several years. Early patient medical records included brief, written case history reports maintained for teaching purposes. One such document obtained is a text from Egypt of 48 case reports that includes injuries, fractures, wounds, dislocations, and tumors that date back to 1600 BC. This document was written on papyrus text and acquired by Edwin Smith, an Egyptologist, in 1862 (Atta, 1999; Gillum, 2013). Case reports served as the patient record for many years, used only intermittently by physicians. By the 1880s, concerns regarding medical records as legal documents for insurance and malpractice cases encouraged administrators of hospitals to supervise record content (Gillum, 2013). By 1898, the patient record came to the bedside, moving from retrospective documentation to cases reported in actual time. Medical records resembled more of the present-day record with family history, patient habits, previous illnesses, present illness, physical examination, admission urine, blood analysis, progress notes, discharge diagnosis, and instructions (Gillum, 2013). 
. PMID:25840379

  1. Next-generation phenotyping of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J

    2013-01-01

    The national adoption of electronic health records (EHR) promises to make an unprecedented amount of data available for clinical research, but the data are complex, inaccurate, and frequently missing, and the record reflects complex processes aside from the patient's physiological state. We believe that the path forward requires studying the EHR as an object of interest in itself, and that new models, learning from data, and collaboration will lead to efficient use of the valuable information currently locked in health records. PMID:22955496

  2. The population health record: concepts, definition, design, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Daniel J; Parrish, R Gibson

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the American Medical Informatics Association proposed a US information strategy that included a population health record (PopHR). Despite subsequent progress on the conceptualization, development, and implementation of electronic health records and personal health records, minimal progress has occurred on the PopHR. Adapting International Organization for Standarization electronic health records standards, we define the PopHR as a repository of statistics, measures, and indicators regarding the state of and influences on the health of a defined population, in computer processable form, stored and transmitted securely, and accessible by multiple authorized users. The PopHR is based upon an explicit population health framework and a standardized logical information model. PopHR purpose and uses, content and content sources, functionalities, business objectives, information architecture, and system architecture are described. Barriers to implementation and enabling factors and a three-stage implementation strategy are delineated. PMID:20595299

  3. The population health record: concepts, definition, design, and implementation

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, R Gibson

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the American Medical Informatics Association proposed a US information strategy that included a population health record (PopHR). Despite subsequent progress on the conceptualization, development, and implementation of electronic health records and personal health records, minimal progress has occurred on the PopHR. Adapting International Organization for Standarization electronic health records standards, we define the PopHR as a repository of statistics, measures, and indicators regarding the state of and influences on the health of a defined population, in computer processable form, stored and transmitted securely, and accessible by multiple authorized users. The PopHR is based upon an explicit population health framework and a standardized logical information model. PopHR purpose and uses, content and content sources, functionalities, business objectives, information architecture, and system architecture are described. Barriers to implementation and enabling factors and a three-stage implementation strategy are delineated. PMID:20595299

  4. The ubiquitin ligase Phr1 regulates axon outgrowth through modulation of microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lewcock, Joseph W; Genoud, Nicolas; Lettieri, Karen; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2007-11-21

    To discover new genes involved in axon navigation, we conducted a forward genetic screen for recessive alleles affecting motor neuron pathfinding in GFP reporter mice mutagenized with ENU. In Magellan mutant embryos, motor axons were error prone and wandered inefficiently at choice points within embryos, but paradoxically responded to guidance cues with normal sensitivity in vitro. We mapped the Magellan mutation to the Phr1 gene encoding a large multidomain E3 ubiquitin ligase. Phr1 is associated with the microtubule cytoskeleton within neurons and selectively localizes to axons but is excluded from growth cones. Motor and sensory neurons from Magellan mutants display abnormal morphologies due to a breakdown in the polarized distribution of components that segregate between axons and growth cones. The Magellan phenotype can be reversed by stabilizing microtubules with taxol or inhibiting p38MAPK activity. Thus, efficacious pathfinding requires Phr1 activity for coordinating the cytoskeletal organization that distinguishes axons from growth cones.

  5. Operating Room Delays: Meaningful Use in Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Van Winkle, Rachelle A; Champagne, Mary T; Gilman-Mays, Meri; Aucoin, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Perioperative areas are the most costly to operate and account for more than 40% of expenses. The high costs prompted one organization to analyze surgical delays through a retrospective review of their new electronic health record. Electronic health records have made it easier to access and aggregate clinical data; 2123 operating room cases were analyzed. Implementing a new electronic health record system is complex; inaccurate data and poor implementation can introduce new problems. Validating the electronic health record development processes determines the ease of use and the user interface, specifically related to user compliance with the intent of the electronic health record development. The revalidation process after implementation determines if the intent of the design was fulfilled and data can be meaningfully used. In this organization, the data fields completed through automation provided quantifiable, meaningful data. However, data fields completed by staff that required subjective decision making resulted in incomplete data nearly 24% of the time. The ease of use was further complicated by 490 permutations (combinations of delay types and reasons) that were built into the electronic health record. Operating room delay themes emerged notwithstanding the significant complexity of the electronic health record build; however, improved accuracy could improve meaningful data collection and a more accurate root cause analysis of operating room delays. Accurate and meaningful use of data affords a more reliable approach in quality, safety, and cost-effective initiatives. PMID:27046388

  6. Consumers’ Perceptions About and Use of the Internet for Personal Health Records and Health Information Exchange: Analysis of the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, Gary; Zhu, Fang; Miller, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) and the sharing of health information through health information exchange (HIE) have been advocated as key new components in the effective delivery of modern health care. It is important to understand consumer attitudes toward utilization of PHRs and HIE to evaluate the public’s willingness to adopt these new health care tools. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine consumer attitudes toward PHRs and their health care providers’ use of HIE, as well as to evaluate consumer use of the Internet for tracking PHRs. Methods Analysis of data from the 2007 iteration of the Health Information National Trends Study (HINTS, N=7674) was conducted using multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of consumer (1) appraisal of PHRs, (2) appraisal of health care provider use of HIE, and (3) use of the Internet for tracking PHRs. Results : Approximately 86% of US adults rated electronic access to their PHRs as important. However, only 9% of them used the Internet for tracking PHRs. Those who rated electronic access to their PHRs as important were more likely to be Hispanic (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 - 1.72) and Internet users (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.02 - 1.57) and less likely to be age 65 and above (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.38 - 0.67) or individuals whose doctors always ensured their understanding of their health (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.49 – 0.78). Those who rated HIE as important were more likely to be 45 to 54 years of age (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.03 - 2.08), 55 to 64 years of age (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.32 - 2.53), or 65 and above (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.27 - 2.43) and less likely to be women (OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.68 - 0.95) or individuals who perceive their health information as not safely guarded by their doctors (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.40 - 0.69). Among Internet users, those who used the Internet to track their PHRs were more likely to be college graduates (OR = 1.84, 95% = 1.32 - 2

  7. How to Create a Personal Health Record

    MedlinePlus

    ... to view and track some of your health information via the Internet. You may also be able to e-mail ... appointments, or get a prescription refilled through the Internet. This is a great start to giving you access to your information, but it is not your complete personal health ...

  8. Distributed Guidelines (DiG): A Software Framework for Extending Automated Health Decision Support to the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Yaqub, Edwin; Barroso, Andre

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a framework and methodology to create personal health record (PHR) systems able to transform raw health data into meaningful information for the general population. By bridging the semantic gap between an individual and his or her health data, it is expected that better care will ensue through consumer empowerment. An important challenge for the realization of this vision is the lack of available expert knowledge in a format that is concomitantly easy to codify, share, and be used by the general population. To address this challenge, we developed a novel approach to encode expert knowledge into machine-interpretable, reusable components called “consumer guidelines.” Once encoded, guidelines are easily shared, extended, and modified. These guidelines can exist as distributed documents on the Internet and be executed by our processing engine (Health-Guru) to provide an individual with personalized assessment against various health risks based on the evidence data stored in a PHR. PMID:20808608

  9. Distributed guidelines (DiG): a software framework for extending automated health decision support to the general population.

    PubMed

    Yaqub, Edwin; Barroso, Andre

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a framework and methodology to create personal health record (PHR) systems able to transform raw health data into meaningful information for the general population. By bridging the semantic gap between an individual and his or her health data, it is expected that better care will ensue through consumer empowerment. An important challenge for the realization of this vision is the lack of available expert knowledge in a format that is concomitantly easy to codify, share, and be used by the general population. To address this challenge, we developed a novel approach to encode expert knowledge into machine-interpretable, reusable components called "consumer guidelines." Once encoded, guidelines are easily shared, extended, and modified. These guidelines can exist as distributed documents on the Internet and be executed by our processing engine (Health-Guru) to provide an individual with personalized assessment against various health risks based on the evidence data stored in a PHR.

  10. Approaches to Recording Drug Allergies in Electronic Health Records: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Bernard; Morrison, Zoe; Kalra, Dipak; Cresswell, Kathrin; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug allergy represent an important subset of adverse drug reactions that is worthy of attention because many of these reactions are potentially preventable with use of computerised decision support systems. This is however dependent on the accurate and comprehensive recording of these reactions in the electronic health record. The objectives of this study were to understand approaches to the recording of drug allergies in electronic health record systems. Materials and Methods We undertook a case study comprising of 21 in-depth interviews with a purposefully selected group of primary and secondary care clinicians, academics, and members of the informatics and drug regulatory communities, observations in four General Practices and an expert group discussion with 15 participants from the Allergy and Respiratory Expert Resource Group of the Royal College of General Practitioners. Results There was widespread acceptance among healthcare professionals of the need for accurate recording of drug allergies and adverse drug reactions. Most drug reactions were however likely to go unreported to and/or unrecognised by healthcare professionals and, even when recognised and reported, not all reactions were accurately recorded. The process of recording these reactions was not standardised. Conclusions There is considerable variation in the way drug allergies are recorded in electronic health records. This limits the potential of computerised decision support systems to help alert clinicians to the risk of further reactions. Inaccurate recording of information may in some instances introduce new problems as patients are denied treatments that they are erroneously believed to be allergic to. PMID:24740090

  11. Platform links clinical data with electronic health records

    Cancer.gov

    To make data gathered from patients in clinical trials available for use in standard care, NCI has created a new computer tool to support interoperability between clinical research and electronic health record systems. This new software represents an inno

  12. An update to the Greig Health Record: Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Greig, Anita Arya; Constantin, Evelyn; LeBlanc, Claire Ma; Riverin, Bruno; Li, Patricia Tak-Sam; Cummings, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The Greig Health Record is an evidence-based health promotion guide for clinicians caring for children and adolescents 6 to 17 years of age. It provides a template for periodic health visits that is easy to use and adaptable for electronic medical records. On the record, the strength of recommendations is indicated in boldface for good, in italics for fair, and in regular typeface for recommendations based on consensus or inconclusive evidence. Checklist templates include sections for Weight, Height and BMI, Psychosocial history and Development, Nutrition, Education and Advice, Specific Concerns, Examination, Assessment, Immunization, and Medications. Included with the checklist tables are five pages of selected guidelines and resources. This update includes information from recent guidelines and research in preventive care for children and adolescents 6 to 17 years of age. Regular updates are planned. The complete Greig Health Record can be found online at the Canadian Paediatric Society's website: www.cps.ca. PMID:27441024

  13. A Study of the Technological, Instructional, and Motivational Factors Affecting PHR Certification Exam Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Although previous studies have considered the factors affecting other certification exam outcomes, they have not examined those that are related to performance on the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) exam. In response to that need, this study specifically investigates technology and training factors that affect self-efficacy and self-set…

  14. A Patient-Held Medical Record Integrating Depression Care into Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Ito, Hiroto; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Yamakage, Hajime; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Daisuke; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Depression is frequently observed in people with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to develop a tool for individuals with diabetes and depression to communicate their comorbid conditions to health-care providers. METHOD We searched the Internet to review patient-held medical records (PHRs) of patients with diabetes and examine current levels of integration of diabetes and depression care in Japan. RESULTS Eight sets of PHRs were found for people with diabetes. All PHRs included clinical follow-up of diabetes and multidisciplinary clinical pathways for diabetes care. No PHRs included depression monitoring and/or treatment. In terms of an integrated PHR for a patient comorbid with diabetes and depression, necessary components include hopes/preferences, educational information on diabetes complications and treatment, medical history, stress and coping, resources, and monitoring diabetes and depression. CONCLUSION A new PHR may be suitable for comorbid patients with diabetes and depression. PMID:27478395

  15. Big data and the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Peters, Steve G; Buntrock, James D

    2014-01-01

    The electronic medical record has evolved from a digital representation of individual patient results and documents to information of large scale and complexity. Big Data refers to new technologies providing management and processing capabilities, targeting massive and disparate data sets. For an individual patient, techniques such as Natural Language Processing allow the integration and analysis of textual reports with structured results. For groups of patients, Big Data offers the promise of large-scale analysis of outcomes, patterns, temporal trends, and correlations. The evolution of Big Data analytics moves us from description and reporting to forecasting, predictive modeling, and decision optimization.

  16. Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Valerie M; Connors, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration.

  17. Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Valerie M; Connors, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration. PMID:27326804

  18. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  19. Electronic health record: implementation across the Michigan Academic Consortium.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Andrea C; Schafer, Patricia; Dontje, Kathy; Pohl, Joanne M; Nagelkerk, Jean; Cavanagh, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The Michigan Academic Consortium of academic nurse-managed primary care centers supported member sites to venture into computer-based advances with the potential to improve quality of health services and students' educational experiences. The experiences of this consortium as it incorporated electronic health records in tandem with an electronic patient management system at several of its member sites reveal the benefits and challenges of such an endeavor. The processes of selection, adoption, and implementation of the electronic health record are discussed in this article. Many lessons learned in the process are discussed.

  20. Barriers for Adopting Electronic Health Records (EHRs) by Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima

    2013-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) are computerized medical information systems that collect, store and display patient information. They are means to create legible and organized recordings and to access clinical information about individual patients. Despite of the positive effects of the EMRs usage in medical practices, the adoption rate of such systems is still low and meets resistance from physicians. The EHRs represent an essential tool for improving both in the safety and quality of health care, though physicians must actively use these systems to accrue the benefits. This study was unsystematic-review. Aim The aim of this study was to express barriers perceived y physicians to the adoption of the EHRs. Method of the study This study was non-systematic reviewed which the literature was searched on barriers perceived by physicians to the adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) with the help of library, books, conference proceedings, data bank, and also searches engines available at Google, Google scholar. Discussion For our searches, we employed the following keywords and their combinations: physicians, electronic medical record, electronic health record, barrier, and adoption in the searching areas of title, keywords, abstract, and full text. In this study, more than 100 articles and reports were collected and 27 of them were selected based on their relevancy. Electronic health record use requires the presence of certain user and system attributes, support from others, and numerous organizational and environment facilitators. PMID:24058254

  1. Uncovering patterns of technology use in consumer health informatics.

    PubMed

    Hung, Man; Conrad, Jillian; Hon, Shirley D; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Tang, Philip

    2013-11-01

    Internet usage and accessibility has grown at a staggering rate, influencing technology use for healthcare purposes. The amount of health information technology (Health IT) available through the Internet is immeasurable and growing daily. Health IT is now seen as a fundamental aspect of patient care as it stimulates patient engagement and encourages personal health management. It is increasingly important to understand consumer health IT patterns including who is using specific technologies, how technologies are accessed, factors associated with use, and perceived benefits. To fully uncover consumer patterns it is imperative to recognize common barriers and which groups they disproportionately affect. Finally, exploring future demand and predictions will expose significant opportunities for health IT. The most frequently used health information technologies by consumers are gathering information online, mobile health (mHealth) technologies, and personal health records (PHRs). Gathering health information online is the favored pathway for healthcare consumers as it is used by more consumers and more frequently than any other technology. In regard to mHealth technologies, minority Americans, compared with White Americans utilize social media, mobile Internet, and mobile applications more frequently. Consumers believe PHRs are the most beneficial health IT. PHR usage is increasing rapidly due to PHR integration with provider health systems and health insurance plans. Key issues that have to be explicitly addressed in health IT are privacy and security concerns, health literacy, unawareness, and usability. Privacy and security concerns are rated the number one reason for the slow rate of health IT adoption.

  2. Recording actions to prevent child morbidity in children's health cards.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Daniele de Souza; Santos, Nathanielly Cristina Carvalho de Brito; Costa, Dayse Kalyne Gomes da; Pereira, Mayara de Melo; Vaz, Elenice Maria Cecchetti; Reichert, Altamira Pereira da Silva

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the registering of preventative actions in relation to child morbidity using information regarding vaccinations, as well as iron and vitamin A supplements, which are recorded in children's health cards. This transversal study used a quantitative approach and was performed in Family Health Units in the city of João Pessoa, Paraíba; the sampling was by convenience and totaled 116 children's health cards. The data was collected by observing the cards and the analysis was simple, statistical. The highest percentage of children had their vaccination cards up to date (92.2%) and those that did not were aged between 6 and 12 months: 78.9% of the cards did not have records relating to iron and vitamin A supplements and others only had records of one of the supplements being administered. The vaccination status of children in the first year of life was found to be satisfactory; however, discrepancies were observed in the recordings of the administration of iron and vitamin A supplements, which complicates monitoring performed by child health care professionals. It is hoped that this study will contribute to discussions and strategies aimed at improving the monitoring and recording of micronutrients in children's health cards. PMID:27383363

  3. A Community Health Record: Improving Health Through Multisector Collaboration, Information Sharing, and Technology.

    PubMed

    King, Raymond J; Garrett, Nedra; Kriseman, Jeffrey; Crum, Melvin; Rafalski, Edward M; Sweat, David; Frazier, Renee; Schearer, Sue; Cutts, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    We present a framework for developing a community health record to bring stakeholders, information, and technology together to collectively improve the health of a community. It is both social and technical in nature and presents an iterative and participatory process for achieving multisector collaboration and information sharing. It proposes a methodology and infrastructure for bringing multisector stakeholders and their information together to inform, target, monitor, and evaluate community health initiatives. The community health record is defined as both the proposed framework and a tool or system for integrating and transforming multisector data into actionable information. It is informed by the electronic health record, personal health record, and County Health Ranking systems but differs in its social complexity, communal ownership, and provision of information to multisector partners at scales ranging from address to zip code. PMID:27609300

  4. A Community Health Record: Improving Health Through Multisector Collaboration, Information Sharing, and Technology

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Nedra; Kriseman, Jeffrey; Crum, Melvin; Rafalski, Edward M.; Sweat, David; Frazier, Renee; Schearer, Sue; Cutts, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    We present a framework for developing a community health record to bring stakeholders, information, and technology together to collectively improve the health of a community. It is both social and technical in nature and presents an iterative and participatory process for achieving multisector collaboration and information sharing. It proposes a methodology and infrastructure for bringing multisector stakeholders and their information together to inform, target, monitor, and evaluate community health initiatives. The community health record is defined as both the proposed framework and a tool or system for integrating and transforming multisector data into actionable information. It is informed by the electronic health record, personal health record, and County Health Ranking systems but differs in its social complexity, communal ownership, and provision of information to multisector partners at scales ranging from address to zip code. PMID:27609300

  5. Health care data recording system for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Brolly, E H

    1982-07-01

    Developed countries have an established pattern for recording clinical data. The unit medical record allows statistics to be extrapolated, as well as disease patterns, births, and causes of deaths. In technologically advanced countries, medical records serve the health needs of clinic and hospital patients. However, it is now becoming clear that the emphasis on hospitalization in patient care is no longer appropriate; the emphasis must be switched from curative services to preventive and basic curative services at the primary health care level. A similar alteration will be necessary in the recordkeeping system. As progress towards literacy occurs, the aim will be to expand and improve the recording of basic data. In the next highest level, the district health center, records can be very simple. Increasing sophistication can be instituted at the higher levels of district hospital and central referral hospital. Obviously there must be adequate medical records to directly support clinical care. This paper goes on to outline the structure of such a system geared to the needs of a developing country. It is basically a model for a pilot project. The various problems which might arise before the system is implemented and can be viable include: 1) precise identification of medical records, 2) the need for standardization and definition of diagnoses, and 3) lack of coordination and/or inappropriate utilization of medical records, procedures, or personnel. Concerning procedures, there could be problems with incorrect data production, erroneous channelling of information, or improper feedback. At the lowest level of the chain would be the rural or urban health unit or the mobile health visitor with the primary health worker (PHW). Forms to be used include an attendance card, an infant weight chart, temperature chart, and referral form. The PHW must be appropriately trained in the recognition of signs and symptoms of diseases most likely to be encountered, basic drug therapy

  6. Fine-Grained Access Control for Electronic Health Record Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Pham Thi Bach; Wohlgemuth, Sven; Echizen, Isao; Thuy, Dong Thi Bich; Thuc, Nguyen Dinh

    There needs to be a strategy for securing the privacy of patients when exchanging health records between various entities over the Internet. Despite the fact that health care providers such as Google Health and Microsoft Corp.'s Health Vault comply with the U.S Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the privacy of patients is still at risk. Several encryption schemes and access control mechanisms have been suggested to protect the disclosure of a patient's health record especially from unauthorized entities. However, by implementing these approaches, data owners are not capable of controlling and protecting the disclosure of the individual sensitive attributes of their health records. This raises the need to adopt a secure mechanism to protect personal information against unauthorized disclosure. Therefore, we propose a new Fine-grained Access Control (FGAC) mechanism that is based on subkeys, which would allow a data owner to further control the access to his data at the column-level. We also propose a new mechanism to efficiently reduce the number of keys maintained by a data owner in cases when the users have different access privileges to different columns of the data being shared.

  7. Template and Model Driven Development of Standardized Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Stefan; Chalopin, Claire; Denecke, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Digital patient modeling targets the integration of distributed patient data into one overarching model. For this integration process, both a theoretical standard-based model and information structures combined with concrete instructions in form of a lightweight development process of single standardized Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are needed. In this paper, we introduce such a process along side a standard-based architecture. It allows the modeling and implementation of EHRs in a lightweight Electronic Health Record System (EHRS) core. The approach is demonstrated and tested by a prototype implementation. The results show that the suggested approach is useful and facilitates the development of standardized EHRSs. PMID:26262004

  8. Future of electronic health records: implications for decision support.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Brian; Leonard, Joan C; Vigoda, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    The potential benefits of the electronic health record over traditional paper are many, including cost containment, reductions in errors, and improved compliance by utilizing real-time data. The highest functional level of the electronic health record (EHR) is clinical decision support (CDS) and process automation, which are expected to enhance patient health and healthcare. The authors provide an overview of the progress in using patient data more efficiently and effectively through clinical decision support to improve health care delivery, how decision support impacts anesthesia practice, and how some are leading the way using these systems to solve need-specific issues. Clinical decision support uses passive or active decision support to modify clinician behavior through recommendations of specific actions. Recommendations may reduce medication errors, which would result in considerable savings by avoiding adverse drug events. In selected studies, clinical decision support has been shown to decrease the time to follow-up actions, and prediction has proved useful in forecasting patient outcomes, avoiding costs, and correctly prompting treatment plan modifications by clinicians before engaging in decision-making. Clinical documentation accuracy and completeness is improved by an electronic health record and greater relevance of care data is delivered. Clinical decision support may increase clinician adherence to clinical guidelines, but educational workshops may be equally effective. Unintentional consequences of clinical decision support, such as alert desensitization, can decrease the effectiveness of a system. Current anesthesia clinical decision support use includes antibiotic administration timing, improved documentation, more timely billing, and postoperative nausea and vomiting prophylaxis. Electronic health record implementation offers data-mining opportunities to improve operational, financial, and clinical processes. Using electronic health record data

  9. Optometric record keeping in a comprehensive health care environment.

    PubMed

    Rivard, B

    1996-05-01

    Optometric records which have evolved in private practice must be reconsidered when included in a comprehensive care environment. These hospital, health maintenance organization (HMO), preferred provider organization, and similarly linked systems require a higher degree of communication among specialties than do self-standing practices. Furthermore, the administrative requirements of such a system require more standardization, cost sensitivity, medicolegal compliance, and other elements pecular to a comprehensive facility. The expended scope of care provided by optometrists within a hospital requires familiarity with a new range of procedures, languages, and reports. Information from laboratories, radiology, and other areas must be incorporated into the optometric record. Continuity of care is more complex. Opportunities for strong interprofessional synergies within the organization arise directly from proactivity in optometric record keeping. New legal hot spots arise from questions of records ownership, access, and privacy. Billing procedures are becoming extremely important, with significant effects on quality assurance audits, coding, doctor "profiling" against fraud, and abuse; these priorities can interfere with clinical priorities. Driven primarily by the concerns and resources of large third-party payers, technology is making rapid changes in the form of optometric record keeping in comprehensive systems. Electronic data management will change the face of medical records, although administrative data will be digitized much more quickly than clinical notes. Comprehensive care environments will be the "test beds" for these technologies. Optometry is in a good position to show its contribution to the health care team through leadership in the implementation of new record keeping models. PMID:8771579

  10. The use of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Marca, Guillem; Perez, Angel; Blanco-Garcia, Martin German; Miravalles, Elena; Soley, Pere; Ortiga, Berta

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals and to identify potential barriers and facilitators to this process. We used an observational cross-sectional design. The survey was conducted between September and December 2011, using an electronic questionnaire distributed through email. We obtained a 30% response rate from the 214 hospitals contacted, all belonging to the Spanish National Health Service. The level of adoption of electronic health records in Spanish hospitals was found to be high: 39.1% of hospitals surveyed had a comprehensive EHR system while a basic system was functioning in 32.8% of the cases. However, in 2011 one third of the hospitals did not have a basic electronic health record system, although some have since implemented electronic functionalities, particularly those related to clinical documentation and patient administration. Respondents cited the acquisition and implementation costs as the main barriers to implementation. Facilitators for EHR implementation were: the possibility to hire technical support, both during and post implementation; security certification warranty; and objective third-party evaluations of EHR products. In conclusion, the number of hospitals that have electronic health records is in general high, being relatively higher in medium-sized hospitals.

  11. Efficient medical information retrieval in encrypted Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Pruski, Cédric; Wisniewski, François

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of eHealth platforms across the world, whose main objective is to centralize patient's healthcare information to ensure the best continuity of care, requires the development of advanced tools and techniques for supporting health professionals in retrieving relevant information in this vast quantity of data. However, for preserving patient's privacy, some countries decided to de-identify and encrypt data contained in the shared Electronic Health Records, which reinforces the complexity of proposing efficient medical information retrieval approach. In this paper, we describe an original approach exploiting standards metadata as well as knowledge organizing systems to overcome the barriers of data encryption for improving the results of medical information retrieval in centralized and encrypted Electronic Health Records. This is done through the exploitation of semantic properties provided by knowledge organizing systems, which enable query expansion. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the approach together with illustrating examples and a discussion on the advantages and limitations of the provided framework.

  12. A personally controlled electronic health record for Australia

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Christopher; Bainbridge, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective On July 1, 2012 Australia launched a personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR) designed around the needs of consumers. Using a distributed model and leveraging key component national eHealth infrastructure, the PCEHR is designed to enable sharing of any health information about a patient with them and any other health practitioner involved in their care to whom the patient allows access. This paper discusses the consumer-facing part of the program. Method Design of the system was through stakeholder consultation and the development of detailed requirements, followed by clinical design assurance. Results Patients are able to access any posted information through a web-accessible ‘consumer portal.’ Within the portal they are able to assert access controls on all or part of their record. The portal includes areas for consumers to record their own personal information. Discussion The PCEHR has the potential to transform the ability of patients to actively engage in their own healthcare, and to enable the emerging partnership model of health and healthcare in medicine. The ability to access health information traditionally kept within the closed walls of institutions also raises challenges for the profession, both in the language clinicians choose and the ethical issues raised by the changed roles and responsibilities. Conclusions The PCEHR is aimed at connecting all participants and their interventions, and is intended to become a system-wide activity. PMID:24650635

  13. Designing an Electronic Personal Health Record for Professional Iranian Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Abdolkhani, Robab; Halabchi, Farzin; Safdari, Reza; Dargahi, Hossein; Shadanfar, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Background: By providing sports organizations with electronic records and instruments that can be accessed at any time or place, specialized care can be offered to athletes regardless of injury location, and this makes the follow-up from first aid through to full recovery more efficient. Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop an electronic personal health record for professional Iranian athletes. Patients and Methods: First, a comparative study was carried out on the types of professional athletes’existing handheld and electronic health information management systems currently being used in Iran and leading countries in the field of sports medicine including; Australia, Canada and the United States. Then a checklist was developed containing a minimum dataset of professional athletes’ personal health records and distributed to the people involved, who consisted of 50 specialists in sports medicine and health information management, using the Delphi method. Through the use of data obtained from this survey, a basic paper model of professional athletes' personal health record was constructed and then an electronic model was created accordingly. Results: Access to information in the electronic record was through a web-based, portal system. The capabilities of this system included: access to information at any time and location, increased interaction between the medical team, comprehensive reporting and effective management of injuries, flexibility and interaction with financial, radiology and laboratory information systems. Conclusions: It is suggested that a framework should be created to promote athletes’ medical knowledge and provide the education necessary to manage their information. This would lead to improved data quality and ultimately promote the health of community athletes. PMID:25741410

  14. Ethical questions must be considered for electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Merle; Arnold, Michael V; Pearce, Christopher M; Fry, Craig

    2012-09-01

    National electronic health record initiatives are in progress in many countries around the world but the debate about the ethical issues and how they are to be addressed remains overshadowed by other issues. The discourse to which all others are answerable is a technical discourse, even where matters of privacy and consent are concerned. Yet a focus on technical issues and a failure to think about ethics are cited as factors in the failure of the UK health record system. In this paper, while the prime concern is the Australian Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR), the discussion is relevant to and informed by the international context. The authors draw attention to ethical and conceptual issues that have implications for the success or failure of electronic health records systems. Important ethical issues to consider as Australia moves towards a PCEHR system include: issues of equity that arise in the context of personal control, who benefits and who should pay, what are the legitimate uses of PCEHRs, and how we should implement privacy. The authors identify specific questions that need addressing.

  15. Emergency access for online personally controlled health records system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Dhileepan, Sunethra; Schmidt, Matthew; Zhong, Sheng

    2012-09-01

    A personally controlled health records (PCHR) system allows a patient user to share his/her health records with trusted physicians by manually granting them the access privilege to his/her online records. However, it presents the problem of emergency access in situations where the user is physically unable to grant the access and the access is required by an Emergency Room (ER) physician who does not have the privilege at that moment. To deal with such a problem, we introduce an online polling system to provide the emergency access control to PCHR systems. For each emergency access request, the access privilege is controlled according to the combined opinions of the patient's preset emergency contacts and other online registered physicians. Because our system is based on the demographic number of the physician community nationwide, it provides a stable emergency access control at all times.

  16. Behavioral Health Providers and Electronic Health Records: An Exploratory Beliefs Elicitation and Segmentation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shank, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    The widespread adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) is a public policy strategy to improve healthcare quality and reduce accelerating health care costs. Much research has focused on medical providers' perceptions of EHRs, but little is known about those of behavioral health providers. This research was informed by the theory of reasoned…

  17. Developmental Surveillance and Screening in the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy Ryan

    2016-10-01

    Effective well-child care includes developmental surveillance and screening to identify developmental delays and subsequent interventions. Electronic health records (EHRs) have been widely adopted to improve efficiency and appropriate clinical practice. Developmental surveillance tools have been introduced. This article summarizes a conceptual framework for application and highlights the principles and tools of EHRs applied to developmental assessment, including interoperability, health information exchange, clinical decision support systems, consumer health informatics, dashboards, and patient portals. Further investigation and dedicated resources will be required for successful application to developmental surveillance and screening.

  18. Electronic Health Record in Italy and Personal Data Protection.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Silvio; Bellavista, Alessandro; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Zangara, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with the Italian Electronic Health Record (hereinafter EHR), recently introduced by Act 221/2012, with a specific focus on personal data protection. Privacy issues--e.g., informed consent, data processing, patients' rights and minors' will--are discussed within the framework of recent e-Health legislation, national Data Protection Code, the related Data Protection Authority pronouncements and EU law. The paper is aimed at discussing the problems arising from a complex, fragmentary and sometimes uncertain legal framework on e-Health.

  19. Electronic Health Record in Italy and Personal Data Protection.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Silvio; Bellavista, Alessandro; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Zangara, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The present article deals with the Italian Electronic Health Record (hereinafter EHR), recently introduced by Act 221/2012, with a specific focus on personal data protection. Privacy issues--e.g., informed consent, data processing, patients' rights and minors' will--are discussed within the framework of recent e-Health legislation, national Data Protection Code, the related Data Protection Authority pronouncements and EU law. The paper is aimed at discussing the problems arising from a complex, fragmentary and sometimes uncertain legal framework on e-Health. PMID:27491249

  20. Developmental Surveillance and Screening in the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy Ryan

    2016-10-01

    Effective well-child care includes developmental surveillance and screening to identify developmental delays and subsequent interventions. Electronic health records (EHRs) have been widely adopted to improve efficiency and appropriate clinical practice. Developmental surveillance tools have been introduced. This article summarizes a conceptual framework for application and highlights the principles and tools of EHRs applied to developmental assessment, including interoperability, health information exchange, clinical decision support systems, consumer health informatics, dashboards, and patient portals. Further investigation and dedicated resources will be required for successful application to developmental surveillance and screening. PMID:27565369

  1. Electronic Health Records and the Evolution of Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishal; Reed, Mary E.; Grant, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has increased dramatically since the 2009 implementation of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. The latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that the majority of U.S. hospitals and nearly half of U.S. health care professionals have implemented an EHR with advanced functionality.1 The goals of the HITECH act were not only to incentivize the adoption of EHRs, but also to increase the quality, safety, and efficiency of health care by promoting the concept of “meaningful use.”2,3 The stepwise implementation of “meaningful use” is now entering the latter stages with a focus on improving patient outcomes.4 PMID:25711684

  2. A global travelers' electronic health record template standard for personal health records.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Chuan; Detmer, Don E; Shabbir, Syed-Abdul; Nguyen, Phung Anh; Jian, Wen-Shan; Mihalas, George I; Shortliffe, Edward H; Tang, Paul; Haux, Reinhold; Kimura, Michio

    2012-01-01

    Tourism as well as international business travel creates health risks for individuals and populations both in host societies and home countries. One strategy to reduce health-related risks to travelers is to provide travelers and relevant caregivers timely, ongoing access to their own health information. Many websites offer health advice for travelers. For example, the WHO and US Department of State offer up-to-date health information about countries relevant to travel. However, little has been done to assure travelers that their medical information is available at the right place and time when the need might arise. Applications of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) utilizing mobile phones for health management are promising tools both for the delivery of healthcare services and the promotion of personal health. This paper describes the project developed by international informaticians under the umbrella of the International Medical Informatics Association. A template capable of becoming an international standard is proposed. This application is available free to anyone who is interested. Furthermore, its source code is made open.

  3. MDPHnet: secure, distributed sharing of electronic health record data for public health surveillance, evaluation, and planning.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Joshua; Brown, Jeffrey S; Land, Thomas; Platt, Richard; Klompas, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Electronic health record systems contain clinically detailed data from large populations of patients that could significantly enrich public health surveillance. Clinical practices' security, privacy, and proprietary concerns, however, have limited their willingness to share these data with public health agencies. We describe a novel distributed network for public health surveillance called MDPHnet. The system allows the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) to initiate custom queries against participating practices' electronic health records while the data remain behind each practice's firewall. Practices can review proposed queries before execution and approve query results before releasing them to the health department. MDPH is using the system for routine surveillance for priority conditions and to evaluate the impact of public health interventions. PMID:25322301

  4. A cloud based architecture to support Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Zangara, Gianluca; Corso, Pietro Paolo; Cangemi, Francesco; Millonzi, Filippo; Collova, Francesco; Scarlatella, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a novel framework of electronic healthcare enabled by a Cloud platform able to host both Hospital Information Systems (HIS) and Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems and implement an innovative model of Electronic Health Record (EHR) that is not only patient-oriented but also supports a better governance of the whole healthcare system. The proposed EHR model adopts the state of the art of the Cloud technologies, being able to join the different clinical data of the patient stored within the HISs and EMRs either placed into a local Data Center or hosted into a Cloud Platform enabling new directions of data analysis. PMID:25488244

  5. Training providers: beyond the basics of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Training is a critical part of health information technology implementations, but little emphasis is placed on post-implementation training to support day-to-day activities. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of post-implementation training on key electronic health record activities. Methods Based on feedback from providers and requests for technical support, we developed two classes designed to improve providers’ effectiveness with the electronic health record. Training took place at Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic States. The classes focused on managing patient-level information using problem lists and medication lists, as well as efficient documentation and chart review. Both classes used the blended learning method, integrating concrete scenarios, hands-on exercises and take-home materials to reinforce class concepts. To evaluate training effectiveness, we used a case–control study with a 1:4 match on pre-training performance. We measured the usage rate of two key electronic health record functions (problem list and medication list management) for six months before and after training. Change scores were compared using the Wilcoxon sign rank test. Results 36 participants and 144 non-participants were included in the training evaluation. Training participants were more likely to manage both medication lists and problem lists after training. Class material is now being incorporated into an enterprise-wide multi-modal training program available to all providers at Kaiser Permanente in the Mid-Atlantic States. Conclusions Ongoing information technology training is well-received by healthcare providers, who expressed a clear preference for additional training. Training improved use of two important electronic health record features that are included as part of the Meaningful Use criteria. PMID:24295150

  6. Evolution of a web-based, prototype Personal Health Application for diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Fonda, Stephanie J; Kedziora, Richard J; Vigersky, Robert A; Bursell, Sven-Erik

    2010-10-01

    Behaviors carried out by the person with diabetes (e.g., healthy eating, physical activity, judicious use of medication, glucose monitoring, coping and problem-solving, regular clinic visits, etc.) are of central importance in diabetes management. To assist with these behaviors, we developed a prototype PHA for diabetes self-management that was based on User-Centered Design principles and congruent with the anticipatory vision of Project Health Design (PHD). This article presents aspects of the prototype PHA's functionality as conceived under PHD and describes modifications to the PHA now being undertaken under new sponsorship, in response to user feedback and timing tests we have performed. In brief, the prototype Personal Health Application (PHA) receives data on the major diabetes management domains from a Personal Health Record (PHR) and analyzes and provides feedback based on clinically vetted educational content. The information is presented within "gadgets" within a portal-based website. The PHR used for the first implementation was the Common Platform developed by PHD. Key changes include a re-conceptualization of the gadgets by topic areas originally defined by the American Association of Diabetes Educators, a refocusing on low-cost approaches to diabetes monitoring and data entry, and synchronization with a new PHR, Microsoft® HealthVault™.

  7. Organ Procurement Organizations and the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Howard, R J; Cochran, L D; Cornell, D L

    2015-10-01

    The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has adversely affected the ability of organ procurement organizations (OPOs) to perform their federally mandated function of honoring the donation decisions of families and donors who have signed the registry. The difficulties gaining access to potential donor medical record has meant that assessment, evaluation, and management of brain dead organ donors has become much more difficult. Delays can occur that can lead to potential recipients not receiving life-saving organs. For over 40 years, OPO personnel have had ready access to paper medical records. But the widespread adoption of EHRs has greatly limited the ability of OPO coordinators to readily gain access to patient medical records and to manage brain dead donors. Proposed solutions include the following: (1) hospitals could provide limited access to OPO personnel so that they could see only the potential donor's medical record; (2) OPOs could join with other transplant organizations to inform regulators of the problem; and (3) hospital organizations could be approached to work with Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to revise the Hospital Conditions of Participation to require OPOs be given access to donor medical records.

  8. Electronic health records in an occupational health setting-Part II. Global deployment.

    PubMed

    Bey, Jean M; de Magalhães, Josiane S; Bojórquez, Lorena; Lin, Karen

    2013-03-01

    Electronic medical record systems are being used by more multi-national corporations. This article describes one corporation's considerations and process in successfully deploying a global electronic medical record system to international facilities in Brazil, Mexico, Singapore, and Taiwan. This article summarizes feedback from the experiences of occupational health nurse superusers in these countries. PMID:23452128

  9. Electronic health records in an occupational health setting-Part II. Global deployment.

    PubMed

    Bey, Jean M; de Magalhães, Josiane S; Bojórquez, Lorena; Lin, Karen

    2013-03-01

    Electronic medical record systems are being used by more multi-national corporations. This article describes one corporation's considerations and process in successfully deploying a global electronic medical record system to international facilities in Brazil, Mexico, Singapore, and Taiwan. This article summarizes feedback from the experiences of occupational health nurse superusers in these countries.

  10. Avoiding Medical Identity Theft

    MedlinePlus

    + - START A PHR HEALTH LITERACY TOOLS + RESOURCES BLOG FAQ Accessing Your Health Records Common Privacy Myths Your Privacy Rights What is a PHR? Information ... Create a PHR Choose a PHR What is Health Literacy? Understanding Your Medical Record Glossary of Terms Health ...

  11. Public trust and privacy in shared electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Rynning, Elisabeth

    2007-07-01

    The development of information and communication technology in health care, also called eHealth, is expected to improve patient safety and facilitate more efficient use of limited resources. The introduction of electronic health records (EHRs) can make possible immediate, even automatic transfer of patient data, for health care as well as other purposes, across any kind of institutional, regional or national border. Data can thus be shared and used more effectively for quality assurance, disease surveillance, public health monitoring and research. eHealth may also facilitate patient access to health information and medical treatment, and is seen as an effective tool for patient empowerment. At the same time, eHealth solutions may jeopardize both patient safety and patients' rights, unless carefully designed and used with discretion. The success of EHR systems will depend on public trust in their compatibility with fundamental rights, such as privacy and confidentiality. Shared European EHR systems require interoperability not only with regard to technological and semantic standards, but also concerning legal, social and cultural aspects. Since the area of privacy and medical confidentiality is far from harmonized across Europe, we are faced with a diversity that will make fully shared EHR systems a considerable challenge.

  12. Assessing the privacy policies in mobile personal health records.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Belén Cruz; Hernández Niñirola, Antonio; Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Toval, Ambrosio

    2014-01-01

    The huge increase in the number and use of smartphones and tablets has led health service providers to take an interest in mHealth. Popular mobile app markets like Apple App Store or Google Play contain thousands of health applications. Although mobile personal health records (mPHRs) have a number of benefits, important challenges appear in the form of adoption barriers. Security and privacy have been identified as part of these barriers and should be addressed. This paper analyzes and assesses a total of 24 free mPHRs for Android and iOS. Characteristics regarding privacy and security were extracted from the HIPAA. The results show important differences in both the mPHRs and the characteristics analyzed. A questionnaire containing six questions concerning privacy policies was defined. Our questionnaire may assist developers and stakeholders to evaluate the security and privacy of their mPHRs. PMID:25571104

  13. Enabling Quality: Electronic Health Record Adoption and Meaningful Use Readiness in Federally Funded Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Wittie, Michael; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Lebrun-Harris, Lydie; Shi, Leiyu; Nair, Suma

    2016-01-01

    The Health Resources and Services Administration has supported the adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) by federally funded health centers for over a decade; however, little is known about health centers' current EHR adoption rates, progress toward Meaningful Use, and factors related to adoption. We analyzed cross-sectional data from all 1,128 health centers in 2011, which served over 20 million patients during that year. As of 2011, 80% of health centers reported using an EHR, and high proportions reported using many advanced EHR functionalities. There were no indications of disparities in EHR adoption by census region, urban/rural location, patient sociodemographic composition, physician staffing, or health center funding; however, there were small variations in adoption by total patient cost and percent of revenue from grants. Findings revealed no evidence of a digital divide among health centers, indicating that health centers are implementing EHRs, in keeping with their mission to reduce health disparities.

  14. Improving Service Coordination and Reducing Mental Health Disparities Through Adoption of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Brian; Mack, Dominic; Wrenn, Glenda; Shim, Ruth S.; Holden, Kisha; Satcher, David

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread support for removing barriers to the use of electronic health records (EHRs) in behavioral health care, adoption of EHRs in behavioral health settings lags behind adoption in other areas of health care. The authors discuss barriers to use of EHRs among behavioral health care practitioners, suggest solutions to overcome these barriers, and describe the potential benefits of EHRs to reduce behavioral health care disparities. Thoughtful and comprehensive strategies will be needed to design EHR systems that address concerns about policy, practice, costs, and stigma and that protect patients’ privacy and confidentiality. However, these goals must not detract from continuing to challenge the notion that behavioral health and general medical health should be treated as separate and distinct. Ultimately, utilization of EHRs among behavioral health care providers will improve the coordination of services and overall patient care, which is essential to reducing mental health disparities. PMID:25975885

  15. Improving Service Coordination and Reducing Mental Health Disparities Through Adoption of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Brian; Mack, Dominic; Wrenn, Glenda; Shim, Ruth S; Holden, Kisha; Satcher, David

    2015-09-01

    Despite widespread support for removing barriers to the use of electronic health records (EHRs) in behavioral health care, adoption of EHRs in behavioral health settings lags behind adoption in other areas of health care. The authors discuss barriers to use of EHRs among behavioral health care practitioners, suggest solutions to overcome these barriers, and describe the potential benefits of EHRs to reduce behavioral health care disparities. Thoughtful and comprehensive strategies will be needed to design EHR systems that address concerns about policy, practice, costs, and stigma and that protect patients' privacy and confidentiality. However, these goals must not detract from continuing to challenge the notion that behavioral health and general medical health should be treated as separate and distinct. Ultimately, utilization of EHRs among behavioral health care providers will improve the coordination of services and overall patient care, which is essential to reducing mental health disparities.

  16. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients.

    PubMed

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan; Keelan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians.

  17. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians. PMID:22120207

  18. Access Control Model for Sharing Composite Electronic Health Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Ahn, Gail-Joon; Covington, Michael J.; Zhang, Xinwen

    The adoption of electronically formatted medical records, so called Electronic Health Records (EHRs), has become extremely important in healthcare systems to enable the exchange of medical information among stakeholders. An EHR generally consists of data with different types and sensitivity degrees which must be selectively shared based on the need-to-know principle. Security mechanisms are required to guarantee that only authorized users have access to specific portions of such critical record for legitimate purposes. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for modelling access control scheme for composite EHRs. Our model formulates the semantics and structural composition of an EHR document, from which we introduce a notion of authorized zones of the composite EHR at different granularity levels, taking into consideration of several important criteria such as data types, intended purposes and information sensitivities.

  19. Report Central: quality reporting tool in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunice; Li, Qi; Mangalampalli, Anil; Greim, Julie; Eskin, Michael S; Housman, Dan; Isikoff, Jeremy; Abend, Aaron H; Middleton, Blackford; Einbinder, Jonathan S

    2006-01-01

    Quality reporting tools, integrated with ambulatory electronic health records, can help clinicians and administrators understand performance, manage populations, and improve quality. Report Central is a secure web report delivery tool built on Crystal Reports XItrade mark and ASP.NET technologies. Pilot evaluation of Report Central indicates that clinicians prefer a quality reporting tool that is integrated with our home-grown EHR to support clinical workflow.

  20. In vitro interaction between coxsackievirus B3 VP1 protein and human pleckstrin homology domain retinal protein (PHR1).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Zhang, Zhiqin; Wang, Hongluan; Xia, Yanhua; Li, Xiuzhen; Yan, Yan; Zou, Weiwen; Zeng, Lingbing; Huang, Xiaotian

    2015-10-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection causes central nervous system diseases including aseptic meningitis and encephalitis. To understand the mechanism of this virus, a yeast two-hybrid system was used to screen cellular proteins from a human heart cDNA library. The results revealed that the human Pleckstrin Homology Domain Retinal protein (PHR1), a PH domain-containing protein with low expression in the heart and high expression in the brain, interacts with CVB3 VP1, a major structural protein of CVB3. Yeast mating assays and in vitro coimmunoprecipitation verified the interaction between CVB3 VP1 and PHR1. An α-galactosidase assay indicated that of α-galactosidase activity was higher in positive clones than in controls suggesting a strong interaction. Furthermore, assay of deletion mutants defined the minimal region of PHR1 required for its interaction with VP1 as amino acids 95-172 and two regions of VP1 required for its interaction with PHR1 as amino acids 729-767 and 811-859. The results revealed multiple binding sites between PHR1 and CVB3 VP1 and suggested that the strong interaction between these two proteins might play an important role in central nervous system disease in the human brain.

  1. Attitude Towards Health Information Privacy and Electronic Health Records Among Urban Sri Lankan Adults.

    PubMed

    Tissera, Shaluni R; Silva, S N

    2016-01-01

    Sri Lanka is planning to move towards an Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. This research argues that the public preparedness should be considered in order to implement a functioning and an effective EHR system in a country. When asked about how concerned the participants were about the security of their health records, 40.5% stated they were concerned and 38.8% were very concerned. They were asked to rate the 'level of trust' they have on health institutes in Sri Lanka on a scale from 1 to 10 (1 lowest level of trust and 10 highest), 66.1% rated at level 5 or less. PMID:27332453

  2. Living Profiles: design of a health media platform for teens with special healthcare needs.

    PubMed

    Chira, Peter; Nugent, Lisa; Miller, Kimberly; Park, Tina; Donahue, Sean; Soni, Amit; Nugent, Diane; Sandborg, Christy

    2010-10-01

    Living Profiles is a health media platform in development that aggregates multiple data flows to help teens with special healthcare needs (SHCN), particularly with regard to self-management and independence. A teen-oriented personal health record (PHR) incorporates typical teen behaviors and attitudes about health and wellness, encompasses how teens perceive and convey quality of life, and aligns with data related to their chronic medical condition. We have conceived a secure personalized user interface called the Quality of Life Timeline, which will assist with the transition from pediatric care to an adult provider through modules that include a mood meter, reminder device, and teleport medicine. With this personalized PHR, teens with SHCN can better understand their condition and its effects on daily activities and life goals and vice versa; additionally, use of this PHR allows for better information sharing and communication between providers and patients. The use of a teen-oriented tool such as Living Profiles can impact teens' overall quality of life and disease self-management, important attributes for a successful transition program. PMID:20937487

  3. The Impacts of Electronic Health Record Implementation on the Health Care Workforce.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Health care organizations at various levels are transitioning into the new electronic era by implementing and adopting electronic health record systems. New job roles will be needed for this transition, and some current job roles will inevitably become obsolete due to the change. In addition to training new personnel to fill these new roles, the focus should also be on equipping the current health care workforce with knowledge and skills in health information technology and health informatics that will support their work and improve quality of care. PMID:26961833

  4. Patients' empowerment of their personal health record requires strong traceability to guarantee patients health care security.

    PubMed

    Allaert, François André; Quantin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Giving patients power over their personal health record is an unavoidable evolution in all industrialized countries which will reflect their active participation in the management of their own health. This would lead to patients sharing management with health professionals, which would need traceability of the data provider to maintain trust and transparency. The systematic use of electronic signatures by medical practitioners will be essential to provide sufficient guarantees and to clearly determine who has added what in the PEHR.

  5. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  6. Archetype Development Process of Electronic Health Record of Minas Gerais.

    PubMed

    Abreu Maia, Thais; Fernandes De Muylder, Cristiana; Mendonça Queiroga, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    The Electronic Health Record (EHR) supports health systems and aims to reduce fragmentation, which will enable continuity of patient care. The paper's main objective is to define the steps, roles and artifacts for an archetype development process (ADP) for the EHR at the Brazilian National Health System (SUS) in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). This study was conducted using qualitative analysis based upon an applied case. It had an exploratory purpose metodologically defined in four stages: literature review; descriptive comparison; proposition of an archetype development process and proof of concept. The proof of concept showed that the proposed ADP ensures the archetype quality and supports the semantic interoperability in SUS to improve clinical safety and the continuity of patient care.

  7. Public Trust in Health Information Sharing: Implications for Biobanking and Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jodyn; Kardia, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are made all the more valuable when the biological samples they hold can be linked to health information collected in research, electronic health records, or public health practice. Public trust in such systems that share health information for research and health care practice is understudied. Our research examines characteristics of the general public that predict trust in a health system that includes researchers, health care providers, insurance companies and public health departments. We created a 119-item survey of predictors and attributes of system trust and fielded it using Amazon’s MTurk system (n = 447). We found that seeing one’s primary care provider, having a favorable view of data sharing and believing that data sharing will improve the quality of health care, as well as psychosocial factors (altruism and generalized trust) were positively and significantly associated with system trust. As expected, privacy concern, but counterintuitively, knowledge about health information sharing were negatively associated with system trust. We conclude that, in order to assure the public’s trust, policy makers charged with setting best practices for governance of biobanks and access to electronic health records should leverage critical access points to engage a diverse public in joint decision making. PMID:25654300

  8. Project HealthDesign: rethinking the power and potential of personal health records.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Downs, Stephen; Casper, Gail

    2010-10-01

    Project HealthDesign, a multi-year, multi-site project sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation with additional support from the California HealthCare Foundation, is designed to stimulate innovation in personal health records (PHRs). Project HealthDesign teams employed user-centered design processes to create designs and prototypes of computer-based applications to support and enhance human health for a wide range of patients, from children with chronic health conditions to elders transitioning from hospital to home. A program design philosophy encouraged designers to envision PHRs as a suite of personal health information management tools, or applications, separate from, but drawing upon, personal health data from a variety of sources. In addition to information contained in one's medical record, these personal health data included patient-supplied clinical parameters such as blood glucose and daily weights; as well as patient-generated observations of daily living (ODLs) - the unique, idiosyncratic cues, such as sleep adequacy or confidence in self care, that inform patients about their abilities to manage health challenges and take healthy action. A common technical platform provided infrastructure services such as data standards and identity-management protocols, and helped to demonstrate a scalable, efficient approach to user-centered design of personal health information management systems. The program's ethical, legal and social issues consultancy identified challenges to acceleration of action-focused PHRs: personal control of privacy choices, management of privacy in home conditions, and rebalancing power structures in shared decision making.

  9. Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Services. Notification of a new system of records: Three Mile Island mental health survey, respondent records.

    PubMed

    1980-10-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Privacy Act, the Public Health Service (PHS) is publishing notice of a proposal to establish a new system of records entitled "Three Mile Island Mental Health Survey, Respondent Records, HHS/ADAMHA/NIMH." The Disaster Assistance and Emergency Mental Health Section, Division of Special Mental Health Programs, National Institute of Mental Health, is responsible for the system. The purpose of the system is to enable the Government to arrange followup study to the currently-funded research project entitled "The Mental Health of Residents Near the Three Mile Island Reactor: A Comparative Study of Selected Groups." PHS invites interested persons to submit comments on the proposed routine uses on or before November 3, 1980. PMID:10248823

  10. Electronic health records: new opportunities for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Coorevits, P; Sundgren, M; Klein, G O; Bahr, A; Claerhout, B; Daniel, C; Dugas, M; Dupont, D; Schmidt, A; Singleton, P; De Moor, G; Kalra, D

    2013-12-01

    Clinical research is on the threshold of a new era in which electronic health records (EHRs) are gaining an important novel supporting role. Whilst EHRs used for routine clinical care have some limitations at present, as discussed in this review, new improved systems and emerging research infrastructures are being developed to ensure that EHRs can be used for secondary purposes such as clinical research, including the design and execution of clinical trials for new medicines. EHR systems should be able to exchange information through the use of recently published international standards for their interoperability and clinically validated information structures (such as archetypes and international health terminologies), to ensure consistent and more complete recording and sharing of data for various patient groups. Such systems will counteract the obstacles of differing clinical languages and styles of documentation as well as the recognized incompleteness of routine records. Here, we discuss some of the legal and ethical concerns of clinical research data reuse and technical security measures that can enable such research while protecting privacy. In the emerging research landscape, cooperation infrastructures are being built where research projects can utilize the availability of patient data from federated EHR systems from many different sites, as well as in international multilingual settings. Amongst several initiatives described, the EHR4CR project offers a promising method for clinical research. One of the first achievements of this project was the development of a protocol feasibility prototype which is used for finding patients eligible for clinical trials from multiple sources. PMID:23952476

  11. Detecting Inappropriate Access to Electronic Health Records Using Collaborative Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Aditya Krishna; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon; Vaidya, Jaideep; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2013-01-01

    Many healthcare facilities enforce security on their electronic health records (EHRs) through a corrective mechanism: some staff nominally have almost unrestricted access to the records, but there is a strict ex post facto audit process for inappropriate accesses, i.e., accesses that violate the facility’s security and privacy policies. This process is inefficient, as each suspicious access has to be reviewed by a security expert, and is purely retrospective, as it occurs after damage may have been incurred. This motivates automated approaches based on machine learning using historical data. Previous attempts at such a system have successfully applied supervised learning models to this end, such as SVMs and logistic regression. While providing benefits over manual auditing, these approaches ignore the identity of the users and patients involved in a record access. Therefore, they cannot exploit the fact that a patient whose record was previously involved in a violation has an increased risk of being involved in a future violation. Motivated by this, in this paper, we propose a collaborative filtering inspired approach to predicting inappropriate accesses. Our solution integrates both explicit and latent features for staff and patients, the latter acting as a personalized “finger-print” based on historical access patterns. The proposed method, when applied to real EHR access data from two tertiary hospitals and a file-access dataset from Amazon, shows not only significantly improved performance compared to existing methods, but also provides insights as to what indicates an inappropriate access. PMID:24683293

  12. Psychiatry and the meaningful use of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Use of electronic health records (EHRs) for psychiatric care is on the rise, although the software and the workflow patterns on which the software has been built are often based on non-psychiatric practices. For providers, the transition from paper psychiatric records to electronic ones requires the development of a new set of skills that includes accommodating the physical presence of the computer and performing various forms of data entry, while still managing to carry out the tasks required for psychiatric practice. These changes alter the dynamic of communication, including elements of assessment and treatment that occur between the psychiatrist and patient. EHRs also raise issues of security of records and greater access by patients to providers and their records. Although EHRs promise an abundance of useful data for research and potentially helpful innovations, they also impose a practice pattern on psychiatry that is made to work largely through the efforts of the physician. EHRs do not enhance interactions in the psychiatric examination room, but instead alter the traditional pattern on which the doctor-patient relationship is founded in psychiatry and through which care is delivered.

  13. Open source electronic health records and chronic disease management

    PubMed Central

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study and report on the use of open source electronic health records (EHR) to assist with chronic care management within safety net medical settings, such as community health centers (CHC). Methods and Materials The study was conducted by NORC at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to CHC that currently use an open source EHR. Results Two of the sites chosen by NORC were actively using an open source EHR to assist in the redesign of their care delivery system to support more effective chronic disease management. This included incorporating the chronic care model into an CHC and using the EHR to help facilitate its elements, such as care teams for patients, in addition to maintaining health records on indigent populations, such as tuberculosis status on homeless patients. Discussion The ability to modify the open-source EHR to adapt to the CHC environment and leverage the ecosystem of providers and users to assist in this process provided significant advantages in chronic care management. Improvements in diabetes management, controlled hypertension and increases in tuberculosis vaccinations were assisted through the use of these open source systems. Conclusions The flexibility and adaptability of open source EHR demonstrated its utility and viability in the provision of necessary and needed chronic disease care among populations served by CHC. PMID:23813566

  14. Electronic Health Record-Driven Workflow for Diagnostic Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Geeslin, Matthew G; Gaskin, Cree M

    2016-01-01

    In most settings, radiologists maintain a high-throughput practice in which efficiency is crucial. The conversion from film-based to digital study interpretation and data storage launched the era of PACS-driven workflow, leading to significant gains in speed. The advent of electronic health records improved radiologists' access to patient data; however, many still find this aspect of workflow to be relatively cumbersome. Nevertheless, the ability to guide a diagnostic interpretation with clinical information, beyond that provided in the examination indication, can add significantly to the specificity of a radiologist's interpretation. Responsibilities of the radiologist include, but are not limited to, protocoling examinations, interpreting studies, chart review, peer review, writing notes, placing orders, and communicating with referring providers. Most of the aforementioned activities are not PACS-centric and require a login to one or more additional applications. Consolidation of these tasks for completion through a single interface can simplify workflow, save time, and potentially reduce the incidence of errors. Here, the authors describe diagnostic radiology workflow that leverages the electronic health record to significantly add to a radiologist's ability to be part of the health care team, provide relevant interpretations, and improve efficiency and quality. PMID:26603098

  15. Going Mobile: How Mobile Personal Health Records Can Improve Health Care During Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Sanjana

    2014-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs), in contrast to electronic health records (EHRs) or electronic medical records (EMRs), are health records in which data are accessible to patients and not just providers. In recent years, many systems have enabled PHRs to be available in a mobile format. Mobile PHRs (mPHRs) allow patients to access health information via the Internet or telecommunication devices, such as mobile phones, personal digital assistants, and tablet computers. mPHRs have the potential to help patients and providers identify medical conditions and prescriptions from numerous locations, which may minimize medical errors and identify improvements to health behaviors during emergencies, when patients present to a new provider, or EHRs are not accessible. Despite their benefits, numerous challenges inhibit the adoption and further development of mPHRs, including integration into overall health technology infrastructure and legal and security concerns. This paper identifies the benefits of mPHRs during emergencies and the remaining challenges impeding full adoption and use, and provides recommendations to federal agencies to enhance support and use of mPHRs. PMID:25098942

  16. Going mobile: how mobile personal health records can improve health care during emergencies.

    PubMed

    Bouri, Nidhi; Ravi, Sanjana

    2014-03-05

    Personal health records (PHRs), in contrast to electronic health records (EHRs) or electronic medical records (EMRs), are health records in which data are accessible to patients and not just providers. In recent years, many systems have enabled PHRs to be available in a mobile format. Mobile PHRs (mPHRs) allow patients to access health information via the Internet or telecommunication devices, such as mobile phones, personal digital assistants, and tablet computers. mPHRs have the potential to help patients and providers identify medical conditions and prescriptions from numerous locations, which may minimize medical errors and identify improvements to health behaviors during emergencies, when patients present to a new provider, or EHRs are not accessible. Despite their benefits, numerous challenges inhibit the adoption and further development of mPHRs, including integration into overall health technology infrastructure and legal and security concerns. This paper identifies the benefits of mPHRs during emergencies and the remaining challenges impeding full adoption and use, and provides recommendations to federal agencies to enhance support and use of mPHRs.

  17. Modelling and implementing electronic health records in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Knut; Bruun-Rasmussen, Morten; Vingtoft, Søren; Andersen, Stig Kjaer; Nøhr, Christian

    2005-03-01

    The Danish Health IT strategy [Danish Ministry of Interior and Health, National Strategy for IT in the Health Sector 2003-2007, Copenhagen, 2003 (in Danish). http://www.im.dk/publikationer/itstrategi/itstrategi.pdf. notes that integration between electronic health records (EHR) systems has a high priority. A prerequisite for real integration and semantic interoperability is agreement of the data content and the information models. The National Board of Health is working on a common model for EHR, and its adoption is now being promoted through pilot projects. At the same time, several development and implementation projects are taking place at a regional level. These EHRs are built on information models from different vendors and are based on different integration platforms. The Danish EHR observatory, which has been monitoring the development of EHRs in Denmark since 1998, has analysed the challenges of using different information models and integration platforms. This paper also maps the development in Denmark to the new paradigms in modelling techniques and integration technology. PMID:15694627

  18. Benefits and drawbacks of electronic health record systems

    PubMed Central

    Menachemi, Nir; Collum, Taleah H

    2011-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 that was signed into law as part of the “stimulus package” represents the largest US initiative to date that is designed to encourage widespread use of electronic health records (EHRs). In light of the changes anticipated from this policy initiative, the purpose of this paper is to review and summarize the literature on the benefits and drawbacks of EHR systems. Much of the literature has focused on key EHR functionalities, including clinical decision support systems, computerized order entry systems, and health information exchange. Our paper describes the potential benefits of EHRs that include clinical outcomes (eg, improved quality, reduced medical errors), organizational outcomes (eg, financial and operational benefits), and societal outcomes (eg, improved ability to conduct research, improved population health, reduced costs). Despite these benefits, studies in the literature highlight drawbacks associated with EHRs, which include the high upfront acquisition costs, ongoing maintenance costs, and disruptions to workflows that contribute to temporary losses in productivity that are the result of learning a new system. Moreover, EHRs are associated with potential perceived privacy concerns among patients, which are further addressed legislatively in the HITECH Act. Overall, experts and policymakers believe that significant benefits to patients and society can be realized when EHRs are widely adopted and used in a “meaningful” way. PMID:22312227

  19. Query log analysis of an electronic health record search engine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zheng, Kai; Hanauer, David A

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a longitudinal collection of query logs of a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval in electronic health records (EHR). The collection, 202,905 queries and 35,928 user sessions recorded over a course of 4 years, represents the information-seeking behavior of 533 medical professionals, including frontline practitioners, coding personnel, patient safety officers, and biomedical researchers for patient data stored in EHR systems. In this paper, we present descriptive statistics of the queries, a categorization of information needs manifested through the queries, as well as temporal patterns of the users' information-seeking behavior. The results suggest that information needs in medical domain are substantially more sophisticated than those that general-purpose web search engines need to accommodate. Therefore, we envision there exists a significant challenge, along with significant opportunities, to provide intelligent query recommendations to facilitate information retrieval in EHR.

  20. 78 FR 65884 - 2014 Edition Electronic Health Record Certification Criteria: Revision to the Definition of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... electronic health record (EHR) technology testing and certification. DATES: Effective date: This regulation... Computer technology, Electronic health record, Electronic information system, Electronic transactions... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 170 RIN 0991-AB91 2014 Edition Electronic...

  1. Adoption Factors of the Electronic Health Record: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) was a significant piece of legislation in America that served as a catalyst for the adoption of health information technology. Following implementation of the HITECH Act, Health Information Technology (HIT) experienced broad adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR), despite skepticism exhibited by many providers for the transition to an electronic system. A thorough review of EHR adoption facilitator and barriers provides ongoing support for the continuation of EHR implementation across various health care structures, possibly leading to a reduction in associated economic expenditures. Objective The purpose of this review is to compile a current and comprehensive list of facilitators and barriers to the adoption of the EHR in the United States. Methods Authors searched Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and MEDLINE, 01/01/2012–09/01/2015, core clinical/academic journals, MEDLINE full text, and evaluated only articles germane to our research objective. Team members selected a final list of articles through consensus meetings (n=31). Multiple research team members thoroughly read each article to confirm applicability and study conclusions, thereby increasing validity. Results Group members identified common facilitators and barriers associated with the EHR adoption process. In total, 25 adoption facilitators were identified in the literature occurring 109 times; the majority of which were efficiency, hospital size, quality, access to data, perceived value, and ability to transfer information. A total of 23 barriers to adoption were identified in the literature, appearing 95 times; the majority of which were cost, time consuming, perception of uselessness, transition of data, facility location, and implementation issues. Conclusions The 25 facilitators and 23 barriers to the adoption of the EHR continue to reveal a preoccupation on cost, despite

  2. Electronic health records: what does your signature signify?

    PubMed

    Victoroff Md, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Electronic health records serve multiple purposes, including clinical communication, legal documentation, financial transaction capture, research and analytics. Electronic signatures attached to entries in EHRs have different logical and legal meanings for different users. Some of these are vestiges from historic paper formats that require reconsideration. Traditionally accepted functions of signatures, such as identity verification, attestation, consent, authorization and non-repudiation can become ambiguous in the context of computer-assisted workflow processes that incorporate functions like logins, auto-fill and audit trails. This article exposes the incompatibility of expectations among typical users of electronically signed information. PMID:22888846

  3. Securing electronic health records with broadcast encryption schemes.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Willy; Win, Khin Than

    2006-01-01

    Information security is a concern in integrated electronic health record systems (EHRs). This paper discusses the development of a mathematical model to secure the access of EHRs. In this paper, we incorporate the notion of a broadcast encryption scheme for securing EHRs. We present a novel solution to allow a secure access to the EHRs whilst minimising the number of the encrypted ciphertexts. In a nutshell, our proposed solution enjoys shorter ciphertexts compared to having multiple ciphertexts encrypted for several different participants. Our proposed solution is applicable in practice to solve an existing open problem in the effort of securing EHRs.

  4. Ethics and the electronic health record in dental school clinics.

    PubMed

    Cederberg, Robert A; Valenza, John A

    2012-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are a major development in the practice of dentistry, and dental schools and dental curricula have benefitted from this technology. Patient data entry, storage, retrieval, transmission, and archiving have been streamlined, and the potential for teledentistry and improvement in epidemiological research is beginning to be realized. However, maintaining patient health information in an electronic form has also changed the environment in dental education, setting up potential ethical dilemmas for students and faculty members. The purpose of this article is to explore some of the ethical issues related to EHRs, the advantages and concerns related to the use of computers in the dental operatory, the impact of the EHR on the doctor-patient relationship, the introduction of web-based EHRs, the link between technology and ethics, and potential solutions for the management of ethical concerns related to EHRs in dental schools.

  5. Ethical issues in electronic health records: A general overview

    PubMed Central

    Ozair, Fouzia F.; Jamshed, Nayer; Sharma, Amit; Aggarwal, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) is increasingly being implemented in many developing countries. It is the need of the hour because it improves the quality of health care and is also cost-effective. Technologies can introduce some hazards hence safety of information in the system is a real challenge. Recent news of security breaches has put a question mark on this system. Despite its increased usefulness, and increasing enthusiasm in its adoption, not much attention is being paid to the ethical issues that might arise. Securing EHR with an encrypted password is a probable option. The purpose of this article is to discuss the various ethical issues arising in the use of the EHRs and their possible solutions. PMID:25878950

  6. Disrupting Electronic Health Records Systems: The Next Generation

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jeffrey David; Lai, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The health care system suffers from both inefficient and ineffective use of data. Data are suboptimally displayed to users, undernetworked, underutilized, and wasted. Errors, inefficiencies, and increased costs occur on the basis of unavailable data in a system that does not coordinate the exchange of information, or adequately support its use. Clinicians’ schedules are stretched to the limit and yet the system in which they work exerts little effort to streamline and support carefully engineered care processes. Information for decision-making is difficult to access in the context of hurried real-time workflows. This paper explores and addresses these issues to formulate an improved design for clinical workflow, information exchange, and decision making based on the use of electronic health records. PMID:26500106

  7. 77 FR 40619 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for What's In Your Health Record Video Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for What's In Your Health Record Video... Your Health Record Video Challenge. This challenge is an open call for the public to create and submit short, compelling videos sharing how getting access to your health record and checking the...

  8. Authorisation and access control for electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd

    2004-03-31

    Enabling the shared care paradigm, centralised or even decentralised electronic health record (EHR) systems increasingly become core applications in hospital information systems and health networks. For realising multipurpose use and reuse as well as inter-operability at knowledge level, EHR have to meet special architectural requirements. The component-oriented and model-based architecture should meet international standards. Especially in extended health networks realising inter-organisational communication and co-operation, authorisation cannot be organised at user level anymore. Therefore, models, methods and tools must be established to allow formal and structured policy definition, policy agreements, role definition, authorisation and access control. Based on the author's international engagement in EHR architecture and security standards referring to the revision of CEN ENV 13606, the GEHR/open EHR approach, HL7 and CORBA, models for health-specific and EHR-related roles, for authorisation management and access control have been developed. The basic concept is the separation of structural roles defining organisational entity-to-entity relationships and enabling specific acts on the one hand, and functional roles bound to specific activities and realising rights and duties on the other hand. Aggregation of organisational, functional, informational and technological components follows specific rules. Using UML and XML, the principles as well as some examples for analysis, design, implementation and maintenance of policy and authorisation management as well as access control have been practically implemented. PMID:15066555

  9. Authorisation and access control for electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Bernd

    2004-03-31

    Enabling the shared care paradigm, centralised or even decentralised electronic health record (EHR) systems increasingly become core applications in hospital information systems and health networks. For realising multipurpose use and reuse as well as inter-operability at knowledge level, EHR have to meet special architectural requirements. The component-oriented and model-based architecture should meet international standards. Especially in extended health networks realising inter-organisational communication and co-operation, authorisation cannot be organised at user level anymore. Therefore, models, methods and tools must be established to allow formal and structured policy definition, policy agreements, role definition, authorisation and access control. Based on the author's international engagement in EHR architecture and security standards referring to the revision of CEN ENV 13606, the GEHR/open EHR approach, HL7 and CORBA, models for health-specific and EHR-related roles, for authorisation management and access control have been developed. The basic concept is the separation of structural roles defining organisational entity-to-entity relationships and enabling specific acts on the one hand, and functional roles bound to specific activities and realising rights and duties on the other hand. Aggregation of organisational, functional, informational and technological components follows specific rules. Using UML and XML, the principles as well as some examples for analysis, design, implementation and maintenance of policy and authorisation management as well as access control have been practically implemented.

  10. Using Electronic Health Record Systems in Diabetes Care: Emerging Practices

    PubMed Central

    Veinot, Tiffany C.; Zheng, Kai; Lowery, Julie C.; Souden, Maria; Keith, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    While there has been considerable attention devoted to the deployment of electronic health record (EHR) systems, there has been far less attention given to their appropriation for use in clinical encounters — particularly in the context of complex, chronic illness. The Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA) has been at the forefront of EHR adoption and, as such, provides a unique opportunity to examine a mature EHR system in widespread use. Moreover, with a high prevalence of diabetes in its patient population, the VA provides a useful platform for examining EHR use in the context of chronic disease care. We conducted a sequential, exploratory qualitative study at two VA Medical Centers in the Midwest. First, we conducted observations of 64 clinical consultations with diabetes patients. These observations involved 31 different health care providers. Second, using insights from these observations, we conducted in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 39 health care providers focusing on their use of information in diabetes patient care. Field notes and interview transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Our analysis generated several categories of EHR use in clinical encounters: priming, structuring, assessing, informing, and continuing. We also outline some mismatches between EHR system design and VA diabetes care practices. We conclude by discussing implications of these emergent system uses for improving the software design of EHRs to better support chronic disease care, as well as for our understanding of the integration of technologies in health care. PMID:25264545

  11. Using ISO 25040 standard for evaluating electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marília; Novaes, Magdala; Vasconcelos, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Quality of electronic health record systems (EHR-S) is one of the key points in the discussion about the safe use of this kind of system. It stimulates creation of technical standards and certifications in order to establish the minimum requirements expected for these systems. [1] In other side, EHR-S suppliers need to invest in evaluation of their products to provide systems according to these requirements. This work presents a proposal of use ISO 25040 standard, which focuses on the evaluation of software products, for define a model of evaluation of EHR-S in relation to Brazilian Certification for Electronic Health Record Systems - SBIS-CFM Certification. Proposal instantiates the process described in ISO 25040 standard using the set of requirements that is scope of the Brazilian certification. As first results, this research has produced an evaluation model and a scale for classify an EHR-S about its compliance level in relation to certification. This work in progress is part for the acquisition of the degree of master in Computer Science at the Federal University of Pernambuco.

  12. Security infrastructure services for electronic archives and electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Pharow, Peter; Blobel, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    Communication and co-operation in the domain of healthcare and welfare require a well-defined set of security services based on a Public Key Infrastructure and provided by a Trusted Third Party (TTP). These services describe both status and relation of communicating principals, corresponding keys and attributes, and the access rights to applications and data. Additional services are needed to provide trustworthy information about dynamic issues of communication and co-operation such as time and location of processes, workflow relations, and system behaviour. Legal, social, behavioural and ethical requirements demand securely stored patient information and well-established access tools and tokens. Electronic (and more specifically digital) signatures--as important means for securing the integrity of a message or file--along with certified time stamps or time signatures are especially important for purposes of data storage in electronic archives and electronic health records (EHR). While just mentioning technical storage problems (e.g. lifetime of the storage devices, interoperability of retrieval and presentation software), this paper identifies mechanisms of securing data items, files, messages, sets of archived items or documents, electronic archive structures, and life-long electronic health records. Other workshop contributions will demonstrate related aspects of policies, patient privacy, and privilege management.

  13. Ethical governance in biobanks linked to electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caenazzo, L; Tozzo, P; Borovecki, A

    2015-11-01

    In the last years an alternative to traditional research projects conducted with patients has emerged: it is represented by the pairing of different type of disease biobanks specimens with Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Even if informed consent remains one of the most contested issues of biobank policy, other ethical challenges still require careful attention, given that additional issues are related to the use of EHRs. In this new way of doing research harmonization of governance is essential in practice, with the aim to make the most use of resources at our disposal, and sharing of samples and data among researchers under common policies regulating the distribution and the use. A biobank-specific Ethics Committee could be seen as a new and type of Ethics Committee, that we suggest to be applied to each biobank, with possible different functions. In particular, considering the possible use of electronic health record data linked to biological specimens in biobanking research, this specific Ethics Committee could draft best practice and ethical guidelines for the utilisation of the EHRs as a tool for genetic research, addressing concerns on accessibility, return of results and privacy and help to educate patients and healthcare providers. PMID:26592845

  14. Standards for the Content of the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Watzlaf, Valerie J.M; Zeng, Xiaoming; Jarymowycz, Christine; Firouzan, Patti Anania

    2004-01-01

    A descriptive, cross-sectional study was performed to measure the awareness, use, and validity of the minimum content recommended in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards for content and structure of electronic health records. A Web-based survey was developed and used as the primary tool to collect this data. Data was collected from a random sample of healthcare facilities from across the country, vendors, and volunteers. Thirteen percent of respondents had an electronic health record (EHR) system fully in place while 10 percent did not have or did not plan to have an EHR system. The majority of respondents (62 percent) used a vendor system for EHR development. The majority of respondents were not aware or slightly aware of the ASTM E1384 standards. Respondents believed that the minimum data elements outlined in the ASTM standards should be included in all EHR systems. Data items such as educational level, patient instructions related to disposition, problem numbers, treatment plan ID, provider agency ID code, and medication date of last refill should not always be included in EHR systems. PMID:18066381

  15. Ethical governance in biobanks linked to electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caenazzo, L; Tozzo, P; Borovecki, A

    2015-11-01

    In the last years an alternative to traditional research projects conducted with patients has emerged: it is represented by the pairing of different type of disease biobanks specimens with Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Even if informed consent remains one of the most contested issues of biobank policy, other ethical challenges still require careful attention, given that additional issues are related to the use of EHRs. In this new way of doing research harmonization of governance is essential in practice, with the aim to make the most use of resources at our disposal, and sharing of samples and data among researchers under common policies regulating the distribution and the use. A biobank-specific Ethics Committee could be seen as a new and type of Ethics Committee, that we suggest to be applied to each biobank, with possible different functions. In particular, considering the possible use of electronic health record data linked to biological specimens in biobanking research, this specific Ethics Committee could draft best practice and ethical guidelines for the utilisation of the EHRs as a tool for genetic research, addressing concerns on accessibility, return of results and privacy and help to educate patients and healthcare providers.

  16. Code Status and Resuscitation Options in the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Haresh L.; Patel, Neal R.; Choma, Neesha N.; Grande, Jonathan; Giuse, Dario A.; Lehmann, Christoph U.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The advance discussion and documentation of code-status is important in preventing undesired cardiopulmonary resuscitation and related End of Life interventions. Code-status documentation remains infrequent and paper-based, which limits its usefulness. This study evaluates a tool to document code-status in the electronic health records at a large teaching hospital, and analyzes the corresponding data. Methods Encounter data for patients admitted to the Medical Center were collected over a period of 12 months (01-APR-2012 – 31-MAR-2013) and the code-status attribute was tracked for individual patients. The code-status data were analyzed separately for adult and pediatric patient populations. We considered 131,399 encounters for 83,248 adult patients and 80,778 encounters for 55,656 pediatric patients in this study. Results 71% of the adult patients and 30% of the pediatric patients studied had a documented code-status. Age and severity of illness influenced the decision to document code-status. Demographics such as gender, race, ethnicity, and proximity of primary residence were also associated with the documentation of code-status. Conclusion Absence of a recorded code-status may result in unnecessary interventions. Code-status in paper charts may be difficult to access in cardiopulmonary arrest situations and may result in unnecessary and unwanted interventions and procedures. Documentation of Code-status in electronic records creates a readily available reference for care providers. PMID:25447035

  17. Public health in an era of personal health records: opportunities for innovation and new partnerships.

    PubMed

    Bonander, Jason; Gates, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    In the near future, citizens will be able to control and manage their own health information through electronic personal health record systems and tools. The clinical benefits of this innovation, such as cost savings, error reduction, and improved communication, have been discussed in the literature and public forums, as have issues related to privacy and confidentiality. Receiving little attention are the benefits these will have for public health. The benefits and potential for innovation are broad and speak directly to core public health functions such as health monitoring, outbreak management, empowerment, linking to services, and research. Coupled with this is a new relationship with citizens as key partners in protecting and promoting the public's health.

  18. Force Health Protection: the mission and political context of the longitudinal health record.

    PubMed

    Collmann, Jeff

    2009-05-01

    Drawing upon an extensive search of publically available literature and discussions at the "National Forum on the Future of the Defense Health Information System," this article documents the evolving mission and political context of the longitudinal health record (LHR) as an instrument for Force Health Protection (FHP). Because of the Gulf War syndrome controversy, the Department of Defense (DoD) launched an ambitious, complex series of programs designed to create a comprehensive, integrated defense health surveillance capability to assure FHP and keep faith with the American people. This "system of systems" includes individual component systems to perform specific functions such as disease surveillance, battlefield assessment, and patient care and consolidates these diverse types of information into centrally accessible archives that serve the interests of occupational health, preventive medicine, medical strategic planning, and longitudinal patient health care. After 25 years of effort and major accomplishments, progress toward a LHR remains uneven and controversy persists. PMID:19562957

  19. Relational Machine Learning for Electronic Health Record-Driven Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Peissig, Peggy L.; Costa, Vitor Santos; Caldwell, Michael D.; Rottscheit, Carla; Berg, Richard L.; Mendonca, Eneida A.; Page, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHR) offer medical and pharmacogenomics research unprecedented opportunities to identify and classify patients at risk. EHRs are collections of highly inter-dependent records that include biological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral observations. They comprise a patient’s clinical phenome, where each patient has thousands of date-stamped records distributed across many relational tables. Development of EHR computer-based phenotyping algorithms require time and medical insight from clinical experts, who most often can only review a small patient subset representative of the total EHR records, to identify phenotype features. In this research we evaluate whether relational machine learning (ML) using Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) can contribute to addressing these issues as a viable approach for EHR-based phenotyping. Methods Two relational learning ILP approaches and three well-known WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) implementations of non-relational approaches (PART, J48, and JRIP) were used to develop models for nine phenotypes. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) coded EHR data were used to select training cohorts for the development of each phenotypic model. Accuracy, precision, recall, F-Measure, and Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUROC) curve statistics were measured for each phenotypic model based on independent manually verified test cohorts. A two-sided binomial distribution test (sign test) compared the five ML approaches across phenotypes for statistical significance. Results We developed an approach to automatically label training examples using ICD-9 diagnosis codes for the ML approaches being evaluated. Nine phenotypic models for each MLapproach were evaluated, resulting in better overall model performance in AUROC using ILP when compared to PART (p=0.039), J48 (p=0.003) and JRIP (p=0.003). Discussion ILP has the potential to improve

  20. Technical Limitations of Electronic Health Records in Community Health Centers: Implications on Ambulatory Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Christopher E.

    2010-01-01

    Research objectives: This dissertation examines the state of development of each of the eight core electronic health record (EHR) functionalities as described by the IOM and describes how the current state of these functionalities limit quality improvement efforts in ambulatory care settings. There is a great deal of literature describing both the…

  1. Rice SPX1 and SPX2 inhibit phosphate starvation responses through interacting with PHR2 in a phosphate-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Wenyuan; Shi, Jing; Zhang, Li; Xiang, Dan; Yang, Chao; Li, Changying; Wu, Zhongchang; Liu, Yu; Yu, Yanan; Shou, Huixia; Mo, Xiaorong; Mao, Chuanzao; Wu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    In plants, sensing the levels of external and internal nutrients is essential for reprogramming the transcriptome and adapting to the fluctuating environment. Phosphate (Pi) is a key plant nutrient, and a large proportion of Pi starvation-responsive genes are under the control of PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PHR1) in Arabidopsis (AtPHR1) and its homologs, such as Oryza sativa (Os)PHR2 in rice. AtPHR1 and OsPHR2 expression is not very responsive to Pi starvation, raising the question as to how plants sense changes in cellular Pi levels to activate the central regulator. SPX [named after SYG1 (suppressor of yeast gpa1), Pho81 (CDK inhibitor in yeast PHO pathway), and XPR1 (xenotropic and polytropic retrovirus receptor)] proteins that harbor only the SPX domain are reported to be involved in the negative regulation of Pi starvation responses. Here, we show that the nuclear localized SPX proteins SPX1 and SPX2 are Pi-dependent inhibitors of the activity of OsPHR2 in rice. Indeed, SPX1 and SPX2 proteins interact with PHR2 through their SPX domain, inhibiting its binding to P1BS (the PHR1-binding sequence: GNATATNC). In vivo data, as well as results from in vitro experiments using purified SPX1, SPX2, and OsPHR2 proteins, showed that SPX1 and SPX2 inhibition of OsPHR2 activity is Pi-dependent. These data provide evidence to support the involvement of SPX1 and SPX2 in the Pi-sensing mechanism in plants. PMID:25271318

  2. Novel Phr1 mutations and the evolution of phenol reaction variation in US weedy rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Briana L.; Skare, Karl J.; Olsen, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Red rice, a major agricultural weed, is phenotypically diverse and possesses traits that are similar to both wild and cultivated rice. The genetic resources available for rice make it possible to examine the molecular basis and evolution of traits characterizing this weed. Here, we assess the phenol reaction – a classical trait for distinguishing among cultivated rice varieties – in red rice at the phenotypic and molecular levels.We phenotyped more than 100 US weed samples for the phenol reaction and sequenced the underlying Phr1 locus in a subset of samples. Data were analyzed in combination with previously published Phr1 data for cultivated rice.Most weed accessions (96.3%) are positive for the phenol reaction, and samples with a negative response carry loss-of-function alleles that are rare or heretofore undocumented. One such allele may have evolved through mutational convergence of a 1-bp frameshift insertion. Haplotype sharing between red rice and US cultivars suggests occasional crop–weed hybridization.Our discovery of previously undocumented nonfunctional phr1 alleles suggests that there are likely to be other loss-of-function mutations segregating in Oryza sativa around the world. Red rice may provide a useful study system for understanding the adaptive significance of Phr1 variation in agricultural settings. PMID:19674331

  3. Essential role of MYB transcription factor PvPHR1 in phosphate starvation signaling in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P), an essential element for plants, is one of the most limiting nutrients for plant growth. In Arabidopsis, several responses to P starvation (-P) are regulated at the level of transcription, involving transcription factors (TF) such as: PHR1, WRKY75, ZAT6, and BHLH. Despite the agronom...

  4. 76 FR 40454 - Proposed Information Collection (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is announcing an opportunity for public comment on...

  5. Developmental Function of the PHR Protein RPM-1 Is Required for Learning in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Giles, Andrew C; Opperman, Karla J; Rankin, Catharine H; Grill, Brock

    2015-12-01

    The PAM/Highwire/RPM-1 (PHR) proteins are signaling hubs that function as important regulators of neural development. Loss of function in Caenorhabditis elegans rpm-1 and Drosophila Highwire results in failed axon termination, inappropriate axon targeting, and abnormal synapse formation. Despite broad expression in the nervous system and relatively dramatic defects in synapse formation and axon development, very mild abnormalities in behavior have been found in animals lacking PHR protein function. Therefore, we hypothesized that large defects in behavior might only be detected in scenarios in which evoked, prolonged circuit function is required, or in which behavioral plasticity occurs. Using quantitative approaches in C. elegans, we found that rpm-1 loss-of-function mutants have relatively mild abnormalities in exploratory locomotion, but have large defects in evoked responses to harsh touch and learning associated with tap habituation. We explored the nature of the severe habituation defects in rpm-1 mutants further. To address what part of the habituation circuit was impaired in rpm-1 mutants, we performed rescue analysis with promoters for different neurons. Our findings indicate that RPM-1 function in the mechanosensory neurons affects habituation. Transgenic expression of RPM-1 in adult animals failed to rescue habituation defects, consistent with developmental defects in rpm-1 mutants resulting in impaired habituation. Genetic analysis showed that other regulators of neuronal development that function in the rpm-1 pathway (including glo-4, fsn-1, and dlk-1) also affected habituation. Overall, our findings suggest that developmental defects in rpm-1 mutants manifest most prominently in behaviors that require protracted or plastic circuit function, such as learning.

  6. Developmental Function of the PHR Protein RPM-1 Is Required for Learning in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Andrew C.; Opperman, Karla J.; Rankin, Catharine H.; Grill, Brock

    2015-01-01

    The PAM/Highwire/RPM-1 (PHR) proteins are signaling hubs that function as important regulators of neural development. Loss of function in Caenorhabditis elegans rpm-1 and Drosophila Highwire results in failed axon termination, inappropriate axon targeting, and abnormal synapse formation. Despite broad expression in the nervous system and relatively dramatic defects in synapse formation and axon development, very mild abnormalities in behavior have been found in animals lacking PHR protein function. Therefore, we hypothesized that large defects in behavior might only be detected in scenarios in which evoked, prolonged circuit function is required, or in which behavioral plasticity occurs. Using quantitative approaches in C. elegans, we found that rpm-1 loss-of-function mutants have relatively mild abnormalities in exploratory locomotion, but have large defects in evoked responses to harsh touch and learning associated with tap habituation. We explored the nature of the severe habituation defects in rpm-1 mutants further. To address what part of the habituation circuit was impaired in rpm-1 mutants, we performed rescue analysis with promoters for different neurons. Our findings indicate that RPM-1 function in the mechanosensory neurons affects habituation. Transgenic expression of RPM-1 in adult animals failed to rescue habituation defects, consistent with developmental defects in rpm-1 mutants resulting in impaired habituation. Genetic analysis showed that other regulators of neuronal development that function in the rpm-1 pathway (including glo-4, fsn-1, and dlk-1) also affected habituation. Overall, our findings suggest that developmental defects in rpm-1 mutants manifest most prominently in behaviors that require protracted or plastic circuit function, such as learning. PMID:26464359

  7. Application of routine electronic health record databases for pharmacogenetic research.

    PubMed

    Yasmina, A; Deneer, V H M; Maitland-van der Zee, A H; van Staa, T P; de Boer, A; Klungel, O H

    2014-06-01

    Inter-individual variability in drug responses is a common problem in pharmacotherapy. Several factors (non-genetic and genetic) influence drug responses in patients. When aiming to obtain an optimal benefit-risk ratio of medicines and with the emergence of genotyping technology, pharmacogenetic studies are important for providing recommendations on drug treatments. Advances in electronic healthcare information systems can contribute to increasing the quality and efficiency of such studies. This review describes the definition of pharmacogenetics, gene selection and study design for pharmacogenetic research. It also summarizes the potential of linking pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacogenetics (along with its strengths and limitations) and provides examples of pharmacogenetic studies utilizing electronic health record databases. PMID:24581153

  8. Electronic Health Record Use a Bitter Pill for Many Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Meigs, Stephen L.; Solomon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health record (EHR) adoption among office-based physician practices in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. However, the challenges of using EHRs have resulted in growing dissatisfaction with the systems among many of these physicians. The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to increase understanding of physician perceptions regarding the value of using EHR technology. Important findings included the belief among physicians that EHR systems need to be more user-friendly and adaptable to individual clinic workflow preferences, physician beliefs that lack of interoperability among EHRs is a major barrier to meaningful use of the systems, and physician beliefs that EHR use does not improve the quality of care provided to patients. These findings suggest that although government initiatives to encourage EHR adoption among office-based physician practices have produced positive results, additional support may be required in the future to maintain this momentum. PMID:26903782

  9. Leveraging the Cloud for Electronic Health Record Access

    PubMed Central

    Coats, Brian; Acharya, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers are under increasing pressure to enable widespread access to their electronic health record (EHR) systems for the patients they serve; the meaningful use incentive programs are perhaps the most significant driver encouraging this access. Elsewhere, the cloud has become extremely efficient and successful at establishing digital identities for individuals and making them interoperable across heterogeneous systems. As the healthcare industry contemplates providing patients access to their EHRs, the solution should leverage existing cloud investment, not duplicate it. Through an analysis of industry standards and similar work being performed in other industries, a trust framework has been derived for exchanging identity information. This research lays out a comprehensive structure that healthcare providers can easily use to integrate their EHRs with the cloud for identity validation, while meeting compliance guidelines for security and privacy. Further, this research has been implemented at a large regional hospital, yielding immediate and tangible improvements. PMID:24808814

  10. Leveraging the cloud for electronic health record access.

    PubMed

    Coats, Brian; Acharya, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers are under increasing pressure to enable widespread access to their electronic health record (EHR) systems for the patients they serve; the meaningful use incentive programs are perhaps the most significant driver encouraging this access. Elsewhere, the cloud has become extremely efficient and successful at establishing digital identities for individuals and making them interoperable across heterogeneous systems. As the healthcare industry contemplates providing patients access to their EHRs, the solution should leverage existing cloud investment, not duplicate it. Through an analysis of industry standards and similar work being performed in other industries, a trust framework has been derived for exchanging identity information. This research lays out a comprehensive structure that healthcare providers can easily use to integrate their EHRs with the cloud for identity validation, while meeting compliance guidelines for security and privacy. Further, this research has been implemented at a large regional hospital, yielding immediate and tangible improvements. PMID:24808814

  11. Electronic health record functionality needed to better support primary care.

    PubMed

    Krist, Alex H; Beasley, John W; Crosson, Jesse C; Kibbe, David C; Klinkman, Michael S; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fox, Chester H; Mitchell, Jason M; Mold, James W; Pace, Wilson D; Peterson, Kevin A; Phillips, Robert L; Post, Robert; Puro, Jon; Raddock, Michael; Simkus, Ray; Waldren, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) must support primary care clinicians and patients, yet many clinicians remain dissatisfied with their system. This article presents a consensus statement about gaps in current EHR functionality and needed enhancements to support primary care. The Institute of Medicine primary care attributes were used to define needs and meaningful use (MU) objectives to define EHR functionality. Current objectives remain focused on disease rather than the whole person, ignoring factors such as personal risks, behaviors, family structure, and occupational and environmental influences. Primary care needs EHRs to move beyond documentation to interpreting and tracking information over time, as well as patient-partnering activities, support for team-based care, population-management tools that deliver care, and reduced documentation burden. While stage 3 MU's focus on outcomes is laudable, enhanced functionality is still needed, including EHR modifications, expanded use of patient portals, seamless integration with external applications, and advancement of national infrastructure and policies. PMID:24431335

  12. Hospital financial position and the adoption of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Gregory O; Shen, Jay J; Moseley, Charles B

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between financial position and adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) in 2442 acute care hospitals. The study was cross-sectional and utilized a general linear mixed model with the multinomial distribution specification for data analysis. We verified the results by also running a multinomial logistic regression model. To measure our variables, we used data from (1) the 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) electronic health record implementation survey, (2) the 2006 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Cost Reports, and (3) the 2006 AHA Annual Survey containing organizational and operational data. Our dependent variable was an ordinal variable with three levels used to indicate the extent of EHR adoption by hospitals. Our independent variables were five financial ratios: (1) net days revenue in accounts receivable, (2) total margin, (3) the equity multiplier, (4) total asset turnover, and (5) the ratio of total payroll to total expenses. For control variables, we used (1) bed size, (2) ownership type, (3) teaching affiliation, (4) system membership, (5) network participation, (6) fulltime equivalent nurses per adjusted average daily census, (7) average daily census per staffed bed, (8) Medicare patients percentage, (9) Medicaid patients percentage, (10) capitation-based reimbursement, and (11) nonconcentrated market. Only liquidity was significant and positively associated with EHR adoption. Asset turnover ratio was significant but, unexpectedly, was negatively associated with EHR adoption. However, many control variables, most notably bed size, showed significant positive associations with EHR adoption. Thus, it seems that hospitals adopt EHRs as a strategic move to better align themselves with their environment. PMID:21991681

  13. Hospital financial position and the adoption of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Gregory O; Shen, Jay J; Moseley, Charles B

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between financial position and adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) in 2442 acute care hospitals. The study was cross-sectional and utilized a general linear mixed model with the multinomial distribution specification for data analysis. We verified the results by also running a multinomial logistic regression model. To measure our variables, we used data from (1) the 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) electronic health record implementation survey, (2) the 2006 Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Cost Reports, and (3) the 2006 AHA Annual Survey containing organizational and operational data. Our dependent variable was an ordinal variable with three levels used to indicate the extent of EHR adoption by hospitals. Our independent variables were five financial ratios: (1) net days revenue in accounts receivable, (2) total margin, (3) the equity multiplier, (4) total asset turnover, and (5) the ratio of total payroll to total expenses. For control variables, we used (1) bed size, (2) ownership type, (3) teaching affiliation, (4) system membership, (5) network participation, (6) fulltime equivalent nurses per adjusted average daily census, (7) average daily census per staffed bed, (8) Medicare patients percentage, (9) Medicaid patients percentage, (10) capitation-based reimbursement, and (11) nonconcentrated market. Only liquidity was significant and positively associated with EHR adoption. Asset turnover ratio was significant but, unexpectedly, was negatively associated with EHR adoption. However, many control variables, most notably bed size, showed significant positive associations with EHR adoption. Thus, it seems that hospitals adopt EHRs as a strategic move to better align themselves with their environment.

  14. Content barriers to pediatric uptake of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Gracy, Delaney; Weisman, Jeb; Grant, Roy; Pruitt, Jennifer; Brito, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    EHR systems provide significant opportunities to enhance pediatric care. Well-constructed clinical content, HIE, automated reminders and alerts, and reporting at practice, community, and public health levels are available in several current systems and products. However, the general focus on inpatient and adult populations in the design and marketing of these systems should be seen as a significant barrier to EHR adoption among pediatric primary care providers. Weight-based medication dosing, specialty growth charts, units of measurement and time, and measures to address minor consent and adolescent confidentiality are not universal in quality and availability to the pediatric practice. However, there are opportunities for pediatricians to provide input and to clearly state minimum requirements when dealing with vendors or when government agencies (eg, ONCHIT and AHRQ) seek comment on standards, practices, and expectations. This article uses cases and examples to describe some areas in which pediatricians should take an active role to advocate for pediatric-appropriate EHR tools. Virtually every child born and cared for in the United States today will have their data and information recorded in an EHR. The quality of the information and the HIT in which it is recorded can affect the care they get as children, and the information they carry into adulthood.

  15. Learning Relational Policies from Electronic Health Record Access Logs

    PubMed Central

    Malin, Bradley; Nyemba, Steve; Paulett, John

    2011-01-01

    Modern healthcare organizations (HCOs) are composed of complex dynamic teams to ensure clinical operations are executed in a quick and competent manner. At the same time, the fluid nature of such environments hinders administrators' efforts to define access control policies that appropriately balance patient privacy and healthcare functions. Manual efforts to define these policies are labor-intensive and error-prone, often resulting in systems that endow certain care providers with overly broad access to patients' medical records while restricting other providers from legitimate and timely use. In this work, we propose an alternative method to generate these policies by automatically mining usage patterns from electronic health record (EHR) systems. EHR systems are increasingly being integrated into clinical environments and our approach is designed to be generalizable across HCOs, thus assisting in the design and evaluation of local access control policies. Our technique, which is grounded in data mining and social network analysis theory, extracts a statistical model of the organization from the access logs of its EHRs. In doing so, our approach enables the review of predefined policies, as well as the discovery of unknown behaviors. We evaluate our approach with five months of access logs from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center and confirm the existence of stable social structures and intuitive business operations. Additionally, we demonstrate that there is significant turnover in the interactions between users in the HCO and that policies learned at the department level afford greater stability over time. PMID:21277996

  16. Automated methods for the summarization of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Elhadad, Noémie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This review examines work on automated summarization of electronic health record (EHR) data and in particular, individual patient record summarization. We organize the published research and highlight methodological challenges in the area of EHR summarization implementation. Target audience The target audience for this review includes researchers, designers, and informaticians who are concerned about the problem of information overload in the clinical setting as well as both users and developers of clinical summarization systems. Scope Automated summarization has been a long-studied subject in the fields of natural language processing and human–computer interaction, but the translation of summarization and visualization methods to the complexity of the clinical workflow is slow moving. We assess work in aggregating and visualizing patient information with a particular focus on methods for detecting and removing redundancy, describing temporality, determining salience, accounting for missing data, and taking advantage of encoded clinical knowledge. We identify and discuss open challenges critical to the implementation and use of robust EHR summarization systems. PMID:25882031

  17. An electronic health record-enabled obesity database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of weight loss therapies is commonly measured using body mass index and other obesity-related variables. Although these data are often stored in electronic health records (EHRs) and potentially very accessible, few studies on obesity and weight loss have used data derived from EHRs. We developed processes for obtaining data from the EHR in order to construct a database on patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Methods Clinical data obtained as part of standard of care in a bariatric surgery program at an integrated health delivery system were extracted from the EHR and deposited into a data warehouse. Data files were extracted, cleaned, and stored in research datasets. To illustrate the utility of the data, Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate length of post-operative follow-up. Results Demographic, laboratory, medication, co-morbidity, and survey data were obtained from 2028 patients who had undergone RYGB at the same institution since 2004. Pre-and post-operative diagnostic and prescribing information were available on all patients, while survey laboratory data were available on a majority of patients. The number of patients with post-operative laboratory test results varied by test. Based on Kaplan-Meier estimates, over 74% of patients had post-operative weight data available at 4 years. Conclusion A variety of EHR-derived data related to obesity can be efficiently obtained and used to study important outcomes following RYGB. PMID:22640398

  18. Determinants of primary care nurses' intention to adopt an electronic health record in their clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Genevieve; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Sanderson, Duncan

    2012-09-01

    A provincial electronic health record is being developed in the Province of Quebec (and in all other provinces in Canada), and authorities hope that it will enable a safer and more efficient healthcare system for citizens. However, the expected benefits can occur only if healthcare professionals, including nurses, adopt this technology. Although attention to the use of the electronic health record by nurses is growing, better understanding of nurses' intention to use an electronic health record is needed and could help managers to better plan its implementation. This study examined the factors that influence primary care nurses' intention to adopt the provincial electronic health record, since intention influences electronic health record use and implementation success. Using a modified version of Ajzen's Theory of Planned Theory of Planned Behavior, a questionnaire was developed and pretested. Questionnaires were distributed to 199 primary care nurses. Multiple hierarchical regression indicated that the Theory of Planned Behavior variables explained 58% of the variance in nurses' intention to adopt an electronic health record. The strong intention to adopt the electronic health record is mainly determined by perceived behavioral control, normative beliefs, and attitudes. The implications of the study are that healthcare managers could facilitate adoption of an electronic health record by strengthening nurses' intention to adopt the electronic health record, which in turn can be influenced through interventions oriented toward the belief that using an electronic health record will improve the quality of patient care. PMID:22592453

  19. Electronic health record usability: analysis of the user-centered design processes of eleven electronic health record vendors.

    PubMed

    Ratwani, Raj M; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Hettinger, A Zachary; Benda, Natalie C

    2015-11-01

    The usability of electronic health records (EHRs) continues to be a point of dissatisfaction for providers, despite certification requirements from the Office of the National Coordinator that require EHR vendors to employ a user-centered design (UCD) process. To better understand factors that contribute to poor usability, a research team visited 11 different EHR vendors in order to analyze their UCD processes and discover the specific challenges that vendors faced as they sought to integrate UCD with their EHR development. Our analysis demonstrates a diverse range of vendors' UCD practices that fall into 3 categories: well-developed UCD, basic UCD, and misconceptions of UCD. Specific challenges to practicing UCD include conducting contextually rich studies of clinical workflow, recruiting participants for usability studies, and having support from leadership within the vendor organization. The results of the study provide novel insights for how to improve usability practices of EHR vendors.

  20. Electronic Personal Health Record Use Among Nurses in the Nursing Informatics Community.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Kyungsook; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Wilson, Marisa L

    2015-07-01

    An electronic personal health record is a patient-centric tool that enables patients to securely access, manage, and share their health information with healthcare providers. It is presumed the nursing informatics community would be early adopters of electronic personal health record, yet no studies have been identified that examine the personal adoption of electronic personal health record's for their own healthcare. For this study, we sampled nurse members of the American Medical Informatics Association and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society with 183 responding. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify those factors associated with electronic personal health record use. Overall, 72% were electronic personal health record users. Users tended to be older (aged >50 years), be more highly educated (72% master's or doctoral degrees), and hold positions as clinical informatics specialists or chief nursing informatics officers. Those whose healthcare providers used electronic health records were significantly more likely to use electronic personal health records (odds ratio, 5.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-25.61). Electronic personal health record users were significantly less concerned about privacy of health information online than nonusers (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.70) adjusted for ethnicity, race, and practice region. Informatics nurses, with their patient-centered view of technology, are in prime position to influence development of electronic personal health records. Our findings can inform policy efforts to encourage informatics and other professional nursing groups to become leaders and users of electronic personal health record; such use could help them endorse and engage patients to use electronic personal health records. Having champions with expertise in and enthusiasm for the new technology can promote the adoptionof electronic personal health records among healthcare providers as well as

  1. Electronic Personal Health Record Use Among Nurses in the Nursing Informatics Community.

    PubMed

    Gartrell, Kyungsook; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Wilson, Marisa L

    2015-07-01

    An electronic personal health record is a patient-centric tool that enables patients to securely access, manage, and share their health information with healthcare providers. It is presumed the nursing informatics community would be early adopters of electronic personal health record, yet no studies have been identified that examine the personal adoption of electronic personal health record's for their own healthcare. For this study, we sampled nurse members of the American Medical Informatics Association and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society with 183 responding. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify those factors associated with electronic personal health record use. Overall, 72% were electronic personal health record users. Users tended to be older (aged >50 years), be more highly educated (72% master's or doctoral degrees), and hold positions as clinical informatics specialists or chief nursing informatics officers. Those whose healthcare providers used electronic health records were significantly more likely to use electronic personal health records (odds ratio, 5.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-25.61). Electronic personal health record users were significantly less concerned about privacy of health information online than nonusers (odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.70) adjusted for ethnicity, race, and practice region. Informatics nurses, with their patient-centered view of technology, are in prime position to influence development of electronic personal health records. Our findings can inform policy efforts to encourage informatics and other professional nursing groups to become leaders and users of electronic personal health record; such use could help them endorse and engage patients to use electronic personal health records. Having champions with expertise in and enthusiasm for the new technology can promote the adoptionof electronic personal health records among healthcare providers as well as

  2. Electronic Health Record (EHR) As a Vehicle for Successful Health Care Best Practice

    PubMed Central

    Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: application of EHR in journey toward the development and adaptation of best practice approach in health care has particular importance. The aim of this review article is survey of successful best practice through EHR. Methods: In this literature review articles were searched with keywords like Electronic Health Record, Best Practice in Science Direct, Google Scholar and Pub Med databases since 1999. Results: best practice in health care through some services like utilization management, case management, and information technology tools can perform. Utilization management in combination with evidence based medicine facilitate determine best decision. Health records are based on evidence medicine and be the richest source of health information. Definitely use of EHR has play pivotal role in journey toward the development and adaptation of best practice approach. Conclusion: Because of potential capabilities, EHR can be regarded as a main core and fundamental element in best practice approach. Success implementation of EHR relies on many factors that should be considered. Some critical success factors for EHR implementation that should be noted are change management, Physicians, nurses and key stakeholders involvement, leadership, provide reliable information technology infrastructure, system design, privacy and security, right budget, support high level management, clear communicate, determine goals and user needs, and define roles and responsibilities, interoperability standards. PMID:25648601

  3. Mobile health platform for pressure ulcer monitoring with electronic health record integration.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Pedro, Luís M C C; Vardasca, Tomé; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; Martins, Henrique M G

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers frequently occur in patients with limited mobility, for example, people with advanced age and patients wearing casts or prostheses. Mobile information communication technologies can help implement ulcer care protocols and the monitoring of patients with high risk, thus preventing or improving these conditions. This article presents a mobile pressure ulcer monitoring platform (mULCER), which helps control a patient's ulcer status during all stages of treatment. Beside its stand-alone version, it can be integrated with electronic health record systems as mULCER synchronizes ulcer data with any electronic health record system using HL7 standards. It serves as a tool to integrate nursing care among hospital departments and institutions. mULCER was experimented with in different mobile devices such as LG Optimus One P500, Samsung Galaxy Tab, HTC Magic, Samsung Galaxy S, and Samsung Galaxy i5700, taking into account the user's experience of different screen sizes and processing characteristics.

  4. Catalytic properties of Phr family members of cell wall glucan remodeling enzymes: implications for the adaptation of Candida albicans to ambient pH.

    PubMed

    Kováčová, Kristína; Degani, Genny; Stratilová, Eva; Farkaš, Vladimír; Popolo, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Fungal wall formation is a dynamic process involving several categories of enzymes. The GH72 family of β(1,3)-glucanosyltransferases is essential for the determination of cell shape, for cell integrity and for virulence in pathogenic fungi. Candida albicans has five GH72 genes: PHR1 and PHR2 are pH dependent, the first being expressed at pH ≥ 6 and repressed at lower pH and the second regulated in the opposite manner, PGA4 is transcribed independently of pH whereas PHR3 and PGA5 have low expression levels. To characterize the catalytic properties of Phr1p-2p and probe the activity of Pga4p, we heterologously expressed these proteins and used a fluorescent assay based on the transfer of oligosaccharyl units from a donor to a sulforhodamine-labeled acceptor. Phr1p-2p used exclusively β-1,3-glucan or cell wall glucan as donor and laminarin-derived oligosaccharides as acceptor. The acceptor efficiency increased with the length of the oligosaccharide. The temperature optimum was 30°C. The pH optimum was 5.8 for Phr1p and 3 for Phr2p. Overall, adaptation to pH of C. albicans appears to involve a fine interplay among the pH-dependent activity of Phr1p and Phr2p, the pH-regulated expression of their genes and protein stability. Unexpectedly, Pga4p was inactive suggesting that it turned into a structural mannoprotein.

  5. Caregiver preferences regarding Personal Health Records in the management of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Ronis, Sarah D; Baldwin, Constance D; McIntosh, Scott; McConnochie, Kenneth; Szilagyi, Peter G; Dolan, James

    2015-01-01

    Objective PHRs may address the needs of children with ADHD. Among parents, we assessed acceptance, barriers, and intentions regarding use of PHR for their children with ADHD. Methods Survey of parents from three practices in Rochester NY. Stepwise logistic regression analysis explored factors predicting respondents’ intentions for future use of PHR, accounting for care coordination needs, caregiver education, SES and satisfaction with providers. Results Of 184 respondents, 23% had used the PHR for their child, 82% intended future use. No difference was observed between users and non-users regarding gender, age, race, or education. Users were more likely than non-users to reside in the suburbs (p=0.03). Caregivers were more likely to plan future use of the PHR if they felt engaged as partners in their child’s care (AOR 2.3, 95%CI 1.2, 4.5). Conclusions Parents are enthusiastic about PHRs. Future work should focus on engaging them as members of the healthcare team. PMID:25567294

  6. Electronic health records and support for primary care teamwork

    PubMed Central

    Draper, Kevin; Gourevitch, Rebecca; Cross, Dori A.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Objective Consensus that enhanced teamwork is necessary for efficient and effective primary care delivery is growing. We sought to identify how electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate and pose challenges to primary care teams as well as how practices are overcoming these challenges. Methods Practices in this qualitative study were selected from those recognized as patient-centered medical homes via the National Committee for Quality Assurance 2011 tool, which included a section on practice teamwork. We interviewed 63 respondents, ranging from physicians to front-desk staff, from 27 primary care practices ranging in size, type, geography, and population size. Results EHRs were found to facilitate communication and task delegation in primary care teams through instant messaging, task management software, and the ability to create evidence-based templates for symptom-specific data collection from patients by medical assistants and nurses (which can offload work from physicians). Areas where respondents felt that electronic medical record EHR functionalities were weakest and posed challenges to teamwork included the lack of integrated care manager software and care plans in EHRs, poor practice registry functionality and interoperability, and inadequate ease of tracking patient data in the EHR over time. Discussion Practices developed solutions for some of the challenges they faced when attempting to use EHRs to support teamwork but wanted more permanent vendor and policy solutions for other challenges. Conclusions EHR vendors in the United States need to work alongside practicing primary care teams to create more clinically useful EHRs that support dynamic care plans, integrated care management software, more functional and interoperable practice registries, and greater ease of data tracking over time. PMID:25627278

  7. Electronic Health Record-Related Safety Concerns: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Electronic Health Record Users

    PubMed Central

    Pajunen, Tuuli; Saranto, Kaija; Lehtonen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Background The rapid expansion in the use of electronic health records (EHR) has increased the number of medical errors originating in health information systems (HIS). The sociotechnical approach helps in understanding risks in the development, implementation, and use of EHR and health information technology (HIT) while accounting for complex interactions of technology within the health care system. Objective This study addresses two important questions: (1) “which of the common EHR error types are associated with perceived high- and extreme-risk severity ratings among EHR users?”, and (2) “which variables are associated with high- and extreme-risk severity ratings?” Methods This study was a quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive study of EHR users. We conducted a cross-sectional web-based questionnaire study at the largest hospital district in Finland. Statistical tests included the reliability of the summative scales tested with Cronbach’s alpha. Logistic regression served to assess the association of the independent variables to each of the eight risk factors examined. Results A total of 2864 eligible respondents provided the final data. Almost half of the respondents reported a high level of risk related to the error type “extended EHR unavailability”. The lowest overall risk level was associated with “selecting incorrectly from a list of items”. In multivariate analyses, profession and clinical unit proved to be the strongest predictors for high perceived risk. Physicians perceived risk levels to be the highest (P<.001 in six of eight error types), while emergency departments, operating rooms, and procedure units were associated with higher perceived risk levels (P<.001 in four of eight error types). Previous participation in eLearning courses on EHR-use was associated with lower risk for some of the risk factors. Conclusions Based on a large number of Finnish EHR users in hospitals, this study indicates that HIT safety hazards should

  8. Chapter 13: Mining Electronic Health Records in the Genomics Era

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Joshua C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The combination of improved genomic analysis methods, decreasing genotyping costs, and increasing computing resources has led to an explosion of clinical genomic knowledge in the last decade. Similarly, healthcare systems are increasingly adopting robust electronic health record (EHR) systems that not only can improve health care, but also contain a vast repository of disease and treatment data that could be mined for genomic research. Indeed, institutions are creating EHR-linked DNA biobanks to enable genomic and pharmacogenomic research, using EHR data for phenotypic information. However, EHRs are designed primarily for clinical care, not research, so reuse of clinical EHR data for research purposes can be challenging. Difficulties in use of EHR data include: data availability, missing data, incorrect data, and vast quantities of unstructured narrative text data. Structured information includes billing codes, most laboratory reports, and other variables such as physiologic measurements and demographic information. Significant information, however, remains locked within EHR narrative text documents, including clinical notes and certain categories of test results, such as pathology and radiology reports. For relatively rare observations, combinations of simple free-text searches and billing codes may prove adequate when followed by manual chart review. However, to extract the large cohorts necessary for genome-wide association studies, natural language processing methods to process narrative text data may be needed. Combinations of structured and unstructured textual data can be mined to generate high-validity collections of cases and controls for a given condition. Once high-quality cases and controls are identified, EHR-derived cases can be used for genomic discovery and validation. Since EHR data includes a broad sampling of clinically-relevant phenotypic information, it may enable multiple genomic investigations upon a single set of genotyped

  9. “Big Data” and the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Ross, M. K.; Wei, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Implementation of Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems continues to expand. The massive number of patient encounters results in high amounts of stored data. Transforming clinical data into knowledge to improve patient care has been the goal of biomedical informatics professionals for many decades, and this work is now increasingly recognized outside our field. In reviewing the literature for the past three years, we focus on “big data” in the context of EHR systems and we report on some examples of how secondary use of data has been put into practice. Methods We searched PubMed database for articles from January 1, 2011 to November 1, 2013. We initiated the search with keywords related to “big data” and EHR. We identified relevant articles and additional keywords from the retrieved articles were added. Based on the new keywords, more articles were retrieved and we manually narrowed down the set utilizing predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results Our final review includes articles categorized into the themes of data mining (pharmacovigilance, phenotyping, natural language processing), data application and integration (clinical decision support, personal monitoring, social media), and privacy and security. Conclusion The increasing adoption of EHR systems worldwide makes it possible to capture large amounts of clinical data. There is an increasing number of articles addressing the theme of “big data”, and the concepts associated with these articles vary. The next step is to transform healthcare big data into actionable knowledge. PMID:25123728

  10. CADe System Integrated within the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Vállez, Noelia; Déniz, Óscar; Fernández, María del Milagro; Pastor, Carlos; Rienda, Miguel Ángel; Esteve, Pablo; Arias, María

    2013-01-01

    The latest technological advances and information support systems for clinics and hospitals produce a wide range of possibilities in the storage and retrieval of an ever-growing amount of clinical information as well as in detection and diagnosis. In this work, an Electronic Health Record (EHR) combined with a Computer Aided Detection (CADe) system for breast cancer diagnosis has been implemented. Our objective is to provide to radiologists a comprehensive working environment that facilitates the integration, the image visualization, and the use of aided tools within the EHR. For this reason, a development methodology based on hardware and software system features in addition to system requirements must be present during the whole development process. This will lead to a complete environment for displaying, editing, and reporting results not only for the patient information but also for their medical images in standardised formats such as DICOM and DICOM-SR. As a result, we obtain a CADe system which helps in detecting breast cancer using mammograms and is completely integrated into an EHR. PMID:24151586

  11. Clinical Research Informatics and Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, M. M.; Rusincovitch, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this survey is to discuss the impact of the growing availability of electronic health record (EHR) data on the evolving field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), which is the union of biomedical research and informatics. Results Major challenges for the use of EHR-derived data for research include the lack of standard methods for ensuring that data quality, completeness, and provenance are sufficient to assess the appropriateness of its use for research. Areas that need continued emphasis include methods for integrating data from heterogeneous sources, guidelines (including explicit phenotype definitions) for using these data in both pragmatic clinical trials and observational investigations, strong data governance to better understand and control quality of enterprise data, and promotion of national standards for representing and using clinical data. Conclusions The use of EHR data has become a priority in CRI. Awareness of underlying clinical data collection processes will be essential in order to leverage these data for clinical research and patient care, and will require multi-disciplinary teams representing clinical research, informatics, and healthcare operations. Considerations for the use of EHR data provide a starting point for practical applications and a CRI research agenda, which will be facilitated by CRI’s key role in the infrastructure of a learning healthcare system. PMID:25123746

  12. Measuring Nursing Value from the Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Welton, John M; Harper, Ellen M

    2016-01-01

    We report the findings of a big data nursing value expert group made up of 14 members of the nursing informatics, leadership, academic and research communities within the United States tasked with 1. Defining nursing value, 2. Developing a common data model and metrics for nursing care value, and 3. Developing nursing business intelligence tools using the nursing value data set. This work is a component of the Big Data and Nursing Knowledge Development conference series sponsored by the University Of Minnesota School Of Nursing. The panel met by conference calls for fourteen 1.5 hour sessions for a total of 21 total hours of interaction from August 2014 through May 2015. Primary deliverables from the bit data expert group were: development and publication of definitions and metrics for nursing value; construction of a common data model to extract key data from electronic health records; and measures of nursing costs and finance to provide a basis for developing nursing business intelligence and analysis systems. PMID:27332163

  13. Information Discovery on Electronic Health Records Using Authority Flow Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As the use of electronic health records (EHRs) becomes more widespread, so does the need to search and provide effective information discovery within them. Querying by keyword has emerged as one of the most effective paradigms for searching. Most work in this area is based on traditional Information Retrieval (IR) techniques, where each document is compared individually against the query. We compare the effectiveness of two fundamentally different techniques for keyword search of EHRs. Methods We built two ranking systems. The traditional BM25 system exploits the EHRs' content without regard to association among entities within. The Clinical ObjectRank (CO) system exploits the entities' associations in EHRs using an authority-flow algorithm to discover the most relevant entities. BM25 and CO were deployed on an EHR dataset of the cardiovascular division of Miami Children's Hospital. Using sequences of keywords as queries, sensitivity and specificity were measured by two physicians for a set of 11 queries related to congenital cardiac disease. Results Our pilot evaluation showed that CO outperforms BM25 in terms of sensitivity (65% vs. 38%) by 71% on average, while maintaining the specificity (64% vs. 61%). The evaluation was done by two physicians. Conclusions Authority-flow techniques can greatly improve the detection of relevant information in EHRs and hence deserve further study. PMID:20969780

  14. CADe system integrated within the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Vállez, Noelia; Bueno, Gloria; Déniz, Óscar; Fernández, María del Milagro; Pastor, Carlos; Rienda, Miguel Ángel; Esteve, Pablo; Arias, María

    2013-01-01

    The latest technological advances and information support systems for clinics and hospitals produce a wide range of possibilities in the storage and retrieval of an ever-growing amount of clinical information as well as in detection and diagnosis. In this work, an Electronic Health Record (EHR) combined with a Computer Aided Detection (CADe) system for breast cancer diagnosis has been implemented. Our objective is to provide to radiologists a comprehensive working environment that facilitates the integration, the image visualization, and the use of aided tools within the EHR. For this reason, a development methodology based on hardware and software system features in addition to system requirements must be present during the whole development process. This will lead to a complete environment for displaying, editing, and reporting results not only for the patient information but also for their medical images in standardised formats such as DICOM and DICOM-SR. As a result, we obtain a CADe system which helps in detecting breast cancer using mammograms and is completely integrated into an EHR.

  15. How the Electronic Health Record Will Change the Future of Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Ronquillo, Jeremiah Geronimo

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is expected to play a critical role in patient care in the near future. Advances in genomic research have the potential to impact medicine in very tangible and direct ways, from carrier screening to disease diagnosis and prognosis to targeted treatments and personalized medicine. However, numerous barriers to widespread adoption of genetic testing continue to exist, and health information technology will be a critical means of addressing these challenges. Electronic health records (EHRs) are a digital replacement for the traditional paper-based patient chart designed to improve the quality of patient care. EHRs have become increasingly essential to managing the wealth of existing clinical information that now includes genetic information extracted from the patient genome. The EHR is capable of changing health care in the future by transforming the way physicians use genomic information in the practice of medicine. PMID:23012585

  16. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients.

  17. Introducing sexual orientation and gender identity into the electronic health record: one academic health center's experience.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Edward J; Sitkin, Nicole; Ton, Hendry; Eidson-Ton, W Suzanne; Weckstein, Julie; Latimore, Darin

    2015-02-01

    Many U.S. populations experience significant health disparities. Increasing health care providers' awareness of and education about sexual orientation (SO) and gender identity (GI) diversity could help reduce health disparities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. The authors share the University of California, Davis, Health System's (UCDHS's) experience as it became the first U.S. academic health center to formally introduce patient SO/GI demographic data into its electronic health record (EHR) as a step toward reducing LGBT health disparities. Adding these data to the EHR initially met with resistance. The authors, members of the UCDHS Task Force for Inclusion of SO/GI in the EHR, viewed this resistance as an invitation to educate leaders, providers, and staff about LGBT health disparities and to expose providers to techniques for discussing SO/GI with patients. They describe the strategies they employed to effect institutional culture change, including involvement of senior leadership, key informant interviews, educational outreach via grand rounds and resident workshops, and creation of a patient safety net through inviting providers to self-identify as welcoming LGBT patients. The ongoing cultural change process has inspired spin-off projects contributing to an improved climate for LGBT individuals at UCDHS, including an employee organization supporting SO/GI diversity, support for and among LGBT medical learners through events and listservs, development and implementation of an LGBT health curriculum, and creation of peer navigator programs for LGBT patients with cancer. The authors reflect on lessons learned and on institutional pride in and commitment to providing quality care for LGBT patients. PMID:25162618

  18. Breaches of health information: are electronic records different from paper records?

    PubMed

    Sade, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Breaches of electronic medical records constitute a type of healthcare error, but should be considered separately from other types of errors because the national focus on the security of electronic data justifies special treatment of medical information breaches. Guidelines for protecting electronic medical records should be applied equally to paper medical records.

  19. The transcription factor PHR1 regulates lipid remodeling and triacylglycerol accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana during phosphorus starvation

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Bikram Datt; Burgos, Asdrubal; Pant, Pooja; Cuadros-Inostroza, Alvaro; Willmitzer, Lothar; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Lipid remodeling is one of the most dramatic metabolic responses to phosphorus (P) starvation. It consists of the degradation of phospholipids to release the phosphate needed by the cell and the accumulation of glycolipids to replace phospholipids in the membranes. It is shown that PHR1, a well-described transcriptional regulator of P starvation of the MYB family, largely controls this response. Glycerolipid composition and the expression of most lipid-remodeling gene transcripts analysed were altered in the phr1 mutant under phosphate starvation in comparison to wild-type plants. In addition to these results, the lipidomic characterization of wild-type plants showed two novel features of the lipid response to P starvation for Arabidopsis. Triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulates dramatically under P starvation (by as much as ~20-fold in shoots and ~13-fold in roots), a response known to occur in green algae but hardly known in plants. Surprisingly, there was an increase in phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in P-starved roots, a response that may be adaptive as it was suppressed in the phr1 mutant. PMID:25680792

  20. Characterization of the photolyase-like iron sulfur protein PhrB from Agrobacterium tumefaciens by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, T. O.; Graf, D.; Lamparter, T.; Schünemann, V.

    2014-04-01

    High field Mössbauer spectroscopy has been used to characterize the [4Fe-4S] 2 +cluster of the protein PhrB from Agrobacterium tumefaciens which belongs to the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF) and which biological function has previously been shown to be DNA repair. Mössbauer spectra taken of the as prepared protein reveal δ = 0. 42 mms - 1, and Δ E Q = 1. 26 mms - 1as well as an asymmetry parameter of η = 0. 8. These parameters are characteristic for a ferredoxin-type [4Fe-4S] 2 +cluster. In order to investigate whether this cluster is involved in DNA-repair the protein has also been studied in its photoactivated state during DNA binding. The so obtained data sets exhibit essentially the same Mössbauer parameters as those of the non-activated PhrB. This indicates that during DNA repair the [4Fe-4S] 2 +cluster of PhrB has no significant amounts of transition states which have conformational changes compared to the resting state of the protein and which have life times of several seconds or longer.

  1. Specialty pharmaceuticals care management in an integrated health care delivery system with electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Monroe, C Douglas; Chin, Karen Y

    2013-05-01

    The specialty pharmaceuticals market is expanding more rapidly than the traditional pharmaceuticals market. Specialty pharmacy operations have evolved to deliver selected medications and associated clinical services. The growing role of specialty drugs requires new approaches to managing the use of these drugs. The focus, expectations, and emphasis in specialty drug management in an integrated health care delivery system such as Kaiser Permanente (KP) can vary as compared with more conventional health care systems. The KP Specialty Pharmacy (KP-SP) serves KP members across the United States. This descriptive account addresses the impetus for specialty drug management within KP, the use of tools such as an electronic health record (EHR) system and process management software, the KP-SP approach for specialty pharmacy services, and the emphasis on quality measurement of services provided. Kaiser Permanente's integrated system enables KP-SP pharmacists to coordinate the provision of specialty drugs while monitoring laboratory values, physician visits, and most other relevant elements of the patient's therapy. Process management software facilitates the counseling of patients, promotion of adherence, and interventions to resolve clinical, logistic, or pharmacy benefit issues. The integrated EHR affords KP-SP pharmacists advantages for care management that should become available to more health care systems with broadened adoption of EHRs. The KP-SP experience may help to establish models for clinical pharmacy services as health care systems and information systems become more integrated.

  2. A plasmid-born Rap-Phr system regulates surfactin production, sporulation and genetic competence in the heterologous host, Bacillus subtilis OKB105.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Wu, Hui-Jun; Lin, Ling; Zhu, Qing-Qing; Borriss, Rainer; Gao, Xue-Wen

    2015-09-01

    According to the change of environment, soil-dwelling Bacillus species differentiate into distinct subpopulations, such as spores and competent cells. Rap-Phr systems have been found to be involved in this differentiation circuit by interacting with major regulatory proteins, such as Spo0A, ComA, and DegU. In this study, we report that the plasmid-born RapQ-PhrQ system found in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens B3 affects three regulatory pathways in the heterologous host Bacillus subtilis. Expression of rapQ in B. subtilis OKB105 strongly suppressed its sporulation efficiency, transformation efficiency, and surfactin production. Co-expression of phrQ or addition of synthesized PhrQ pentapeptide in vitro could compensate for the suppressive effects caused by rapQ. We also found that expression of rapQ decreased the transcriptional level of the sporulation-related gene spoIIE and surfactin synthesis-related gene srfA; meanwhile, the transcriptional levels of these genes could be rescued by co-expression of phrQ and in vitro addition of PhrQ pentapeptide. Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) result also showed that RapQ could bind to ComA without interacting with ComA binding to DNA, and PhrQ pentapeptide antagonized RapQ activity in vitro. These results indicate that this new plasmid-born RapQ-PhrQ system controls sporulation, competent cell formation, and surfactin production in B. subtilis OKB105.

  3. Physicians, Patients, and the Electronic Health Record: An Ethnographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William; Kooienga, Sarah; Vuckovic, Nancy; Marlin, Ryan; Nygren, Peggy; Stewart, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about the effects of the electronic health record (EHR) on physician-patient encounters. The objectives of this study were to identify the factors that influence the manner by which physicians use the EHR with patients. METHODS This ethnographic study included 4 qualitative components: 80 hours of participant observation in 4 primary care offices in the Pacific Northwest; individual interviews with 52 patients, 12 office staff members, 23 physicians, and 1 nurse-practitioner; videotaped reviews of 29 clinical encounters; and 5 focus-group interviews with physicians and computer advocates. The main outcome measures were factors that influence how physicians use the EHR. Researchers qualitatively derived these factors through serial reviews of data. RESULTS This study identified 14 factors that influence how EHRs are used and perceived in medical practice today. These factors were categorized into 4 thematic domains: (1) spatial—effect of the physical presence and location of EHRs on interactions between physicians and patients; (2) relational—perceptions of physicians and patients about the EHR and how those perceptions affected its use; (3) educational—issues of developing physicians’ proficiency with and improving patients’ understandings about EHR use; and (4) structural—institutional and technological forces that influence how physicians perceived their use of EHR. CONCLUSIONS This study found that the introduction of EHRs into practice influences multiple cognitive and social dimensions of the clinical encounter. It brings into focus important questions that through further inquiry can determine how to make best use of the EHR to enhance therapeutic relationships. PMID:16569715

  4. Factors in medical student beliefs about electronic health record use.

    PubMed

    Harle, Christopher A; Gruber, Laura A; Dewar, Marvin A

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare providers' ongoing investment in electronic health records (EHRs) necessitates an understanding of physicians' expectations about using EHRs. Such understanding may aid educators and administrators when utilizing scarce resources during EHR training and implementation activities. This study aimed to link individual medical student characteristics to their perceptions of EHRs' ease of use and usefulness. This study employed a cross-sectional survey of 126 third-year medical students at a large southeastern university. Using a questionnaire designed for this study and containing previously validated items, the study team measured and related students' expectations about EHR ease of use and usefulness to their computer self-efficacy, openness to change, personality traits, and demographic characteristics. On a seven-point scale, men reported, on average, ease-of-use scores that were 0.71 higher than women's (p < .001). Also, increased computer self-efficacy related to higher expectations of EHR ease of use (p < .01) and usefulness (p < .05). Openness-to-change scores were also associated with higher expectations of EHR ease of use (p < .01) and usefulness (p < .001). Finally, a more conscientious personality was positively associated with EHR ease of use (p < .01). Our findings suggest that medical educators and administrators may consider targeting EHR management strategies on the basis of individual differences. Enhanced training and support interventions may be helpful to women or to clinicians with lower computer self-efficacy, lower openness to change, or less conscientious personalities. Also, current and future physicians who rate higher in terms of self-efficacy, openness to change, or conscientiousness may be useful as champions of EHR use among their peers.

  5. Exploring electronic health records as a population health surveillance tool of cardiovascular disease risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, Abbey C; Johnson, Pamela Jo; VanWormer, Jeffrey J; Sillah, Arthur; Winden, Tamara J; Boucher, Jackie L

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the utility of using electronic health record (EHR) data for periodic community health surveillance of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors through 2 research questions. First, how many years of EHR data are needed to produce reliable estimates of key population-level CVD health indicators for a community? Second, how comparable are the EHR estimates relative to those from community screenings? The study takes place in the context of the Heart of New Ulm Project, a 10-year population health initiative designed to reduce myocardial infarctions and CVD risk factor burden in a rural community. The community is served by 1 medical center that includes a clinic and hospital. The project screened adult residents of New Ulm for CVD risk factors in 2009. EHR data for 3 years prior to the heart health screenings were extracted for patients from the community. Single- and multiple-year EHR prevalence estimates were compared for individuals ages 40-79 years (N=5918). EHR estimates also were compared to screening estimates (N=3123). Single-year compared with multiyear EHR data prevalence estimates were sufficiently precise for this rural community. EHR and screening prevalence estimates differed significantly-systolic blood pressure (BP) (124.0 vs. 128.9), diastolic BP (73.3 vs. 79.2), total cholesterol (186.0 vs. 201.0), body mass index (30.2 vs. 29.5), and smoking (16.6% vs. 8.2%)-suggesting some selection bias depending on the method used. Despite differences between data sources, EHR data may be a useful source of population health surveillance to inform and evaluate local population health initiatives.

  6. Can an electronic health record system be used for preconception health optimization?

    PubMed

    Straub, Heather; Adams, Marci; Silver, Richard K

    2014-11-01

    To explore the potential of an integrated outpatient electronic health record (EHR) for preconception health optimization. An automated case-finding EHR-derived algorithm was designed to identify women of child-bearing age having outpatient encounters in an 85-site, integrated health system. The algorithm simultaneously cross-referenced multiple discrete data fields to identify selected preconception factors (obesity, hypertension, diabetes, teratogen use including ACE inhibitors, multivitamin supplementation, anemia, renal insufficiency, untreated sexually transmitted infection, HIV positivity, and tobacco, alcohol or illegal drug use). Surveys were mailed to a random sample of patients to obtain their self-reported health profiles for these same factors. Concordance was assessed between the algorithm output, survey results, and manual data abstraction. Between 8/2010-2/2012, 107,339 female outpatient visits were identified, from which 29,691 unique women were presumed to have child-bearing potential. 19,624 (66 %) and 8,652 (29 %) had 1 or ≥2 health factors, respectively while only 1,415 (5 %) had none. Using the patient survey results as a reference point, health-factor agreement was similar comparing the algorithm (85.8 %) and the chart abstraction (87.2 %) results. Incorrect or missing data entries in the EHR encounters were largely responsible for discordances observed. Preconception screening using an automated algorithm in a system-wide EHR identified a large group of women with potentially modifiable preconception health conditions. The issue most responsible for limiting algorithm performance was incomplete point of care documentation. Accurate data capture during patient encounters should be a focus for quality improvement, so that novel applications of system-wide data mining can be reliably implemented. PMID:24627232

  7. A new quorum sensing system (TprA/PhrA) for Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 that regulates a lantibiotic biosynthesis gene cluster

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Sharon E.; Perez, Amilcar J.; Tsui, Ho-Ching T.; Sinha, Dhriti; Smiley, David L.; DiMarchi, Richard D.; Winkler, Malcolm E.; Lazazzera, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    The Phr peptides of Bacillus species mediate quorum sensing, but their identification and function in other species of bacteria has not been determined. We have identified a Phr peptide quorum sensing system (TprA/PhrA) that controls the expression of a lantibiotic gene cluster in the Gram-positive human pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae. Lantibiotics are highly modified peptides that are part of the bacteriocin family of antimicrobial peptides. We have characterized the basic mechanism for a Phr peptide signaling system in S. pneumoniae and found that it induces expression of the lantibiotic genes when pneumococcal cells are at high density in the presence of galactose, a main sugar of the human nasopharynx, a highly competitive microbial environment. Activity of the Phr peptide system is not seen when pneumococcal cells are grown with glucose, the preferred carbon source and the most prevalent sugar encountered by S. pneumoniae during invasive disease. Thus, the lantibiotic genes are expressed under the control of both cell density signals via the Phr peptide system and nutritional signals from the carbon source present, suggesting that quorum sensing and the lantibiotic machinery may help pneumococcal cells compete for space and resources during colonization of the nasopharynx. PMID:25869931

  8. A new quorum-sensing system (TprA/PhrA) for Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 that regulates a lantibiotic biosynthesis gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Sharon E; Perez, Amilcar J; Tsui, Ho-Ching T; Sinha, Dhriti; Smiley, David L; DiMarchi, Richard D; Winkler, Malcolm E; Lazazzera, Beth A

    2015-07-01

    The Phr peptides of the Bacillus species mediate quorum sensing, but their identification and function in other species of bacteria have not been determined. We have identified a Phr peptide quorum-sensing system (TprA/PhrA) that controls the expression of a lantibiotic gene cluster in the Gram-positive human pathogen, Streptococcus pneumoniae. Lantibiotics are highly modified peptides that are part of the bacteriocin family of antimicrobial peptides. We have characterized the basic mechanism for a Phr-peptide signaling system in S. pneumoniae and found that it induces the expression of the lantibiotic genes when pneumococcal cells are at high density in the presence of galactose, a main sugar of the human nasopharynx, a highly competitive microbial environment. Activity of the Phr peptide system is not seen when pneumococcal cells are grown with glucose, the preferred carbon source and the most prevalent sugar encountered by S. pneumoniae during invasive disease. Thus, the lantibiotic genes are expressed under the control of both cell density signals via the Phr peptide system and nutritional signals from the carbon source present, suggesting that quorum sensing and the lantibiotic machinery may help pneumococcal cells compete for space and resources during colonization of the nasopharynx. PMID:25869931

  9. Evaluating Health Outcomes of Criminal Justice Populations Using Record Linkage: The Importance of Aliases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larney, Sarah; Burns, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    Individuals in contact with the criminal justice system are a key population of concern to public health. Record linkage studies can be useful for studying health outcomes for this group, but the use of aliases complicates the process of linking records across databases. This study was undertaken to determine the impact of aliases on sensitivity…

  10. A Quantitative Comparative Study Measuring Consumer Satisfaction Based on Health Record Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Vivianne E.

    2013-01-01

    This research study used a quantitative comparative method to investigate the relationship between consumer satisfaction and communication based on the format of health record. The central problem investigated in this research study related to the format of health record used and consumer satisfaction with care provided and effect on communication…

  11. Designing a quality improvement program with electronic health records: New York City's Health eQuits.

    PubMed

    Duquaine, Damon; Farley, Shannon M; Sacks, Rachel; Mandel-Ricci, Jenna; Silfen, Sheryl L; Shih, Sarah C

    2015-01-01

    Despite clear recommendations for identifying and intervening with smokers, clinical preventive practice is inconsistent in primary care. Use of electronic health records could facilitate improvement. Community health centers treating low-income and Medicaid recipients with greater smoking prevalence than the general population were recruited for a pilot program. Key design elements used to engage centers' participation include designating a project champion at each organization, confirming ability to transmit data for reporting and participation, and offering money to facilitate initial engagement; however, financial incentives did not motivate all organizations. Other methods to elicit participation and to motivate practice change included building on centers' previous experiences with similar programs, utilizing existing relationships with state cessation centers, and harnessing the "competitive" spirit-sharing both good news and areas for improvement to stimulate action. These experiences and observations may assist others in designing programs to improve clinical interventions with smokers.

  12. Using Digital Crumbs from an Electronic Health Record to Identify, Study and Improve Health Care Teams

    PubMed Central

    Gray, James E; Feldman, Henry; Reti, Shane; Markson, Larry; Lu, Xiaoning; Davis, Roger B.; Safran, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach, the Digital Crumb Investigator, for using data collected as a byproduct of Electonic Health Record (EHR) use to help define care teams and care processes. We are developing tools and methods to utilize these routinely collected data to visualize and quantify care networks across acute care and ambulatory settings We have chosen a clinical care domain where clinicians use EHRs in their offices, on the maternity wards and in the neonatal intensive care units as a test paradigm for this technology. The tools and methods we deliver should readily translate to other health care settings that collect behind-the-scenes electronic metadata such as audit trails. We believe that by applying the methods of social networking to define clinical relationships around a patient’s care we will enable new areas of research into the usage of EHRs to promote patient safety and other improvements in care. PMID:22195103

  13. Using Digital Crumbs from an Electronic Health Record to identify, study and improve health care teams.

    PubMed

    Gray, James E; Feldman, Henry; Reti, Shane; Markson, Larry; Lu, Xiaoning; Davis, Roger B; Safran, Charles A

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach, the Digital Crumb Investigator, for using data collected as a byproduct of Electonic Health Record (EHR) use to help define care teams and care processes. We are developing tools and methods to utilize these routinely collected data to visualize and quantify care networks across acute care and ambulatory settings We have chosen a clinical care domain where clinicians use EHRs in their offices, on the maternity wards and in the neonatal intensive care units as a test paradigm for this technology. The tools and methods we deliver should readily translate to other health care settings that collect behind-the-scenes electronic metadata such as audit trails. We believe that by applying the methods of social networking to define clinical relationships around a patient's care we will enable new areas of research into the usage of EHRs to promote patient safety and other improvements in care.

  14. Ethical, legal, and social implications of incorporating genomic information into electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Hazin, Ribhi; Brothers, Kyle B.; Malin, Bradley A.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; Rothstein, Mark A.; Williams, Marc S.; Clayton, Ellen W.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of genomic data in the electronic health record raises important ethical, legal, and social issues. In this article, we highlight these challenges and discuss potential solutions. We provide a brief background on the current state of electronic health records in the context of genomic medicine, discuss the importance of equitable access to genome-enabled electronic health records, and consider the potential use of electronic health records for improving genomic literacy in patients and providers. We highlight the importance of privacy, access, and security, and of determining which genomic information is included in the electronic health record. Finally, we discuss the challenges of reporting incidental findings, storing and reinterpreting genomic data, and nondocumentation and duty to warn family members at potential genetic risk. PMID:24030434

  15. Ethical, legal, and social implications of incorporating genomic information into electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hazin, Ribhi; Brothers, Kyle B; Malin, Bradley A; Koenig, Barbara A; Sanderson, Saskia C; Rothstein, Mark A; Williams, Marc S; Clayton, Ellen W; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2013-10-01

    The inclusion of genomic data in the electronic health record raises important ethical, legal, and social issues. In this article, we highlight these challenges and discuss potential solutions. We provide a brief background on the current state of electronic health records in the context of genomic medicine, discuss the importance of equitable access to genome-enabled electronic health records, and consider the potential use of electronic health records for improving genomic literacy in patients and providers. We highlight the importance of privacy, access, and security, and of determining which genomic information is included in the electronic health record. Finally, we discuss the challenges of reporting incidental findings, storing and reinterpreting genomic data, and nondocumentation and duty to warn family members at potential genetic risk.

  16. 2015 Edition Health Information Technology (Health IT) Certification Criteria, 2015 Edition Base Electronic Health Record (EHR) Definition, and ONC Health IT Certification Program Modifications. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-10-16

    This final rule finalizes a new edition of certification criteria (the 2015 Edition health IT certification criteria or "2015 Edition'') and a new 2015 Edition Base Electronic Health Record (EHR) definition, while also modifying the ONC Health IT Certification Program to make it open and accessible to more types of health IT and health IT that supports various care and practice settings. The 2015 Edition establishes the capabilities and specifies the related standards and implementation specifications that Certified Electronic Health Record Technology (CEHRT) would need to include to, at a minimum, support the achievement of meaningful use by eligible professionals (EPs), eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs (EHR Incentive Programs) when such edition is required for use under these programs.

  17. On the usage of health records for the design of virtual patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The process of creating and designing Virtual Patients for teaching students of medicine is an expensive and time-consuming task. In order to explore potential methods of mitigating these costs, our group began exploring the possibility of creating Virtual Patients based on electronic health records. This review assesses the usage of electronic health records in the creation of interactive Virtual Patients for teaching clinical decision-making. Methods The PubMed database was accessed programmatically to find papers relating to Virtual Patients. The returned citations were classified and the relevant full text articles were reviewed to find Virtual Patient systems that used electronic health records to create learning modalities. Results A total of n = 362 citations were found on PubMed and subsequently classified, of which n = 28 full-text articles were reviewed. Few articles used unformatted electronic health records other than patient CT or MRI scans. The use of patient data, extracted from electronic health records or otherwise, is widespread. The use of unformatted electronic health records in their raw form is less frequent. Patient data use is broad and spans several areas, such as teaching, training, 3D visualisation, and assessment. Conclusions Virtual Patients that are based on real patient data are widespread, yet the use of unformatted electronic health records, abundant in hospital information systems, is reported less often. The majority of teaching systems use reformatted patient data gathered from electronic health records, and do not use these electronic health records directly. Furthermore, many systems were found that used patient data in the form of CT or MRI scans. Much potential research exists regarding the use of unformatted electronic health records for the creation of Virtual Patients. PMID:24011027

  18. Electronic health records: Is it a risk worth taking in healthcare delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    The electronic health record represents a major change in healthcare delivery, either for health professionals and health institutions, either for patients. In this essay we will mainly focus on its consequences regarding patient safety and medical liability. In this particular domain the electronic health record has dual effects: on one side prevents medical errors and, in this sense, promotes patient safety and protects the doctor from lawsuits; but, on the other side, when not used properly, it may also generate other kind of errors, potentially threatening patient safety and, therefore, increasing the risk of juridical liability for the physician. This paper intends to underline the main human errors, technologic mistakes and medical faults that may occur while using the electronic health record and the ways to overcome them, also explaining how the electronic health record may be used in court during a judicial proceeding. PMID:26693253

  19. Effective Sharing of Health Records, Maintaining Privacy: A Practical Schema

    PubMed Central

    Neame, Roderick

    2013-01-01

    A principal goal of computerisation of medical records is to join up care services for patients, so that their records can follow them wherever they go and thereby reduce delays, duplications, risks and errors, and costs. Healthcare records are increasingly being stored electronically, which has created the necessary conditions for them to be readily sharable. However simply driving the implementation of electronic medical records is not sufficient, as recent developments have demonstrated (1): there remain significant obstacles. The three main obstacles relate to (a) record accessibility (knowing where event records are and being able to access them), (b) maintaining privacy (ensuring that only those authorised by the patient can access and extract meaning from the records) and (c) assuring the functionality of the shared information (ensuring that the records can be shared non-proprietorially across platforms without loss of meaning, and that their authenticity and trustworthiness are demonstrable). These constitute a set of issues that need new thinking, since existing systems are struggling to deliver them. The solution to this puzzle lies in three main parts. Clearly there is only one environment suited to such widespread sharing, which is the World Wide Web, so this is the communications basis. Part one requires that a sharable synoptic record is created for each care event and stored in standard web-format and in readily accessible locations, on ‘the web’ or in ‘the cloud’. To maintain privacy these publicly-accessible records must be suitably protected either stripped of identifiers (names, addresses, dates, places etc.) and/or encrypted: either way the record must be tagged with a tag that means nothing to anyone, but serves to identify and authenticate a specific record when retrieved. For ease of retrieval patients must hold an index of care events, records and web locations (plus any associated information for each such as encryption keys

  20. Effective sharing of health records, maintaining privacy: a practical schema.

    PubMed

    Neame, Roderick

    2013-01-01

    A principal goal of computerisation of medical records is to join up care services for patients, so that their records can follow them wherever they go and thereby reduce delays, duplications, risks and errors, and costs. Healthcare records are increasingly being stored electronically, which has created the necessary conditions for them to be readily sharable. However simply driving the implementation of electronic medical records is not sufficient, as recent developments have demonstrated (1): there remain significant obstacles. The three main obstacles relate to (a) record accessibility (knowing where event records are and being able to access them), (b) maintaining privacy (ensuring that only those authorised by the patient can access and extract meaning from the records) and (c) assuring the functionality of the shared information (ensuring that the records can be shared non-proprietorially across platforms without loss of meaning, and that their authenticity and trustworthiness are demonstrable). These constitute a set of issues that need new thinking, since existing systems are struggling to deliver them. The solution to this puzzle lies in three main parts. Clearly there is only one environment suited to such widespread sharing, which is the World Wide Web, so this is the communications basis. Part one requires that a sharable synoptic record is created for each care event and stored in standard web-format and in readily accessible locations, on 'the web' or in 'the cloud'. To maintain privacy these publicly-accessible records must be suitably protected either stripped of identifiers (names, addresses, dates, places etc.) and/or encrypted: either way the record must be tagged with a tag that means nothing to anyone, but serves to identify and authenticate a specific record when retrieved. For ease of retrieval patients must hold an index of care events, records and web locations (plus any associated information for each such as encryption keys, context etc

  1. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today’s user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. Objective The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. Methods We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. Results The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Conclusions Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals. PMID:26935646

  2. What is Clinical Safety in Electronic Health Care Record Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, George

    There is mounting public awareness of an increasing number of adverse clinical incidents within the National Health Service (NHS), but at the same time, large health care projects like the National Programme for IT (NPFIT) are claiming that safer care is one of the benefits of the project and that health software systems in particular have the potential to reduce the likelihood of accidental or unintentional harm to patients. This paper outlines the approach to clinical safety management taken by CSC, a major supplier to NPFIT; discusses acceptable levels of risk and clinical safety as an end-to-end concept; and touches on the future for clinical safety in health systems software.

  3. Impact of Electronic Health Records on Nurses' Information Seeking and Discriminating Skills for Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Adria S.

    2013-01-01

    In February 2009, the United States government passed into law the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) providing incentive money for hospitals and care providers to implement a certified electronic health record (EHR) in order to promote the adoption and…

  4. Acceptance and Usage of Electronic Health Record Systems in Small Medical Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannan, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    One of the objectives of the U.S. government has been the development of a nationwide health information infrastructure, including adoption and use of an electronic health records (EHR) system. However, a 2008 survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics indicated a 41.5% usage of the EHR system by physicians in office-based…

  5. Using routinely recorded herd data to predict and benchmark herd and cow health status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic improvement of dairy cattle health using producer-recorded data is feasible. Estimates of heritability are low, indicating that genetic progress will be slow. Improvement of health traits may also be possible with the incorporation of environmental and managerial aspects into herd health pro...

  6. Geometric Data Perturbation-Based Personal Health Record Transactions in Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramaniam, S.; Kavitha, V.

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud. PMID:25767826

  7. Geometric data perturbation-based personal health record transactions in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, S; Kavitha, V

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud. PMID:25767826

  8. Geometric data perturbation-based personal health record transactions in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, S; Kavitha, V

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new delivery model for information technology services and it typically involves the provision of dynamically scalable and often virtualized resources over the Internet. However, cloud computing raises concerns on how cloud service providers, user organizations, and governments should handle such information and interactions. Personal health records represent an emerging patient-centric model for health information exchange, and they are outsourced for storage by third parties, such as cloud providers. With these records, it is necessary for each patient to encrypt their own personal health data before uploading them to cloud servers. Current techniques for encryption primarily rely on conventional cryptographic approaches. However, key management issues remain largely unsolved with these cryptographic-based encryption techniques. We propose that personal health record transactions be managed using geometric data perturbation in cloud computing. In our proposed scheme, the personal health record database is perturbed using geometric data perturbation and outsourced to the Amazon EC2 cloud.

  9. Assessing electronic health record systems in emergency departments: Using a decision analytic Bayesian model.

    PubMed

    Ben-Assuli, Ofir; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-09-01

    In the last decade, health providers have implemented information systems to improve accuracy in medical diagnosis and decision-making. This article evaluates the impact of an electronic health record on emergency department physicians' diagnosis and admission decisions. A decision analytic approach using a decision tree was constructed to model the admission decision process to assess the added value of medical information retrieved from the electronic health record. Using a Bayesian statistical model, this method was evaluated on two coronary artery disease scenarios. The results show that the cases of coronary artery disease were better diagnosed when the electronic health record was consulted and led to more informed admission decisions. Furthermore, the value of medical information required for a specific admission decision in emergency departments could be quantified. The findings support the notion that physicians and patient healthcare can benefit from implementing electronic health record systems in emergency departments.

  10. Genetic manipulation of a high-affinity PHR1 target cis-element to improve phosphorous uptake in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Wenyuan; Guo, Meina; Cai, Linlin; Hu, Hongtao; Li, Changying; Liu, Yu; Wu, Zhongchang; Mao, Chuanzao; Yi, Keke; Wu, Ping; Mo, Xiaorong

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for crop development and production. Phosphate starvation response 1 (PHR1) acts as the central regulator for Pi-signaling and Pi-homeostasis in plants by binding to the cis-element PHR1 binding sequence (P1BS; GNATATNC). However, how phosphate starvation-induced gene expression is regulated remains obscure. In this work, we investigated the DNA binding affinity of the PHR1 ortholog OsPHR2 to its downstream target genes in Oryza sativa (rice). We confirmed that a combination of P1BS and P1BS-like motifs are essential for stable binding by OsPHR2. Furthermore, we report that variations in P1BS motif bases affected the binding affinity of OsPHR2 and that the highest affinity motif was GaATATtC (designated the A-T-type P1BS). We also found that a combination of two A-T-type P1BS elements in tandem, namely HA-P1BS, was very efficient for binding of OsPHR2. Using the cis-regulator HA-P1BS, we modified the promoters of Transporter Traffic Facilitator 1 (PHF1), a key factor controlling endoplasmic reticulum-exit of phosphate transporters to the plasma membrane, for efficient uptake of phosphorous in an energetically neutral way. Transgenic plants with the modified promoters showed significantly enhanced tolerance to low phosphate stress in both solution and soil conditions, which provides a new strategy for crop improvement to enhance tolerance of nutrient deficiency.

  11. Integrating Clinical Decision Support into EMR and PHR: a Case Study Using Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Chackery, Dave-Gregory; Keshavjee, Karim; Mirza, Kashif; Ghany, Ahmad; Holbrook, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) for atrial fibrillation is expected to ease the implementation of often-complex guidelines for atrial fibrillation and anticoagulation. Most clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for anticoagulation are stand-alone systems that do not integrate with electronic medical records (EMR). We have developed an architecture that consists of a computerized CDS that can integrate with multiple EMRs and multiple patient health records (PHRs). The design process revealed some significant issues that were resolved through systematic business/clinical analysis and creative clinical design in the diagnostic and treatment domains. Key issues identified and resolved include: 1) how to correctly allocate existing patients into various CDSS states (e.g., MAINTENANCE, HOLD, DISCONTINUE, etc), 2) identify when a patient becomes eligible for CDSS guidance over time, 3) how the CDSS maintains information about the patient's anticoagulation state and 4) how to transform vague human-readable concepts to explicit computable concepts. The management of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation is no easy task and we believe our architecture will improve patient care at all levels and ultimately better balance the reduction of stroke risk while minimizing harms from major bleeding. In addition, the architecture presented is scalable to other treatment guidelines and is scalable to multiple EMRs and PHRs, making it suitable for use in a platform approach. PMID:25676955

  12. Record linkage in Australian epidemiological research: health benefits, privacy safeguards and future potential.

    PubMed

    Sibthorpe, B; Kliewer, E; Smith, L

    1995-06-01

    Epidemiologists are increasingly concerned with the health effects of interventions and of exposure to noninfectious agents, but there may be long periods between exposure and outcome. Collecting information from respondents is a costly and often inefficient way of obtaining the longitudinal data necessary to study these effects. Linking existing data can be an effective and efficient alternative. However, it is often not practicable to obtain informed consent from the individuals whose records are to be linked. This raises important issues relating to protection of privacy. This paper examines the health benefits and privacy issues of epidemiological and health services research involving record linkage in Australia. The future potential for studies based on record linkage is discussed in the context of recent national and international developments in data protection. In the interests of public health and the rational use of health resources a balance must be struck between protecting individual privacy and conducting such health research for the common good.

  13. National Association of School Nurses ISSUE BRIEF: School Health Nurse's Role in Education: Privacy Standards for Student Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Katherine; Schwab, Nadine

    2003-01-01

    This article is a reprint of the National Association of School Nurses' "Issue Brief" on Privacy Standards for Student Health Records. It distinguishes between the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HI-PAA), clarifies which of these laws governs the privacy of student health…

  14. Creating a Powerful Platform to Explore Health in a Correctional Population: A Record Linkage Study.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, Kathryn E; Farrell MacDonald, Shanna; Chong, Nelson; Moser, Andrea; Moineddin, Rahim; Colantonio, Angela; Nathens, Avery; Matheson, Flora I

    2016-01-01

    We used record linkage to create a data repository of health information of persons who were federally incarcerated in Ontario and Canada. We obtained records from 56,867 adults who were federally incarcerated between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2011 from the Correctional Service of Canada; 15,248 records belonged to individuals residing in Ontario, Canada. We linked these records to the Registered Persons Database (RPDB) which contained records from 18,116,996 individuals eligible for health care in Ontario. Out of 56,867 OMS records, 22,844 (40.2%) were linked to the RPDB. Looking only at those incarcerated in Ontario, 98%, (14 953 of 15248) records were linked to RPDB. Most records of persons in Ontario-based facilities were linked deterministically. Linkage rates were lower for women, minority groups, and substance users. In conclusion, record linkage enabled the creation of a valuable data repository: there are no electronic medical records for correctional populations in Canada, making it more difficult to profile their health. PMID:27532612

  15. Creating a Powerful Platform to Explore Health in a Correctional Population: A Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, Kathryn E.; Farrell MacDonald, Shanna; Chong, Nelson; Moser, Andrea; Moineddin, Rahim; Colantonio, Angela; Nathens, Avery; Matheson, Flora I.

    2016-01-01

    We used record linkage to create a data repository of health information of persons who were federally incarcerated in Ontario and Canada. We obtained records from 56,867 adults who were federally incarcerated between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2011 from the Correctional Service of Canada; 15,248 records belonged to individuals residing in Ontario, Canada. We linked these records to the Registered Persons Database (RPDB) which contained records from 18,116,996 individuals eligible for health care in Ontario. Out of 56,867 OMS records, 22,844 (40.2%) were linked to the RPDB. Looking only at those incarcerated in Ontario, 98%, (14 953 of 15248) records were linked to RPDB. Most records of persons in Ontario-based facilities were linked deterministically. Linkage rates were lower for women, minority groups, and substance users. In conclusion, record linkage enabled the creation of a valuable data repository: there are no electronic medical records for correctional populations in Canada, making it more difficult to profile their health. PMID:27532612

  16. Supporting health insurance expansion: do electronic health records have valid insurance verification and enrollment data?

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Miguel; Hoopes, Megan; Bailey, Steffani R; Gold, Rachel; O’Malley, Jean; Angier, Heather; Nelson, Christine; Cottrell, Erika; Devoe, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Objective To validate electronic health record (EHR) insurance information for low-income pediatric patients at Oregon community health centers (CHCs), compared to reimbursement data and Medicaid coverage data. Materials and Methods Subjects Children visiting any of 96 CHCs (N = 69 189) from 2011 to 2012. Analysis The authors measured correspondence (whether or not the visit was covered by Medicaid) between EHR coverage data and (i) reimbursement data and (ii) coverage data from Medicaid. Results Compared to reimbursement data and Medicaid coverage data, EHR coverage data had high agreement (87% and 95%, respectively), sensitivity (0.97 and 0.96), positive predictive value (0.88 and 0.98), but lower kappa statistics (0.32 and 0.49), specificity (0.27 and 0.60), and negative predictive value (0.66 and 0.45). These varied among clinics. Discussion/Conclusions EHR coverage data for children had a high overall correspondence with Medicaid data and reimbursement data, suggesting that in some systems EHR data could be utilized to promote insurance stability in their patients. Future work should attempt to replicate these analyses in other settings. PMID:25888586

  17. Multi-level analysis of electronic health record adoption by health care professionals: A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The electronic health record (EHR) is an important application of information and communication technologies to the healthcare sector. EHR implementation is expected to produce benefits for patients, professionals, organisations, and the population as a whole. These benefits cannot be achieved without the adoption of EHR by healthcare professionals. Nevertheless, the influence of individual and organisational factors in determining EHR adoption is still unclear. This study aims to assess the unique contribution of individual and organisational factors on EHR adoption in healthcare settings, as well as possible interrelations between these factors. Methods A prospective study will be conducted. A stratified random sampling method will be used to select 50 healthcare organisations in the Quebec City Health Region (Canada). At the individual level, a sample of 15 to 30 health professionals will be chosen within each organisation depending on its size. A semi-structured questionnaire will be administered to two key informants in each organisation to collect organisational data. A composite adoption score of EHR adoption will be developed based on a Delphi process and will be used as the outcome variable. Twelve to eighteen months after the first contact, depending on the pace of EHR implementation, key informants and clinicians will be contacted once again to monitor the evolution of EHR adoption. A multilevel regression model will be applied to identify the organisational and individual determinants of EHR adoption in clinical settings. Alternative analytical models would be applied if necessary. Results The study will assess the contribution of organisational and individual factors, as well as their interactions, to the implementation of EHR in clinical settings. Conclusions These results will be very relevant for decision makers and managers who are facing the challenge of implementing EHR in the healthcare system. In addition, this research constitutes a

  18. The social life of health records: understanding families' experiences of autism.

    PubMed

    Angell, Amber M; Solomon, Olga

    2014-09-01

    Outside of the epidemiological surveillance studies of autism prevalence, health records of children diagnosed with autism have not been sufficiently examined, yet they provide an important lens for showing how autism diagnosis, services and interventions are negotiated, coordinated and choreographed by families and practitioners across multiple settings. This article provides a multifaceted understanding of these processes from an ethnographic and discourse analytic perspective that reveals structural and interactional phenomena contributing to disparities in autism diagnosis and services. We consider health records as dualistic, material-discursive artifacts that are socio-interactionally co-constructed and variably interpreted, contested and utilized across home, school and clinic contexts. We chronicle several families' experiences of their children's autism diagnoses and interventions and describe ways in which health records are socially constructed, curated and placed in the middle of clinical encounters. We show how the parents in our study draw upon health records' material-discursive properties to display epistemic authority, expertise and knowledge in interactions with healthcare and school professionals involved in authorizing and planning their children's care. We describe how the parents experience the health records' clinical portrayals of their children and themselves, and how the parents' portrayals of their children are tacitly ratified or negated in the health records. The data include health record reviews, narrative interviews with parents and practitioners, and clinical observations. These data were collected between October 2009 and August 2012 as part of a larger study on disparities in autism diagnosis, interventions and services experienced by African American children with autism and their families living in Los Angeles County, California. Our analysis reveals the central role of health records in maintaining continuity of an autism

  19. Method for automatic escalation of access rights to the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Frode Orbeck; Fensli, Rune

    2006-01-01

    In an emergency situation, it can be vital for rescuing personnel to have access to fragmented parts of patients Electronic Health Record (EHR) shared between patients and health care services. In such situations, can Spatial Role Based Access Control combined with measurements of vital sign parameters recorded from a wireless monitoring system used by the patient and patient's physiological situation be used to facilitate for medical personnel automatic access to parts of the EHR.

  20. Nurses' Perceptions of Nursing Care Documentation in the Electronic Health Record

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Tracey A.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) will soon become the standard for documenting nursing care. The EHR holds the promise of rapid access to complete records of a patient's encounter with the healthcare system. It is the expectation that healthcare providers input essential data that communicates important patient information to support quality…

  1. Stakeholder engagement: a key component of integrating genomic information into electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Hartzler, Andrea; McCarty, Catherine A; Rasmussen, Luke V; Williams, Marc S; Brilliant, Murray; Bowton, Erica A; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Faucett, William A; Ferryman, Kadija; Field, Julie R; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Horowitz, Carol R; Koenig, Barbara A; McCormick, Jennifer B; Ralston, James D; Sanderson, Saskia C; Smith, Maureen E; Trinidad, Susan Brown

    2013-10-01

    Integrating genomic information into clinical care and the electronic health record can facilitate personalized medicine through genetically guided clinical decision support. Stakeholder involvement is critical to the success of these implementation efforts. Prior work on implementation of clinical information systems provides broad guidance to inform effective engagement strategies. We add to this evidence-based recommendations that are specific to issues at the intersection of genomics and the electronic health record. We describe stakeholder engagement strategies employed by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, a national consortium of US research institutions funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute to develop, disseminate, and apply approaches that combine genomic and electronic health record data. Through select examples drawn from sites of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network, we illustrate a continuum of engagement strategies to inform genomic integration into commercial and homegrown electronic health records across a range of health-care settings. We frame engagement as activities to consult, involve, and partner with key stakeholder groups throughout specific phases of health information technology implementation. Our aim is to provide insights into engagement strategies to guide genomic integration based on our unique network experiences and lessons learned within the broader context of implementation research in biomedical informatics. On the basis of our collective experience, we describe key stakeholder practices, challenges, and considerations for successful genomic integration to support personalized medicine.

  2. Moderating Effects of Voluntariness on the Actual Use of Electronic Health Records for Allied Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Benny PS

    2015-01-01

    Background Mandatory versus voluntary requirement has moderating effect on a person’s intention to use a new information technology. Studies have shown that the use of technology in health care settings is predicted by perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, social influence, facilitating conditions, and attitude towards computer. These factors have different effects on mandatory versus voluntary environment of use. However, the degree and direction of moderating effect of voluntariness on these factors remain inconclusive. Objective This study aimed to examine the moderating effect of voluntariness on the actual use of an electronic health record (EHR) designed for use by allied health professionals in Hong Kong. Specifically, this study explored and compared the moderating effects of voluntariness on factors organized into technology, implementation, and individual contexts. Methods Physiotherapists who had taken part in the implementation of a new EHR were invited to complete a survey. The survey included questions that measured the levels of voluntariness, technology acceptance and use, and attitude towards technology. Multiple logistic regressions were conducted to identify factors associated with actual use of a compulsory module and a noncompulsory module of the EHR. Results In total, there were 93 participants in the study. All of them had access to the noncompulsory module, the e-Progress Note, to record progress notes of their patients. Out of the 93 participants, 57 (62%) were required to use a compulsory module, the e-Registration, to register patient attendance. In the low voluntariness environment, Actual Use was associated with Effort Expectancy (mean score of users 3.51, SD 0.43; mean score of non-users 3.21, SD 0.31; P=.03). Effort Expectancy measured the perceived ease of use and was a variable in the technology context. The variables in the implementation and individual contexts did not show a difference between the two groups. In the high

  3. CKD as a Model for Improving Chronic Disease Care through Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Archdeacon, Patrick; McDonald, Clement J; Powe, Neil R; Smith, Kimberly A; Norton, Jenna; Williams, Desmond E; Patel, Uptal D; Narva, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Electronic health records have the potential to improve the care of patients with chronic medical conditions. CKD provides a unique opportunity to show this potential: the disease is common in the United States, there is significant room to improve CKD detection and management, CKD and its related conditions are defined primarily by objective laboratory data, CKD care requires collaboration by a diverse team of health care professionals, and improved access to CKD-related data would enable identification of a group of patients at high risk for multiple adverse outcomes. However, to realize the potential for improvement in CKD-related care, electronic health records will need to provide optimal functionality for providers and patients and interoperability across multiple health care settings. The goal of the National Kidney Disease Education Program Health Information Technology Working Group is to enable and support the widespread interoperability of data related to kidney health among health care software applications to optimize CKD detection and management. Over the course of the last 2 years, group members met to identify general strategies for using electronic health records to improve care for patients with CKD. This paper discusses these strategies and provides general goals for appropriate incorporation of CKD-related data into electronic health records and corresponding design features that may facilitate (1) optimal care of individual patients with CKD through improved access to clinical information and decision support, (2) clinical quality improvement through enhanced population management capabilities, (3) CKD surveillance to improve public health through wider availability of population-level CKD data, and (4) research to improve CKD management practices through efficiencies in study recruitment and data collection. Although these strategies may be most effectively applied in the setting of CKD, because it is primarily defined by laboratory

  4. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information.

  5. Health Care Professionals' Perceptions of the Use of Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyeye, Adebisi

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) use has improved significantly in health care organizations. However, many barriers and factors influence the success of EMR implementation and adoption. The purpose of the descriptive qualitative single-case study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of the use of EMRs at a hospital division of a…

  6. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information. PMID:25480723

  7. Examining the Relationship between Electronic Health Record Interoperability and Quality Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Bernice M.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of interoperability impairs data quality among health care providers' electronic health record (EHR) systems. The problem is whether the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9000 principles relate to the problem of interoperability in implementation of EHR systems. The purpose of the nonexperimental quantitative…

  8. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  9. Can Social Cognitive Theories Help Us Understand Nurses' Use of Electronic Health Records?

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Gillian; Booth, Richard; Mistry, Kartini

    2016-04-01

    Electronic health record implementations have accelerated in clinical settings around the world in an effort to improve patient safety and enhance efficiencies related to care delivery. As the largest group of healthcare professionals globally, nurses play an important role in the use of these records and ensuring their benefits are realized. Social cognitive theories such as the Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned Behaviour, and the Technology Acceptance Model have been developed to explain behavior. Given that variation in nurses' electronic health record utilization may influence the degree to which benefits are realized, the aim of this article is to explore how the use of these social cognitive theories may assist organizations implementing electronic health records to facilitate deeper-level adoption of this type of clinical technology.

  10. Can Social Cognitive Theories Help Us Understand Nurses' Use of Electronic Health Records?

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Gillian; Booth, Richard; Mistry, Kartini

    2016-04-01

    Electronic health record implementations have accelerated in clinical settings around the world in an effort to improve patient safety and enhance efficiencies related to care delivery. As the largest group of healthcare professionals globally, nurses play an important role in the use of these records and ensuring their benefits are realized. Social cognitive theories such as the Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned Behaviour, and the Technology Acceptance Model have been developed to explain behavior. Given that variation in nurses' electronic health record utilization may influence the degree to which benefits are realized, the aim of this article is to explore how the use of these social cognitive theories may assist organizations implementing electronic health records to facilitate deeper-level adoption of this type of clinical technology. PMID:26844529

  11. Protection of electronic health records (EHRs) in cloud.

    PubMed

    Alabdulatif, Abdulatif; Khalil, Ibrahim; Mai, Vu

    2013-01-01

    EHR technology has come into widespread use and has attracted attention in healthcare institutions as well as in research. Cloud services are used to build efficient EHR systems and obtain the greatest benefits of EHR implementation. Many issues relating to building an ideal EHR system in the cloud, especially the tradeoff between flexibility and security, have recently surfaced. The privacy of patient records in cloud platforms is still a point of contention. In this research, we are going to improve the management of access control by restricting participants' access through the use of distinct encrypted parameters for each participant in the cloud-based database. Also, we implement and improve an existing secure index search algorithm to enhance the efficiency of information control and flow through a cloud-based EHR system. At the final stage, we contribute to the design of reliable, flexible and secure access control, enabling quick access to EHR information. PMID:24110656

  12. Protection of electronic health records (EHRs) in cloud.

    PubMed

    Alabdulatif, Abdulatif; Khalil, Ibrahim; Mai, Vu

    2013-01-01

    EHR technology has come into widespread use and has attracted attention in healthcare institutions as well as in research. Cloud services are used to build efficient EHR systems and obtain the greatest benefits of EHR implementation. Many issues relating to building an ideal EHR system in the cloud, especially the tradeoff between flexibility and security, have recently surfaced. The privacy of patient records in cloud platforms is still a point of contention. In this research, we are going to improve the management of access control by restricting participants' access through the use of distinct encrypted parameters for each participant in the cloud-based database. Also, we implement and improve an existing secure index search algorithm to enhance the efficiency of information control and flow through a cloud-based EHR system. At the final stage, we contribute to the design of reliable, flexible and secure access control, enabling quick access to EHR information.

  13. Predicting the Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Physicians: When Will Health Care be Paperless?

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Eric W.; Menachemi, Nir; Phillips, M. Thad

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was threefold. First, we gathered and synthesized the historic literature regarding electronic health record (EHR) adoption rates among physicians in small practices (ten or fewer members). Next, we constructed models to project estimated future EHR adoption trends and timelines. We then determined the likelihood of achieving universal EHR adoption in the near future and articulate how barriers can be overcome in the small and solo practice medical environment. Design: This study used EHR adoption data from six previous surveys of small practices to estimate historic market penetration rates. Applying technology diffusion theory, three future adoption scenarios, optimistic, best estimate, and conservative, are empirically derived. Measurement: EHR adoption parameters, external and internal coefficients of influence, are estimated using Bass diffusion models. Results: All three EHR scenarios display the characteristic diffusion S curve that is indicative that the technology is likely to achieve significant market penetration, given enough time. Under current conditions, EHR adoption will reach its maximum market share in 2024 in the small practice setting. Conclusion: The promise of improved care quality and cost control has prompted a call for universal EHR adoption by 2014. The EHR products now available are unlikely to achieve full diffusion in a critical market segment within the time frame being targeted by policy makers. PMID:16221936

  14. Wearable Technology Surveillance Data for the Personal Health Record Using the Omaha System: Noise Exposure, Cardiovascular and Stress Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Madeleine J; Chin, Dal Lae; Monsen, Karen A; Hong, OiSaeng

    2016-01-01

    This poster describes a method to prepare noise and health data from wearable technology for standardized representation in the electronic personal health record thus enabling individuals to identify noise-related health risks. Using a case study approach, the authors demonstrate transformation of data to the Omaha System standardized terminology in order to depict the data graphically in a personal health record.

  15. Mitigating the health effects of disasters for medically underserved populations: electronic health records, telemedicine, research, screening, and surveillance.

    PubMed

    Mack, Dominic; Brantley, Katrina M; Bell, Kimberly G

    2007-05-01

    The Regional Coordinating Center for Hurricane Response (RCC) collaborated with the EXPORT Centers (Centers of Excellence in Partnerships for Community Outreach, Research on Health Disparities and Training) to rebuild, revitalize, and improve the health care infrastructure in the Gulf Coast states damaged by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. This initiative aims to enhance the provision of health care by installing Electronic Health Records and Telepsychiatry systems throughout the Gulf Coast. Through the EXPORT Centers, the RCC plans to perform screening and surveillance projects within the communities and develop research projects focused on eliminating health disparities affecting underserved populations in the region. Another goal is to establish partnerships with EXPORT Centers, Community Health Centers, and other essential primary care practices in hurricane-ravaged communities. Through these partnerships, the overarching goal is to create a balanced health care system model that academic institutions can integrate into preventive care for emergency planning and research.

  16. The computerized medical record in gastroenterology: part 4. Health curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Jeanty, C

    1978-12-01

    The health curriculum vitae consists mainly of a chronological sequence of diagnoses, which are the mainstays of the medical record. Each diagnosis is connected vertically in the health curriculum vitae with its aetiological factors and its medical or surgical treatments in a casual concatenation; and horizontally throughout the other three parts of the record with its relevant functional, morphological (descriptive) and numerical laboratory data in a diagnostic association. The health curriculum vitae uses the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED), the International Nomenclature of the Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract (CIOMS) and the International Standard Classification of Occupations of the Internationl Labour Office.

  17. Patients want granular privacy control over health information in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Kelly; Hanania, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess patients’ desire for granular level privacy control over which personal health information should be shared, with whom, and for what purpose; and whether these preferences vary based on sensitivity of health information. Materials and methods A card task for matching health information with providers, questionnaire, and interview with 30 patients whose health information is stored in an electronic medical record system. Most patients’ records contained sensitive health information. Results No patients reported that they would prefer to share all information stored in an electronic medical record (EMR) with all potential recipients. Sharing preferences varied by type of information (EMR data element) and recipient (eg, primary care provider), and overall sharing preferences varied by participant. Patients with and without sensitive records preferred less sharing of sensitive versus less-sensitive information. Discussion Patients expressed sharing preferences consistent with a desire for granular privacy control over which health information should be shared with whom and expressed differences in sharing preferences for sensitive versus less-sensitive EMR data. The pattern of results may be used by designers to generate privacy-preserving EMR systems including interfaces for patients to express privacy and sharing preferences. Conclusions To maintain the level of privacy afforded by medical records and to achieve alignment with patients’ preferences, patients should have granular privacy control over information contained in their EMR. PMID:23184192

  18. Archetype-based electronic health records: a literature review and evaluation of their applicability to health data interoperability and access.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Dennis; Sari, Anny; Rahayu, Wenny

    2009-01-01

    Health Information Managers (HIMs) are responsible for overseeing health information. The change management necessary during the transition to electronic health records (EHR) is substantial, and ongoing. Archetype-based EHRs are a core health information system component which solve many of the problems that arise during this period of change. Archetypes are models of clinical content, and they have many beneficial properties. They are interoperable, both between settings and through time. They are more amenable to change than conventional paradigms, and their design is congruent with clinical practice. This paper is an overview of the current archetype literature relevant to Health Information Managers. The literature was sourced in the English language sections of ScienceDirect, IEEE Explore, Pubmed, Google Scholar, ACM Digital library and other databases on the usage of archetypes for electronic health record storage, looking at the current areas of archetype research, appropriate usage, and future research. We also used reference lists from the cited papers, papers referenced by the openEHR website, and the recommendations from experts in the area. Criteria for inclusion were (a) if studies covered archetype research and (b) were either studies of archetype use, archetype system design, or archetype effectiveness. The 47 papers included show a wide and increasing worldwide archetype usage, in a variety of medical domains. Most of the papers noted that archetypes are an appropriate solution for future-proof and interoperable medical data storage. We conclude that archetypes are a suitable solution for the complex problem of electronic health record storage and interoperability.

  19. Electronic Health Record Systems and Intent to Apply for Meaningful Use Incentives among Office-based Physician ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Wisconsin. The 2009 Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act authorized incentive payments through Medicare and Medicaid to increase physician adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems ( 1 , 2 ). Eligible Medicare and Medicaid physicians may ...

  20. Health Care Professionals Devise Ways to Get Around Using Electronic Health Record Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Coronary Artery Disease Computers and Medical Informatics Children's Health Aging Women's Health ... screenings and medication lists to confirm for accuracy. Computer-based workarounds included copying and pasting text from ...

  1. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: towards an integrative framework.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Joe, Ron; Otto, Tony

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our approach for integrating electronic patient records into health professional education. Electronic patient record (EPR) use is increasing globally. The EPR is considered the cornerstone of the modernization and streamlining of healthcare worldwide. However, despite the importance of the EPR, health professional education in much of the world provides health professional students (who will become the practicing health professionals of the future) with limited access or knowledge about the EPR. New ways of exposing students to EPRs will be needed in order to ensure that health professionals will adopt and use this complex technology wisely and effect the positive benefits EPRs are expected to bring to healthcare globally. In this paper we describe: (a) a framework we have developed for integrating EPRs into health professional education and (b) an innovative Web portal, known as the University of Victoria Electronic Health Record (EHR) Educational Portal (which houses a number of EPRs) that can be used to explore the integration of EPRs in health professional education. It is hoped that adoption and use of EPRs will ultimately be improved through the use of the portal to allow students virtual and ubiquitous access to example EPRs, coupled with principled educational approaches for integrating EPR technology into health professional curricula.

  2. Electronic health records in an occupational health setting--part I. A global overview.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Euzelia S

    2013-02-01

    Most health care settings have focused on becoming more interconnected using technology. The same trend is occurring in occupational health settings. Using technology to enhance communications, facilitate workers' health, and measure the quality of occupational health services is advantageous to employers. The privacy and security of health information is as much the company's responsibility as protecting financial and personal data. As the health privacy agent for the employer, the occupational health nurse must have knowledge of legal regulations and professional standards that govern the security and privacy of health care information, especially when that information is collected, stored, and potentially transmitted within and outside country boundaries.

  3. Arabidopsis ferritin 1 (AtFer1) gene regulation by the phosphate starvation response 1 (AtPHR1) transcription factor reveals a direct molecular link between iron and phosphate homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bournier, Marc; Tissot, Nicolas; Mari, Stéphane; Boucherez, Jossia; Lacombe, Eric; Briat, Jean-François; Gaymard, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    A yeast one-hybrid screening allowed the selection of PHR1 as a factor that interacted with the AtFer1 ferritin gene promoter. In mobility shift assays, PHR1 and its close homologue PHL1 (PHR1-like 1) interact with Element 2 of the AtFer1 promoter, containing a P1BS (PHR1 binding site). In a loss of function mutant for genes encoding PHR1 and PHL1 (phr1 phl1 mutant), the response of AtFer1 to phosphate starvation was completely lost, showing that the two transcription factors regulate AtFer1 expression upon phosphate starvation. This regulation does not involve the IDRS (iron-dependent regulatory sequence) present in the AtFer1 promoter and involved in the iron-dependent regulation. The phosphate starvation response of AtFer1 is not linked to the iron status of plants and is specifically initiated by phosphate deficiency. Histochemical localization of iron, visualized by Perls DAB staining, was strongly altered in a phr1 phl1 mutant, revealing that both PHR1 and PHL1 are major factors involved in the regulation of iron homeostasis.

  4. The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely-collected health Data (RECORD) Statement

    PubMed Central

    Benchimol, Eric I.; Smeeth, Liam; Guttmann, Astrid; Harron, Katie; Moher, David; Petersen, Irene; Sørensen, Henrik T.; von Elm, Erik; Langan, Sinéad M.

    2015-01-01

    Routinely collected health data, obtained for administrative and clinical purposes without specific a priori research goals, are increasingly used for research. The rapid evolution and availability of these data have revealed issues not addressed by existing reporting guidelines, such as Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely collected health Data (RECORD) statement was created to fill these gaps. RECORD was created as an extension to the STROBE statement to address reporting items specific to observational studies using routinely collected health data. RECORD consists of a checklist of 13 items related to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion section of articles, and other information required for inclusion in such research reports. This document contains the checklist and explanatory and elaboration information to enhance the use of the checklist. Examples of good reporting for each RECORD checklist item are also included herein. This document, as well as the accompanying website and message board (http://www.record-statement.org), will enhance the implementation and understanding of RECORD. Through implementation of RECORD, authors, journals editors, and peer reviewers can encourage transparency of research reporting. PMID:26440803

  5. Is patient confidentiality compromised with the electronic health record?: a position paper.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ilse M

    2015-02-01

    In order for electronic health records to fulfill their expected benefits, protection of privacy of patient information is key. Lack of trust in confidentiality can lead to reluctance in disclosing all relevant information, which could have grave consequences. This position paper contemplates whether patient confidentiality is compromised by electronic health records. The position that confidentiality is compromised was supported by the four bioethical principles and argued that despite laws and various safeguards to protect patients' confidentiality, numerous data breaches have occurred. The position that confidentiality is not compromised was supported by virtue ethics and a utilitarian viewpoint and argued that safeguards keep information confidential and the public feels relatively safe with the electronic health record. The article concludes with an ethically superior position that confidentiality is compromised with the electronic health record. Although organizational and governmental ways of enhancing the confidentiality of patient information within the electronic health record facilitate confidentiality, the ultimate responsibility of maintaining confidentiality rests with the individual end-users and their ethical code of conduct. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for nurses calls for nurses to be watchful with data security in electronic communications.

  6. Avoiding Failure for Australia's Digital Health Record: The Findings from a Rural E-Health Participatory Research Project.

    PubMed

    Almond, H; Cummings, E; Turner, P

    2016-01-01

    Low adoption and use of Australia's digital health record has driven the Australian Government to trial 'opt-out' registration from mid-June 2016. The assumption that automatic registration will increase use and thereby deliver benefit requires further investigation especially amongst those sections of the population in rural, regional, remote Australia living with complex chronic conditions. This paper reports on findings from a community based participatory e-health research project based on an initiative where people with complex chronic conditions and their carers attended a rural health promotion and lifestyle modification program. Through co-operative enquiry, health promotion officers and their clients were actively supported to adopt and use Australia's digital health record as an intervention. Simultaneously they were encouraged to reflect on its design and their perceptions of its overall impact on their individual ability to self-manage complex chronic conditions. The findings, ultimately contributing to a conceptual implementation and evaluation framework for Australia's digital health record that could directly avoid failure of the new 'opt-out' approach being adopted. PMID:27440282

  7. Avoiding Failure for Australia's Digital Health Record: The Findings from a Rural E-Health Participatory Research Project.

    PubMed

    Almond, H; Cummings, E; Turner, P

    2016-01-01

    Low adoption and use of Australia's digital health record has driven the Australian Government to trial 'opt-out' registration from mid-June 2016. The assumption that automatic registration will increase use and thereby deliver benefit requires further investigation especially amongst those sections of the population in rural, regional, remote Australia living with complex chronic conditions. This paper reports on findings from a community based participatory e-health research project based on an initiative where people with complex chronic conditions and their carers attended a rural health promotion and lifestyle modification program. Through co-operative enquiry, health promotion officers and their clients were actively supported to adopt and use Australia's digital health record as an intervention. Simultaneously they were encouraged to reflect on its design and their perceptions of its overall impact on their individual ability to self-manage complex chronic conditions. The findings, ultimately contributing to a conceptual implementation and evaluation framework for Australia's digital health record that could directly avoid failure of the new 'opt-out' approach being adopted.

  8. Progress along developmental tracks for electronic health records implementation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hollar, David W

    2009-01-01

    The development and implementation of electronic health records (EHR) have occurred slowly in the United States. To date, these approaches have, for the most part, followed four developmental tracks: (a) Enhancement of immunization registries and linkage with other health records to produce Child Health Profiles (CHP), (b) Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO) demonstration projects to link together patient medical records, (c) Insurance company projects linked to ICD-9 codes and patient records for cost-benefit assessments, and (d) Consortia of EHR developers collaborating to model systems requirements and standards for data linkage. Until recently, these separate efforts have been conducted in the very silos that they had intended to eliminate, and there is still considerable debate concerning health professionals access to as well as commitment to using EHR if these systems are provided. This paper will describe these four developmental tracks, patient rights and the legal environment for EHR, international comparisons, and future projections for EHR expansion across health networks in the United States. PMID:19291284

  9. Meaningful use of pharmacogenomics in health records: semantics should be made explicit.

    PubMed

    Shabo Shvo, Amnon

    2010-01-01

    The recent emphasis on 'meaningful use' of electronic health records in health information technology reforms (e.g., as in the US stimulus package) can leverage the pharmacogenomics field. In order for clinical trials outcomes, based on pharmacogenomics research, to be meaningfully and effectively used in clinical practice there is a need to make health semantics explicit. Often, semantics is merely implicit in both the research and practice worlds and is buried in unstructured and disconnected descriptions of the data or just in the heads of human experts. Meaningful semantics includes rich metadata, but more importantly, the context of each discrete data item and how it relates to other data items in a specific dataset, as well as how it fits within the entire health record of an individual and how it references up-to-date clinical knowledge. Properly-built electronic health records systems based on standards could provide meaningful semantics on the healthcare side, while the fields of research and clinical trials need to come closer to healthcare in its data and knowledge representations in a way that lends itself to personalized medicine. The purpose of this review is to explore how evidence created by pharmacogenomics can be meaningfully delivered to healthcare through new approaches, such as electronic health records systems and information models.

  10. Adoption and use of electronic health records among federally qualified health centers grew substantially during 2010-12.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily B; Furukawa, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    Federally qualified health centers play an important role in providing health care to underserved populations. Recent substantial federal investments in health information technology have enabled health centers to expand their use of electronic health record (EHR) systems, but factors associated with adoption are not clear. We examined 2010-12 administrative data from the Health Resources and Services Administration's Uniform Data System for more than 1,100 health centers. We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Only one-third of health centers had EHR systems that could meet CMS's stage 1 meaningful-use core requirements. Health centers that met the stage 1 requirements had more than twice the odds of receiving quality recognition, compared with centers with less than basic EHRs. Policy initiatives should focus assistance on EHR capabilities with slower uptake; connect providers with technical assistance to support implementation; and leverage the connection between meaningful use and quality recognition programs.

  11. Adoption and use of electronic health records among federally qualified health centers grew substantially during 2010-12.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emily B; Furukawa, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    Federally qualified health centers play an important role in providing health care to underserved populations. Recent substantial federal investments in health information technology have enabled health centers to expand their use of electronic health record (EHR) systems, but factors associated with adoption are not clear. We examined 2010-12 administrative data from the Health Resources and Services Administration's Uniform Data System for more than 1,100 health centers. We found that in 2012 nine out of ten health centers had adopted a EHR system, and half had adopted EHRs with basic capabilities. Seven in ten health centers reported that their providers were receiving meaningful-use incentive payments from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Only one-third of health centers had EHR systems that could meet CMS's stage 1 meaningful-use core requirements. Health centers that met the stage 1 requirements had more than twice the odds of receiving quality recognition, compared with centers with less than basic EHRs. Policy initiatives should focus assistance on EHR capabilities with slower uptake; connect providers with technical assistance to support implementation; and leverage the connection between meaningful use and quality recognition programs. PMID:25006154

  12. Method and system for determining precursors of health abnormalities from processing medical records

    DOEpatents

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    Medical reports are converted to document vectors in computing apparatus and sampled by applying a maximum variation sampling function including a fitness function to the document vectors to reduce a number of medical records being processed and to increase the diversity of the medical records being processed. Linguistic phrases are extracted from the medical records and converted to s-grams. A Haar wavelet function is applied to the s-grams over the preselected time interval; and the coefficient results of the Haar wavelet function are examined for patterns representing the likelihood of health abnormalities. This confirms certain s-grams as precursors of the health abnormality and a parameter can be calculated in relation to the occurrence of such a health abnormality.

  13. Digitally enabled patients, professionals and providers: making the case for an electronic health record in mental health services

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jonathan; McDonald, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The move to a digital health service may improve some components of health systems: information, communication and documentation of care. This article gives a brief definition and history of what is meant by an electronic health record (EHR). There is some evidence of benefits in a number of areas, including legibility, accuracy and the secondary use of information, but there is a need for further research, which may need to use different methodologies to analyse the impact an EHR has on patients, professionals and providers. PMID:27752348

  14. Evaluating the Usability of a Free Electronic Health Record for Training

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Robert; Adler, Kenneth; Ziesemer, Brandy; Palombo, Georgina

    2013-01-01

    The United States will need to train a large workforce of skilled health information technology (HIT) professionals in order to meet the US government's goal of universal electronic health records (EHRs) for all patients and widespread health information exchange. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act established several HIT workforce educational programs to accomplish this goal. Recent studies have shown that EHR usability is a significant concern of physicians and is a potential obstacle to EHR adoption. It is important to have a highly usable EHR to train both clinicians and students. In this article, we report a qualitative-quantitative usability analysis of a web-based EHR for training health informatics and health information management students. PMID:23805062

  15. Is Canada ready for patient accessible electronic health records? A national scan

    PubMed Central

    Urowitz, Sara; Wiljer, David; Apatu, Emma; Eysenbach, Gunther; DeLenardo, Claudette; Harth, Tamara; Pai, Howard; Leonard, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Background Access to personal health information through the electronic health record (EHR) is an innovative means to enable people to be active participants in their own health care. Currently this is not an available option for consumers of health. The absence of a key technology, the EHR, is a significant obstacle to providing patient accessible electronic records. To assess the readiness for the implementation and adoption of EHRs in Canada, a national scan was conducted to determine organizational readiness and willingness for patient accessible electronic records. Methods A survey was conducted of Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of Canadian public and acute care hospitals. Results Two hundred thirteen emails were sent to CEOs of Canadian general and acute care hospitals, with a 39% response rate. Over half (54.2%) of hospitals had some sort of EHR, but few had a record that was predominately electronic. Financial resources were identified as the most important barrier to providing patients access to their EHR and there was a divergence in perceptions from healthcare providers and what they thought patients would want in terms of access to the EHR, with providers being less willing to provide access and patients desire for greater access to the full record. Conclusion As the use of EHRs becomes more commonplace, organizations should explore the possibility of responding to patient needs for clinical information by providing access to their EHR. The best way to achieve this is still being debated. PMID:18652695

  16. Benchmarking dairy herd health status using routinely recorded herd summary data.

    PubMed

    Parker Gaddis, K L; Cole, J B; Clay, J S; Maltecca, C

    2016-02-01

    Genetic improvement of dairy cattle health through the use of producer-recorded data has been determined to be feasible. Low estimated heritabilities indicate that genetic progress will be slow. Variation observed in lowly heritable traits can largely be attributed to nongenetic factors, such as the environment. More rapid improvement of dairy cattle health may be attainable if herd health programs incorporate environmental and managerial aspects. More than 1,100 herd characteristics are regularly recorded on farm test-days. We combined these data with producer-recorded health event data, and parametric and nonparametric models were used to benchmark herd and cow health status. Health events were grouped into 3 categories for analyses: mastitis, reproductive, and metabolic. Both herd incidence and individual incidence were used as dependent variables. Models implemented included stepwise logistic regression, support vector machines, and random forests. At both the herd and individual levels, random forest models attained the highest accuracy for predicting health status in all health event categories when evaluated with 10-fold cross-validation. Accuracy (SD) ranged from 0.61 (0.04) to 0.63 (0.04) when using random forest models at the herd level. Accuracy of prediction (SD) at the individual cow level ranged from 0.87 (0.06) to 0.93 (0.001) with random forest models. Highly significant variables and key words from logistic regression and random forest models were also investigated. All models identified several of the same key factors for each health event category, including movement out of the herd, size of the herd, and weather-related variables. We concluded that benchmarking health status using routinely collected herd data is feasible. Nonparametric models were better suited to handle this complex data with numerous variables. These data mining techniques were able to perform prediction of health status and could add evidence to personal experience in herd

  17. Benchmarking dairy herd health status using routinely recorded herd summary data.

    PubMed

    Parker Gaddis, K L; Cole, J B; Clay, J S; Maltecca, C

    2016-02-01

    Genetic improvement of dairy cattle health through the use of producer-recorded data has been determined to be feasible. Low estimated heritabilities indicate that genetic progress will be slow. Variation observed in lowly heritable traits can largely be attributed to nongenetic factors, such as the environment. More rapid improvement of dairy cattle health may be attainable if herd health programs incorporate environmental and managerial aspects. More than 1,100 herd characteristics are regularly recorded on farm test-days. We combined these data with producer-recorded health event data, and parametric and nonparametric models were used to benchmark herd and cow health status. Health events were grouped into 3 categories for analyses: mastitis, reproductive, and metabolic. Both herd incidence and individual incidence were used as dependent variables. Models implemented included stepwise logistic regression, support vector machines, and random forests. At both the herd and individual levels, random forest models attained the highest accuracy for predicting health status in all health event categories when evaluated with 10-fold cross-validation. Accuracy (SD) ranged from 0.61 (0.04) to 0.63 (0.04) when using random forest models at the herd level. Accuracy of prediction (SD) at the individual cow level ranged from 0.87 (0.06) to 0.93 (0.001) with random forest models. Highly significant variables and key words from logistic regression and random forest models were also investigated. All models identified several of the same key factors for each health event category, including movement out of the herd, size of the herd, and weather-related variables. We concluded that benchmarking health status using routinely collected herd data is feasible. Nonparametric models were better suited to handle this complex data with numerous variables. These data mining techniques were able to perform prediction of health status and could add evidence to personal experience in herd

  18. MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records to Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    Skip navigation U.S. National Library of Medicine Menu Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools About MedlinePlus Search ... GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: ...

  19. Developing and Implementing Patients' Full-Scale Electronic Access to Their Health Record.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Tove; Johansen, Monika A

    2016-01-01

    To increase patients' empowerment and involvement in their own health, several countries has decided to provide patients with electronic access to their health record. This paper reports on the main findings from sub-studies and pilots prior to the implementation of patients' access to their medical records in large-scale in the Northern Norway Region. The largest pilot included nearly 500 patients. Data for the participatory design process was collected through questionnaires and interviews. The results revealed that the service in general functioned as expected. The patients reported that they would continue to use the service, recommend it to others, and generally had no problems in understanding the content. PMID:27577347

  20. Occupational Safety and Health Administration--Access to employee exposure and medical records. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1980-05-23

    This final occupational safety and health standard, promulgated today as a revised 29 CFR 1910.20, provides for employee, designated representative, and OSHA access to employer-maintained exposure and medical records relevant to employees exposed to toxic substances and harmful physical agents. Access is also assured to employer analyses using exposure and medical records. The final standard requires long term preservation of these records, contains provisions concerning informing employees of their rights under the standard, and includes provisions protective of trade secret information.

  1. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Functions § 476.88 Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners. (a... examine its operation and records (including information on charges) that are pertinent to health...

  2. MPEG-21 as an access control tool for the National Health Service Care Records Service.

    PubMed

    Brox, Georg A

    2005-01-01

    Since the launch of the National Health Service (NHS) Care Records Service with plans to share patient information across England, there has been an emphasis on the need for manageable access control methods. MPEG-21 is a structured file format which includes an Intellectual Property Management and Protection (IPMP) function using XML to present all digitally stored items in the patient record. Using DICreator software, patient records consisting of written text, audio-recordings, non-X-ray digital imaging and video sequences were linked up successfully. Audio records were created using Talk-Back 2002 to standardize and optimize recording quality. The recorded reports were then linked and archived using iTunes. A key was used each time the file was displayed to secure access to confidential patient data. The building of the correct file structure could be monitored during the entire creation of the file. The results demonstrated the ability to ensure secure access of the MPEG-21 file by both health-care professionals and patients by use of different keys and a specific MPEG-21 browser. The study also showed that the enabling of IPMP will provide accurate audit trails to authenticate appropriate access to medical information. PMID:16035983

  3. The impact of electronic health records on client safety in aged care homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    This study collects and critically reviews the published literature to synthesize the risk factors for client safety in residential aged care and the potential contributions of electronic health records to reducing these risks. Three major types of risk factors for client safety were identified: risk factors related to the person's health; those related to the health and aged care system serving the person and those related to human error. Multiple strategies at all levels of an aged care organization are needed to reduce risks and improve client safety. Electronic health records can be one of the effective organizational mechanisms because it improves access to better information and integrates intelligent functions to support point-of-care decision making.

  4. Mining association rules between abnormal health examination results and outpatient medical records.

    PubMed

    Chao Huang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Currently, interpretation of health examination reports relies primarily on the physician's own experience. If health screening data could be integrated with outpatient medical records to uncover correlations between disease and abnormal test results, the physician could benefit from having additional reference resources for medical examination report interpretation and clinic diagnosis. This study used the medical database of a regional hospital in Taiwan to illustrate how association rules can be found between abnormal health examination results and outpatient illnesses. The rules can help to build up a disease-prevention knowledge database that assists healthcare providers in follow-up treatment and prevention. Furthermore, this study proposes a new algorithm, the data cutting and sorting method, or DCSM, in place of the traditional Apriori algorithm. DCSM significantly improves the mining performance of Apriori by reducing the time to scan health examination and outpatient medical records, both of which are databases of immense sizes.

  5. Importance of health information technology, electronic health records, and continuously aggregating data to comparative effectiveness research and learning health care.

    PubMed

    Miriovsky, Benjamin J; Shulman, Lawrence N; Abernethy, Amy P

    2012-12-01

    Rapidly accumulating clinical information can support cancer care and discovery. Future success depends on information management, access, use, and reuse. Electronic health records (EHRs) are highlighted as a critical component of evidence development and implementation, but to fully harness the potential of EHRs, they need to be more than electronic renderings of the traditional paper medical chart. Clinical informatics and structured accessible secure data captured through EHR systems provide mechanisms through which EHRs can facilitate comparative effectiveness research (CER). Use of large linked administrative databases to answer comparative questions is an early version of informatics-enabled CER familiar to oncologists. An updated version of informatics-enabled CER relies on EHR-derived structured data linked with supplemental information to provide patient-level information that can be aggregated and analyzed to support hypothesis generation, comparative assessment, and personalized care. As implementation of EHRs continues to expand, electronic databases containing information collected via EHRs will continuously aggregate; aggregating data enhanced with real-time analytics can provide point-of-care evidence to oncologists, tailored to patient-level characteristics. The system learns when clinical care informs research, and insights derived from research are reinvested in care. Challenges must be overcome, including interoperability, standardization, access, and development of real-time analytics.

  6. One positive impact of health care reform to physicians: the computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    England, S P

    1993-11-01

    The health care industry is an information-dependent business that will require a new generation of health information systems if successful health care reform is to occur. We critically need integrated clinical management information systems to support the physician and related clinicians at the direct care level, which in turn will have linkages with secondary users of health information such as health payors, regulators, and researchers. The economic dependence of health care industry on the CPR cannot be underestimated, says Jeffrey Ritter. He sees the U.S. health industry as about to enter a bold new age where our records are electronic, our computers are interconnected, and our money is nothing but pulses running across the telephone lines. Hence the United States is now in an age of electronic commerce. Clinical systems reform must begin with the community-based patient chart, which is located in the physician's office, the hospital, and other related health care provider offices. A community-based CPR and CPR system that integrates all providers within a managed care network is the most logical step since all health information begins with the creation of a patient record. Once a community-based CPR system is in place, the physician and his or her clinical associates will have a common patient record upon which all direct providers have access to input and record patient information. Once a community-level CPR system is in place with a community provider network, each physician will have available health information and data processing capability that will finally provide real savings in professional time and effort. Lost patient charts will no longer be a problem. Data input and storage of health information would occur electronically via transcripted text, voice, and document imaging. All electronic clinical information, voice, and graphics could be recalled at any time and transmitted to any terminal location within the health provider network. Hence

  7. Patients’ attitudes to the summary care record and HealthSpace: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To document the views of patients and the public towards the summary care record (SCR, a centrally stored medical record drawn from the general practice record) and HealthSpace (a personal health organiser accessible through the internet from which people can view their SCR), with a particular focus on those with low health literacy, potentially stigmatising conditions, or difficulties accessing health care. Design 103 semistructured individual interviews and seven focus groups. Setting Three early adopter primary care trusts in England where the SCR and HealthSpace are being piloted. All were in areas of relative socioeconomic deprivation. Participants Individual participants were recruited from general practice surgeries, walk-in centres, out of hours centres, and accident and emergency departments. Participants in focus groups were recruited through voluntary sector organisations; they comprised advocates of vulnerable groups and advocates of people who speak limited English; people with HIV; users of mental health services; young adults; elderly people; and participants of a drug rehabilitation programme. Methods Participants were asked if they had received information about the SCR and HealthSpace and about their views on shared electronic records in different circumstances. Results Most people were not aware of the SCR or HealthSpace and did not recall receiving information about it. They saw both benefits and drawbacks to having an SCR and described a process of weighing the former against the latter when making their personal choice. Key factors influencing this choice included the nature of any illness (especially whether it was likely to lead to emergency care needs); past and present experience of healthcare and government surveillance; the person’s level of engagement and health literacy; and their trust and confidence in the primary healthcare team and the wider NHS. Overall, people with stigmatising illness were more positive about the SCR

  8. Practicing preventive ethics, protecting patients: challenges of the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Satkoske, Valerie B; Parker, Lisa S

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of guidelines regarding breaches of electronic health information requires an anticipatory stance and physician and patient education regarding security and monitoring measures and methods of redress. Adopting a preventive ethics, rather than a crisis management, model may also increase physician awareness of how the information they choose to include and privilege within the health record may expose patients to added harms if not done mindfully.

  9. Cloud-based Electronic Health Records for Real-time, Region-specific Influenza Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Santillana, M.; Nguyen, A. T.; Louie, T.; Zink, A.; Gray, J.; Sung, I.; Brownstein, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate real-time monitoring systems of influenza outbreaks help public health officials make informed decisions that may help save lives. We show that information extracted from cloud-based electronic health records databases, in combination with machine learning techniques and historical epidemiological information, have the potential to accurately and reliably provide near real-time regional estimates of flu outbreaks in the United States. PMID:27165494

  10. Implications of Swedish National Regulatory Framework of the Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Isabella; Lyttkens, Leif; Eklund, Benny

    2016-01-01

    Online access to your own electronic health record is a controversial issue. In a Swedish county such eHealth service has been in operation since 2012 and it is now being widely deployed in the other counties. This first review presents work regarding current National Regulatory Framework (NRF) related to the public eHealth service Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record (PAEHR) and points out how electable paragraphs have been applied in different counties. Potential implications due to the different decisions made are discussed in terms of patient centricity and health information outcome. In current PAEHR, care providers have assessed differently how to apply the NRF. For the patients, this means that information gathered from the health record may be displayed differently, depending on where, when and why they seek treatment. When a patient visits different care providers such solution may cause confusion and its purpose may go lost. Consequently a revised NRF with less electable paragraphs is recommended, as well as adherence to the next NRF by all county councils. PMID:27577474

  11. Patient Core Data Set. Standard for a longitudinal health/medical record.

    PubMed

    Renner, A L; Swart, J C

    1997-01-01

    Blue Chip Computers Company, in collaboration with Wright State University-Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health, with support from the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Public Health Service, completed Small Business innovative Research research to design a comprehensive integrated Patient information System. The Wright State University consultants undertook the development of a Patient Core Data Set (PCDS) in response to the lack of uniform standards of minimum data sets, and lack of standards in data transfer for continuity of care. The purpose of the Patient Core Data Set is to develop a longitudinal patient health record and medical history using a common set of standard data elements with uniform definitions and coding consistent with Health Level 7 (HL7) protocol and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. The PCDS, intended for transfer across all patient-care settings, is essential information for clinicians, administrators, researchers, and health policy makers.

  12. Health Recommender Systems: Concepts, Requirements, Technical Basics and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Martin; Pfeifer, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades huge amounts of data have been collected in clinical databases representing patients' health states (e.g., as laboratory results, treatment plans, medical reports). Hence, digital information available for patient-oriented decision making has increased drastically but is often scattered across different sites. As as solution, personal health record systems (PHRS) are meant to centralize an individual's health data and to allow access for the owner as well as for authorized health professionals. Yet, expert-oriented language, complex interrelations of medical facts and information overload in general pose major obstacles for patients to understand their own record and to draw adequate conclusions. In this context, recommender systems may supply patients with additional laymen-friendly information helping to better comprehend their health status as represented by their record. However, such systems must be adapted to cope with the specific requirements in the health domain in order to deliver highly relevant information for patients. They are referred to as health recommender systems (HRS). In this article we give an introduction to health recommender systems and explain why they are a useful enhancement to PHR solutions. Basic concepts and scenarios are discussed and a first implementation is presented. In addition, we outline an evaluation approach for such a system, which is supported by medical experts. The construction of a test collection for case-related recommendations is described. Finally, challenges and open issues are discussed. PMID:24595212

  13. Health recommender systems: concepts, requirements, technical basics and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Martin; Pfeifer, Daniel

    2014-03-03

    During the last decades huge amounts of data have been collected in clinical databases representing patients' health states (e.g., as laboratory results, treatment plans, medical reports). Hence, digital information available for patient-oriented decision making has increased drastically but is often scattered across different sites. As as solution, personal health record systems (PHRS) are meant to centralize an individual's health data and to allow access for the owner as well as for authorized health professionals. Yet, expert-oriented language, complex interrelations of medical facts and information overload in general pose major obstacles for patients to understand their own record and to draw adequate conclusions. In this context, recommender systems may supply patients with additional laymen-friendly information helping to better comprehend their health status as represented by their record. However, such systems must be adapted to cope with the specific requirements in the health domain in order to deliver highly relevant information for patients. They are referred to as health recommender systems (HRS). In this article we give an introduction to health recommender systems and explain why they are a useful enhancement to PHR solutions. Basic concepts and scenarios are discussed and a first implementation is presented. In addition, we outline an evaluation approach for such a system, which is supported by medical experts. The construction of a test collection for case-related recommendations is described. Finally, challenges and open issues are discussed.

  14. Security Requirements for a Lifelong Electronic Health Record System: An Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Wainer, J; Campos, C.J.R; Salinas, M.D.U; Sigulem, D

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the authors' views on the security requirements of a central, unique electronic health record. The requirements are based on the well-known principles of confidentiality and integrity and the less discussed principles of control and legal value. The article does not discuss any technical or legal solutions to the requirements proposed herein. PMID:19415143

  15. 75 FR 44313 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... rule (75 FR 1844), entitled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive... technology are coordinated. In the interim final rule published on January 13, 2010 (75 FR 2014) entitled... related proposed rule published on March 10, 2010, (75 FR 11328) entitled ``Proposed Establishment...

  16. Hospital Electronic Health Record Adoption and Its Influence on Postoperative Sepsis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fareed, Naleef

    2013-01-01

    Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems could make healthcare delivery safer by providing benefits such as timely access to accurate and complete patient information, advances in diagnosis and coordination of care, and enhancements for monitoring patient vitals. This study explored the nature of EHR adoption in U.S. hospitals and their patient…

  17. Nurse Educators' Consensus Opinion on Using an Academic Electronic Health Record: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Darlene S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the opinions of nurse educators in the state of North Dakota (ND) who were using the academic Electronic Health Record (EHR) known as SimChart. In this dissertation research study, factors that either hindered or facilitated the introduction of SimChart in nursing programs in ND were examined.…

  18. 75 FR 1446 - Rate of Payment for Medical Records Received Through Health Information Technology (IT) Necessary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION Rate of Payment for Medical Records Received Through Health Information Technology (IT) Necessary... Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments on the basis of disability, and we expect this trend to continue..., underscores our need to process cases more efficiently by using advanced technologies. Applicants...

  19. Benchmarking dairy herd health status using routinely recorded herd summary data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic improvement of dairy cattle health through the use of producer-recorded data has been determined to be feasible. Low estimated heritabilities indicate that genetic progress will be slow. Variation observed in lowly heritable traits can largely be attributed to non-genetic factors, such as th...

  20. Automated Methods to Extract Patient New Information from Clinical Notes in Electronic Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) has resulted in rapid text proliferation within clinical care. Clinicians' use of copying and pasting functions in EHR systems further compounds this by creating a large amount of redundant clinical information in clinical documents. A mixture of redundant information (especially outdated…

  1. Implementation of an Electronic Health Records System in a Small Clinic: The Viewpoint of Clinic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carayon, Pascale; Smith, Paul; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Kuruchittham, Vipat; Li, Qian

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the implementation of an electronic health records (EHR) system in a small family practice clinic. We used three data collection instruments to evaluate user experience, work pattern changes, and organisational changes related to the implementation and use of the EHR system: (1) an EHR user survey, (2) interviews with…

  2. A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Arshia A.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

  3. Characterization of Help Desk issues After the Implementation of an Emergency Department Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Capurro, Daniel; Soto, Mauricio; Giacaman, Patricio; Catalán, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) can produce significant disruption when first implemented. Successful implementations depend on the availability of technical and clinical support. We present a description of the frequency and types of issues raised during the first 12 months after the implementation of an EHR at a teaching hospital in Santiago, Chile. PMID:26262177

  4. Understanding Clinician Information Demands and Synthesis of Clinical Documents in Electronic Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farri, Oladimeji Feyisetan

    2012-01-01

    Large quantities of redundant clinical data are usually transferred from one clinical document to another, making the review of such documents cognitively burdensome and potentially error-prone. Inadequate designs of electronic health record (EHR) clinical document user interfaces probably contribute to the difficulties clinicians experience while…

  5. The Role of Electronic Health Records in Structuring Nursing Handoff Communication and Maintaining Situation Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghenaimi, Said

    2012-01-01

    In healthcare institutions, work must continue 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. A team of nurses is needed to provide around-the-clock patient care, and this process requires transfer of patient care responsibilities, a process known as a "handoff." The present study explored the role of electronic health records in structuring handoff…

  6. Electronic Health Record Adoption as a Function of Success: Implications for Meaningful Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naser, Riyad J.

    2012-01-01

    Successful electronic health records (EHR) implementation has the potential to transform the entire care delivery process across the enterprise. However, the rate of EHR implementation and use among physicians has been slow. Different factors have been reported in the literature that may hinder adoption of EHR. Identifying and managing these…

  7. Using the Electronic Health Record in Nursing Research: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Joanne G; McGrath, Robert J; Fetzer, Susan J; Mittal, Prashant; Bourgoine, Derek

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the patient record from the paper to the electronic health record format present challenges and opportunities for the nurse researcher. Current use of data from the electronic health record is in a state of flux. Novel data analytic techniques and massive data sets provide new opportunities for nursing science. Realization of a strong electronic data output future relies on meeting challenges of system use and operability, data presentation, and privacy. Nurse researchers need to rethink aspects of proposal development. Joining ongoing national efforts aimed at creating usable data output is encouraged as a means to affect system design. Working to address challenges and embrace opportunities will help grow the science in a way that answers important patient care questions. PMID:25819698

  8. Using community based participatory research as a method for investigating electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Almond, Helen; Cummings, Elizabeth; Turner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    One information source for the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record is the consumer repository. This paper reports on the use of community based participatory research, as a project method, derived from an initiative where people with complex chronic conditions and their carers attended a rural health promotion and lifestyle modification program. Through co-operative inquiry embedded in the research approach, health promotion workers and their clients were actively supported to adopt and use the PCEHR as an intervention. Simultaneously they were encouraged to reflect on its design, mechanisms for its implementation and their perceptions of its overall impact on consumer's ability to self-manage complex conditions. PMID:25676944

  9. A model for consent-based privilege management in personal electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Oliver; Bergh, Björn

    2014-01-01

    One of the biggest issues in the domain of standardized, regional, crossinstitutional, personal, electronic health records is the privilege management. While many health information exchange projects use IHE-based architectures there are still unsolved questions regarding the restricting parameters a patient can use in the electronic consent configuring access control. This work determines these parameters, derives an information model of privilege management, introduces a set representation of the model and shows how to apply them to EHR architectures. The introduced model can serve as framework for health information exchanges using a consent-based privilege management. The set representation can help to understand the complexity of consent representations. PMID:25160217

  10. Factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of electronic health records for nursing education (EHRNE) software program.

    PubMed

    Kowitlawakul, Yanika; Chan, Sally Wai Chi; Pulcini, Joyce; Wang, Wenru

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Health Information Technology Act (2009) in America had recommended that electronic health records (EHRs) should be fully adopted by 2014. This has urged educational institutions to prepare healthcare professionals to be competent in using electronic health records (EHRs) while they are in schools. To equip nursing students with competency in using EHRs, an electronic health record for nursing education (EHRNE) has been developed and integrated it into nursing curricula. The purposes of the study were to investigate the factors influencing nursing students' acceptance of the EHRs in nursing education using the extended Technology Acceptance Model with self-efficacy as a conceptual framework. The study is a descriptive study design using self-reported questionnaires with 212 student participants. The IBM SPSS and AMOS 22.0 were used to analyze the data. The results showed that attitude toward using the EHRNE was the most influential factor on students' acceptance. The preliminary findings suggested that to enhance the students' acceptance of the EHRNE, cultivation of a positive attitude toward using this EHR as well as increasing the perceived usefulness is very important. Also, the study's framework could be used in guiding learning health informatics and be applied to nursing students.

  11. Electronic health records approaches and challenges: a comparison between Malaysia and four East Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Abd Ghani, Mohd Khanapi; Bali, Rajeev K; Naguib, Raouf N G; Marshall, Ian M

    2008-01-01

    An integrated Lifetime Health Record (LHR) is fundamental for achieving seamless and continuous access to patient medical information and for the continuum of care. However, the aim has not yet been fully realised. The efforts are actively progressing around the globe. Every stage of the development of the LHR initiatives had presented peculiar challenges. The best lessons in life are those of someone else's experiences. This paper presents an overview of the development approaches undertaken by four East Asian countries in implementing a national Electronic Health Record (EHR) in the public health system. The major challenges elicited from the review including integration efforts, process reengineering, funding, people, and law and regulation will be presented, compared, discussed and used as lessons learned for the further development of the Malaysian integrated LHR.

  12. National electronic health records and the digital disruption of moral orders.

    PubMed

    Garrety, Karin; McLoughlin, Ian; Wilson, Rob; Zelle, Gregor; Martin, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The digitalisation of patient health data to provide national electronic health record systems (NEHRS) is a major objective of many governments. Proponents claim that NEHRS will streamline care, reduce mistakes and cut costs. However, building these systems has proved highly problematic. Using recent developments in Australia as an example, we argue that a hitherto unexamined source of difficulty concerns the way NEHRS disrupt the moral orders governing the production, ownership, use of and responsibility for health records. Policies that pursue digitalisation as a self-evident 'solution' to problems in healthcare without due regard to these disruptions risk alienating key stakeholders. We propose a more emergent approach to the development and implementation of NEHRS that supports moral re-ordering around rights and responsibilities appropriate to the intentions of those involved in healthcare relationships. PMID:24560226

  13. National electronic health records and the digital disruption of moral orders.

    PubMed

    Garrety, Karin; McLoughlin, Ian; Wilson, Rob; Zelle, Gregor; Martin, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The digitalisation of patient health data to provide national electronic health record systems (NEHRS) is a major objective of many governments. Proponents claim that NEHRS will streamline care, reduce mistakes and cut costs. However, building these systems has proved highly problematic. Using recent developments in Australia as an example, we argue that a hitherto unexamined source of difficulty concerns the way NEHRS disrupt the moral orders governing the production, ownership, use of and responsibility for health records. Policies that pursue digitalisation as a self-evident 'solution' to problems in healthcare without due regard to these disruptions risk alienating key stakeholders. We propose a more emergent approach to the development and implementation of NEHRS that supports moral re-ordering around rights and responsibilities appropriate to the intentions of those involved in healthcare relationships.

  14. [ELGA--the electronic health record in the light of data protection and data security].

    PubMed

    Ströher, Alexander; Honekamp, Wilfried

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of an electronic health record (ELGA) is a subject discussed for a long time in Austria. Another big step toward ELGA is made at the end of 2010 on the pilot project e-medication in three model regions; other projects should follow. In addition, projects of the ELGA structure are sped up on the part of the ELGA GmbH to install the base of a functioning electronic health record. Unfortunately, many of these initiatives take place, so to speak, secretly, so that in the consciousness of the general public - and that includes not only patients but also physicians and other healthcare providers - always concerns about protection and security of such a storage of health data arouse. In this article the bases of the planned act are discussed taking into account the data protection and data security. PMID:21858632

  15. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education.

    PubMed

    Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

    2014-01-01

    Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area.

  16. A database to record, track and report health student rural placements.

    PubMed

    Whitrow, Melissa J; McKenzie, Warren

    2005-01-01

    The Spencer Gulf Rural Health School (SGRHS), South Australia, is funded by the Australian Commonwealth Government to deliver health education in the rural setting. The SGRHS required a database to record, track and report on student rural placements to satisfy Commonwealth reporting requirements, and for internal academic and administration staff use. Staff in widely separate rural locations needed to be able to access the database. A web-based relational database was created using Microsoft Access. The student rural placement database has been successfully utilised as the primary tool to record and track student placements in the SGRHS for 2 years, and has generated data for eight Commonwealth reports in this time. Future database developments include student accessible sections. With few alterations the database could be utilised by other Australian Rural Clinical Schools and University Departments of Rural Health.

  17. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration. PMID:26174867

  18. Place Matters: The problems and possibilities of spatial data in electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Christopher L.; Novak, Laurie L.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that “place matters” in health and illness. Climate, pollution and crime are examples of geographically specific social and environmental factors that can substantially impact health. However, health care decision-making and practice do not currently include spatial data on specific patients. Opportunities to incorporate clinically relevant data from the environment into health care practice are numerous, and the implementation issues are virtually unexplored. We use a qualitative study from a natural disaster, the Middle Tennessee Flood of 2010, to examine the possibilities presented by community-sourced spatial data. In our case, linking EHR data with data from rasterized photos of inundated areas could have enabled providers to identify at-risk populations of patients after the flood and conduct supportive outreach for patients with chronic illness. We explore the potential benefits for patients, policy issues and implications for biomedical informatics of expanding the health record to incorporate or link to community-sourced data. PMID:24551409

  19. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration.

  20. Can big data transform electronic health records into learning health systems?

    PubMed

    Harper, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    In the United States and globally, healthcare delivery is in the midst of an acute transformation with the adoption and use of health information technology (health IT) thus generating increasing amounts of patient care data available in computable form. Secure and trusted use of these data, beyond their original purpose can change the way we think about business, health, education, and innovation in the years to come. "Big Data" is data whose scale, diversity, and complexity require new architecture, techniques, algorithms, and analytics to manage it and extract value and hidden knowledge from it.

  1. Fragmented implementation of maternal and child health home-based records in Vietnam: need for integration

    PubMed Central

    Aiga, Hirotsugu; Nguyen, Vinh Duc; Nguyen, Cuong Dinh; Nguyen, Tho Thi Thi; Nguyen, Lien Thi Phuong

    2016-01-01

    Background Home-based records (HBRs) are globally implemented as the effective tools that encourage pregnant women and mothers to timely and adequately utilise maternal and child health (MCH) services. While availability and utilisation of nationally representative HBRs have been assessed in several earlier studies, the reality of a number of HBRs subnationally implemented in a less coordinated manner has been neither reported nor analysed. Objectives This study is aimed at estimating the prevalence of HBRs for MCH and the level of fragmentation of and overlapping between different HBRs for MCH in Vietnam. The study further attempts to identify health workers’ and mothers’ perceptions towards HBR operations and utilisations. Design A self-administered questionnaire was sent to the provincial health departments of 28 selected provinces. A copy of each HBR available was collected from them. A total of 20 semi-structured interviews with health workers and mothers were conducted at rural communities in four of 28 selected provinces. Results Whereas HBRs developed exclusively for maternal health and exclusively for child health were available in four provinces (14%) and in 28 provinces (100%), respectively, those for both maternal health and child health were available in nine provinces (32%). The mean number of HBRs in 28 provinces (=5.75) indicates over-availability of HBRs. All 119 minimum required items for recording found in three different HBRs under nationwide scale-up were also included in the Maternal and Child Health Handbook being piloted for nationwide scaling-up. Implementation of multiple HBRs is likely to confuse not only health workers by requiring them to record the same data on several HBRs but also mothers about which HBR they should refer to and rely on at home. Conclusions To enable both health workers and pregnant women to focus on only one type of HBR, province-specific HBRs for maternal and/or child health need to be nationally standardised

  2. Possibilities and Implications of Using the ICF and Other Vocabulary Standards in Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Vreeman, Daniel J; Richoz, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    There is now widespread recognition of the powerful potential of electronic health record (EHR) systems to improve the health-care delivery system. The benefits of EHRs grow even larger when the health data within their purview are seamlessly shared, aggregated and processed across different providers, settings and institutions. Yet, the plethora of idiosyncratic conventions for identifying the same clinical content in different information systems is a fundamental barrier to fully leveraging the potential of EHRs. Only by adopting vocabulary standards that provide the lingua franca across these local dialects can computers efficiently move, aggregate and use health data for decision support, outcomes management, quality reporting, research and many other purposes. In this regard, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) is an important standard for physiotherapists because it provides a framework and standard language for describing health and health-related states. However, physiotherapists and other health-care professionals capture a wide range of data such as patient histories, clinical findings, tests and measurements, procedures, and so on, for which other vocabulary standards such as Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes and Systematized Nomenclature Of Medicine Clinical Terms are crucial for interoperable communication between different electronic systems. In this paper, we describe how the ICF and other internationally accepted vocabulary standards could advance physiotherapy practise and research by enabling data sharing and reuse by EHRs. We highlight how these different vocabulary standards fit together within a comprehensive record system, and how EHRs can make use of them, with a particular focus on enhancing decision-making. By incorporating the ICF and other internationally accepted vocabulary standards into our clinical information systems, physiotherapists will be able to leverage the potent

  3. Do health checks improve risk factor detection in primary care? Matched cohort study using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Alice S.; Burgess, Caroline; Dodhia, Hiten; Fuller, Frances; Miller, Jane; McDermott, Lisa; Gulliford, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of NHS Health Checks on cardiovascular risk factor detection and inequalities. Methods Matched cohort study in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, including participants who received a health check in England between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2013, together with matched control participants, with linked deprivation scores. Results There were 91 618 eligible participants who received a health check, of whom 75 123 (82%) were matched with 182 245 controls. After the health check, 90% of men and 92% of women had complete data for blood pressure, total cholesterol, smoking and body mass index; a net 51% increase (P < 0.001) over controls. After the check, gender and deprivation inequalities in recording of all risk factors were lower than for controls. Net increase in risk factor detection was greater for hypercholesterolaemia (men +33%; women +32%) than for obesity (men +8%; women +4%) and hypertension in men only (+5%) (all P < 0.001). Detection of smoking was 5% lower in health check participants than controls (P < 0.001). Over 4 years, statins were prescribed to 11% of health -check participants and 7.6% controls (hazard ratio 1.58, 95% confidence interval 1.53–1.63, P < 0.001). Conclusion NHS Health Checks are associated with increased detection of hypercholesterolaemia, and to a lesser extent obesity and hypertension, but smokers may be under-represented. PMID:26350481

  4. An analysis of the paper-based health record: information content and its implications for electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Geiger, G; Merrilees, K; Walo, R; Gordon, D; Kunov, H

    1995-01-01

    An analysis of paper-based charting was carried out at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center as a prelude to developing a strategic plan to implement an electronic patient record. A relational model of the Sunnybrook paper chart was developed, describing each of its forms in terms of specific data fields. Three hundred and forty nine different forms are in current use at Sunnybrook, containing 64 types of data fields such as Patient Demographics, Vital Signs, and Doctor's Orders. The extent of data field duplication at the level of hospital forms was significant. A Patient Demographics field was present on all forms and on all pages of a patient's chart, as would be expected. Twenty seven other fields were duplicated on more than ten different forms, including Working Diagnosis which was present on 110 forms, History of Past Illness on 42 forms, and History of Present Illness on 32 forms. Current Medications were recorded on 32 forms and Allergy fields were present on 29 separate forms. Only five data fields of the total 64 were present on only one form. The duplication of data fields within complete patient charts was then examined to confirm that data field duplication was occurring within the actual healthcare delivery process. Using the relational model of the charting system, 143 acute care in-patient encounters were abstracted into the database. The charts were selected randomly from each of the hospital inpatient services. The numbers and types of forms within each chart were recorded, amounting to 18,654 physical pages and using 165 of the different forms. The average in-patient encounter within the model was 130.4 pages long, with a minimum of 27 pages, a maximum of 559 pages, and containing on average 25.8 different forms. The duplication of data fields within actual charts followed a pattern similar to the duplication found on the forms. Initial diagnosis was present on an average of 20.4 pages within the charts, with a minimum of 2 pages and a maximum of

  5. Measuring Population Health Using Electronic Health Records: Exploring Biases and Representativeness in a Community Health Information Exchange.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Gibson, P Joseph; Frederickson Comer, Karen; Rosenman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Assessment is a core function of public health. Comprehensive clinical data may enhance community health assessment by providing up-to-date, representative data for use in public health programs and policies, especially when combined with community-level data relevant to social determinants. In this study we examine routinely collected and geospatially-enhanced EHR data to assess population health at various levels of geographic granularity available from a regional health information exchange. We present preliminary findings and discuss important biases in EHR data. Future work is needed to develop methods for correcting for those biases to support routine epidemiology work of public health.

  6. Electronic Health Records and Meaningful Use in Local Health Departments: Updates From the 2015 NACCHO Informatics Assessment Survey

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gulzar H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electronic health records (EHRs) are evolving the scope of operations, practices, and outcomes of population health in the United States. Local health departments (LHDs) need adequate health informatics capacities to handle the quantity and quality of population health data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain an updated view using the most recent data to identify the primary storage of clinical data, status of data for meaningful use, and characteristics associated with the implementation of EHRs in LHDs. Methods: Data were drawn from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, which used a stratified random sampling design of LHD populations. Oversampling of larger LHDs was conducted and sampling weights were applied. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression in SPSS. Results: Forty-two percent of LHDs indicated the use of an EHR system compared with 58% that use a non-EHR system for the storage of primary health data. Seventy-one percent of LHDs had reviewed some or all of the current systems to determine whether they needed to be improved or replaced, whereas only 6% formally conducted a readiness assessment for health information exchange. Twenty-seven percent of the LHDs had conducted informatics training within the past 12 months. LHD characteristics statistically associated with having an EHR system were having state or centralized governance, not having created a strategic plan related to informatics within the past 2 years throughout LHDs, provided informatics training in the past 12 months, and various levels of control over decisions regarding hardware allocation or acquisition, software selection, software support, and information technology budget allocation. Conclusion: A focus on EHR implementation in public health is pertinent to examining the impact of public health programming and interventions for the positive change in population health. PMID:27684614

  7. The Evaluation of SEPAS National Project Based on Electronic Health Record System (EHRS) Coordinates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Farkhondeh; Moghaddasi, Hamid; Rabiei, Reza; Rahimi, Forough; Mirshekarlou, Soheila Jahangiri

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are secure private lifetime records that can be shared by using interoperability standards between different organizations and units. These records are created by the productive system that is called EHR system. Implementing EHR systems has a number of advantages such as facilitating access to medical records, supporting patient care, and improving the quality of care and health care decisions. The project of electronic health record system in Iran, which is the goal of this study, is called SEPAS. With respect to the importance of EHR and EHR systems the researchers investigated the project from two perspectives: determining the coordinates of the project and how it evolved, and incorporating the coordinates of EHR system in this project. Methods: In this study two evaluation tools, a checklist and a questionnaire, were developed based on texts and reliable documentation. The questionnaire and the checklist were validated using content validity by receiving the experts’ comments and the questionnaire’s reliability was estimated through Test-retest(r =87%). Data were collected through study, observation, and interviews with experts and specialists of SEPAS project. Results: This research showed that SEPAS project, like any other project, could be evaluated. It has some aims; steps, operational phases and certain start and end time, but all the resources and required facilities for the project have not been considered. Therefore it could not satisfy its specified objective and the useful and unique changes which are the other characteristics of any project have not been achieved. In addition, the findings of EHR system coordinates can be determined in 4 categories as Standards and rules, Telecommunication-Communication facilities, Computer equipment and facilities and Stakeholders. Conclusions: The findings indicated that SEPAS has the ability to use all standards of medical terminology and health classification

  8. Electronic health record meets digital library: a new environment for achieving an old goal.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, B L

    2000-01-01

    Linking the electronic health record to the digital library is a Web-era reformulation of the long-standing informatics goal of seamless integration of automated clinical data and relevant knowledge-based information to support informed decisions. The spread of the Internet, the development of the World Wide Web, and converging format standards for electronic health data and digital publications make effective linking increasingly feasible. Some existing systems link electronic health data and knowledge-based information in limited settings or limited ways. Yet many challenging informatics research problems remain to be solved before flexible and seamless linking becomes a reality and before systems become capable of delivering the specific piece of information needed at the time and place a decision must be made. Connecting the electronic health record to the digital library also requires positive resolution of important policy issues, including health data privacy, government encouragement of high-speed communications, electronic intellectual property rights, and standards for health data and for digital libraries. Both the research problems and the policy issues should be important priorities for the field of medical informatics.

  9. Analysis of the Security and Privacy Requirements of Cloud-Based Electronic Health Records Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Gonzalo; López-Coronado, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Background The Cloud Computing paradigm offers eHealth systems the opportunity to enhance the features and functionality that they offer. However, moving patients’ medical information to the Cloud implies several risks in terms of the security and privacy of sensitive health records. In this paper, the risks of hosting Electronic Health Records (EHRs) on the servers of third-party Cloud service providers are reviewed. To protect the confidentiality of patient information and facilitate the process, some suggestions for health care providers are made. Moreover, security issues that Cloud service providers should address in their platforms are considered. Objective To show that, before moving patient health records to the Cloud, security and privacy concerns must be considered by both health care providers and Cloud service providers. Security requirements of a generic Cloud service provider are analyzed. Methods To study the latest in Cloud-based computing solutions, bibliographic material was obtained mainly from Medline sources. Furthermore, direct contact was made with several Cloud service providers. Results Some of the security issues that should be considered by both Cloud service providers and their health care customers are role-based access, network security mechanisms, data encryption, digital signatures, and access monitoring. Furthermore, to guarantee the safety of the information and comply with privacy policies, the Cloud service provider must be compliant with various certifications and third-party requirements, such as SAS70 Type II, PCI DSS Level 1, ISO 27001, and the US Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA). Conclusions Storing sensitive information such as EHRs in the Cloud means that precautions must be taken to ensure the safety and confidentiality of the data. A relationship built on trust with the Cloud service provider is essential to ensure a transparent process. Cloud service providers must make certain that all security

  10. Empowerment of patients over their personal health record implies sharing responsibility with the physician.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Benzenine, Eric; Auverlot, Bertrand; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François-André

    2011-01-01

    Through this article, we point out the unavoidable empowerment of patients with regard to their personal health record and propose the mixed management of patients' medical records. This mixed management implies sharing responsibilities between the patient and the Medical Practitioner (MP) by making patients responsible for the validation of their administrative information, and MPs responsible for the validation of their patients' medical information. We propose a solution to gather and update patients' administrative and medical data in order to reconstitute patients' medical histories accurately. This method is based on two processes. The aim of the first process is to provide patients administrative data, in order to know where and when they received care (name of the health structure or health practitioner, type of care: outpatient or inpatient). The aim of the second process is to provide patients' medical information and to validate it under the responsibility of the MP with the help of patients if needed. During these two processes, the patients' privacy will be ensured through cryptographic hash functions like the Secure Hash Algorithm, which allows the pseudonymization of patients' identities. The Medical Record Search Engine we propose will be able to retrieve and to provide upon a request formulated by the MP all the available information concerning a patient who has received care in different health structures without divulging the patient's true identity. Associated with strong traceability of all access, modifications or deletions, our method can lead to improved efficiency of personal medical record management while reinforcing the empowerment of patients over their medical records.

  11. Design and implementation of a privacy preserving electronic health record linkage tool in Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Cashy, John P; Jackson, Kathryn L; Pah, Adam R; Goel, Satyender; Boehnke, Jörn; Humphries, John Eric; Kominers, Scott Duke; Hota, Bala N; Sims, Shannon A; Malin, Bradley A; French, Dustin D; Walunas, Theresa L; Meltzer, David O; Kaleba, Erin O; Jones, Roderick C; Galanter, William L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To design and implement a tool that creates a secure, privacy preserving linkage of electronic health record (EHR) data across multiple sites in a large metropolitan area in the United States (Chicago, IL), for use in clinical research. Methods The authors developed and distributed a software application that performs standardized data cleaning, preprocessing, and hashing of patient identifiers to remove all protected health information. The application creates seeded hash code combinations of patient identifiers using a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant SHA-512 algorithm that minimizes re-identification risk. The authors subsequently linked individual records using a central honest broker with an algorithm that assigns weights to hash combinations in order to generate high specificity matches. Results The software application successfully linked and de-duplicated 7 million records across 6 institutions, resulting in a cohort of 5 million unique records. Using a manually reconciled set of 11 292 patients as a gold standard, the software achieved a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 100%, with a majority of the missed matches accounted for by patients with both a missing social security number and last name change. Using 3 disease examples, it is demonstrated that the software can reduce duplication of patient records across sites by as much as 28%. Conclusions Software that standardizes the assignment of a unique seeded hash identifier merged through an agreed upon third-party honest broker can enable large-scale secure linkage of EHR data for epidemiologic and public health research. The software algorithm can improve future epidemiologic research by providing more comprehensive data given that patients may make use of multiple healthcare systems. PMID:26104741

  12. Visualizing collaborative electronic health record usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Matthew B; Lee, Young Ji; Schneider, Daniel H; Skeehan, Connor T; Scholtens, Denise M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To visualize and describe collaborative electronic health record (EHR) usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure. Materials and methods We identified records of patients with heart failure and all associated healthcare provider record usage through queries of the Northwestern Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse. We constructed a network by equating access and updates of a patient’s EHR to a provider-patient interaction. We then considered shared patient record access as the basis for a second network that we termed the provider collaboration network. We calculated network statistics, the modularity of provider interactions, and provider cliques. Results We identified 548 patient records accessed by 5113 healthcare providers in 2012. The provider collaboration network had 1504 nodes and 83 998 edges. We identified 7 major provider collaboration modules. Average clique size was 87.9 providers. We used a graph database to demonstrate an ad hoc query of our provider-patient network. Discussion Our analysis suggests a large number of healthcare providers across a wide variety of professions access records of patients with heart failure during their hospital stay. This shared record access tends to take place not only in a pairwise manner but also among large groups of providers. Conclusion EHRs encode valuable interactions, implicitly or explicitly, between patients and providers. Network analysis provided strong evidence of multidisciplinary record access of patients with heart failure across teams of 100+ providers. Further investigation may lead to clearer understanding of how record access information can be used to strategically guide care coordination for patients hospitalized for heart failure. PMID:25710558

  13. An evaluation of a tailored intervention on village doctors use of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To describe and evaluate the effectiveness of tailored intervention on village doctor’s use of electronic health records (EHR) in rural community health services in less developed areas. Methods Ten townships were selected. In each township, two similar health service station (CHSS) were chosen. One was randomly as allocated to the intervention group, the other to the control group. Over six monthly visits, a structured on-site intervention including education, supervision and technical support was provided to village doctors in the intervention group tailored to their needs. The Control group received no visits. A sample of 20 families from each CHSS was randomly chosen. An online evaluation of each family’s EHR was conducted by the investigators at baseline and at the end of the 6 month intervention. Results In the intervention group, the proportion of households with complete records increased: basic personal information from 2.6% to 32.5%, (Z = -15.099, P = 0.000) and health education records from 0.3% to 1.6% (Z = -4.459, P = 0.000). Similarly at baseline none of the 80 elders had her records. This increased in the intervention group to 16.4% recorded in part and 37.0% in full (Z = -7.480, P = 0.000). The proportion of complete health management records for children aged 1 to 2 years and 3 to 6 years increased from 28.6% and 33.3% to 66.7% and 74.2% respectively (the difference of children group 3 to 6 years of age was statistically significant, Z = -3.860, p = 0.000). The proportion of complete basic clinic records in the intervention group increased from 7.6% to 13.9% (Z = -3.252, P = 0.001). There were no significant differences in the control group. Conclusions The pilot study showed that a on-site education, supervision and technical support tailored to their needs was associated with improvements in village doctors use of EHR. This model is worthy of implementation in other rural areas. PMID

  14. The SMART Platform: early experience enabling substitutable applications for electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Joshua C; Murphy, Shawn N; Bernstam, Elmer Victor; Ramoni, Rachel L; Kreda, David A; McCoy, J Michael; Adida, Ben; Kohane, Isaac S

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Substitutable Medical Applications, Reusable Technologies (SMART) Platforms project seeks to develop a health information technology platform with substitutable applications (apps) constructed around core services. The authors believe this is a promising approach to driving down healthcare costs, supporting standards evolution, accommodating differences in care workflow, fostering competition in the market, and accelerating innovation. Materials and methods The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, through the Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) Program, funds the project. The SMART team has focused on enabling the property of substitutability through an app programming interface leveraging web standards, presenting predictable data payloads, and abstracting away many details of enterprise health information technology systems. Containers—health information technology systems, such as electronic health records (EHR), personally controlled health records, and health information exchanges that use the SMART app programming interface or a portion of it—marshal data sources and present data simply, reliably, and consistently to apps. Results The SMART team has completed the first phase of the project (a) defining an app programming interface, (b) developing containers, and (c) producing a set of charter apps that showcase the system capabilities. A focal point of this phase was the SMART Apps Challenge, publicized by the White House, using http://www.challenge.gov website, and generating 15 app submissions with diverse functionality. Conclusion Key strategic decisions must be made about the most effective market for further disseminating SMART: existing market-leading EHR vendors, new entrants into the EHR market, or other stakeholders such as health information exchanges. PMID:22427539

  15. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals.

    PubMed

    Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

    2010-07-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve standards of care, address Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and accreditation standards, and promote appropriate documentation to enable data retrieval for clinical research. UAMS will ensure that graduates are ready for the rapidly evolving practice environment created by the HITECH Act. PMID:20648253

  16. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences electronic health record and medical informatics training for undergraduate health professionals*

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Jan K; Newton, Bruce W; Boone, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is planning interprofessional training in electronic health records (EHRs) and medical informatics. Training will be integrated throughout the curricula and will include seminars on broad concepts supplemented with online modules, didactic lectures, and hands-on experiences. Training will prepare future health professionals to use EHRs, evidence-based medicine, medical decision support, and point-of-care tools to reduce errors, improve standards of care, address Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and accreditation standards, and promote appropriate documentation to enable data retrieval for clinical research. UAMS will ensure that graduates are ready for the rapidly evolving practice environment created by the HITECH Act. PMID:20648253

  17. Patient empowerment by the means of citizen-managed Electronic Health Records: web 2.0 health digital identity scenarios.

    PubMed

    Falcão-Reis, Filipa; Correia, Manuel E

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of more sophisticated and comprehensive healthcare information systems, system builders are becoming more interested in patient interaction and what he can do to help to improve his own health care. Information systems play nowadays a crucial and fundamental role in hospital work-flows, thus providing great opportunities to introduce and improve upon "patient empowerment" processes for the personalization and management of Electronic Health Records (EHRs). In this paper, we present a patient's privacy generic control mechanisms scenarios based on the Extended OpenID (eOID), a user centric digital identity provider previously developed by our group, which leverages a secured OpenID 2.0 infrastructure with the recently released Portuguese Citizen Card (CC) for secure authentication in a distributed health information environment. eOID also takes advantage of Oauth assertion based mechanisms to implement patient controlled secure qualified role based access to his EHR, by third parties.

  18. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Healthcare Professional's Beliefs and Attitudes toward Face to Face Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickles, Kenneth Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The impact of electronic health records on healthcare professional's beliefs and attitudes toward face to face communication during patient and provider interactions was examined. Quantitative survey research assessed user attitudes towards an electronic health record system and revealed that healthcare professionals from a wide range of…

  19. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  20. Improve Synergy Between Health Information Exchange and Electronic Health Records to Increase Rates of Continuously Insured Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Rachel; Burdick, Tim; Angier, Heather; Wallace, Lorraine; Nelson, Christine; Likumahuwa-Ackman, Sonja; Sumic, Aleksandra; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Affordable Care Act increases health insurance options, yet many Americans may struggle to consistently maintain coverage. While health care providers have traditionally not been involved in providing insurance enrollment support to their patients, the ability for them to do so now exists. We propose that providers could capitalize on the expansion of electronic health records (EHRs) and the advances in health information exchanges (HIEs) to improve their patients’ insurance coverage rates and continuity. Evidence for Argument: We describe a project in which we are building strategies for linking, and thus improving synergy between, payer and EHR data. Through this effort, care teams will have access to new automated tools and increased EHR functionality designed to help them assist their patients in obtaining and maintaining health insurance coverage. Suggestion for the Future: The convergence of increasing EHR adoption, improving HIE functionality, and expanding insurance coverage options, creates new opportunities for clinics to help their patients obtain public health insurance. Harnessing this nascent ability to exchange information between payers and providers may improve synergies between HIE and EHRs, and thus support clinic-based efforts to keep patients continuously insured. PMID:26355818

  1. Moving toward multimedia electronic health records: how do we get there?

    PubMed

    Seto, Belinda; Friedman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This report, based on a workshop jointly sponsored the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Biomedical Engineering and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, examines the role and value of images as multimedia data in electronic health records (EHRs). The workshop, attended by a wide range of stakeholders, was motivated in part by the absence of image data from discussions of meaningful use of health information technology. Collectively, the workshop presenters and participants argued that images are not ancillary data and should be central to health information systems to facilitate clinical decisions and higher quality, efficiency, and safety of care. They emphasized that the imaging community has already developed standards that form the basis of interoperability. Despite the apparent value of images, workshop participants also identified challenges and barriers to their implementation within EHRs. Weighing the opportunities and challenges, workshop participants provided their perspectives on possible paths forward toward fully multimedia EHRs.

  2. Moving toward multimedia electronic health records: how do we get there?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This report, based on a workshop jointly sponsored the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Biomedical Engineering and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, examines the role and value of images as multimedia data in electronic health records (EHRs). The workshop, attended by a wide range of stakeholders, was motivated in part by the absence of image data from discussions of meaningful use of health information technology. Collectively, the workshop presenters and participants argued that images are not ancillary data and should be central to health information systems to facilitate clinical decisions and higher quality, efficiency, and safety of care. They emphasized that the imaging community has already developed standards that form the basis of interoperability. Despite the apparent value of images, workshop participants also identified challenges and barriers to their implementation within EHRs. Weighing the opportunities and challenges, workshop participants provided their perspectives on possible paths forward toward fully multimedia EHRs. PMID:22306113

  3. Data-driven human rights: using the electronic health record to promote human rights in jail.

    PubMed

    Glowa-Kollisch, Sarah; Andrade, Kelly; Stazesky, Richard; Teixeira, Paul; Kaba, Fatos; Macdonald, Ross; Rosner, Zachary; Selling, Daniel; Parsons, Amanda; Venters, Homer

    2014-06-14

    The electronic health record (EHR) is a commonplace innovation designed to promote efficiency, quality, and continuity of health services. In the New York City jail system, we implemented an EHR across 12 jails between 2008 and 2011. During the same time, our work increasingly focused on the importance of human rights as an essential element to the provision of medical and mental health care for our patients. Consequently, we made major modifications to the EHR to allow for better surveillance of vulnerable populations and enable reporting and analysis of patterns of abuse, neglect, and other patient concerns related to human rights. These modifications have improved our ability to find and care for patients injured in jail and those with mental health exacerbations. More work is needed, however, to optimize the potential of the EHR as a tool to promote human rights among patients in jail.

  4. Exploring Healthcare Consumer Acceptance of Personal Health Information Management Technology through Personal Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare technologies are evolving from a practitioner-centric model to a patient-centric model due to the increasing need for technology that directly serves healthcare consumers, including healthy people and patients. Personal health information management (PHIM) technology is one of the technologies designed to enhance an individual's ability…

  5. Electronic health records: a valuable tool for dental school strategic planning.

    PubMed

    Filker, Phyllis J; Cook, Nicole; Kodish-Stav, Jodi

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if electronic patient records have utility in dental school strategic planning. Electronic health records (EHRs) have been used by all predoctoral students and faculty members at Nova Southeastern University's College of Dental Medicine (NSU-CDM) since 2006. The study analyzed patient demographic and caries risk assessment data from October 2006 to May 2011 extracted from the axiUm EHR database. The purpose was to determine if there was a relationship between high oral health care needs and patient demographics, including gender, age, and median income of the zip code where they reside in order to support dental school strategic planning including the locations of future satellite clinics. The results showed that about 51 percent of patients serviced by the Broward County-based NSU-CDM oral health care facilities have high oral health care needs and that about 60 percent of this population resides in zip codes where the average income is below the median income for the county ($41,691). The results suggest that EHR data can be used adjunctively by dental schools when proposing potential sites for satellite clinics and planning for future oral health care programming.

  6. Improving the Effectiveness of Electronic Health Record-Based Referral Processes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Electronic health records are increasingly being used to facilitate referral communication in the outpatient setting. However, despite support by technology, referral communication between primary care providers and specialists is often unsatisfactory and is unable to eliminate care delays. This may be in part due to lack of attention to how information and communication technology fits within the social environment of health care. Making electronic referral communication effective requires a multifaceted “socio-technical” approach. Using an 8-dimensional socio-technical model for health information technology as a framework, we describe ten recommendations that represent good clinical practices to design, develop, implement, improve, and monitor electronic referral communication in the outpatient setting. These recommendations were developed on the basis of our previous work, current literature, sound clinical practice, and a systems-based approach to understanding and implementing health information technology solutions. Recommendations are relevant to system designers, practicing clinicians, and other stakeholders considering use of electronic health records to support referral communication. PMID:22973874

  7. Technical and architectural issues in deploying electronic health records (EHRs) over the WWW.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brian; Kushniruk, Andre; Joe, Ron; Borycki, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this paper technical and architectural issues are described in deploying electronic health records (EHRs) over the WWW. The project described involved deployment of EHRs that have been designed to serve in the education of health professionals and health/biomedical informaticians. In order to allow for ubiquitous access to a range of EHRs remotely an architecture was designed with three layers: (a) the "Internet" or remote user access layer (2) the "Perimeter Network", or middle firewall security and authentication layer (3) the "HINF EHR Network", consisting of the internal servers hosting EHR applications and databases. The approaches allow for a large number of remote users running a range of operating systems to access the educational EHRs from any location remotely. Virtual machine (VM) technology is employed to allow multiple versions and platforms of operating systems to be installed side-by-side on a single server. Security, technical and budgetary considerations are described as well as past and current applications of the architecture for a number of projects for the education of health professionals in the area of electronic health records. PMID:19380921

  8. Electronic Health Records: An Enhanced Security Paradigm to Preserve Patient's Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamanig, Daniel; Stingl, Christian

    In recent years, demographic change and increasing treatment costs demand the adoption of more cost efficient, highly qualitative and integrated health care processes. The rapid growth and availability of the Internet facilitate the development of eHealth services and especially of electronic health records (EHRs) which are promising solutions to meet the aforementioned requirements. Considering actual web-based EHR systems, patient-centric and patient moderated approaches are widely deployed. Besides, there is an emerging market of so called personal health record platforms, e.g. Google Health. Both concepts provide a central and web-based access to highly sensitive medical data. Additionally, the fact that these systems may be hosted by not fully trustworthy providers necessitates to thoroughly consider privacy issues. In this paper we define security and privacy objectives that play an important role in context of web-based EHRs. Furthermore, we discuss deployed solutions as well as concepts proposed in the literature with respect to this objectives and point out several weaknesses. Finally, we introduce a system which overcomes the drawbacks of existing solutions by considering an holistic approach to preserve patient's privacy and discuss the applied methods.

  9. Electronic health records: a new tool to combat chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed Central

    Navaneethan, Sankar D.; Jolly, Stacey E.; Sharp, John; Jain, Anil; Schold, Jesse D.; Schreiber, Martin J.; Nally, Joseph V.

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) were first developed in the 1960s as clinical information systems for document storage and retrieval. Adoption of EHRs has increased in the developed world and is increasing in developing countries. Studies have shown that quality of patient care is improved among health centers with EHRs. In this article, we review the structure and function of EHRs along with an examination of its potential application in CKD care and research. Well-designed patient registries using EHRs data allow for improved aggregation of patient data for quality improvement and to facilitate clinical research. Preliminary data from the United States and other countries have demonstrated that CKD care might improve with use of EHRs-based programs. We recently developed a CKD registry derived from EHRs data at our institution and complimented the registry with other patient details from the United States Renal Data System and the Social Security Death Index. This registry allows us to conduct a EHRs-based clinical trial that examines whether empowering patients with a personal health record or patient navigators improves CKD care, along with identifying participants for other clinical trials and conducting health services research. EHRs use have shown promising results in some settings, but not in others, perhaps attributed to the differences in EHRs adoption rates and varying functionality. Thus, future studies should explore the optimal methods of using EHRs to improve CKD care and research at the individual patient level, health system and population levels. PMID:23320972

  10. Improving the effectiveness of electronic health record-based referral processes.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Adol; Sittig, Dean F; Murphy, Daniel R; Singh, Hardeep

    2012-01-01

    Electronic health records are increasingly being used to facilitate referral communication in the outpatient setting. However, despite support by technology, referral communication between primary care providers and specialists is often unsatisfactory and is unable to eliminate care delays. This may be in part due to lack of attention to how information and communication technology fits within the social environment of health care. Making electronic referral communication effective requires a multifaceted "socio-technical" approach. Using an 8-dimensional socio-technical model for health information technology as a framework, we describe ten recommendations that represent good clinical practices to design, develop, implement, improve, and monitor electronic referral communication in the outpatient setting. These recommendations were developed on the basis of our previous work, current literature, sound clinical practice, and a systems-based approach to understanding and implementing health information technology solutions. Recommendations are relevant to system designers, practicing clinicians, and other stakeholders considering use of electronic health records to support referral communication. PMID:22973874

  11. A sophisticated mechanism for enabling real-time mobile access to PHR data.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    Faced with rapid changes, such as growing complexity in care delivery, health systems nowadays fall short in their ability to translate knowledge into practice. Mobile technology holds enormous potential for transforming healthcare delivery systems which currently involve cumbersome processes that slow down care and decrease rather than improve safety. However, the limited computing, energy and information storage capabilities of mobile devices are hampering their ability to support increasingly sophisticated applications required by certain application fields, such as healthcare. This paper is concerned with a framework which provides ubiquitous mobile access to comprehensive health information at any point of care or decision making in a way that efficient utilization of mobile device resources is achieved. To this end, a cloud-based push messaging mechanism is utilized which draws upon and enhances Google Cloud Messaging service. PMID:23823405

  12. “Nothing About Me Without Me”: An Interpretative Review of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Ryan; Sevdalis, Nick; Mayer, Erik K; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) enable patients to access and manage personal clinical information that is made available to them by their health care providers (HCPs). It is thought that the shared management nature of medical record access improves patient outcomes and improves patient satisfaction. However, recent reviews have found that this is not the case. Furthermore, little research has focused on PAEHRs from the HCP viewpoint. HCPs include physicians, nurses, and service providers. Objective We provide a systematic review of reviews of the impact of giving patients record access from both a patient and HCP point of view. The review covers a broad range of outcome measures, including patient safety, patient satisfaction, privacy and security, self-efficacy, and health outcome. Methods A systematic search was conducted using Web of Science to identify review articles on the impact of PAEHRs. Our search was limited to English-language reviews published between January 2002 and November 2014. A total of 73 citations were retrieved from a series of Boolean search terms including “review*” with “patient access to records”. These reviews went through a novel scoring system analysis whereby we calculated how many positive outcomes were reported per every outcome measure investigated. This provided a way to quantify the impact of PAEHRs. Results Ten reviews covering chronic patients (eg, diabetes and hypertension) and primary care patients, as well as HCPs were found but eight were included for the analysis of outcome measures. We found mixed outcomes across both patient and HCP groups, with approximately half of the reviews showing positive changes with record access. Patients believe that record access increases their perception of control; however, outcome measures thought to create psychological concerns (such as patient anxiety as a result of seeing their medical record) are still unanswered. Nurses are more likely than

  13. Health information technology: standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria for electronic health record technology, 2014 edition; revisions to the permanent certification program for health information technology. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    With this final rule, the Secretary of Health and Human Services adopts certification criteria that establish the technical capabilities and specify the related standards and implementation specifications that Certified Electronic Health Record (EHR) Technology will need to include to, at a minimum, support the achievement of meaningful use by eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs beginning with the EHR reporting periods in fiscal year and calendar year 2014. This final rule also makes changes to the permanent certification program for health information technology, including changing the program's name to the ONC HIT Certification Program. PMID:22946139

  14. Health information technology: standards, implementation specifications, and certification criteria for electronic health record technology, 2014 edition; revisions to the permanent certification program for health information technology. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    With this final rule, the Secretary of Health and Human Services adopts certification criteria that establish the technical capabilities and specify the related standards and implementation specifications that Certified Electronic Health Record (EHR) Technology will need to include to, at a minimum, support the achievement of meaningful use by eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals under the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs beginning with the EHR reporting periods in fiscal year and calendar year 2014. This final rule also makes changes to the permanent certification program for health information technology, including changing the program's name to the ONC HIT Certification Program.

  15. Identifying synonymy between SNOMED clinical terms of varying length using distributional analysis of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Aron; Conway, Mike; Duneld, Martin; Chapman, Wendy W

    2013-01-01

    Medical terminologies and ontologies are important tools for natural language processing of health record narratives. To account for the variability of language use, synonyms need to be stored in a semantic resource as textual instantiations of a concept. Developing such resources manually is, however, prohibitively expensive and likely to result in low coverage. To facilitate and expedite the process of lexical resource development, distributional analysis of large corpora provides a powerful data-driven means of (semi-)automatically identifying semantic relations, including synonymy, between terms. In this paper, we demonstrate how distributional analysis of a large corpus of electronic health records - the MIMIC-II database - can be employed to extract synonyms of SNOMED CT preferred terms. A distinctive feature of our method is its ability to identify synonymous relations between terms of varying length.

  16. Identifying Synonymy between SNOMED Clinical Terms of Varying Length Using Distributional Analysis of Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Aron; Conway, Mike; Duneld, Martin; Chapman, Wendy W.

    2013-01-01

    Medical terminologies and ontologies are important tools for natural language processing of health record narratives. To account for the variability of language use, synonyms need to be stored in a semantic resource as textual instantiations of a concept. Developing such resources manually is, however, prohibitively expensive and likely to result in low coverage. To facilitate and expedite the process of lexical resource development, distributional analysis of large corpora provides a powerful data-driven means of (semi-)automatically identifying semantic relations, including synonymy, between terms. In this paper, we demonstrate how distributional analysis of a large corpus of electronic health records – the MIMIC-II database – can be employed to extract synonyms of SNOMED CT preferred terms. A distinctive feature of our method is its ability to identify synonymous relations between terms of varying length. PMID:24551362

  17. Identification and Progression of Heart Disease Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients from Longitudinal Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Dai, Hong-Jie; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, assessing the risk of its occurrence is a crucial step in predicting serious cardiac events. Identifying heart disease risk factors and tracking their progression is a preliminary step in heart disease risk assessment. A large number of studies have reported the use of risk factor data collected prospectively. Electronic health record systems are a great resource of the required risk factor data. Unfortunately, most of the valuable information on risk factor data is buried in the form of unstructured clinical notes in electronic health records. In this study, we present an information extraction system to extract related information on heart disease risk factors from unstructured clinical notes using a hybrid approach. The hybrid approach employs both machine learning and rule-based clinical text mining techniques. The developed system achieved an overall microaveraged F-score of 0.8302. PMID:26380290

  18. Securing SSL-VPN with LR-AKE to access personal health record.

    PubMed

    Eizen, Kimura; Masato, Saito; Kazukuni, Kobara; Yoshihito, Nakato; Takuji, Kuroda; Ken, Ishihara

    2013-01-01

    Using SSL-VPN requires special considerations for well-known issues such as attackers exploiting web browser vulnerabilities and phishing sites using man-in-the-middle attacks. We used leakage-resilient authenticated key exchange (LR-AKE) to develop a comprehensive solution to SSL-VPN issues. Our results show that the LR-AKE should contribute to building a robust infrastructure for personal health records.

  19. Securing SSL-VPN with LR-AKE to access personal health record.

    PubMed

    Eizen, Kimura; Masato, Saito; Kazukuni, Kobara; Yoshihito, Nakato; Takuji, Kuroda; Ken, Ishihara

    2013-01-01

    Using SSL-VPN requires special considerations for well-known issues such as attackers exploiting web browser vulnerabilities and phishing sites using man-in-the-middle attacks. We used leakage-resilient authenticated key exchange (LR-AKE) to develop a comprehensive solution to SSL-VPN issues. Our results show that the LR-AKE should contribute to building a robust infrastructure for personal health records. PMID:23920704

  20. Pan-Canadian REspiratory STandards INitiative for Electronic Health Records (PRESTINE): 2011 National Forum Proceedings

    PubMed Central

    Lougheed, M Diane; Minard, Janice; Dworkin, Shari; Juurlink, Mary-Ann; Temple, Walley J; To, Teresa; Koehn, Marc; Van Dam, Anne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In a novel knowledge translation initiative, the Government of Ontario’s Asthma Plan of Action funded the development of an Asthma Care Map to enable adherence with the Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines developed under the auspices of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS). Following its successful evaluation within the Primary Care Asthma Pilot Project, respiratory clinicians from the Asthma Research Unit, Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario) are leading an initiative to incorporate standardized Asthma Care Map data elements into electronic health records in primary care in Ontario. Acknowledging that the issue of data standards affects all respiratory conditions, and all provinces and territories, the Government of Ontario approached the CTS Respiratory Guidelines Committee. At its meeting in September 2010, the CTS Respiratory Guidelines Committee agreed that developing and standardizing respiratory data elements for electronic health records are strategically important. In follow-up to that commitment, representatives from the CTS, the Lung Association, the Government of Ontario, the National Lung Health Framework and Canada Health Infoway came together to form a planning committee. The planning committee proposed a phased approach to inform stakeholders about the issue, and engage them in the development, implementation and evaluation of a standardized dataset. An environmental scan was completed in July 2011, which identified data definitions and standards currently available for clinical variables that are likely to be included in electronic medical records in primary care for diagnosis, management and patient education related to asthma and COPD. The scan, sponsored by the Government of Ontario, includes compliance with clinical nomenclatures such as SNOMED-CT® and LOINC®. To help launch and create momentum for this initiative, a national forum was convened on October 2 and 3, 2011, in Toronto, Ontario. The forum was designed to bring together key

  1. Pan-Canadian REspiratory STandards INitiative for Electronic Health Records (PRESTINE): 2011 national forum proceedings.

    PubMed

    Lougheed, M Diane; Minard, Janice; Dworkin, Shari; Juurlink, Mary-Ann; Temple, Walley J; To, Teresa; Koehn, Marc; Van Dam, Anne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In a novel knowledge translation initiative, the Government of Ontario's Asthma Plan of Action funded the development of an Asthma Care Map to enable adherence with the Canadian Asthma Consensus Guidelines developed under the auspices of the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS). Following its successful evaluation within the Primary Care Asthma Pilot Project, respiratory clinicians from the Asthma Research Unit, Queen's University (Kingston, Ontario) are leading an initiative to incorporate standardized Asthma Care Map data elements into electronic health records in primary care in Ontario. Acknowledging that the issue of data standards affects all respiratory conditions, and all provinces and territories, the Government of Ontario approached the CTS Respiratory Guidelines Committee. At its meeting in September 2010, the CTS Respiratory Guidelines Committee agreed that developing and standardizing respiratory data elements for electronic health records are strategically important. In follow-up to that commitment, representatives from the CTS, the Lung Association, the Government of Ontario, the National Lung Health Framework and Canada Health Infoway came together to form a planning committee. The planning committee proposed a phased approach to inform stakeholders about the issue, and engage them in the development, implementation and evaluation of a standardized dataset. An environmental scan was completed in July 2011, which identified data definitions and standards currently available for clinical variables that are likely to be included in electronic medical records in primary care for diagnosis, management and patient education related to asthma and COPD. The scan, sponsored by the Government of Ontario, includes compliance with clinical nomenclatures such as SNOMED-CT® and LOINC®. To help launch and create momentum for this initiative, a national forum was convened on October 2 and 3, 2011, in Toronto, Ontario. The forum was designed to bring together key

  2. A Standards-Based Architecture Proposal for Integrating Patient mHealth Apps to Electronic Health Record Systems

    PubMed Central

    Fontelo, P.; Rossi, E.; Ackerman, MJ

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Mobile health Applications (mHealth Apps) are opening the way to patients’ responsible and active involvement with their own healthcare management. However, apart from Apps allowing patient’s access to their electronic health records (EHRs), mHealth Apps are currently developed as dedicated “island systems”. Objective Although much work has been done on patient’s access to EHRs, transfer of information from mHealth Apps to EHR systems is still low. This study proposes a standards-based architecture that can be adopted by mHealth Apps to exchange information with EHRs to support better quality of care. Methods Following the definition of requirements for the EHR/mHealth App information exchange recently proposed, and after reviewing current standards, we designed the architecture for EHR/mHealth App integration. Then, as a case study, we modeled a system based on the proposed architecture aimed to support home monitoring for congestive heart failure patients. We simulated such process using, on the EHR side, OpenMRS, an open source longitudinal EHR and, on the mHealth App side, the iOS platform. Results The integration architecture was based on the bi-directional exchange of standard documents (clinical document architecture rel2 – CDA2). In the process, the clinician “prescribes” the home monitoring procedures by creating a CDA2 prescription in the EHR that is sent, encrypted and de-identified, to the mHealth App to create the monitoring calendar. At the scheduled time, the App alerts the patient to start the monitoring. After the measurements are done, the App generates a structured CDA2-compliant monitoring report and sends it to the EHR, thus avoiding local storage. Conclusions The proposed architecture, even if validated only in a simulation environment, represents a step forward in the integration of personal mHealth Apps into the larger health-IT ecosystem, allowing the bi-directional data exchange between patients and

  3. Discourses of aggression in forensic mental health: a critical discourse analysis of mental health nursing staff records.

    PubMed

    Berring, Lene L; Pedersen, Liselotte; Buus, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Managing aggression in mental health hospitals is an important and challenging task for clinical nursing staff. A majority of studies focus on the perspective of clinicians, and research mainly depicts aggression by referring to patient-related factors. This qualitative study investigates how aggression is communicated in forensic mental health nursing records. The aim of the study was to gain insight into the discursive practices used by forensic mental health nursing staff when they record observed aggressive incidents. Textual accounts were extracted from the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R), and Fairclough's critical discourse analysis was used to identify short narrative entries depicting patients and staffs in typical ways. The narratives contained descriptions of complex interactions between patient and staff that were linked to specific circumstances surrounding the patient. These antecedents, combined with the aggression incident itself, created stereotyping representations of forensic psychiatric patients as deviant, unpredictable and dangerous. Patient and staff identities were continually (re)produced by an automatic response from the staff that was solely focused on the patient's behavior. Such response might impede implementation of new strategies for managing aggression.

  4. THE CHALLENGES IN USING ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS FOR PHARMACOGENOMICS AND PRECISION MEDICINE RESEARCH.

    PubMed

    Laper, Sarah M; Restrepo, Nicole A; Crawford, Dana C

    2016-01-01

    Access and utilization of electronic health records with extensive medication lists and genetic profiles is rapidly advancing discoveries in pharmacogenomics. In this study, we analyzed ~116,000 variants on the Illumina Metabochip for response to antihypertensive and lipid lowering medications in African American adults from BioVU, the Vanderbilt University Medical Center's biorepository linked to de-identified electronic health records. Our study population included individuals who were prescribed an antihypertensive or lipid lowering medication, and who had both pre- and post-medication blood pressure or low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) measurements, respectively. Among those with pre- and post-medication systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements (n=2,268), the average change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was -0.6 mg Hg and -0.8 mm Hg, respectively. Among those with pre- and post-medication LDL-C measurements (n=1,244), the average change in LDL-C was -26.3 mg/dL. SNPs were tested for an association with change and percent change in blood pressure or blood levels of LDL-C. After adjustment for multiple testing, we did not observe any significant associations, and we were not able to replicate previously reported associations, such as in APOE and LPA, from the literature. The present study illustrates the benefits and challenges with using electronic health records linked to biorepositories for pharmacogenomic studies.

  5. Impact of electronic health record (EHR) reminder on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine initiation and timely completion

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Mack T.; Plegue, Melissa A.; Rockwell, Pamela G.; Young, Alisa P.; Patel, Divya A.; Yeazel, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Initiation and timely completion of the HPV vaccine in young women is critical. We compared initiation and completion of HPV vaccine among women in two community-based networks with electronic health records: one with a prompt and reminder system (prompted cohort) and one without (unprompted cohort). Methods Female patients aged 9–26 years seen between March 1, 2007 and January 25, 2010 were used as retrospective cohorts. Patient demographics and vaccination dates were extracted from the electronic health record. Results Patients eligible for the vaccine included 6019 from the prompted cohort and 9096 from the unprompted cohort. Mean age at initiation was 17.3 years in prompted cohort and 18.1 years at unprompted cohort with significantly more (p<0.001) patients initiating in the prompted cohort (34.9%) compared to the unprompted cohort (21.5%). African Americans age 9–18 years with three or more visits during the observation period were significantly more likely to initiate in the prompted cohort (p<0.001). Prompted cohort was significantly more (p<0.001) likely to complete the vaccine series timely compared to unprompted cohort. Conclusion More patients age 9–26 years initiated and timely completed the HPV vaccine series in clinics using an electronic health record system with prompts compared to clinics without prompts. PMID:25957365

  6. Induction of Plasmid Conjugation in Bacillus subtilis Is Bistable and Driven by a Direct Interaction of a Rap/Phr Quorum-sensing System with a Master Repressor.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Thomas C; Graumann, Peter L

    2015-08-14

    Conjugation of plasmid pLS20 from Bacillus subtilis is limited to a time window between early and late exponential growth. Genetic evidence has suggested that pLS20-encoded protein RcoLS20 represses expression of a large conjugation operon, whereas Rap protein RapLS20 relieves repression. We show that RapLS20 is a true antirepressor protein that forms dimers in vivo and in vitro and that it directly binds to the repressor protein RcoLS20 in a 1:1 stoichiometry. We provide evidence that RapLS20 binds to the helix-turn-helix-containing domain of RcoLS20 in vivo, probably obstructing DNA binding of RcoLS20, as seen in competitive DNA binding experiments. The activity of RapLS20 in turn is counteracted by the addition of the cognate PhrLS20 peptide, which directly binds to the Rap protein and presumably induces a conformational change of the antirepressor. Thus, a Rap protein acts directly as an antirepressor protein during regulation of plasmid conjugation, turning on conjugation, and is counteracted by the PhrLS20 peptide, which, by analogy to known Rap/Phr systems, is secreted and taken back up into the cells, mediating cell density-driven regulation. Finally, we show that this switchlike process establishes a population heterogeneity, where up to 30% of the cells induce transcription of the conjugation operon.

  7. A tutorial on activity-based costing of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Federowicz, Marie H; Grossman, Mila N; Hayes, Bryant J; Riggs, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    As the American Recovery and Restoration Act of 2009 allocates $19 billion to health information technology, it will be useful for health care managers to project the true cost of implementing an electronic health record (EHR). This study presents a step-by-step guide for using activity-based costing (ABC) to estimate the cost of an EHR. ABC is a cost accounting method with a "top-down" approach for estimating the cost of a project or service within an organization. The total cost to implement an EHR includes obvious costs, such as licensing fees, and hidden costs, such as impact on productivity. Unlike other methods, ABC includes all of the organization's expenditures and is less likely to miss hidden costs. Although ABC is used considerably in manufacturing and other industries, it is a relatively new phenomenon in health care. ABC is a comprehensive approach that the health care field can use to analyze the cost-effectiveness of implementing EHRs. In this article, ABC is applied to a health clinic that recently implemented an EHR, and the clinic is found to be more productive after EHR implementation. This methodology can help health care administrators assess the impact of a stimulus investment on organizational performance. PMID:20042937

  8. A tutorial on activity-based costing of electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Federowicz, Marie H; Grossman, Mila N; Hayes, Bryant J; Riggs, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    As the American Recovery and Restoration Act of 2009 allocates $19 billion to health information technology, it will be useful for health care managers to project the true cost of implementing an electronic health record (EHR). This study presents a step-by-step guide for using activity-based costing (ABC) to estimate the cost of an EHR. ABC is a cost accounting method with a "top-down" approach for estimating the cost of a project or service within an organization. The total cost to implement an EHR includes obvious costs, such as licensing fees, and hidden costs, such as impact on productivity. Unlike other methods, ABC includes all of the organization's expenditures and is less likely to miss hidden costs. Although ABC is used considerably in manufacturing and other industries, it is a relatively new phenomenon in health care. ABC is a comprehensive approach that the health care field can use to analyze the cost-effectiveness of implementing EHRs. In this article, ABC is applied to a health clinic that recently implemented an EHR, and the clinic is found to be more productive after EHR implementation. This methodology can help health care administrators assess the impact of a stimulus investment on organizational performance.

  9. [Improvement in the mother-child health record in pediatric health care].

    PubMed

    Hohenauer, L

    1992-01-01

    The recommended program of Child Health Care in Austria needs some additions: The first routine visit should be done between the 3rd and 5th week of life because of the insecurity of the young mother. The orthopedic examination must comprise the ultrasonographic examination of the hip. At 7-9 months of age the urinary screening for neuroblastoma must be incorporated into the existing program. The vaccination against haemophilus influenzae Type B must be added to the existing vaccination recommendations. During school age three additional examinations are recommended at 6, 10 and 15 years respectively.

  10. Taking a quality assurance program from paper to electronic health records: one dental school's experience.

    PubMed

    Filker, Phyllis J; Muckey, Erin Joy; Kelner, Steven M; Kodish-Stav, Jodi

    2009-09-01

    The Obama administration is seeking to increase access to and improve the efficiency of the health care system in the United States. One aspect of those efforts is a push towards the utilization of electronic health records (EHRs) by health care providers. Nova Southeastern University College of Dental Medicine (NSU-CDM) opened its doors in 1997 and began its evolution from paper charts to EHRs in 2006. AxiUm, a computer-run patient record and clinical management system, has become an integral part of the college's quality assurance program and its students' clinical education. Since the introduction of axiUm, the school has already noticed an increase in the quality of patient care due to improved oversight of patient management and the ability to more efficiently track treatment outcomes. Over time, the system will enable data collected by students providing care in the clinics to be quantified. Opposition to EHRs tends to stem primarily from the amount of time required for users to gain proficiency in the new technology, as well as from the initial cost to the provider. But there is no better place to begin this learning process regarding the importance and utilization of EHR systems than universities, where health professions students can acquire a comfort level with EHRs in an academic environment that they may then implement in their future practice.

  11. Use and records of child health handbook focused on growth and development.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Claudia Nery Teixeira; Duarte, Luciane Simões; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Toriyama, Aurea Tamami Minagawa

    2014-08-01

    Objective To evaluate the use and records of the Child Health Handbook (CHH), especially growth and development. Method Cross-sectional study with 358 mother-child pairs registered in 12 Primary Health Centers (PHCs) of a small municipality. Mothers were interviewed at the PHC from February to April 2013 using a questionnaire. Data analysis was done using WHO Anthro software, Epi InfoTM and Stata. Results Fifty-three percent of the mothers were carrying the CHH at the time of the interview, similar to the proportion of mothers who were instructed to bring the CHH to health appointments. Annotations in the CHH during the visits were reported by 49%. The vaccination schedule was completed in 97% of the CHH, but only 9% and 8% of the CHH, respectively, contained growth charts and properly completed developmental milestones. Conclusion Low rates of use and unsatisfactory record-keeping in the CHH reinforce the need for investment in professional training and community awareness for the CHH to become an effective instrument of promotion of child health.

  12. Taking a quality assurance program from paper to electronic health records: one dental school's experience.

    PubMed

    Filker, Phyllis J; Muckey, Erin Joy; Kelner, Steven M; Kodish-Stav, Jodi

    2009-09-01

    The Obama administration is seeking to increase access to and improve the efficiency of the health care system in the United States. One aspect of those efforts is a push towards the utilization of electronic health records (EHRs) by health care providers. Nova Southeastern University College of Dental Medicine (NSU-CDM) opened its doors in 1997 and began its evolution from paper charts to EHRs in 2006. AxiUm, a computer-run patient record and clinical management system, has become an integral part of the college's quality assurance program and its students' clinical education. Since the introduction of axiUm, the school has already noticed an increase in the quality of patient care due to improved oversight of patient management and the ability to more efficiently track treatment outcomes. Over time, the system will enable data collected by students providing care in the clinics to be quantified. Opposition to EHRs tends to stem primarily from the amount of time required for users to gain proficiency in the new technology, as well as from the initial cost to the provider. But there is no better place to begin this learning process regarding the importance and utilization of EHR systems than universities, where health professions students can acquire a comfort level with EHRs in an academic environment that they may then implement in their future practice. PMID:19734251

  13. Legal, ethical, and financial dilemmas in electronic health record adoption and use.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Singh, Hardeep

    2011-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) facilitate several innovations capable of reforming health care. Despite their promise, many currently unanswered legal, ethical, and financial questions threaten the widespread adoption and use of EHRs. Key legal dilemmas that must be addressed in the near-term pertain to the extent of clinicians' responsibilities for reviewing the entire computer-accessible clinical synopsis from multiple clinicians and institutions, the liabilities posed by overriding clinical decision support warnings and alerts, and mechanisms for clinicians to publically report potential EHR safety issues. Ethical dilemmas that need additional discussion relate to opt-out provisions that exclude patients from electronic record storage, sale of deidentified patient data by EHR vendors, adolescent control of access to their data, and use of electronic data repositories to redesign the nation's health care delivery and payment mechanisms on the basis of statistical analyses. Finally, one overwhelming financial question is who should pay for EHR implementation because most users and current owners of these systems will not receive the majority of benefits. The authors recommend that key stakeholders begin discussing these issues in a national forum. These actions can help identify and prioritize solutions to the key legal, ethical, and financial dilemmas discussed, so that widespread, safe, effective, interoperable EHRs can help transform health care. PMID:21422090

  14. Utilizing Dental Electronic Health Records Data to Predict Risk for Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Thyvalikakath, Thankam P; Padman, Rema; Vyawahare, Karnali; Darade, Pratiksha; Paranjape, Rhucha

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a major cause for tooth loss and adversely affects individuals' oral health and quality of life. Research shows its potential association with systemic diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and social habits such as smoking. This study explores mining potential risk factors from dental electronic health records to predict and display patients' contextualized risk for periodontal disease. We retrieved relevant risk factors from structured and unstructured data on 2,370 patients who underwent comprehensive oral examinations at the Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Predicting overall risk and displaying relationships between risk factors and their influence on the patient's oral and general health can be a powerful educational and disease management tool for patients and clinicians at the point of care.

  15. Connecting knowledge resources to the veterinary electronic health record: opportunities for learning at point of care.

    PubMed

    Alpi, Kristine M; Burnett, Heidi A; Bryant, Sheila J; Anderson, Katherine M

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) provide clinical learning opportunities through quick and contextual linkage of patient signalment, symptom, and diagnosis data with knowledge resources covering tests, drugs, conditions, procedures, and client instructions. This paper introduces the EHR standards for linkage and the partners-practitioners, content publishers, and software developers-necessary to leverage this possibility in veterinary medicine. The efforts of the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) Electronic Health Records Task Force to partner with veterinary practice management systems to improve the use of controlled vocabulary is a first step in the development of standards for sharing knowledge at the point of care. The Veterinary Medical Libraries Section (VMLS) of the Medical Library Association's Task Force on Connecting the Veterinary Health Record to Information Resources compiled a list of resources of potential use at point of care. Resource details were drawn from product Web sites and organized by a metric used to evaluate medical point-of-care resources. Additional information was gathered from questions sent by e-mail and follow-up interviews with two practitioners, a hospital network, two software developers, and three publishers. Veterinarians with electronic records use a variety of information resources that are not linked to their software. Systems lack the infrastructure to use the Infobutton standard that has been gaining popularity in human EHRs. While some veterinary knowledge resources are digital, publisher sites and responses do not indicate a Web-based linkage of veterinary resources with EHRs. In order to facilitate lifelong learning and evidence-based practice, veterinarians and educators of future practitioners must demonstrate to veterinary practice software developers and publishers a clinically-based need to connect knowledge resources to veterinary EHRs.

  16. Validation of diabetes mellitus and hypertension diagnosis in computerized medical records in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Computerized Clinical Records, which are incorporated in primary health care practice, have great potential for research. In order to use this information, data quality and reliability must be assessed to prevent compromising the validity of the results. The aim of this study is to validate the diagnosis of hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the computerized clinical records of primary health care, taking the diagnosis criteria established in the most prominently used clinical guidelines as the gold standard against which what measure the sensitivity, specificity, and determine the predictive values. The gold standard for diabetes mellitus was the diagnostic criteria established in 2003 American Diabetes Association Consensus Statement for diabetic subjects. The gold standard for hypertension was the diagnostic criteria established in the Joint National Committee published in 2003. Methods A cross-sectional multicentre validation study of diabetes mellitus and hypertension diagnoses in computerized clinical records of primary health care was carried out. Diagnostic criteria from the most prominently clinical practice guidelines were considered for standard reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and global agreement (with kappa index), were calculated. Results were shown overall and stratified by sex and age groups. Results The agreement for diabetes mellitus with the reference standard as determined by the guideline was almost perfect (κ = 0.990), with a sensitivity of 99.53%, a specificity of 99.49%, a positive predictive value of 91.23% and a negative predictive value of 99.98%. Hypertension diagnosis showed substantial agreement with the reference standard as determined by the guideline (κ = 0.778), the sensitivity was 85.22%, the specificity 96.95%, the positive predictive value 85.24%, and the negative predictive value was 96.95%. Sensitivity results were worse in patients who also had diabetes and in

  17. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... health care facilities and practitioners. (a) Authorization to examine records. A facility claiming... information on charges) that are pertinent to health care services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries and...

  18. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... health care facilities and practitioners. (a) Authorization to examine records. A facility claiming... information on charges) that are pertinent to health care services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries and...

  19. 42 CFR 476.88 - Examination of the operations and records of health care facilities and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... care facilities and practitioners. 476.88 Section 476.88 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... health care facilities and practitioners. (a) Authorization to examine records. A facility claiming... information on charges) that are pertinent to health care services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries and...

  20. An Evaluation of the Implementation of Hand Held Health Records with Adults with Learning Disabilities: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Vicky; Burchell, Sarah; Burrha, Sukhjinder; Corney, Roslyn; Elliott, Sandra; Kerry, Sally; Molloy, Catherine; Painter, Kerry

    2010-01-01

    Background: Personal health records were implemented with adults with learning disabilities (AWLD) to try to improve their health-care. Materials and Method: Forty GP practices were randomized to the Personal Health Profile (PHP) implementation or control group. Two hundred and one AWLD were interviewed at baseline and 163 followed up after 12…

  1. A comparison of death recording by health centres and civil registration in South Africans receiving antiretroviral treatment

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leigh F; Dorrington, Rob E; Laubscher, Ria; Hoffmann, Christopher J; Wood, Robin; Fox, Matthew P; Cornell, Morna; Schomaker, Michael; Prozesky, Hans; Tanser, Frank; Davies, Mary-Ann; Boulle, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is uncertainty regarding the completeness of death recording by civil registration and by health centres in South Africa. This paper aims to compare death recording by the two systems, in cohorts of South African patients receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods Completeness of death recording was estimated using a capture–recapture approach. Six ART programmes linked their patient record systems to the vital registration system using civil identity document (ID) numbers and provided data comparing the outcomes recorded in patient files and in the vital registration. Patients were excluded if they had missing/invalid IDs or had transferred to other ART programmes. Results After exclusions, 91,548 patient records were included. Of deaths recorded in patients files after 2003, 94.0% (95% CI: 93.3–94.6%) were recorded by civil registration, with completeness being significantly higher in urban areas, older adults and females. Of deaths recorded by civil registration after 2003, only 35.0% (95% CI: 34.2–35.8%) were recorded in patient files, with this proportion dropping from 60% in 2004–2005 to 30% in 2010 and subsequent years. Recording of deaths in patient files was significantly higher in children and in locations within 50 km of the health centre. When the information from the two systems was combined, an estimated 96.2% of all deaths were recorded (93.5% in children and 96.2% in adults). Conclusions South Africa's civil registration system has achieved a high level of completeness in the recording of mortality. However, the fraction of deaths recorded by health centres is low and information from patient records is insufficient by itself to evaluate levels and predictors of ART patient mortality. Previously documented improvements in ART mortality over time may be biased if based only on data from patient records. PMID:26685125

  2. Naturalistic observation of health-relevant social processes: the electronically activated recorder methodology in psychosomatics.

    PubMed

    Mehl, Matthias R; Robbins, Megan L; Deters, Fenne Große

    2012-05-01

    This article introduces a novel observational ambulatory monitoring method called the electronically activated recorder (EAR). The EAR is a digital audio recorder that runs on a handheld computer and periodically and unobtrusively records snippets of ambient sounds from participants' momentary environments. In tracking moment-to-moment ambient sounds, it yields acoustic logs of people's days as they naturally unfold. In sampling only a fraction of the time, it protects participants' privacy and makes large observational studies feasible. As a naturalistic observation method, it provides an observer's account of daily life and is optimized for the objective assessment of audible aspects of social environments, behaviors, and interactions (e.g., habitual preferences for social settings, idiosyncratic interaction styles, subtle emotional expressions). This article discusses the EAR method conceptually and methodologically, reviews prior research with it, and identifies three concrete ways in which it can enrich psychosomatic research. Specifically, it can (a) calibrate psychosocial effects on health against frequencies of real-world behavior; (b) provide ecological observational measures of health-related social processes that are independent of self-report; and (c) help with the assessment of subtle and habitual social behaviors that evade self-report but have important health implications. An important avenue for future research lies in merging traditional self-report-based ambulatory monitoring methods with observational approaches such as the EAR to allow for the simultaneous yet methodologically independent assessment of inner, experiential aspects (e.g., loneliness) and outer, observable aspects (e.g., social isolation) of real-world social processes to reveal their unique effects on health.

  3. e-Patients Perceptions of Using Personal Health Records for Self-management Support of Chronic Illness.

    PubMed

    Gee, Perry M; Paterniti, Debora A; Ward, Deborah; Soederberg Miller, Lisa M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic illness self-management is largely moving from healthcare professionals and into the hands of the patient. One tool that has been promoted to facilitate self-management support of chronic illness by policymakers, health advocates, providers, and consumers is the personal health record. Little is known about how consumers effectively use personal health records for self-management support and for productive patient-provider interactions. The purpose of this study was to learn from chronically ill engaged, experienced, and educated (e-patient) adults how and why they use personal health records for self-management support and productive patient-provider interactions. Eighteen purposively selected consumers were interviewed in two communities. Qualitative description methods were used, and we used a grounded theory approach to analyzing interview data, which was digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. We identified four major thematic categories that capture the perceptions of the chronically ill using personal health records: (1) patient engagement and health self-management, (2) access to and control over personal health data, (3) promotion of productive communication, and (4) opportunities for training and education. Knowledge gained from the e-patient personal health record users suggest that making improvements to the portal system and providing education to consumers and providers will increase the utility among the experienced users and encourage new users to embrace adoption and use.

  4. A knowledge-based taxonomy of critical factors for adopting electronic health record systems by physicians: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The health care sector is an area of social and economic interest in several countries; therefore, there have been lots of efforts in the use of electronic health records. Nevertheless, there is evidence suggesting that these systems have not been adopted as it was expected, and although there are some proposals to support their adoption, the proposed support is not by means of information and communication technology which can provide automatic tools of support. The aim of this study is to identify the critical adoption factors for electronic health records by physicians and to use them as a guide to support their adoption process automatically. Methods This paper presents, based on the PRISMA statement, a systematic literature review in electronic databases with adoption studies of electronic health records published in English. Software applications that manage and process the data in the electronic health record have been considered, i.e.: computerized physician prescription, electronic medical records, and electronic capture of clinical data. Our review was conducted with the purpose of obtaining a taxonomy of the physicians main barriers for adopting electronic health records, that can be addressed by means of information and communication technology; in particular with the information technology roles of the knowledge management processes. Which take us to the question that we want to address in this work: "What are the critical adoption factors of electronic health records that can be supported by information and communication technology?". Reports from eight databases covering electronic health records adoption studies in the medical domain, in particular those focused on physicians, were analyzed. Results The review identifies two main issues: 1) a knowledge-based classification of critical factors for adopting electronic health records by physicians; and 2) the definition of a base for the design of a conceptual framework for supporting the

  5. The use of regional platforms for managing electronic health records for the production of regional public health indicators in France

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In France, recent developments in healthcare system organization have aimed at strengthening decision-making and action in public health at the regional level. Firstly, the 2004 Public Health Act, by setting 100 national and regional public health targets, introduced an evaluative approach to public health programs at the national and regional levels. Meanwhile, the implementation of regional platforms for managing electronic health records (EHRs) has also been under assessment to coordinate the deployment of this important instrument of care within each geographic area. In this context, the development and implementation of a regional approach to epidemiological data extracted from EHRs are an opportunity that must be seized as soon as possible. Our article addresses certain design and organizational aspects so that the technical requirements for such use are integrated into regional platforms in France. The article will base itself on organization of the Rhône-Alpes regional health platform. Discussion Different tools being deployed in France allow us to consider the potential of these regional platforms for epidemiology and public health (implementation of a national health identification number and a national information system interoperability framework). The deployment of the Rhône-Alpes regional health platform began in the 2000s in France. By August 2011, 2.6 million patients were identified in this platform. A new development step is emerging because regional decision-makers need to measure healthcare efficiency. To pool heterogeneous information contained in various independent databases, the format, norm and content of the metadata have been defined. Two types of databases will be created according to the nature of the data processed, one for extracting structured data, and the second for extracting non-structured and de-identified free-text documents. Summary Regional platforms for managing EHRs could constitute an important data source for

  6. Health protection at the Savannah River Site: A guide to records series of the Department of Energy and its contractors

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide to the records series pertaining to health protection activities at the DOE`s Savannah River Site (SRS). Since its inception in the early 1950s, the SRS, formerly known as the Savannah River Plant (SRP), has demonstrated significant interest in safeguarding facilities, protecting employees` health, and monitoring the environment. The guide describes records that concern health protection program administration, radiological monitoring of the plant and the environment, calibration and maintenance of monitoring instruments, internal and external dosimetry practices, medical surveillance of employees, occupational safety and training measures, site visitation, and electronic information systems. The introduction to the guide describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project. It provides brief histories of the DOE, SRS, and the SRS organizational units responsible for health protection activities. This introduction also summarizes HAI`s methodology in developing criteria and conducting its verification of the SRS inventory of active and inactive SRS Health Protection records. Furthermore, it furnishes information on the production of the guide, the content of the records series descriptions, the location of the records, and the procedures for accessing records repositories.

  7. Utilization of Child Health Services during the first 18 months of life: aspects of health surveillance in Swedish preschool children based on information in health records.

    PubMed

    Hagelin, E; Jackson, K; Wikblad, K

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some aspects of care given within the preventive Child Health Services (CHS) during the first 18 months of life. A national random sample performed on child health records of 172 Swedish preschool children born between 1982 and 1987 was analysed regarding services recorded as having been provided and used within and beyond the national programme of health surveillance. Most families had made visits within the core programme of health surveillance to an optimal or at least sufficient extent. First-time parents visited the CHS more frequently than did more experienced parents. Procedures within the programme, such as growth monitoring, hip examination and immunizations, were documented to have been optimally performed on a majority of the children. Conversely, screening for hearing impairment and assessment of developmental milestones were performed less frequently, as were health information and postnatal parental education. To improve the quality of care, national recommendations ought to be more specific regarding both the performance and the documentation of the service.

  8. Extracting physician group intelligence from electronic health records to support evidence based medicine.

    PubMed

    Weber, Griffin M; Kohane, Isaac S

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine employs expert opinion and clinical data to inform clinical decision making. The objective of this study is to determine whether it is possible to complement these sources of evidence with information about physician "group intelligence" that exists in electronic health records. Specifically, we measured laboratory test "repeat intervals", defined as the amount of time it takes for a physician to repeat a test that was previously ordered for the same patient. Our assumption is that while the result of a test is a direct measure of one marker of a patient's health, the physician's decision to order the test is based on multiple factors including past experience, available treatment options, and information about the patient that might not be coded in the electronic health record. By examining repeat intervals in aggregate over large numbers of patients, we show that it is possible to 1) determine what laboratory test results physicians consider "normal", 2) identify subpopulations of patients that deviate from the norm, and 3) identify situations where laboratory tests are over-ordered. We used laboratory tests as just one example of how physician group intelligence can be used to support evidence based medicine in a way that is automated and continually updated.

  9. Quantitative ethnographic study of physician workflow and interactions with electronic health record systems

    PubMed Central

    Asan, Onur; Chiou, Erin; Montague, Enid

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between primary care physicians’ interactions with health information technology and primary care workflow. Clinical encounters were recorded with high-resolution video cameras to capture physicians’ workflow and interaction with two objects of interest, the electronic health record (EHR) system, and their patient. To analyze the data, a coding scheme was developed based on a validated list of primary care tasks to define the presence or absence of a task, the time spent on each task, and the sequence of tasks. Results revealed divergent workflows and significant differences between physicians’ EHR use surrounding common workflow tasks: gathering information, documenting information, and recommend/discuss treatment options. These differences suggest impacts of EHR use on primary care workflow, and capture types of workflows that can be used to inform future studies with larger sample sizes for more effective designs of EHR systems in primary care clinics. Future research on this topic and design strategies for effective health information technology in primary care are discussed. PMID:26279597

  10. Navigating ethical issues with electronic health records in developmental-behavioral pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Britt A; Baum, Rebecca A; Soares, Neelkamal S

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of electronic health records (EHRs) allows for sharing of information across clinicians, quick access to laboratory results, and supports for documentation. However, this environment raises new issues of ethics and privacy, and it magnifies other issues that existed with paper records. In developmental-behavioral pediatrics (DBP) practice, which relies heavily on a team approach to blend pediatrics, mental health, and allied health, these issues are even more complicated. In this review, we highlight the ethical and privacy issues in DBP practice related to EHR use. Case examples illustrate the potential risks related to EHR access, confidentiality, and interprofessional collaboration. Suggestions to mitigate some of the ethical and privacy issues associated with EHRs at both an administrative level and a clinician level are included. With the expected increase in the adoption of EHRs by DBP clinicians in the near future, professional standards will need to be defined, and novel technological solutions may offer additional safeguards. Until then, professionals and organizations are responsible to uphold the standards of ethical practice while promoting effective information exchange to facilitate clinical care. PMID:23275058

  11. Should medical students track former patients in the electronic health record? An emerging ethical conflict.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Gregory E; Neely, Kathy Johnson; Tyler, Patrick D; Barnard, Cynthia

    2015-08-01

    Medical students are increasingly using electronic health records (EHRs) in clerkships, and medical educators should seek opportunities to use this new technology to improve training. One such opportunity is the ability to "track" former patients in the EHR, defined as following up on patients in the EHR for educational purposes for a defined period of time after they have left one's direct care. This activity offers great promise in clinical training by enabling students to audit their diagnostic impressions and follow the clinical history of illness in a manner not possible in the era of paper charting. However, tracking raises important questions about the ethical use of protected health information, including concerns about compromising patient autonomy, resulting in a conflict between medical education and patient privacy. The authors offer critical analysis of arguments on both sides and discuss strategies to balance the ethical conflict by optimizing outcomes and mitigating harms. They observe that tracking improves training, thus offering long-lasting benefits to society, and is supported by the principle of distributive justice. They conclude that students should be permitted to track for educational purposes, but only with defined limits to safeguard patient autonomy, including obtaining permission from patients, having legitimate educational intent, and self-restricting review of records to those essential for training. Lastly, the authors observe that this conflict will become increasingly important with completion of the planned Nationwide Health Information Network and emphasize the need for national guidelines on tracking patients in an ethically appropriate manner.

  12. Security of electronic mental health communication and record-keeping in the digital age.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Jon D; Frueh, B Christopher

    2016-02-01

    The mental health field has seen a trend in recent years of the increased use of information technology, including mobile phones, tablets, and laptop computers, to facilitate clinical treatment delivery to individual patients and for record keeping. However, little attention has been paid to ensuring that electronic communication with patients is private and secure. This is despite potentially deleterious consequences of a data breach, which are reported in the news media very frequently in modern times. In this article, we present typical security concerns associated with using technology in clinical services or research. We also discuss enhancing the privacy and security of electronic communication with clinical patients and research participants. We offer practical, easy-to-use software application solutions for clinicians and researchers to secure patient communication and records. We discuss such issues as using encrypted wireless networks, secure e-mail, encrypted messaging and videoconferencing, privacy on social networks, and others.

  13. Security of electronic mental health communication and record-keeping in the digital age.

    PubMed

    Elhai, Jon D; Frueh, B Christopher

    2016-02-01

    The mental health field has seen a trend in recent years of the increased use of information technology, including mobile phones, tablets, and laptop computers, to facilitate clinical treatment delivery to individual patients and for record keeping. However, little attention has been paid to ensuring that electronic communication with patients is private and secure. This is despite potentially deleterious consequences of a data breach, which are reported in the news media very frequently in modern times. In this article, we present typical security concerns associated with using technology in clinical services or research. We also discuss enhancing the privacy and security of electronic communication with clinical patients and research participants. We offer practical, easy-to-use software application solutions for clinicians and researchers to secure patient communication and records. We discuss such issues as using encrypted wireless networks, secure e-mail, encrypted messaging and videoconferencing, privacy on social networks, and others. PMID:26301860

  14. Role-based access control through on-demand classification of electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Basant; Kumar, Abhay

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) provides convenient method to exchange medical information of patients between different healthcare providers. Access control mechanism in healthcare services characterises authorising users to access EHR records. Role Based Access Control helps to restrict EHRs to users in a certain role. Significant works have been carried out for access control since last one decade but little emphasis has been given to on-demand role based access control. Presented work achieved access control through physical data isolation which is more robust and secure. We propose an algorithm in which selective combination of policies for each user of the EHR database has been defined. We extend well known data mining technique 'classification' to group EHRs with respect to the given role. Algorithm works by taking various roles as class and defined their features as a vector. Here, features are used as a Feature Vector for classification to describe user authority. PMID:26559071

  15. Electronic Health Record Mid-Parental Height Auto-Calculator for Growth Assessment in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Terri H; Cousounis, Pamela; Grundmeier, Robert W; Massey, James; Cucchiara, Andrew J; Stallings, Virginia A; Grimberg, Adda

    2016-10-01

    Primary care providers are charged with distinguishing children with an underlying growth problem from those with healthy variant short stature. Knowing the heights of the biological parents aids in making that decision. This study sought to determine the feasibility and functionality of an electronic mid-parental height (MPH) auto-calculator in the clinical assessment of child growth in a pediatric primary care setting. Clinicians completed surveys for 62% of 6803 children (mean height 13 ± 7 percentile) with recorded parent heights. Collecting parent height data required <30 seconds in 91% of encounters. The MPH tool confirmed clinicians' initial growth assessment in 79% of cases and changed it in 4%; the remainder did not use the tool. Clinicians who changed assessment were more likely (P < .0001) to pursue more comprehensive evaluation. The MPH tool was a quick, functional resource as a component of an electronic health record system in actual, busy, pediatric primary care practices.

  16. Linking guidelines to Electronic Health Record design for improved chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Sistine A; Warren, Jim; Goodchild, Andrew; Bird, Linda; Heard, Sam; Stumptner, Markus

    2003-01-01

    The promise of electronic decision support to promote evidence based practice remains elusive in the context of chronic disease management. We examine the problem of achieving a close relationship of Electronic Health Record (EHR) content to other components of a clinical information system (guidelines, decision support and workflow), particularly linking the decisions made by providers back to the guidelines. We use the openEHR architecture, which allows extension of a core Reference Model via Archetypes to refine the detailed information recording options for specific classes of encounter. We illustrate the use of openEHR for tracking the relationship of a series of clinical encounters to a guideline via a case study of guideline-compliant treatment of hypertension in diabetes. This case study shows the contribution guideline content can have on problem-specific EHR structure and demonstrates the potential for a constructive interaction of electronic decision support and the EHR.

  17. Role-based access control through on-demand classification of electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Basant; Kumar, Abhay

    2015-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) provides convenient method to exchange medical information of patients between different healthcare providers. Access control mechanism in healthcare services characterises authorising users to access EHR records. Role Based Access Control helps to restrict EHRs to users in a certain role. Significant works have been carried out for access control since last one decade but little emphasis has been given to on-demand role based access control. Presented work achieved access control through physical data isolation which is more robust and secure. We propose an algorithm in which selective combination of policies for each user of the EHR database has been defined. We extend well known data mining technique 'classification' to group EHRs with respect to the given role. Algorithm works by taking various roles as class and defined their features as a vector. Here, features are used as a Feature Vector for classification to describe user authority.

  18. Linkage methods for connecting children with parents in electronic health record and state public health insurance data.

    PubMed

    Angier, Heather; Gold, Rachel; Crawford, Courtney; P O'Malley, Jean; J Tillotson, Carrie; Marino, Miguel; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop methodologies for creating child-parent 'links' in two healthcare-related data sources. We linked children and parents who were patients in a network of Oregon clinics with a shared electronic health record (EHR), using data that reported the child's emergency contact information or the 'guarantor' for the child's visits. We also linked children and parents enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan (OHP; Oregon's public health insurance programs), using administrative data; here, we defined a 'child' as aged <19 years and identified potential 'parents' from among adults sharing the same OHP household identification (ID) number. In both data sources, parents had to be 12-55 years older than the child. We used OHP individual client ID and EHR patient ID numbers to assess the quality of our linkages through cross-validation. Of the 249,079 children in the EHR dataset, we identified 62,967 who had a 'linkable' parent with patient information in the EHR. In the OHP data, 889,452 household IDs were assigned to at least one child; 525,578 with a household ID had a 'linkable' parent (272,578 households). Cross-validation of linkages revealed 99.8 % of EHR links validated in OHP data and 97.7 % of OHP links validated in EHR data. The ability to link children and their parents in healthcare-related datasets will be useful to inform efforts to improve children's health. Thus, we developed strategies for linking children with their parents in an EHR and a public health insurance administrative dataset.

  19. Patients’ online access to their electronic health records and linked online services: a systematic interpretative review

    PubMed Central

    de Lusignan, Simon; Mold, Freda; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Wyatt, Jeremy C; Quinn, Tom; Cavill, Mary; Gronlund, Toto Anne; Franco, Christina; Chauhan, Umesh; Blakey, Hannah; Kataria, Neha; Barker, Fiona; Ellis, Beverley; Koczan, Phil; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; McCarthy, Mary; Jones, Simon; Rafi, Imran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of providing patients online access to their electronic health record (EHR) and linked transactional services on the provision, quality and safety of healthcare. The objectives are also to identify and understand: barriers and facilitators for providing online access to their records and services for primary care workers; and their association with organisational/IT system issues. Setting Primary care. Participants A total of 143 studies were included. 17 were experimental in design and subject to risk of bias assessment, which is reported in a separate paper. Detailed inclusion and exclusion criteria have also been published elsewhere in the protocol. Primary and secondary outcome measures Our primary outcome measure was change in quality or safety as a result of implementation or utilisation of online records/transactional services. Results No studies reported changes in health outcomes; though eight detected medication errors and seven reported improved uptake of preventative care. Professional concerns over privacy were reported in 14 studies. 18 studies reported concern over potential increased workload; with some showing an increase workload in email or online messaging; telephone contact remaining unchanged, and face-to face contact staying the same or falling. Owing to heterogeneity in reporting overall workload change was hard to predict. 10 studies reported how online access offered convenience, primarily for more advantaged patients, who were largely highly satisfied with the process when clinician responses were prompt. Conclusions Patient online access and services offer increased convenience and satisfaction. However, professionals were concerned about impact on workload and risk to privacy. Studies correcting medication errors may improve patient safety. There may need to be a redesign of the business process to engage health professionals in online access and of the EHR to make it friendlier and provide equity of

  20. Residential segregation, dividing walls and mental health: a population-based record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Aideen; French, Declan; O'Reilly, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Background Neighbourhood segregation has been described as a fundamental determinant of physical health, but literature on its effect on mental health is less clear. While most previous research has relied on conceptualised measures of segregation, Northern Ireland is unique as it contains physical manifestations of segregation in the form of segregation barriers (or ‘peacelines’) which can be used to accurately identify residential segregation. Methods We used population-wide health record data on over 1.3 million individuals, to analyse the effect of residential segregation, measured by both the formal Dissimilarity Index and by proximity to a segregation barrier, on the likelihood of poor mental health. Results Using multilevel logistic regression models, we found residential segregation measured by the Dissimilarity Index poses no additional risk to the likelihood of poor mental health after adjustment for area-level deprivation. However, residence in an area segregated by a ‘peaceline’ increases the likelihood of antidepressant medication by 19% (OR=1.19, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.23) and anxiolytic medication by 39% (OR=1.39, 95% CI 1.32 to 1.48), even after adjustment for gender, age, conurbation, deprivation and crime. Conclusions Living in an area segregated by a ‘peaceline’ is detrimental to mental health suggesting segregated areas characterised by a heightened sense of ‘other’ pose a greater risk to mental health. The difference in results based on segregation measure highlights the importance of choice of measure when studying segregation. PMID:26858342

  1. A thematic review and a policy-analysis agenda of Electronic Health Records in the Greek National Health System.

    PubMed

    Emmanouilidou, Maria; Burke, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The increasing pressure to improve healthcare outcomes and reduce costs is driving the current agenda of governments at worldwide level and calls for a fundamental reform of the status quo of health systems. This is especially the case with the Greek NHS (National Health System), a system in continuous crisis, and with the recent ongoing financial turbulence under intensive scrutiny. Technological innovations and Electronic Health Records (EHR) in particular, are recognised as key enablers in mitigating the existing burdens of healthcare. As a result, EHR is considered a core component in technology-driven reform processes. Nonetheless, the successful implementation and adoption of EHR proves to be a challenging task due to a mixture of technological, organisational and political issues. Drawing upon experiences within the European Union (EU) healthcare setting and the Greek NHS the paper proposes a conceptual framework as a policy-analysis agenda for EHR interventions in Greece. While the context of discussion is Greece, the paper aims to also derive useful insights to healthcare policy-makers around the globe.

  2. The Geisinger MyCode Community Health Initiative: an electronic health record-linked biobank for Precision Medicine research

    PubMed Central

    Carey, David J.; Fetterolf, Samantha N.; Davis, F. Daniel; Faucett, William A.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Mirshahi, Uyenlinh; Murray, Michael F.; Smelser, Diane T.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Ledbetter, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Geisinger Health System (GHS) provides an ideal platform for Precision Medicine. Key elements are the integrated health system, stable patient population, and electronic health record (EHR) infrastructure. In 2007 Geisinger launched MyCode®, a system-wide biobanking program to link samples and EHR data for broad research use. Methods Patient-centered input into MyCode® was obtained using participant focus groups. Participation in MyCode® is based on opt-in informed consent and allows recontact, which facilitates collection of data not in the EHR, and, since 2013, the return of clinically actionable results to participants. MyCode® leverages Geisinger’s technology and clinical infrastructure for participant tracking and sample collection. Results MyCode® has a consent rate of >85% with more than 90,000 participants currently, with ongoing enrollment of ~4,000 per month. MyCode® samples have been used to generate molecular data, including high-density genotype and exome sequence data. Genotype and EHR-derived phenotype data replicate previously reported genetic associations. Conclusion The MyCode® project has created resources that enable a new model for translational research that is faster, more flexible, and more cost effective than traditional clinical research approaches. The new model is scalable, and will increase in value as these resources grow and are adopted across multiple research platforms. PMID:26866580

  3. Research Reproducibility in Longitudinal Multi-Center Studies Using Data from Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Zozus, Meredith N.; Richesson, Rachel L.; Walden, Anita; Tenenbaum, Jessie D.; Hammond, W.E.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental premise of scientific research is that it should be reproducible. However, the specific requirements for reproducibility of research using electronic health record (EHR) data have not been sufficiently articulated. There is no guidance for researchers about how to assess a given project and identify provisions for reproducibility. We analyze three different clinical research initiatives that use EHR data in order to define a set of requirements to reproduce the research using the original or other datasets. We identify specific project features that drive these requirements. The resulting framework will support the much-needed discussion of strategies to ensure the reproducibility of research that uses data from EHRs. PMID:27570682

  4. A Study of the Access to the Scholarly Record from a Hospital Health Science Core Collection *

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James F.; Pings, Vern M.

    1973-01-01

    This study is an effort to determine possible service performance levels in hospital libraries based on access to the scholarly record of medicine through selected lists of clinical journals and indexing and abstracting journals. The study was designed to test a methodology as well as to provide data for planning and management decisions for health science libraries. Findings and conclusions cover the value of a core collection of journals, length of journal files, performance of certain bibliographic instruments in citation verification, and the implications of study data for library planning and management. PMID:4744345

  5. Research Reproducibility in Longitudinal Multi-Center Studies Using Data from Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Zozus, Meredith N; Richesson, Rachel L; Walden, Anita; Tenenbaum, Jessie D; Hammond, W E

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental premise of scientific research is that it should be reproducible. However, the specific requirements for reproducibility of research using electronic health record (EHR) data have not been sufficiently articulated. There is no guidance for researchers about how to assess a given project and identify provisions for reproducibility. We analyze three different clinical research initiatives that use EHR data in order to define a set of requirements to reproduce the research using the original or other datasets. We identify specific project features that drive these requirements. The resulting framework will support the much-needed discussion of strategies to ensure the reproducibility of research that uses data from EHRs. PMID:27570682

  6. Assessing the cost of electronic health records: a review of cost indicators.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Ana Isabel; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Desmartis, Marie

    2010-11-01

    We systematically reviewed PubMed and EBSCO business, looking for cost indicators of electronic health record (EHR) implementations and their associated benefit indicators. We provide a set of the most common cost and benefit (CB) indicators used in the EHR literature, as well as an overall estimate of the CB related to EHR implementation. Overall, CB evaluation of EHR implementation showed a rapid capital-recovering process. On average, the annual benefits were 76.5% of the first-year costs and 308.6% of the annual costs. However, the initial investments were not recovered in a few studied implementations. Distinctions in reporting fixed and variable costs are suggested.

  7. Case-Based Learning: A Formal Approach to Generate Health Case Studies from Electronic Healthcare Records.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fabrizio L; Consorti, Fabrizio; Gentile, Manuel; Messineo, Linda; La Guardia, Dario; Arrigo, Marco; Allegra, Mario

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing social pressure to train medical students with a level of competency sufficient to face clinical practice already at the end of their curriculum. The case-based learning (CBL) is an efficient teaching method to prepare students for clinical practice through the use of real or realistic clinical cases. In this regard, the Electronic Healthcare Record (EHR) could be a good source of real patient stories that can be transformed into educative cases. In this paper a formal approach to generate Health Case Studies from EHR is defined. PMID:27071887

  8. Medicare incentive payments for meaningful use of electronic health records: accounting and reporting developments.

    PubMed

    2012-02-01

    The Healthcare Financial Management Association through its Principles and Practices (P&P) Board publishes issue analyses to provide short-term practical assistance on emerging issues in healthcare financial management. In a new issue analysis excerpted in this article, HFMA's P&P Board provides some clarity to the healthcare industry on certain accounting and reporting issues resulting from incentive payments under the Medicare program for the meaningful use of electronic health record (EHR) technology. Consultation on these matters with independent auditors is highly recommended.

  9. Medicare incentive payments for meaningful use of electronic health records: accounting and reporting developments.

    PubMed

    2012-02-01

    The Healthcare Financial Management Association through its Principles and Practices (P&P) Board publishes issue analyses to provide short-term practical assistance on emerging issues in healthcare financial management. In a new issue analysis excerpted in this article, HFMA's P&P Board provides some clarity to the healthcare industry on certain accounting and reporting issues resulting from incentive payments under the Medicare program for the meaningful use of electronic health record (EHR) technology. Consultation on these matters with independent auditors is highly recommended. PMID:22372298

  10. Evaluation of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) at Large Urban Primary Care Sexual Health Centre

    PubMed Central

    Huffam, Sarah; Cummings, Rosey; Chen, Marcus Y.; Sze, Jun K.; Fehler, Glenda; Bradshaw, Catriona S.; Schmidt, Tina; Berzins, Karen; Hocking, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite substantial investment in Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems there has been little research to evaluate them. Our aim was to evaluate changes in efficiency and quality of services after the introduction of a purpose built EMR system, and to assess its acceptability by the doctors, nurses and patients using it. Methods We compared a nine month period before and after the introduction of an EMR system in a large sexual health service, audited a sample of records in both periods and undertook anonymous surveys of both staff and patients. Results There were 9,752 doctor consultations (in 5,512 consulting hours) in the Paper Medical Record (PMR) period and 9,145 doctor consultations (in 5,176 consulting hours in the EMR period eligible for inclusion in the analysis. There were 5% more consultations per hour seen by doctors in the EMR period compared to the PMR period (rate ratio = 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.02, 1.08) after adjusting for type of consultation. The qualitative evaluation of 300 records for each period showed no difference in quality (P>0.17). A survey of clinicians demonstrated that doctors and nurses preferred the EMR system (P<0.01) and a patient survey in each period showed no difference in satisfaction of their care (97% for PMR, 95% for EMR, P = 0.61). Conclusion The introduction of an integrated EMR improved efficiency while maintaining the quality of the patient record. The EMR was popular with staff and was not associated with a decline in patient satisfaction in the clinical care provided. PMID:23593268

  11. Capturing structured, pulmonary disease-specific data elements in electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Peter E; Gronkiewicz, Cynthia; Diamond, Edward J; French, Kim D; Christodouleas, John

    2015-04-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have the potential to improve health-care quality by allowing providers to make better decisions at the point of care based on electronically aggregated data and by facilitating clinical research. These goals are easier to achieve when key, disease-specific clinical information is documented as structured data elements (SDEs) that computers can understand and process, rather than as free-text/natural-language narrative. This article reviews the benefits of capturing disease-specific SDEs. It highlights several design and implementation considerations, including the impact on efficiency and expressivity of clinical documentation and the importance of adhering to data standards when available. Pulmonary disease-specific examples of collection instruments are provided from two commonly used commercial EHRs. Future developments that can leverage SDEs to improve clinical quality and research are discussed. PMID:25846531

  12. Using Linked Electronic Health Records to Estimate Healthcare Costs: Key Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Asaria, Miqdad; Grasic, Katja; Walker, Simon

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses key challenges and opportunities that arise when using linked electronic health records (EHR) in health economics and outcomes research (HEOR), with a particular focus on estimating healthcare costs. These challenges and opportunities are framed in the context of a case study modelling the costs of stable coronary artery disease in England. The challenges and opportunities discussed fall broadly into the categories of (1) handling and organising data of this size and sensitivity; (2) extracting clinical endpoints from datasets that have not been designed and collected with such endpoints in mind; and (3) the principles and practice of costing resource use from routinely collected data. We find that there are a number of new challenges and opportunities that arise when working with EHR compared with more traditional sources of data for HEOR. These call for greater clinician involvement and intelligent use of sensitivity analysis. PMID:26645571

  13. Utilization of open source electronic health record around the world: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Aminpour, Farzaneh; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Ahamdi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Many projects on developing Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems have been carried out in many countries. The current study was conducted to review the published data on the utilization of open source EHR systems in different countries all over the world. Using free text and keyword search techniques, six bibliographic databases were searched for related articles. The identified papers were screened and reviewed during a string of stages for the irrelevancy and validity. The findings showed that open source EHRs have been wildly used by source limited regions in all continents, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa and South America. It would create opportunities to improve national healthcare level especially in developing countries with minimal financial resources. Open source technology is a solution to overcome the problems of high-costs and inflexibility associated with the proprietary health information systems. PMID:24672566

  14. A cloud-based approach for interoperable electronic health records (EHRs).

    PubMed

    Bahga, Arshdeep; Madisetti, Vijay K

    2013-09-01

    We present a cloud-based approach for the design of interoperable electronic health record (EHR) systems. Cloud computing environments provide several benefits to all the stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem (patients, providers, payers, etc.). Lack of data interoperability standards and solutions has been a major obstacle in the exchange of healthcare data between different stakeholders. We propose an EHR system - cloud health information systems technology architecture (CHISTAR) that achieves semantic interoperability through the use of a generic design methodology which uses a reference model that defines a general purpose set of data structures and an archetype model that defines the clinical data attributes. CHISTAR application components are designed using the cloud component model approach that comprises of loosely coupled components that communicate asynchronously. In this paper, we describe the high-level design of CHISTAR and the approaches for semantic interoperability, data integration, and security. PMID:25055368

  15. Understanding Nurses' Perceptions of Electronic Health Record Use in an Acute Care Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Strudwick, Gillian; McGillis Hall, Linda; Nagle, Lynn; Trbovich, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are being implemented in health care environments in an effort to improve the safety, quality and efficiency of care. However, not all of these potential benefits have been demonstrated in empirical research. One of the reasons for this may be a number of barriers that prevent nurses from being able to incorporate EHRs into their professional practice. A review of the literature revealed a number of barriers to, and facilitators of EHR use by nurses. Among these, EHR usability, organizational context, and individual nurse characteristics were found to be concepts that influence use. It is currently unknown how these concepts together might influence nurses' perceptions of their ability to use the technology to support the nursing process. In this poster, the authors will describe a study aimed at achieving a better understanding of nurses' perceptions of their EHR use by investigating the concepts of EHR usability, organizational context and select individual nurse characteristics. PMID:27332345

  16. Improving immunization data management: an editorial on the potential of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Erika; Kaushal, Rainu; Vest, Joshua

    2014-02-01

    Immunizations are critical for maintaining individual and population health. Yet ensuring that complete immunization histories are available at the point of care is challenging. Currently, immunization information systems (IIS) are used to aggregate data at a regional level, although their value is often limited by incomplete data. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program, which is an unprecedented federal initiative promoting EHR use, is linking financial payments in part to demonstrating ability to transmit EHR data directly to IIS and thus has potential to change immunization data management on a large scale. We believe that EHRs are critical for allowing more complete and timely immunization data capture and will offer many benefits. To achieve these benefits, however, it will be necessary to engage the EHR vendor community in developing EHRs that allow for comprehensive immunization data capture and policy makers to incentivize bidirectional, real-time exchange between IIS and EHRs.

  17. A cloud-based approach for interoperable electronic health records (EHRs).

    PubMed

    Bahga, Arshdeep; Madisetti, Vijay K

    2013-09-01

    We present a cloud-based approach for the design of interoperable electronic health record (EHR) systems. Cloud computing environments provide several benefits to all the stakeholders in the healthcare ecosystem (patients, providers, payers, etc.). Lack of data interoperability standards and solutions has been a major obstacle in the exchange of healthcare data between different stakeholders. We propose an EHR system - cloud health information systems technology architecture (CHISTAR) that achieves semantic interoperability through the use of a generic design methodology which uses a reference model that defines a general purpose set of data structures and an archetype model that defines the clinical data attributes. CHISTAR application components are designed using the cloud component model approach that comprises of loosely coupled components that communicate asynchronously. In this paper, we describe the high-level design of CHISTAR and the approaches for semantic interoperability, data integration, and security.

  18. Factors Affecting Participation in the eRedBook: A Personal Child Health Record.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Devlin, Alison M; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Mair, Frances S

    2016-01-01

    A personal child health record called the eRedBook was recently piloted in the United Kingdom. A qualitative exploratory case study was used to examine how public health nurses engaged or recruited parents and what factors hindered participation. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with those implementing the eRedBook and those taking part in the pilot study. A range of project documentation was also reviewed. Thematic analysis using the framework approach was applied to draw out themes. Numerous socio-technical factors such as the usability of the software, concerns over data protection and costs, poor digital literacy skills and a lack of Internet connectivity emerged. These barriers need to be addressed before the eRedBook is implemented nationwide. PMID:27332437

  19. Possible Legal Barriers for PCP Access to Mental Health Treatment Records.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Leslie S; Ganz, David A; Wenger, Neil S

    2016-04-01

    Provider and payer groups have endorsed the goal of improving the integration of primary care and behavioral health across a variety of programs and settings. There is an interest in sharing patients' medical information, a goal that is permissible within HIPAA, but there are concerns about more restrictive state medical privacy laws. This article assesses whether a substantial number of state medical privacy laws are, or could be interpreted to be, more restrictive than HIPAA. Preliminary investigation found that in almost one third of the states (including large-population states such as Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New York, and Texas), primary care physicians (PCPs) may have difficulty accessing mental health treatment records without the patient's (or his/her guardian/conservator's) written consent. If a comprehensive legal analysis supports this conclusion, then those advocating integration of behavioral and primary care may need to consider seeking appropriate state legislative solutions.

  20. Ethical considerations for informed consent in infertility research: The use of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Kristen J.; Gordon, Janna R.; Su, H. Irene; Plosker, Shayne; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of electronic health records (EHRs) in healthcare provides rich opportunities for biomedical research. Using EHRs, massive quantities of patient data can be extracted for research without the need to recruit patients, schedule study visits, or rely on self-reporting. However, this innovation poses significant concerns about patient privacy and confidentiality of data. Patients receiving infertility treatment may be particularly vulnerable to data breaches, as their EHRs often include sensitive health information about themselves, their partner, and their offspring. Helping patients with infertility to make informed decisions about sharing data is crucial, yet little is known about best practices for obtaining informed consent to use EHR data for research. This commentary reviews possible options for obtaining informed consent for EHR use among patients seeking fertility services. In addition, this commentary summarizes the limited research available on patient preferences for informed consent practices. PMID:27066591